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JUL 3119?2
document collection

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES

Region II
1515 Broadway, Suite 3400
New York, N .Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region III
406 Penn Square<Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region VI
Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas. Tex. 75202
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 3 5 3 -1880(Area Code 312)
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions V II and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 10th Floor
Kansas C ity, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017 '
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

Region I
1603-JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)




Regions V II and V III will be serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.

AREA WAGE SURVEY

Bulletin 1 7 2 5 -5 3
June 1972

V

U.S. D EPARTM ENT OF LABOR, J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
B U R EA U OF LAB O R S TA TIS TIC S , Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner

T h e W a te r b u r y , C o n n e c tic u t, M e tr o p o lita n A r e a , M a r c h 1 9 7 2
CONTENTS
Page

1.
5.

Introduction
W age tren ds fo r sele c te d occupational groups

T a b le s :
4.
6.

1. E stablish m en ts and w o rk e rs w ithin scope o f su rvey and num ber studied
2. Indexes o f standard w e e k ly s a la rie s and s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupational
grou ps, and p ercen ts o f change fo r s e le c te d p erio d s
A.

O ccupational earn in gs:
A - l . O ffic e occupations—w om en
A - 2. P r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ica l occupations— en and w om en
m
A -3 . O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and tech n ica l occupations— en and w om en com bined
m
A - 4 . M aintenance and pow erplan t occupations
A - 5. C ustodial and m a te r ia l m ovem en t occupations

B.

E stablishm ent p ra c tic e s and su pplem entary w age p ro v is io n s :
B - l . M inim um entrance s a la r ie s fo r w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s
B -2. Shift d iffe re n tia ls
B -3. Scheduled w eek ly hours and days
B -4. P a id h olidays
B -5. P a id vacations
B -6 . Health, in su ran ce, and pension plans

7.

8.
9.
10

11
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
18.

20. Appendix.

O ccupational d escrip tion s




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 2 0 4 0 2 —Price 35 cents

Preface
Note:

The Bureau o f .Labor S tatistics p ro g ra m of annual occupa­
tio n a l wage su rveys in m etro p o lita n a re a s is designed to p ro v id e data
on occupational earn in gs, and establish m en t p ra c tic e s and supple­
m en ta ry w age p ro v is io n s . It y ie ld s d eta iled data by s e le c te d in du stry
d iv is io n fo r each o f the a rea s studied, fo r geograp h ic reg io n s, and fo r
the United States. A m a jo r co n sid era tion in the p ro g ra m is the need
fo r g r e a te r in sigh t into (1) the m ovem en t o f wages by occupational
c a te g o ry and s k ill le v e l, and (2) the stru ctu re and le v e l o f w ages
among a rea s and in du stry d ivisio n s.

S im ila r re p o rts a re a v a ila b le fo r oth er a re a s .
back c o v e r .)

Union w age ra te s , in d ica tive o f p re v a ilin g pay le v e ls in the
W aterb u ry a re a , a re also ava ila b le fo r building construction;
prin tin g; lo c a l-tr a n s it o p era tin g em p lo yees; lo c a l tru c k d riv e rs
and h elp e rs ; and g r o c e r y sto re em p lo y ees.

A t the end o f each su rvey, an individual area bulletin p r e ­
sents the resu lts.
A ft e r com p letion o f a ll individual a rea bulletins
fo r a round o f su rvey s, two su m m ary bulletins are issu ed. The fir s t
brin gs data fo r each o f the m e tro p o lita n a rea s studied into one bulletin.
The second presen ts in fo rm a tio n which has been p ro je c te d fro m in d i­
vid u al m etro p o lita n a rea data to re la te to geograph ic regio n s and the
United States.
N in e ty -fo u r a rea s cu rre n tly a re included in the p ro g ra m . In
each a re a , in form a tion on occupational earnings is c o lle c te d annually
and on establish m en t p ra c tic e s and supplem entary w age p ro v is io n s
bien n ially.
This bu lletin presen ts resu lts o f the su rvey in W aterbu ry,
Conn., in M arch 1972.
The Standard M etro p o lita n S ta tistica l A r e a ,
as defined by the O ffic e o f M anagem ent and Budget (fo r m e r ly the
Bureau o f the Budget) through January 1968, con sists o f the c ity o f
W aterbu ry; borough o f Naugatuck; the towns o f Beacon F a lls , C h esh ire,
M id d leb u ry, P ro s p e c t, and W olcott in N ew Haven County; and the towns
o f Thom aston, W atertow n, and W oodbury in L itc h fie ld County.
This
study was conducted by the B ureau's re g io n a l o ffic e in Boston, M a ss.,
under the g e n e ra l d ire c tio n o f Paul V. M u lkern , A ssista n t R egion a l
D ir e c to r fo r O p eration s.




(See in sid e

ii

In tro d u c tio n
This area is 1 o f 94 in which the U.S. D epartm ent o f L a b o r 's
Bureau of L a b or S tatistics conducts su rveys of occupational earnings
and re la te d ben efits on an area w id e b a s is .1 In this area , data w e re ob­
tained by p erson al v is its of Bureau fie ld econ om ists to rep re s e n ta tiv e
establish m en ts within six broad indu stry d ivis io n s :
M anufacturing:
tra n sp ortation , com m unication, and oth er public u tilitie s ; w h olesale
trad e; re ta il trad e; finance, insu rance, and re a l estate; and s e r v ic e s .
M a jo r industry groups excluded fro m these studies a re governm ent
operation s and the constru ction and e x tra c tiv e in d u stries. E sta b lish ­
m ents having fe w e r than a p re s c rib e d num ber o f w o rk e rs a re om itted
because they tend to furnish in su fficien t em ploym ent in the occupations
studied to w arran t inclusion.
Separate tabulations a re p rovid ed fo r
each o f the broad industry d ivisio n s which m e e t publication c r it e r ia .

Occupational em ploym ent and earnings data are shown fo r
fu ll-tim e w o rk ers, i.e ., those h ired to w ork a re g u la r w eekly schedule.
Earnings data exclude prem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on
weekends, h olid a ys, and late sh ifts.
Nonproduction bonuses a re e x ­
cluded, but c o s t- o f- liv in g allow an ces and in cen tive earnings are in ­
cluded. W here w eek ly hours a re rep orted , as fo r o ffic e c le r ic a l occu ­
pations, re fe r e n c e is to the standard w orkw eek (rounded to the n earest
h alf hour) fo r which em p loyees r e c e iv e th e ir reg u la r stra ig h t-tim e
s a la rie s (e x c lu s iv e o f pay fo r o v e rtim e at reg u la r and/or p rem iu m
ra te s ).
A v e r a g e w eek ly earnings fo r these occupations have been
rounded to the n ea rest h alf d o lla r.

Th ese su rveys a re conducted on a sam ple basis because o f
the unn ecessary cost in volved in su rveyin g a ll establish m en ts. To
obtain optim um a ccu racy at m inim um cost, a g r e a te r p rop ortion of
la r g e than o f sm all establish m en ts is studied. In com bining the data,
h o w ever, all establishm ents a re given th e ir ap p rop ria te weight. E s t i­
m ates based on the establish m en ts studied a re presen ted , th e r e fo r e ,
as re la tin g to a ll establishm ents in the indu stry grouping and a rea ,
except fo r those below the m inim um s iz e studied.

T h ese su rveys m easu re the le v e l of occupational earnings in
an a rea at a p a rtic u la r tim e. C om parison s o f individual occupational
a v e ra g e s o v e r tim e m ay not r e fle c t expected wage changes.
The
a v e ra g e s fo r individual jobs a re a ffected by changes in wages and
em ploym ent pattern s. F o r exam ple, prop ortion s o f w o rk e rs em ployed
by high- o r lo w -w a g e firm s m ay change o r h igh -w age w o rk ers m ay
advance to b etter jobs and be rep la ced by new w o rk e rs at lo w e r ra tes.
Such shifts in em ploym ent could d e c re a s e an occupational a vera g e even
though m ost establishm ents in an a rea in c re a s e w ages during the y e a r.
T ren d s in earn in gs o f occupational groups, shown in table 2, are
better in d ica to rs o f w age trends than individual jobs within the groups.

