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AREA W A G E SURVEY
P ortland , O reg on —W a s h in g to n , M e tr o p o lita n A rea,
M a y 1973
Bulletin 1775 87




U S D EP ART ME NT OF LABOR
____ Bureau of Labor Statistics




Preface
T h is b u lle tin p r o v id e s r e s u lts o f a M a y 1973 s u r v e y o f oc c u p a tio n a l
e a r n in g s in the P o r tla n d , O reg on —W ash in gton , Standard M e tro p o lita n S ta tis tic a l
A r e a (C la c k a m a s , M u ltn om ah , and W ash ington C o u n tie s, O re g o n ; and C la r k
C ou n ty, W a sh in gton ).
T h e s u r v e y w as m ad e as p a rt o f th e B u re a u o f L a b o r
S t a tis tic s ' annual a r e a w a g e s u r v e y p r o g r a m . T h e p r o g r a m is d e s ig n e d to y ie ld
data f o r in d iv id u a l m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s , as w e ll as n a tion a l and r e g io n a l e s tim a te s
f o r a ll Standard M e tr o p o lita n A r e a s in the U nited S ta tes, e x c lu d in g A la s k a and
H a w a ii, (a s d e fin e d by the U.S. O ffic e o f M a n a ge m en t and B u d get th rou gh
N o v e m b e r 1971).
A m a jo r c o n s id e r a tio n in th e a r e a w a g e s u r v e y p r o g r a m is the n eed to
d e s c r ib e the l e v e l and m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s in a v a r ie t y o f la b o r m a r k e ts , th rou gh
the a n a ly s is o f (1 ) the l e v e l and d is trib u tio n o f w a g e s by oc c u p a tio n , and (2 ) the
m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s by oc c u p a tio n a l c a t e g o r y and s k ill le v e l .
The p ro gra m d e­
v e lo p s in fo r m a tio n that m a y be u sed f o r m an y p u r p o s e s , in clu d in g w a g e and s a la r y
a d m in is tr a tio n , c o lle c t iv e b a rg a in in g , and a s s is ta n c e in d e te rm in in g plant lo c a tio n .
S u rv e y r e s u lt s a ls o a r e u sed by the U.S. D e p a rtm e n t o f L a b o r to m ak e w age
d e te rm in a tio n s under the S e r v ic e C o n tra c t A c t o f 1965.
C u r r e n tly , 96 a r e a s a r e in c lu d e d in th e p r o g r a m .
(S e e li s t o f a r e a s
on in s id e back c o v e r . )
In each a r e a , o c c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s data a r e c o lle c te d
an n u ally. In fo r m a tio n on e s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and s u p p lem e n ta ry w a g e b e n e ­
f it s , c o lle c t e d e v e r y secon d y e a r in th e p a s t, is n ow ob ta in ed e v e r y th ird y e a r .
E a ch y e a r a ft e r a ll in d iv id u a l a r e a w a g e s u r v e y s h ave b een c o m p le te d ,
tw o s u m m a ry b u lle tin s a r e is s u e d .
T h e f i r s t b rin g s to g e th e r data fo r ea c h
m e tro p o lita n a r e a s u r v e y e d . T h e seco n d s u m m a ry b u lle tin p re s e n ts n a tion a l and
r e g io n a l e s tim a te s , p r o je c t e d fr o m in d iv id u a l m e tr o p o lita n a r e a data.
T h e P o r tla n d s u r v e y w as con du cted by the B u re a u 's r e g io n a l o ffic e in
San F r a n c is c o , C a lif. , u n der the g e n e r a l d ir e c tio n o f M ilto n K e en a n , A s s is ta n t
R e g io n a l D ir e c t o r f o r O p e ra tio n s . T h e s u r v e y cou ld not h a ve b een a c c o m p lis h e d
w ith out the c o o p e r a tio n o f the m a n y f ir m s w h ose w a g e and s a la r y data p ro v id e d
the b a s is f o r the s ta tis tic a l in fo r m a tio n in th is b u lle tin .
T h e B u reau w is h e s to
e x p r e s s s in c e r e a p p re c ia tio n f o r the c o o p e r a tio n r e c e iv e d .

Note:
A c u r r e n t r e p o r t on oc c u p a tio n a l e a rn in g s in the P o r tla n d a r e a is a v a ila ­
b le fo r s e le c te d lau n d ry and d r y c le a n in g occu p a tio n s (M a y 1973). A ls o a v a ila b le
a r e lis tin g s o f union w a g e r a te s f o r b u ild in g t r a d e s , p rin tin g tr a d e s , lo c a l- t r a n s it
o p e r a tin g e m p lo y e e s , lo c a l tr u c k d r iv e r s and h e lp e r s , and g r o c e r y s to r e e m ­
p lo y e e s . F r e e c o p ie s o f th es e a r e a v a ila b le fr o m the B u re a u 's r e g io n a l o f f ic e s .
(S ee b ack c o v e r f o r a d d r e s s e s .)

A R EA W A G E S U R VE Y

B ulletin 1775-87
S e p te m b e r 1 9 7 3

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, Peter J. Brennan, Secretary
BUR EA U OF LABOR STATIS TIC S, Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

Portland, O regon—W ashington, M etro p olitan Area, M ay 1973
CONTENTS
Page
2 In tro d u c tio n
5 W age tr e n d s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s

T a b le s :
4
6

7

8
10
11
12

13

1.
2.
3.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ith in s cop e o f s u r v e y and n u m b er studied
In d e x e s o f e a r n in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s , and p e rc e n ts o f in c r e a s e f o r s e le c te d p e r io d s
P e r c e n ts o f in c r e a s e in a v e r a g e h o u rly e a r n in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s , a d ju sted fo r e m p lo y m e n t sh ifts

A . O ccu p a tion a l e a rn in g s :
A - l . O ffic e o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k ly e a rn in g s
A - 2 . P r o fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k ly e a r n in g s
A - 3 . O ffic e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s : A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s , b y sex
A - 4 . M a in ten a n ce and p o w e rp la n t o c c u p a tio n s : H o u rly e a r n in g s
A - 5 . C u s to d ia l and m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s : H o u rly e a r n in g s

17 A p p e n d ix .




O c c u p a tio n a l d e s c r ip tio n s

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 204 02 —Price 35 cents

Introduction
T h i s a r e a i s 1 of 96 in w h i c h the U .S . D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s
B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s co n d u c t s s u r v e y s o f o c c u p a t io n a l e a r n i n g s
on an a r e a w i d e b a s i s a n n u a l l y . 1
F i e l d r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s , in p e r s o n a l
v i s i t s to e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the a r e a , c o l l e c t e m p lo y m e n t , e a r n i n g s ,
e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s , and r e l a t e d b e n e f i t s i n f o r m a t i o n e v e r y t h i r d
year.
In e a c h o f the i n t e r v e n i n g y e a r s , i n f o r m a t i o n on e m p l o y m e n t
an d e a r n i n g s is c o l l e c t e d b y m a i l q u e s t i o n n a i r e s f r o m e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
p a r t i c i p a t i n g in the p r e v i o u s s u r v e y . T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s the r e s u l t s
o f the l a t t e r type s u r v e y .

(3) m a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t ; and (4) c u s t o d i a l an d m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
ment.
O c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n is b a s e d on a u n i f o r m set o f jo b
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d to ta k e ac co u nt o f i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in du ties w i t h i n the s a m e jo b .
T h e o c c u p a t io n s s e l e c t e d f o r study a r e
l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d in the ap p en d ix .
U n l e s s o t h e r w i s e i n d i c a t e d , the
e a r n i n g s d a ta f o l l o w i n g the j o b t i t l e s a r e f o r a l l i n d u s t r i e s c o m b i n e d .
E a r n i n g s d a ta f o r s o m e o f the o c c u p a t io n s l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d , o r
f o r s o m e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w i t h i n o c c u p a t i o n s , a r e not p r e s e n t e d in
the A - s e r i e s t a b l e s , b e c a u s e e i t h e r (1) e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a t io n
is too s m a l l to p r o v i d e en ou g h d a ta to m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e
is p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t data.
E arnings
d a ta not s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y f o r i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s a r e i n c lu d e d in a l l
i n d u s t r i e s c o m b i n e d da ta , w h e r e shown.
L i k e w i s e , d a ta a r e i n c lu d e d
in the o v e r a l l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n w h e n a s u b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n of s e c r e t a r i e s
o r t r u c k d r i v e r s is not s h o w n o r i n f o r m a t i o n to s u b c l a s s i f y i s not
available.

In e a c h a r e a , data a r e o b t a i n e d f r o m r e p r e s e n t a t i v e e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t s w ithin s i x b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s : M a n u f a c t u r i n g ; t r a n s ­
p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , an d o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ; w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ;
r e t a i l t r a d e ; fi n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s . M a j o r
i n d u s t r y g r o u p s e x c lu d e d f r o m t h e s e s t u d i e s a r e g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a ­
tions and the c o n s t r u c t i o n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s .
E stablishm ents
h a v i n g f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r of w o r k e r s a r e o m it t e d b e c a u s e
the y tend to f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a t io n s stu die d
to w a r r a n t in c lu s i o n .
S e p a r a t e t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h of
the b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w h i c h m e e t p u b l i c a t i o n c r i t e r i a .

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t an d e a r n i n g s d a ta a r e s h o w n f o r
f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s , i . e . , t h o se h i r e d to w o r k a r e g u l a r w e e k l y s c h e d u le .
E a r n i n g s d a ta e x c l u d e p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e an d f o r w o r k on
w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la t e s hift s .
Nonproduction bonuses are e x ­
c l u d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a l l o w a n c e s an d i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e i n ­
c l u d e d . 2 W h e r e w e e k ly h o urs a r e re p o rte d , a s fo r office c l e r i c a l o c c u ­
p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e i s to the s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k ( r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t
h a l f h o u r ) 'f or w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e of p a y f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m
rates).
A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s f o r t h e s e o c c u p a t io n s a r e r o u n d e d
to the n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e c o n d u c t e d on a s a m p l e b a s i s .
The s a m ­
p l i n g p r o c e d u r e s i n v o lv e d e t a i l e d s t r a t i f i c a t i o n o f a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
w i t h i n the s c o p e o f an i n d i v i d u a l a r e a s u r v e y b y i n d u s t r y and n u m b e r
of e m p lo y e e s .
F r o m this s t r a t i f i e d u n i v e r s e a p r o b a b i l i t y s a m p l e is
s e l e c t e d , w i t h e a c h e s t a b l i s h m e n t h a v i n g a p r e d e t e r m i n e d ch an ce of
selection.
T o o bta in o p t im u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r
p r o p o r t i o n o f l a r g e than s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s e le c t e d . W h e n data
a r e c o m b i n e d , e a c h e s t a b l i s h m e n t is w e i g h t e d a c c o r d i n g to its p r o b a ­
b i l i t y of s e le c t i o n , so that u n b i a s e d e s t i m a t e s a r e g e n e r a t e d . F o r e x ­
a m p l e , i f one out o f f o u r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s e l e c t e d , it is g i v e n a
w e i g h t o f f o u r to r e p r e s e n t i t s e l f p l u s t h r e e o t h e r s . A n a l t e r n a t e o f the
s a m e o r i g i n a l p r o b a b i l i t y is c h o s e n in the s a m e i n d u s t r y - s i z e c l a s s i f i ­
c a t io n i f d a ta a r e not a v a i l a b l e f o r the o r i g i n a l s a m p l e m e m b e r .
If
no s u i t a b l e substitu te i s a v a i l a b l e , a d d i t i o n a l w e i g h t i s a s s i g n e d to a
s a m p l e m e m b e r that is s i m i l a r to the m i s s i n g unit.

T h e s e s u r v e y s m e a s u r e the l e v e l o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s in
an a r e a at a p a r t i c u l a r t i m e .
C o m p a r i s o n s o f i n d i v i d u a l o c c u p a t io n a l
a v e r a g e s o v e r t i m e m a y not r e f l e c t e x p e c t e d w a g e c h a n g e s .
The a v e r ­
a g e s f o r i n d i v i d u a l j o b s a r e a f f e c t e d b y c h a n g e s in w a g e s and e m p l o y ­
ment p attern s.
F o r ex a m p le , pro p o rtio n s of w o r k e r s em p loyed by
h ig h - o r l o w - w a g e f i r m s m a y change o r h ig h -w a g e w o r k e r s m a y a d ­
v a n c e to b e t t e r j o b s an d b e r e p l a c e d b y n e w w o r k e r s at l o w e r r a t e s .
Su ch s h ift s in e m p l o y m e n t c o u ld d e c r e a s e an o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e
e v e n t ho ugh m o s t e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in an a r e a i n c r e a s e w a g e s d u r i n g
the y e a r . T r e n d s in e a r n i n g s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s , s h o w n in t a b l e 2,
a r e b e t t e r i n d i c a t o r s o f w a g e t r e n d s than i n d i v i d u a l j o b s w it h in the
groups.

O c c u p a t i o n s an d E a r n i n g s
T h e o c c u p a t io n s s e l e c t e d f o r stu dy a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y
o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g and n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , and a r e o f the
fo llo w in g types:
( l ) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l ;

A v e r a g e earn in g s reflec t com posite, a re a w id e estim ates.
In­
d u s t r i e s and e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l an d j o b s ta ff in g , and
thus c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to the e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h jo b .
Pay aver­
a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t a c c u r a t e l y the w a g e d i f f e r e n t i a l a m o n g j o b s in
individual establish m e n ts.

1 Included in the 96 areas are 10 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract. These areas
are Austin, T e x .; Binghamton, N .Y . (New York portion only); Durham, N. C . ; Fort Lauderdale—
Hollywood and West Palm Beach, F la .; Huntsville, A la .; Lexington, K y .; Poughkeepsie—Kingston—
Newburgh, N. Y . ; Rochester, N .Y . (office occupations only); Syracuse, N. Y. ; and U tica—Rome, N .Y .
In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies in approximately 70 areas at the request
of the Employment Standards Administration of the U. S. Department of Labor.




2 Special payments provided for work in designated parts of the area by companies not consid-r
ering such payments a part of the regular salary or hourly rate were not included because of reporting
problems. Such instances are few and do not have a large im pact on the published data.

2

3

A v e r a g e p a y l e v e l s f o r m e n and w o m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ­
t i o n s s h o u l d n ot b e a s s u m e d t o r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s i n p a y o f th e s e x e s
w ith in in d ivid u al esta b lish m e n ts .
F a c t o r s w h i c h m a y c o n t r i b u t e to
d i ff e r e n c e s in clu de p r o g r e s s i o h w ith in e s t a b lis h e d ra te r a n g e s , sin ce
o n l y th e r a t e s p a i d i n c u m b e n t s a r e c o l l e c t e d , an d p e r f o r m a n c e o f s p e ­
c i f i c d u t i e s w i t h i n th e g e n e r a l s u r v e y j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s .
Job d e s c r ip ­
t i o n s u s e d t o c l a s s i f y e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s u s u a l l y a r e m o r e
g e n e r a l i z e d th a n t h o s e u s e d in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d a l l o w f o r
m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in s p e c i f i c d u t i e s p e r f o r m e d .
O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the t o t a l in a l l
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h i n th e s c o p e o f th e s t u d y an d n o t t h e n u m b e r a c t u ­
ally surveyed.
B eca u se occu p ation al s tru ctu re s am ong e stab lish m en ts
d i f f e r , e s t i m a t e s o f o c c u p a t io n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b ta in e d f r o m the s a m p le




o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d s e r v e o n l y t o i n d i c a t e th e r e l a t i v e i m p o r ­
ta n ce o f the jo b s studied.
T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
d o n o t a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y th e a c c u r a c y o f th e e a r n i n g s d a ta .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s and S u p p l e m e n t a r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s
T a b u l a t i o n s on s e l e c t e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e ­
m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s ( B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d in t h i s
bulletin .
In fo r m a tio n f o r th ese ta bu lation s, c o lle c t e d e v e r y 2 y e a r s
in t h e p a s t , i s n o w c o l l e c t e d e v e r y 3 y e a r s .
T h e s e t a b u l a t i o n s on
m in im u m entrance s a la r ie s fo r in ex p erien c ed w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s ;
shift d iff e r e n t ia ls ; sch ed u led w o r k w e e k ; paid h o lid a y s ; p aid v a c a tio n s ;
an d h e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n p l a n s a r e p r e s e n t e d ( i n t h e B - s e r i e s
ta b le s ) in p r e v io u s b u lle tin s f o r this a r e a .

4




T a b le 1. E s ta b lis h m e n ts an d w o rk e rs w ith in s c o p e o f s u rv e y an d n u m b e r s tu d ie d in P o r tla n d , O r e g .—W a s h .,1
b y m a jo r in d u s try d iv is io n ,2 M a y 1 9 7 3
Minimum
employment
in e sta b lish m ents in scope
of study

Industry d ivision

Number of establish m en ts
Within scope
of study*

W orkers in establish m en ts
Within scope of study4

Studied

Number

P ercen t

Studied

All d iv is i o n s _____________________________

.

812

189

158,660

100

84,007

M an u factu rin g______________
____________
N on m an ufacturin g____________________________
T ran sp o rtatio n , com m unication, and
other public u tilities 5 ____________________
W holesale trad e 6 _________________________
R etail trad e _______________________________
Finance, in su ran ce, and r e a l estate 6 ------S e rv ic e s 6 7 ________________________________

50
“

309
503

72
117

71,780
86,880

45
55

38, 861
45,146

50
50
50
50
50

65
126
145
77
90

24
24
33
13
23

20,929
13,285
27,557
15,311
9, 798

13
9
17
10
6

14, 078
3,940
16,397
7,021
3, 710

1 The P ortland Standard M etropolitan S ta tistic al A re a, a s defined by the Office of M anagem ent and Budget through Novem ber 1971, c o n sists
of C la c k am a s, Multnomah, and Washington C ounties, O reg.; and C lark County, Wash. The "w o rk ers within scope of study" e stim a te s shown in
th is table provide a reaso n ab ly accu rate d escrip tion of the size and com position of the labor fo rce included in the survey. The e stim a te s a re not
intended, however, to se rv e
a s a b a sis of com parison with other employment in dexes for the a re a to m ea su re employment tren d s or le v e ls since
(1) planning of wage su rv ey s
r e q u ire s the u se of establish m en t data com piled con sid erably in advance of the p ay roll period studied, and (2) sm all
estab lish m en ts a re excluded from the scope of the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Ind ustrial C la ssific atio n Manual w as u sed in cla ssify in g estab lish m en ts by in dustry division .
3 Includes a ll estab lish m en ts with total employment at or above the minim um lim itation. 1 A ll outlets (within the a re a ) of com pan ies in such
in d u strie s a s trad e, finance,
auto re p a ir se rv ic e , and motion picture th eaters a re con sid ered a s 1 establishm ent.
4 Includes all w o rk ers in a ll establish m en ts with total employment (within the a re a ) at or above the m inim um lim itation.
5 A bbreviated to "public u tilitie s" in the A - s e r ie s ta b le s. T a x ica b s and s e r v ic e s incidental to w ater tran sp ortation w ere excluded. P o rtlan d 's
tra n sit system i s publicly owned and i s excluded by definition from the scope of the study.
6 Th is in du stry division i s rep resen ted in e stim a te s for "a ll in d u str ie s" and "nonm anufacturing" in the S e r ie s A ta b le s. S ep arate p resentation
of data fo r this division is not m ade for one or m ore of the following re a so n s: (1) Em ploym ent in the d ivision is too sm all to provide enough data
to m e rit sep arate study, (2) the sam ple w as not designed in itially to p erm it sep arate presentation, (3) resp on se w as in sufficien t or inadequate to
p erm it sep arate presentation, and (4) there is p o ssib ility of d isc lo su re of individual establish m en t data.
7 H otels and m o tels; laun dries and other p e rso n al s e r v ic e s; b u sin e ss s e r v ic e s; autom obile r e p a ir , ren tal, and parking; motion p ictu re s;
nonprofit m em bersh ip o rgan ization s (excluding relig io u s and ch aritable organ ization s); and engineering and a rch ite ctu ra l s e r v ic e s.

