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AREA W A G E SURVEY
A tlan ta, Georgia, M etropolitan Area,
M ay 1973
Bulletin 1775-79




U S DE PARTMENT OF LABOR
R 1 1 rpa 11 of Labor Statistics




Preface
T h i s b u lle tin p r o v i d e s r e s u lt s o f a M a y 1973 s u r v e y o f oc c u p atio n al
e a r n in g s in the A tl a n ta , G e o r g i a , Standard M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a ( C l a y t o n ,
C ob b , D e K alb , F u lto n , and G w in nett C o u n tie s ).
T h e s u r v e y was m ad e as p a r t
o f the B u re au o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s ' annual a r e a wage s u r v e y p r o g r a m .
The
p r o g r a m is d e s i g n e d to y i e l d data f o r in d iv id u a l m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s , as w e l l as
national and r e g i o n a l e s t i m a t e s f o r a l l Standard M e t r o p o l i t a n A r e a s in the Unite d
S t a te s , e xc lu d in g A l a s k a and H a w a i i , (as d e fin e d by the U.S. O f f i c e o f M a n a g e m e n t
and B udget th rough N o v e m b e r 1971).
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in the a r e a wage s u r v e y p r o g r a m is the need to
d e s c r i b e the l e v e l and m o v e m e n t o f wag e s in a v a r i e t y o f l a b o r m a r k e t s , thro ugh
the a n a ly s is o f ( l ) the l e v e l and d i s trib u t io n o f w a g e s by o c c u p a tio n , and ( 2 ) the
m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s by o c c u p a tio n a l c a t e g o r y and s k i l l l e v e l . T h e p r o g r a m d e ­
v e l o p s i n f o r m a t i o n that m a y be used f o r m a n y p u r p o s e s , includin g wage and
s a l a r y a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , c o l l e c t i v e b a r g a i n i n g , and a s s i s t a n c e in d e t e r m i n i n g plant
lo c a t io n .
S u r v e y r e s u lt s a l s o a r e used b y the U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r to
m a k e w ag e d e t e r m i n a t i o n s un der the S e r v i c e C o n t r a c t A c t o f 1965.
C u r r e n t l y , 96 a r e a s a r e included in the p r o g r a m .
(See l i s t o f a r e a s
on in s id e b ac k c o v e r . )
In e ach a r e a , oc c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s data a r e c o l l e c t e d
an nually. In f o r m a t i o n on e s ta b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n ta r y wage b e n e ­
f i t s , c o l l e c t e d e v e r y s eco nd y e a r in the p a s t, is now ob ta ined e v e r y th ird y e a r .
E a c h y e a r a f t e r a l l in d iv id u al a r e a w age s u r v e y s have been c o m p l e t e d ,
tw o s u m m a r y b u lle tin s a r e is s u e d .
T h e f i r s t b r i n g s t o g e t h e r data f o r each
m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s u r v e y e d . T h e s eco nd s u m m a r y b u lle tin p r e s e n t s national and
r e g i o n a l e s t i m a t e s , p r o j e c t e d f r o m ind iv id u al m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a data.
T h e A tla n ta s u r v e y was conducted by the B u r e a u 's r e g i o n a l o f f i c e in
A t l a n t a , G a. , un der the g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f D on ald M . C r u s e , A s s i s t a n t R e g i o n a l
D i r e c t o r f o r O p e r a t i o n s . T h e s u r v e y could not ha ve b een a c c o m p l i s h e d without
the c o o p e r a t i o n o f the m a n y f i r m s wh ose w ag e and s a l a r y data p r o v i d e d the b as is
f o r the s t a t i s t i c a l i n f o r m a t i o n in this b ulletin.
T h e B u re a u w is h e s to e x p r e s s
s i n c e r e a p p r e c i a t i o n f o r the c o o p e r a t i o n r e c e i v e d .

Note:
C u r r e n t r e p o r t s on oc c u p atio n al e a r n in g s and s u p p le m e n ta r y w ag e p r o ­
v i s i o n s in the A tla n ta a r e a a r e a v a i l a b l e f o r c o n tr a c t cle an in g (July 1971),
h o s p it a ls (A u g u s t 1972), and l i f e i n s u r a n ce (J an uary 1972).
A ls o available a re
l i s t i n g s o f union w ag e ra te s f o r building t r a d e s , p rin tin g t r a d e s , l o c a l - t r a n s i t
o p e r a t i n g e m p l o y e e s , l o c a l t r u c k d r i v e r s and h e l p e r s , and g r o c e r y s t o r e e m ­
p l o y e e s . F r e e c o p i e s o f t h e s e a r e a v a i l a b l e f r o m the B u r e a u 's r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s .
(S ee b ac k c o v e r f o r a d d r e s s e s . )

AREA W A G E S U R VE Y

B ulletin 1775-79

v

A ugust 1973

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF LABOR, Peter J Brennan, Secretary
.
BUR EA U OF LABOR STATISTIC S, Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

A tlan ta, Georgia, M etropolitan Area, M ay 1973
CONTENTS
P age

<

2 Int rodu ct ion
5 W a g e t r en d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s

T ables:
4
6
7

22

24
26

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s and w o r k e r s within s c o p e of s u r v e y and n u m b e r s tu died
In d exes of e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p s , an d p e r c e n t s o f i n c r e a s e f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s
P e r c e n t s of i n c r e a s e in a v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p s , a d ju s t e d f o r e m p l o y m e n t shifts

A.
8
12
14
16
17
19
20
21

1.
2.
3.

Occupational e a rn in g s:
A -l.
O f f i c e o c c u p a t io n s : W e e k l y e a r n i n g s
A -la .
O f f i c e o c c u p a t io n s —l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s : W e e k l y e a r n i n g s
A - 2.
P r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t io n s : W e e k l y e a r n i n g s
A -2 a .
P r o f e s s i o n a l a n d 't e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t io n s —l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s : W e e k l y e a r n i n g s
A - 3.
O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t io n s : A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s , b y s e x
A -3 a .
O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , an d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t io n s —l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s : A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s , b y s e x
A -4 .
M a i n t e n a n c e ,a n d p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t io n s : H o u r l y e a r n i n g s
A -4 a .
M a in t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t io n s —l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s : H o u r l y e a r n i n g s
A - 5.
C u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t io n s : H o u r l y e a r n i n g s
A -5 a .
C u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t io n s —l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s : H o u r l y e a r n i n g s

A ppendix.

Occupational d e sc riptio n s




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 — Price 40 cents

1

In tro d u ctio n
(3) m ain te n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t ; and (4) c u s to d ia l and m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m en t.
O c c u p a tio n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n is b ased on a u n i fo r m set o f job
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d to take account of i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in duties w ith in the s am e job . T h e oc c up atio ns s e l e c t e d f o r study a r e
l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d in the appendix. U n le s s o t h e r w i s e i n d ic a te d , the
e a r n in g s data f o l l o w i n g the jo b t i t l e s a r e f o r a l l i n d u s t r i e s c om b in e d .
E a r n i n g s data f o r s o m e o f the oc c up atio ns l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d , o r
f o r s o m e in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n s w ith in o c c u p a tio n s , a r e not p r e s e n t e d in
the A - s e r i e s ta b l e s , b e c a u s e e i t h e r (1) e m p l o y m e n t in the oc c up atio n
is to o s m a l l to p r o v i d e enough data to m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e
is p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f in d iv id u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t data. E a r n i n g s
data not shown s e p a r a t e l y f o r i n d u s tr y d i v i s i o n s a r e includ ed in all
i n d u s tr ie s c o m b i n e d data, w h e r e shown.
L i k e w i s e , data a r e included
in the o v e r a l l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n when a s u b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n o f s e c r e t a r i e s
o r t r u c k d r i v e r s is not shown o r i n f o r m a t i o n to s u b c l a s s i f y is not
available.

T h i s a r e a is 1 o f 96 in w h ic h the U.S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s
B u re a u o f L a b o r S t a tis tic s conducts s u r v e y s o f oc c u p atio n al e a r n in g s
on an a r e a w i d e b a s is an n u a lly .1 F i e l d r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s , in p e r s o n a l
v i s i t s to e s ta b l i s h m e n ts in the a r e a , c o l l e c t e m p l o y m e n t , e a r n i n g s ,
e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s , and r e l a t e d b e n e f i t s i n f o r m a t i o n e v e r y th ird
year.
In eac h o f the i n t e r v e n i n g y e a r s , i n f o r m a t i o n on e m p l o y m e n t
and e a r n in g s is c o l l e c t e d b y m a i l q u e s t i o n n a i r e s f r o m e s t a b lis h m e n ts
p a r t i c i p a t i n g in the p r e v i o u s s u r v e y . T h i s b u lle tin p r e s e n t s the r e s u l t s
o f the l a t t e r type s u r v e y .
In each a r e a , data a r e ob ta in ed f r o m r e p r e s e n t a t i v e e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t s w ith in s ix b r o a d in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n s : M an u fa c t u rin g ; t r a n s ­
p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and ot h e r pub li c u t i l i t i e s ; w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ;
r e t a i l t r a d e ; fin a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v i c e s . M a j o r
i n d u s tr y g ro u p s e x c lu d e d f r o m th es e stu die s a r e g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a ­
tions and the c o n s t r u c ti o n and e x t r a c t i v e in d u s tr ie s . E s t a b l i s h m e n t s
ha vin g f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e o m i t t e d b e c a u s e
th ey tend to f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the occup ations studied
to w a r r a n t in c lu s io n .
S e p a r a t e ta bula tions a r e p r o v i d e d f o r each of
the b r o a d in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n s w h ic h m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .

O c c u p a tio n a l e m p l o y m e n t and e a r n i n g s data a r e shown f o r
f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s , i . e . , th os e h i r e d to w o r k a r e g u l a r w e e k l y schedule.
E a r n i n g s data e x c lu d e p r e m i u m p ay f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on
w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and late shifts . N o n p r o d u c tio n bon u s es a r e e x ­
cluded, but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a l l o w a n c e s and i n c e n t i v e e a r n in g s a r e i n ­
c l u d e d . 2 W h e r e w e e k l y ho u rs a r e r e p o r t e d , as f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u ­
p atio n s , r e f e r e n c e is to the s ta n dard w o r k w e e k (r ou n d e d to the n e a r e s t
h a l f ho ur) f o r w h ic h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e o f p a y f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r an d/or p r e m i u m
rates).
A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s f o r th es e o c c u p a tio n s a r e rounded
to the n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e condu cted on a s a m p l e b a s i s . T h e s a m ­
p lin g p r o c e d u r e s i n v o l v e d e t a i l e d s t r a t i f i c a t i o n o f a l l e s ta b l i s h m e n ts
w it h in the s c o p e o f an i n d iv id u a l a r e a s u r v e y b y in d u s tr y and n u m b e r
of e m p l o y e e s .
F r o m this s t r a t i f i e d u n i v e r s e a p r o b a b i l i t y s a m p le is
s e l e c t e d , w ith eac h e s t a b l i s h m e n t havin g a p r e d e t e r m i n e d chance o f
s e l e c t i o n . T o ob ta in o p tim u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t, a g r e a t e r
p r o p o r t i o n o f l a r g e than s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s e l e c t e d . Wh en data
a r e c o m b in e d , each e s t a b l i s h m e n t is w e i g h t e d a c c o r d i n g to its p r o b a ­
b i l i t y o f s e l e c t i o n , so that un bia sed e s t i m a t e s a r e g e n e r a t e d . F o r e x ­
a m p l e , i f one out o f f o u r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s e l e c t e d , it is g i v e n a
w e i g h t o f f o u r to r e p r e s e n t i t s e l f plus t h r e e o t h e r s . A n a l te r n a t e o f the
s a m e o r i g i n a l p r o b a b i l i t y is c h o se n in the s a m e i n d u s t r y - s i z e c l a s s i f i ­
catio n i f data a r e not a v a i l a b l e f o r the o r i g i n a l s a m p le m e m b e r .
If
no suitable substitute is a v a i l a b l e , ad d ition a l w e i g h t is a s s i g n e d to a
s a m p le m e m b e r that is s i m i l a r to the m i s s i n g unit.

T h e s e s u r v e y s m e a s u r e the l e v e l o f o c c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s in
an a r e a at a p a r t i c u l a r t i m e . C o m p a r i s o n s o f in d iv id u a l oc c u p atio n al
a v e r a g e s o v e r t i m e m a y not r e f l e c t e x p e c t e d w a g e chan ges.
The a v e r ­
ag es f o r in d iv id u a l jo b s a r e a f f e c t e d b y c han ges in w a g e s and e m p l o y ­
m en t p a tte r n s .
F o r e x a m p l e , p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d by
h i g h - o r l o w - w a g e f i r m s m a y change o r h i g h - w a g e w o r k e r s m a y a d ­
v a n c e to b e t t e r jo b s and be r e p l a c e d b y new w o r k e r s at l o w e r r a te s .
Such sh ifts in e m p l o y m e n t cou ld d e c r e a s e an o c c u p a tio n a l a v e r a g e
e v e n though m o s t e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in an a r e a i n c r e a s e w a g e s during
the y e a r . T r e n d s in e a r n i n g s o f o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p s , shown in tab le 2,
a r e b e t t e r i n d i c a t o r s o f w a g e t r e n d s than i n d iv id u a l jo b s within the
g ro u p s.

Occupations and E a r n in g s
T h e oc c u p atio n s s e l e c t e d f o r study a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y
o f m an u fa c tu rin g and no nm anu fa cturin g i n d u s t r i e s , and a r e o f the
f o l l o w i n g ty p e s :
(1) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l and te c h n i c a l ;

A v e r a g e earnings r e fle c t c o m p o site, a r e a w id e estim a tes. In­
d u s t r i e s and e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in pay l e v e l and j o b s ta ffin g , and
thus c on trib u te d i f f e r e n t l y to the e s t i m a t e s f o r each job. P a y a v e r ­
1
Included in the 96 areas are 10 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract.
These areas
a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t a c c u r a t e l y the w a g e d i f f e r e n t i a l am ong jo b s in
are Austin. T e x .; Binghamton, N. Y . (New York portion only); Durham, N. C . ; Fort Lauderdale—
i n d iv id u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
Hollywood and West Palm Beach, F la.; Huntsville, A la .; Lexington, K y .; Poughkeepsie—Kingston—
2
Special payments provided for work in designated parts of the area by companies not consid­
ering such payments a part of the regular salary or hourly rate were not included because of reporting
problems. Such instances are few and do not have a large im pact on the published data.

Newburgh, N .Y . ; Rochester, N. Y. (office occupations only); Syracuse, N .Y . ; and U tica—Rome, N .Y .
Ir. addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies in approximately 70 areas at the request
of the Employment Standards Administration of the U .S. Department of Labor.




2

3
A v e r a g e pay l e v e l s f o r m e n and w o m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ­
tions should not be a s s u m ed to r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y o f the s e x e s
with in in dividual e s ta b lis h m e n ts .
F a c t o r s w h ich m a y c on trib u te to
d i f f e r e n c e s in clude p r o g r e s s i o n w it h in e s t a b l i s h e d r a te r a n g e s , sin c e
only the rate s paid in cum bents a r e c o l l e c t e d , and p e r f o r m a n c e o f s p e ­
c i f i c duties with in the g e n e r a l s u r v e y j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s . Job d e s c r i p ­
tions used to c l a s s i f y e m p l o y e e s in th e s e s u r v e y s u s u a lly a r e m o r e
g e n e r a l i z e d than those used in in d iv id u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and a l l o w f o r
m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s amon g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in s p e c i f i c duties p e r f o r m e d .
O c c u p ation al e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the to ta l in a ll
e s ta b lis h m e n ts with in the sc op e o f the study and not the nu m b er actu­
a l l y s u r v e y e d . B e c a u s e o c c u p a tio n a l s t r u c t u r e s am ong e s t a b lis h m e n ts
d i f f e r , e s t i m a t e s o f oc c u p a tio n a l e m p l o y m e n t ob ta ined f r o m the s a m p l e




o f e s ta b l i s h m e n ts studied s e r v e only to in d ic a te the r e l a t i v e i m p o r ­
tance o f the jo b s studied. T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in oc c u p atio n al s t r u c tu r e
do not a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y the a c c u r a c y of the e a r n i n g s data.
E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s and S u p p le m e n ta r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s
T a b u la tio n s on s e l e c t e d e s ta b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le ­
m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s ( B - s e r i e s ta b l e s ) a r e not p r e s e n t e d in this
b ulletin.
In f o r m a t i o n f o r th es e tab ula tion s, c o l l e c t e d e v e r y 2 y e a r s
in the p ast, is now c o l l e c t e d e v e r y 3 y e a r s .
T h e s e tabulation s on
m i n i m u m e n tr a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r i n e x p e r i e n c e d w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s ,
shift d i f f e r e n t i a l s ; scheduled w o r k w e e k ; paid h o lid a y s ; paid v a c a ti o n s ;
and health, in s u r a n c e , and p ension plans a r e p r e s e n t e d (in the B - s e r i e s
ta b l e s ) in p r e v i o u s b u lle tin s f o r this a r e a .




T a b le 1. E s ta b lis h m e n ts an d w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u rv e y an d n u m b e r s tu d ie d in A tla n ta , G a .,1
by m a jo r in d u s try d iv is io n , M a y 1 9 7 3
N u m ber

M in im u m

of estab lish m en ts

W ork ers

em p loym en t
In d u stry

W ith in

in e s t a b l i s h -

d ivision

m en ts

in

W ith in

scope

scope

estab lish m en ts

of stu d y4
S tu d ied

S tu d ied

of stu dy3

o f study

A ll

scope

in

N u m ber

P ercen t

e sta b lish m e n ts

A l l d i v i s i o n s --------------------------------------------------------------

_

M a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------------------------------------------------

50

353

75

9 6,21 5

31

5 4 ,5 7 8

-

953

196

2 1 8 ,8 9 0

69

1 2 5 ,6 5 3
44,11 0

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------------------------------------- T ra n s p o rta tio n ,

c o m m u n ic a tio n ,

1 ,3 06

271

3 15 ,1 0 5

100

1 8 0 ,£ 3 1

and
50

110

31

56,21 8

18

t r a d e ------------------------------------- ----------------------

50

258

40

32,231

10

9 , 356

R e t a i l t r a d e -------------------------------------------------------------------

50

247

42

41,02 8

50

149

33

6 7,84 9
29,96 5

22

F in a n c e,

16,566

50

189

50

3 2,62 7

9
10

-

92

73

1 6 0 ,3 5 7

100

1 46 ,1 1 3

500
-

34

50, 646

32

58

25
48

1 0 9 ,7 1 1

68

4 5,449
1 0 0 ,6 6 4

u t i l i t i e s 5 -------------------------------------------

500

17

14

4 3 , 373

27

4 0 , 892

t r a d e ------------------ ----------------------------------------

500

6

5

4 , 10 5

2

3, 561

R e t a i l t r a d e -------------------------------------------------------------------

500

21

15

4 3,288

27

3 7,266

F in a n c e,

e s t a t e 6 -------------

500

9

12,165

8

12,165

S e r v i c e s 7 ---------------------------------------- i ---------------------------- -

500

9
5

5

6, 780

4

6 ,7 8 0

oth er

p u b lic

W h olesa le

u t i l i t i e s 5 - ---------------------------------------- -

in su ran ce,

and

real

e s t a t e 6 - --------—

S e r v i c e s 7 ---------------;---------- ----------------- ------------------- ------Large

A l l d i v i s i o n s -------------------------------------------------------------M a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------------------------------------------------N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------------------------------------------- T ra n s p o rta tio n ,
oth er

p u b lic

W h olesa le

1

a

A tlan ta

b asis

of

use

scope

2

The

3

In clu d es

in d u strie s

of
of

1967

as

tra n sit

7

H o tels

n on p rofit

of

to

and

to

e m p lo y m en t
d ata

A rea ,

as

The
lab or

in dexes

com p ile d

S tandard

au to

for

d efin ed

by

th e

O ffic e

of

M anagem ent

"p u b lic
is

and

Budget

th ro u gh

"w ork ers
w ith in s c o p e o f
s tu d y" e stim a tes
s h o w n in
f o r c e i n c l u d e d in th e s u r v e y .
T h e e s tim a te s a r e not

th e

con s id e ra b ly

In d u s tria l

w ith

total

re p a ir

area
in

to

m easure

advance

and

u tilitie s"

m u n ic ip a lly
in

la u n d ries

orga n iza tion s

in
A -

and

and

oth er

th e
and

and

and

is

B -s e rie s

oth er

(exclu d in g

at

or

m otion

w orkers

A -

operated

th e

C la ss ific a tio n

e m p lo ym en t

s erv ic e,

p ro fe ss io n a l,

"fin a n c e"

m o te ls ;

m e m b ers h ip

S ta tistical

G w in n e tt C o u n ties.
c o m p o s itio n o f the

of

em p lo ym en t

th e

p a y ro ll

tren d s

p erio d

or

levels

stu d ied ,

and

sin ce

(2 )

N ovem b er

1971,

con s ists

of

th is ta b le p r o v id e a r e a s o n a b ly
in ten ded, h o w e v e r ,
to s e r v e as
( l )

sm a ll

p la n n in g

of

wage

e sta b lish m e n ts

surveys

are

exclu d ed

!

the

fin a n ce,

system

A b b rev ia ted

oth er

e sta b lish m e n ts

e x e c u tiv e ,

6

and
and

survey.

ed ition
all

A b b reviated

A t la n ta 's

w ith

and

M e tro p o lita n

F u lto n ,
the s iz e

e sta b lish m e n t

th e

trad e,

4 In clu d es

real

Standard

c om p a riso n

the

th e

5

and

Cobb, D eK a lb ,
d es crip tion o f

re q u ires
from

c o m m u n ic a tio n ,

in s u ra n c e ,

The

C la yto n ,
accu ra te

1 4,59 3

e sta b lish m e n ts

B -s eries

was

th e
fro m

ta b les.

exclu d ed

by

th e

p loy ed
sp ecific

in

of

the

m a n u fa ctu rin g

in d u strie s

as

a

Food

b u sin ess

c h a rita b le

w orkers

w ith in

firm s .

The

T ex tile
T h is
m a te ria ls
d iffer

of

scope

a ll

e sta b lish m e n ts
A ll

as
and

s erv ic es
scope

of

1

ou tlets

o ffic e

in d u stry
the

a u to m o b ile

and

to

re p a ir,

en g in eerin g

the

survey

presents

in

the

the
m a jo r

S p e c ific
A irc ra ft

w a ter

and

ren ta l,

and

p ark in g ;
s ervices.

A tlan ta

area

in du stry

w ere

e m ­

grou ps

and

in d u strie s

and

e q u i p m e n t -----------------------------------------1 3

p r o d u c t s ------------

7
6
5

is
to

c om p a n ie s

a rch ite c tu ra l

6

p rio r

of

tra n sp o rta tio n

a n d p a r t s ____________________ 2 0

M o to r veh icles

p r o d u c t s ----------- 14

-----------------

in fo rm a tio n

d ivis io n .
in

such

w ere

e xclu d ed .

study.

in m a n u fa c t u r in g
of

groups

and p u b lish in g

p rop ortion s

area)

ca teg o ries.

in cid e n ta l
the

by

(w ith in

e sta b lish m en t.

m a n u fa ctu rin g :

m i l l p r o d u c t s ---------------------

com p ile d

fro m

p lan t

s ervices;

o th er tex tile

and a llie d

P rin tin g

and
the

orga n iza tion s);

follow in g

p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------------P ap er

sep ara te
from

e q u i p m e n t ------------ 3 4

and k in d red

A p p a r e l and

c la s sify in g

lim ita tio n .
c on s id e re d

T a x ica b s

d efin itio n

s ervices;

and

percent

In d u stry
T ra n s p o rta tio n

in

are

ta b les.