Occupations and E arnings
The occupations selected fo r study a re com m on to a v a rie ty
of m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing in d u stries, and a re of the
fo llo w in g types:
(1) O ffic e c le r ic a l; (2) p ro fe s s io n a l and tech n ical;
(3) m aintenance and pow erplant; and (4) custodial and m a te ria l m o v e ­
m ent.
Occupational c la s s ific a tio n is based on a u niform set o f job
d escrip tion s designed to take account o f in teresta b lish m en t va ria tio n
in duties within the sam e job.
The occupations selected fo r study
a re lis te d and d escrib ed in the appendix. U nless o th erw ise indicated,
the earnings data fo llo w in g the jo b title s a re fo r a ll in du stries c o m ­
bined. E arnings data fo r som e of the occupations lis te d and d escrib ed ,
o r fo r som e industry d ivisio n s within occupations, are not p resen ted
in the A - s e r ie s ta b les, because eith er (1) em ploym ent in the occu pa­
tion is too sm all to p ro vid e enough data to m e r it presen tation , or
(2) th ere is p o s s ib ility o f d is c lo s u re of individu al establishm ent data.
E arn in gs data not shown s ep a ra tely fo r in du stry d ivisio n s a re included
in a ll in du stries com bined data, w h ere shown.
L ik e w is e , data are
included in the o v e r a ll c la s s ific a tio n when a su b cla ssifica tio n o f s e c ­
r e ta r ie s o r tru c k d riv e rs is not shown o r in form a tion to su b cla ssify
is not a va ila b le.

The a v e ra g e s p resen ted r e fle c t com p osite, areaw id e e s ti­
m a tes.
In du stries and establishm ents d iffe r in pay le v e l and job
staffin g and, thus, contribute d iffe re n tly to the estim ates fo r each job.
The pay rela tion sh ip obtainable fro m the a v e ra g e s m ay fa il to re fle c t
a c c u ra te ly the w age spread o r d iffe re n tia l m aintained among jobs in
individual estab lish m en ts. S im ila rly , d iffe re n c e s in a vera g e pay le v e ls
fo r m en and wom en in any o f the selected occupations should not be
assum ed to r e fle c t d iffe re n c e s in pay treatm en t of the sexes within
individual estab lish m en ts.
O ther p o ssib le fa c to rs which m ay con ­
tribu te to d iffe re n c e s in pay fo r m en and wom en include: D ifferen ces
in p ro g re s s io n within establish ed rate ran ges, since only the actual
rates paid incumbents a re c o lle c te d ; and d iffe re n c e s in sp ecific duties
p e rfo rm e d , although the w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d a p p rop ria tely within
the sam e su rvey job d escrip tio n . Job d escrip tion s used in cla s s ify in g
em p loyees in these su rveys a re usually m o re g e n e ra lize d than those
used in individual establishm ents and allow fo r m in or d iffe re n c e s
among establish m en ts in the sp e c ific duties p e rfo rm e d .

1
Included in the 94 areas are eight studies conducted by the Bureau under contract.
These
areas are Binghamton, N .Y . (New Yoik portion only); Durham, N. C . ; Fort Lauderdale—Hollywood and
Occupational em ploym ent estim a tes rep resen t the total in a ll
West Palm Beach, F la.; Huntsville, A la .; Poughkeepsie—Kingston—Newburgh, N . Y . ; Rochester, N .Y .
establishm ents within the scope o f the study and not the number actu­
(office occupations only); Syracuse, N . Y . ; and Utica— Rome, N . Y . In addition the Bureau conducts
a lly su rveyed . B ecause o f d iffe re n c e s in occupational structure among
more limited area studies in 64 areas at the request of the Employment Standards Administration of
estab lish m en ts,

the U. S. Department of Labor.




1

the

estim a tes

o f occupational

em ploym ent obtained

2
fro m the sam ple o f establish m en ts studied s e r v e only to indicate
the r e la tiv e im p o rta n ce o f the jobs studied.
Th ese d iffe re n c e s in
occupational stru ctu re do not a ffe c t m a te r ia lly the a ccu ra cy o f the
earn in gs data.
E stablish m en t P r a c tic e s and Supplem entary W age P ro v is io n s
In form a tion is p resen ted (in the B - s e r ie s ta b les) on selected
establish m en t p ra c tic e s and su pplem en tary w age p ro v is io n s as they
re la te to plant- and o ffic e w o r k e r s . Data fo r industry d iv is io n s not
presen ted se p a ra te ly a re included in the e s tim a te s fo r " a ll in d u s trie s ."
A d m in is tra tiv e , ex e c u tiv e , and p ro fe s s io n a l em p lo yees, and con stru c­
tion w o rk e rs who a re u tilize d as a sep arate w ork fo r c e a re excluded.
"P la n tw o r k e r s " include w orkin g fo re m e n and a ll n on su p ervisory w o rk ­
e rs (including leadm en and tra in e e s ) engaged in non office functions.
"O ffic e w o r k e r s " include w o r k i n g s u p e rv is o rs and n o n su p erviso ry
w o rk e rs p e rfo rm in g c le r ic a l or re la te d fu nctions. C a fe te ria w o rk e rs
and routem en a re excluded in m anu factu ring in d u stries, but included
in nonm anufacturing in d u stries.
M inim um entrance s a la r ie s fo r w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s (table
B - l ) re la te only to the establish m en ts v is ite d . B ecau se o f the optim um
sam pling techniques used, and the p ro b a b ility that la r g e e s ta b lis h ­
m ents a re m o r e lik e ly to have fo r m a l entrance ra tes fo r w o rk e rs
above the s u b c le ric a l le v e l than s m a ll estab lish m en ts, the tab le is
m o r e re p re s e n ta tiv e o f p o lic ie s in m edium and la r g e estab lish m en ts.
Shift d iffe r e n tia l data (table B -2 ) a re lim ite d to p lan tw ork ers
in m anufacturing in d u stries.
T h is in fo rm a tio n is p resen ted both in
te rm s o f (1) estab lish m en t p o lic y , 2 p resen ted in te rm s o f tota l plantw o rk e r em p loym en t, and (2) e ffe c tiv e p ra c tic e , presen ted in te rm s
o f w o rk e rs a ctu a lly em p loyed on the s p e c ifie d shift at the tim e o f the
su rv e y .
In estab lish m en ts having v a r ie d d iffe r e n tia ls , the amount
applying to a m a jo r ity was used o r , i f no amount applied to a m a jo r ity ,
the c la s s ific a tio n " o th e r " was used. In establish m en ts in which som e
la te -s h ift hours a re paid at n orm al ra te s , a d iffe re n tia l was re c o rd e d
only i f it applied to a m a jo r ity o f the shift hours.
The scheduled w e e k ly hours and days (table B -3 ) o f a m a ­
jo r it y o f the fir s t - s h ift w o rk e rs in an establish m en t a re tabulated as
applying to a ll o f the plan t- o r o ffic e w o r k e r s o f that establish m en t.
Scheduled w e e k ly hours and days a re those which a m a jo r ity o f fu ll­
tim e e m p lo y ees w e re expected to w ork, w hether they w e re paid fo r at
s tra ig h t-tim e o r o v e r tim e ra te s .
P a id h olid ays; paid vacation s; and health, insu rance, and pen ­
sion plans (ta b les B -4 through B -6 ) a re tre a te d s ta tis tic a lly on the
b asis that th ese a re ap p lica b le to a ll plant- o r o ffic e w o r k e r s i f a