In d u strial com position in m anufacturing
A lm ost one-half of the w ork ers within scope of the su rvey in the Portland a re a
w ere employed in m anufacturing fir m s . The following p re se n ts the m ajo r industry groups
and sp ecific in d u stries a s a percent of a ll m anufacturing:
Industry groups

Specific in d u strie s

E le c tric a l equipment and
s u p p lie s _____________________ 14
T ransportation equipm ent_____ 11
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts------ 10
P ap er and allied p ro d u c ts_____ 10
Lum ber and wood p r o d u c ts ---- 9
P rim a ry m etal in d u str ie s ------ 9
M achinery, except e le c tr ic a l __ 8
F ab ricated m etal p r o d u c ts----- 7

E le ctric te st and distribu ting
e qu ip m en t____________________ 12
P a p e r m ills, except
building p a p e r ________________ 7
M illw ork, plywood, and
related p ro d u c ts______________ 5

This inform ation is based on e stim a te s of total employment derived from u n iverse
m a te r ia ls com piled p rio r to actu al survey. P roportion s in v a rio u s in dustry d ivision s m ay
d iffer from p roportion s b a se d on the r e s u lts of the survey a s shown in table 1 above.

W a g e T re n d s fo r S e le c te d O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s
P r e s e n t e d i n t a b l e 2 a r e i n d e x e s a n d p e r c e n t s o f c h a n g e in
a v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l
n u r s e s , an d i n a v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .
T h e i n d e x e s a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g i v e n t i m e , e x p r e s s e d as a
p e r c e n t o f w a g e s d u r i n g th e b a s e p e r i o d .
S u b t r a c t i n g 100 f r o m the
i n d e x y i e l d s th e p e r c e n t c h a n g e in w a g e s f r o m th e b a s e p e r i o d t o the
d a t e o f th e i n d e x .
T h e p e r c e n t s o f chan ge o r i n c r e a s e r e l a t e to w a g e
c h a n g e s b e t w e e n th e i n d i c a t e d d a t e s .
Annual ra tes of in c r e a s e , w h ere
s h o w n , r e f l e c t t h e a m o u n t o f i n c r e a s e f o r 12 m o n t h s w h e n th e t i m e
p e r i o d b e t w e e n s u r v e y s w a s o t h e r th a n 12 m o n t h s .
T hese com pu­
t a t i o n s a r e b a s e d o n th e a s s u m p t i o n th a t w a g e s i n c r e a s e d at a c o n s t a n t
rate b etw een s u rv ey s.
T h e s e e s t i m a t e s a r e m e a s u r e s o f c h a n g e in
a v e r a g e s f o r th e a r e a ; t h e y a r e n o t i n t e n d e d t o m e a s u r e a v e r a g e p a y
c h a n g e s i n th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in t h e a r e a .

T h e i n d e x i s a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g i v e n t i m e and i s e x ­
p r e s s e d a s a p e r c e n t o f w a g e s in t h e b a s e y e a r .
T h e b a s e y e a r is
a s s i g n e d t h e v a l u e o f 100 p e r c e n t .
T h e in d e x is c o m p u te d b y m u l t i ­
p l y i n g th e b a s e y e a r r e l a t i v e (1 00 p e r c e n t ) b y th e r e l a t i v e (t h e p e r c e n t
c h a n g e p lu s 100 p e r c e n t ) f o r th e n e x t s u c c e e d i n g y e a r an d th e n c o n ­
tin u ing to m u l t i p l y (c o m p o u n d ) each y e a r ' s r e l a t i v e b y the p r e v i o u s
y e a r ' s index.
F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , th e w a g e
t r e n d s r e l a t e t o r e g u l a r w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r th e n o r m a l w o r k w e e k ,
e x c lu s iv e o f e arn in gs fo r o v e r t im e .
F o r p la n tw o rk e r grou ps, they
m e a s u r e cha n ges in a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , exclu d in g
p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
la te shifts.
T h e p e r c e n t s a r e b a s e d on d a t a f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u ­
p a t i o n s an d i n c l u d e m o s t o f th e n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t j o b s w i t h i n
each group.

M eth o d o f C om p uting
E a c h o f th e f o l l o w i n g k e y o c c u p a t i o n s w i t h i n an o c c u p a t i o n a l
g ro u p is a s s ig n e d a con sta nt w e ig h t b a s e d on its p r o p o r t io n a t e e m ­
p l o y m e n t in th e o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p ;
Office clerical (men and
women):
Bookke eping- machine
operators, class B
Cleiks, accounting, classes
A and B
Clerks, file, classes
A , B, and C
Clerks, order
Clerks, payroll
Keypunch operators, classes
A and B
Messengers (office boys or
girls)

Office clerical (men and
women)— Continued
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Switchboard operators, classes
A and B
Tabulating-machine operators,
class B
Typists, classes A and B
Industrial nurses (men and
women):
Nurses, industrial (registered)

L im it a tio n s o f Data
T h e i n d e x e s an d p e r c e n t s o f c h a n g e , as m e a s u r e s o f c h a n g e
in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e i n f l u e n c e d b y ;
( l ) G e n e r a l s a l a r y and w a g e
c h a n g e s , (2 ) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y i n d i v i d u a l
w o r k e r s w h i l e in t h e s a m e j o b , and (3 ) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e w a g e s due
t o c h a n g e s in t h e l a b o r f o r c e r e s u l t i n g f r o m l a b o r t u r n o v e r , f o r c e
e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , and c h a n g e s in th e p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k ­
e r s e m p lo y e d by e sta b lish m e n ts w ith d iffe r e n t p a y le v e ls .
C h a n g e s in
th e l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in th e o c c u p a t i o n a l
a v e r a g e s w ith ou t a ctu al w a g e cha n ges.
It i s c o n c e i v a b l e th a t e v e n
th o u g h a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in an a r e a g a v e w a g e i n c r e a s e s , a v e r a g e
w a g e s m a y have d ec lin ed b ecau se lo w e r -p a y in g estab lish m en ts e n tered
th e a r e a o r e x p a n d e d t h e i r w o r k f o r c e s .
S im ila r ly , w a ges m a y have
r e m a i n e d r e l a t i v e l y c o n s t a n t , y e t a v e r a g e s f o r an a r e a m a y h a v e r i s e n
c o n s i d e r a b l y b e c a u s e h i g h e r - p a y i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e n t e r e d the a r e a .

Skilled maintenance (men):
Carpenters
Electricians
Machinists
Mechanics
Mechanics (automotive)
Painters
Pipefitters
Tool and die makers
Unskilled plant (men):
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners
Laborers, material handling

NOTE: Comptometer operators, used in the computation of previous trends, are no longer
surveyed by the Bureau.
T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s th e e f f e c t
o f c h a n g e s in t h e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h j o b i n ­
c l u d e d i n t h e d a ta .
T h e p e r c e n t s o f c h a n g e r e f l e c t o n l y c h a n g e s in
a v e ra g e p ay fo r s tra ig h t-tim e hours.
T h e y a r e not in flu e n c e d b y
c h a n g e s i n s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , as s u c h , o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
fo r o ve rtim e.
W h e r e n e c e s s a r y , d ata a r e a d ju s te d to r e m o v e f r o m
th e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t s o f c h a n g e a n y s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d b y
c h a n g es in the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .

T h e a v e r a g e (m ean ) e a rn in g s f o r each occup ation a r e m u lt i­
p l i e d b y th e o c c u p a t i o n a l w e i g h t , an d th e p r o d u c t s f o r a l l o c c u p a t i o n s
in th e g r o u p a r e t o t a l e d .
T h e a g g re g a te s f o r 2 con s ec u tive y e a r s a re
r e l a t e d b y s u b t r a c t i n g th e a g g r e g a t e f o r t h e e a r l i e r y e a r f r o m the
a g g r e g a t e f o r th e l a t e r y e a r an d d i v i d i n g th e r e m a i n d e r b y th e a g g r e ­
g a t e f o r th e e a r l i e r y e a r .
T h e r e s u l t t i m e s 100 s h o w s th e p e r c e n t
o f change.




5




T a b le 2 . In d e x e s o f e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s in P o r tla n d , O r e g .—W a s h ., M a y 1 9 7 2 a n d M a y 1 9 7 3 ,
a n d p e r c e n t s o f in c r e a s e fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s
M anufacturing

A ll in d u stries
Weekly earn ings
P eriod

Office
c le r ic a l
(men and
women)

In d ustrial
n u rse s
(men and
women)

Hourly earn ings
Skilled
m aintenance
trad e s
(men)

U nskilled
plantw orkers
(men)

Weekly earn ings
Office
c le r ic a l
(men and
women)

In d u strial
n u rse s
(men and
women)

Hourly earn ings
Skilled
m aintenance
trad e s
(men)

U nskilled
plantw ork ers
(men)

Indexes (May 1967= 100)
May 1972____________________________________
May 197 3 ------------------------------------------------

127. 9
135.4

145. 3
151. 7

144. 8
155. 5

145. 0
155.9

127. 8
134. 3

144. 5
149. 3

146. 3
153.9

148. 1
156. 5

1. 2
5. 2
12. 1
(*)
(*)
1. 8
5 .9
7. 3
7. 2
8. 2
4. 8
10. 8
3. 3

2 .9
2. 7
2. 0
3.6
3. 7
3. 2
2. 7
8. 1
7. 5
5. 5
4. 5
14. 2
5. 2

2. 4
2. 5
1. 1
6. 4
2 .4
3. 8
2. 8
3.9
5 .4
8. 9
10. 8
12. 0
5. 7

P erce n ts of in cre a se
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May

I960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972

to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to

May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May

1961------------------------------1962—
-----— — _ ___—
— _
_____
1963_______________________
1964------------------------------1965 . ____________________
1966________________________
1967________________________
1968_______________________
1969................................................
1970______________ ______
1971 ..........................................
1972_______________________
1973-------------------------------

2. 8
1. 7
2 .9
4. 5
3. 3
3.4
4. 4
3. 8
5. 4
4. 6
6. 3
5. 2
5 .9

2. 3
4. 5
10. 7
1. 4
3. 8
2. 3
5. 8
7. 2
7. 1
8. 1
5. 5
11. 0
4. 4

3. 3
2. 5
2 .9
3. 2
3. 8
3. 7
2 .9
7. 8
7. 0
5. 5
5. 2
13. 1
7. 4

3. 4
3. 6
3. 7
2. 8
4. 2
3. 0
5 .4
5. 5
6. 2
6. 1
10. 2
10. 7
7. 5

3. 8
.9
1. 5
5. 0
3. 3
2. 1
3. 7
4. 8
6. 5
5. 6
6. 0
2. 2
5. 1




7

T a b le 3 . P e r c e n ts o f in c r e a s e in a v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s ,
a d ju s te d fo r e m p lo y m e n t s h ifts in P o r tla n d , O r e g .—W a s h ., M a y 1 9 7 2 to M a y 1 9 7 3
Occupational group

_____
Office c le r ic a l (men and w om en)____ ____
Industrial n u rses (men and women) ------------------Skilled m aintenance trad e s (m en )_________________
Unskilled plantw orkers (m en )_____________________

All
in d u stries

5.
4.
7.
7.

4
6
0
2

M anufac­
turing

Nonmanu­
facturing

4. 7
3. 5
4. 7
5 .9

1 Data do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .

NOTE: Table 3 provides p ercen ts of change in av erage hourly earnings for selected
occupational groups, adjusted to exclude the effect of employment sh ifts. The new method
for computing wage trends is based on changes in av erage hourly earn ings for establishm ents
reporting the index jobs in both the current and p revious y e a r (matched establish m en ts),
holding establish m en t employment in the jobs constant.
The new wage trends a re not linked to the curren t indexes becau se the new wage trends
m easu re changes in m atched establishm ent a v e ra g e s w hereas the curren t indexes m easu re
changes in a r e a a v e r a g e s. Other c h a ra c te ristic s of the new wage trends which d iffer from
the curren t ones include (1) earnings data of office c le r ic a l w orkers and in du strial n urses
are converted to an hourly b a s i s , and (2) trend e stim a te s a re provided for nonmanufacturing
estab lish m en ts.
F o r a m ore detailed d escrip tion of the new method used to compute a re a wage survey
in dexes, see "Im proving A rea Wage Survey In d exes, " Monthly L ab or R eview , Jan u ary 1973,
pp. 52-57.

5. 6
(*)
n
8. 2

8

A. Occupational earnings
T a b le A -1 . O f f ic e o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k ly e a r n in g s
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Portland, Oreg,— ash,, May 1973)
W
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Number of vworkers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
t

weekly
(standard]

t

Median ^

Middle ranged

WOMEN

4 0 .0

$
1 1 6 .5 0

$
1 0 8 .0 0

*

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S A ------------------------------------

37

1 6 0 .5 0

1 5 2 .5 0

1 4 1 .0 0 - 1 8 7 .5 0

BO OK KE EP IN G- MA CH IN E OPERATORS,
C L A S S B -----------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

87
67

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 1 4 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0

1 0 5 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0

1 0 1 .0 0 - 1 2 5 .5 0
1 0 0 .5 0 - 1 1 5 .5 0

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S A --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------

549
185
364

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 5 7 .0 0
1 4 8 .5 0
1 6 1 .5 0
1 3 4 .0 0

1 5 1 .5 0
1 4 9 .0 0
1 5 6 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0

1 2 9 .5 0 - 1 8 6 .0 0
1 2 5 .5 0 - 1 6 7 .5 0

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S 8 --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------

1 ,0 7 2
270
802
159
208

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 9 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0

34
33

S

$

i

$

t

*

85

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

80

85

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

24

-

-

1

1

3

A -------------------------------------

70

-

-

_

_

36

-

13

35

11
11

10

“

2
2

14

-

-

9

3

2

5

7

“

5

1

6

-

9

-

22
12
10
7

50
42
8
3

37
9

56
20
36

77
3

9
2

2

22

74

7

2

22

157
20

19
2
17

14
6

12
12
12

1
1
-

2
-

8
8

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
7

53
16

84
44

79
7

-

-

37

1 2 6 .0 0 - 1 4 6 .0 0

~

~

-

-

-

1
1

11

40
19

72
20

48
23
25
9

9 9 .5 0 - 1 4 2 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0 - 1 2 8 .0 0
9 8 .5 0 - 1 4 7 .0 0

-

-

90

-

210
58
152

166

-

76
-

1 1 9 .5 0

1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0

72
94

23
67

45
21
24

12
70

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 5 2 .0 0
1 1 8 .0 0

1 5 3 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0

1 4 6 .0 0 - 1 5 8 .5 0
1 0 1 .5 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0

-

4
36

2
36

37

17
2

36
22

137
69
27

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 5 2 .5 0
1 5 3 .5 0

1 3 7 .5 0
1 4 2 .5 0

1 0 2 .5 0 -2 1 0 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 -2 1 0 .5 0

-

1

-

7
7

2
2

2
2

-

”

_

16

-

8

-

-

16

“

8

“

-

-

-

3

-

3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 0 5 .5 0
9 8 .0 0
1 0 6 .5 0

9 7 .0 0
9 7 .0 0
9 7 .5 0

8 7 .0 0 - 1 2 1 .0 0
8 8 .5 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0
8 6 .5 0 - 1 2 3 .0 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

C -------------------------------------

160
140

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

9 4 .5 0
9 5 .0 0

9 0 .0 0
8 9 .5 0

8 4 .5 0 8 4 .0 0 -

C L E R K S , O R D E R ----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

390
114
276

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 5 3 .0 0
1 4 5 .5 0
1 5 6 .0 0

1 5 7 .0 0
1 2 7 .0 0

4 0 .0

C L E R K S , P A Y R O L L -------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------

283
133

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 3 6 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0

150
42

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

51

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------

475

76
-

31
2
29
-

167
53
114
-

“

8

12

26

_

-

“

-

2
2

6

-

14
-

-

14

29

6

51
9

i
i

18
5

2
27

36
8
28

42

20
3
17

39
38

36
31

57
45

11
11

12
11
1

24
6
18

20
15
5

16
14

27
25

13
-

9 4 .0 0
9 4 .5 0

-

6

*

4

1 6 0 .0 0

1 3 0 .5 0 -1 7 2 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 8 8 .5 0
1 4 6 .0 0 - 1 7 0 .5 0

-

1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 5 4 .5 0

.