In d u s tria l c o m p o s itio n
O n e-th ird

used

m in im u m

th eaters

e xclu d ed

personal

re ligio u s

M anual
above

p ictu re

based
actu al

based

on

on

e stim a tes

survey.
th e

of

total

P ro p o rtion s

re su lts

of

the

em p lo ym en t d eriv e d
in

v a rio u s

survey

as

in d u stry

shown

in

from

u n iverse

d ivis io n s
ta b le

1

m ay

above.

m o tio n

p ictu re s;

W a g e T re n d s fo r S e le c te d O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s
P r e s e n t e d in ta b le 2 a r e in d e x e s and p e r c e n t s o f chan ge in
a v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s tr ia l
n u r s e s , and in a v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n in g s o f s e l e c t e d p l a n t w o r k e r g ro u p s.
T h e in d e x e s a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g i v e n t i m e , e x p r e s s e d as a
p e r c e n t o f w a g e s durin g the b a s e p e r i o d .
Su btractin g 100 f r o m the
in d e x y i e l d s the p e r c e n t chan ge in w a g e s f r o m the b as e p e r i o d to the
date o f the index. T h e p e r c e n t s o f change o r i n c r e a s e r e l a t e to w a g e
c han ges b e t w e e n the in d ic a te d date s. Annual r a t e s of i n c r e a s e , w h e r e
shown, r e f l e c t the amount o f i n c r e a s e f o r 12 months wh en the t i m e
p e r i o d b e t w e e n s u r v e y s w a s o t h e r than 12 mon ths.
T h ese com pu­
ta tio ns a r e b a s e d on the a s s u m p tion that w a g e s i n c r e a s e d at a constant
r a te b e tw e e n s u r v e y s .
T h e s e e s t i m a t e s a r e m e a s u r e s o f chan ge in
a v e r a g e s f o r the a r e a ; th ey a r e not intended to m e a s u r e a v e r a g e p a y
chan ges in the e s ta b l i s h m e n ts in the are a.

T h e in d e x is a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g i v e n t i m e and is e x ­
p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t o f w a g e s in the b as e y e a r .
T h e b a s e y e a r is
a s s i g n e d the v a lu e o f 100 p e r c e n t. T h e in d e x is c om p u te d by m u l t i ­
p ly in g the b a s e y e a r r e l a t i v e (100 p e r c e n t ) b y the r e l a t i v e (the p e r c e n t
chan ge plus 100 p e r c e n t ) f o r the next s u c c e e d in g y e a r and then c o n ­
tinuing to m u l t i p l y (com pou nd) each y e a r ' s r e l a t i v e b y the p r e v i o u s
y e a r ' s index.
F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , the w a g e
tr e n d s r e l a t e to r e g u l a r w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r the n o r m a l w o r k w e e k ,
exc lu s iv e o f earnings fo r o v e r tim e .
F o r p l a n t w o r k e r g ro u p s, th ey
m e a s u r e changes in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e xclud ing
p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
la te shifts .
T h e p e r c e n t s a r e b a s e d on data f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u ­
pations and in clud e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t job s w ith in
each gro up.

M e th o d o f C om pu ting
E a c h o f the f o l l o w i n g k e y occup ations w it h in an oc c u p a tio n a l
g ro u p is a s s i g n e d a con stant w e i g h t b as e d on its p r o p o r t i o n a t e e m ­
p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a tio n a l group :
Office clerical (men and
women):
Bookkeeping-machine

operators, class B
Clerics, accounting, classes
A and B

Clerks, file, classes
A , B, and C
Clerics, order
Clerics, payroll
Keypunch operators, classes
A and B
Messengers (office boys or
girls)

Office clerical (men and
women)— Continued
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers,

senior

S w itch b oa rd operators,

classes

A and B

Tabulating-m achine operators,
class B
Typists, classes A and B
Industrial nurses (men and
women):
Nurses, industrial (registered)

L i m i t a t i o n s o f Data
T h e in d e x e s and p e r c e n t s o f c han ge, as m e a s u r e s o f chan ge
in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e in flu e n c e d b y:
(1) G e n e r a l s a l a r y and w a g e
c h a n ge s , (2) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p ay r e c e i v e d b y ind iv id u al
w o r k e r s w h i l e in the s a m e j o b , and (3) c han ges in a v e r a g e w a g e s due
to changes in the l a b o r f o r c e r e s u l t i n g f r o m l a b o r t u r n o v e r , f o r c e
e xp a n sio n s , f o r c e r e d u c tio n s , and chan ges in the p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k ­
e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s ta b l i s h m e n ts w ith d i f f e r e n t p a y l e v e l s . Chan ges in
the l a b o r f o r c e can cause i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in the oc c u p atio n al
a v e r a g e s with out actu al w a g e c h an ges.
It is c o n c e i v a b l e that e v e n
though a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in an a r e a g a v e w a g e i n c r e a s e s , a v e r a g e
w a g e s m a y h a ve d e c l i n e d b e c a u s e l o w e r - p a y i n g e s t a b lis h m e n ts e n t e r e d
the a r e a o r e xpan ded t h e i r w o r k f o r c e s . S i m i l a r l y , w a g e s m a y ha ve
r e m a i n e d r e l a t i v e l y con stant, y e t a v e r a g e s f o r an a r e a m a y ha ve r i s e n
c o n s i d e r a b l y b e c a u s e h i g h e r - p a y i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e n t e r e d the a r e a .

Skilled maintenance (men):
Carpenters
Electricians
Machinists
Mechanics
Mechanics (automotive)
Painters
Pipefitters
Tool and die makers
Unskilled plant (men):
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners
Laborers, m aterial handling

NOTE: Comptometer operators, used in the computation of previous trends, are no longer
surveyed by the Bureau.

T h e us e o f constant e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s the e f f e c t
o f changes in the p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in eac h job i n ­
clud ed in the data.
T h e p e r c e n t s o f chan ge r e f l e c t o n ly changes in
a v e r a g e p a y f o r s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u rs.
T h e y a r e not in flu e n ce d b y
chan ges in sta n d a rd w o r k s c h e d u le s , as such, o r b y p r e m i u m p ay
for overtim e.
W h e r e n e c e s s a r y , data a r e a d ju s te d to r e m o v e f r o m
the in d e x e s and p e r c e n t s o f change any s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t caused b y
chan ges in the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .

T h e a v e r a g e (m ea n ) e a r n i n g s f o r eac h oc c u p atio n a r e m u l t i ­
p l i e d b y the o c c u p a tio n a l w e i g h t , and the p ro d u c ts f o r a l l oc c u p atio n s
in the g r o u p a r e to ta le d . T h e a g g r e g a t e s f o r 2 c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s a r e
r e l a t e d b y s u b trac tin g the a g g r e g a t e f o r the e a r l i e r y e a r f r o m the
a g g r e g a t e f o r the l a t e r y e a r and d i v i d i n g the r e m a i n d e r b y the a g g r e ­
g a te f o r the e a r l i e r y e a r .
T h e r e s u l t t i m e s 100 shows the p e r c e n t
o f chan ge.




5




T a b le 2 . In d e x e s o f e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s in A tla n ta , 6 a ., M a y 1 9 7 2 and M a y 1 9 7 3 ,
and p e rc e n ts o f in c re a s e fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s
A l l in d u strie s
W e e k ly earn in gs
P erio d

O ffice
cleric a l
(m en

and

wom en)

M an u factu rin g

H o u rly earn in gs

In d u stria l

S kille d

n urses

m a in ten a n ce

p lan t-

trad es

W ee k ly

w orkers

(m en

and

wom en)

(m e n )

U n sk illed

O ffic e
c leric a l
(m en

(m e n )
Indexes

and

wom en)
(M a y

earn in gs

H o u rly e a rn in g s

In d u strie 1

S killed

nurses

m a in ten a n ce

p lan t-

trad es

w orkers

(m en )

(m en )

(m e n

and

wom en)

U n sk illed

1967-100)

M ay

1 9 7 2 ___________________________

______________________________

131.5

1 47.5

1 43.1

144 .0

128.9

O

137.6

145 .6

M ay

1 9 7 3 ........................ .................................................................... ...

140.4

156.9

153.8

1 51.5

137.5

(*)

146.8

158.0

Percents

June

1960 to M a y

11-m on th

M ay

1961:

i n c r e a s e _________________________________________

Annual rate

3.7

1.1

3.6

2.7

2.9

1.5

3 .3

4 .1

4.0

1.2

3.9

2 .9

3 .2

1 .6

3.6

4.5

1 9 6 2 ________________________________________

3.1

4.7

4 .1

6 .4

4.4

6.0

3 .5

7.6

o f in c re a s e

196 1 t o M a y

of in crea se

...................

M ay

1962 t o M a y

1 9 6 3 ________________________________________

4.2

3 .0

3 .0

2.3

3.1

2.8

3 .3

M ay

1963 to M a y

1 9 6 4 ________________________________________

2 .9

4 .9

3 .5

1.5

2.7

3.2

2.8

1 .3

M ay
M ay

1964 to M a y
1965 t o M a y

1 9 6 5 ________________________________________
1 9 6 6 ________________________________________

4.3
4 .3

4.7
3 .1

4 .6
3.6

4.7

4.0

4 .6

6 .5

3.4

4.4
3 .0

3 .2

2.3

M ay

1966 to M a y

1 9 6 7 ________________________________________

5.7

4.3

4.6

8.7

5.3

4.5

5 .2

M ay

1967 to M a y

1 9 6 8 ______________________________

______

5.0

5.8

7.3

9.8

4.1

6.7

6.8

6.6

M ay

1968 to M a y

1 9 6 9 ________________________________________

5.5

10.2

5.3

4.9

5.8

1 1.1

5 .5

5.6

6.7

4.7

.9

.3

7 .1

8 .2

8.3

8 .1

5.7

M ay

1970 t o M a y

1 9 7 1 ___________________________________

..

6.0

9 .2

8 .1

8 .5

4 .9

C )

7.1

9 .0

M ay

1971 t o M a y

1 9 7 2 ________________________________________

5.0

7 .2

8 .2

6.6

5.6

( l )

7 .3

8.0

M ay

1972 to M a y

1 9 7 3 ________________________________________

6 .8-

6.4

7 .5

5 .2

6.7

(*)

6 .7

8 .5

M ay

1969 to M a y

1 9 7 0 ________________________________________

Data do not m e e t p u b lica tion

criteria .

6 .2

9.9




7

T a b le 3 . P e r c e n ts o f in c re a s e in a v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s ,
a d ju s te d fo r e m p lo y m e n t s h ifts , in A tla n ta , 6 a . , M a y 1 9 7 2 to M a y 1 9 7 3
A ll

M an u fac­

Nonm anu­

in d u stries

tu rin g

factu rin g

6. 3
(■)

6. 6

6. 6
7. 3

6. 7

6. 1

O ccu p a tio n al grou p

5. 5

( l )
6. 2

6. 6

1 D ata

do

not

m eet

p u b lica tion

N O T E :
for

h o ld in g

wage

the

in dex

m easure

new

wage

changes
in

area

the

current

ones

are

con verted

p ro vid es

ad ju sted

tren ds

in

is

jo b s

e stab lish m en t

The
changes

3

groups,

com pu tin g

re p o rtin g

criteria.

T a b le

occu p atio n a l

in

percents

to

both

are

m atched

in clu d e

e xclu d e

based

e m p lo ym en t

trends

averages.

to an

( l )

th e

of

in

e ffec t

of

current

in

the

and

d ata
(2 )

h o u rly

h o u rly

p reviou s

e a rn in gs

sh ifts.

earn in gs

year

The
for

(m atch ed

for

selected

new

m eth od

estab lish m en ts

estab lish m en ts),

constant.

the

current

averages

ch a racteristics

earn in gs

average

e m p lo ym en t

in a v e r a g e
and

jobs
to

e sta b lish m e n t

h o u rly b a s is ,

change

the

changes

not lin k e d

O th er

(1 )

on

of

of

o ffic e

tren d

in d ex es
w hereas

th e

new

c leric a l

e stim a tes

because
the

wage

are

the

current
tren d s

w orkers

and

p ro vid ed

for

new

wage

in d e x e s
w h ich

trends

m easure

d iffer

in d u strial

from

nurses

n on m an u factu rin g

esta b lish m e n ts .
F o r
in dexes,
pp.

a m ore
see

d etailed

"Im p rovin g

d es crip tion

A rea

W age

of

th e

Survey

new

m eth od

used

I n d e x e s M on th ly

to

com pu te

L ab or

area

R ev iew ,

wage

Janu ary

survey
1973,

52-57.

\

8

A.

Occupational earnings

T a b le A -1 . O f fic e o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k ly e a rn in g s
Average straight-time w
eekly hours an earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1973)
d
Num ber of w orkers

O ccu p ation and in d u stry d iv isio n

Num ber
of

*

(standard)

M ean A

M edian £

M iddle ranged

f

S

60

w eekly

70

$

8

80

90

*

100

8

8

110

120

re ce iv in g

*
130

s tra ig h t- tim e w e e k ly e arn in gs of— ,

8

140

8

150

8

160

8

170

8

8

180

190

8

8
200

210

8

220

8

8

230

240

8
250

and
under

70

260

and
80

90

100

110

J30

l? o

140

150

190

299

219

229

11

160

180

H O

299

299

299

299

MEN AND WOMEN COMBINED
BILLERS, MACHINE

(BILLING

NONMANUFACTURING ----------

63
50

39.0 U . s o
38.5 128.50

Ut.oo
123.50

$
$
115.00-141.00
104.00-133.00

10
10

1
1

13
13

17
15

2
2

—

5
5

3
3

42
41

15
14

*

20
11
9
7

29
6
23
6

45
15
30
11

62
29
33
18

26
26
—

171
9
162
39
36
74
13

144
19
125

7
10
9

81
6
75
—
4
22
38
11

15
30
8

386
41
345
11
28
83
187
36

470
70
400
15
101
70
158
56

3
3

7
7

13
13

107
107

107
96
10
52

T

—

*

35
33

6
6

*

37
1
36
15

5
5
4

11
11
—

_

*

*

29
23
54
19

188
33
155
3
66
34
25
27

153
27
126
1
54
32
29
10

145
33
112
46
32
21
10
3

96
8
88
17
25
17
23
6

405
45
360
47
108
52
112
41

404
59
345
121
60
48
58
58

303
77
226
108
50
28
27
13

136
22
114
72
16
6
6
14

94
6
88
48
12
21
2
5

82
4
78
35
6
35
2

13
12

48
44

10
7

14
13

1
1

50

7

3

4

5
33

27
19
7
8

1
1

-

*

*

*

6
6

—

ncnmanufacturing

-----------------

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -----------------------MANUFACTURING --------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------RETAIL TRADE -------------CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------WHOLESALE TRAOE ---------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------SERVICES -----------------------CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------NON M Ah'U F A C T U R I N G ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------^ W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------

111
107

40.0
40.0

133.00
133.00

123.50
123.00

114.00-145.50
114.00-145.50

212
73
139
64

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

121.00
121.50
120.50
122.00

122.00
125.50
121.50
122.50

111.00-130.50
111.50-129.00
111.00-131.50
115.50-132.00

1,384
210
1,174
221
330
230
265
128

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.0
40.0
39.5
38.5
37.0

150.50
163.50
148.00
182.50
151.50
140.00
125.50
139.00

144.50
153.50
143.00
179.00
144.50
136.50
122.00
132.50

-

-

—
—

-

-

-

125.00-175.00
136.50-191.50
122.00-171.50
164.50-194.00
131.00-169.50
115.00-155.00
112.00-139.50
119.50-164.00

_
—
-

_
—
—
—

5
5

_

_

—
-

—
-

—

—

*

*

-

•

2,441
340
2,101
524
397
367
582
231

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
40.0
38.5
39.0

120.50
118.00
121.00
142.50
120.00
118.00
106.00
114.00

117.50
120.00
117.50
135.50
116.50
114.50
104.00
113.50

103.00-132.50
106.00-132.50
103.00-132.50
124.50-153.50
106.00-130.00
99.50-132.50
96.00-116.50
103.00-124.00

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A --------NCNMANUFACTURING ------------

114
102

39.0
38.5

124.50
122.50

123.50
122.50

116.00-134.00
114.50-129.50

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B --------NCNMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------FINANCE --------------------

541
498
51
221

38.5
38.5
38.0
37.5

103.00
102.00
143.00
99.50

97.50
96.50
121.00
98.00

90.50-108.00
90.00-106.00
102.00-200.00
91.50-108.00

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C --------NCNMANUFACTURING -----------f i n a n c e --------------------

680
657
416

38.5
38.0
37.0

92.00
91.50
87.50

89.00
88.50

CLERKS, ORDER ------------------NCNMANUFACTURING -----------wFCLESALE TRAOE ---------RETAIL TRACE --------------

796
754
568
184

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

136.50
136.00
135.50
138.00

CLERKS, PAYROLL ---------------MANUFACTURING --------------NCNMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------FINANCE --------------------

400
139
261
75
58

39.5
39.5
39.0
39.0
38.5

134.50
125.50
139.00
170.50
120.00




tabli

—
5
—
*

*
-

“

“

44

198
190
10
82

98.50
98.00
94.00

30
30
30

46
46
46

288
285
164

163
157
117

113
99
41

20
20
14

“

4
4

*

4
4

*

—

*

135.50
136.00
125.50
138.50

118.50-153.50
118.50-153.50
118.50-153.50
119.00-153.00

_

_

8

-

-

8

-

-

13
11
6

*

“

6

5

60
60
33
27

151
139
129
10

131.50
124.50
134.50
171.00
122.50

112.50-145.00
110.50-136.00
113.50-150.50
139.00-206.00
100.50-138.00

27
11
16

51
23
28

82.5082.5081.50-

-

-

-

44

55
12
17

2
3

2
21

6

*

3

*

*

•

*

*

”

21
-

19
2
17
10
6

13

17

2

22

_

_

_

_

13
8
5

17
13
2
2

2
2
—

22
22
•

—
—

-

—

-

-

—
—

—

_

-

21
12
5
4

3

—

-

—

—

1
1

1
1

-

.

-

-

-

-

6
6

-

6

6
6
6

_

•

.

6

-

—

-

6

68
68
47
21

21
21
19
2

7
7
7

19
19
19

15
6
6

1

1
1
1

”

•

5

21
1
20
12

-

5

-

4

6
6

14

1

3
3
3

9

2
2

53
12
41
11
9

3

4
4
—

3

1
1
—
—
-

2
2
2

82
27

-

14
2
12
9
-

2
2

54
34
20

14

31
22

3

55
6
49
26
15
8

2

52
18
34

-

*

36
4
32
5
21

8
6
1

96
96
74
22

12

-

*

3

95
86
60
26

2

—

*

-

71
69
42
27

-

—

•

_

153
147
122
25

-

-

*

-

-

2

-

*

-

—

-

54
19
35
14
17
4

-

•

•

-

79
11
68
40
16
6

—

-

•

17

3

-

2

3

5

-

2

1

*

*

•

_

.

1
1

3

-

-

-

-

6

-

6
92
53
10
6

-

-

6

-

2

1
2

98

*

1

2
2
2

•

*

4

88.00

-

15
15

67
14
53
—
-

-

*

*

*

BOOKKEEPING— HACHINE OPERATORS,

*

13

5
8
8

2
2
-

17
16
3
13

8

_

11

—

6

-

-

11
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

.

.

-

-

-

*

1
7

_

•

-

*

-

_

2

—

-

—

-

-

2
2

-

-

_

9
T a b le A -1 . O ffic e o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k ly e a rn in g s — C o n tin u e d
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division* Atlanta, Ga., May 1973)
W eekly earnings 1
(standard)

O c c u p a t i o n a n d i n d u s t r y divisic

Num ber
of
workers

(standard

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e i v i n g st r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s of—
t

A verage
w eekly

60

M ean ^

M edian ^

M iddle ranged

AND

70

s
90

s
100

$
110

s
120

$
130

s
140

$

$

150

160

*

170

$

180

$
190

*
20 0

*
210

*
22 0

*

*

23C

240

t

250

260

—
80

9 0

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

9

-

an d

260

over

-

WOMEN C O M B I N E D CONTINUED
$
$
1 2 4 .5 0 -1 7 0 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
H A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------NONHANUFACTURINC WHOLESALE TRADE
R E T A I L T R A D E --F I N A N C E ----------SERVICES

1 ,2 7 6

3 9 .5

$
1 4 7 . OC

$
1 3 9 .0 0

177

4 0 .0

1 4 2 .0 0

1 3 3 .0 0

1 2 7 .0 0 -1 5 3 .5 0

1 ,0 9 9

3 9 .5

1 4 8 . OC

1 4 0 .5 0

1 2 3 .5 0 -1 7 6 .5 0

207

3 9 .5

1 3 5 .0 0

1 3 2 .5 0

1 2 2 .5 0 -1 4 7 .0 0

146

4 0 .0

1 2 2 .5 0

1 1 6 .0 0

1 0 8 .5 0 -1 3 3 .0 0

153

3 8 .5

1 3 1 . OC

1 3 1 .5 0

1 2 1 .0 0 -1 3 9 .0 0

262

3 9 .0

1 3 1 .5 0

1 3 3 .5 0

1 2 0 .0 0 -1 4 2 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS
HANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE
R E T A I L T R A D E --FINANCE —
SERVICES

1 ,7 2 1

3 9 .0

1 2 1 .0 0

1 1 7 .5 0

1 0 9 .5 0 -1 2 8 .0 0

.

-

203

4 0 .0

1 2 2 .5 0

1 1 2 .0 0

1 0 6 .0 0 -1 2 5 .0 0

-

1 1 0 .0 0 -1 2 8 .0 0

—
-

B

3 9 .0

1 2 1 .0 0

1 1 8 .5 0

1 3 8 .0 0

1 3 6 .5 0

1 1 9 .5 0 -1 4 7 .0 0

1 1 8 .0 0

1 1 5 .5 0

1 1 0 .0 0 -1 2 3 .0 0

298

4 0 .0

1 2 9 .0 0

1 2 4 .5 0

1 1 1 .5 0 -1 5 2 .0 0

-

379

3 8 .5

1 1 7 .0 0

1 1 7 .5 0

1 1 0 .5 0 -1 2 4 .0 0

-

33 2

3 6 .5

1 1 5 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0

1 0 3 .5 0 -1 2 3 .5 0

503

3 9 .0

1 0 6 .5 0

1 0 1 .5 0

77

4 0 .0

1 0 6 .0 0

1 0 2 .0 0

9 4 .0 0 -1 0 9 .0 0

-

42 6

3 8 .5

1 0 7 .0 0

1 0 1 .0 0

9 3 .0 0 -1 1 6 .5 0

-

-

-

“

_

3 8 .0

1 2 9 .5 0

1 2 0 .0 0

1 0 4 .0 0 -1 4 9 .0 0

-

115

4 0 .0

1 0 8 .0 0

1 0 6 .0 0

9 7 .0 0 -1 1 6 .0 0

-

176

3 7 .5

1 0 0 .0 0

9 7 .5 0

8 9 .0 0 -1 1 2 .5 0

69

-

*

3 9 .5

9 3 .0 0 -1 1 6 .0 0

—
-

-

4 0 .0

5
5
-

-

3 9 .0

1 5 0 .0 0

1 4 3 .0 0

1 2 6 .5 0 -1 7 0 .5 0

.