m a jo r ity o f such w o rk e rs a re e lig ib le or m a y even tu a lly q u alify fo r
the p ra c tic e s lis te d . Sums o f individu al ite m s in ta b les B -2 through
B -6 m ay not equal to ta ls because o f rounding.
Data on paid h olid ays (table B -4 ) a re lim ite d to data on h o li­
days granted annually on a fo r m a l b asis; i.e ., (1) a re p ro vid ed fo r in
w ritte n fo rm , o r (2) have been estab lish ed by custom . H olidays o r d i­
n a rily granted a re included even though they m ay fa ll on a nonworkday
and the w o rk e r is not granted another day o ff. The f ir s t p art o f the
paid h olidays tab le p resen ts the num ber o f w hole and h a lf h olidays
actu ally gran ted.
The second p art com bines w hole and h alf holidays
to show total h olid ay t im e .
The su m m ary o f vacation plans (table B -5 ) is lim ite d to a
s ta tis tic a l m e a s u re o f va ca tion p r o v is io n s .
It is not intended as a
m ea su re o f the p ro p o rtio n o f w o rk e rs actu ally r e c e iv in g s p e c ific ben e­
fits .
P r o v is io n s o f an establish m en t fo r a ll lengths o f s e r v ic e w e re
tabulated as applying to a ll plant- o r o ffic e w o r k e r s o f the e s ta b lis h ­
m ent, re g a r d le s s o f length o f s e r v ic e .
P r o v is io n s fo r paym ent on
oth er than a tim e basis w e re con verted to a tim e b asis; fo r exam p le,
a paym ent o f 2 p ercen t o f annual earn in gs was co n s id e re d as the e q u iv ­
alent o f 1 w e e k 's pay. Only b a sic plans a re included. E stim a tes e x ­
clude vacation bonus and va c a tio n -s a v in g s plans and those which o ffe r
"e x te n d e d " o r "s a b b a tic a l" b en efits beyond b a sic plans with qu alifyin g
lengths o f s e r v ic e . Such exclu sion s a re ty p ic a l in the s te e l, aluminum,
and can in d u stries.
Data on health, in su ran ce, and pension plans (table B -6 ) in ­
clude those plans fo r which the e m p lo y e r pays at le a s t a p art o f the
cost. Such plans include th ose u n d erw ritten by a c o m m e r c ia l insurance
com pany and those p ro v id e d through a union fund o r paid d ir e c tly by
the e m p lo y e r out o f cu rren t o p era tin g funds o r fr o m a fund set aside
fo r this pu rp ose. An estab lish m en t was co n s id e re d to have a plan i f
the m a jo r ity o f e m p lo y ees was e lig ib le to be c o v e re d under the plan,
even i f le s s than a m a jo r ity e le c te d to p a rtic ip a te because em p loyees
w e re re q u ire d to contribute to w a rd the cost o f the plan. L e g a lly r e ­
qu ired plans, such as w o rk m en 's com pensation, s o c ia l s e c u rity , and
r a ilro a d r e tire m e n t w e re excluded.
Sickness and acciden t insu rance is lim ite d to that type o f in ­
surance under which p re d e te rm in e d cash paym ents a re m ade d ir e c tly
to the insu red during te m p o ra ry illn e s s o r acciden t d is a b ility . In fo r ­
m ation is p resen ted fo r a ll such plans to which the em p lo y e r c o n trib ­
utes.
H o w e v e r, in N ew Y o rk and N ew J e r s e y , which have enacted
te m p o ra ry d is a b ility insu rance law s which re q u ire e m p lo y e r con trib u ­
t io n s , 3 plans a re included only i f the e m p lo y e r (1) contributes m o re
than is le g a lly re q u ire d , o r (2) p ro v id e s the e m p lo y ee with ben efits
which exceed the req u irem en ts o f the law .
Tabulations o f paid sick

2
An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met either of the following condi­
tions: (1 ) Operated late shifts at the time of the survey, or (2 ) had formal provisions covering late
2
shifts. An establishment was considered as having formal provisions if it (1 ) had operated late shifts
during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2 ) had provisions in written form for operating late shifts.
contributions.




The temporary disability laws in California

and

Rhode Island do not require employer

3
le a v e plans a re lim ite d to fo rm a l plans 4 which p ro v id e fu ll pay o r a
p ro p o rtio n o f the w o r k e r 's pay during absence fro m w o rk because of
illn e s s . Separate tabulations a re p resen ted a cco rd in g to (1) plans
which p ro v id e fu ll pay and no w aitin g p e rio d , and (2) plans which p r o ­
vid e eith er p a rtia l pay o r a w aiting p e rio d . In addition to the p re s e n ­
tation o f the p ro p o rtio n s o f w o rk e rs who a re p rovid ed sickn ess and
acciden t insu rance o r paid sick le a v e , an unduplicated total is shown
o f w o rk e rs who r e c e iv e e ith er o r both typ es o f b en efits.
L o n g -te rm d is a b ility plans p ro v id e paym ents to to ta lly d is ­
abled em p loyees upon the exp ira tio n o f th e ir paid sick le a v e and/or
sick n ess and acciden t in su ran ce, o r a fte r a p re d e te rm in e d p e rio d of
d is a b ility (ty p ic a lly 6 m onths).
P aym en ts a re m ade until the end o f
4 An establishment was considered as having a formal plan if it established at least the mini­
mum number of days of sick leave available to each employee.
Such a plan need not be written,
but informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, were excluded.




the d is a b ility , a m axim u m age, o r e lig ib ilit y fo r re tire m e n t b en efits.
Paym ents m ay be at fu ll o r p a rtia l pay but a re alm ost alw ays r e ­
duced by so cia l se c u rity , w o rk m en 's com pensation, and p riva te pension
ben efits payable to the disab led em p lo yee.
M a jo r m e d ic a l insurance includes those plans which a re d e ­
signed to p ro te c t em p loyees in case o f sickness and in ju ry in volvin g
expenses beyond the c o v e ra g e o f basic h osp ita liza tion , m e d ic a l, and
s u rg ic a l plans. M e d ic a l insurance r e fe r s to plans p ro vid in g fo r c o m ­
p lete o r p a rtia l paym ent o f d o c to rs ' fe e s .
Dental insurance usually
c o v e r s fillin g s , ex tra ctio n s, and X - r a y s .
Excluded a re plans which
c o v e r only o r a l s u rg e ry o r accident dam age.
P lan s m ay be u n d er­
w ritten by c o m m e ric a l insurance com panies o r n on profit organ ization s
o r they m a y be paid fo r by the em p lo y e r out o f a fund set aside fo r
this pu rpose. Tabulations o f re tire m e n t pension plans a re lim ite d to
those plans that p ro v id e re g u la r paym ents fo r the rem a in d er o f the
w o r k e r 's life .

4

T a b le 1.