-

_

-

1 4 2 .5 0
1 8 1 .0 0

1 2 8 .5 0
1 2 2 .0 0
1 3 0 .5 0
1 9 2 .5 0

1 0 3 .5 0 -1 5 5 .5 0
1 2 0 .5 0 -1 5 4 .5 0
1 5 8 .0 0 - 2 1 1 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 0 .0

1 2 7 .0 0

1 2 6 .0 0

1 1 9 .0 0 - 1 3 0 .0 0

-

“

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 3 2 .5 0

1 2 3 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0
1 2 6 .0 0

-

_

-

_

16

88

-

-

-

-

7

22

1 5 2 .5 0

1 1 1 .5 0 -1 4 9 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0 - 1 2 3 .5 0
1 1 2 .5 0 - 1 5 3 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0 -1 8 1 .0 0

9
-

7

4 0 .0

1 3 6 .5 0

1 4 6 .0 0

1 1 9 .0 0 -1 4 9 .0 0

“

-

*

*

1 1 7 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0
1 5 8 .5 0

-

5
2

4
4
-

”

2
2

_

-

“

“

3

6

3

6

5
5

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

25
15
10

30
3

55
6

67
-

24

27

49

67

45
2
43

19

9

2

39

35

50

24

4

11

17

8

7

9

11
39

3
4

13

11

3

-

11

4
-

7

26
2

43
15
28

7

31
8
-

4

-

2

6
6

5
5

7

6

-

“

8

66
3

3

5

2

-

*

4

92

90

32

49

17

23
69

21
69

4
28

11
5

12
3

2
47
22

2
15
6
9

45
6
39
8

23
4
19

-

4

7
12

3
3
-

14
4
10

7

8

15

3 9 .5

1 1 8 .5 0

-

-

4

1 1 5 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0

1 1 1 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0

1 0 2 .0 0 - 1 3 0 .0 0

4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 0 1 .0 0 - 1 2 4 .0 0
1 0 3 .0 0 - 1 3 6 .0 0

-

-

-

1
3

11
5
6

78
28
50

4 0 .0

1 3 8 .5 0

1 2 4 .0 0

1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 5 8 .5 0

“

“

"

*

”

61
20

27
45
6

M E S S E N G E R S ( O FF IC E BO YS A N D GIRLSIN O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

177

3 9 .0

9 3 .0 0

9 2 .0 0

26

6

25

16

67

24

2

153

3 8 .5

9 2 .5 0

9 1 .5 0

26

3

23

16

57

18

107
46

33

3

25

145
276
64

9 9 .0 0
9 8 .5 0

25
1
24

82

28

3
3

“

421

8 2 .5 0 8 2 .0 0 -

4

“

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------

S footnotes at end of tables.
ee

1

4

-

226
28
198

82
393
113
54

1

1 3 2 .0 0 - 1 9 1 .0 0

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S B -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------




S

$

80

$
$
1 0 5 .5 0 - 1 1 7 .0 0

o

48

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

$

75

COMBINED

BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
M A C H I N E ) -----------------------------------

*
O

ANO

$

*

and
under
75

MEN

t

11

70
Mean ^

$

72

1

3

22
31
5
26
6

30
19

2
2

2
2

11
10

42

12

10

l

7

1
41
15

12
12

10
10

1
1

3

1

1

15

-

3
-

1

-

1

15
13

-

-

3

_

_

19
19

*
-

3

"

2

9
T a b le A -1 . O f f ic e o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k ly e a r n in g s — C o n tin u e d
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Portland, Oreg.— ash., May 1973)
W
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number

O c c u p a t i o n a n d i n d u s t r y division
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard

$

t

70
Mean ^

Median ^

Middle ranged

$

$

135.00
131.00
136.50
174.50
145.00

$

$

120.50-152.00
118.50-148.00
122.00-153.50
137.00-209.50
134.00-153.00

80

1,785
576
1,209

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

151
47
104

39.5 156.50 150.50 140.50-164.00
40.0 145.50 139.50 129.00-150.00
39.5 161.50 154.00 147.00-164.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

370
99
271

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

560
188
372
69
34

39.0
40.0
38.5
40.0
40.0

142.50
138.00
144.50
181.50
141.50

137.50
134.00
138.50
185.00
147.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------

704
242
462
71

39.0
40.0
39.0
40.0

126.00
125.50
126.00
133.00

122.50 112.00-135.00
121.00 110.00-135.50
124.00 113.50-134.50
132.00 115.00-142.50

-

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL —
MANUFACTURING --------------NONMANUFACTURING --------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----

298
71
227
80

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

136.50
134.00
137.00
171.00

127.50 113.00-158.00
134.50 120.00-146.00
121.00 111.00-170.00
174.00 149.50-198.00

_

_

-

-

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR
MANUFACTURING --------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES

314
54
260
39

39.0
40.0
38.5
40.0

125.50
139.00
123.00
165.50

121.50
137.00
118.50
161.00

92

140.50
135.50
142.50
173.50
142.00

l

85

-

-

-

-

85

-

no

120

130

140

150

160

9

49
17
32
3
1

142
58
84
9
1

234
85
149
17
8

297
119
178
5
4

327
94
233
23
17

144
41
103
15
22

8

16
16
-

13
9
4

24
1
23

21
2
19

11
4

2
-

8

245
70
175
20
32
38
11
27

7

2

55
12
43

70
25
45

79
13
66

46
21
25

11
3
8

20
5
15

13
9

*

6
5
1

4
4
3
1

40
14
26
1

68
27
41
2

74
36
38
3

127
33
94
2
2

89
35
54
4
16

56
13
43
12
8

21
11
10

-

9
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

_
-

39.5 157.50 146.00 135.00-173.50
40.0 150.00 147.00 134.00-159.50
39.5 160.00 146.00 135.50-186.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

125.00-152.50
122.00-148.00
127.00-154.50
158.00-202.00
139.00-153.00

-

-

-

-

-

“

*
_
-

“
9
9
“

45
17
28

102
44
58
9

152
53
99
17

152
55
97
5

117
27
90
21

39
11
28
10

18
6
12
2

_
-

8
8
“

13
1
12
“

44
9
35
2

63
8
55
4

22
2
20
5

47
32
15
2

14
6
8
8

15
5
10
10

41
1
40

75
7
68
2

27

23
7
16
-

9

27
-

86
16
70
12

9
4
5
3

11

7
6
i

9

2

4
5

10
4
6

7
1
6

40
38

8
4

7
5

1
"

6
6

3
3

72

11
2

14
2
12
3

“

“
_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

*

“

“

103
94

39.5 109.50
40.0 109.50

-

_

”

”

292
90
61

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

84
71

39.5 113.00 108.50 99.50-122.50
39.5 113.50 109.00 100.00-122.50

TYPISTS, CLASS A ----MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING

89
48
41

40.0 132.50 128.50 104.50-147.50
40.0 112.50 106.00 99.00-125.50
40.0 156.00 144.00 137.00-174.00

543
80
463

86.50- 99.00
92.50-105.00
86.00- 98.00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

202

TYPISTS, CLASS B ----MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING

S footnotes at end of tables.
ee




170

38.5
40.0
33.0

115.50
117.50
114.50
106.00

95.50
99.00
95.00

97.00
96.00

90.50-114.00
89.50-116.00

113.00 98.50-127.00
115.00 106.00-127.50
112.00 97.50-127.00
102.00 95.00-114.00

90.50
97.50
89.50

210

220

230

240

2
2

23
23

5
5
5

11

-

”

5
5

-

-

9

-

74
23
51
2
3

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

over

80
27

39

51
11
40
20

27
5

18
2
16
9

30
2
28
25

7
2

7
-

5
-

22
14

5
3

7
7

5
5

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

2
-

5

4

2

5

4

2
1
1

-

2
5
1
4

7

22

4

2

1
6

22

i
3

3
-

4

27
3
24

19

17

15

16

5

6
13
9

6
11
6

1
14
13

3
13
11

1
4

4

53
13
3

-

3
6
2

-

_

-

-

-

”

2

1
-

1
-

1
1

1
1

-

28
28

8
8

20
11
9
4

4
3
1

3
2
1

8

4

-

8
7

4

-

8

3

-

8

3

11
10

12
12

5
3

1

-

-

-

16
16
*

5
2
3

13
11
2

12
1
11

9
-

-

14
14
“

9

5
2
3

156
41
115

60
10
50

24
12
12

12
1
11

4

3

17

3

17

21
7
14

30
12
18

14
6
8
8

-

4
4

-

_

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

-

-

-

-

4

5
-

*

2
4
4

2
2

2
2

1
1

1

8

28
23

183
8
175

4
4

28

18
14

84
6
78

1

1
l

2
1
1
1

24

-

1
-

1
-

2

46
15
31
1

2

2

20
1
19
4

54
19
35
11

9

3
4
-

i
3
1

47
19
28
16

2

1

2

9

-

3
2

6
4

63
20

9

11
1

7
5

2
“

15
3

20
19

2
2

9

_

-

-

-

4
4

-

_

250

180

5
5

104.50-133.50
122.00-162.50
103.50-128.50
127.50-200.00

-

-

-

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
s
t
S
»
$
$
100 n o 120 130 140 150 1 6 0 1 7 0 1 8 0 1 9 0 2 0 0

100

-

62
29
33

90

90

40.0 129.50 129.50 109.00-144.50
40.0 113.00 116.00 101.50-124.00
39.5 144.00 142.50 132.50-153.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -----------------------------

$

and

SECRETARIES — ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

201

39.0
40.0
39.0
40.0
40.0

80

and
under
75

MEN ANO WOMEN COMBINED—
CONTINUED

75

1
1

4
4

:

1
i

2

-

■-

-

i
i

2

4

i

2

2

3

i

2

2

4

-

-

"

-

:

-

-

-

-

4

1

-

-

2
2

2

10
T a b le A - 2 . P r o f e s s io n a l a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k ly e a r n in g s
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Portland, Oreg.—
Wash., May 1973)
Weekly earnings *
(standard)

O c c u p a t i o n a n d i n d u s t r y division

Number
of
workere

Average
weekly
(standard)

*

$

Median ^

AND

WOMEN

CLASS

C --------

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S A --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

300

320

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

2 3 0 ___ 2 4 0

250

260

270

28C

300

320

over

7
7

3

30
30

10
10

7
7

6

8

-

-

-

5

7

“

*

-

-

-

l

-

*

l

under

$
2 0 2 .5 0
2 0 4 .0 0

$
$
1 8 1 .5 0 - 2 1 4 .5 0
200 . 0 0 - 2 2 0 . 0 0

172
26
146

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 6 2 .5 0
1 6 4 .0 0

1 5 9 .0 0
1 6 2 .5 0

30
4

41

2

1 6 2 .0 0

1 5 7 .0 0

1 4 8 .0 0 - 1 7 2 .5 0
1 5 4 .5 0 - 1 7 3 .0 0
1 4 7 .0 0 - 1 7 2 .5 0

19

3 9 .0

18

26

39

43

3 9 .5

1 3 0 .5 0

1 3 2 .5 0

1 2 1 .0 0 - 1 4 2 .0 0

11

11

-

92

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

2 2 8 .0 0
2 1 4 .0 0
2 3 6 .0 0

2 1 4 .5 0
2 1 9 .0 0
2 1 4 .0 0

2 0 5 .0 0 -2 4 4 .0 0
1 8 4 .5 0 -2 3 5 .5 0
2 0 6 .5 0 -2 6 9 .0 0

_

_

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 8 7 .0 0
1 7 5 .0 0
1 9 1 .5 0

1 8 6 .5 0
1 7 1 .0 0
1 9 6 .0 0

1 6 6 .0 0 -2 1 0 .5 0
1 5 9 .5 0 - 1 8 7 .5 0
1 7 4 .0 0 -2 1 2 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

_

79

34
58

122
33
89

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S C ---------------------

38

3 9 .5

1 6 2 .0 0

1 6 0 .5 0

1 4 4 .0 0 - 1 8 3 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S A --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

69
27
42

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

2 9 7 .0 0
2 8 7 .0 0
3 0 3 .5 0

2 9 7 .5 0
2 8 5 .0 0
3 0 2 .5 0

2 6 2 .5 0 - 3 2 7 .5 0
2 6 2 .5 0 - 3 0 5 .0 0
2 6 4 .0 0 -3 5 7 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S . C L A S S B --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

78
26
52

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

2 5 2 .0 0
2 3 9 .5 0
2 5 8 .0 0

2 5 1 .0 0

2 2 4 .0 0 - 2 6 2 .0 0
2 3 0 .5 0 - 2 8 9 .5 0

1 9 6 .0 0
1 9 1 .0 0

1 9 3 .0 0
1 8 4 .5 0

1 7 2 .5 0 - 2 1 2 .0 0
1 6 7 .0 0 - 2 1 3 .0 0
1 8 2 .0 0 - 2 1 0 .0 0

1
-

1

_

_

153
72
81

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

200.00 201.00

D R A F T S M E N , C L A S S B --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

269
186

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 7 7 .0 0
1 7 2 .5 0

1 7 8 .0 0
1 7 5 .5 0

83

4 0 .0

1 8 6 .5 0

1 8 5 .5 0

C --------------------------------------------

87
49

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 3 7 .5 0
1 4 3 .0 0

1 3 8 .5 0

1 2 5 .0 0 -1 4 5 .5 0

1 4 2 .5 0

1 3 7 .0 0 -1 5 0 .5 0

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL iREGISTERED) —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

31
28

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 7 9 .0 0
1 7 4 .5 0

1 7 5 .0 0
1 7 4 .0 0

1 6 5 .5 0 -1 9 2 .5 0
1 6 5 .0 0 -1 8 9 .5 0

7

9

6

5

11
2

6
4

18
-

9

2

10
1

-

12
24

18

9

•

_

36

-

6

8

4

4

-

19
5

10

4

3

5
4

1

15

1

11

14

8

12
2
10

20
1
19

9

1

9

*

5

4

4

_

_

_

_

*

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

2
2

2
2

5

2
1

13
2

-

-

-

“

”

“

“

_

8

i
i

2
1

3

5

4

i

1

*

”

-

-

-

-

4
2
2

5
2
3

9
4
5

1
1
~

12
9
3

6

5
3
2

14
6

4
2
2

8

3

8

5

8

3

1

"

8

1
1

2

5

3

-

1

15

-

13
4
9

*19
4
15

"

“

-

~

2

3
1
2

9

5
2
3

4
3
1

11
5

6

11
2
9

29

14
12
2

5

1
4

11
5

10
4
6

1
1

_
-

-

-

1

~

23
9
14

20
10
10

10
10

6
2
4

i

2

_

2

-

-

-

-

i

2

2

-

-

-

-

2

_

-

_

_

-

2

7

*

-

-

30
15
15

5

26
22
4

22
15
7

49
36
13

39
30
9

60
43
17

9
-

26
15

22
19

9

4

_

1

-

-

7

4

-

2
2

1
1

3
3

8

4
4

5
5

2
2

4
4

-

1

6

-

5

-

1
1

5
5

6
6

7

3
3

6

23

$ 360 to $ 380; 1 at $ 380 to $400; and 2 at $400 to $420.

S footnotes at end of tables.
ee

-

3
1
2

2

27
12
15

“

-

-

•

_

_

-

“

2

“

-

“

~

2
2

_
-

*

2

“

”

1 6 3 .0 0 -1 8 9 .5 0
1 6 0 .5 0 -1 8 4 .5 0
1 6 8 .5 0 - 1 9 9 .0 0

10
2

3
-

-

-

2 2 6 .0 0 - 2 7 3 .0 0

2 3 9 .0 0
2 5 7 .5 0

D R A F T S M E N , C L A S S A --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------




I

140

$
1 9 8 .5 0
2 0 4 .0 0

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B -------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS
MANUFACTURING

t

130

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

101

OPERATORS,

t

*

120

COMBINED

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A -------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------- --------

COMPUTER

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
$
*
*
*
$
*
*
»
»
*
*
*

$

Middle ranged
110

MEN

*

110

100
Mean ^

*

-

6

11
T a b le A -3 .

O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s : A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s , b y sex

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Portland, Oreg.—
Wash., May 1973)
Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Num
ber
of
w
orkers

Weekly
Weekly
h rs 1 earnings1
ou
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - M
EN
CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

89
95
39
39

CLERKS, ORDER ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING------------------- ---------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

151
90
111

MESSENGERS (OFFICE BOYS) ---------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

59
92

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - W M
O EN
98

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A -------------------------------------------

32
85
65

90.0 119.50
90.0 107.50

Weekly
(standard)

Weekly
earnings*
(standard)

nUMt N CiJ M I NlifcU
—
l

195
276
69

111
1 ,7 7 6
576

T Y P l^ lS , CLASS A --------------MANUFACTURING --------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------120.00

3 9 .5
9 0 .0

1 1 8 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0

3 9 .0
9 0 .0

8 7 .5 0

90.0 130.00
90.0 112.50
90.0 153.00

1 3 8 .5 0

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

86
98
38

3 9 .0

88.00

1,200

9 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 9 0 .0 0
1 3 5 .5 0
1 9 2 .0 0

192
92

9 0 .0
9 0 .0

1 7 1 .0 0
1 9 2 .0 0

149

TYPISTS, CLASS B --------------MANUFACTURING --------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------

593
80
963

38.5
90.0
38.0

95.50
99.00
95.00

1 5 5 .5 0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN
COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING -----------

99
77

39.5 196.50
39.5 209.00

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
NONMANUFACTURING ------------

155
136

39.5 163.00
39.5 162.50

1 5 6 .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C

33

39.5 128.50

1 5 8 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A —
MANUFACTURI MG----NONMANUFACTURING -

86
33
53

39.5 230.00
90.0 219.50
39.0 239.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B —
NONMANUFACTURING -

101
78

39.0 190.00
38.5 192.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINF'G, CLASS C —

35

39.5 161.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINf T$, CLASS A ----------M
AN ..CTURING-------------NONE IUFACTURING---------

67
27
9C

39.5 298.50
90.0 287.00
39.0 306.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ----------NONMANUFACTURING ---------

71
98

39.5 256.00
39.0 262.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A ---MANUFACTURING ------NONMANUFACTURINC —

199
69
75

90.0 196.00
90.0 192.50
90.0 199.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ---MANUFACTURING ------NONMANUFACTURING - PUBLIC U TILITIE S

256
182
79
90

90.0
90.0
90.0
90.0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ---MANUFACTURING -------

77
99

90.0 190.00
90.0 195.00

31
28

39.5 179.00
39.5 179.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

97

3 9 .5
9 0 .0

102

3 9 .5

1 6 0 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

363
99
269

3 9 .5
9 0 .0
3 9 .5

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S --------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

560
188
372

3 9 .0
9 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 9 2 .5 0
1 3 8 .0 0
1 9 9 .5 0

69
39

9 0 .0
9 0 .0

1 9 1 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 ------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

709

3 9 .0

1 2 6 .0 0

292
962
71

9 0 .0
3 9 .0
9 0 .0

1 2 5 .5 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 3 3 .0 0

1 9 5 .5 0

90.0 157.50

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

Sex, occupation, and industry division

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

123

116.50

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WO ME N— CONT1M
UEO

90.0 178.00 MESSENGERS (OFFICE GIRLS) -------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------90.0 199.50
90.0 170.50 1
SECRETARIES ------------------------------------39.0 109.50
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------38.5 106.00
NONMANUFACTURING------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S --------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

138.50

Weekly
(standard)

921

o
o

BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) -----------------------------------------

Number
of
workers

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S ---------------------

o
o

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -----------

$
90.0 169.50
90.0 161.50
39.5 179.50

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

965
190
325
61

39.5
39.5
39.5
90.0

155.00
199.00
159.50
133.50

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -----------

NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S --------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

1,038
250
788
152
208

39.5
90.0
39.5
90.0
90.0

118.00
116.00
119.00
151.00
118.00

CLERKS, FILE , CLASS A --------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

31
30

CLERKS, FILE , CLASS B --------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

221
28
193

MANUFACTURING --------------------------

CLERKS, FILE , CLASS C --------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------CLERKS, ORDER ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

158
138
239
79
165

CLERKS, PAYROLL ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S --------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

270
126
199
37
51

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC U TILITIE S -------RETAIL TRADE ---------------

979
82
392
112
59

See footnote at end of tables.