-

1 ,0 5 1

3 9 .5

1 4 7 .0 0

1 4 3 .5 0

1 2 6 .0 0 -1 6 2 .5 0

-

-

3 ,1 1 4

3 9 .0

1 5 1 .5 0

1 4 2 .5 0

1 2 7 .0 0 -1 7 3 .5 0

-

-

4 6 0

3 8 .5

1 9 2 .0 0

1 9 6 .0 0

1 6 8 .0 0 -2 1 2 .0 0

-

-

722

4 ,1 6 5

SECRETARIES, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES

-

-

4 0 .0

1 4 8 .5 0

1 4 2 .5 0

46 4

3 9 .5

1 5 8 .5 0

1 5 4 .5 0

1 3 4 .0 0 -1 8 2 .0 0

-

-

1 ,1 8 9

3 8 .5

1 3 6 .5 0

1 3 5 .0 0

1 2 2 .5 0 -1 4 7 .5 0

-

-

279

3 8 .0

1 4 2 .5 0

1 3 5 .5 0

1 2 0 .0 0 -1 5 6 .5 0

165

3 9 .0

1 7 8 .5 0

1 5 8 .5 0

1 4 5 .5 0 -2 0 9 .0 0

-

1 2 5 .0 0 -1 6 9 .0 0

136

3 8 .5

1 8 3 .0 0

1 6 7 .0 0

1 4 4 .0 0 -2 1 4 .5 0

30

3 9 .0

2 2 9 .0 0

2 2 9 .0 0

3 9 .0

1 6 6 .5 0

1 6 2 .0 0

1 4 1 .5 0 -1 8 5 .0 0

173

3 9 .5

1 6 3 .5 0

1 6 1 .0 0

1 4 2 .0 0 -1 8 1 .0 0

60 6

3 9 .0

1 6 7 .5 0

1 6 2 .5 0

1 4 1 .0 0 -1 8 7 .5 0

144

3 9 .0

2 0 2 .0 0

2 0 8 .5 0

4 0 .0

1 7 1 .5 0

1 6 0 .5 0

1 4 2 .5 0 -1 8 8 .5 0

65

4 0 .0

1 4 1 .0 0

1 3 8 .5 0

1 3 0 .0 0 -1 6 1 .0 0

201

3 8 .0

1 5 4 .5 0

1 5 1 .0 0

1 3 9 .5 0 -1 7 1 .0 0

78

3 8 .0

1 5 3 .5 0

1 5 3 .0 0

80
6
74
50
3
3
2
1

“

-

69
2
67
6
44
8
8

163
13
150
25
30
27
59

225
62
163
60
19
34
45

189
31
158
31
27
51
40

199
19
180
56
11
13
95

62
13
49
6
6
18
11

47
7
40
15
2
1
2

50
17
33
3
5
-

347
82
265
19
83
28
70
65

523
59
464
16
155
62
145
86

364
15
349
20
78
58

57
2
55
25
8
7
2
13

60
60
13
3
44

26

25
7
18
-

14
14

94

159
11
148
28
24
25
48
23

149
23
126
12
44
56

97
30
67
10
24
19

82
8
74
13
23
37

27
2
25
10
9
5

26
2
24
15
9

10
10
8

6
5
1
-

149
30
119
17
20
73
9

399
101
298
2
80
17
139
60

657
196
461
4
136
50
216
55

631
123
508
24
102
56
295
31

530
184
346
20
76
55
160
35

1
1

13
12

64
43

59

20
39
5
34
*
-

-

-

-

99

361

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

14
—
14

10
1
9

13
1
“

4
5

6
3
4
17

14
19
44
5

125
33
92
15
20
6
46
5

16
6

110
16
94
2
4
61
27

236
42
194

235
43
192
4
18
6
154
10

182
67
115
4
12
15
75
9

43
13
30

101
19
82

3 9 .0

1 5 3 .5 0

1 4 B .5 0

1 3 0 .0 0 -1 7 6 .5 0

4 2 4

3 9 .5

1 5 6 .0 0

1 5 6 .0 0

1 3 6 .0 0 -1 8 1 .0 0

1 ,1 1 2

3 9 .0

1 5 2 .5 0

1 4 5 .0 0

1 2 9 .0 0 -1 7 3 .0 0

-

183

3 8 .5

1 8 9 .0 0

1 9 2 .5 0

1 7 2 .0 0 -2 0 4 .0 0

178

4 0 .0

1 5 6 .5 0

1 5 3 .5 0

1 3 5 .0 0 -1 7 1 .5 0

-

17
12
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1 3 7 .0 0 -1 9 8 .5 0

3 8 .5

1 3 6 .0 0

1 3 4 .5 0

1 2 5 .5 0 -1 4 4 .5 0

-

1 4 1 . 50|

1 3 4 .0 0

1 1 9 .5 0 -1 6 4 .5 0

___________

-

1

3 8 .0

1 6 4 .5 0

-

.

100

1 6 9 .0 0

-

503

3 9 .5

-

-

-

148

-

1

-

5

10
-

2
1
7
-

1
35
28
111
19

8
18

1
17

9

9
5

18

7
7
7

73
2
71
5
1

73

104

73

104

20

13
5

2

98
2
96
2
6
23
14
51

-

-

_

1 2 8 .5 0 -1 7 6 .0 0

1 ,5 3 6

tables.

13
3
10
9
1
~ ■

3
1
2
1
1
-

1 8 7 .5 0 -2 1 6 .0 0

118

SECRETARIES, CLASS C
MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE R E T A I L T R A D E ----F I N A N C E -----------SERVICES

—
-

8
3
3

2
-

2
2

2

-

~
-

55

14

-

-

-

133

94

105

58

79
49
69
25

32
103

8

72
22
21
4
4

16
15
3

7
7
“

8
8
1

4
3
2

9

83
17
66
7
4
6
33
16

173
62
in
8
34
17
43
9

130
36
94
25
29
9

5

29

2

81
15
66

20
13
13

10

9

9

123

85

96
62
n
19
4
**

4
15
6
2

8
2

10
6
2

36
8
28
25
2

47

1
“

32

-

64
43

10

10

11

9
-

2
30
17
6
7

2

3

44

2

17

8
i
7
5

2

-

1

1

“

16
2
14
2
4
8

21

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

42

5

6

7
2
4

3
3
3

-

67

10

9
9

1

13

-

-

170
112
58
22

5

2
1

5

1
2

42
27
2
11

9
9

5

6
22

3

10

7
48
36
7
3
2

16
10
6

21
60
7
23
7
17
6

4

6
31

39

28

15

37

-

12
4
8
2

81

15

-

2
2

38
47
60
33
13

81
27
54
5
6
3
35

-

_
-

35
67
44
48
31

79
16
63
5
19
8
15
16

-

1
1

46

19
3

-

-

28

133

9

2

8

257
32
225

191

-

6
2

13
6
5

320
72
248

59

324

10
10

2
2
-

7

in
250

2 0 4 .5 0 -2 5 5 .5 0

77 9

SECRETARIES, CLASS B
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE R E T A I L T R A D E -----FINANCE SERVICES




—

144

SECRETARIES
MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE
R E T A I L T R A O E ---F I N A N C E ----------S E R V I C E S ---------

a e
*. r.'

—
-

365

1 ,5 1 8

M E S S E N G E R S ( O F F I C E B O Y S A N D G I R L S tM A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE
F I N A N C E -----------

5
*:*-

80

an d
under
70

KEN

$

S

6
15
10

1
2
2
-

10

27

2

5

8

22

7

11

1

3

-

3

:

5

6

14

4

12

4

5

4

10

-

3

4

7

3

6

1

1

4
4

3
3

-

4
-

3

10
T a b le A -1 . O ffic e o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k ly e a rn in g s -----C o n tin u e d
( A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s o f w o r k e r s in s e le c te d o ccu p atio n s b y in d u stry d iv is io n , A tla n t a , G a ., M a y 1973)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Num ber

O c c u p a t i o n a n d i n d u s t r y division

of

workers

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s o f—

$

A verage
w eekly
(standard)

$
60

Mean A

Median *

70

AND

SECRETARIES
SECRCT

80

S
90

t
100

*
n o

t
120

$

t
130

140

$

150

$

%
160

170

*

t
180

190

t
200

$
210

$

220

$

230

s

t
240

250

an d
under

Middle ranged

260

(and

70

MEN

t

$

80

90

100

n o

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

over

WOMEN C0MBINED-CDNTINUED
-

CONTINUED

AR1C S v CL Aj j D

$ ■

$
* 'in 1 * \C
\X
232
77

n il

$

$
86

|
nn
n i
fn n 1 3 7 * 5 0
xa n 1 5 7 . 5 0

13 1 50
158.00

136.50-181.50

li

95
17

30*^
39.0

122.50

120.50

115.50-134.00

nn

39.5

i

A

nn
_

i «'n l!

39.5
40.0

39.5

598

39.0

56

30 5
40.0

138.50

133.00

62

19 5

i^B

1^3

401
91
81
165

40.5

108.50

103.50

115.50
93.50

119.00
94. j 0

104.50-126.50
84.50-101.50

591

39.5

120.50

116.00

104.00-125.50

iil*c n

1 i e * nn

129.00
126.50

117.50115.50-

153.00

151.00

134.50-177.00

149.50

146.00

133.00-168.50

151.00

148.50

136.50
151.50

40

138.50166.00
117.00-138.00
127.50143.50

34

»

Jj n *? ?

00

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS.
CLAj j A

182 00
111.50
111.00
109.00

193*00
111.50
107.00
115.00

69

39.5

163.00

*

40.0
40.0

138.00
130.00

138.00
130.00

262
229
72
145

38.0
38.0
40.0
36.5

117.00
116.50
123.50
113.00

116.50
115.50
119.00
113.00

19

24

41

12

12

1

12

1
1

10

_
'

55

71

134

132

86

50

187

88

16

17

41

53

119

128

45

48

28

87

15

8

34
34
18

53

30

21

*J

'

g

*

16

31

g

41

8

40

14

10

9
19
15

3

-

6

57

6

6

91

72

40

61

14
59

13
13

13
38

16

78

133

131

9

10

J

8
6

4

i

i

i

3

2

11

-

65

60

28

16

25

1

i

J

10

38

8

34

28

8

12
12

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

> *.r.o s at en of tables.
o *.e
d




3

-

-

2

*

8
62*

21
65

s
r

19

15

26

106.00- 124.00
111.50-125.00
104.00123.00

6

10

*

1

5

8

2

TABULATING-MACHINE CPERATORS,

HONNANOFACTORING

‘

i
j

48
16

116.50-144.50

1

5
134

12

104.00119.00
101.50-127.00
100.00119.50

14

2

1
1

29

142.00

152
151

FINANCE

33*5
40.0
39.5
37.0

24

60
15

fO

177
90
74

25

, |^

93.00-125.00

38.0
42.5

127.00
131.00

*

id
31

8

100.00-137.00

872

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

ni
.

130*00

226
95

RETAIL TRAD£ ™
*
FINANCE
SERVICES

'

19?

131 *0
122.50

i

72

w

1
33

30

13

i

n
8
J

8

8
1

6

9

2

*

1

-

11
T a b l e A -1 . O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s : W e e k l y e a r n i n g s -----C o n t i n u e d
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , A t l a n t a ,

G a .,

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

O c c u p a tio n a n d in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

s

$
60

weekly
hours1
(standard]

Mean *

Median ^

Middle ranged

AND

70

80

t

90

100

s

$
110

120

t

r e c e i v in g s t r a i g h t - t i m e

$
130

t
160

t
150

t
160

v e e k ly e a rn m g s 0 —

$

$

170

180

t
190

200

t

210

1

t
220

t
230

$

92
82

60.0

$

$

127.00

121.00
166.00

^ 121.00

122.50
106.50

1 ,2 0 1

116

6 0 .0

110.50

1 1 2 .0 0

80

90

100

n o

120

130

21

160

16

150

160

210

180

10

190

700

220

230

260

250

12

10

-

-

12

170

10

10

$

20
13
5

132.00-172.50
106.50127.50
102.50137.50

151

footnotes

at




e n d o f tabl<

*

34

20

2
an

7

5

22

96.00-116.00
103.00-123.00

73

326
8

9

9

323
32

188
27

116
23

13

5

1

t6

1
2

16

19

1

1

67

1 ,0 8 ^

93
67

6 0 .0

39.5
37.0
35.5

107.00
112.50
100.50
106.50

133*00
99.50
110.50
1 0 1 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0

250

T/
24
9 7 . 0 0 - 111.00
106.00-126.00
96.50-108.50
96.00121.00

260
an d

112.50-138.00

155.00
116.00

20

s

$
260

WOMEN C O M B I N E D —
CONTINUED

* 70"

See

1

$

and
u n d er

70

MEN

M a y 1973)

N u m ber o f w o rk ers

53

20
20

__
5

13

8

18

35

25

'* 1 0

33

7

16
22

*

8

1

260

over

12
T a b le A -1a. O f f ic e o c c u p a tio n s —la rg e e s ta b lis h m e n ts : W e e k ly e a rn in g s
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1973)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s of—
Ni
O c c u p a tio n

and

in d u s t r y

d iv is io n

of
workere

t

t

A v e ra g e
w e e k ly

70
M ean ^

(standard

M e d ia n 2

ANO

W OMEN

*■0*"

39.5

$

164.50
190.50

167.00
193.00

3

$

An

n

it

39

0

1 3 ' *^0

39.5
39.5

133.00
132.50
133.00
142.00

130.00
135.00
129.00
135.50

116.00-144.50
>
124.00-142.00
115.50-144.50
124.00-153.00

113.50

115.50

101.50-121.00

i Tn

-n

n*'- n ,

0

02

l0„

3

122

*

15
*

A 1L K ^ i L L A
J

90.50

A

85.00

133.50

129.00

in* n
to
n
'0*0

160*00

157*50
_____
_

7 Ii

jj

u

$

t

190

200

t

*
210

220

t
230

%

*

240

250

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

44

33
5

46

29

80
8

41
5

81
3

62

42
19

18

36

30
22

11
2

1
1

260

270

J

f r

f r

r?

0

7

3

3

_

*

98.00
96.50

191
188

109.00-149.00

2
?
2

151

to

81
85
u

3

151
13
138
47

76
15

1

0

s

t9

169
12
157
121

175
29
146
90

w

2

105
18
87
72

^6
72
43

44
29

6

8

3

21

19

13

17

21
12

17
10

13
8

17
13

7

-

260

270

o ver

-

-

-

“

“

“

-

-

22
1
1

22
22

”

2

1 Aft f ft
t
..,

w

i t

T0 . ?
J n "D

1a .
n
i i i n -*»-o

210

G IR L S )-

,048

33*
6A0

113.00-128.50
96.50-118.00

111.50

105.00

j
* f t ft
1 2 9 .0 0

39.0

159.50
,y

ft

at end of tables.

27

154.00
i '■ /

Tn •
*
T T ^ i a t nn
39*0 136*00

im
}
13"

nn

nn
*?°

n«*ft
39*0

ftft 2 2 5 . 0 0
OOKftft

2 2 2 .0 0

12
3

3

0

2
t9

__

^4
_

^4

A

22

0
22

A1

77
77

?n
77
in

_.

*? ?

30
fr

vn
77
2

18
t5

68

1 7~r
l7?

107
l 77

40
39

35
18

77
r8

41

43

10

5

?

A

3

19

3

*

07
7
g

37
_

«

nf
VO
Tfl
va

37
r

3

73

10

132.50-183.50

0

3
*
1

37

V4
7

44

172

224

w

,2

7

104

1A
1
*

77

2?

^7
1I
r 8t

4
r8

J
0
0

3

2

2

-

i

2
2

2

w

l

5

7

-

2

-

-

-

32

14

10

*
7

305

200

149

224
2

179

123

239

117

87

91

33

77

ft7

f?

34

11
2

73

2

^77

5?

2

3

5

7

**

10

2
1

"0

J}}*55

VI

77

1A
to

.
1
*

3

J

2

21

1 1 0 .^ 0

j L L m L 1A K 1 L j v L L A j A
j
L 11L 1 11t j

7

40

j

i_n
ru

127*50
118.50

39.0

^ ft

2

1

0
'

J

38

n*^n

Tfl .*0
3 8 U

ANO

23

l

| T j* f ft
t

3

t3

3
*
2

00

hi*??

97




i n

44

37
82.5082.50-

10-7* Eft

IT*n
^ *r

i3

BOYS

‘

l TT

072

FINANCE

r w t L 1L

180

160

J

95.50

92.00
91.50

1 -in

(OFFICE

$

$

170

150

19

60

MESSENGERS

28

15
39.5
-

00

*0

39*^
,A „

CLAoS

TRA0E

L T r U * ^ ■1 U * t

*
160

140

3
5

, 3 A ftft

f
t

*

m

150

130

AA

-

RETAIL

$

S

140

120

7

2 !j7
227

TI N A N C E

O P C R A T 0 RSf

$

130

1 •)/ Eft , „„

A

122*50

KEYPUNCH

no

-

13"*00

39.5

CLASS

100

8

90

5

911
494

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

C L E R K S » FILE,

*

120

$

^67

LLAjj

$

no

and

136.50-189.00
158.50-223.50

ooo
ITT

U 1 ILL 1 i L j

j f 1 1 LLi

100

under

$

LL t

90

C O M B IN E D

^2?

rU D L iL

80

$

$

and

M id d le ranged

80

HEN

$

3

7

J
2

1

*
3

2
*

10

13
T a b le A -1a. O f fic e o c c u p a tio n s —la rg e e s ta b lis h m e n ts :

W e e k l y e a r n i n g s ----- C o n t i n u e d

fAverage straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1973)
Number of worke rs rec eiving straight-time wee kly earnings of—

W eekly earnings 1
(star dard)

*
O ccu pation and in d u stry d iv isio n
workers

(standard

M ean ^

M edian ^

M iddle ranged

t

S

TO

w eekly

80

$

90

S

100

t

t

n o

120

*

130

t

$

$

140

150

160

t
170

$

$

180

190

*

2 00

t

*

f

210

220

230

240

*

250

$

260

and
under
80

*

270

and
90

100

n o

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

2 10

220

2 30

2 40

250

260

5

30
10
20
3
9

51
12
39
5
31

24
8
16
5
5

35
10
25
7
9

25
6
19
15
1

36
8
28
25
1

42

11
4
7
1

11
1
10
7
“

8
1

4

39
34

7

4

5

3

71
26
45
6

68
15
53
18
13
5

154
111
43
22
11

63
3
60
42
9

40
40
25
11

26
2
24
17
7

15
2
13
2
8

13
6
7
4
2

25
25
12
12

7
7
4
3

16
16
4
12

-

270

over

PEN ANO WOMEN CO MBINED—
CONTINUED

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING -------------------N C N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------FINANCE -------------------------

346
74
272
no
97

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0

$
1 8 2 .0 0
1 8 2 .5 0
1 8 1 .5 0
2 0 6 .0 0
1 5 4 .5 0

$
$
$
1 8 1 .0 0 1 5 7 . 5 0 - 2 0 9 . 0 0
1 7 7 .5 0 1 6 1 . 0 0 - 2 0 2 . 0 0
1 8 2 .5 0 1 5 6 . 5 0 - 2 1 0 . 0 0
2 0 9 .0 0 1 9 5 . 0 0 - 2 1 5 . 5 0
1 5 9 .0 0 1 3 9 . 0 0 - 1 6 7 . 5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ------------MANUFACTURING -------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------

985
261
724
153
119
397

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 6 0 .0 0
1 6 9 .0 0
1 5 6 .5 0
1 9 1 .0 0
1 7 7 .0 0
1 3 4 .0 0

1 5 5 .5 0
1 7 4 .0 0
1 4 6 .5 0
1 9 4 .5 0
1 7 7 .5 0
1 3 4 .0 0

1 3 5 .0 0 -1 8 3 .0 0
1 4 9 .0 0 -1 8 3 .0 0
1 3 1 .0 0 -1 8 3 .0 0
1 7 8 .5 0 -2 0 4 .0 0
1 4 8 .5 0 -2 0 5 .0 0
1 2 5 .0 0 -1 4 2 .5 0

646
421
44
232
129

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 4 3 .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0
1 8 8 .5 0
1 5 7 .5 0
1 2 4 .0 0

1 3 6 .5 0
1 4 3 .5 0
1 9 5 .5 0
1 5 8 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0

1 2 1 .5 0 -1 6 2 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0 -1 7 9 .0 0
1 6 9 .0 0 -2 0 4 .5 0
1 3 6 .5 0 -1 8 1 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0 -1 3 7 .0 0

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0

1 3 7 .5 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 4 1 .5 0
1 3 8 .5 0

1 3 5 .5 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 3 7 .0 0
1 4 1 .0 0
1 3 7 .5 0

1 1 9 .0 0 -1 5 2 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0 -1 4 2 .0 0
1 2 0 .5 0 -1 5 6 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0 -1 5 9 .5 0
1 1 9 .5 0 -1 6 0 .5 0

-

2

-

-

-

------------------------

430
53
3 77
266
64

-

2
1

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR --------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------

538
293
177

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1 5 7 .5 0
1 5 2 .0 0
1 6 4 .0 0

1 6 6 .0 0
1 4 7 .5 0
1 7 5 .0 0

1 3 7 .5 0 -1 7 9 .0 0
1 3 3 .0 0 -1 8 6 .0 0
1 4 6 .0 0 -1 8 8 .0 0

“

“

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B ---NONMANUFACTURING -----------------

116
110

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 1 6 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0

1 1 1 .5 0
1 1 1 .5 0

9 8 .5 0 - 1 2 8 .0 0
9 8 .5 0 -1 2 8 .5 0

_

_

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR— RECEPTIONISTS—

67

3 9 .5

1 2 7 .0 0

1 1 9 .5 0

1 0 6 .0 0 -1 3 5 .0 0

-

o
o

SECRETARIES - CONTINUED

1 3 9 .0 0

1 2 5 .5 0 -2 1 6 .5 0

1 2 7 .5 0
1 2 6 .0 0

1 1 4 .5 0 -1 7 6 .0 0
1 1 4 .0 0 -1 7 6 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D ------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------RETAIL TRAOE ------------------STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ------------MANUFACTURING -------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------r et ai l

trade

-

-

-

-

-

1

l

4

6
1
5

30
2
26

23
4
19

l

-

4

2

21

13

l
-

1
1
1

5
5
5

8
a
l
7

64
1
63
4
59

100
6
94
1
12
80

166
26
140
2
6
130

2
2
2

14
12
5
7

27
17
5
12

101
51
11
39

115
56
1
17
31

108
56

26
1
25
21
-

34
9
25
18
3

51
12
39
21
13

9
7
“

22
8
2

36
35

-

-

“

-

-

-

37
73
2
8
61

25

74
26
48
12
9
24

31
21

63
36
1
25
10

45
28
1
24
1

45
37
10
19
8

27
27
2
24

46
46
5
41

66
1
65
40
9

62
16
46
24
9

71
11
60
56
3

36
2
34
22
10

25

24
1
23
19
4

6

19

3

25
14
11

6
4
i

19
19

3
3

38
29
4

30
23
9

51
43
18

71
67
49

42
7
1

14
12
5

168
9
5

78
77
73

10
9
9

2
1
1

-

18
16

23
23

14
12

7
6

8
8

4
4

4
4

-

1
1

1
1

-

.