Establishm ents and w orkers within scope of survey and num ber studied in W a te rb u ry , C o n n .,1by m ajor industry d ivision ,2M arch 1 9 7 2
Num ber o f establishm ents

Indu stry d ivis io n

M inim um
em ploym en t
in e sta b lish ­
ments in scope
o f study

W ork ers in establishm ents
W ithin scope o f study

W ithin scope
of stu dy3

Studied
T o t a l4

Studied

Plan t
Num ber

A ll d iv is io n s __________________________________
Manufacturing______________________________________
N onm anufacturing__________________________________
Tran sp o rta tion , com m unication, and
other public u t ilit ie s 5 _______________________
W h olesa le t r a d e ________________________________
R e ta il tra d e _____________________________________
Fin ance, in su rance, and r e a l e s t a t e _____ _
S e rv ic e s 8 _ ___ ________ ________ __________

O ffic e

P e rc e n t

T o t a l4

_

149

65

37, 517

100

26,675

4,653

24,903

50

98
51

34
31

30,456
7, 061

81
19

22,200

3,346
1, 307

19, 837
5,066

7
4

1,749
462
2, 760
1,097
993

5

-

50
50
50
50
50

8
6
23
5
9

1
0
3
7

1

7
3
3

4,475
1, 192
(6 )
(6 )
(!)
(6 )

247
(6 )

0)
(6
(

6
)

1,682
329
1,371
783
901

1 Th e W a terb u ry Standard M etrop o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a , as defined by the O ffic e o f M anagem ent and Budget (fo r m e r ly the Bureau o f the Bu dget) through January 1968, con sists of the city of
W aterbu ry; borough o f Naugatuck; the towns o f Beacon F a lls , C h esh ire, M id d leb u ry, P r o s p e c t, and W olco tt in N ew H aven County; and the towns of Th om aston , W atertow n , and W oodbury in L itc h fie ld
County. T h e " w o r k e r s w ithin scope o f stu dy" estim ates shown in this table p ro v id e a reason a b ly a ccu rate d e s crip tio n o f the s iz e and co m position o f the la b o r fo r c e inclu ded in the su rvey. Th e
estim a tes a re not intended, h o w e v e r, to s e r v e as a b a sis of com parison w ith oth er em ploym en t in dexes fo r the a re a to m e a s u re em ploym en t tren ds o r le v e ls sin ce (1) planning o f w age su rveys
re q u ire s the use o f esta b lish m en t data co m p iled c o n s id era b ly in advance o f the p a y r o ll p e r io d studied, and (2) sm a ll establish m ents a re excluded fr o m the scope o f the su rvey.
2 Th e 1967 ed itio n o f the Standard In du stria l C la s s ific a tio n Manual was used in c la s s ify in g establish m ents by in du stry d ivis io n .
3 Includes a ll esta b lish m en ts w ith to ta l em ploym en t at o r above the m in im u m lim ita tio n . A l l outlets (w ithin the a r e a ) o f com pan ies in such in d u stries as tra d e , fin an ce, auto re p a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion p ictu re th e a ters a re co n s id ere d as 1 establish m ent.
4 Inclu des e x e c u tiv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and oth er w o r k e r s excluded fr o m the sep arate plant and o ffic e c a te g o rie s .
5 A b b r e v ia te d to "p u b lic u t ilitie s " in the A - and B - s e r ie s ta b les. Taxicabs and s e r v ic e s in ciden tal to w a te r tra n sp o rta tio n w e r e excluded.
6 T h is in du stry d iv is io n is re p res en ted in estim a tes fo r " a l l in d u s trie s " and "non m anu factu rin g" in the S e rie s A ta b le s , and fo r " a ll in d u s trie s " in the S e rie s B ta b les. Separate presen tation
o f data fo r th is d iv is io n is not m ade fo r one o r m o r e o f the fo llow in g reason s: (1) E m ploym en t in the d ivis io n is too sm a ll to p ro v id e enough data to m e r it sep ara te study, (2) the sam ple w as not
design ed in itia lly to p e r m it sep ara te p resen tation , (3) respon se w as in su fficien t o r inadequate to p e r m it sep ara te p resen tation , and (4) th e re is p o s s ib ility of d is c lo s u re o f in dividu al establish m ent data.
7 W o r k e rs fr o m this en tire in du stry d iv is io n a re re p res en ted in estim ates fo r " a l l in d u s trie s " and "non m anu factu rin g" in the S e rie s A ta b le s , but fr o m the r e a l esta te po rtio n only in estim ates
fo r " a ll in d u s trie s " in the S e rie s B ta b les. Separate p resen tation of data fo r this d ivis io n is not m ade fo r one o r m o re o f the reason s given in fo otn ote
6 above.
8 H o te ls and m o te ls ; lau ndries and oth er p erso n a l s e r v ic e s ; business s e r v ic e s ; au tom obile r e p a ir , ren ta l, and parking; m otion p ictu re s; n on profit m e m b ersh ip o rga n izatio n s (excluding re lig io u s
and ch a rita b le o rg a n iz a tio n s ); and en gin eerin g and a rc h ite c tu ra l s e r v ic e s .




F o u r-fifth s o f the w o rk e rs w ithin scope o f su rv ey in the W a terb u ry a rea w e r e
em p loyed in m anufacturing fir m s .
The fo llo w in g presen ts the m a jo r in du stry groups and
s p e c ific in du stries as a p ercen t o f a ll m anufacturing:
Industry groups
F a b rica ted m e ta l p ro d u cts ______ 23
P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s trie s ------- 15
Instrum ents and re la ted
p rod u cts________________________ 14
Rubber and p la stics products,
N E C _____________________________ 13
E le c tr ic a l equipm ent and
supplies_________________________ 6
C h em ica ls and a llie d
p ro d u cts________________________ 5
M a ch in e ry, ex cept e le c tr ic a l______ 5
M iscella n eo u s m anufacturing
in d u s trie s ______________________ 5

S p e c ific in du stries
M eta l sta m p in gs__________________ 17
N o n ferrou s r o llin g and
draw in g________
13
Rubber fo o tw e a r __________________ 11
W atch es, c lo ck s, and
w a tc h c a s e s --------------------------- 8
In d u stria l ch em ic a ls_____________ 5
Costu m e je w e lr y and notions___ 4

Th is in form a tion is based on estim ates of to ta l em ploym en t d e r iv e d fr o m u n iv erse
m a te r ia ls co m p ile d p r io r to actual su rvey.
P r o p o rtio n s in va rio u s in du stry d ivis ion s m ay
d iffe r fr o m prop o rtio n s based on the resu lts o f the su rvey as shown in table 1 above.

W a g e T re n d s fo r S e le c te d O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s
shows the p ercen ta g e change. The index is the product o f multiplying
the base y e a r r e la t iv e (100) by the r e la t iv e f o r the next succeeding
y e a r and continuing to m u ltiply (compound) each y e a r 's re la tiv e by the
previou s y e a r 's index.

P r e s e n t e d in table 2 a r e indexes and p e rcen ta g es o f change
in a v e ra g e s a la r ie s o f o ffic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and industria l nurses,
and in a v e r a g e earnings of s e lected p lan tw ork er groups. The indexes
a r e a m e a s u re of w ages at a given tim e , e x p r e s s e d as a percen t of
w ages during the base p eriod . Subtracting 100 fr o m the index yield s
the percen tage change in w ages f r o m the base p e rio d to the date of
the index.
The p e rc e n ta g e s of change or in c re a s e re la te to wage
changes between the indicated dates. Annual rates of in c r e a s e , w h ere
shown, r e f l e c t the amount o f in c r e a s e fo r 12 months when the tim e
p e r io d between su rveys was other than 12 months. T h e s e computations
w e r e based on the assumption that wages in c re a s e d at a constant rate
betw een surveys. T h e s e estim ates a r e m e a s u re s of change in a v e r ­
ages fo r the a r e a ; th ey a re not intended to m e a s u re a v e ra g e pay
changes in the establishm ents in the area.