39.0 196.50
39.0 197.50

NONM
ANUFACTURING ---------------------

PUBLIC U TILITIE S --------------------STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S ---------------------

38.5 103.50
90.0
98.00 ste n o g r a ph e r s , s e n io r --------------------38.5 109.00
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------93.00
39.0
PUBLIC U TILITIE S --------------------93.50
38.5
SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----MANUFACTURING ----------------------------90.0 137.00
90.0 116.00
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------90.0 196.00
SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B -----90.0 139.00
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------90.0 126.50
90.0 191.00 SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ----------------------------90.0 179.50
NONMANUFACTURING - - 1
--------------------90.0 127.00
RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------39.5 132.50
90.0 117.00 TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL
39.5 136.00
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------90.0 158.00
90.0 136.50

1 8 1 .5 0

295
71
229
77

3 9 .5
9 0 .0
3 9 .5
9 0 .0

1 3 9 .0 0
1 3 6 .5 0
1 6 9 .5 0

313
59

3 9 .0
9 0 .0

1 2 5 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0

259

3 8 .5
9 0 .0

1 2 2 .5 0
1 6 9 .5 0

62
29

9 0 .0

1 2 9 .5 0

9 0 .0

33

3 9 .5

1 1 3 .0 0
1 9 9 .0 0

103

3 9 .5
9 0 .0

38

99
292

1 3 5 .5 0

1 0 9 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0

90

3 9 .5
9 0 .0

1 1 7 .5 0

202

3 9 .5

1 1 9 .5 0

61

9 0 .0

1 0 6 .0 0

89

3 9 .5

1 1 3 .0 0

71

3 9 .5

1 1 3 .5 0

177.50
173.50
187.00
199.00

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - W M
O EN
NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
MANUFACTURING ------------------------

12
T a b le A -4 .

M a in te n a n c e and p o w e r p la n t o c c u p a tio n s :

H o u rly e a rn in g s

(Average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Portland, Oreg—
Wash., May 1973)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

Sex, occupation, and industry division

i
$
s
s
$
t
*
s
*
*
s
$
S
S
$
$
s
s
%
$
$
$
s
3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50 4 .60 4 .80 5.00 5. 20 5.40 5. 60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80

Num
ber
of
Mean 2

Median2

Middle range 2

and
under

and

3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50 4.60 4 .80 5.00 5.20 5. 40 5.60 5. 80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 over

HEN

C A R P E N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

36
50
*5

$
5 .3 8
5 .7 1
5 .1 4
5 .1 2

$
5 .0 8
5 .3 0
4 .9 9
4 .9 8

$
4
5
4
4

-

$
5 .5 8
6 .6 8
5 .0 8
5 .0 6

E L E C T R I C I A N S . M A I N T E N A N C E -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

267
237
30

5 .6 7
5 .7 2
5 .2 4

5 .5 5
5 .5 7

5 .2 9 -

5 .9 1

5 .1 6

5 .3 7 4 .8 9 -

5 .9 4
5 .5 5

E N G I N E E R S , S T A T I O N A R Y -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

203
158
45

5 .3 5
5 .4 2
5 . 11

5 .3 3
5 .3 9
5 .1 2

5 .0 5 5 .0 6 4 .5 8 -

5 .7 4
5 .7 4
5 .7 2

F I R E M E N , S T A T I O N A R Y B O I L E R ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

51
35

4 .6 5
4 .5 9

4 .7 3
4 .4 3

4 .2 6 4 .2 1 -

4 .9 3
4 .9 9

HELPERS,

86

.9
.2
.9
.9

6
0
4
4

-

1
1

1
1

14

4
1
3
3

27
3
24
24

17
4
13
13

13
10
3

-

21
21

-

12
3
9

24
15
9

27
26
1

-

74
60
14

24
20
4

16
4

3
3

2

4
4

1
1

14

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

6
6

-

8
8

1
1

2

3
3

-

3
3

-

2
2
*

85
77
8

30
30

15
15

10
10

77
64
13

-

4
4

*

“

*
_
*

-

8
3
5
5

6
6

1

-

3
-

4

~

-

*39
39

_

_

“

”
_
“

1

-

“

i

10
10

3

“

-

"
-

“
-

3
3

-

3

_

~
-

---------

28

4 .2 3

4 .2 6

3 .9 5 -

4 .6 4

2

-

3

2

-

-

4

6

-

3

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

87

5 .0 9
5 .0 9

4 .3 9 4 .3 9 -

5 .3 8
5 .3 8

-

_

4
4

3
3

2
2

6
6

3
3

3
3

2
2

14
14

i
1

12
12

15
15

10
10

8
8

_

_

-

_

-

1
1

-

-

3
3

-

87

4 .8 7
4 .8 7

-

“

“

“

“

M A C H I N I S T S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

’ 294
248

5 .5 2
5 .6 0

5 .5 4
5 .5 6

5 .4 5 5 .5 1 -

5 .6 0
5 .6 2

21
21

30

6
6

166
150

45
45

5
5

-

_

_

“

1
1

16
16

4
4

5 .9 9

7
7
-

14
4
10
2

37
7
30
28

71
57
14

*

30
1
29
29

“

57
57
51

14
14

51
51

93
78

74
74

163
161

41
38

1
1

11
8

12

2

15
15

1
1

“

2
2

35
35

6
6

28
28

_

47
47

10
10

1
1

9
9

26
26

MAINTENANCE

TRADES

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
( M A I N T E N A N C E ! ---------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

6 .5 4

5 .7 4
6 .0 4
6 .0 8

6 .1 6
5 .5 6
6 .2 3
6 .5 1

5 .5 7 5 .5 1 5 .6 5 5 .6 6 -

6 .1 5
6 .5 5
6 .5 5

-

522
428

M E C H A N I C S , M A I N T E N A N C E ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

536
516

5 .4 5
5 .4 5

5 .4 5
5 .4 7

5 .0 6 5 .0 5 -

5 .5 9
5 .5 9

2
2

P A I N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

46
27

5 .1 8
5 .3 3

5 .0 7
5 .5 3

4 .9 7 4 .9 6 -

5 .5 4
5 .5 7

P I P E F I T T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

78

5 .3 2

78

5 .3 2

5 .2 4
5 .2 4

5 .0 5 5 .0 5 -

T O O L A N D D I E M A K E R S --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

150
150

5 .3 5
5 .3 5

5 .0 9
5 .0 9

4 .9 2 4 .9 2 -

5 .6 9
5 .6 9

_

_

-

-

5 .5 6
5 .5 6

* All workers were at $6.80 to $7.
* * All workers were at $ 7 to $ 7.20.

See footnotes at end of tables.




646
124

-

4
4

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

4
4

-

2
2

-

1
1

-

i
i

24
7
17
17

-

-

7
7

-

1
1

-

2

3
3

-

3
3

18
18

“

“

“
112
18
94
30

35
35
35

236
236
236

-

-

“

-

10
10

-

-

20
20

48
48

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

22
- **22

7
7

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

17
17

16
16

-

-

-

-

-

13
T a b le A -5 . C u s to d ia l and m a te ria l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s : H o u rly e a rn in g s
(Average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Portland, Oreg.—
Wash., May 1973)
Hourly earnings^

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of
w
orkers

Under
M 2 Median2
ean

M
iddle range 2

Numbe r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
s
s
s
S
t
$
$
$
%
$
s
$
%
$
S
*
%
*
s
$
$
$
2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00

and
%
2»10 under
O
2.20 2.30 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6 . G 6.20

HEN

G U A R D S A N D W A T C H M E N --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------WATCHMEN
MANUFACTURING

693
44
649

$

2.20
4.03
2.08

$
2.02
3.95
2.01

$
1 .9 33 .9 1 1 .9 2-

$
2.10 *521
4.00
2.09
521

73
73

10
10

*

5

1

-

-

1

17

”

35

3.80

3.94

3 .8 9 - 3.97

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,253
500
753
99
175

3.25
3.56
3.04
3.71
3.00

3.13
3.68
3.07
3.65
3.12

3 .0 1 3 .2 0 2 .9 9 3 .2 8 2 .8 7 -

3.68
4.00
3.18
3.96
3.17

4
4

80

13
12
1

14
1
13

25
18
7

33
22
11

-

-

-

L A B O R E R S , M A T E R I A L H A N D L I N G --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

769
372
397
305

4.87
4.39
5.32
5.57

4.93
4.68
5.73
5.75

4 .3 9 3 .7 0 4 .7 9 5 .7 1 -

5.74
4.95
5.78
5.79

ORDER
F I L L E R S ---------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------

1,438
174
1,264
187

5.00
4.36
5.09
5.43

5.30
4.62
5.37
5.64

4 .3 8 3 .2 6 4 .7 9 5 .6 1 -

5.67
5.42
5.68
5.67

P A C K E R S , S H I P P I N G -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

238
162

3.78
3.33

3.57
3.34

3 .1 8 - 4.08
3 .0 7 - 3.58

-

-

R E C E I V I N G C L E R K S ------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

161
66
95

4.52
4.16
4.78

4.45
4.15
5.03

4 .0 4 - 5.43
3 .9 4 - 4.83
4 .2 2 - 5.45

-

S H I P P I N G C L E R K S --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

152
64
88

4.85
4.65
4.99

5.01
4.73
5.07

4 .4 1 - 5.38
4 .4 4 - 5.03
4 .3 5 - 5.49

S H I P P I N G A N D R E C E I V I N G C L E R K S ------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

168
66
102

4.74
4.52
4.88

4.91
4.55
5.43

4 .0 5 - 5.66
4 .1 6 - 4.96
3 .7 6 - 5.74

TRUCKDRIVERS
----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------

3,342
551
2,791
1,951
239

5.75
5.50
5.79
5.85
5.72

5.84
5.77
5.85
5.85
6.01

5 .7 4 5 .6 1 5 .7 5 5 .7 7 5 .6 7 -

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 T O N S ) ---------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

271
31

5.00
3.43

5.73
2.60

4 .3 3 - 5.76
2 .5 5 - 4.64

1,080
161
919
P47

5.78
5.55
5.82
5. 84

T R U C K D R I V E R S , M E D I U M (1-1/2 TO
A N D I N C L U D I N G A T O N S ) -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------ *

* Workers were distributed as follows:

See footnotes at end of tables.




5.83
5.83
5.83
5.83

5 .7 5 5 .7 1 5 .7 6 5 .7 7 -

6.01
5.86
6.02
6.01
6.05

5.88
5.86
5.8B
5.89

-

80
-

-

-

15
13
2

“

5
1
4
“

~

1

13

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

7

s

9
9

2

-

-

-

-

“

*

-

429
37
392

“

-

-

108
30
78
3
34

-

-

-

-

5

J A N I T O R S , P O R T E R S , A N D C L E A N E R S ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------

-------------------------

17

-

7
7
“
7

8

61
15
46

132
-

-

132
12

128
-

7
7

24

_

-

-

7
5
2

2
1
1

14
6
8

-

16
14
2

9
9
-

35
11
24

17
17
~

13
7
6

12
11
1

14
5
9

13
13

12
10
2
2

7
4
3

14
2
12
9

-

-

37
9
28
1

12
3
9

8
8

17
6

5
-

7

2

4
2
2

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-v

-

7

•

7
“

“

-

25
3
22

2

“

-

-

21
15
6

1
1
-

*

_

“

8

-

_

-

-

”

*

3
3
“

-

21
16
5

5
1
4

-

-

-

8
8

3
3
-

1
1
-

1
1

1
1

—

- .

_

4

-

-

7

-

4

6
5
1

4

4

8

-

12
12

-

-

5
5
-

_

-

5
-

36
6

1
1

-

41
8

20
20

i
32
32

-

B
7

244
30
214
4

31
31

-

-

5

27
27

-

-

5
1

7
7

-

-

47
36
11
-

-

-

19
19

-

-

*

•

ii
ii

-

-

-

13

1
1

-

7
“
7

56
55
1
-

13
1

1
1

-

124
84
40
26

4
3
1
1

-

-

93
61
32
15

i
i

-

-

41

-

10
9

-

-

8

37
37

-

-

-

20
17

24
24

-

-

-

-

.

6
6

-

-

-

9
8
1
-

-

-

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

49
49

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

71
66
5
5

_

-

_
•

82
73
9
5

-

*

_

27

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_

166
110
56
42

-

2
*

-

-

4

4

ii

5

-

12
12
-

1
-

14
8
6

19
13
6

3

17
1
16

14
6
8

•17
1
16

ii
ii

1
1
“

5
1
4

4

-

-

-

8

-

"

2

27
27
-

14
14

99

-

-

135
54
81
27
20

-

4

-

8
2
6

4
4

1

-

10
10

_
-

_
-

20
20

-

128

_

”

-

21
16

-

_

_

-

_

26
20
6
-

220
23
197
197

10
10

42
42

69
36
33
9

590
9
581
151

-

-

-

-

«.

14

-

-

_

_

-

98
30
68

8
“
_

8

-

8

-

-

-

-

6
6
-

-

1

-

-

-

_

5
1

-

_

1
1

-

132 at $ 1,80 to $ 1,90; 162 at $ 1.90 to $2; and 227 at $2 to $2.10.

8

“
1
1

1
1

6
6

16
“
1
1

1
1
4
4

7
1

6

6
6

_

.

“

-

1
1

12
10
_

-

4
1
3

9

-

9
9

-

_
-

8
8

-

-

12
3
9

20

4
4

_

20

9

43

1

43

1

-

936 1096
185 225
751 871
633 748
62
33

895
8
887
559
128

-

-

9

130
7
123

133
43
90
-

-

42

-

_

_

_

_

_

187
1

“

*

-

-

7
7

_

10

42
9
33

4

-

5
_

-

-

-

-

368
29
339
275

516
111
405
405

163
_

163
158

14
T a b le A -5 . C u s to d ia l and m a te ria l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s : H o u rly e a rn in g s — C o n tin u e d
(Average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Portland, Oreg.—
Wash., May 1973)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
1
2*10 2*20 2.30 2.60 2.60 2.80

Number
of
Mean 2

Median^

Middle range 2

$

and

2.1C under

—

i
I
I
I
*
I
*
i
S
S
*
*
3.00 3.20 3.60 3.60 3.80 6.00 6.2 0 6.60 6.6 0 6.80 5.00 5.20

t
$
t
$
5.60 5.60 5.80 6.00

_

2.20 2.30 2.40

2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.6 0 3.6 0 3.8 0 6.00 6.2 0 6.6 0 6.60 6.8 0 5.00 5.20 5.60 5.60 5.80 6,00 6.20

MEN - CONTINUED
TRUCKORIVERSl - CONTINUED
TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 6 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------

1,162
157
1,005
529

$
5.88
5.65
5.92
5.91

$
5.95
5.75
6.00
5.89

$
5 .8 3 5 .7 1 5 .8 6 5 .8 6 -

$
6.06
5.78
6.05
6.03

TRUCK0RIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 6 TONS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) ----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S ---------------------

668
181
687
623

5.82
5.70
5.86
5.88

5.86
5.83
5.93
6.00

5 .7 3 5 .6 3 5 .7 6 5 .7 5 -

6.03
5.96
6.06
6.05

TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT) -----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

1,077
605
672

6.97
6.38
5.73

6.76
6.37
5. 76

6 .3 3 - 5.76
6 .1 9 - 6.67
5 .7 2 - 5.80

TRUCKERS, POWER (OTHER THAN
FORKLIFT) --------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

69
66

6. 56
6.55

6.65
6.65

6 .6 0 - 6.50
6 .6 0 - 6.69

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------

572
556
65

3.06
3.06
3.51

3.06
3.06
3.63

2 .9 6 - 3.09
2 .9 5 - 3.09
3 .1 7 - 3.67

88
73

2.77
2.61

2.63
2.56

1 .9 9 - 3.08
1 .9 7 - 2.86

PACKERS, SHIPPING ---------------------m anu factu ring ------------------------

* Workers were distributed as follows:
See footnotes at end of tables.




-

*

-

*

-

-

-

-

12
12

-

-

-

9
9
“

132
116
18
*

626
363

509
509
186

26
26

27
27
“

267
39
208
208

132
92
60
-

215
215

10

5
5

339
16
325

20

5
5

-

-

—

1
1
“
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

1
1

1
1

13
13

-

*

1
1

”

“

"

”

1
1

29
29

102
102

172
172

183
183

38

22
16

”

*

*

135
133
*30
30

6 at $ 1.80 to $ 1.90; 18 at $ 1.90 to $ 2; and 6 at $ 2 to $ 2.10.

“

*

356
356

*

10

37
36
36

9

-

-

”

27
27

-

*

7
3
3

6
6

2
-

10
10

38
38

-

2
2
2
15

3

63
26
17

7
7
”

5
5

-

668
22

52
52

_

_

-

223

8

15
5

99
99

7
7

-

15

Footnotes

1 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e o f p a y f o r o v e r t i m
a t r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , a n d the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k l y h o u r s .
2 T h e m e a n i s c o m p u t e d f o r e a c h j o b b y t o t a l i n g the e a r n i n g s o f a l l w o r k e r s a n d d i v i d i n g b y the n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ,
The m edian
d e s i g n a t e s p o s i t i o n — h a l f o f th e e m p l o y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e th a n the r a t e sh o w n ; h a l f r e c e i v e l e s s th a n the r a t e sh o w n ,
The m iddle
r a n g e i s d e f i n e d b y 2 r a t e s o f p a y ; a f o u r t h o f th e w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s t h a n th e l o w e r o f t h e s e r a t e s a n d a f o u r t h e a r n m o r e th a n the h i g h e r r a t e .
3 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , a n d l a t e s h i f t s .