“

*

15

13

12

6

4

-

-

1

2

5

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

26

5

6

-

-

1

-

1

1

17

1

-

”

1
1

2
2

22
22

6
6

5
5

4
3

3
3

1
1

5
5

8
8

2
2

”

“

10
10
10

21
10
10

5
5
4

-

3
3
3

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

_

“

-

n o

n

-

-

_

-

3

_

2

3
3

-

-

2
2

-

*

1 6 3 .5 0

2
1
1

59
58

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 4 0 .5 0
1 4 0 .5 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
NCNMANUFACTURING -----------------

_

T R AN SCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
52
typists, class

-------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------- i
PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------FINANCE ------------------------a

TYPISTS, CLASS B -------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------NCNMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------




» tables.
:

3 9 .0

1 2 0 .5 0

1 1 8 .0 0

1 1 2 .5 0 -1 2 9 .0 0

-

-

2

3

25

9

9

1

3

186
142
50
61

3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0

1 3 3 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0
1 5 5 .0 0
1 1 3 .5 0

1 2 9 .0 0
1 2 9 .0 0
1 6 6 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0 -1 4 6 .5 0
1 1 5 .0 0 -1 4 6 .5 0
1 3 2 .0 0 -1 7 2 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0 -1 2 5 .5 0

-

_

“

-

16
16
13

17
15
2
10

34
23
4
18

31
20
6
12

23
18
5
7

22
18
5
1

4
4
1

365
88
277
107
61
84

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

1 1 6 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0
1 3 5 .5 0
1 1 2 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0

1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 3 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0
1 0 1 .0 0

1 0 0 .5 0 -1 2 6 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0 -1 2 5 .5 0
9 9 .5 0 -1 2 7 .0 0
1 1 5 .5 0 -1 5 2 .0 0
1 0 3 .0 0 -1 2 6 .0 0
9 2 .5 0 -1 0 7 .5 0

64
8
56
10

93

56
17
39

16
1
15
7
8

-

1

2

2

3

19
19

-

1

2

2

-

5
5

1

2
2

3
3

22

29
13
16
12
4

19

4

53
21
32
14
7

•

-

-

-

-

30

32

2
-

2

20
6
14

-

-

2

5

9

22
71
11

11

22
8
2

-

-

3

5
5
4
1

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
60

i

-

7

4
3

-

-

“

-

3

-

l

-

l

14
T a b le A -2 . P ro fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k ly e a rn in g s
fAverage straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1973)
W eekly earnings 1
(standard )_____

*

A verage

S

Under 100 110
1
A
and
1100 under

Occupation and industry division
(standard)

110

HEN

AND

WOMEN

120

*

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
*
*
$
*
t
$
»
*
*
$
s

*
120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

211

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------W H O L E S A L E T R A 0 E --------------------

582

$

$

$

240

«

*
250

*
260

t
270

179.00
184.50

158.50158.50-

39.0
40.0
38.5
40.0
40.0
38.5
36.5

169.00
196.50
162.50
199.50
164.00
158.50
141.50

164.50
216.00
158.50
207.00
171.00
149.00
142.50

138.00200.00
160.00219.00
136.00195.00
195.50-211.50
137.00194.50
135.00191.00
119.00162.00

30

82

39.5
39.5
40.0

141.00
139.50
140.50

140.50
139.00
133.00

125.50-149.50
125.00149.00
123.00153.00

139
113
32

39.0
39.0
40.0

248.50
248.00
285.50

246.00
Z4Z.50
282.00

215.50277.50 213.50- Z79.50
267.00-3014.00

386
345
108
78

38.5
38.5
40.0
38.5

214.00
213.00
233.50

200.00

212.50
213.00
229.50
203.00

194.00- 233.00
192.50-232.50
213.00246.00
183.00217.00 “

107
44

39.0
39.0
40.0

189.50
188.50
187.00

184.00
184.00
184.00

163.50- 205.00
162.00-206.00
180.50198.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S A -------------------N G N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

135
104

39.0
38.5

298.00
304.00

301.00
306.50

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

6
6

19
17

25
17

15
8

40
30

12
11

18
15

15
11

4
3

29
29

11
11

7
7

2
2

290

60
7
53
3
7
16
22

46
11
35

46
5
41
3
14
3
21

19
3
16
4
i
6
3

71

40

71
18
21
32

40
28
10

71
51
20
18
-

18
3
15
10
5

4
3
l

2
1
1

-

-

2
12
16

33
9
24
3
3
6
11

1

1

280

290

over

2
2

268.00-323.50
272.50-334.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S 8 ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

189
182

37.5
37.5

262.50
262.00

261.00
260.50

233.50-280.00
234.00-278.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S C ---------N C N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------

111
66

39.0
38.5

230.00
239.00

229.00
239.50

203.00216.00-

CRAFTSMEN, CLASS
MANUFACTURING

310
132

40.0
40.0

207.50
198.50

206.50
199.00

191.00-230.00
173.50-219.50

330
142
188
50

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0

171.00
160.50
179.00
182.50

170.50
160.50
178.00
183.00

155.00-188.00
144.50171.00
164.50193.00
168.50200.50

174

111
471
90
103

122

------------------------------

128

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S C --------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A 0 E --------------------

221
210

COMPUTER PR0GRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S A ------------N G N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S --------COMPUTER PR0GRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S C ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

A ----------------------------

D R A F T S M E N , C L A S S B --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------N G N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----

101

39.5
39.5

220.00
222.00
16
1
15

42
1
41

—

-

-

8

2
1
12

7
11
14

76
8
68
3
21
35
7

10
10

23
23
13

49
47
26

28
26
4

63
63
18

21
19
7

5
5
2

6
6
5

4
3
3

4
2
2

3
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

1

3
3

1
1

4
Z

-

30

-

22

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

-

20
20

13
13

21
21

31
28

“

-

“

2
2
1

-

-

3

8

5

9

41
33
8
10

12
12
1

7
7
3

12
10
3

6
5
2

21
19
15

11
11
11

-

4
4

17
17
1

17
16

9
0

51
42
13
16

10
10
5

-

2
2

1
1

4
4

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i

10
5
-

8
Z

i

11
9
7

18
15
5

14
13
7

*15
13
10

58
51
20
14

39
38
14
2

34
31
17
8

38
35
16
2

2
2
1
1

9
9
2
-

10
7
7

14
10
5

5
5
5
-

2
2
-

-

3
3
-

15
15
2

1
1
-

1
1
1

-

6
2

10
8

13
8

25
25

25
25

7

35

2
2

11
8

u
9

5
5

2
2

250.00
257.00

2
2
14

5
3
6
6

-

-

15
12
3
2

44
17
27
1

32
24
8
7

20
14
56
36
20
4

1

2
31
25
63
15
48
5

2
2

9
5

14
9

2
2

4
4

21
20

5
3

17
17

8
8

32
32

6

18

12

6
6

12
6

7
7

20
14

8

6

5

3

49

1

> tables.
:

-

1
1
-

17

8

34
17

70
17

33
18

23
7

27
1
26
13

18
18
6

28
2
26
6

23
19
4
4

6
1

5

22

5

2

V.'^rkers were distributed as follows: 5 at $290 to $300; 1 at $300 to $310; 2 at $310 to $320; 5 at $330 to $340; and 2 at $340 and over.
V.'orkers were distributed as follows: 8 at $290 to $300; 24 at $300 to $310; 9 at $310 to $320; 5 at $320 to $330; 8 at $330 to $340; 8 at $340 to $350; 3 at $350 to $360; and 11 at $360 and over.
V.'orkers w e r e distributed as follows: 10 at $290 to $300; 7 at $300 to $310; 3 at $310 to $320; 2 at $320 to $330; 11 at $330 to $340; and 6 at $340 to $350.




n 280

and

5
5

185.50
187.50

SERVICES

230

COHBINEC

C L A S S A -----------------------------

COMPUTER OPERATORS,
NGNMANUFACTURING

220

1
1
-

1
-

-

**76
65

f ***39

15
T a b le A -2 . P ro fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s :

W e e k l y e a r n i n g s ---- C o n t i n u e d

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s in se l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s b y i n d u s t r y division, Atlanta, Ga. , M a y
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)______

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s of—

%
weekly

O ccu p ation an d in d u stry d iv is i

Under

i

(standard)

100

%

%

110

120

and
under

-

-

120

130

%
130

-

%

-

U P

%

140

150

%

%

%

160

170

180

-

150

160

-

170

%
190

180

-

190

%

200

%

210

%

220

%
230

%
240

%
250

%

%

%

270

260

280

-

200

W o r k e r s w e r e distributed a s follows:




178
70

*
1 3 5 . 5 0 23
134.0023

73
13

37
25

—
-

203.00-

233.00

14

200.00-

208.50

4

167.00-

210.00

-

129.50
123.50

122.00120.50-

400

39.5

212.00

231.00

73

37.0

203.50

205.00

39.5

190.00

184.50

E L E C T R O N I C S T E C H N I C I A N S --------------NONMANUFACTURING
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

S e e footnotes at e n d of tables.

224
53

125.00
121.50

225
137

----

$

41
14

140.50127.50-

39.0
38.0

D R A F T S M E N - T R A C E R S -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

IREGISTEREO)

$

144.50
147.00

39.5
38.5

INDUSTRIAL

$

143.50
145.00

571
2*4

6 at $8 0 to $90; a n d 17 at $90 to $100.

153.00
158.00

29
29

7
2
9

14
14

-

10

1

14
14

210

220

230

2*0

250

-

260

239

270

260

290

9

-

11

6
17

3
3

1

-

1

8
8

10
2

13

8

-

6

6

66

1

45

3

290

and

AND' W O M E N C O M B I N E D CONTINUED

D R A F T S M E N , C L A S S C -------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------

NURSES,

%

100

_________1 1 0

MEN

1973)

-

-

13

8

1

-

5

6

8

8
-

-

-

1

-2
2

-

-

over

16

P r o fe s s io n a l a n d t e c h n ic a l o c c u p a t io n s — la rg e e s ta b lis h m e n ts :

Table A-2a.

W e e k ly e a rn in g s

• Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1973)
W eekly earnings
(standard)
Number
of
work e is

O c c u p a t i o n ar.d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

1

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s
t

Average
weekly
Mean

(standard)

*

Median 2

Middle ranged

AND

WOMEN

120

$

130

t
140

$

$

108
95

39.5
39.5

190.00
191.50

188.00
191.00

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -------------------

289
90
199
86

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0

187.00
207.50
177.50
200.50

196.00
217.00
182.00
207.50

154.00-216.00
174.50-219.50
147.00208.00
196.00212.00
133.50-167.00

1

210

*

220

s

*
230

240

t

250

*
260

*

t
270

280

290

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

$

$
158.00-223.50
159.00-224.50

—

-

2
2

12
10

10
8

10
6

6
5

12
11

9
9

5
4

3
2

14
14

8
8

7
7

2
2

2
2

1

-

-

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

.

2
1
1

13
1
12

23
2
21
3

24
l
23
3

22
5
17

18
9
9

18
5
13
3

15
-

32
-

18
3
15
10

4
3
1

2
1
1

2
2

1
1
-

4
4

•

32
28

71
51
20
18

1
1

15
4

19
19
17

13
11

15
13

49
49

14
12

5
5

3
3

1
-

4
2

3
2

4
4

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

3
3

1
1

4
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

4
3
1

9
7
1

8
2

-

5
5
1

10
5

-

“

-

6
4
4

10
7
5

9
8
4

*15
13
10

5
5

6
6

3
3

10
7

29
26
17
8

24
21
16
2

9
5

5
5

7

18
17
14
2

6
6

3

37
30
20
9

4
4

6

32
26
13
11

2
2

1

21
13
8
3

1

-

-

7
7
3

12
10
3

6
5
2

21
19
15

11
11
11

7
7
2

2
2
-

-

3
3
-

2
2
2

1
1
“

1
1
1

-

-

290

over

10
10

8
8

COMPUTER PR0GRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S A ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -------------------

94
68
26

39.0
39.5
40.0

253.00
254.00
287.50

252.50
252.50
282.00

222.00-281.00
218.00-284.00
269.50-316.00

-

-

39.5
39.5

221.50
222.00

217.00
219.50

205.00-239.00
206.00-240.00

“

-

---------------------------------------------------

211
176
107
53

38.5

203.50

208.00

183.00-222.50

-

*

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S C ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -------------------

89
83
41

39.0
39.0
40.0

182.50
181.00
186.00

182.00
182.00
183.50

161.00-196.50
160.00-197.00
180.00-195.50

-

2
2
1

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B ------------------------------------N C N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------

_

“

*

130.50-155.50
130.50-150.00

-

-

-

-

*

“

2
2
“

10
10
1

_
-

9
8

-

_

_

-

-

1
1
-

1
-

ANALYSTS,
271.00-336.50

304.50
J1f

T9

1

285.00-347.50
-

-

62
52

40.0
40.0

199.50
199.00

192.50
191.00

166.50-237.00
167.00-236.50

-

O P A F T S M E N , C L A S S B ----------------------NCNMANUFACTURING
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -------------------

71

39.0

168.50

167.00

141.50-186.50

-

-

(REGISTERED)

----

35

38.0

183.50

183.00

172.50-202.50

-

183
182
INDUSTRIAL

38.0
38.0

151.50
151.50

154.00
154.00

141.00141.00-

159.50
159.50

1

79

39.5

193.00

191.00

170.00-

211.50

-

•Vorkers were distributed as follows:
v.orkers were distributed as follows:




> tables,
f

**55

44

A ------------------------------------------------

NURSES,

200

150

146.50
146.50

CRAFTSMEN, CLASS
MANUFACTURING

190

140

146.50
144.50

SYSTEMS

s

t

$
180

130

39.0
39.0

COMPUTER

170

120

130
119

FINANCE

r e c e i v i n g strai g h t - t i m e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s of—

t

*
160

and

C L A S S C -------------------------------

COMPUTER OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING

t
150

COMBINED

C L A S S A -------------------------

COMPUTER OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING

n o

and
under
110

MEN

s

*

$
100

-

1

-

-

-

•

1

“
15

5
3

14
14

1
1

9
8

7
5

”

1
1

2
2

17
17

6

4

13

5

12

3

8

2

2

_

4

5

10

3

6

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

g

6

13

8

1

5

6

-

1

-

-

-

-

2

1

1

21

14

38

64

2
-

2
1

1
-

-

-

"

_

8
i

6

13

11

8

5 at $290 to $300; 1 at $300 to $310; 2 at $310 to $320; 5 at $330 to $340; and 2 at $340 and over.
6 at $290 to $300; 10 at $300 to $310; 7 at $310 to $320; 5 at $320 to $330; 8 at $330 to $340; 8 at $340 to $350; 3 at $350 to $360; and 8 at $360

17
T a b le A -3 .

O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s :

A v e ra g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s , by sex

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1973)
A ve rage

A v e rage

Sex , o c c u p a t i o n ,

a n d i n d u s t r y d ivision

N um ber
of
workers

W eekly
(standard )

OFFICE

OCCUPATIONS

-

W eekly
e arn in gs1
(standard)

$
166.00
172.50
164.50
202.00
160.50

332
70
262
49
124

39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0

C L E R K S . A C C O U N T I N G . C L A S S B ---------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

141
130
45

39.0 145.50
39.0 146.50
39.0 178.00

C L E R K S , O R D E R -----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E --------------------

335
324
285

O
40.0 147.O i
40.0 147.00
40.0 143.50

M E S S E N G E R S ( O F F I C E B O V S ) -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -------------------F I N A N C E -------------------------------

316
53
263
49
55
134

38.5
40.0
38.5
39.0
40.0
37.5

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S B ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

141
141

40.0 136.00
40.0 136.00

63
50

39.0 130.50
38.5 128.50

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S A ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

110
106

40.0 132.50
40.0 132.50

BUCKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S B ------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g
--------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------

212
73
139
64

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

121.00
121.50
120.50
122.O
C

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S A ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N U N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -------------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------------S E R V I C E S ------------------------------

1,052
140
912
172
206
206
239
89

39.0
40.0
39.0
39.0
40.0
39.5
38.5
37.0

145.50
159.00
143.00
177.00
146.50
137.00
124.50
134.50

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N C N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -------------------R E T A I L T R A O E -----------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------------S E R V I C E S ------------------------------

2,300
329
1,971
479
361
366
572
193

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
40.0
38.5
39.0

119.00
117.50
119.00
139.00
118.00
118.00
106.00
112.50

OCCUPATIONS

-

108.00
108.50
108.00
137.50
107.00
99.00

WCMEN

BILLERS. MACHINE (BILLING
M A C H I N E ) -----------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

See footnote at end of tables.




o c c u p a t i o n , a n d i n d u s t r y division

MEN

C L E R K S . A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S A ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E --------------------

OFFICE

Sex,

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED
CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

W eekly
hours 1
(standard )

W eekly
e arn in gs1
(standard )

$
39.0 123.00
39.0 120.50

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S B -----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

38.5 101.50
38.5 100.50
38.0 141.00
37.5 99.50

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

38.5
38.0
37.0

C --------------------------------------

91.50
91.50
87.50

C L E R K S , O R D E R -----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E --------------------

39.5 129.00
39.5 128.00
39.5 128.00

CLERKS,

P A Y R O L L --------------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g
-------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------F I N A N C E -------------------------------

39.0
39.5
39.0
38.5
38.5

129.00
124.50
132.00
156.00
117.00

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -------------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------------S E R V I C E S ------------------------------

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
38.5
39.0

147.00
142.00
147.50
134.50
122.50
130.50
131.50

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------W H O L E S A L E T R A O E -------------------R E T A I L T R A O E -----------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------------S E R V I C E S ------------------------------

39.0
40.0
39.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
38.5
36.5

121.00
122.50
121.00
138.00
118.00
129.00
117.00
114.50

M E S S E N G E R S ( O F F I C E G I R L S ) -----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E --------------------

39.0 104.00
39.0 1 05.CO
40.0 109.50

S E C R E T A R I E S --------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -------------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------------S E R V I C E S ------------------------------

39.0
39.5
39.0
38.5
40.0
39.5
38.5
38.0

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S A ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

150.00
146.50
151.00
191.00
148.50
158.50
136.50
142.50

39.0 178.00
38.5 182.00
39.0 228.00

W eekly
[standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED

-

A ----------------

Sex , o c c u p a t i o n , a n d i n d u s t r y division

SECRETARIES

-

W eekly
earnings1
(standard)

-

CONTINUED

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S --------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ---------------R E T A I L T R A O E --------------------F I N A N C E ---------------------------S E R V I C E S --------------------------S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S --------------W H O L E S A L E T R A O E ---------------R E T A I L T R A D E --------------------F I N A N C E ---------------------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------

776
173
603
141
118
66
201
78
1,530
423
1,107
179
177
148
503
IOC

39.
39.5
39.0
39.0
40.
40.0
38.0
38.0
39.C
39.5
39.0
38.5

40.0
39.5
38.5
38.0

$
C
166.50
163.50
167.00
201.50
C
171.50
141.00
154.50
153.50
153.50
155.50
152.50
188.50
156.CO
169.00
136.00
141.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S D ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S --------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ---------------R E T A I L T R A D E --------------------F I N A N C E ---------------------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------

1,658
405
1,253
103
400
232
441
77

39.0 136.50
39.0 i 127.50
39.0 139.C0
39.0' 172.CO
40.0 137.50
4 0 . C 157.50
38.5 126.00
3 9 . C 122.50

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , G E N E R A L ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S --------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ---------------R E T A I L T R A D E --------------------F I N A N C E ---------------------------S E R V I C E S --------------------------

1,046
205
841
318
226
95
126
76

39.0
39.5
38.5
38.5
39.5
40.0
37.0
38.0

131.50
122.50
134.00
145.00
127. CO
131.00
122.00
130.50

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , S E N I O R --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S --------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ---------------F I N A N C E ---------------------------S E R V I C E S --------------------------

871
273
598
218
189
102
56

39.5
39.5
39.0
39.0
39.5
38.5
40.0

153.00
16 0 .5C
149.50
165.00
151.00
126.00
138.50

SWITCHBOARO

OPERATORS,

CLASS

A -----

61

40.0 14 8 .5C

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING —
R E T A I L T R A O E ----F I N A N C E -----------S E R V I C E S -----------

413
401
91
81
165

40.5
40.5
40.0
38.0
42.5

108.00
108.50
111.CO
115.50
93.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSM A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------W H O L E S A L E t r a d e ------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------F I N A N C E -------------------------------

585
145
440
53
177
90
74

39.5
40.0
39.0
39.
40.0
39.5
37.0

11 9.5C
117.50
120.00
177.00
111.50
111.00
109.00

18
T a b le A -3 .

O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s :

A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s , b y s e x -----C o n t i n u e d

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s b y i n d u s t r y division, Atlanta, Ga. ,

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUEO
TRANSCRI81NG-MACHINE

Num ber
of
workers

1

W eekly
e a r n in g s1
(standard )

116.50
123.50
113.00

76

38.5
40.0
38.0
38.5
37.5
38.5

126.00
127.00
125.50
154.50
116.00
121.00

1,182
115
1,067
108
93
67
648

38.0
40.0
38.0
39.0
40.0
39.5
37.0

106.50
110.50
106.00
135.50
107.00
112.50
100.50

P l i 'm T u K j f C L A S S

A

footnote at e n d

of tables.

187.50

39.0

AND TECHNICAL
HEN— CONTINUEO

38.5
40.0
40.0
39.0
36.5

164.00
201.50
168.50
160.50
141.50

110
128

Sex,

o c c u p a t i o n , a n d i n d u s t r y division

174

A v e rage

39.5

$
140.00

of

W eekly

W eekly
earnings^
(standard )

w orkers
standard)

PROFESSIONAL
OCCUPATIONS -

33
76

W h U L t S A L t7 2 1KAUfc

39.5
40.0

AN0 TECHNICAL
MEN— CONTINUEO
$

U K A r 1i n t N *

L LA j j A

149.00
140.00
___

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----— —

—

— — — — ----

312
139

_

—

182.50

39.5

143.00

251.00
NONMANUFACTURING

COMPUTER PR0GRAHERS,
BUSINESS* CLASS B ——— — —

160.50
39.5

543
——— ——— — ————

—

— — —

39.5

P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------FINANCE —
— — — —
— —
—
PR0GRAMERS,
* c l a s s c — ——
—
—
—
N O N M A N U F A C IU R I N G — —
— — — — —
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----— -------- —

40.0

238.50

126.00

394

39.5

212.00

70

79

37.0

204.00

T9

30

206.50

88

39.5

NONMANUFACTURING

COMPUTER

ANALYSTS*
A

COMPUTER SYSTEMS
BUSINESS* CLASS

ANALYSTS,
B — —————— ——

86
81
35

39.5
40.0

187.50

120
90

b u s i n e s s

38.5

305.00

147
141

37.5
37.5

264.50
264.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS* CLASS C ——— —————
NONMANUFACTURING

PROFESS I O N A L AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

COMPUTER

169.50

425

F I N A N C E -------------------------------S E R V I C E S ------------------------------

39.5

504




(standard )

W eekly
earnings *
(stan dard )

r. lrr »
166

See

W eekly

workers

COMPUTER SYSTEMS
B U S 1 NE«i^>* C L A S S

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
O C C U PATIONS - MEN
j

of

127
30 0
40.0
36.-,

309
70
239
49

COMPUTER

o c c u p a t i o n , a n d i n d u s t r y division

$

*
?

145

.nnt.