F o r o ffic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and in dustrial nurses, the wage
trends re la te to r e g u la r w e e k ly s a la r ie s f o r the n orm a l w orkweek,
e x c lu sive of earnings fo r o v e r tim e .
F o r plantw orker groups, they
m e a s u re changes in a v e r a g e s tra ig h t-tim e hourly earnings, excluding
p re m iu m pay fo r o v e r t im e and fo r w o rk on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts. The p ercen ta ges a re based on data f o r selected key o c c u ­
pations and include m ost of the n u m e r ic a lly important jobs within
each group.
L im ita tio n s of Data

Method of Computing
The indexes and p ercentages o f change, as m easu res of
change in a re a a v e r a g e s , a re influenced by;
(1) g e n e ra l sa la ry and
wage changes, (2) m e r i t or other in c r e a s e s in pay r e c e iv e d by in d i­
vidual w o r k e r s while in the same job, and (3) changes in a v e ra g e
w ages due to changes in the labor f o r c e resulting fr o m labor turn­
o v e r , f o r c e expansions, fo r c e reductions, and changes in the p r o p o r ­
tions o f w o r k e r s em ployed by establishments with d ifferen t pay lev e ls .
Changes in the labor f o r c e can cause in c r e a s e s o r d e c re a s e s in the
occupational a v e r a g e s without actual wage changes. It is conceivable
that even though a ll establishments in an a rea gave wage in c r e a s e s ,
a v e ra g e w ages m ay have declin ed because lo w e r-p a y in g establishments
entered the a r e a o r expanded their w o rk fo r c e s .
S im ila rly , wages
m a y have rem ained r e l a t i v e l y constant, yet the a v e ra g e s fo r an area
m a y have ris e n c o n sid era b ly because hig h er-payin g establishments
entered the area.

Each o f the fo llow in g key occupations within an occupational
group was assigned a constant w eight based on its proportionate e m ­
ploym ent in the occupational group:
Office clerical (m en and women):
Bookkeeping-machine
operators, class B
Clerks, accounting, classes
A and B
Clerks, file, classes
A , B, and C
Clerks, order
Clerks, payroll
Comptometer operators
Keypunch operators, classes
A and B
Messengers (office boys or
girls)

Office clerical (men and women)—
Continued
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Switchboard operators, classes
A and B

Skilled maintenance ( men):
Carpenters
Electricians
Machinists
Mechanics
Mechanics (automotive)
Painters

T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e operators,

Pipefitters

class B
Typists, classes A and B

Tool and die makers

Industrial nurses (m en and
women):
Nurses, industrial (registered)

Unskilled plant (men):
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners
Laborers, material handling

The use of constant em plo ym ent weights elim in ates the effect
o f changes in the proportion o f w o r k e r s rep resen ted in each job in ­
cluded in the data.
The percen tages of change r e f l e c t only changes
in a v e ra g e pay f o r s tra ig h t-tim e hours.
T h e y a re not influenced by
changes in standard w o rk schedules, as such, o r by prem iu m pay
fo r o v e r t im e . W h e re n e c e s s a r y , data w e r e adjusted to re m o v e fr o m
the indexes and p ercen ta ges of change any significant effect caused
by changes in the scope o f the survey.

The a v e r a g e (mean) earnings fo r each occupation w e r e m u lt i­
plied by the occupational weight, and the products fo r a ll occupations
in the group w e r e totaled.
The a g g r e g a te s f o r 2 consecutive y e a rs
w e r e rela ted by dividing the a g g re g a te fo r the la t e r y e a r by the a g g r e ­
gate f o r the e a r l i e r year.
The resultant r e la t iv e , less 100 percent,




5

6




T ab le 2.

Indexes of standard w eekly salaries and straight-tim e hourly earnings for selected occupational groups

in W a te rb u ry , Conn., M arch 1971 and M arch 1 9 7 2 , and percents of c han ge1 for selected periods
A ll in du stries
P e r io d

O ffic e
c le r ic a l
(m en and
w om en)

Indu strial
nurses
(men and
w om en)

M anufacturing

S killed
maintenance
tra des
(m en)

U n skilled
plan tw o rk e rs
(m en)

O ffic e
c le r ic a l
(men and
w om en)

In du strial
nu r s e s
(m en and
w om en )

S killed
maintenance
tra d es
(m en)

U nskilled
pian tw o rk ers
(m en)

Indexes (M a rc h 1967=100)
M a rch 1971________________________________________
M a rch 1972________________________________________

121.9
128.1

122.9
129.9

125.9
134.3

119.7
124.6

121.9
127.8

122.5
128.7

125.6
133.4

123.0
130.1

P erc e n ts o f change 1
2.2
1.6
2.7
3.1
2.8
2.1
3.7

5.5
2.6
3.5
0
2.4
1.9
6.1

2.8
2.9
2.2
1.5
2.6
3.1
3.9

1.8
2.7
3.5
1.4
1.8
2
—.6
4.0

2.3
1.6
3.0
3.0
2.3
1.8
3.4

4.9
3.1
3.0
.5
2.0
2.9
5.6

2.7
2.8
2.1
1.3
2.5
3.0
4.0

2.8
3.4
3.3
.5
1.8
2.0
1.7

4.5
4.1

3.5
3.2

6.8
6.3

2.6
2.4

4.2
3.9

3.5
3.2

6.7
6.2

4.5
4.1

A p r il 1968 to M arch 1969:
11-m onth in c re a s e _____________________________
Annual ra te o f in c r e a s e _______________________

5.2
5.7

5.1
5.6

4.3
4.7

3.6
3.9

5.3
5.8

4.7
5.1

4.3
4.7

3.3
3.6

M arch 1969 to M a rch 1970_______________________
M arch 1970 to M a rch 1971----------------------------M a rch 1971 to M a rch 1972-----------------------------

5.6
5.0
5.1

8.5
4.1
5.7

5.9
6.7
6.7

6.2
6.0
4.1

6.0
4.9
4.8

8.6
4.1
5.1

5.9
6.5
6.2

7.4
6.1
5.8

M a rc h I960 to M a rch 1961_______________________
M a rc h 1961 to M a rch 1962_______________________
M a rch 1962 to M a rch 1963_______________________
M a rch 1963 to M a rch 1964_______________________
M a rc h 1964 to M arch 1965_______________________
M a rch 1965 to M a rch 1966_______________________
M a rch 1966 to M a rch 1967_______________________
M a rch 1967 to A p r il 1968:
13-month in c re a s e _____________________________
Annual ra te o f in c r e a s e _______________________

A l l changes a re in c re a s e s unless o th erw is e in dicated.
Th is d e c re a s e la r g e ly re fle c t s changes in em ploym en t betw een high- and lo w -w a g e establish m ents ra th er than w age d e c re a s e s .

7

A.

Occupational earnings

T a b le A -1 .

O ffic e

o c c u p a t i o n s —w o m e n

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly hours and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupations studied on an a r e a b a s is by in d u stry d iv is io n , W a te rb u ry , Conn. , M a rc h 1972)
Weekly earnings 1
( standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e weekly earnings of—
i

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range2

$

t
70

75

85

$

t

$

*
80

90

95

s

t

100

105

f
110

115

S
120

t

t
125

*
130

*
135

t
140

s
150

t
160

S
170

t

180

t

190

and

75

200
and

un d er
80

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

*

85

10
9

8
5

-

1
1

1
1

1
1

4
4

5
5

20
20

10
10

4
4

2
2

25
18
7

14
11
3

15
14
1

14
11
3

6
4
2

2
2

4
4

2
2

2
2

2
1

1

1

200 over

140

150

160

170

180

190

8
7

10
10

6
6

8
8

3
3

2
1

1
-

_

-

-

3
3
*

6
5
1

1
1
-

-

3
3
-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

_

_

1
1

-

_

-

_

-

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

WOMEN
BILLERS. MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) ----------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------

28

3 9.5
4 0.0

1 02 .5 0

$
1 0 9 .0 0

$
$
9 4 .0 0 -1 1 3 .0 0

17

1 11 .5 0

1 10 .0 0

1 07 .5 0 -1 1 4 .5 0

CLERKS. ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

83
80

40.0
4 0.0

1 28 .5 0
1 27 .0 0

1 24 .0 0
1 2 2 .0 0

1 13 .0 0 -1 4 0 .0 0
1 13 .0 0 -1 3 9 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------MA NUFACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