Appendix. Occupational Descriptions
The p rim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the B u reau 's wage surveys is to a s s is t its field staff in classify in g into appropriate
occupations w orkers who are employed under a variety of payroll title s and different work arrangem en ts from establishm ent to establishm ent and
from a re a to a re a . This p erm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representing com parable job content. B ecause of this em phasis on
interestablishm ent and in terarea com parability of occupational content, the B u reau 's job descriptions m ay differ significantly from those n use in
individual establishm ents or those prepared for other p u rp oses. In applying these job d escrip tion s, the B u reau 's field econom ists are instructed
to exclude working su p e rv iso rs; apprentices; le arn e rs; beginners; train e es; and handicapped, p art-tim e, tem porary, and probationary w orkers.

O F F IC E
C LER K , ACCOUNTING— Continued

B IL L E R , MACHINE
P re p a re s statem en ts, b ills, and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or electrom atic typew riter. May also keep reco rd s as to billings or shipping charges or perform other
c le rical work incidental to billing operations. F o r wage study p u rp o ses, b ille r s , m achine, are
cla ssifie d by type of m achine, a s follow s:
B ille r, machine (billing m achine). U ses a sp ecial billing machine (combination typing
and adding machine) to prepare bills and invoices from cu sto m ers' purchase o rd e rs, in ter­
nally prepared o rd e rs, shipping m em orandum s, etc. U sually involves application of p r e ­
determined discounts and shipping charges and entry of n ec e ssa ry extensions, which m ay or
m ay not be computed on the billing m achine, and totals which are autom atically accum ulated
by machine. The operation usually involves a la rge number of carbon copies of the bill being
p repared and is often done on a fanfold m achine.
B ille r, machine (bookkeeping m achine). U ses a bookkeeping machine (with or without
a typew riter keyboard) to p rep are cu sto m ers' b ills as part of the accounts receivable op era­
tion. G enerally involves the sim ultaneous entry of figu res on cu stom ers' ledger record . The
machine autom atically accum ulates figu res on a number of vertical columns and computes
and usually prints autom atically the debit or credit balan ces. Does not involve a knowl­
edge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of sale s and cred it slip s.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
O perates a bookkeeping machine (with or without a typew riter keyboard) to keep a record
of bu sin ess tran sactio n s.
C la ss A. K eeps a set of reco rd s requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic
bookkeeping p rin cip les, and fam iliarity with the structure of the p articu lar accounting system
used. D eterm ines proper reco rd s and distribution of debit and cred it item s to be used in each
phase of the work. May p rep are consolidated rep o rts, balance sheets, and other record s
by hand.
C la ss B. K eeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections of a set of record s usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. P h ases or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, cu sto m ers' accounts (not including a sim ple type of billing d escribed under b iller,
m achine), co st distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or a s s is t
in preparation of tr ia l balances and p rep are control sheets for the accounting departm ent.
C LE R K , ACCOUNTING
P erfo rm s one or m ore accounting c le ric al task s such as posting to r e g iste rs and le d g e rs;
reconciling bank accounts; verifying the internal consistency, com pleteness, and m athem atical
accu racy of accounting docum ents; assignin g p rescrib e d accounting distribution codes; examining
and verifying for c le ric al accu racy various types of rep o rts, lis t s , calculations, posting, etc.;
or preparing sim ple or a ssistin g in preparing m ore com plicated journal vouchers. May work
in either a manual or automated accounting system .
The work req u ires a knowledge of c le ric al methods and office p ractice s and procedures
which relate s to the c le ric a l p ro cessin g and recording of tran sactio n s and accounting information.
With experience, the worker typically becom es fam iliar with the bookkeeping and accounting term s
and procedures used in the assign ed work, but is not required to have a knowledge of the form al
principles of bookkeeping and accounting.




P osition s a re c la ssifie d into levels on the b a sis of the following definitions.
C la ss A. Under general supervision, perform s accounting c le ric a l operations which
require the application of experience and judgment, for exam ple, cle rically processin g com ­
plicated or nonrepetitive accounting tran saction s, selecting among a substantial variety of
p rescrib e d accounting codes and c la ssifica tio n s, or tracin g tran saction s through previous
accounting actions to determ ine source of d iscre p an cies. May be a ss is te d by one or m ore
c la ss B accounting cle rk s.
C la ss B. Under close supervision, following detailed instructions and standardized pro­
cedu res, p erform s one or m ore routine accounting c le rical operations, such as posting to
le d g e rs, c a rd s, or w orksheets where identification of item s and locations of postings are
cle arly indicated; checking accu racy and com pleteness of standardized and repetitive record s
or accounting documents; and coding documents using a few p rescrib e d accounting codes.
C LER K , F IL E
F ile s , c la s s ifie s , and retrie v e s m aterial in an established filing system . May perform
cle ric al and m anual task s required to m aintain file s. Positions a re cla ssifie d into levels on the
b a sis of the following definitions.
C la ss A. C la ssifie s and indexes file m aterial such a s correspondence, rep orts, tech­
nical docum ents, e tc., in an established filing system containing a number of varied subject
m atter file s. May also file this m ate rial. May keep record s of various types in conjunction
with the file s. May lead a sm all group of lower level file c le rk s.
C la ss B . S o rts, codes, and files unclassified m aterial by sim ple (subject m atter) head­
ings or partly c la ssifie d m ate rial by finer subheadings. P re p a re s sim ple related index and
c r o ss-r e fe re n c e aid s. As requested, locates clearly identified m aterial in files and fo r­
w ards m ate rial. May perform related c le rical task s required to m aintain and service file s.
C la ss C . P erfo rm s routine filing of m aterial that has already been cla ssifie d or which
is e asily c la ssifie d in a sim ple se r ia l classificatio n system (e.g., alphabetical, chronological,
or n um erical). As requested, locates readily available m aterial in file s and forw ards m a ­
te ria l; and m ay fill out withdrawal charge. May perform sim ple cle ric al and manual task s
required to m aintain and serv ice files.
C L E R K , ORDER
R eceives cu sto m ers' ord e rs for m aterial or m ercha 'ise by m ail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the following: Quoting p r’ c^s to custom ers; making out an order
sheet listing the item s to make up the order; checking p rices and quantities of item s on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to resp ective departm ents to be filled. May check with credit
departm ent to determ ine credit rating of custom er, acknowledge receipt of ord e rs from custom ers,
follow up ord e rs to see that they have been filled, keep file of o rd ers received, and check shipping
invoices with original o rd e rs.
C LE R K , PAYROLL
Computes w ages of company em ployees and enters the n ece ssa ry data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve: Calculating w ork ers' earnings based on time or production record s; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such a s w ork er's name, working
days, tim e, rate, deductions for in su ran ce, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and
a s s is t p ay m aster in making up and distributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.

NOTE: The Bureau has discontinued collecting data for com ptom eter op erators.

17

18
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR

SEC R E T ARY— Continued

O perates a keypunch machine to reco rd or v erify alphabetic and/or num eric data on
tabulating card s or on tape.

NOTE: The term "corp orate o fficer, " used in the level definitions following, r e fe r s to
those o fficials who have a significant corporate-w ide policym aking role with regard to m ajor
company a ctiv ities. The title "v ice p re sid e n t," though norm ally indicative of this role, does not
in all c a se s identify such positions. Vice presiden ts whose p rim ary respon sibility is to act p e r ­
sonally on individual c a se s or tran saction s (e.g., approve or deny individual loan or cred it actions;
adm in ister individual tru st accounts; directly su p ervise a c le ric a l staff) a re not considered to be
"corp orate o ffic e r s" for purposes of applying the following level definitions.

P ositions are c la ssifie d into lev els on the b a sis of the following definitions.
C la ss A . Work req u ires the application of experience and judgment in selectin g p ro ce ­
dures to be followed and in searching fo r, in terpreting, selectin g, or coding item s to be
keypunched from a variety of source docum ents. On occasion m ay a lso perform some routine
keypunch work. May train inexperienced keypunch o p e rato rs.
C la ss B . Work is routine and repetitive. Under clo se supervision or following specific
procedures or in struction s, works from v ario u s standardized source documents which have
been coded, and follows specified p roced ures which have been p rescrib e d in detail and require
little or no selectin g, coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. R e fe rs to su p ervisor
problem s a risin g from erroneous item s or codes or m issin g information.
MESSENGER (Office Boy or Girl)
P erfo rm s variou s routine duties such a s running e rra n d s, operating m inor office m a ­
chines such a s s e a le r s or m a ile r s, opening and distributing m ail, and other m inor c le r ic a l work.
Exclude positions that require operation of a m otor vehicle as a significant duty.
SECRETARY
A ssigned a s p erso n al se c r e ta r y , norm ally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
respon sive relationship to the day-to-day work of the su p e rv iso r. Works fa irly independently r e ­
ceiving a minimum of detailed supervision and guidance. P erfo rm s varied c le r ic a l and se c r e ta r ia l
duties, usually including m o st of the following:
a. R eceives telephone c a lls , p erso n al c a lle r s , and incoming m ail, answ ers routine
in q uires, and routes technical in q uiries to the proper p erson s;
b.

E sta b lish e s, m ain tain s, and r e v ise s the su p e rv iso r's files;

c.

Maintains the su p e rv iso r 's calendar and m akes appointments a s instructed;

d.

R elays m e ssa g e s from su p e rv iso r to subordinates;

e. Reviews correspondence, m em orandum s, and rep orts prepared by others for the
su p e rv iso r 's signature to a ssu r e procedural and typographic accuracy;
f.

P erfo rm s stenographic and typing work.

May a lso perform other c le r ic a l and s e c r e ta r ia l ta sk s of com parable nature and difficulty.
The work typically req u ires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
p ro g ra m s, and procedures related to the work of the su p e rv iso r.
Exc lusions
Not a ll positions that are titled "s e c re ta r y " p o s s e s s the above c h a ra c te ristic s. Exam ples
of positions which are excluded from the definition are a s follow s:
a.

P ositions which do not m eet the "p e rso n al" se c re ta ry concept d escribed above;

b.

Stenographers not fully train ed in se c r e ta r ia l type duties;

c. Stenographers servin g a s office a ssista n ts to a group of p rofession al, technical, or
m an ag erial p erso n s;
d. S ec re ta ry positions in which the duties are either substantially m ore routine or
substantially m ore com plex and respon sible than those ch aracterized in the definition;
e. A ssista n t type positions which involve m ore difficult or m ore respon sible tech­
n ical, adm in istrativ e, sup erv iso ry , or sp ecialized c le r ic a l duties which are not typical of
se c r e ta r ia l work.




C la ss A
1. S ecre tary to the chairm an of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
a ll, over 100 but few er than 5,000 p e rso n s; or *
1
2. S ecre tary to a corporate officer (other than the chairm an of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000 p e rso n s; or
3. S ecre ta ry to the head, im m ediately below the corporate officer level, of a m ajor
segm ent or su b sid iary of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 25,000 p e rso n s.
C la ss B
1. S ecre tary to the chairm an of the board or presiden t of a company that em ploys, in
a ll, fewer than 100 p e rso n s; or
2. S ecre ta ry to a corporate officer (other than the chairm an of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 p e rso n s; or
3. S ecre ta ry to the head, im m ediately below the officer level, over either a m ajor
corporate-w ide functional activity (e.g ., m arketing, re se arch , operations, industrial relation s, etc.) or~a m ajo r geographic or organizational segm ent (e.g ., a regional h eadquarters;
a m ajor division) of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
em ployees; or
4. S ecre ta ry to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in a ll, over 5,000 p e rso n s; or
5. S ecre tary to the head of a large and im portant organizational segm ent (e.g., a m iddle
m anagem ent su p e rv iso r of an organizational segm ent often involving as many as se v e ral
hundred p erson s) or a company that em ploys, in all, over 25,000 p e rso n s.
C la ss C
1. S ecre ta ry to an executive or m an agerial person whose resp on sibility is not equivalent
to one of the sp ecific level situations in the definition for c la s s B, but whose organizational
unit norm ally num bers at le a st sev e ral dozen em ployees and is usually divided into o rg an iza­
tional segm ents which a re often, in turn, further subdivided. In som e com panies, this level
includes a wide range of organizational echelons; in oth ers, only one or two; or
2. S ecre ta ry to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in a ll, fewer than 5,000 p e rso n s.
C la ss D
1. S ecre ta ry to the su p ervisor or head of a sm all organizational unit (e.g ., fewer than
about 25 or 30 p erson s); m2. S ecre tary to a n onsupervisory staff sp e cia list, p ro fessio n al employee, ad m in istra­
tive o fficer, or a ssista n t, sk illed technician or expert. (NOTE: Many com panies a ssig n
sten ograph ers, rather than se c r e ta r ie s a s d escribed above, to this level of su p ervisory or
nonsupervisory w orker.)
STENOGRAPHER
P rim ary duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to tran scrib e the dictation. May
a lso type from written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool. May occasion ally tran scrib e
from voice recordings (if p rim ary duty is tran scrib in g from record in g s, see Transcribing-M achine
O perator, G eneral).
NOTE : This job is distinguished from that of a se cre tary in that a se cre tary norm ally
works in a confidential relationship with only one m an ager or executive and perform s m ore
respon sible and d iscretion ary task s as d escribed in the se c re ta ry job definition.
Stenographer, General
Dictation involves a norm al routine vocabulary. May m aintain file s , keep sim ple re c o rd s,
or perform other relatively routine c le ric a l ta sk s.

19
TABU LATIN G -M ACH IN E O PE R A TO R (E le ctric Accounting Machine O perator)— Continued

STEN OGRAPH ER— Continued

P osition s are cla s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis of the follow ing definitions.

Sten ographer, Senior
D ictation in v olves a varied tech n ical o r sp ec ia lized v o cab u lary such as in le g a l b riefs
o r rep o rts on scie n tific re s e a rc h . May also set up and m aintain file s , keep re c o r d s , etc.
OR
P e rfo rm s stenographic duties requirin g sign ifican tly g re a te r independence and resp on ­
sib ility than sten o graph er, gen era l, as evidenced by the follow ing: Work re q u ire s a high
d egree of stenographic speed and accu racy; a thorough w orking knowledge of gen eral business
and o ffice p roced ure; and of the s p ec ific business operation s, o rgan ization , p o lic ie s , p ro c e ­
d u res, file s , w orkflow , etc. U ses th is knowledge in p erform in g stenographic duties and
resp on sible c le r ic a l ta sk s such as m aintaining followup file s; assem bling m a te ria l for rep orts,
m em orandum s, and le tte rs ; com posing sim ple le tte rs from gen eral in stru ction s; reading and
routing incom ing m ail; and answ ering routine questions, etc.
SWITCHBOARD O PERATO R
C la s s A . O p erates a sin gle- or m ultiple-position telephone sw itchboard handling incom ing,
outgoing, intraplant or o ffice c a lls . P e rfo rm s full telephone inform ation s e rv ic e o r handles
com plex c a lls , such as co n feren ce, c o lle c t, o v e rs e a s , or s im ila r c a lls , e ith er in addition to
doing routine work as d escrib ed for sw itchboard o p erato r, c la s s B, or as a fu ll-tim e
assign m en t. ("F u ll" telephone inform ation s e rv ic e o ccu rs when the establishm ent has v arie d
functions that are not rea d ily understandable for telephone inform ation p u rpo ses, e .g ., because
of overlapping or in terrela ted functions, and consequently p resen t frequent p roblem s as to
which extensions are appropriate for c a lls.)
C la s s B . O perates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone sw itchboard handling incom ing,
outgoing, intraplant or o ffice c a lls . May handle routine long distan ce c a lls and re c o rd to lls.
May p erform lim ited telephone inform ation s e r v ic e . ("L im ited " telephone inform ation s e rv ic e
o ccu rs if the functions of the establishm ent se rv ice d are rea d ily understandable for telephone
inform ation p urpo ses, or if the requests are routine, e .g ., giving extension num bers when
s p ec ific nam es are furnished, or if com plex c a lls are r e fe rr e d to another operator.)
T hese cla s s ific a tio n s do not include switchboard o p era to rs in telephone com panies who
a s s is t cu stom ers in placing c a lls.
SWITCHBOARD O PE R A TO R -R E CEPT IO N IST
In addition to p erform in g duties of operator on a sin gle-p ositio n or m on itor-typ e sw itch ­
board, acts as recep tion ist and m ay also type or p erform routine c le r ic a l w ork as p art of regu lar
d u ties. This typing o r c le r ic a l work m ay take the m ajo r p art of this w o rk e r's tim e while at
sw itchboard.
TABU LATIN G-M ACH IN E O PERATO R (E le ctric Accounting Machine Operator)
O perates one or a v a rie ty of m achines such as the tabulato r, ca lc u la to r, co lla to r, in te r­
p re te r, so rte r, reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from this definition are working su p e rv is o rs .
A lso excluded a re operato rs of e lec tro n ic digital co m puters, even though they m ay also operate
EAM equipment.

C la s s A . P e rfo rm s com plete reporting and tabulating assign m en ts including devising
d ifficu lt control panel w irin g under gen eral su pervision . A ssign m en ts ty p ic a lly involve a
v a rie ty of long and com plex rep orts which often are irre g u la r or n o n recu rrin g, requiring
som e planning of the nature and sequencing of operations, and the use of a v a rie ty of m a ­
chines. Is ty p ic a lly involved in train in g new operators in m achine operations or train in g
low er le v e l o p era to rs in w irin g from d iagram s and in the operating sequences of long and
com plex re p o rts . Does not include positions in which w iring re sp o n sib ility is lim ited to
selectio n and in se rtio n of p rew ired boards.
C la s s B . P e rfo rm s w ork accord in g to establish ed p roced u res and under sp ecific in ­
stru ction s. A ssign m en ts ty p ic a lly involve com plete but routine and re c u rrin g rep orts or parts
of la r g e r and m ore com plex re p o rts. O perates m ore d ifficu lt tabulating o r e le c tric a l a c ­
counting m achines such as the tabulator and ca lcu la to r, in addition to the sim p ler m achines
used by c la s s C o p e ra to rs. May be required to do som e w irin g fro m d ia gram s. May train
new em ployees in basic m achine operations.
C la s s C . Under sp e c ific in stru ction s, operates sim ple tabulating or e le c tr ic a l accounting
m ach in es such as the s o rte r, in te rp re te r, reproducing punch, c o lla to r, e tc. A ssignm ents
ty p ic a lly involve portions o f a w ork unit, for exam ple, individual sortin g or collatin g runs,
or rep e titive o peratio n s. May p erform sim ple w irin g from d ia g ram s, and do some filin g w ork.
TRANSCRIBING-M ACH INE OPERA TO R, GEN ERAL
P rim a ry duty is to tra n s crib e dictation involving a norm al routine vocabu lary from
tran scrib in g-m ach in e re c o rd s. May also type from w ritten copy and do sim ple c le r ic a l w ork.
W orkers tran scrib in g dictation involving a varied tech n ical or s p e c ia lize d vocabu lary such as
le g a l b rie fs or rep orts on s cie n tific re s e a rch a re not included. A w o rk er who takes dictation
in shorthand or by Stenotype or s im ila r m achine is cla s s ifie d as a sten ograph er.
T Y P IST
U ses a ty p e w rite r to m ake copies of various m a te ria ls or to m ake out bills after c a lc u la ­
tions have been m ade by another person . May include typing of ste n c ils , m a ts, or s im ila r m a te ­
r ia ls for u se in duplicating p ro c e s s e s . May do c le r ic a l work involving little sp e cia l train in g, such
as keeping sim ple re c o r d s , filin g re co rd s and re p o rts, or sorting and distributing incom ing m ail.
C la s s A . P e rfo rm s one or m ore of the follow in g: Typing m a te ria l in final form when
it in volves com bining m a te ria l from s e v e ra l so u rces; or re sp o n sib ility fo r co rr e c t spellin g,
syllab icatio n , punctuation, e tc ., of tech n ical or unusual words or foreign language m ate ­
ria l; or planning layout and typing of com plicated s ta tistica l ta b le s to m aintain u niform ity
and balance in spacing. May type routine form le tte r s , v aryin g d etails to suit circu m sta n ce s.
C la s s B . P e rfo rm s one or m ore of the follow in g: Copy typing from rough or cle a r
drafts; o r routine typing of fo rm s, in surance p o lic ie s , etc.; o r setting up sim ple standard
tabulations: or copying m ore com plex tables alre ad y set up and spaced p rop erly .