Sex,

PROFESSIONAL
OCCUPATIONS -

-

•
N um ber

N um ber
W eekly
hours
(standard )

-

OPERATORS,

1973)

A v e rage

A v e rage

Sex , o c c u p a t i o n , a n d i n d u s t r y division

May

—

—

—

—

—— ——

85

39.5

232.00

PR0GRAMERS,
5

220.00
NURSES,

INDUSTRIAL

(REGISTERED)

----

190.00

19
T a b l e A - 3 a . O ffic e , p r o fe s s io n a l, an d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s — la rg e e s ta b lis h m e n ts :
A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s , by s e x
{Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1973)
A v e rage
N um ber
of
workers

W eekly
(standard]

OFFICE

OCCUPATIONS

-

W eekly
earnings 1
(standard)

MEN

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S A ---------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

39.5
39.5
40.0

184.50
180.50
192.50

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B --------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

79
74
39

39.5
39.5
39.5

160.00
162.50
179.50

M E S S E N G E R S I G F F I C E B O Y S ) -------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

125
112
43

39.5
39.0
39.0

117.50
117.00
137.50

Num ber
of
workers

W eekly

W eekly
earnings *
(standard )

A verage

S e x , o ccu p atio n , an d in d u s t r y d iv is io n

N um ber
of
workers

standard)

W eekly
e arn in gs1
(standard )

363
87
276
106
61
84

39.0
40.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
38.0

$
116.00
113.00
117.00
135.50
112.50
100.00

C L A S S A ------------------------------

102
89

39.5
39.5

189.00
190.50

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------F I N A N C E -------------------------------

246
64
182
74
59

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
38.0

186.00
207.50
178.50
203.00
150.00

C L A S S C ------------------------------

92
81

39.5
39.5

147.50
145.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S A ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------ —

77
55

39.5
39.5

258.50
261.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

158
126
78

39.5
39.5
40.0

224.50
226.50
238.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S C ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

68
63

39.5
39.5

186.00
184.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS
BUSINESS, CLASS

ANALYSTS,
A -----------------------

77

39.0

304.50

DRAFTSMEN,

A

-----------------------

57

197.50

D R A F T S M E N , C L A S S B ----------------------NONMANUFACTURING
P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

59

39.5

167.00

27

39.0

184.00

D R A F T S M E N , C L A S S C ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED
138
108
39

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S B ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

A v e rage

Sex, o c c u p a tio n , an d in d u s t r y d iv is io n

o

S e x , o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s t r y d iv is io n

161
160

38.0
38.0

151.50
151.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

53
50
29

39.5
39.5
39.5

211.00
210.50
220.00

NURSES,

79

39.5

193.00

-

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED

M E S S E N G E R S ( O F F I C E G I R L S ) --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------

85
78

39.0
39.0

102.50
103.50

S E C R E T A R I E S -----------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -------------- ---R E T A I L T R A O E -----------------------F I N A N C E --------------------------------

2,040
570
1,470
328
404
640

39.0
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.5
39.0

159.50
156.00
160.50
197.50
163.00
136.00

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S A ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------

61
50

39.0
39.0

205.00
204.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B ---------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------

344
74
270
108
97

39.0
38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0

181.50
182.50
181.50
206.00
154.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C ---------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------------------------F I N A N C E ----------------------------------------------------

982
260
722
152
119
397

39.0
39.5
39.0
38.0
39.5
39.0

159.50
168.50
156.50
190.50
177.00
134.00

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S 0 ---------------------------N C N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------------------R E T A I L T R A O E -----------------------F I N A N C E --------------------------------

646
421
44
232
129

39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.5

143.00
150.00
188.50
157.50
124.00

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , G E N E R A L ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A O E ------------------------

430
53
377
266
64

38.5
39.5
38.5
38.5
40.0

137.50
127.50
139.00
141.50
138.50

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , S E N I O R -----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

537
293
177

39.5
39.0
38.5

157.50
152.00
164.00

116
110

39.5
39.5

116.00
116.00

40.0
40.0

137.00
137.00

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S A --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------

461
64
397
163
139
61

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.0

158.50
186.00
154.00
176.50
134.00
135.00

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------

920
83
837
455
254
81

39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0

130.50
132.50
130.50
139.00
118.00
112.50

A --------------------------------------

79
67

39.0
39.0

123.00
120.00

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S B -----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------F I N A N C E -------------------------------

235
209
33
62

39.0
39.0
37.5
39.0

103.00
101.00
128.00
96.50

CL ER KS . FILE, CLASS
NCNMANUFACTURING

289
275

39.5
39.5

92.00
91.50

C L E R K S , P A Y R O L L --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

150
53
97
30

39.0
39.0
38.5
40.0

129.50
132.00
128.00
155.50

S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B ----N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

67

39.5

762
79
683
145
59

39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0

157.00
152.00
157.50
122.50
129.00

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
G E N E R A L --------------------------------------

52

39.0

670
90
580
130
261
96

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
38.5

130.50
140.00
129.00
138.50
130.50
118.50

185
141
49
61

38.5
38.0
38.5
38.0

133.00
132.50
154.50
113.50

P R O F ES SI ON AL AND TECHNICAL
OC CU PA TI ON S - MEN
COMPUTER OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING

120.50

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S A -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------F I N A N C E --------------------------------

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S B -------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------F I N A N C E -------------------------------

127.00

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N C N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------

-

OFFICE

OCCUPATIONS

-

WOMEN

NONMANUFACTURING --------------------PUBLIC
RETAIL

U T I L I T I E S -----------------T R A D E ------------------------

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

C --------------------------------------

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S 8 --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N C N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------

.-r at er.d
'<




tables.

SWITCHBOARD

COMPUTER OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING

CLASS

PROFESSIONAL

ANO

OCCUPATIONS

INDUSTRIAL

-

o
•r

51
51

W eekly

TECHNICAL
WOMEN

(REGISTERED)

----

20
T a b le A -4 .

M a in te n a n c e and p o w e r p la n t o c c u p a tio n s : H o u rly e a rn in g s

(Average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1973)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f—

Hourly earnin gs34

S e x , o ccu p atio n , and in d u stry d iv is io n

of

Mean*

M e d ian *

M iddle range 2

$

S
t
*
*
$
Under2' 60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.40 3. 60 3.
*
and
2*60 under
*

*

O
0
0

s

t

»

$

t

$

t

»

*

$

$

*

$

and
80 5,00 5. 20 5.40 5.60 5.80

o

00 4. 20 4 4 0 4,60

o
o

2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.40 3.60 3. 80

f

4. 00 4 20 4 .40 4. 60 4.80 5. 00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6 .00 6.20

6 .20 over

MEN

C A R P E N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------N C N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------

118
86
57

$
5.53
5.75
5.67

$
5.53
5.65
5.55

$
4.605.185.15-

$
6.71
6.75
5.89

E L E C T R I C I A N S , M A I N T E N A N C E -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

425
337
88
56

5.46
5.34
5.92
5.80

5.54
5.45
6.08
5.23

5.024.845.165.14-

6.14
6.12
6.74
6.73

E N G I N E E R S , S T A T I O N A R Y -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

146
74
72

5.05
5.07
5.02

5.09
5.38
5.03

4.084.764.06-

5.71
5.59
5.74

F I R E M E N , S T A T I O N A R Y B O I L E R ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

58
53

3.33
3.25

2.70
2.69

2.642.63-

3.63
3.57

6
6

24
24

“

1

12

9

_

3

-

---------

295

3.47

3.23

3.05-

3.79

3

M A C H I N I S T S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

371
289

5.24
4.81

5.21
4.93

4.724.47-

5.88
5.38

1,194
177
1,017
882
102

5.08
4.59
5.16
5.26
4.56

4.95
4.56
4.98
4.99
4.82

4.584.054.794.844.06-

5.92
4.95
5.94
5.98
5.04

M E C H A N I C S , M A I N T E N A N C E ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

582
468
114

4.33
4.18
4.94

4.24
4.18
5.14

3.693.654.33-

4.88
4.76
5.29

P A I N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

98
53

5.23
5.29

5.91
5.91

3.504.78-

6.26
5.96

P I P E F I T T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

147
146

5.58
5.58

5.93
5.93

5.175.17-

6.01
6.01

T O O L A N D D I E M A K E R S --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

193
193

5.44
5.44

5.81
5.81

4.794.79-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

4
2

3

5

3
1

-

15
15

MAINTENANCE

TRADES

5
1
W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d a s fo llo w s :
W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d a s fo llo w s :
* ~ W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d a s fo llo w s :
*
W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d a s fo llo w s :
W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s fo llo w s :
t t i A l l w o r k e r s w e r e at $6.20 to $6.40.
See footr.oti




at end o f ta b le s .

3 at $6.20 to
6 at $6.20 to
4 at $6.20 to
3 at $6.20 to
2 at $6.20 to

$6.40;
$6.40;
$6.40;
$6.40;
$6.40;

“
“
-

1

14
10
8

14
12
12

2
2
2

12
12

30
29
1

53
25
28
28

40
36
4
2

21
20
1

48
40
8

8
5
3

6
5
1

20

-

15
15

-

20

*

18
16
2

-

-

1

-

_
-

-

6
6

17
17

l

_
-

-

-

1

10

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

“

-

.
-

-

_
-

6
6

1
1

9

4

-

16

-

2

8
1

4
1
3

-

4

16

2

-

4
4

10
9

2
1

“

1

4
3

-

12

13

-

71

5

12

3
3

_
”

6
6

9
9

21
21

7
7

8
8

28
28

11
11

80
80

1
1

37
37

13
7
6
2
4

17
11
6
2
4

34
2
32
30
2

32
14
18
10
8

58
14
44

49
3
46
25
11

92
51
41
27
4

75
15
60
55

307
12
295
273
20

90
1
89
65
24

27
7
20
16
4

18
18

ii

48
43

46
46

54
51
3

54
8
46

-

*
_

30
25
5

43
43

5

45
43
2

53
53

5

67
52
15

18

8
6

1
1

1
1

3

9
9

-

3
3

1

-

“
“

18
18

5

2
2

-

3
3

_

*

3

“

_
“

2

11
5
5

_
-

*
107

1
1

9
9

1

9

6.24
6.24

HELPERS,

4
3
2

3

5
5
5

-

6
6

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
( M A I N T E N A N C E ) ---------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------R E T A I L T R A 0 E ------------------------

“

-

-

*
_
-

*
_
-

*
_
_
_

-

9
2
7
1
4
36
35
1

-

6
6

-

“

6

1
1

“

1

1 at $6.40 to $6.60; 21 at $6.60 to $6.80; an d 10 at $7.40 to $7.60.
23 at $6.60 to $6.80; 3 at $6.80 to $7; 3 at $7 to $7.20; and 1 at $7.20 to $7.40.
4 at $6.60 to $6.80; 3 at $6.80 to $7; 1 at $7 to $7.20; and 2 at $7.20 to $7.40.
and 82 at $6.60 to $6.80.
20 at $6.60 to $6.80; 1 at $7 to $7.20; and 2 at $7.40 to $7.60.

31

6

10
10

43

“
3

1
1
5
5

-

-

14
8
8

“

*35
33
13

6
6

117 **36
108
9
36
6
20

5

7
7

i i ***14

5

11

1
1

*
*

37
37

16
16

12
12

11

52

11
10
1

52
48
4

105
21
84
81
1

43
41
2

14
4
10

3
-

-

2

10

3

2

10

“

28
27

18
18

-

47
46

6
6

-

18
18

“

“

7
4

3

5
5

_

1

t85

7

5

-

_
“

15
15

“
*

11
11

23
23

38
38

5
3

5

5

-

-

”
5

1
150
11
139
139

3

67

-

67
67

-

- tt25
3
“
38
38
“
_ ttteo

80

21
T a b le A -4 a .

M a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s — la r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s :

H o u r l y e a r n in g s

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f w o r k e r s in s e le c te d o ccu p atio n s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts em p lo y in g 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e by in d u s t ry d iv is io n , A tla n t a , G a . , M a y 1973)

Numbe

Hourly eamings3

of
workers

Mean2

Median*

U nd e r
Middle range *

$
3. 0 0

t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n i i g s of —

$
3.20

t
3.30

$
3.60

t
3.50

s
3.60

$
3. 7 0

$
3.80

s
3. 9 0

$
6.00

t

6.60

$
6.60

t

6.20

t

4 .80

5.00

$
5.20

$
5 60

$
5.60

5.80

*
6.00

$
6.20

3.20

3.30

3.60

3.50

3.60

3.70

3. 8 0

3.90

6. 0 0

6.60

6.60

6.80

5 .00

5.20

5.60

5 .6 0

5.80

6.00

6.20

over

16
12
12

2
2
2

16

—
-

*35

9

67
39

6
6

i

an d
under
o

4-

3.10

t

o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i 7g

t
3.10

rg

S e x , o c c u p a t i o n , an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

i
3.00

t

MEN
$
5.65
5.90
5.78

$
5.58
5.83
5.57

$
6.955.305.27-

$
6.72
6.76
6.10

-

367
207
80

5.56
5.66

5.76
5.73

5.135.07-

6.15
6.13

3
3

105
65

5.19
5.18

C A R P E N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------R E T A I L T R A O E ------------------------

107
78
53

E L E C T R I C I A N S , M A I N T E N A N C E -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

—

-

-

_

-

-

-

—
-

1
1

—

-

2
2

3
3

2

-

6
6

—
-

1
1

3
3
1

-

2

-

3
2

—
-

—
-

1
1

1
1
1

11
5
5

“

6
3
2

2
1
1

12

-

3
-

“

i
i

6
6

12
12

12
12

18
17

51
25
26

60
36

1

1

8
8

9

8
8

111
108

HLL'Lhji

M A IN T L N A N C L T R A 0 Lu

5.39
5.39

6.286.83-

5.95
5.59

3.0

3.05

3»74

MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

302
220

5.65
6.97

5.27
6.96

6.896.81-

6.71
5.37

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE! -------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------RETAIL TRAOE ---------------------------

511
66
665
371
70

5.31
5.30
5.32
5.39
6.91

5.26
5.38
5.19
5.72
4.99

6.806.796.806.776.81-

5.95
5.98
5.95
5.97
5.08

MECHANICS* MAINTENANCE ------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------

330
238
92

6.72
6.51
5.26

4.80
6.65
5.17

6.186.135.11-

5.17
6.87
5.72

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE -----------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

80
53

5.65
5.29

5.95
5.91

5.036.78-

6.72
5.96

PIPEFITTERS, MAINTENANCE -----------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

167
166

5.58
5.58

5.93
5.93

5.175.17-

6.01
6.01

m a c h in ists,

m a in t e n a n c e

--------------------

223

r
J

.

-

i 0t
1 h7

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

1

-

“

-

i
i
i

-

9
8

-

-

-

3
1
2
2

-

-

_

1

-

-

-

1

-

1
1

.
-

”

"

1
1

1

7

*

r
J

70
4
4

-

2
1
1
1

1

31

10

-

-

1
1

31
29
2

10
10

1

1
1

16
16

“

“
36
35
1

_
”

1

7
6

1
1

-

*

i
i

2

-

2

1
1

1

.
“

6
5

6

-

5

-

3
8
a

13
13

11
11

77

1

77

1

29
10
19
17
2

6
1
5
2
3

31
31
27
6

12
4
8
3
5

49
9
60
18
20

76
1
75
51
26

-

32
30

30
30

6
1

60
40

56

_

2

5

“

62
39
3

_

-

3

“

5
3

-

3
1
1

_

15
15

_

-

7
7

15
15

18
16

4

37
37

19
19

16
16

12
12

52

105
21
86
81
1

u

ii

7

7

7
7

_

-

-

1
1

2

-

-

2
2

-

1

-

3

“

2

6
6

“

_

2
1

1

3
3

*

*

1
1

13

i

-

_

**36

on
**

2
E N G I N E E R S , S T A T I O N A R Y -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------

33
13

“

-

_

-

13
7
6
2

4

11

-

-

11
1C
1

52

48
4

i ***85
3

i
u

t67

-

u

-

67
67

2

:c

5

8
46

-

37
35

2

3
1C

-

5

9
9

-

-

-

*

28
27

-

"

tt25
3

18
18

5

18
18

-

47
46

38
38

_
"

5

13

3

3

2

10

+++80
18

+
TT
ttt

W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d as fo llo w s
.Vo r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d as fo llo w s
W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d as fo llo w s
’W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d as fo llo w s
Vi o r ke r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d as fo llo w s
A l l w o r k e r s w e r e at S6. 20 to $ 6 .4 0 .




o f ta b le s

3 at
at
3 at
2 at
2 at

6

$ 6 .2 0 to
$ 6 .2 0 to
$ 6 .2 0 to
$6. 20to
$ 6 .2 0 to

$ 6 .4 0 ;
$ 6 .4 0 ;
$ 6 .4 0 ;
$6. 40;
$ 6 .4 0 ;

1 at $ 6 .4 0 to $ 6 .6 0 ; 21 at $ 6 .6 0 to $ 6 .8 0 ; and 10at $ 7 .4 0 to $ 7 .6 0 .
23 at $ 6 .6 0 to $ 6 .8 0 ; 3 at $ 6 .8 0 to $7; 3 at $7 to $ 7 .2 0 ; and 1 at $ 7 .2 0 to $ 7 .4 0 .
and 82 at $ 6 .6 0 to $ 6 .8 0 .
6 at $6. 40 to $6. 60; and 59 at $6. 60 to $6. 80.
20 at $ 6 .6 0 to $ 6 .8 0 ; 1 at $7 to $ 7 .2 0 ; and 2 at $ 7 .4 0 to $ 7 .6 0 .

22
T a b le A -5 . C u s t o d ia l a nd m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s : H o u r l y e a r n in g s
(Average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1973)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings^

Sex, occupation, and industry division

t
*
S
$
*
s
*
S
t
*
*
s
S
S
t
$
S
1.60 1.70 1.80 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.2 0 3.40 3.6 0 3 .80 4 .0 0 4.20 4.4 0 4.60
w
orkers

M 2 Median2
ean

Middle range 2

GUARDS
MANUFACTURING

1,977
241
1,736

$
2.30
3.75
2.10

$
2.04
4.5 2
2.02

$
1 .8 9 2 .5 8 1 .8 8 -

$
2.23
4.92
2.10

20
20

69
69

163

--

WATCHMEN
MANUFACTURING

4 .4 7

4 .5 9

4 .5 1 - 4.9 5

-

-

-

-

658
18
640

-

695
26
669

-

171
2
169

-

52
16
36

6

42
20
22

11
11

-

-

78

2.2 5

2.18

2 .0 2 - 2.62

18

26

2

10

20

-

JANITORS. PORTERS. AND CLEANERS
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE
R E T A I L T R A O E --F I N A N C E ----------SERVICES

A , 747
777
3,970
270
115
309
106
3,170

2.2 9
3.52
2.0 5
3.8 9
3.0 0
2.6 9
2.1 6
1.79

1.92
3.43
1.79
4.0 4
3.02
2.57
1.87
1.74

1 .6 9 2 .5 8 1 .6 8 3 .8 3 2 .5 6 2 .3 2 1 .7 7 1 .6 6 -

2.52 1292
4.53
2.10 1292
4.19
3.24
3.05
13
2.64
1.98 1279

764
764
6
40
718

452
13
439
—
20
419

663
67
596
20
23
2
551

258
57
201
6
53
8
134

232
65
167
7
29
75
9
47

137
54
83
8
18
39
8
10

67
32
35

LABORERS. MATERIAL HANDLING
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------

3,833
1,151
2*682
506
1,018
1,158

3 .0 9
2.97
3 .1 6
4 .3 9
2.81
2.87

2.75
2.75
2.75
3.76
2.65
2.61

2 .4 5 2 .3 7 2 .6 8 —
3 .0 8 2 .4 2 2 .4 5 -

3.48
3.48
3.68
5.94
2.87
3.21

.
•
—

12
12
-

64
51
13
13

201
87
114
26
88

467
191
276
198
78

725
115
610
2
212
396

584
143
441
8
253
180

356
165
191
3

1,719
401
1,318
758
560

3.51
3.78
3.42
3.23
3.68

3.26
3.89
3.21
3.03
3.77

2 .8 5 3 .1 7 2 .8 2 2 .7 6 2 .8 7 -

4.25
4.91
4.22
3.29
4 .3 0

6
6
—

21
21
—
-

62
3
59
39
20

90
12
78
65
13

P A C K E R S . S H I P P I N G -----M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---NONMANUFACTURING
W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ----------RETAIL TRADE

617
409
208
140
68

3.08
3.00
3.26
3.28
3.21

2.81
2.70
2.83
2.39
2.90

2 .6 0 2 .6 3 2 .3 0 2 .2 7 2 .8 3 -

3.53
3.18
4.71
4.74
3.84

82
9
73
72
1

57
46
11
7

R E C E I V I N G C L E R K S ----MANUFACTURING
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E --------R E T A I L T R A D E ---

375
124
251
97
152

3.82
4 .1 9
3.6 3
3.17
3.92

3.72
4.48
3.36
3.06
4.0 5

2 .9 4 3 .4 3 2 .7 8 2 .6 7 2 .8 8 -

3

30

S H I P P I N G C L E R K S ----M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---

173
108

3.93
4.4 7

SHIPPING ANO RECEIVING CLERKS
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------NONMANUFACTURING
WHOLESALE TRADE

217
117
100
76
6,871
1,237
5,634
3,198
1,195
1,062
155

NONMANUFACTURING ----------PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE
R E T A I L TRADE --

--

ORDER
FILLERS
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --NONMANUFACTURING
^ W H O L E S A L E T R A D E -------R E T A I L T R A O E ------------

TRUCKORIVERS
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE RETAIL TRADE
S E R V I C E S -----

See footnotes at end of tables.




$
5.00

i
$
5.20 5.40

.60 5.80

4.2 0 4.40 4.6 0 4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

.80 6.00

-

t

i

and
under
1.70 I t 80 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.4 0 3.6 0 3.8 0 4 .00

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---NONMANUFACTURING

4.80

_
—

-

~

-

-

*

—
-

•
-

—
“

*

4.92
4.95
4.75
3.81
4.9 4

•
-

-

.
—

“

3.83
4.9 2

3 .0 6 - 4.9 4
3 .8 5 - 4.9 7

-

3.9 0
4.2 8
3.46
3.5 2

3.74
4.52
3.46
3.48

3 .5 1 3 .6 8 3 .0 4 3 .0 9 -

4.54
4.82
3.94
3.70

4 .3 7
3 .3 7
4 .5 9
5.53
3.11
3.69
3.12

4.4 7
3.43
4.98
5.93
2.88
3.09
2.89

3 .0 8 3 .2 1 3 .0 5 5 .1 9 2 .6 8 2 .8 2 2 .5 5 -

5.92
3.48
5.94
5.96
3.38
4.84
4.10

-

-

-

-

12
12

—
-

_

*
.

-

•

.

-

-

-

4

28
14
14

24
2
22

7

6

14

14
6
8

20
20
12
5

*

*

_
-

111
77

265
54
211
150
32
29

143
25
118
32
4
82

132
27
105
100
5

189
54
135
102
1
32

188
16
172
151
21

248
34
214
96
118

131
12
119
107
12

236
65
171
156
15

82
4
78
12

18

153
140
13
7
6

85
56
29

55
51
4

17
12
5

*

*

15
10
5

53

-

65

10

-

7

-

2

18
12
3

2
19
21

1
7

6

93
35
58
51
7

129
26
103
95
8
“

“

“

68
58

93
10

115
43

7

3

*

33
15

18

66

6

11
10
1

5
1

10

83

38
32
6
3
3

72

329
287
42
29
13
-

2

2
5
4
i

21
21
16
5

“

—
—
”

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

“

13
1

156
74

43
41

2

5
5
5

12

65

3
9

78
4

81

47
18
29
29

138
40
98
98

124
124
124

120
1
119

111
109
2

1
1

1

2

1

19
17

10

2

54

2

54
48

-

2

8

6

54
54
“

-

-

-

45
36
14
22

1
1

1

1

2

8

6

1

27
13
14
14

8

29
9
20
19
1

6
6

10

4

7

3

7

13

13
”

19

10

7

6
6

3

27
14
13

3
3

13
“

*

-

•

19

-

*

19
6

23
23

3
6

*
45
42
3

193
38
155

460
22
438

6

—

214
51
163

*

3

52
70
19

65
53
35

329
96
13

-

2
1

16
16

4

1
1

20

49

16

6

6
6

18
18

13

“

8
8

5
1
i

600
28
572
42
276
246
8

273
111
162
28
52
79
3

476
136
340
154
136
20
30

679
623
56

215
47
168
74
88
4

93
10
83
1
75
4

2

3

18
3

-

12
44

2

•

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

202
-

202

202
“
_

-

“

-

_
-

-

*

*

*

83

13
13

4

57
26

5
1

13

-

-

-

1

3

1

23
23

4

6
6

2

20
20

31

118

-

-

1

23

26

4

6
-

*

3

1

-

6

-

8

2

83

5

4
4

82

T

10

11
2
9

4

14
12
12
-

4

3

-

78
65
13

47
17
30
11
19

3

-

4
4

29

*

6

62
53
9

27

12
6

—
-

9

1
101
53
48

12

—
—
—

9

11
11

-

*

2

1

-

-

10
7
3

116
46
70
9
29
25
7
*

39
1
38
28
10

-

18
8
10

5.60

98
14
84

4
17
24
39

-

3

_

*

3

“

62
61

1
1

13
13
13

34
34
•

1
1
*

20
20
“

11
11
"

47
19
28
17
7
4

162
11
151
1
36
114

73
11
62

447
64
383
209
1
173

325

-

39
23

4

321
302
1
18

“

2

-

_

-

“

-

2

170
170

9

-

9

144

-

26

-

-

*

-

-

2

6

6

9

-

- 2280
- 2280
- 2222
58

23
T a b l e A - 5 . C u s t o d ia l and m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s : H o u r l y e a r n in g s — C o n t i n u e d
(Average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1973)

M ean 2

M e d ian 2

M iddle range 2

*

1.70 1.80

2.00

2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00

i

$

$
$
*
3.40 3.60 3.80

0
0

%
t
$
i
t
*
1.60 1.70 1.80 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80
and
under
«

3.20

3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00

4.20

3.00 3.20

t
$
t
$
S
$
»
*
*
4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80

l

Sex, occupation, and industry division

receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

N u m ber of w orkers

Hourly earnings
Num ber
of

4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00

5.20

5.40 5.60 5.80

6.00

M
EN - CONTINUED
TRUCKORIVERS

-

1

CONTINUED

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1-1/2 TONS! ----------------------------------------------

1,027

$

2.97

$

2.86

$

$

2 .6 2 - 3.22

6

34G
456
98

^*90
2.72

2.59

1 \ 503
578
302

2* 2!f
50
5.44
2.79
3. 83

t * St
5 12
5.92
2.73
3. 05

5.26
3.54

5.91
3.63

4 .6 9 - 5.96
3 .0 6 - 3.69

117

3

111
70
t9

5 .1 2 - 5.96
2 .6 4 - 2.87
t.0 5
3 .t3

2,294
60

6

3

3

-

3*13

■ }* j ; ?

i'ai

116

172

268

64

A6 1

33
30

96
8

1-5

133
127
8

48

“■It
o f?
244

^nn
ft/

125
119

37

46

2 .7 6 - 3.22
2 .6 2 - 3.03
2.51
3.22

169

i

l

59

56
3-2

3
3

4

-

-

12

18

32

-

-

-

ra

18

6

30

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM (1-1/2 TO

KC * MftL 1nM L
u

284
_
52
52

Z73
26
20

268

-

-

TRUCKORIVERS, HEAVY (OVER A TONS,
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

-

-

-

-

-

•8

TRUCKERS v POWER (F O R K L IF T )------------

2,045

3.77

* '? ? ?