153

3 9.5

1 04 .0 0

1 0 2 .0 0

9 5 .5 0 -1 1 3 .5 0

129
29

4 0.0
39.0

1 0 5 .5 0
9 8.50

1 0 2 .5 0
1 02 .0 0

9 6 .5 0 -1 1 4 .0 0
8 5 .5 0 -1 1 2 .5 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A --------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

18
16

40.0
4 0.0

1 1 3 .0 0
1 1 1 . 00

1 13 .0 0
1 12 .0 0

1 0 0 .0 0 -1 2 3 .0 0
9 9 .0 0 -1 1 9 .5 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B --------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

21
19

4 0.0
4 0.0

94.50
92.50

9 5.00
93.50

8 8 .0 0 -1 0 2 .5 0
8 7 .5 0 - 9 9.00

CLERKS, ORDER -----------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------

80

40.0

1 0 5 .0 0

1 0 4 .0 0

9 7 . 0 0 - 1 1 3". 0 0

71

40.0

1 0 6 .5 0

1 0 5 .5 0

9 8 .5 0 -1 1 3 .5 0

CLERKS, PAYROLL ---------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------

74
66

39.5

1 1 5 .0 0
1 15 .5 0

1 1 4 .0 0

1 0 4 .0 0 -1 2 3 .5 0
1 0 5 . C O - 1 2 3 . 50

_

-

KE YPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -------MA NUFACTURING ---------------------

74
68

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

44

SECRETARIES --------------------------MA NU FACTURING ---------------------

39.5

1 1 4 .0 0

4

_

1

1

-

-

3
-

-

-

“

~

-

6

13

12

2
4

8
5

12

-

-

3
-

-

-

-

5
5

*•
_

32
32
-

-

-

“

1
1

i
i

6
6

3
3

5
5

-

2

-

4

6

-

2

5

16
15

13
13

11
11

11
11

6
6

6
5

2
2

1
1

-

-

11
11

7
6

8
8

12
11

10
8

9
9

3
2

2
1

6
6

1
1

2
2

1
1

_

-

_

*

-

-

-

4

11
11

11
11

11
9

6
5

11
11

4

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

3

-

2
2

“

-

21
19

21
20

24
20

36
33

51
43

42
42

19
19

17
17

6
6

4

1

_

4
4

15
11

4
4

3
3

4
4

2
2

4
4

-

*

_

2

_

-

1 1 3 .5 0

1 0 5 .5 0 -1 2 4 ,5 0
1 0 5 .5 0 -1 2 5 .0 0

“

“

1 0 3 .0 0
1 04 .0 0

9 7 .5 0 -1 0 8 .0 0
9 8 .0 0 -1 0 8 .0 0

-

-

_

1 4 4 .0 0
1 4 8 .0 0

1 4 6 .5 0
1 5 0 .0 0

1 27 .5 0 -1 6 2 .0 0
1 3 1 .5 0 -1 6 3 .5 0

-

-

3 9.5
3 9.5

1 66 .5 0
1 6 9 .0 0

1 59 .5 0
1 6 2 .0 0

1 55 .5 0 -1 8 6 .0 0
1 56 .0 0 -1 8 8 .0 0

65
50

39.5
40.0

1 47 .5 0
1 5 4 .5 0

1 5 2 .5 0
1 60 .5 0

1 3 1 .0 0 -1 7 3 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0 -1 8 0 .5 0

-

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -------------MANUFA CT UR IN G ---------------------

78
77

4 0.0
4 0.0

1 4 9 . 5C
1 4 8 .5 0

1 49 .0 0
1 49 .0 0

1 3 5 .5 0 -1 6 3 .0 0
1 3 5 .5 0 -1 6 2 .5 0

-

-

-

-

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -------------MANUFA CT UR IN G ---------------------

130
105

3 9.5
40.0

1 33 .0 0
1 37 .5 0

1 32 .5 0
1 3 8 .5 0

1 1 6 .0 0 -1 5 2 .5 0
1 2 3 .5 0 -1 5 5 .5 0

-

-

i

2

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

91

39.5

1 1 0 .0 0

1 0 9 .0 0

1 0 1 .5 0 -1 1 9 .5 0

-

-

-

2

7

86

4 0.0

1 1 0 .0 0

1 0 9 .0 0

1 0 2 .0 0 -1 2 0 .5 0

2

5

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR --------------MANU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

55
48

4 0.0

1 2 9 .0 0

1 1 7 .0 0 -1 4 3 .5 0

-

-

_

4 0.0

1 30 .0 0
1 3 0 .0 0

1 29 .0 0

1 1 7 .0 0 -1 4 4 .5 0

SW ITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A ---MANU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

20
20

4 0.0

1 23 .5 0

1 23 .0 0

1 1 0 .5 0 -1 3 8 .0 0

-

4 0.0

1 23 .5 0

1 23 .0 0

1 1 C .5 0-1 38 .00

4 0.0
4 0.0

1 1 4 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0

33

40.0
4 0.0

1 0 2 .5 0
1 03 .0 0

310
264

39.5
4 0.0

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

37
32

SECRETARIES, CLASS B -------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




1 14 .0 0

-

_

-

-

4
2
-

“
i

2

14
12

5
5

9
6

10
8

13
10

2
1

1
1

3

9
6

8

9
6

11
5

13

12

4

9

9

-

_

_

6
6

-

-

3
-

7
7

3
2

5
3

10
7

7
7

6
6

10
10

2
2

_

5
5

i
i

6
6

6
6

12
12

11
11

12
12

17
17

3
3

2
2

2
2

i
-

5
4

10

15
13

7
7

9

16
15

14
13

14
14

7
7

1
1

_

_

8

-

-

4
4

9
9

6
6

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

10
9

6

4

2
2

_

-

1
-

-

4

4
4

-

4

8
8

-

-

2
2

3
3

2
2

1
1

-

-

_

_

_

-

7
4

7
6

9
5

5
5

27
27

6
6

12
11

-

1
1

2
“

2
2

7
7

5
5

2

-

-

1
1

4

2
2

1
1

4
4

4

5

-

-

2

2

-

3

i
-

-

-

-

3

“

_

i
“

2
*

“

-

“

2
2

2

“

-

ii
9

-

6

8
T a b le A -1 .

O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly hours and earn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupations studied on an a r e a b a s is by in d u stry d iv is io n , W a te rb u ry , Conn. , M a rc h 1972)
Weekly earnings
(standard)

*
75

80

85

90

Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e we ekly earnings of-$
S
$
$
*
$
*
*
i
*
*
s
*
*
s
115
120
no
95
100
105
125
130
135
140
150
160
170 180
190
200

75

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

80

85

90

95

100

105

-

-

3
2

“

1

11
11

15
13

t
Average
weekly
hours 1
(standard)

70
M ean2

Median2

S

t

*

t

$

Middle range2

and

under
115

120

125

130

135

3
3

l
l

13
13

3
3

2
2

3
3

no

140

150

160

-

170

180

190

200 over

WOMEN - CONT IN UE D
SWITCHBOARO OPERATOR-RECEPTI ONISTSMA NUFACTURING ---------------------

55
51

$
$
$
$
40.0 107.50 104.50 99.50-118.00
40.0 108.50 105.00 100.00-118.50

TYPISTS, CLASS A --------------------MA NUFACTURING ---------------------

65
65

40.0 110.50 109.00 101.00-121.00
40.0 110.50 109.00 101.00-121.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

7
7

6
6

7
7

14
14

8
8

A
A

10
10

2
2

1
1

1
1

3
3

TYPISTS, CLASS B --------------------MA NUFACTURING ---------------------

112
63

39.5 100.50 100.00
40.0 102.00 103.00

1
“

8
A

17
8

8
3

10
2

12
8

15
12

5
2

9
6

10
9

9
7

2
2

1

1

4

86.50-115.00
92.50-116.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

See footnotes at end o f tables.