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COM PU TER O PERATO R
M onitors and o perates the control console of a digital com puter to p ro c e ss data according
to operating in stru ction s, u sually p repared by a p ro g ra m er. Work includes m ost of the follow in g:
Studies instru ction s to d eterm ine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
item s (tape re e ls , ca rd s , etc.); sw itches n e c e s s a ry a u x ilia ry equipment into c irc u it, and sta rts
and o perates com puter; m akes adjustm ents to com puter to c o rr e c t operating problem s and m eet
sp e cia l conditions; review s e r r o r s m ade during operation and d eterm in es cause or r e fe r s problem
to su p e rviso r or p rog ram er; and m aintains operating re c o r d s . M ay te st and a s s is t in co rre ctin g
p rogram .
F o r wage study p urp o ses, com puter o p era to rs are c la s s ifie d as follow s:
C la s s A . O perates independently, o r under only gen eral d irectio n , a com puter running
p rog ram s with m ost of the follow ing c h a ra c te r is tic s : New p rog ram s a re frequ en tly tested
and introduced; scheduling requirem en ts a re of c r itic a l im portance to m in im ize downtime;
the p rog ram s a re o f com plex design so that iden tification of e r r o r so u rce often re q u ire s a
working knowledge of the total p ro g ram , and altern ate p rogram s m ay not be ava ilab le. May
give d irectio n and guidance to lo w er le v e l o p era to rs.
C la s s B. O perates independently, o r under only gen eral d irectio n , a com puter running
p ro g ram s with m ost of the follow ing c h a ra c te r is tic s : M ost of the program s a re establish ed
production run s, ty p ic a lly run on a re g u la rly re c u rrin g b a sis; there is little o r no testin g




COM PU TER O PERATO R— Continued
of new p rogram s required; altern ate p rog ram s are provided in ca se o rigin al p rogram needs
m ajo r change or cannot be c o rre cte d within a reason able tim e. In common e rr o r situ a­
tion s, diagnoses cause and takes co rr e c tiv e action. This usu ally in volves applying p revio u sly
p rogram ed c o rr e c tiv e step s, or using standard co rre ctio n techniques.
OR
O p erates under d ire c t su p ervisio n a com puter running p rogram s o r segm ents of p rogram s
with the c h a ra c te r is tic s d escrib ed fo r c la s s A . May a s s is t a high er le v e l operator by inde­
pendently p erform in g le s s d ifficu lt ta sk s assign ed , and p erform in g d ifficu lt tasks follow ing
detailed in stru ction s and with frequent re v ie w of operations perform ed .
C la s s C . W orks on routine p rogram s under clo se su pervision . Is expected to develop
working knowledge of the com puter equipment used and ab ility to detect problem s involved in
running routine p ro g ram s. U sually has re ce ive d som e fo rm al train in g in com pute: operation.
M ay a s s is t higher le v e l operator on com plex p rog ram s.
CO M PU TER PRO G RAM ER, BUSINESS
C on verts statem ents of b u sin ess p rob lem s, ty p ic a lly p repared by a system s analyst, into
a sequence of detailed in stru ction s which a re requ ired to so lve the p rob lem s by autom atic data
p ro ce ssin g equipm ent. W orking from ch a rts or d ia gram s, the p ro g ram er develops the p re cis e in ­
stru ction s which, when entered into the com puter system in coded language, cau se the m anipulation

20
COM PU TER PRO GRAM ER, BUSINESS-^-Continued
of '• j.ca to achieve d esired re s u lts . Work in v o lves m ost of the follow in g: A pp lies knowledge of
’
com puter ca p a b ilitie s, m ath em a tics, lo gic em ployed by co m pu ters, and p a rticu la r subject m atter
involved to analyze ch arts and d ia gram s of the problem to be program ed; develops sequence
of p rogram steps; w rites detailed flow ch a rts to show o rd e r in which data w ill be p rocessed ;
co n verts th ese ch a rts to coded in stru ction s fo r m achine to follow ; tests and c o r r e c ts p rogram s;
p rep a res in stru ction s for operating person n el during production run; an a ly ze s, re v ie w s, and a lte rs
p rog ram s to in c re a s e operating effic ie n cy or adapt to new requ irem en ts; m aintains re c o rd s of
p rogram developm ent and re v isio n s. (NOTE: W orkers p erform in g both sy ste m s an a ly sis and p ro ­
gram ing should be cla s s ifie d as system s an a lysts if th is is the sk ill used to determ in e th e ir pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim a rily resp o n sib le fo r the m anagem ent or su p ervisio n of
other e lectro n ic data p ro cessin g em p lo yees, o r p ro g ra m e rs p rim a rily concerned with scien tific
and/or engineering p rob lem s.
F o r wage study p u rp o ses, p ro g ra m e rs are c la s s ifie d as follow s:
C la s s A . Works independently or under only gen eral d irectio n on com plex problem s which
requ ire com petence in a ll phases of p rogram in g concepts and p ra c tic e s . Working from d ia ­
gram s and ch arts which identify the nature of d e sire d re s u lts , m ajo r p ro c e ssin g steps to be
accom plish ed , and the relation sh ip s between v ario u s steps of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of program ing actions needed to e fficie n tly u tilize the com puter system
in achievin g d esired end products.
At th is le v e l, p rogram in g is d ifficu lt because com puter equipment m u st be o rgan ized to
produce s e v e ra l in terrela ted but d iv e rs e products from num erous and d iv e rs e data elem en ts.
A wide v a rie ty and exten sive num ber of in tern al p ro c e ssin g actions m ust o cc u r. Th is req u ires
such actions as developm ent of com m on o peration s which can be reu sed , establish m en t of
linkage points between o p eratio n s, adjustm ents to data when p rogram requ irem en ts exceed
com puter sto rage ca p acity, and substantial m anipulation and resequencing of data elem ents
to form a highly in tegrated p ro g ram .
M ay provide functional d irectio n to lo w er le v e l p ro g ra m e rs who a re assign ed to a s s is t .
C la s s B .~ Works independently o r under only gen era l d irectio n on re la tiv e ly sim ple
p ro g ra m s, or on sim ple segm en ts of com plex p ro g ra m s. P ro g ra m s (or segm ents) u su ally
p ro c e s s inform ation to produce data in two o r th ree v a rie d sequences o r fo rm ats. Reports
and listin g s are produced by refin in g, adapting, a r ra y in g , or m aking m in or additions to or
d eletions from input data which a r e rea d ily av a ilab le. While num erous re c o rd s m ay be
p ro c e s s e d , the data have been refin ed in p rio r actions so that the a c c u r a c y and sequencing
of data can be tested by using a few routine ch ecks. T y p ic a lly , the p rogram d eals with
routine reco rd -k eep in g type o peratio n s.
OR
W orks on com plex p rog ram s (as d escrib ed fo r c la s s A) under clo se d irectio n of a higher
le v e l p ro g ra m er o r s u p e rv is o r. M ay a s s is t h igher le v e l p ro g ra m e r by independently p e r ­
form in g le s s d ifficu lt ta sk s assign ed , and p erform in g m o re d ifficu lt ta sk s under f a ir ly clo se
d irectio n .
May guide o r in stru ct lo w er le v e l p ro g ra m e rs .
C la s s C . M akes p ra c tic a l applications o f p rogram in g p ra c tic e s and concepts u su ally
learn ed in fo rm al train in g c o u rs e s . A ssign m en ts a re designed to develop com petence in the
application o f standard p roced u res to routine p rob lem s. R e c e iv e s clo se su p ervisio n on new
a sp ects of assign m en ts; and w ork is review ed to v e r ify its accu ra c y and conform ance with
required p ro ced u res.
CO M PU TER SYSTEM S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS
A n a lyzes busin ess problem s to form ulate p roced u res for solving them by use of e lectro n ic
data p ro cessin g equipm ent. D evelops a com plete d escrip tion of all sp ecification s needed to enable
p ro g ra m e rs to p rep a re required d igital com puter p ro g ram s. Work in volves m ost of the follow in g:
A n a lyzes su b ject-m atter operations to be automated and id en tifies conditions and c r ite r ia requ ired
to ach ieve s a tis fa c to ry re su lts; sp e c ifie s number and types of re c o r d s , f ile s , and docum ents to
be used; outlines action s to be p erform ed by p erson n el and com puters in su fficien t detail for
p resentation to m anagem ent and for p rogram in g (typ ically th is involves preparatio n of w ork and
data flow ch arts); coordin ates the developm ent of te s t p rob lem s and p articip ate s in tr ia l runs of
new and re v ise d system s; an i recom m ends equipment changes to obtain m ore e ffe ctiv e o v e ra ll
o peratio n s. (NOTE: W orkers p erform in g both system s an a ly sis and program ing should be c la s ­
sified as system s an alysts if th is is the sk ill used to d eterm in e th e ir pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim a rily resp on sible fo r the m anagem ent or su pervisio n
o f other e lec tro n ic data p ro c essin g em p lo yees, or system s an alysts p rim a rily concerned with
s cien tific or engineering p rob lem s.
F o r wage study p u rp o ses,

system s an alysts are c la s s ifie d as follow s:

C la s s A . W orks independently or under only gen eral d irectio n on com plex problem s in ­
volvin g all phases of system s a n a ly s is . P ro b lem s a re com plex because o f d iv e rs e so u rce s of
input data and m u ltip le-u se requirem en ts of output data. (F o r exam ple, d evelops an integrated
production scheduling, inventory co n trol, co st a n a ly s is , and sale s an a ly sis re c o r d in which




C O M PU TER SYSTEM S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS— Continued
e v e ry item of each type is au to m atically p ro c e s s e d through the ull system of re co rd s and
app rop riate followup actions are initiated by the com puter.) C o n fe .s with p ersons concerned to
d eterm ine the data p ro ce ssin g p rob lem s and ad v ise s s u b je ct-m atte r personnel on the im p lic a ­
tions of new or re v is e d sy ste m s of data p ro c e ssin g o peration s. M akes recom m endations, if
needed, for ap p roval of m ajo r sy ste m s in sta lla tio n s o r changes and for obtaining equipm ent.
May provid e functional d ire ctio n to lo w er le v e l system s an alysts who are assign ed to
a s s is t .
C la s s B . W orks independently or under only gen eral d irectio n on problem s that are
re la tiv e ly uncom plicated to an a lyze , plan, p ro g ram , and operate. P ro b lem s are of lim ited
co m plexity becau se so u rce s of input data are hom ogeneous and the output data a re c lo se ly
related . (F o r exam ple, d evelops sy ste m s for m aintaining depositor accounts in a bank,
m aintaining accounts re c e iv a b le in a re ta il establish m en t, or m aintaining inventory accounts
in a m anufacturing or w h o lesale establish m en t.) C on fers with p erson s concerned to d eterm ine
the data p ro c e ssin g problem s and ad v ise s s u b je ct-m atte r personnel on the im plication s of the
data p ro ce ssin g system s to be applied.
OR
W orks on a segm ent of a com plex data p ro c e ssin g schem e or sy stem , as d e scrib e d for
c la s s A . W orks independently on routine assign m en ts and re c e iv e s in stru ction and guidance
on com plex assign m en ts. Work is review ed for a c cu ra c y of judgm ent, com pliance with in ­
stru ction s, and to in su re p rop er alinem ent with the o v e ra ll system .
C la s s C . W orks under im m ediate su pervisio n , c a rry in g out an a lyses as assign ed , u su ally
of a sin gle a c tiv ity . A ssign m en ts a re designed to develop and expand p ra c tic a l ex p erien ce
in the application of p roced u res and s k ills requ ired fo r sy ste m s an a ly sis w ork. F o r exam ple,
m ay a s s is t a h igh er le v e l sy ste m s an alyst by p rep arin g the d etailed sp ecification s req u ired
by p ro g ra m e rs from inform ation developed by the high er le v e l an alyst.
DRAFTSM AN
C la s s A . Plans the graphic p resentation of com plex item s having d istin ctive design
fe a tu re s that d iffe r sign ifican tly from estab lish ed draftin g p re ce d e n ts. Works in c lo se sup­
port with the design o rig in a to r, and m ay recom m end m in or design changes. A n a lyzes the
e ffe ct of each change on the d eta ils of fo rm , function, and p ositional relation sh ip s of co m ­
ponents and p a rts. W orks with a m inim um o f su p e rv iso ry a s s is ta n c e . Com pleted w ork is
review ed by design o rigin a to r for co n sisten cy with p rio r en gin eerin g d eterm in ation s. May
e ith er p rep a re draw in gs, o r d ire c t th e ir p reparation by low er le v e l d raftsm en.
C la s s B . P e rfo rm s nonroutine and com plex drafting assign m en ts that requ ire the ap p li­
cation of m o st of the standardized drawing techniques re g u la rly used. Duties ty p ic a lly in ­
volve such w ork as: P re p a r e s w orking draw ings of su b a ssem b lies with irre g u la r shapes,
m u ltiple functions, and p re c is e p ositional relation sh ip s between com ponents; p re p a re s a r c h i­
tec tu ra l draw ings for con stru ction of a building including d etail draw ings of foundations, wall
se ctio n s, flo o r plan s, and ro o f. U ses accepted fo rm u las and m anuals in m aking n e c e s s a ry
com putations to d eterm in e quantities o f m a te ria ls to be used, load ca p a citie s , stren gth s,
s tr e s s e s , e tc .
R e c e iv e s in itial in stru ctio n s, req u irem en ts, and advice from s u p e rv is o r.
Com pleted w ork is checked for tech n ical adequacy.
C la s s C . P re p a r e s detail draw ings of sin gle units or p arts for en gin eerin g, construction,
m anufacturing, o r re p air p u rp o ses. Typ es of draw ings prepared include is o m e tric p rojection s
(depicting th re e dim ensions in accu rate sca le) and section al view s to c la r ify positioning of
com ponents and convey needed inform ation. C o n so lid ates d etails from a num ber o f so u rce s
and adjusts o r tran sp o se s sca le as requ ired . Suggested m ethods of approach, ap p licable
p reced en ts, and advice on so u rce m a te ria ls are given with in itial assign m en ts. Instructions
are le s s com plete when assign m en ts re c u r. Work m ay be spot-ch ecked during p ro g re s s .
D R A FT SM A N -TR A C E R
C opies plans and draw ings p rep a red by o th ers by placing tracin g cloth or paper o ver
draw ings and tracin g with pen or p en cil. (Does not include tracin g lim ited to plans p rim a rily
co n sistin g of stra igh t lin es and a la rg e sca le not requ irin g clo se delineation.)
AND/OR
P re p a r e s sim ple o r re p e titive draw ings of e a s ily v isu a lize d ite m s .
during p ro g re s s .

Work is c lo s e ly su p ervised

E L E C T R O N IC S TECHNICIAN
W orks on vario u s typ es of e le c tro n ic equipm ent or sy ste m s by p erform in g one or m ore
of the follow ing operation s: M odifying, in sta llin g, rep airin g, and o verh au lin g. T h ese operations
req u ire the p erform an ce of m ost or all of the follow ing ta sks: A ssem b lin g, testin g, adjusting,
ca lib ratin g, tuning, and alining.
W ork is nonrepetitive and re q u ire s a knowledge o f the th eo ry and p ra c tic e of e le c tro n ic s
pertaining to the use o f gen eral and sp e c ia lize d e le c tro n ic te st equipment; trou b le an alysis; and
the operation, relation sh ip , and alinem ent of e le c tro n ic s y s te m s , su b sy ste m s, and c irc u its having
a v a rie ty o f component p a rts.

21
E L E C T R O N IC S TECHNICIAN— Continued

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (R egistered )

E le ctro n ic equipm ent or system s w orked on ty p ic a lly include one o r m ore of the follow in g:
Ground, v e h ic le , o r airb o rn e rad io com m unications s y s te m s , r e la y s y ste m s, navigation aids;
airb o rn e or ground ra d a r system s; radio and televisio n tran sm ittin g o r record in g syste m s; e le c ­
tro n ic com puters; m is s ile and s p a cec ra ft guidance and con trol syste m s; in d u strial and m ed ica l
m easu rin g, in dicating and con trollin g d ev ices; etc.

A re g is te re d n u rse who g iv e s nursing s e rv ic e under gen era l m e d ica l direction to i l l or
injured em ployees or other p erson s who becom e ill or su ffer an accid ent on the p re m ise s of a
facto ry or other establish m en t. D uties involve a com bination of the follow in g: Giving fir s t aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent d ressin g of em p loyees' in ju rie s; keeping re co rd s
of patients treated ; preparin g accident rep orts for com pensation or other pu rposes; a ssistin g in
p h y sical exam inations and health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing out p rog ram s in volving health education, accident p revention, evaluation of plant environm ent,
or other a c tiv itie s affectin g the health, w e lfa re , and safety of a ll person n el. N ursing s u p e rviso rs
or head n u rses in establish m en ts em ploying m ore than one n u rse a re excluded.

(Exclude production a s s e m b le r s and t e s t e r s , craftsm en , d raftsm en, d e s ig n e rs , e n gin eers,
and rep airm en of such standard ele c tro n ic equipm ent as o ffice m ach in es, radio and te le visio n
re c e iv in g s e ts .)