3.54

ni
• 3
*

•55

3 .0 4 - 4.59
i* ? ?
jr

"

1&4
36

Tn
28

r
*?
28

12

24

■

1

14
13
1

14

12

106
23

74
3

33

12

12

??
ftn
60

71

16

123

180

104

75

14

1
135

47
47

2

Hr
W

3

7

'

-

21

59

91

*

137

177

294

*99
29

-

28

1
1 !?

■

T 71

^59

3 0t

4 3^

, ^

'5 ''

1,828

1.95

1.75

1 .6 7 - 1.91

676

467

252

1,707

1.92

1.74

1 .6 6 - 1.87

665

467

224

1,446

1.71

1.71

1 .6 5 - 1.79

665

451

217

109

647
285

2. 63

2» 81

2.54
2.90

2 .3 5 - 3l35
2.40
2.98

167

O'
63

°0

8

H

28

10

153

51

34

24

13

20

26

131

42

14

16

11
to

12

23

_
1
1

_
154

26

95

302
302

2-6

9r 0
893
__

_

*

70
70

302

33
12
1
4

T?

7

4. 5

UP
12

24
??

c * nl
30

106
1

134
3

49

36
95

39
16

T_
1

63
,3
2

67

255

6
-1

227

1312
4

12

3

89

See footnotes at end of table:




9

42

291
29

28
46

18
22

16

89

10

285

4
2
*
*
*

3

34

65

2

2

3
5

u

10

*5

3

-

-

-

166
\f e

i

1

g

;
6

10

_
1

19

6

55
1

3

-

1

WM
O EN
JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ----

18

r8

?

■

100

20

1
1

-

1
*

24
T a b le A -5 a .

C u s to d ia l and m a te ria l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s —la rge e s ta b lis h m e n ts :

H o u r ly e a rn in g s

(Average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1973)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u rly e a r n in g s of—

Hourly

Sex,

*
i
$
*
t
%
s
%
S
$
t
$
S
S
$
$
*
$
$
*
t
t
i
1.60 1.70 1.80 2.00 2.20 2 .AO 2 .60 2.80 3.00 3. 20 3. AO 3. 60 3. 80 A .00 A .20 A.AO A .60 A .80 5.00 5.20 5 .AO 5.60 5.80

o c c u p a t i o n , an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n
workers

Mean 2

Median2

Middle range c

and

1.70 1.80
M
EN
GUARDS AND WATCHMEN-------------------------!
MANUFACTURING------------------------------1
NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------- j

321
175
1A6

$
3.98
A .33
3.56

$
A . 38
A .58
3.61

$
3 .2 5 3 .5 8 2 .8 2 -

GUARDS
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

$
A .91
A .95
A .29

—
-

~
-

ro
o
o

under

-

2.20 2 . AO 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3. AO 3. 60 3. 80 4« 00 A . 20 A.AO A .60 A. 80 5.00 5.20 5 . AO 5.60 5.80 6.00

8
2
6

8
2
6

27
10
17

8
2
6

11

18
8
10

157

A.5A

A .59

2.50
3.92

1.79
A . 51

1 .6 6 - 3.50 1029
3 .1 7 - A .55
"

88
20

102
A2

84
18

65
18

32
1A

3.93
2.83

A .03
2.62

3 .8 6 - A .13
2 .3 9 - 3.19

-

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING ------------! 1,829
599
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------- j 1,230

3.51
3.33
3.60

3.02
2.99
3.09

2 .5 5 - A .29
2 .7 8 - 3.87
2 .5 2 - A .39

-

ORDER F IL L E R S --------------------------------- :
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------- i
RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------

727
190
537
419

A . 21
A . 36
A. 16
3.98

A .31
A . 91
A. 28
4.22

3 .6 9 3 .6 6 3 .7 1 3 .5 7 -

PACKERS, S H IPPIN G ---------------------------- \
MANUFACTURING------------------------------ j
NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------- |

138
56
82

3.9A
3.25
A.A2

A . 19
3.16
A .73

3 .1 6 - A .7 A
3 .1 1 - 3.85
A . 20- A .76

RECEIVING CLERKS ------------------------------ }
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------- |

195
118
116

A .37
A.2A
A.2A

4.91
4.76
A .77

3 .3 9 - A .97
3 .0 8 - A .98
3 .0 8 - A .98

TRUCKCRIVERS -----------------------------------j 1,953
157
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------1,796
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------------------- j 1,087
658
RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------

A . 87
A . 32
A .92
5 .AO
4.23

4.99
5.12
5.21
A . 57

A . 603 .8 0 A . 795 .1 1 2 .9 3 -

5.29
A .93
5.90
5.93
A .96

-

A . 52- A .96

2 , A52
JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ---5A1
MANUFACTURING------------------------------ I
NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC U T IL I T IE S ----------------------I
211
238
RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------- j

11

4 .44

A .73
A .96
A .59
4.51

-

9

218

108
1

1A

2

-

-

3A
13

1A
6

17
-

91
35

12A
23

9

4

-

-

-

-

_

15
10
5

-

53

-

65

10

-

38
32

326
287

2
2

7
2

5

*

”

-

_

_

5

-

“

5
-

-

-

5

“

-

-

-

7
52

8
33

2
10

7
25

-

-

A9
7

93
8

3
3

-

7

12
5

26

21

*

“

A
1

68
A5
23

7A
35
39

397
1A
383

179
61
118

191
1A5
A6

75
A6
29

96
10
86

6
1
5

87
5A
33

68
58
10

90
7
83

79
7
72

13
1
12

156
7A
82

A3
A1
2

-

-

3
3

-

23
2
21
21

10

39
2A
15
15

70
A
66
66

23
5
18
18

29
-

22
22

29
29

128
30
98
98

12A

-

10
10

2A
12
12
12

22

-

12 A
124

120
1
119
1

111
109
2
2

1

10
10

2
2

3
2
1

32
28
A

i
i

i

i
-

-

-

i

12
6
6

2
i

i

10
2
8

5A

-

9
7
2

i

5A

-

-

13
13
13

A
3
3

6

15
9
9

8
6
6

i
-

2
1
1

-

-

3
2
1

5
3
2

4

4
4

i
i

23
23
23

83
26
26

4
4

22

3

-

-

22

3

7A
A
70

108
1
107

A3
1
A2

15
7
8

1A
2
12

23
23
-

70

107

A2

8

12

18
11
7
4
2

36
19
17
13

1

8
7
1
1
~

123
8
115
1
11A

52
5
A7
23

AA7
6A
383
209
173

3

1

2
2

_
-

1A
12

13
6

32
13
13

28
20
1
19

12
7
7

1
1
-

A
A
A

95
95
95

26
2A
2
2

70
7
63
63

63
63
61

6
6

20

-

~
_

-

1

_
-

_
-

“
-

-

1
1
-

~

-

“

"
_

1

3
3
3

“

-

839
7A2
617
125

5.1A
5.23
5.2A
5.18

5.1A
5.15
5.15
5.28

A . 86A .88A . 89A . 53-

5.26
5.91
5.20
5.95

_

TRUCKCRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER A TONS,
TRAILER TYPE! ----------------------------NON»ANUFACTU»ING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------r e t a il trade ---------------------------

805
778
A69
283

5.2A
5.29
5.62
A. 80

5.21
5.22
5.91
A .91

A . 86A . 885 .2 A A .57-

5.93
5.93
5.96
A .95

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT! -----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NCNMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------- ,
WM
O EN

7AO
531
209
18A

A .21
A.v13
A.AO
A .33

A .39
A . 17
A.A7
A .39

3 .5 5 3 .A 6A . 31A . 30-

A .83
A.8A
A .59
A .56

_
-

-

-

-

-

7

1
1

13
13

38
36
2

57
50
7
7

96
96
-

JANITORS, PORTERS, ANO CLEANERS---- 1
MANUFACTURING------------------------------I
NCNMANUFACTURING -------------------------j
RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------- j

A27
73
3 5A
TO

2.61
2.67
2.59
2.87

2.33
2.A7
2.21
2.68

1 .7 8 2 .1 2 1 .7 7 2 .3 5 -

3.75
3 .0 A
3.8A
3.36

-

PACKERS, SHIPPING ---------------------------- j

233

2.82

2.50

2.3 A- 3.19

-

_

“

7

44

30
22
8
8

33

A2
-

A2

29

2

3

30
17

25
15
10

12

_

16
8
8

8

3

13
2
11
10

50

22

23

20
8
12
5
10

”

8
i
i
“

«

2

*

2

127
127

-

78
65
13

_

_

-

“

4

50

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

62
53
9

11

“

-

-

-

6

68
28

11

”

11

-

*

-

28
1A
1A

TRUCKCRIVERS, MEDIUM (1-1/2 TO
AND INCLUCING A TONS) ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRACE ---------------------------




2A
2
22

10
7
3

7

“

23

_

-

-

-

27
1
26
26

A3
A3
-

3

3A
3A

-

A
2

-

A

4
A

2

2

65
10
55
1

17

1

' 5

-

10

7

3
4

4

3

A

-

1

-

1
l

-

_
“

_
-

202
-

202
_

_

-

-

~

-

-

-

_

“

_
-

-

-

6
6
6

13
13
13

1
1
1

_

321
302
18

170
170
1AA
26

“

-

198
15A
15A
“

302
302
302
“

26
26
26

“

“

199
199
1A2
57

3A
3A
10

227
227
5A
173

5
1
-

1AA
1AA
1AA
“

-

“

272
272
271
1

31
19
12

255
233

9
1
8
8

“

-

8

22
7

*

-

-

i

-

-

_

5

32 5

A

-

_
-

A71
A71
A13
58

4
A

6

3

-

25

Footnotes

1 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e of p a y f o r o v e r t i m e
at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , an d the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k l y h o u r s .
The m ed ian
2 T h e m e a n is c o m p u t e d f o r e a c h j o b b y tota li ng the e a r n i n g s o f a l l w o r k e r s an d d i v i d i n g b y the n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ,
The m iddle
d e s i g n a t e s p o s i t i o n — h a l f o f the e m p l o y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e than the r a t e s h o w n ; h a l f r e c e i v e l e s s than the r a t e shown,
r a n g e i s d e fi n e d b y 2 r a t e s o f p a y ; a fo u r t h o f the w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s than the l o w e r o f t h e s e r a t e s an d a fo u r t h e a r n m o r e than the h i g h e r r at e.
3 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , an d la te sh ift s.




A p p e n d ix .

O c c u p a tio n a l D e s c rip tio n s

The prim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the B u reau 's wage surveys is to a s s is t its field staff in classify in g into aripropriate
occupations w orkers who are employed under a variety of payroll title s and different work arrangem en ts from establishm ent to establishm ent and
from a re a to a re a . This p erm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representing com parable job content. B ecause of this em phasis on
interestablishm ent and in terare a com parability of occupational content, the B u reau 's job descriptions m ay differ significantly from thos< n use in
individual establishm ents or those prepared for other p urposes. In applying these job d escrip tion s, the B u reau 's field econom ists a re instructed
to exclude working su p e rv iso rs; apprentices; le a rn e rs; beginners; train e es; and handicapped, p art-tim e, tem porary, and probationary w orkers.

OFFICE

C LER K, ACCOUNTING— Continued

B IL L E R , MACHINE
P re p a re s statem en ts, b ills, and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or electrom atic typew riter. May a lso keep reco rd s as to billings or shipping ch arges or perform other
cle rical work incidental to billing operations. F o r wage study p urp oses, b ille r s, m achine, are
cla ssifie d by type of m achine, as follows:
B ille r, machine (billing m achine). U ses a sp ecial billing machine (combination typing
and adding machine) to p rep are bills and invoices from cu stom ers' purchase o rd e rs, in ter­
nally p repared o rd e rs, shipping m em orandum s, etc. Usually involves application of p r e ­
determined discounts and shipping ch arges and entry of n ece ssary extension s, which m ay or
may not be computed on the billing m achine, and totals which are autom atically accum ulated
by m achine. The operation usually involves a la rge number of carbon copies of the bill being
prepared and is often done on a fanfold m achine.
B iller, machine (bookkeeping m achine). U ses a bookkeeping machine (with or without
a typew riter keyboard) to p rep are cu sto m ers' b ills a s part of the accounts receivable o p era­
tion. G enerally involves the sim ultaneous entry of figu res on cu sto m ers' ledger record . The
machine autom atically accum ulates figu res on a number of vertical columns and computes
and usually prints autom atically the debit or credit b alan ces. Does not involve a knowl­
edge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of sa le s and credit slip s.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
O perates a bookkeeping machine (with or without a typew riter keyboard) to keep a record
of bu sin ess tran sactio n s.
C la ss A. K eeps a set of reco rd s requiring a knowledge of and experience in b asic
bookkeeping p rin cip les, and fam iliarity with the structure of the p articu lar accounting system
used. Determ ines proper reco rd s and distribution of debit and credit item s to be used in each
phase of the work. May p rep are consolidated rep o rts, balance sheets, and other record s
by hand.
C la ss B. K eeps a record of one or m ore p h ases or sections of a set of record s usually
requiring little knowledge of b asic bookkeeping. P h ases or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, cu sto m ers' accounts (not including a sim ple type of billing d escribed under b iller,
machines, cost d: stribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or a s s is t
in nreoaration of tria l balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting departm ent.
C LE R K , ACCOUNTING
P erfo rm s one or m ore accounting c le ric al task s such as posting to r e g iste rs and le d g e rs;
reconciling bank accounts; verifying the internal consistency, com pleteness, and m athem atical
accu racy of accounting docum ents; assignin g p rescrib ed accounting distribution codes; examining
and verifying for c le ric al accuracy various types of rep o rts, lis t s , calculations, posting, etc.;
or preparing sim ole or a ssistin g in preparing m ore com plicated journal vouchers. May work
in either a manual or automated accounting system .
The work reo u ires a knowledge of c le ric al methods and office p ractice s and procedures
which relates to the c le ric al p ro cessin g and recording of tran saction s and accounting information.
With experience, the worker typically becom es fam iliar with the bookkeeping and accounting term s
ar.d procedures used in the assign ed work, but is not required to have a knowledge of the form al
principles of bookkeeping and accounting.




P osition s are c la ssifie d into levels on the b a sis of the following definitions.
C la ss A . Under general supervision, p erform s accounting c le ric a l operations which
require the application of experience and judgment, for exam ple, c le rically processin g com ­
plicated or nonrepetitive accounting tran saction s, selecting among a substantial variety of
p rescrib e d accounting codes and cla ssific a tio n s, or tracin g tran saction s through previous
accounting actions to determ ine source of d iscre p an cies. May be a ss is te d by one or m ore
c la ss B accounting c le rk s.
C la ss B . Under close supervision, following detailed instructions and standardized p ro­
cedu res, perform s one or m ore routine accounting c le ric a l operations, such as posting to
le d g e rs, ca rd s, or w orksheets where identification of item s and locations of postings are
cle arly indicated; checking accu racy and com pleteness of standardized and repetitive record s
or accounting documents; and coding documents using a few p rescrib e d accounting codes.
C LE R K , F IL E
F ile s , c la s s ifie s , and retriev es m ate rial in an establish ed filing system . May perform
c le ric a l and m anual task s required to m aintain file s. P ositions are c la ssifie d into levels on the
b a sis of the following definitions.
C la ss A . C la ssifie s and indexes file m ate rial such a s correspondence, rep orts, tech­
nical documents, e tc., in an established filing system containing a number of varied subject
m atter file s . May also file this m ate rial. May keep reco rd s of various types in conjunction
with the file s. May lead a sm all group of lower level file cle rk s.
C la ss B . S o rts, codes, and file s u n classified m ate rial by sim ple (subject m atter) head­
ings or partly c la ssifie d m ate rial by finer subheadings. P re p a re s sim ple related index and
c r o ss-r e fe re n c e aid s. As requested, locates clearfy identified m aterial in files and fo r­
w ards m ate rial. May perform related cle ric al task s required to m aintain and service files.
C la ss C . P erfo rm s routine filing of m aterial that has already been cla ssifie d or which
is e asily c la ssifie d in a sim ple se r ia l classificatio n system (e.g ., alphabetical, chronological,
or num erical). As requested, locates readily available m aterial in files and forw ards m a­
te ria l; and m ay fill out withdrawal charge. May perform sim ple cle ric al and manual task s
required to m aintain and serv ice file s.
C LE R K , ORDER
R eceives cu sto m ers' ord e rs for m aterial or m erchandise by m ail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the following: Quoting p rice s to cu stom ers; making out an order
sheet listin g the item s to m ake up the o rder; checking p rices and quantities of item s on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departm ents to be filled. May check with credit
departm ent to determ ine cred it rating of custom er, acknowledge receipt of ord e rs from custom ers,
follow up ord e rs to see that they have been filled, keep file of ord e rs received, and check shipping
invoices with original o rd e rs.
C LER K , PAYROLL
Computes w ages of company em ployees and enters the n ece ssa ry data on the payroll
sh eets. Duties involve: Calculating w ork ers' earnings based on tim e or production reco rd s; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such a s w ork er's name, working
days, tim e, rate, deductions for in suran ce, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and
a s s is t p aym aster in making up and distributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.

NOTE: The Bureau has discontinued collecting data for com ptom eter op erators.

27
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR

SECRETARY— Continued

O perates a keypunch machine to record or verify alphabetic and/or num eric data on
tabulating card s or on tape.

NOTE: The term "corporate o fficer, " used in the level definitions following, re fe r s to
those officials who have a significant corporate-w ide policymaking role with regard to m ajor
company activ ities. The title "vice p re sid e n t," though norm ally indicative of this role, does not
in all c a se s identify such positions. Vice presiden ts whose prim ary respon sibility is to act p e r ­
sonally on individual c a se s or tran saction s (e.g., approve or deny individual loan or credit actions:
adm inister individual tru st accounts; d irectly supervise a c le rical staff) are not considered to be
"corp orate o ffic e r s” for purposes of applying the following level definitions.

Positions are c la ssifie d into levels on the b a sis of the following definitions.
C la ss A. Work req u ires the application of experience and judgment in selectin g p ro ce­
dures to be followed and in searching fo r, interpreting, selecting, or coding item s to be
keypunched from a variety of source docum ents. On occasion m ay a lso perform some routine
keypunch work. May train inexperienced keypunch o p erators.
C la ss B. Work is routine and repetitive. Under clo se supervision or following specific
procedures or instructions, works from variou s standardized source documents which have
been coded, and follows specified procedures which have been p rescrib ed in detail and require
little or no selectin g, coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. R efers to su p ervisor
problem s arisin g from erroneous item s or codes or m issin g information.
MESSENGER (Office Boy or Girl)
P erform s various routine duties such as running e rran d s, operating m inor office m a ­
chines such as se a le r s or m a ile rs, opening and distributing m ail, and other m inor cle ric al work.
Exclude positions that require operation of a motor vehicle as a significant duty.

C la ss A
1. S ecretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
a ll, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 p e rso n s; or
2. S ecretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 but fewer than 25, 000 p e rso n s; or
3. S ecretary to the head, im m ediately below the corporate officer level, of a m ajor
segm ent or su bsid iary of a company that em ploys, in all, over 25,000 p e rso n s.
C la ss B
1. S ecretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
a ll, fewer than 100 p e rso n s, or
2. S ecretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairm an of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 p e rso n s: or

Assigned as personal se c re tary , norm ally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the day-to-day work of the su p erv isor. Works fairly independently r e ­
ceiving a minimum of detailed supervision and guidance. P erfo rm s varied c le ric a l and se c r e ta r ia l
duties, usually including m ost of the following:

3. S ecretary to the head, im m ediately below the officer level, over either a m ajor
corporate-w ide functional activity (e.g., m arketing, rese arch , operations, industrial relatio n s, etc.) or a m ajor geographic or organizational segm ent (e.g., a regional headquarters;
a m ajor division) of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
em ployees; or
4. S ecretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in all, over 5,000 p e rso n s: or

a. R eceives telephone c a lls, person al c a lle rs , and incoming m ail, answ ers routine
inquires, and routes technical inquiries to the proper p erson s;

5. S ecretary to the head of a large and important organizational segm ent (e.g., a middle
m anagem ent su p ervisor of an organizational segm ent often involving as many as sev eral
hundred person s) or a company that em ploys, in all, over 25,000 p e rso n s.

SECRETARY

b.

E sta b lish e s, m aintains, and re v ise s the su p e rv iso r's files;

c.

Maintains the su p e rv iso r's calendar and m akes appointments as instructed;

d.

R elays m e ssa g e s from su p erv iso r to subordinates;

e. Reviews correspondence, m em orandum s, and reports prepared by others for the
su p e rv iso r's signature to a ssu r e procedural and typographic accuracy;
f.

P erfo rm s stenographic and typing work.

May a lso perform other c le ric a l and se c r e ta r ia l task s of com parable nature and difficulty.
The work typically requ ires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
p ro g ram s, and procedures related to the work of the su p e rv iso r.
Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled "s e c re ta r y " p o s se s s the above c h a ra c te ristic s. E xam ples
of positions which are excluded from the definition are as follows;
a.

Positions which do not m eet the "p e rso n al" secre tary concept described above;

b.

Stenographers not fully trained in s e c r e ta r ia l type duties;

c. Stenographers serving as office a ssista n ts to a group of p ro fessio n al, technical, or
m an agerial person s;
d. Secretary positions in which the duties are either substantially m ore routine or
substantially m ore com plex and respon sible than those ch aracterized in the definition;
e. A ssistan t type positions which involve m ore difficult or m ore responsible tech­
nical, adm in istrativ e, su p erv iso ry, or sp ecialized c le ric al duties which are not typical of
se c re taria l work.




C la s s C
1. S ecre tary to an executive or m an agerial person whose respon sibility is not equivalent
to one of the specific level situations in the definition for c la ss B, but whose organizational
unit norm ally num bers at le a st several dozen employees and is usually divided into o rgan iza­
tional segm ents which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In some com panies, this level
includes a wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; err
2. S ecre tary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in all, fewer than 5,000 p e rso n s.
C la ss D
1. S ecretary to the su p ervisor or head of a sm all organizational unit (e.g., fewer than
about 25 or 30 p erson s); or
2. S ecretary to a nonsupervisory staff sp e cia list, p rofession al employee, ad m in istra­
tive officer, or a ssista n t, skilled technician or expert. (NOTE: Many com panies a ssign
sten ographers, rather than se c r e ta r ie s as d escribed above, to this level of supervisory or
n onsupervisory worker.)
STENOGRAPHER
P rim ary duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to tran scrib e the dictation. May
a lso type from written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool. May occasionally tran scrib e
from voice recordings (if prim ary duty is tran scrib in g from record in gs, see Transcribing-M achine
O perator, G eneral).
NO TE: This job is distinguished from that of a secre tary in that a secre tary norm ally
works in a confidential relationship with only one m anager or executive and perform s m ore
respon sible and d iscretion ary ta sk s as d escribed in the se cre tary job definition.
Stenographer, General
Dictation involves a norm al routine vocabulary. May maintain file s, keep simple reco rd s,
or perform other relatively routine cle ric al ta sk s.