P ro fe s s io n a l

T a b le A -2 .

and te c h n ic a l

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

and w o m en

(A verage straight-tim e w eekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on,an area basis by industry division, Waterbury, Conn., March 1972)
Weekly

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
woikers

weekly
hours *
(standard)

amings 1
ard)

Number o f w orkers receivin g straight-tim e weekly earnings of—
Under

Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range2

t
.1 1 5

$
115

1

and
under
120

$

*

$

120

125

*
130 ■ 140

125

130

140

1

7

$

%

1

%

%

*

%

t

*

$

$

%

$

%

150

160

170

180

19 0

20 0

21 0

220

230

240

250

26C

27 0

28 0

290

150

16 0

170

18 0

190

200

210

220

23 0

24 0

250

26 0

27 0

280

290

300

2

3

2

~

2
-

2

3

_

_

“

MEN
O

20

O
*

CO MPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B

$
1 4 4 .0 0

$
1 3 9 .5 0

$
$
1 3 2 .0 0 -1 5 9 .0 0

-

2 4 7 .5 0 -2 9 0 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

3

A

1

1 8 5 .5 0 -2 1 6 .0 0
1 8 5 .5 0 -2 1 6 .0 0

-

-

-

-

_

_

A

“

-

*

-

4

2
2

8
8

16
16

8
8

7
7

3
3

1
l

3

-

6
6

4
4

2
2

1 5 8 .5 0
1 5 8 .5 0

1 4 8 .0 0 -1 8 2 .0 0
1 4 8 .0 0 -1 8 2 .0 0

-

-

-

-

20
20

8

3
3

6
6

A

-

11
11

8

“

12
12

-

7
7

2
2

1
1

1 4 3 .0 0
1 4 3 .0 0

1 4 2 .0 0
1 4 2 .0 0

1 2 4 .5 0 -1 5 9 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0 -1 5 9 .0 0

1
1

A
A

6
6

5

5

1
1

A
A

A
A

1 4 7 .5 0
1 4 5 .5 0

1 4 4 .0 0
1 4 4 .0 0

1 3 9 .0 0 -1 5 6 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0 -1 5 5 .0 0

6
6

1
1

2
2

15

3 9 .5

2 6 4 .0 0

2 5 8 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A
MA NU FACTURING

64
64

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 0 2 .0 0
2 0 2 .0 0

1 9 8 .0 0
1 9 8 .0 0

74
74

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 6 2 .5 0
1 6 2 .5 0

41
41

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

28
27

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS
MA NU FA CT UR IN G

8

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C
MANUFA CT UR IN G

2

1

CO MPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A

3

5

3

5

8
8

8
8

10
10

A

WOMEN
NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) --MANU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




i

3
_

-

-

-

-

_

-

*

_

-

-

9
T a b le

A -3 .

O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s — m e n

and w o m e n

c o m b in e d

(A verage straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings fo r selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Waterbury, Conn., March 1972)
Av trage

Average

Av erage

Number

Occupation and industry divis io n

Weekly
earnings »
(standard) (standard)
Weekly

of

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

Occupation and industry divi sio n

3 9. 5
40.0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING -------------------

94
88

40.0
40.0

131.50
129.0 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------

155
126
29

39 .5
4 0 .0
3 9. 0

10 4. 50
106 .00
98 .5 0

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS A --------MANUFACTURING -------------------

18
16

40.0
4 0 .0

113 .00

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS B --------MANUFACTURING -------------------

21
19

SECRETARIES -

-

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

CONTINUED

Number

Occupation and industry division

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

CONTINUED

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

of

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

CONTINUED

T Y P I S T S , CLASS A --------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

65
65

40.0
40.0

110.50
1 1 0. 50

T Y P I S T S , CLASS 8 --------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

112
63

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

100 .5 0
1 0 2 . OC

SECRETARIES, CLASS A --------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

37
32

39.5
3 9 .5

$
1 6 6 . 5C
169.0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS 8 --------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

65
50

3 9 .5
40.0

147. 50
154 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C --------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

78
77

40.0
40.0

149 .5 0
148. 50

1 1 1 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 --------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

131
105

3 9 .5
40.0

1 3 3 . CO
137 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

26
17

40.0
40.0

141 .0 0
144 .0 0

40.0
40.0

94 .5 0
92 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL --------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

91
86

3 9 .5
40.0

110 .0 0
110. 00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A -----------------------------

16

3 9 .5

2 5 9. 50

CLERKS, OROER -----------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

86
75

40.0
40.0

109 .00
109.50

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ----------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

55
48

40.0
40.0

130. 00
1 30 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -----------------------------

16

*
o

28
17

$
10 2. 50
111.50

of

(standard]

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

BILLERS, MACHINE ( B I L L I N G
MACHINE) -------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

Weekly

CLERKS, PAYROLL -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

75
67

39 .5
3 9. 5

115 .00
115 .50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

23
20

40.0
40.0

1 2 8. 5 0
1 23 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A ----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

64
64

4 0 .0
40.0

202.00
202 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING -------------------

74
66

40.0
4 0 .0

114 .5 0
114 .50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

55
51

40.0
40.0

107. 50
108. 50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

76
76

40.0
40.0

162.00
162.00

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ------------------

44
33

40.0
4 0 .0

102 .5 0
103 .00

TABULA!ING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

18
17

40.0
40.0

119.00
120. 50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ----------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

43
43

40.0
4 0 .0

143.50
143.50

311
264

39 .5
4 0 .0

144 .00
146 .00

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ----MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

28
27

4 0 .0
40.0

147.50
145.50

SECRETARIES ---------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

See footnote at end of tables.




|

o

PROFESSIONAL ANO TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

202 .00

10
T a b le

A -4 .

M a in te n a n c e

and

p o w e r p la n t o c c u p a tio n s

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d occu pation s stu died on an a re a b a sis by in d u stry d iv is io n , W a terb u ry, C onn., M a rc h 1972)
Numbe r of w o r k e r

Hourly earnings3

M ea n2

Median2

Middle range c

t
3 .6 0

3. 7 0

t
%
3 80 3 . 9 0

S
4.00

3 .20

3 .3 0

3.40

3 .5 0

3 .60

3 .7 0

3 .80

3 90

4.10

2
2

1
1

5
5

4
4

-

2
2

20
20

9
9

4
4

3
3

12
12

1
1

-

i

t

$

*

3 .5 0

t

U n d e r 3 * 10 3 .2 0
%
and
3.1C under

i

$

$

i

4.30

*
4.50

$

4.20

S
4.40

*

4 .1 0

4.60

4.70

4.80

(
t
i
5 . 0 0 5.20

t
.40

O
eg

workers

%
3 .4 0

o
o

Sex, occupation, and industry division

r e c e iv i n g s t ra i g h t- ti m e hour ly earnings of—

s
3 .30

-

*

Number

4.30

4.40

4.50

4.60

4.70

4.80

5. 00

5.20

•60 o v e r

2
2

2
2

5
5

-

-

-

-

1

a

5
5

7
7

2
2

5
5

9

9

26
26

11
11

5
5

8
8

1
1

1
1

3
3

2
2

3

1

-

-

-

-

-

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

MEN
$

$

$

$

26
25

3 .8 7
3 .8 3

3.79
3. 7 8

3.643.63-

4.31
4 .2 8

2
2

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTE NANCE ---------MAN UFA CTURING ---------------------

149
139

4 .3 6
4.27

4 .2 8
4. 1 9

4.0 0 3.98-

4 .75
4.72

2
2

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY --------------MAN UFA CTURING ---------------------