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
C A R P E N T E R , M AINTENANCE

MACHINIST, M AINTENANCE

P e rfo rm s the ca rp en try duties n e c e s s a r y to co n stru ct and m aintain in good re p a ir b u ild ­
ing woodwork and equipm ent such as bin s, c r ib s , co u n ters, ben ches, p artitio n s, d o o rs, flo o rs ,
s ta ir s , ca sin g s, and tr im m ade of wood in an establish m en t. W ork in volves m ost of the follow in g:
Planning and layin g out of w ork fro m blu ep rin ts, d raw in gs, m o d els, or v e rb a l in stru ction s; using a
v a rie ty of ca rp e n te r's handtools, portable pow er to o ls , and standard m easu rin g in stru m en ts; m ak ­
ing standard shop com putations relatin g to dim ensions of work; and selectin g m a te ria ls n e c e s s a ry
fo r the w ork. In g en era l, the w ork of the m aintenance ca rp en te r re q u ire s rounded train in g and
exp erien ce usually acquired through a fo rm a l ap p ren ticeship or equivalent train in g and exp erien ce.

P ro d u ces rep lacem en t parts and new p arts in m aking re p a irs of m etal p arts of m ech anical
equipment operated in an establish m en t. W ork in volves m ost of the fo llo w in g: Interpreting w ritten
in stru ction s and sp ecification s; planning and layin g out of w ork; using a v a rie ty of m ach in ist's
handtools and p re cisio n m easu rin g in stru m en ts; setting up and operating standard m achine tools;
shaping of m eta l p arts to clo se to le ran ce s; m aking standard shop com putations relating to dim en­
sions of w ork , toolin g, fe e d s, and speeds of m achining; knowledge of the w orking p ro p erties of
the com m on m e ta ls; se le ctin g standard m a te ria ls , p a rts, and equipm ent requ ired for his w ork;
and fitting and assem b lin g p arts into m ech anical equipm ent. In g e n e ra l, the m a ch in ist's w ork
n o rm a lly re q u ire s a rounded train in g in m achine-shop p ra c tic e u su ally acqu ired through a fo rm al
apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and experien ce.

E L E C T R IC IA N , M AINTENANCE
P e rfo rm s a v a rie ty of e le c tr ic a l trad e functions such as the in stallation , m aintenance, or
re p a ir of equipment fo r the gen eration , d istribution , or u tilizatio n of e le c tr ic en ergy in an e s ta b ­
lishm en t. W ork in volves m ost of the follow in g: In stallin g or rep airin g any of a v a rie ty of e le c ­
tr ic a l equipment such as gen era to rs, tr a n s fo rm e r s , sw itch bo ard s, co n tro lle rs , c irc u it b re a k e rs ,
m o to rs, heating un its, conduit s y s te m s , o r other tra n sm issio n equipment; w orking fro m b lu e ­
p rin ts, d raw in gs, layouts, or other sp ecification s; locating and diagnosing trou b le in the e le c tr ic a l
system or equipment; working standard com putations relatin g to load requirem en ts of w irin g or
e le c tr ic a l equipment; and using a v a rie ty of e le c tr ic ia n 's handtools and m easu rin g and testin g
in stru m en ts. In g en era l, the work of the m aintenance e le c tricia n req u ires rounded train in g and
experien ce u sually acquired through a fo rm al appren ticeship or equivalent train in g and ex p erien ce.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
O perates and m aintains and m ay a lso su p ervise the operation of statio n ary engines and
equipment (m echanical or e le c tr ic a l) to supply the establish m en t in which em ployed with p ow er,
heat, re frig e ra tio n , or air-co n d itio n in g. W ork in volves: Operating and m aintaining equipment
such as steam engines, a ir c o m p r e ss o rs , g e n e ra to rs, m o to rs, tu rbin es, ventilating and r e f r ig ­
eratin g equipm ent, steam b o ile rs and b o ile r -fe d w a ter pumps; m aking equipm ent re p a irs; and
keeping a reco rd of operation of m ach in ery, tem p eratu re, and fu el consum ption. May also su ­
p e rv ise th ese operation s. Head or ch ief en gin eers in establish m en ts em ploying m ore than one
engineer a re exclud ed .
FIREM AN, STATIO N A RY
F ir e s station ary
or steam . F eed s fuels to
checks w a ter and safety

BO ILER
b o ile rs to furnish the establish m en t in w hich em ployed with heat, pow er,
fir e by hand or o perates a m ech an ical sto k er, ga s, or o il bu rn er; and
v a lv e s . May clean , o il, or a s s is t in rep airin g b o ile rro o m equipm ent.

H E L P E R , M AINTENANCE TRADES
A s s is t s one or m ore w o rk ers in the skilled m aintenance tra d e s, by p erform in g sp e c ific
or g e n era l duties of le s s e r s k ill, such as keeping a w o rk er supplied with m a te ria ls and to o ls;
cleaning w orking a r e a , m achine, and equipment; a s s is tin g journeym an by holding m a te ria ls or
to o ls; and p erform in g other unskilled ta sk s as d irected by journeym an. The kind of w ork the
h elp er is p erm itted to p erfo rm v a rie s fro m trad e to trad e: In som e trad es the h elp er is confined
to supplying, liftin g, and holding m a te ria ls and to o ls , and cleaning working a re a s ; and in others
he is p erm itted to p erfo rm s p ec ia lized m achine o peration s, or p arts of a trad e that are also
p erform ed by w o rk ers on a fu ll-tim e b a s is .
M A CH IN E-TO O L O PE R A TO R , TOOLROOM
S p e cia liz e s in the operation of one or m ore types of m achine to o ls, such as jig b o r e r s ,
cy lin d ric a l or su rface g rin d e rs , engine la th es, or m illin g m ach in es, in the construction of
m achin e-shop to o ls, ga g e s, jig s , fix tu re s , or d ies. W ork in volves m ost of the follow in g: Planning
and perform in g d ifficult m achining operations; p ro cessin g item s requiring com plicated setups or
a high d egree of accu racy; using a v a rie ty of p recisio n m easu rin g instru m ents; se le ctin g feed s,
speed s, toolin g, and operation sequence; and m aking n e c e s s a ry adjustm ents during operation
to achieve req u isite to leran ces or d im ensions. M ay be req u ired to recogn ize when tools need
d re ssin g , to d re s s to o ls , and to select p rop er coolants and cutting and lu b ricatin g o ils . F o r
cr o s s -in d u s try wage study p u rp o ses, m ach in e-to ol o p era to rs, to o lro o m , in to o l and die jobbing
shops a re excluded from th is cla s s ific a tio n .




M ECH AN IC, AU TO M O TIV E (Maintenance)
R ep airs au tom obiles, b u ses, m o to rtru cks, and tr a c to rs of an establishm ent. W ork in ­
v o lve s m ost of the follow in g: Exam ining autom otive equipment to diagnose so u rce of trou ble; d is ­
assem bling equipm ent and p erform in g re p a irs that involve the use of such handtools as w ren ch es,
ga g e s, d r ills , or sp e c ia lize d equipment in d isassem b lin g o r fitting p a rts; rep lacin g broken or
d efective p arts fro m stock; grinding and adjusting v a lv e s; rea ssem b lin g and in stallin g the vario u s
asse m b lie s in the v e h icle and m aking n e c e s s a ry adjustm ents; and alining w h e e ls, adjusting brakes
and lig h ts, or tightening body bolts. In g en era l, the w ork of the autom otive m echanic re q u ire s
rounded train in g and exp erien ce u su ally acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
train in g and exp e rie n ce .
Th is c la s s ific a tio n does not include m ech anics who re p a ir cu sto m e rs ' v e h icle s in auto­
m obile re p a ir shops.
M ECH ANIC, M AINTENANCE
R ep airs m ach in ery or m ech an ical equipment of an establish m en t. Work involves m ost
of the fo~lowing: Exam ining m achines and m ech anical equipment to diagnose sou rce of trouble;
dism antling or p artly dism antling m achines and p erform in g re p a irs that m ain ly involve the use
of handtools in scrap in g and fitting p arts; rep lacin g broken or d efective p arts with item s obtained
fro m stock; o rd erin g the production of a rep lacem en t p art by a m achine shop or sending of the
m achine to a m achine shop for m ajo r re p a irs; p reparin g w ritten sp ecification s for m ajo r re p airs
or fo r the production of p arts o rd ered fro m m achine shop; rea ssem b lin g m achines; and m aking
a ll n e c e s s a r y adjustm ents fo r operation. In gen e ra l, the w ork of a m aintenance m echanic re q u ire s
rounded train in g and ex p erien ce u su ally acqu ired through a fo rm a l appren ticeship or equivalent
train in g and exp e rie n ce . Excluded from th is cla s s ific a tio n are w o rk e rs whose p rim ary duties
involve setting up or adjusting m ach in es.
MILLWRIGHT
In stalls new m achines or h eavy equipm ent, and dism an tles and in s ta lls m achines or heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout are requ ired . W ork in volves m ost of the follow in g:
Planning and laying out of the w ork; in terpretin g blueprints or other specification s; using a v a rie ty
of handtools and riggin g; m aking standard shop com putations relatin g to s tr e s s e s , strength of
m a te ria ls , and ce n ters of gra vity ; alining and balancing of equipment; se le ctin g standard to o ls ,
equipm ent, and p arts to be used; and in sta llin g and (^maintaining in good o rd er power tran sm issio n
equipment such as d riv e s and speed re d u c e rs . In g e n e ra l, the m illw rig h t's w ork n o rm ally re q u ire s
a rounded train in g and exp erien ce in the trad e acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or
equivalent train in g and ex p erien ce.
PA IN TE R , M AINTENANCE
Pain ts and re d e co ra te s w a lls , woodwork, and fix tu re s of an establish m en t. Work involves
the follow in g: Knowledge of su rfa ce p e cu lia ritie s and typ es of paint requ ired for d ifferent ap p lica­
tions; p reparin g su rfa ce fo r painting by rem oving old fin ish or by placing putty or f ille r in nail

22
PA IN TER , M AINTENANCE— Continued

S H E E T -M E T A L W ORKER, M AIN TEN AN CE— Continued

holes and in te r s tic e s: and applying paint with sp ray gun o r bru sh . May m ix c o lo rs , o ils , white
lead, and other paint in gred ien ts to obtain p rop er co lo r o r co n siste n c y . In gen e ra l, the work of the
m aintenance painter req u ires rounded train in g and ex p erien ce u su ally acqu ired through a fo rm al
ap p ren ticeship or equivalent train in g and exp erien ce.

types of s h e e t-m e ta l m aintenance w ork from blu eprin ts, m od els, o r other sp ecification s; setting
up and operating a ll av a ilab le typ es of sh eet-m eta l w orking m achines; using a v a rie ty o f handtools
in cutting, bending, fo rm in g, shaping, fittin g, and assem bling; and in sta llin g sh e e t-m e ta l a r tic le s
as requ ired . In gen e ra l, the work of the m aintenance sh e e t-m e ta l w o rk er re q u ire s rounded
train in g and e x p erien ce u su ally acqu ired through a fo rm al ap p ren ticeship or equivalent train in g
and ex p e rie n ce .

P IP E F IT T E R , M AINTENANCE
In stalls o r rep a irs w a ter, stea m , g a s, o r other typ es of pipe and pipefittin gs in an
establish m en t. Work in volves m ost of the fo llo w in g: Layin g out of work and m easu rin g to locate
position of pipe fro m draw ings o r other w ritten sp ecificatio n s; cutting v ario u s s iz e s of pipe to
c o r r e c t lengths with c h is e l and h am m er o r o xyacetylen e to rc h o r p ipe-cu ttin g m ach in es; threading
pipe with sto ck s and d ies; bending pipe by h an d -d riven o r p ow er-d riv en m ach in es; assem bling
pipe with couplings and fasten in g pipe to han gers; m aking standard shop com putations re la tin g to
p re s s u r e s , flo w , and s ize of pipe required ; and m aking standard te sts to determ in e whether fin ­
ished pipes m eet sp ecificatio n s. In g en era l, the w ork o f the m aintenance p ip efitter re q u ire s
rounded train in g and ex p erien ce u su ally acqu ired through a fo rm al appren ticeship or equivalent
train in g and exp erien ce. W orkers p rim a rily engaged in in sta llin g and rep airin g building sanitation
o r heating system s are exclud ed .
S H E E T -M E T A L WORKER, M AINTENANCE
F a b ric a te s , in s ta lls , and m aintains in good re p a ir the sh e e t-m e ta l equipm ent and fix tu res
(such as m achine guard s, g re a s e pans, s h e lv e s , lo c k e r s , tan ks, v en tila to rs, ch u tes, du cts, m eta l
roofing) of an establish m en t. Work in volves m o st o f the follow ing: Planning and layin g out all

TO O L AND DIE M AKER
C o n stru cts and re p a ir s m ach in e-sh op to o ls , ga g e s, jig s , fix tu re s o r d ies fo r fo rg in g s,
punching, and other m e ta l-fo rm in g w ork. Work in volves m ost of the fo llo w in g: Planning and
laying out of w ork fro m m o d e ls, blu ep rin ts, d raw in gs, o r other o ra l and w ritten sp ecification s;
using a v a rie ty of tool and die m a k e r 's handtools and p re cis io n m easu rin g in stru m en ts; un der­
standing of the w orking p ro p e rtie s of com m on m eta ls and allo y s; setting up and operatin g of
m achine tools and re late d equipment; m aking n e c e s s a ry shop com putations relatin g to dim ensions
of w ork, speed s, fe e d s, and tooling of m achin es; h e at-tre a tin g of m eta l p arts during fab ricatio n
as w ell as of fin ish ed to o ls and dies to ach ieve req u ired qu alities; w orking to clo se to le ra n ce s;
fitting and assem b lin g o f p arts to p re s c rib e d to le ra n ce s and allow an ces; and se le ctin g ap p rop riate
m a te ria ls , to o ls , and p r o c e s s e s . In gen e ra l, the tool and die m a k e r 's work re q u ire s a rounded
train in g in m ach in e-sh op and toolroom p ra c tic e u su ally acqu ired through a fo rm al appren ticeship
or equivalent train in g and ex p e rie n ce .
F o r c r o s s -in d u s try wage study p u rp o ses, tool and die m ak e rs in tool and die jobbing
shops a re excluded fro m this c la s s ific a tio n .

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND WATCHMAN
G uard. P e rfo rm s routine p o lice duties, eith er at fix ed post o r on to u r, m aintaining o rd e r,
using arm s o r fo rce w here n e c e s s a r y . Includes gatem en who a re stationed at gate and check
on id en tity o f em ployees and other p erson s en terin g.
W a t c h m a n . M a k e s rounds of p r e m i s e s periodically in protecting property against fire,
theft, and illegal entry.

JANITOR, PO R T E R , OR CLE A N E R

SHIPPING AND RE CEIV IN G C L E R K
P re p a r e s m erch an d ise fo r shipm ent, o r re c e iv e s and is re sp o n sib le fo r incom ing ship­
m ents of m erch a n d ise or other m a te ria ls . Shipping w ork in v o lv e s : A knowledge of shipping p ro ­
ce d u re s, p r a c tic e s , ro u tes, av a ilab le m eans of tran sp o rtation , and ra te s; and p reparin g re c o rd s
of the goods shipped, m aking up b ills of lading, posting weight and shipping ch a rg e s, and keeping
a file of shipping re c o r d s . M ay d ire c t or a s s is t in p reparin g the m erch an dise for shipm ent.
R eceivin g work in v o lv e s : V erify in g o r d irectin g others in v e rify in g the c o rr e c tn e s s of shipm ents
again st b ills of lading, in v o ic e s, or other re c o rd s; checkin g for sh ortag es and rejectin g dam ­
aged goods; routing m erch an d ise or m a te ria ls to p rop er departm ents; and m aintaining n e c e s s a ry
re c o rd s and f ile s .

C lean s and keeps in an o rd e rly condition fa c to ry w orking a re a s and w ash roo m s, or
p re m ise s of an o ffic e , apartm ent house, o r co m m ercia l o r other establish m en t. D uties involve
a com bination of the fo llo w in g; Sweeping, m opping or scrubbin g, and polishing flo o rs ; rem oving
ch ip s, tra s h , and other refu se; dusting equipm ent, fu rn itu re, o r fix tu res; polishing m e ta l f ix ­
tu res or trim m in gs; providing supplies and m in or m aintenance s e rv ic e s ; and clean in g la v a to rie s ,
sh ow ers, and re s tro o m s . W orkers who s p e c ia liz e in window w ashing are exclu d ed .

F o r wage study p u rp o se s, w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:
R eceivin g c le r k
Shipping c le r k
Shipping and re c e iv in g c le r k
TRU CKDRIVER

LA B O R E R , M A TE R IA L HANDLING
A w o rk er em ployed in a w areh o use, m anufacturing plant, sto re , o r other establish m en t
whose duties in volve one o r m o re of the fo llo w in g: Loading and unloading v ario u s m a te ria ls and
m erch an dise on or from freig h t c a r s , tr u c k s , or other tran spo rtin g d evices; unpacking, shelvin g,
o r placing m a te ria ls or m erch a n d ise in p rop er sto rage location; and tran sp o rtin g m a te ria ls or
m erch an dise by handtruck, c a r , or w h eelbarrow . Longshorem en, who load and unload ships are
exclud ed .
ORDER F IL L E R
F ills shipping or tr a n s fe r o rd e rs for finished goods fro m stored m erch an d ise in a c c o rd ­
ance with sp ecificatio n s on s a le s s lip s , c u sto m e rs' o r d e r s , o r other in stru ctio n s. May, in addition
to fillin g o rd ers and indicating item s fille d or om itted, keep re c o rd s of outgoing o rd e rs , re q u i­
sition additional stock or rep o rt sh ort supplies to s u p e rv is o r, and p erform other re late d duties.