28
STENOGRAPHER— Continued

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (E lectric Accounting Machine Operator)— Continued

Stenographer, Senior

Positions are c la ssifie d into levels on the b a sis of the following definitions.

Dictation involves a varied technical or sp ecialized vocabulary such a s in legal briefs
or rep orts on scientific rese arc h . May a lso set up and m aintain file s, keep reco rd s, etc.
OR
P erfo rm s stenographic duties requiring significantly g reater independence and respon ­
sibility than stenographer, general, a s evidenced by the following: Work requ ires a high
degree of stenographic speed and accu racy; a thorough working knowledge of general bu sin ess
and office procedure; and of the sp ecific bu sin ess operations, organization, p o licies, p ro ce ­
d u res, file s, workflow, etc. U ses this knowledge in perform ing stenographic duties and
responsible c le ric al task s such as m aintaining followup file s; assem bling m aterial for rep orts,
m em orandum s, and le tte rs; com posing sim ple le tte rs from general instructions; reading and
routing incoming m ail; and answering routine questions, etc.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
C la ss A. O perates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office c a lls. P erfo rm s full telephone information serv ice or handles
com plex c a lls , such as conference, co llect, o v e rse a s, or sim ilar c a lls, either in addition to
doing routine work as d escribed for switchboard o p erator, c la ss B, or a s a full-tim e
assignm ent. ("F u ll" telephone inform ation serv ic e o ccurs when the establishm ent has varied
functions that are not readily understandable for telephone information p urp oses, e .g ., because
of overlapping or in terrelated functions, and consequently present frequent problem s as to
which extensions are appropriate for c a lls.)
C la ss B . O perates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office c a lls . May handle routine long distance ca lls and record tolls.
May perform lim ited telephone information se rv ic e . ("L im ite d " telephone information service
occurs if the functions of the establishm ent serv iced are readily understandable for telephone
information p u rp o ses, or if the req u ests are routine, e .g ., giving extension num bers when
specific names are furnished, or if com plex c a lls are referre d to another operator.)
These cla ssific a tio n s do not include switchboard o p erators in telephone com panies who
a s s is t custo m ers in placing c a lls.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR - RECEPTIONIST
In addition to perform ing duties of operator on a single-position or m onitor-type switch­
board. acts as receptionist and m ay also type or perform routine c le rical work as part of regu lar
duties. This typing or c le ric al work m ay take the m ajo r part of this w ork er's tim e while at
switchboard.
TABULATING-MACHIXE OPERATOR (E lectric Accounting Machine Operator)
O perates one or a variety of m achines such as the tabulator, calculator, collator, in ter­
p rete r, so rte r, reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from this definition are working su p e rv iso rs.
Also excluded are op erators of electronic digital com puters, even though they m ay a lso operate
E AM ecu: pm e nt.

C la ss A. P erfo rm s com plete reporting and tabulating assignm ents including devising
difficult control panel wiring under general supervision. Assignm ents typically involve a
variety of long and com plex rep orts which often are irreg u lar or nonrecurring, requiring
some planning of the nature and sequencing of operations, and the use of a variety ofi m a ­
chines. Is typically involved in training new op erators in machine operations or training
lower level op erators in wiring from d iagram s and in the operating sequences of long and
com plex rep o rts. Does not include positions in which wiring respon sibility is lim ited to
selection and insertion of prew ired boards.
C la ss B . P erform s work according to established procedures and under specific in­
structions. A ssignm ents typically involve complete but routine and recu rrin g reports or p arts
of la rg e r and m ore com plex rep o rts. O perates m ore difficult tabulating or electrical a c ­
counting m achines such a s the tabulator and calculator, in addition to the sim pler m achines
used by c la ss C o p e rato rs. May be required to do some wiring from d iag ram s. May train
new em ployees in basic machine operations.
C la ss C . Under specific in struction s, operates sim ple tabulating or ele ctrical accounting
m achines such as the so rte r, in terp reter, reproducing punch, collator, etc. Assignm ents
typically involve portions of a work unit, for exam ple, individual sorting or collating runs,
or repetitive operations. May perform sim ple wiring from d iag ram s, and do some filing work.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
P rim ary duty is to tran scrib e dictation involving a norm al routine vocabulary from
transcribing-m achine reco rd s. May also type from written copy and do sim ple cle rical work.
W orkers tran scrib in g dictation involving a varied technical or sp ecialized vocabulary such as
legal b riefs or rep orts on scien tific rese arch are not included. A worker who takes dictation
in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine is c la ssifie d as a stenographer.
TYPIST
U se s a typew riter to make copies of various m ate rials or to m ake out bills after ca lcu la­
tions have been made by another person. May include typing of sten cils, m ats, or sim ilar m ate ­
ria ls for use in duplicating p r o c e sse s. May do c le rical work involving little sp ecial training, such
a s keeping sim ple reco rd s, filing record s and rep orts, or sorting and distributing incoming m ail.
C la ss A. P erform s one or m ore of the following: Typing m aterial in final form when
it involves combining m aterial from sev eral so u rces; or respon sibility for correct spelling,
syllabication, punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language m ate ­
rial; or planning layout and typing of com plicated statistical tab les to m aintain uniformity
and balance in spacing. May type routine form le tte rs, varying details to suit circum stan ces.
C la ss B . P erform s one or m ore of the following: Copy typing from rough or clear
d rafts; or routine typing of fo rm s, insurance p o licies, etc.; or setting up sim ple standard
tabulations; or copying m ore com plex tables already set up and spaced properly.

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COMPUTER OPERATOR
Monitors and op erates the control console of a digital com puter to p ro c e ss data according
to operating in struction s, usually prepared by a p ro gram er. Work includes m ost of the following:
.Stid.es instructions to determ ine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
.terns 'tape re e ls, c a rd s, etc.); switches n ec e ssa ry auxiliary equipment into circu it, and starts
and op erates com puter; m akes adjustm ents to computer to c o rrect operating problem s and m eet
special cond.tions; reviews e rr o r s made during operation and determ ines cause or r e fe r s problem
to su p erv iso r or p ro g ram er; and m aintains operating re c o rd s. May te st and a s s is t in correcting
program .
For wage study p u rp o ses, computer o p erato rs are c la ssifie d as follows:

COMPUTER OPERATOR— Continued
of new p rogram s required; alternate p rogram s are provided in case original program needs
m ajor change or cannot be corrected within a reasonable tim e. In common e rror situ a­
tions, diagnoses cause and takes corrective action. This usually involves applying previously
program ed corrective step s, or using standard correction techniques.
OR
O perates under d irect supervision a computer running p rogram s or segm ents of program s
with the c h a ra cte ristics described for c la ss A. May a s s is t a higher level operator by inde­
pendently perform ing le s s difficult task s assign ed , and perform ing difficult task s following
detailed instructions and with frequent review of operations perform ed.
C la ss C . Works on routine p rogram s under close supervision. Is expected to develop
working knowledge of the computer equipment used and ability to detect problem s involved in
running routine p ro g ra m s. Usually has received some form al training in com puter operation.
May a s s is t higher level operator on com plex p rog ram s.

C la ss A. O perates independently, or under only general direction, a com puter running
p rogram s with m ost of the following c h a ra c te ristic s: New p rogram s are frequently tested
and introduced; scheduling requirem ents are of critic al im portance to m inim ize downtime;
the p ro gram s are of com plex design so that identification of e rro r source often requ ires a
working knowledge of the total program , and alternate p rogram s may not be available. May
give direction and guidance to lower level o p erato rs.

COMPUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS

C la ss B . O perates independently, or under only general direction, a computer running
p rogram s with m ost of the following c h a ra c te ristic s: Most of the program s are established
production runs, typically run on a regu larly recu rrin g b a sis; there is little or no testing

Converts statem ents of busin ess problem s, typically prepared by a system s analyst, into
a sequence of detailed instructions which are required to solve the problem s by automatic data
p ro cessin g equipment. Working from charts or d iag ram s, the p rogram er develops the p recise in­
structions which, when entered into the com puter system in coded language, cause the manipulation




29
COMPUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS— Continued

COMPUTER SYSTEM S ANALYST, BUSINESS— Continued

of data to achieve d esired r e su lts. Work involves m ost of the following: Applies knowledge of
com puter capabilities, m athem atics, logic employed by com puters, and p articu lar subject m atter
involved to analyze charts and d iagram s of the problem to be program ed: develops sequence
of program step s; w rites detailed flow charts to show order in which data will be p ro cessed ;
converts these charts to coded instructions for machine to follow; te sts and co rre c ts p rogram s;
p rep a re s instructions for operating personnel during production run; analyzes, review s, and a lters
p rogram s to in crease operating efficiency or adapt to new requirem ents; m aintains record s of
program development and rev isio n s. (NOTE: W orkers perform ing both system s an alysis and pro­
gram ing should be c la ssifie d a s system s analysts if this is the sk ill used to determ ine their pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim a rily resp on sible for the management or supervision of
other electronic data p ro cessin g em ployees, or p ro g ra m ers p rim arily concerned with scientific
and/or engineering problem s.
For wage study p u rp o ses, p ro g ram ers are c la ssifie d as follows:
C la ss A. Works independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s which
require competence in all phases of program ing concepts and p ractice s. Working from d ia­
gram s and charts which identify the nature of d esired r e su lts, m ajor p rocessin g steps to be
accom plished, and the relationships between various step s of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of program ing actions needed to efficiently utilize the computer system
in achieving d esired end products.
At this level, program ing is difficult because com puter equipment m ust be organized to
produce sev eral in terrelated but d iv erse products from numerous and d iv erse data elem ents.
A wide variety and extensive number of internal p ro cessin g actions m ust occur. This requ ires
such actions as development of common operations which can be reused, establishm ent of
linkage points between operations, adjustm ents to data when program requirem ents exceed
computer storage capacity, and substantial m anipulation and re sequencing of data elements
to form a highly integrated program .
May provide functional direction to lower level p ro g ra m ers who are assign ed to a s s is t .
C la ss B .' Works independently or under only general direction on relatively sim ple
p ro g ram s, or on sim ple segm ents of com plex p ro g ram s. P rog ram s (or segm ents) usually
p ro c e ss information to produce data in two or three varied sequences or form ats. Reports
and listin gs are produced by refining, adapting, arrayin g, or making m inor additions to or
deletions from input data which are readily available. While numerous record s m ay be
p ro cessed , the data have been refined in prior actions so that the accu racy and sequencing
of data can be tested by using a few routine checks. Typically, the program d eals with
routine record-keeping type operations.

every item of each type is autom atically p ro cessed through the full system of record s and
appropriate followup actions are initiated by the computer.) Confers with p erson s concerned to
determ ine the data p rocessin g problem s and advises subject-m atter personnel on the im p lica­
tions of new or revised system s of data p rocessin g operations. Makes recom m endations, if
needed, for approval of m ajor system s in stallations or changes and for obtaining equipment.
May provide functional direction to lower level system s analysts who are assign ed to
a s s is t .
C la ss B . Works independently or under only general direction on problem s that are
relatively uncomplicated to analyze, plan, program , and operate. Problem s are of lim ited
com plexity because sources of input data are homogeneous and the output data are closely
related. (For exam ple, develops system s for m aintaining depositor accounts in a bank,
m aintaining accounts receivable in a retail establishm ent, or maintaining inventory accounts
in a m anufacturing or wholesale establishm ent.) Confers with person s concerned to determ ine
the data p ro cessin g problem s and ad vises subject-m atter personnel on the im plications of the
data p rocessin g sy stem s to be applied.
OR
Works on a segm ent of a com plex data p rocessin g scheme or system , as described for
c la ss A. Works independently on routine assignm ents and receives instruction and guidance
on com plex assign m en ts. Work is reviewed for accu racy of judgment, compliance with in­
structions, and to insure proper alinement with the overall system .
C la ss C . Works under im m ediate supervision, carryin g out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. A ssignm ents are designed to develop and expand p ractical experience
in the application of procedures and sk ills required for system s an alysis work. For exam ple,
m ay a s s is t a higher level system s analyst by preparing the detailed specifications required
by p ro g ra m ers from information developed by the higher level analyst.
DRAFTSMAN
C la ss A. Plans the graphic presentation of complex item s having distinctive design
featu res that differ significantly from established drafting precedents. Works in close sup­
port with the design originator, and m ay recommend m inor design changes. Analyzes the
effect of each change on the details of form , function, and positional relationships of com ­
ponents and p a rts. Works with a minimum of supervisory a ssistan c e . Completed work is
reviewed by design originator for consistency with p rior engineering determ inations. May
either p rep are draw ings, or d irect their preparation by lower level draftsm en.
C la ss B . P erfo rm s nonroutine and com plex drafting assignm ents that require the appli­
cation of m ost of the standardized drawing techniques regu larly used. Duties typically in ­
volve such work a s: P re p a re s working drawings of su b assem b lies with irreg u lar shapes,
m ultiple functions, and p re c ise positional relationships between components; p rep ares a rch i­
tectu ral drawings for construction of a building including detail drawings of foundations, wall
section s, floor plans, and roof. U ses accepted form ulas and m anuals in making n ecessary
computations to determ ine quantities of m ate rials to be used, load capacities, stren gth s,
s t r e s s e s , etc. R eceives initial in struction s, requirem ents, and advice from su p erv iso r.
Completed work is checked for technical adequacy.
C la ss C . P re p a re s detail drawings of single units or p arts for engineering, construction,
m anufacturing, or rep air p urp oses. Types of drawings prepared include isom etric projections
(depicting three dim ensions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning of
components and convey needed information. C onsolidates details from a number of sou rces
and adju sts or tran sp o se s scale as required. Suggested methods of approach, applicable
preceden ts, and advice on source m ate rials are given with initial assign m en ts. Instructions
are le s s com plete when assignm ents recu r. Work may be spot-checked during p r o g re ss.

OR
Works on com plex p rogram s (as described for c la ss A) under close direction of a higher
level pro gram er or su p erv iso r. May a s s is t higher level p rogram er by independently p e r ­
form ing le s s difficult task s assign ed , and perform ing m ore difficult ta sk s under fairly close
direction.
May guide or instruct lower level p ro g ra m ers.
C la ss C. Makes p ractical applications of program ing p ractices and concepts usually
learned in form al training c o u rse s. A ssignm ents are designed to develop competence in the
application of standard procedures to routine problem s. R eceives close supervision on new
a sp e cts of assign m en ts; and work is reviewed to verify its accuracy and conformance with
required procedures.
COMPUTER SYSTEM S ANALYST, BUSINESS
Analyzes bu sin ess problem s to form ulate procedures for solving them by use of electronic
data p ro cessin g equipment. Develops a com plete description of all specification s needed to enable
p ro g ra m ers to p rep are required digital computer p ro g ram s. Work involves m ost of the following:
Analyzes subject-m atter operations to be automated and identifies conditions and c rite ria required
to achieve satisfa c to ry resu lts; sp ecifies number and types of reco rd s, file s, ana documents to
be used; outlines actions to be perform ed by personnel and com puters in sufficient detail for
presentation to m anagem ent and for program ing (typically this involves preparation of work and
data flow charts); coordinates the development of te st problem s and particip ates in trial runs of
new and revised sy stem s: and recom m ends equipment changes to obtain m ore effective overall
operations. (NOTE: W orkers perform ing both sy stem s an alysis and program ing should be c la s ­
sified as system s analysts if this is the skill used to determ ine their pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim arily resp o n sible for the management or supervision
of other electronic data p ro cessin g em ployees, or system s analysts p rim arily concerned with
scientific or engineering problem s.
F or wage study p urp o ses, system s analysts are c la ssifie d as follows:
C la ss A. Works independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s in­
volving all phases of system s a n aly sis. P roblem s are com plex because of d iverse so u rces of
input data and m ultiple-use requirem ents of output data. (F o r exam ple, develops an integrated
production scheduling, inventory control, cost a n a ly sis, and sa le s an aly sis record in which




DRAFTSMAN- TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing cloth or paper over
drawings and tracin g with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracing lim ited to plans p rim arily
consisting of straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
AND/OR
P re p a re s sim ple or repetitive drawings of e asily visualized item s. Work is closely supervised
during p r o g re ss.
ELECTRO N ICS TECHNICIAN
Works on various types of electronic equipment or system s by perform ing one or m ore
of the following operations: Modifying, in stallin g, repairing, and overhauling. These operations
require the perform ance of m ost or all of the following ta sk s: A ssem bling, testing, adjusting,
calibrating, tuning, and alining.
Work is nonrepetitive and requ ires a knowledge of the theory and practice of electron ics
pertaining to the use of general and sp ecialized electronic test equipment: trouble an alysis; and
the operation, relationship, and alinement of electronic sy stem s, su b sy stem s, and circu its having
a variety of component p arts.

30
ELECTRO N ICS TECHNICIAN— Continued

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (R egistered)

E lectron ic equipment or sy stem s worked on typically include one or m ore of the following:
Ground, vehicle, or airborne radio communications sy ste m s, relay sy stem s, navigation aid s;
airborne or ground rad a r sy stem s; radio and television tran sm ittin g or recording sy stem s; e le c ­
tronic com puters; m iss ile and sp ace craft guidance and control sy stem s; in dustrial and m edical
m easuring, indicating and controlling devices; etc.

A reg iste re d nurse who gives nursing serv ice under general m edical direction to ill or
injured em ployees or other person s who become ill or suffer an accident on the p rem ises of a
factory or other establishm ent. Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving fir s t aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent d ressin g of em ployees' in juries; keeping records
of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or other p urp oses; a ssistin g in
physical exam inations and health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing out p rogram s involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment,
or other activities affecting the health, w elfare, and safety of all personnel. Nursing su p e rv iso rs
or head n u rses in establishm ents employing m ore than one nurse a re excluded.

(Exclude production a sse m b le r s and te st e r s , craftsm en , draftsm en, d esig n e rs, engin eers,
and repairm en of such standard electronic equipment a s office m achines, radio and television
receiving s e t s .)

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

P erfo rm s the carpentry duties n e c e ssa ry to construct and maintain in good rep a ir build­
ing woodwork and equipment such as bins, c r ib s, coun ters, benches, p artition s, d oors, flo o rs,
s ta ir s , c a sin g s, and trim made of wood in an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following:
Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, draw ings, m odels, or verbal in struction s; using a
variety of c arp e n te r's handtools, portable power to o ls, and standard m easuring instrum ents; m ak ­
ing standard shop computations relating to dim ensions of work; and selecting m ate rials n ece ssa ry
for the work. In g en eral, the work of the m aintenance carpenter requ ires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
ELECTRICIAN , MAINTENANCE
P erfo rm s a variety of e le ctric a l trad e functions such a s the installation, m aintenance, or
rep air of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of e le ctric energy in an e sta b ­
lishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of e le c ­
tric al equipment such as g en erato rs, tr a n sfo r m e r s, sw itchboards, con trollers, circuit b r e a k e r s ,
m o to rs, heating units, conduit sy ste m s, or other tran sm issio n equipment; working from blue­
prints, draw ings, layouts, or other sp ecificatio n s; locating and diagnosing trouble in the e le ctrica l
system or equipment; working standard computations relating to load requirem ents of wiring or
e le ctric a l equipment; and using a variety of e le ctric ia n 's handtools and m easuring and testing
instrum ents. In g en eral, the work of the m aintenance electrician requ ires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
O perates and m aintains and may a lso su p erv ise the operation of station ary engines and
equipment (mechanical or e le ctric a l) to supply the establishm ent in which employed with power,
heat, refrigeratio n , or air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment
such as steam engines, a ir c o m p re sso rs, ge n e rato rs, m o tors, turbines, ventilating and r e fr ig ­
erating equipment, steam bo ilers and b oiler-fed water pum ps; making equipment r e p a irs; and
keeping a record of operation of m achinery, tem perature, and fuel consumption. May a lso su ­
p erv ise these operations. Head or chief engineers in establishm ents employing m ore than one
engineer are excluded.

P roduces replacem ent p arts and new p arts in making re p a irs of m etal p arts of m echanical
equipment operated in an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following: Interpreting written
instructions and sp ecification s; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m ach in ist's
handtools and p recision m easuring instrum ents; setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of m etal p arts to close toleran ces; making standard shop computations relating to dim en­
sions of work, tooling, feed s, and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working p roperties of
the common m etals; selecting standard m a te r ia ls, p a rts, and equipment required for his work;
and fitting and assem bling p arts into m echanical equipment. In g en eral, the m achinist's work
norm ally requ ires a rounded training in m achine-shop p ractice usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
F ir e s stationary bo ilers to furnish the establishm ent in which employed with heat, power,
or steam . F eeds fuels to fir e .b y hand or op erates a m echanical stoker, g as, or oil burner; and
checks water and safety v alv es. May clean, oil, or a s s is t in repairing boilerroom equipment.
H E LPE R , MAINTENANCE TRADES
A s s is t s one or m ore w orkers in the skilled maintenance trad e s, by perform ing sp ecific
or general duties of le s s e r sk ill, such as keeping a w orker supplied with m ate rials and tools;
cleaning working a re a , m achine, and equipment; a ssistin g journeyman by holding m ate rials or
tools; and perform ing other unskilled ta sk s as d irected by journeym an. The kind of work the
helper is perm itted to perform v a rie s from trade to trad e: In som e trad es the helper is confined
to supplying, lifting, and holding m ate rials and to o ls, and cleaning working a r e a s; and in others
he is perm itted to perform sp ecialized machine operations, or parts of a trad e that are also
perform ed by w orkers on a full-tim e b a sis.
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Sp ecializes in the operation of one or m ore types of machine tools, such a s jig b o r e rs,
cylindrical or surface grin d e rs, engine lath es, or m illing m achines, in the construction of
m achine-shop to o ls, g ag e s, jig s , fix tu res, or d ies. Work involves m ost of the following: Planning
and perform ing difficult machining operations; p ro cessin g item s requiring com plicated setups or
a high degree of accu racy; using a variety of precision m easuring instrum ents; selectin g feeds,
sp eeds, tooling, and operation sequence; and making n e c e ssa ry adjustm ents during operation
to achieve requisite toleran ces or dim ensions. May be required to recognize when tools need
d re ssin g , to d re ss to o ls, and to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating o ils. F or
cro ss-in d u stry wage study p urp o ses, m achine-tool o p erato rs, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing
shops are excluded from this classificatio n .




MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (Maintenance)
R ep airs autom obiles, b u se s, m otortruck s, and tr a c to r s of an establishm ent. Work in ­
volves m ost of the following: Examining automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble; d is ­
assem bling equipment and perform ing re p a irs that involve the use of such handtools as w renches,
g ag e s, d r ills , or sp ecialized equipment in d isassem b lin g or fitting p a r ts; replacing broken or
defective p arts from stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassem b lin g and installing the various
a sse m b lie s in the vehicle and making n e c e ssa ry adjustm ents; and alining w heels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tightening body bolts. In gen eral, the work of the automotive mechanic requ ires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.
This cla ssifica tio n does not include m echanics who rep air c u sto m ers' vehicles in auto­
m obile rep a ir shops.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R ep airs m achinery or m echanical equipment of an establishm ent. Work involves m ost
of the following: Exam ining m achines and m echanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
dism antling or partly dism antling m achines and perform ing re p a irs that m ainly involve the use
of handtools in scrap in g and fitting p arts; replacing broken or defective p arts with item s obtained
from stock; ordering the production of a replacem ent part by a m achine shop or sending of the
machine to a machine shop for m ajor r e p a irs; preparing written specification s for m ajor rep a irs
or for the production of p arts ordered from machine shop; reassem blin g m achines; and making
all n e c e ssa ry adjustm ents for operation. In general, the work of a maintenance m echanic req u ires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. Excluded from this c la ssifica tio n are w orkers whose prim ary duties
involve setting up or adjusting m achines.
MILLWRIGHT
In stalls new m achines or heavy equipment, and dism antles and in sta lls m achines or heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout a re required. Work involves m ost of the following:
Planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other sp ecification s; using a variety
of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations relating to s t r e s s e s , strength of
m a te r ia ls, and centers of gravity; alining and balancing of equipment; selectin g standard too ls,
equipment, and p arts to be used; and in stalling and pnaintaining in good order power tran sm issio n
equipment such a s d riv es and speed red u ce rs. In gen eral, the m illw righ t's work norm ally requ ires
a rounded training and experience in the trade acquired through a form al apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.
PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and red ecorates w alls, woodwork, and fixtures of an establishm ent. Work involves
the following: Knowledge of su rface p ecu liaritie s and types of paint required for different app lica­
tions; preparing su rface for painting by rem oving old finish or by placing putty or fille r in nail

31
PA IN TER , MAINTENANCE— Continued

SH EET-M ETA L WORKER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

holes and in te rstic e s; and applying paint with sp ray gun or brush. May m ix c o lo rs, o ils, white
lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper color or con sisten cy. In general, the work of the
m aintenance painter req u ires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

types of sheet-m etal maintenance work from blueprints, m odels, or other specification s; setting
up and operating all available types of sheet-m etal working m achines; using a variety of handtools
in cutting, bending, form ing, shaping, fitting, and assem bling; and installing sheet-m etal a rticle s
a s required. In gen eral, the work of the maintenance sh eet-m etal worker requ ires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.

P IP E F IT T E R , MAINTENANCE
In stalls or rep a irs w ater, steam , g a s, or other types of pipe and pipefittings in an
establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following; Laying out of work and m easuring to locate
position of pipe from drawings or other written sp ecificatio n s; cutting variou s siz e s of pipe to
co rrect lengths with chisel and ham m er or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting m achines: threading
pipe with stocks and d ies; bending pipe by hand-driven or pow er-driven m achines; assem bling
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to
p r e s s u r e s , flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard te sts to determ ine whether fin­
ished pipes m eet sp ecificatio n s. In general, the work of the m aintenance pipefitter requ ires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. W orkers p rim arily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation
or heating system s are excluded.
SH EET-M ETA L WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F ab ric a te s, in sta lls, and m aintains in good rep air the sheet-m etal equipment and fixtures
(such a s machine guards, g rea se pans, sh elv es, lo c k e rs, tan ks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, m etal
roofing) of an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following: Planning and laying out all

TOOL AND DIE MAKER
Constructs and rep a irs m achine-shop tools, g ag e s, jig s , fixtures or dies for forgin gs,
punching, and other m etal-form in g work. Work involves m ost of the following: Planning and
laying out of work from m odels, blueprints, draw ings, or other oral and written specification s;
using a variety of tool and die m ak e r's handtools and precision m easuring instrum ents; under­
standing of the working properties of common m etals and alloys; setting up and operating of
machine tools and related equipment; making n ece ssa ry shop computations relating to dim ensions
of work, sp eed s, feeds, and tooling of m achines; heat-treating of m etal p arts during fabrication
as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities; working to close toleran ces;
fitting and assem blin g of p arts to p rescrib e d toleran ces and allow ances; and selecting appropriate
m a te ria ls, tools, and p ro c e s s e s . In general, the tool and die m ak e r's work requ ires a rounded
training in m achine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship
or equivalent training and experience.
F or cro ss-in d u stry wage study p urp oses, tool and die m akers in tool and die jobbing
shops are excluded from this classificatio n .

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND WATCHMAN
Guard. P erfo rm s routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour, m aintaining o rder,
using arm s or force where n ec e ssa ry . Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate and check
on identity of em ployees and other person s entering.
Watchman. Makes rounds of p rem ises period ically in protecting property again st fire ,
theft, and illegal entry.
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working a re a s and w ashroom s, or
p re m ise s of an office, apartm ent house, or com m ercial or other establishm ent. Duties involve
a combination of the following: Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing flo o rs; removing
chips, trash , and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing m etal fix ­
tures or trim m in gs; providing supplies and m inor maintenance se rv ic e s; and cleaning la v ato rie s,
show ers, and re stro o m s. W orkers who sp ecialize in window washing are excluded.
LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
A worker employed in a warehouse, m anufacturing plant, store, or other establishm ent
whose duties involve one or m ore of the following; Loading and unloading various m ate rials and
m erchandise on or from freight c a r s , tru ck s, or other transporting d evices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing m a te ria ls or m erchandise in proper sto rage location; and tran sportin g m ate rials or
m erchandise by handtruck, c a r, or wheelbarrow. Longshorem en, who load and unload ships are
excluded.
ORDER F IL L E R
F ills shipping or tran sfe r o rd e rs for finished goods from stored m erchandise in a cco rd ­
ance with specification s on sa le s slip s, cu sto m ers' o r d e r s, or other in struction s. May, in addition
to filling o rd e rs and indicating item s filled or om itted, keep reco rd s of outgoing o rd e rs, requ i­
sition additional stock or report short supplies to su p e rv iso r, and perform other related duties.
PACKER, SHIPPING
P re p a re s finished products for shipment or sto rage by placing them in shipping con­
tain e rs, the specific operations perform ed being dependent upon the type, siz e , and number
of units to be packed, the type of container employed, and method of shipment. Work requ ires
the placing of item s in shipping containers and m ay involve one or m ore of the following:
Knowledge of variou s item s of stock in o rder to v erify content; selection of appropriate type
and size of container; inserting en clo sures in container; using e xce lsio r or other m ate rial to
prevent breakage or dam age; closing and sealin g container; and applying lab els or entering
identifying data on container. P ack ers who a lso make wooden boxes or c rate s are excluded.




SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
P re p a re s m erchandise for shipment, or receives and is respon sible lor incoming ship­
m ents of m erchandise or other m a t e r ia ls . Shipping work involves: A knowledge of shipping pro­
cedu res, p rac tic e s, routes, available m eans of tran sportation, and rate s; and preparing record s
of the goods shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping ch arges, and keeping
a file of shipping reco rd s. May d irect or a s s is t in preparing the m erchandise for shipment.
Receiving work involves: Verifying or directing others in verifying the co rrectn ess of shipments
again st bills of lading, in voices, or other reco rd s; checking for shortages and rejecting dam ­
aged goods; routing m erchandise or m ate rials to proper departm ents; and maintaining n ecessary
record s and file s.
F o r wage study p u rp o ses, w orkers are c la ssifie d as follow s:
Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCKDRIVER
D rives a truck within a city or in du strial a re a to tran sp ort m a te ria ls, m erchandise,
equipment, or men between variou s types of establishm ents such a s: Manufacturing plants, freight
depots, w arehouses, wholesale and re ta il establish m ents, or between retail establishm ents and
cu sto m ers' houses or p laces of bu sin e ss. May a lso load or unload truck with or without helpers,
make m inor m echanical r e p a ir s, and keep truck in good working ord er. D riv er-salesm en and
over-th e-road d riv e rs are excluded.
follow s:

F or wage study p u rp oses, tru ck d riv ers are c la ssifie d by size and type of equipment, as
(T r a c to r -tr a ile r should be rated on the b a sis of tr a ile r capacity.)
T ruckdriver
T ruck d river,
T ruck d river,
T ruck d river,
T ruck d river,

(combination of siz e s listed separately)
light (under IV2 tons)
medium (lVz to and including 4 tons)
heavy (over 4 tons, tr a ile r type)
heavy (over 4 tons, other than tr a ile r type)

TRUCKER, POWER
O perates a m anually controlled gasoline- or electric-pow ered truck or tractor to tran sp ort
goods and m a te ria ls of all kinds about a warehouse, m anufacturing plant, or other establishm ent.
F o r wage study p u rp o ses, w orkers a re c la ssifie d by type of truck, as follows:
T rucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)

A v a ila b le O n R e q u es t----The fo ll o w in g a r e a s a r e s u r v e y e d p e r i o d i c a l l y fo r u se in a d m in i s t e r i n g the S e r v i c e C o ntrac t A c t of 1965.
w i l l be a v a i l a b l e at no cost while s up pli es la s t f r o m any of the B L S r e g i o n a l o ffi c e s shown on the b a c k c o v e r .
A l a m o g o r d o —L a s C r u c e s , N . M e x .
Alaska
A lb a n y , Ga.
A m a r illo , Tex.
A tlan tic City, N .J .
A u g u st a , G a ,— C,
S.
B a k e r s f i e l d , C a li f.
Baton R o u ge , L a .
B i l o x i , G u lf p o rt , and P a s c a g o u l a , M i s s ,
B r i d g e p o r t , N o r w a l k , and S t a m fo r d , Conn.
C e d a r R a p i d s , Iowa
C h am p a ig n —U r b a n a , 111.
C h a r le s t o n , S .C .
C l a r k s v i l l e , T en n ., and H o p k i n s v i l l e , Ky.
C o lo r a d o S p r i n g s , Co lo .
C o l u m b i a , S .C .
C o lu m b u s , G a —A l a .
Corpus C h risti, Tex.
C r a n e , Ind.
Dothan, A l a .
Duluth— u p e r i o r , M in n .—W i s .
S
E l Paso, Tex.
E u g en e— p r i n g f i e ld , O r e g .
S
F a r g o — o o r h e a d , N . Da k.—Minn .
M
F a y e t t e v i lle , N. C.
F i t c h b u r g —L e o m i n s t e r , M a s s .
F r e d e r ic k — agerstow n, M d —P a —W. Va.
H
F r e sn o , Calif. .
G r a n d F o r k s , N . Da k.
G r a n d Islan d—H a s t i n g s , N e b r .
G r e e n b o r o —Winston S a l e m — ig h P oin t, N . C .
H
H a r r is b u r g , Pa.
K n o x v i lle , Tenn.
R e p o r t s fo r the fo ll o w in g

surveys

releases are

or

L a re d o , Tex.
L a s V e g a s, Nev.
L o w e r E a s t e r n S h o r e , M d __V a .
M a c o n , Ga.
M arquette, E sc an a ba, S aultSte.
M a r i e , Mich.
M e l b o u r n e —T i t u s v i l l e —C o c o a , F l a .
( B r e v a r d Co .)
M eridian, M iss.
M i d d l e s e x , M onm outh , O ce an , and S o m e r s e t
C o s . , N .J .
M o b i l e , A l a . , and P e n s a c o l a , F l a .
Montgom ery, A la.
N a s h v i l l e , Tenn.
N o r t h e a s t e r n M a in e
N o r w i c h —Groton — e w Lo nd on, Conn.
N
O gd en, Utah
O r la n d o , F l a .
O x n a r d — im i V a l l e y —V e n t u r a , C a li f.
S
P a n a m a City, F l a .
P o r t s m o u t h , N . H —M a i n e — a s s .
M
IPueblo, Co lo .
Re no , N e v .
S a c r a m e n t o , C a li f.
Santa B a r b a r a —
Santa M a r i a —L o m p o c , C a li f.
S h e rm a n —D e n is o n , T e x .
Shreveport, La.
S p r i n g f i e ld —C h ic o p e e — o l y o k e , M a s s . —Conn.
H
T o p e k a , Kan s.
Tucson, A r iz .
V a l l e j o —F a i r f i e l d — a p a , C a li f.
N
W i lm i n g t o n , D e l —N . J —M d .
Yuma, A riz .

conducted in the p r i o r y e a r but since di scont inued a r e a l s o a v a i l a b l e :

A l p e n a , Stand ish, and T a w a s City, M i c h .
A sh eville, N.C.
Austin, T e x . *
F o r t Smith, A r k —Okla.
G r e a t F a l l s , Mont.
*

C o p ie s of public

Expan ded to an a r e a w a g e

s u r v e y in f i s c a l y e a r

1973.

L e x in gt o n , K y . *
P i n e B lu ff, A r k .
Stockton, C a l i f .
Tacom a, W ash.
W ich ita F a l l s , T e x .
See ins ide b a c k c o v e r .

The twelfth annual r e p o r t on s a l a r i e s f o r ac co untan ts, a u d i t o r s , ch ief ac co untan ts, a t t o rn e y s , jo b a n a l y s t s , d i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l , b u y e r s , c h e m i s t s ,
e n g i n e e r s , en g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c ia n s , d r a f t s m e n , and c l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s . O r d e r as B L S Bulle tin 1742, N a tio n a l S u r v e y of P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d m i n i s t r a t i v e ,
T e c h n ic a l, and C l e r i c a l P a y , June 1971, 75 cents a copy , f r o m any of the B L S r e g i o n a l s a l e s off ic es shown on the b a c k c o v e r , or f r o m fKe
Superintendent of D o c u m e n t s, U.S. G o v e r n m e n t P r in t in g O f f i c e , W a sh in gt o n , D . C . , 20402.




**U . 1 G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O FFICE: 1#7* — 7 4 « -229/1

A re a W a g e Surveys
A list of the la test a v a i la b le bu ll e ti n s is p r e s e n t e d b e lo w . A d i r e c t o r y of a r e a w a g e studies including m o r e l i m i t e d s t u d i e s c o n d u c t e d at t h e
req u es t of the E m p lo y m e n t Stan dards A d m i n i s t r a t i o n of the D e p ar t m en t of L a b o r is a v a i la b le on r eq ues t. B ulle tins m a y b e p u r c h a s e d f r o m a n y o f t h e B L S
r e g io n a l s a le s o ff ic es shown on the back c o v e r , or f r o m the Superintendent of Docu m ents, U.S. G o v e r n m e n t P r in t in g O f f i c e , W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . , 2 0 4 0 2 .
A rea
A k r o n , Ohio , D ec. 1972------------------------------------------------------A lb a n y —
Sch enecta dy— r o y , N . Y . , M a r . 1973 1 --------------T
A lb u q u e r q u e , N. M e x . , M a r . 1973__________________________
A ll en tow n—Bet hlehe m—E as to n , P a . —N .J ., M a y 1972 1 —
Atlanta, G a „ M a y 1973_______________________________________
A ustin, T e x . , Dec. 1972 1---------------------------------------------------B a l t i m o r e , M d . , Aug . 1972 1_________________________________
B eaumo nt—P o r t Arthux—O r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1972---------Bingh amton , N . Y . , July 1972________________________________
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , M a r . 1973 1_____________________________
B o i s e City, Idaho, No v. 1972 1______________________________
Boston, M a s s . , Aug . 1972 1-----------------------------------------------B u ffa lo , N . Y . , Oct. 19721____________________________________
B ur lin gt on , V t . , De c. 1972 1---------------------------------------------Canton, Ohio, M a y 1973______________________________________
C h a r le s t o n , W. V a . , M a r . 1973----------------------------------------Ch ar lo tt e , N . C . , Jan. 1973------------------------------------------------Chattanoo ga, T e n n . - C a . , Sept. 1972 1-----------------------------C h ic ag o, 111., June 1972______________________________________
Cincinnati, Ohio—
Ky.—In d ., F e b . 1973-----------------------------C le v e la n d , Ohio, Sept. 1972 1________________________________
C o lu m b u s , Ohio , Oct. 1972 1_________________________________
D a l l a s , T e x . , Oct. 1972 1---------------------------------------------------D a ven por t —Rock Is land— o li n e , Io wa^Ill. , F e b . 1973----M
Dayton, Ohio , De c. 1972_____________________________________
D e n v e r , C o lo ., D ec. 1972--- -- --------- ----------------------------------D e s M o i n e s , Iowa, M a y 1973________________________________
D e t ro it , M i c h ., F e b . 1972___________________________________
D u r h a m , N . C . , A p r . 1973___________ _— ---------- ----------------- F o r t L a u d e r d a l e —H o ll yw o od and W e s t P a l m
B e a c h , F l a . , A p r . 1973_____________________________________
F o r t W o rth , T e x . , Oct. 19 721-------------------------------------------G r e e n B a y , W i s . , July 1972 1--------------------------------------------G r e e n v i l l e , S .C ., M a y 1972__________________________________
Houston, T e x . , A p r . 1973_____________________________________
H un tsv ill e , A l a . , F e b. 1973-----------------------------------------------Ind ian ap ol is, Ind., Oct. 1972 1_______________________________
Ja ck so n, M i s s . , Jan. 1973-------------------------------------------------J a c k s o n v ill e , F l a . , Dec. 1972-------------------------------------------K a n s a s City, M o . - K a n s . , Sept. 1972--------------------------------L a w r e n c e —H a v e r h i l l , M a s s . —N . H . , June 1972 1-------------Lexin gto n, K y ., No v. 1972 1-----------------------------------------------Little Rock—N o r th Little Rock, A r k . , July 1972 1---------L o s A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h and A n a h e i m —Santa A n a G a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , Oct. 1972 1---------------------------------L o u i s v i l l e , Ky.—Ind., No v. 1972----------------------------------------L u bbo ck , T e x . , M a r . 1973---------- -- ------ ------------------- ____—
M a n c h e s t e r , N . H . , July 1972 1-----------------------------------------M e m p h i s , T e n n . - A r k . , Nov. 1972------- ,----------------------------M i a m i , F l a . , Nov. 1972 1_________ — ---------------------------------M i d la n d and O d e s s a , T e x . , Jan. 1973_____________________
l

Data on establishment



B u lle t in nu m ber
and p r i c e
1775-36,
1775-62,
1775-52,
1725-87,
1775-79,
1775-42,
1775-20,
1725-69,
1775-5,
1775-65,
1775-32,
1775-13,
1775-18,
1775-28,
1775-73,
1775-74,
1775-39,
1775-14,
1725-92,
1775-53,
1775-15,
1775-23,
1775-25,
1775-57,
1775-34,
1775-35,
1775-72,
1725-68,
1775-61,

40 cents
55 cents
40 cents
35 cents
40 cents
40 cents
75 cents
30 cents
45 cents
55 cents
50 cents
75 cents
65 cents
50 cents
40 cents
40 cents
40 cents
55 cents
70 cents
50 cents
75 cents
55 cents
75 cents
40 cents
40 cents
40 cents
40 cents
40 cents
35 cents

1775-64,
1775-24,
1775-1,
1725-66,
1775-71,
1775-48,
1775-27,
1775-44,
1775-31,
1775-17,
1725-81,
1775-22,
1775-2,

40
50
55
30
50
40
55
40
40
50
35
50
55

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1775-38,
1775-37,
1775-55,
1775-8,
1775-30,
1775-29,
1775-41,

75
40
40
55
40
55
35

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.

B u lletin n u m b e r

A rea
M i lw a u k e e , W i s . , M a y 1972 1-------------------------------------- -------M in n e a p o lis —St. P a u l , Minn., Jan. 1973___________________
M u s k e go n — u s k e g o n H eigh ts , M i c h ., June 1972 1 _______
M
N e w a r k and J e r s e y Cit y, N .J ., Jan. 1973------------------------N e w H av en , Conn ., Jan. 1973--------------------------------------------N e w O r l e a n s , L a . , Jan. 1973 ---------------------------------------------N e w Y o r k , N . Y . , A p r . 19721
_________________________________
N o r f o l k —V i r g i n i a B e a c h — o r t s m o u t h and
P
N e w p o r t N e w s —H ampton, V a . , Jan. 1973 1---------------------O k la h o m a City, O k l a . , July 1972____________________________
O m a h a , N e b r . —Io wa, Sept. 1972_____________________________
P a t e r s o n — ifto n— a s s a i c , N .J ., June 1972 1 ____________
Cl
P
P h i la d e lp h i a , P a . —N .J ., No v. 1972------------------------------------P h o e n ix , A r i z . , June 1972 1__________________________________
P i t t s b u r g h , P a . , Jan. 1973 1
__________________________________
P o r t l a n d , M a i n e , No v. 1972____ _____________________________
P o r t l a n d , O r e g . —W a s h . , M a y 1972 1 ---------------------------------Poughkeepsie^K ingston -New burgh , N .Y .,
June 1972 1 ______________________________________________________
P r o v i d e n c e —W a r w i c k - P a w t u c k e t , R.I.—M a s s . ,
M a y 1972________________________________________________________
R a le i g h , N . C . , Aug . 1972----------------------------------------------------Ric hmond, V a . , M a r . 1973____________________________________
R iverside—
San B e r n a r d i n o — n t a ri o , C a li f.,
O
De c. 1972 1 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------R o c h e s t e r , N . Y . (o ffi ce occupa tions only), July 1972___
R o c k f o r d , 111., June 1972 1 ___________________________________
St. L o u i s , M o .—111., M a r . 1973 1 ----------------------------------------Salt La k e City, Utah, No v. 19 721___________________________
San Anton io, T e x . , M a y 1973_________________________________
San D i e g o , C a l i f . , No v. 1972__________________________________
San F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , Oct. 1971 1 _______________
O
San J o s e , C a li f ., M a r . 1973__________________________________
Savannah, G a . , M a y 1973_____________________________________
Scranton , P a . , July 1972______________________________________
Seattle—E v e r e t t , W a s h . , J an. 1973------------------------------------Sioux F a l l s , S. D a k . , De c. 1972 1 ____________________________
South B end , In d ., M a r . 1973__________________________________
Spokane, W a s h . , J une 1972 1_________________________________
S y r a c u s e , N . Y . , July 1972___________________________________
T a m p a - S t . P e t e r s b u r g , F l a . , A u g . 1972--------------------------To le d o , Oh io — i c h . , A p r . 1973______________________________
M
Tr en to n , N . J . , Sept. 1972 1____________________________________
U t ica— o m e , N . Y . , July 1972_________________________________
R
W ash in gt on, D . C .—M d.—V a . , M a r . 1973____________________
W a t e r b u r y , Co nn ., M a r . 1973---------------------------------------------W a t e r l o o , Iowa, No v. 1972------------------------------------------------W ich ita , K a n s . , A p r .
1973___________________________________
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , M a y 1973________________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F eb. 1973__________________________________________
Yo un gs town— a r r e n , Ohio, No v. 1972_____________________
W

and p r ic e

1725-83,
1775-49,
1725-85,
1775-50,
1775-4o.
1775-47,
1725-90,

45cents
55cents
35cents
55 cents
40 cents
40cents
50cents

1775-51,
1775-6,
1775-16,
1725-88,
1775-45,
1725-94,
1775-67,
1775-21,
1725-89,

50cents
45cents
40cents
40cents
55cents
55 cents
75 cents
40cents
35cents

1725-80,

35cents

1725-70,
1775-7,
1775-68,

30cents
45cents
40cents

1775-60,
1775-4,
1725-84,
1775-69,
1775-33,
1775-78,
1775-40,
1725-33,
1775-66,
1775-77,
1775-10,
1775-56,
1775-43,
1775-54,
1725-91,
1775-1 1,
1775-9,
1775-63,
1775-12,
1775-3,
1775-75,
1775-58,
1775-26,
1775-70,
1775-76,
1775-59,
1775-19,

65cents
45cents
35cents
75cents
50cents
35cents
40cents
50cents
40cents
40cents
45cents
40cents
cents
40cents
35cents
cents
45cents
40cents
55cents
45cents
50cents
cents
40cents
40cents
40cents
40cents
cents

40

45

40

40

P O S T A G E A N D FEES PAID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20212

L A B -4 4 1

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE $300

THIRD CLASS MAIL

BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S REGIONAL OFFICES
Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

Region II
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Region III
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)
Delaware
District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee

Region V
8th Fioor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin

Region VI
1100 Commerce St. Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Arkansas
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas

Regions VII and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
VII
V III
Iowa
Colorado
Kansas
Montana
Missouri
North Dakota
Nebraska
South Dakota
Utah
Wyoming

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)
IX
X
Alaska
Arizona
Idaho
California
Oregon
Hawaii
Washington
Nevada





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102