D riv e s a tru ck within a c ity o r in d u strial a re a to tra n sp o rt m a te ria ls , m erch an d ise ,
equipm ent, or m en between v ario u s typ es of e stablish m en ts such as: M anufacturing plants, freigh t
depots, w a reh o u ses, w h o lesale and re ta il esta b lish m en ts, or between r e ta il establish m en ts and
cu sto m e rs ' houses o r p laces of b u sin ess. M ay also load or unload tru ck with or without h e lp e rs,
m ake m in or m ech an ical r e p a ir s , and keep tru ck in good w orking o rd e r. D riv e r-s a le sm e n and
o v e r-th e -r o a d d riv e rs are exclu d ed .
fo llo w s:

F o r wage study p u rp o ses, tr u c k d riv e rs are c la s s ifie d by s iz e and type of equipm ent, as
( T r a c t o r - tr a ile r should be rated on the basis o f tr a ile r cap acity.)
T ru c k d riv e r
T ru c k d riv e r,
T ru c k d riv e r,
T ru c k d riv e r,
T ru c k d riv e r,

(com bination o f s iz e s lis te d sep a ra tely)
light (under IV 2 tons)
m edium (IV 2 to and including 4 tons)
h eavy (over 4 tons, t r a ile r type)
h eavy (over 4 tons, other than tr a ile r type)

P A C K E R , SHIPPING
T R U C K E R , POWER
P re p a r e s fin ish ed p roducts fo r shipm ent o r sto ra ge by placing them in shipping con­
ta in e rs , the sp e c ific operation s p erform ed being dependent upon the type, s iz e , and num ber
of units to be packed, the type of container em ployed, and m ethod of shipm ent. Work req u ires
the p lacin g of item s in shipping con tain ers and m ay involve one or m ore of the fo llo w in g:
Knowledge of v ario u s item s of stock in o rd er to v e r ify content; selectio n of appropriate type
and s iz e o f container; in sertin g e n clo su res in container; usin g e x c e ls io r o r other m a te ria l to
p reven t breakage or dam age; clo sin g and sealin g container; and applying la b e ls o r entering
identifying data on co n tain er. P a ck e rs who also m ake wooden boxes or c r a te s are excluded.




O p erates a m an ually co n trolled gasoline- or e le c tric-p o w e re d tr u ck or tr a c to r to tran sp o rt
goods and m a te ria ls of a ll kinds about a w areh ouse, m anufacturing plant, o r other establish m en t.
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d by type o f tru ck , as follow s:
T ru c k e r, pow er (forklift)
T ru c k e r, pow er (other than fo rk lift)

Available On RequestT he fo llo w in g a r e a s a r e s u rv e y e d p e r io d ic a lly fo r u se in a d m in is te rin g the S e r v ic e C o n trac t A c t of 1965.
w i ll be a v a ila b le at no cost w h ile su p p lies la s t fr o m any o f the B L S r e g io n a l o ffic e s shown on the b a c k c o v e r .
A la m o g o r d o —L a s C r u c e s , N . M e x .
A la s k a
A lb a n y , G a .
A m a r i llo , T e x .
A tlan tic C ity , N .J .
A u g u sta , G a ,— C,
S.
B a k e r s fie ld , C a lif.
Baton R o u ge , L a .
B ilo x i, G u lfp o rt, and P a s c a g o u la , M is s .
B r id g e p o r t , N o r w a lk , and S ta m fo rd , Conn.
C e d a r R a p id s , Iow a
C h am paign—U r b a n a , 111.
C h a rle s to n , S .C .
C la r k s v i lle , T en n ., and H o p k in s v ille , Ky.
C o lo ra d o S p r in g s , C o lo .
C o lu m b ia , S .C .
C o lu m b u s, G a —A la .
C o rp u s C h r is t i, T e x .
C r a n e , Ind.
Dothan, A la .
Duluth— u p e r i o r , M in n .—W is .
S
E l P aso, Tex.
E ugen e—S p r in g fie ld , O r e g .
F a r g o — o o rh e a d , N . D ak .—M inn .
M
F a y e tte v ille , N. C.
F itc h b u rg —L e o m i n s t e r , M a s s .
F r e d e r ic k — a g e r s t o w n , M d — P a .—W . V a .
H
F r e s n o , C a lif.
G ran d F o r k s , N . D ak.
G ran d Islan d —H a s t in g s , N e b r .
G r e e n b o r o —W inston S a le m — ig h P oin t, N .C .
H
H a r r is b u r g , P a .
K n o x v ille , T en n.
R e p o rts fo r the fo llo w in g

su rv e y s

r e le a s e s

are

or

L a re d o , Tex.
L as V ega s, Nev.
L o w e r E a s t e r n S h o re, M d —V'a.
M a c o n , G a.
M a rq u e tte , E s c a n a b a , Sault Ste.
M a r i e , M ic h .
M e lb o u rn e —T it u s v ille —C o c o a , F la .
(B r e v a r d C o .)
M e r id ia n , M i s s .
M id d le s e x , M onm outh, O ce an , and S o m e rs e t
C o s ., N .J .
M o b ile , A la ., and P e n s a c o la , F la .
M o n tg o m e ry , A la .
N a s h v ille , Ten n.
N o r th e a s t e r n M a in e
N o r w ic h —G roton—N e w London, Conn.
O gd en , Utah
O rla n d o , F la .
O xn a rd — im i V a lle y —V e n tu ra , C a lif.
S
P a n a m a C it y , F l a .
P o rts m o u th , N .H .— a in e — a s s .
M
M
P u e b lo , C o lo .
R en o , N e v .
S a c ra m e n to , C a lif.
Santa B a r b a r a —
Santa M a r i a —L o m p o c , C a lif.
S herm an—D e n iso n , T e x .
S h re v e p o rt, L a .
S p rin g fie ld —C h ic op ee— o ly o k e , M a s s — Conn.
H
T o p e k a , K an s.
T ucson , A r iz .
V a lle jo —F a i r f i e ld — a p a , C a lif.
N
W ilm in g to n , D e l —N . J —M d .
Yum a, A riz .

conducted in the p r io r y e a r but sin ce discontinu ed a r e a ls o a v a ila b le :

A lp e n a , S tandish, and T a w a s C ity, M ic h .
A s h e v ille , N .C .
A u s tin , T e x . *
F o r t Sm ith, A r k —O k la.
G re a t F a lls , M ont.
*

C o p ies of pu blic

E xpan ded to an a r e a w ag e

s u rv e y in f i s c a l y e a r

1973.

L e x in g to n , K y .*
P in e B lu ff, A r k .
Stockton, C a lif.
T a c o m a , W a sh .
W ich ita F a l l s , T e x .
See in side b ac k c o v e r .

The tw elfth an nual r e p o r t on s a la r i e s fo r acco u n tan ts, a u d ito rs , ch ie f accou ntan ts, a tto rn e y s, jo b a n a ly s ts , d ir e c t o r s of p e rs o n n e l, b u y e r s , ch e m is ts ,
e n g in e e r s , e n g in e e rin g tec h n ic ia n s, d r a ft s m e n , and c l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s. O r d e r as B L S B u lletin 1764, N a tio n a l S u rv e y of P r o f e s s io n a l, A d m in is t r a t iv e ,
T e c h n ic a l, and C le r ic a l P a y , June 1972, $ 1 .2 5 a copy, fr o m any of the B L S r e g io n a l s a le s o ffic e s shown on the bac k c o v e r , or fr o m the Superintendent
of D o cu m en ts, U .S . G o v ern m en t P rin tin g O ffic e , W ash in gton, D .C ., 20402.




'fr'U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: I »7| —74* - 230/ U
.




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Area W a g e Surveys
A lis t o f the la te st a v a ila b le b u lle tin s is p re s e n te d b e lo w . A d ir e c t o r y o f a r e a w a g e stu dies including m o re lim ite d stu dies conducted at the
re q u e st o f the E m p lo ym en t S tan d ards A d m in is t r a t io n o f the D e p artm en t o f L a b o r is a v a ila b le on re q u e s t. B u lle tin s m ay be p u rc h a s e d fr o m any of the B L S
r e g io n a l s a le s o ffic e s shown on the back c o v e r , o r fr o m the S uperintendent o f D o cu m en ts, U .S . G o v ern m en t P rin t in g O ffic e , W ash in gto n , D .C ., 20402.
A re a
A k r o n , O h io , D e c. 1972------------- — ------ — -------------------------A lb a n y -S c h e n e c t a d y -T r o y , N . Y . , M a r . 1973 .......... .....
A lb u q u e rq u e , N . M e x ., M a r . 1973..... ............................. —
A lle n to w n — eth leh em —E a s to n , P a .—N .J ., M a y 1 9 7 2 * _
B
A tlan ta , G a ., M a y 1973____ L—_____ -------------- ------ ---------------A u s tin , T e x ., D ec. 1972 1---------------------------------------------------B a lt im o r e , M d ., A ug. 19721_ _ _ ______ —— ------------- ---------B eau m o n t— o r t A r t h u r -O r a n g e , T e x ., M a y 1973 *.------P
B in gh am ton , N .Y . , Ju ly 1972________ - ___ - ___ - ----- ------------B ir m in g h a m , A la ., M a r . 1973 1_—. ___ _______ — _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
B o is e C ity , Idaho, N o v . 197.2 1____ — -------------1775-32,
B o sto n , M a s s ., A u g . 19721................ ....................... ...........
B u ffa lo , N .Y . , O ct. 19721____________________________________
B u rlin g to n , V t., D ec. 1972 1——_____ _____________ ____ _____
C anton , O hio, M a y 1973____ --------------------— ------------- ---------C h a rle s to n , W . V a . , M a r . 1973------ -------------- -------------------C h arlo tte , N .C ., Jan. 1973----------------—
C h attanooga, T e n n .-G a ., Sept. 1972 1------ --------------- — —
C h ic a g o , 111., June 1972______________________________________
C in cin n ati, O hio—
Ky.—In d ., F e b . 1973_______ ____ _____ _
C le v e la n d , O hio, Sept. 1972 1------------------ -----_ _ _ _ _ _ -----C o lu m b u s, O hio, O ct. 1972 1.---------------- -------------- _ _ _ _ _
D a lla s , T e x ., O ct. 19721---------------------------------------------------D a v en p o rt—R ock Isla n d — o lin e , Iow a—
M
111., F e b . 1973----D ayton, O h io , D e c. 1972------ ----------------------------------------------D e n v e r, C o lo ., D e c. 1972—
———
D e s M o in e s , Iow a, M a y 1973____ _ ___________________ ____
_
D e tro it, M ic h ., M a r . 1973 *1
---------------------------------------------D u rh a m , N .C ., A p r . 1973___ —------- ---------- -------------- ---------F o r t L a u d e r d a le — o lly w o o d and W e s t P a lm
H
B e a c h , F la ., A p r . 1973____ ________— ---------- --------— —
F o r t W o rth , T e x ., O ct. 1972 1----------- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ------ -----G r e e n B a y , W i s ., J u ly 1972 1— _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ — --------------------G r e e n v ille , S .C ., M a y 1973 * .----------- ---------- --------- — -------H ouston, T e x ., A p r . 1973 -------------—
------ -----— — —
H u n tsv ille . A la ., F e b . 1973-----------------------------------------------In d ia n a p o lis, Ind., O ct. 1972 1------ ----------------------------— _ _
J ack so n , M i s s ., Jan. 1973— ...... .................... ...... ...............
J a c k so n v ille , F la ., D e c. 1972 — ------- ----- ----- ---------- ----- ----K a n sa s C ity, M o .- K a n s ., Sept. 1972-----— —
------ —— L a w r e n c e — a v e r h ill, M a s s .—N .H ., June 1972 1_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
H
Lexin gton , K y ., N o v . 1972 1------------------------------------— — —
L ittle R o c k -N o r th L ittle R ock, A r k ., J u ly 1972 1---------L o s A n g e le s —Lo n g B e a c h and A n a h e im —
Santa A n a —
G a rd e n G r o v e , C a li f., O ct. 1972 * —..................
L o u is v ille , K y.—Ind., N o v . 1972__-----_ _ _ _ _ — _ _ _ _ _ _ _
L u b b o ck , T e x ., M a r . 1973-------------------------------------------------M a n c h e s te r, N .H ., J u ly 1972 1------------------------------ — ------M e m p h is , Term.—A r k . , N o v . 1972------------------------------------M ia m i, F la ., N o v . 1972 1--------------------------------------- _ _ _ _ _ _
M id la n d and O d e s s a , T e x ., Jan. 1973____ _____ _____ _____
l

B u lle tin n u m ber
and p r ic e

B u lle tin nu m ber
and p r ic e

M ilw a u k e e , W i s ., M a y 1973_____ 1775-83, I 40 cents
M in n e a p o lis —St. P a u l, M in n ., Jan. 1973---------------------------- 1775-49, 55 cents
M u s k e g o n -M u s k e g o n H e ig h ts, M ic h ., June 19721 _ _ _ _ _ 1725-85,
35 cents
N e w a r k and J e r s e y C ity , N .J ., Jan. 1973-------- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1775-50,
55 cents
N e w H aven , C o n n ., Jan. 1973--------- —_— - —
1775-46,
40 cents
N e w O r le a n s , L a ., Jan. 1973
— _ _ _ _ _ — 1775-47,
40 cents
-------------------- -------------------------- 1725-90,
50cents
N e w Y o rk , N . Y . , A p r . 1972 1
N o r fo lk — ir g in i a B e a c h — o rts m o u th and
V
P
N e w p o rt N e w s — am pton, V a ., Jan. 1973 1— _ _ _ _ _ _ — 1775-51,
H
50cents
O k la h o m a C ity , O k la ., J u ly 1972 — __ — — _______ _________ 1775-6,
45cents
O m ah a, N e b r .—Io w a, Sept. 1972— ____ — ____ _____________ 1775-16, 40 cents
50
P a t e r s o n — lifto n — a s s a i c , N .J ., June 1972 1 ------------------ 1725-88, 40 cents
C
P
1775-13, 75
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a . - N . J . , N o v . 1972__________________________ 1775-45, 55 cents
1775-18, 65
P h o e n ix , A r i z . , June 1972 1 —___ --------------------------------—____ 1725-94, 55 cents
1775-28, 50
P itt s b u rg h , P a . , Jan. 1973 1 ------------------------------------------------ 1775-67,
75cents
1775-73, 40
P o r t la n d , M a in e , N o v . 1972____ _____________________________ 1775-21, 40 cents
1775-74, 40
P o r t la n d , O r e g .—W a s h ., M a y 1973__________________________ 1775-87, 35 cents
1775-39,
40
P o u g h k e e p s ie —K in g s t o n -N e w b u r g h , N . Y .,
1775-14,
June 1973------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1775-85,
35cents
1725-92, 70
P r o v id e n c e -W a r w ic k -P a w t u c k e t , R .I.—M a s s . ,
1775-53, 50
M a y 1973________________________________________________________ 1775-84, ! 35 cents
1775-15, 75
1775-23,
R a le ig h , N .C . , A u g . 1972----------------------------------------------------- 1775-7,
45cents
R ichm ond, V a ., M a r . 1973----------- — —- ____ ________________ 1775-68, 40 cents
1775-25, 75
R iv e r s id e —San B e r n a r d in o -O n t a r io , C a lif.,
1775-57, 40
D e c. 1972 1 ______________________________________________________ 1775-60,
65cents
1775-34, 40
R o c h e s te r, N .Y . (o ffic e o ccu pations o n ly ), J u ly 1 9 7 2 _ _ 1775-4,
45cents
1775-35, 40
R o c k fo rd , 111., June 1973_____________________________________ 1775-80,
35cents
1775-72, 40
St. L o u is , M o.—111., M a r . 1973 1
1775-69,
75cents
1775-89, 80
S alt L a k e C ity , U tah , N o v. 1972 1___________________________ 1775-33,
50cents
1775-61, 35
San A nton io, T e x ., M a y 1973--------------- —____________________ 1775-78, 35 cents
San D ie g o , C a li f., N o v. 1972____ _ __________________________ 1775-40, 40 cents
_
1775-64, 40 cents 1
San F r a n c is c o — a k la n d , C a lif., M a r . 1973____ __________ 1775-81,
O
40cents
1775-24, 50 cents
San J o s e , C a lif., M a r . 1973____ _____________________________ 1775-66,
40cents
1775-1,
55 cents
Savannah, G a ., M a y 1973______ — ——— —
__________ 1775-77, 40 cents
1775-86, 40 cents
S cran ton , P a . , J u ly 1972_____________________ _________________ 1775-10, 45 cents
1775-71, 50 cents
Seattle— v e r e t t , W a s h ., Jan. 1973------------------------------------- 1775-56, 40 cents
E
1775-48, 40 cents
1775-27,
55cents Siou x F a lls , S. D a k ., D e c. 1972 1____________________________ 1775-43, 40 cents
1775-44, 40 cents
South B en d , Ind., M a r . 1973------ ---------- ------------------------------- 1775-54, 40 cents
Spokane, W a s h ., June 1972 1_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ -----—_______________ 1725-91,
35cents
1775-31, 40 cents
S y r a c u s e , N .Y . , J u ly 1972____________________________________ 1775-11, 45 cents
1775-17, • 50 cents
>
1725-81, 35 cents
T am p a^S t. P e t e r s b u r g , F l a ., A u g . 1972__________ _________ 1775-9,
45cents
T o le d o , O h io — ic h ., A p r . 1973___ _________________________ 1775-63, 40 cents
M
1775-22, 50 cents
55cents
T re n to n , N .J ., Sept. 1972 1____________________________________ 1775-12,
1775-2,
55 cents
U t ic * -R o m e , N . Y . , J u ly 1972---------------------------------------------- 1775-3,
45cents
W a sh in gto n , D . C . - M d . - V a . , M a r . 1973.____________________ ; 1775-75, ! 50 cents
1775-38,
75 cents
1775-37, 40 cents
W a t e r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r . 1973---------------------------------------------- 1775-58, 40 cents
1775-55, 40 cents
W a te r lo o , Io w a, N o v. 1972-------------------------------------------------- 1775-26, 40 cents
1775-8,
55 cents
40cents
W ic h ita , K a n s ., A p r . 1973-------------------------------------------------- 1775-70,
1775-30, 40 cents
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s ., M a y 1973________ _ _____________________ 1775-76, 40 cents
_
1775-29, 55 cents
Y o r k , P a . , F e b. 1973__________________________________________ 1775-59 |40 cents
1775-41, 35 cents
Y o u n g s to w rr-W a rre n , O hio, N o v . 1972_____________________ 1775-19, 40 cents
1775-36,
1775-62,
1775-52,
1725-87,
1775-79,
1775-42,
1775-20,
1775-82,
1775-5,
1775-65,

40
55
40
35
40
40
75
40
45

Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




A re a

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
55cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
55cents
cents
cents
cents
55cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

P O S T A G E A N D F E E S P A ID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20212

L A B -4 4 1

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE $300

THIRD CLASS MAIL

BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S REGIONAL OFFICES
Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

Region II
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Region III
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)
Delaware
District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin

Region VI
1100 Commerce St. Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Arkansas
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas

Regions VII and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
VII
V III
Iowa
Colorado
Kansas
Montana
Missouri
North Dakota
Nebraska
South Dakota
Utah
Wyoming




Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee
Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)
IX
X
Alaska
Arizona
Idaho
California
Oregon
Hawaii
Washington
Nevada


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102