46
46

4 . 19
4.19

4 .2 5
4 .2 5

3.843.84-

4 .53
4.53

*

1
7

3 .5 9

3.4 7

3.23-

4 .15

1

3

2

1

3

2

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

1
1

5
5

3
3

3
3

9
9

13
13

60
60

4
4

22
22

4
4

22
22

3
3

2
2

9
9

5
5

12
12

-

-

_

3
3

4
4

25
25

9
9

33
33

5
5

9
9

11
11

9
9

11
11

2
2

40
40

_

9
4
5
5

12
1
11
11

_

_

_

_

18
18

8
8

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

1
1

33
30

11
11

39
39

_

12
12

12
12

34
34

-

_

1

“

-

-

4
4

20
20

6
6

3
3

18
18

21
21

36
36

25
25

12
12

49
49

27
27

92
92

16
16

27
27

CARPENTERS, MAINTENA NC E ------------MAN UFA CTURING ---------------------

HELPERS, MAI NTENANCE TRADES --------

-

-

-

*

-

-

4
4

-

-

-

_

-

*

MAC HIN E-TOOL OPERATORS, TO OLROOM —
MAN UFA CTURING ---------------------

187
187

4.13
4.13

4 .0 0
4. 0 0

3.923.92-

4 .3 6
4 .36

1
1

MACHINISTS, MAINTEN AN CE ------------MANUFAC TUR ING ---------------------

167
167

4 .2 6
4.26

4. 2 3
4. 2 3

3.993.99-

4.71
4.71

_
”

2
2

(MAINTENANCE) ----------------------MAN UFA CTU RIN G --------------------NO NM AN UFA CTU RIN G ----------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ---------------

94
33
61
61

4 .6 0
4 .2 8
4 .7 7
4 .7 7

4 .4 2
4. 3 6
5.14
5.14

3.864.313.843.84-

5.19
4.42
5.52
5.52

_

_

-

-

MECHANICS, MAIN TEN AN CE -------------MA NU FAC TUR ING ---------------------

169
161

4 .1 8
4 .1 5

4. 01
3. 9 9

3.883.89-

4 .58
4 .55

MILLWRIG HTS --------------------------MAN UFA CTU RIN G ---------------------

53
53

3 .8 9
3. 8 9

3. 7 9
3.7 9

3.723.72-

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ----------------MAN UFA CTU RIN G ---------------------

576
576

4 .3 9
4 .3 9

4 .3 5
4. 3 5

4.104.10-

MECHANICS,

AUTOMOTIVE

See footnotes at end o f tables.




~

1

_

~

-

-

1

-

6
1
5
5

1
1

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

1

-

_

*

*

4 .18
4 .1 8

-

4
4

-

4.73
4 .73

-

4
4

-

~

2
2

i

26
26

8

-

-

-

18
18

4
4

_

3
3

~

52
52

48
48

_

-

“

40
40

-

-

3
3

1

9

-

-

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

7
7

-

_

"

-

4
4

_

-

-

“

“

3
1
2
2

14

5

14
~

-

14
14

5
5

14
14

3
3

12
12

70
70

1

-

-

4
“

34
34

5
5

“

3

11
T a b le

A -5 .

C u s to d ia l

and

m a te ria l

m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a sis by in du stry d iv is io n , W a te rb u ry , Conn. , M a rc h 1972)

Numbe r of w orker s receiving straight-tim e hourly ear nings of ----

Hourly earnings ^

Mean2

Median2

Middle range 2

t
2 .1 0

t
2 .2 0

$
2 .3 0

$
2 .4 0

2 .5 0

$
2 .6 0

s
2 .7 0

$
2 .8 0

*
3 .0 0

S
3 .2 0

S
3 .4 0

$
3 .6 0

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

17

39

s

*
3 .8 0

s
4 .0 0

t
4 .2 0

f
4 .4 0

$
4 .6 C

i

i
5 .0 0

i
5 .2

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4

-

-

-

and
under
1 .9 0

*

workers

t
2 .0 0

o
o

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
1 .9 0

O
C
O

t
1 .8 0

Number

MEN
$

$

115

2 .5 5

2 .3 5

2 .1 3 -

3 .0 9

-

59

2 .9 9

3 .0 7

2 .4 9 -

3 .2 9

*

$

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN --------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------WATCHMEN
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

$

26

2 .8 2

2 .4 9

2 .4 3 -

549

2 .2 6
2 .8 5

1 .9 9 -

2 .8 7

240

2 .4 6
2 .9 1

2 .6 5 -

3 .3 8

19

3 .5 5

3 .3 7

3 .3 2 -

286
268

2 .9 1
2 .9 1

2 .7 6
2 .7 5

2 .5 0 2 .5 0 -

3 .2 8
3 .3 0

18

2 .9 2

3 .1 2

2 .5 6 -

137
137

3 .1 0

2 .9 4

3 .1 0

2 .9 4

2 .7 9 2 .7 9 -

3 .2 8
3 .2 8

-

2

2

8

15

5

7

-

4

12

*

2

2

8

15

5

7

*

4

-

2

-

-

6

-

-

-

17

44

25

74

9

8

-

4

2

16

7
6

42

25

67

5

11
1

45
44

16
16

-

-

1

2

10

-

-

-

5

-

1

-

-

-

4
4

1
~

-

-

20
18

20
20

26
26

16

15
15

34
34

26
18

31
31

8
8

15
15

5
5

2
-

15
15

-

_

_

_

13

48
46

-

2

*

3

2

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

17

15

26

6
6

8

6

_

8

6

-

1

2
2

3

2

9

_

-

3

2

9

-

-

-

4
4

6
6

6

_

_

6

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

2

4

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

27
9

-

12
12
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1
'
-

-

-

4

-

-

-

4

-

*

-

*

17

15

40
40

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

4

26

22
20

3 .3 8
3 .4 8

3 .5 1
3 .5 4

3 .1 5 3 .2 6 -

3 .7 4
3 .7 5

-

_

-

-

-

2

-

-

_

_

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS -------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

29

3 .1 9
3 .1 8

3 .1 3 3 .1 4 -

3 .5 8
3 .7 4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

20

3 .3 0
3 .3 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

14
14

263

4 .0 9

3 .9 6

3 .3 5 -

5 .3 2

_

-

-

-

-

4

3 .4 2
4 .6 7
5 .3 1

3 .3 8
5 .3 1
5 .3 5

3 .1 1 3 .9 8 5 .3 2 -

3 .5 6
5 .3 6
5 .3 7

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

-

122
141

3
-

-

2

3
-

-

2

3

12
12
-

26
26
-

_

2

_

_

12

”

“

“

~

12

105
52

4 .0 7

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) -----------TRUCKERS, POWER (FO RKL IF T) -------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

-

4

3

3
3
-




-

-

24

35
35
-

22
2

_

_

_

4
4
4
i
3

30
1
29

~

~

3 .1 0 3 .1 4 -

3 .4 8
3 .5 1

3 .6 5

3 .9 5
3 .4 8

3 .4 8 3 .3 4 -

4 .5 5
3 .6 0

22

3 .7 1

4 .0 3

2 .8 4 -

4 .0 8

3

2

77

3 .4 5

3 .2 9

2 .9 8 -

3 .5 5

1

22

5

68

3 .4 7

3 .3 0

2 .9 7 -

4 .2 0

1

22

5

18

5

44
44

2 .6 1
2 .6 1

2 .5 7
2 .5 7

2 .5 2 -

2 .8 7

4

2 .5 2 -

2 .8 7

4

3
~

“

2
2

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

-

-

5

1

18

-

2

20

16

20

16

-

7
5

21

_

21

“

2

-

-

23

9

_

~

_

-

_

8
8
2
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

2
2

1
1

-

_

-

6

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

~

”

12
12

-

8
8
8

14

15
15

1

-

~

3 .3 6

___________________ ,

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .

-

4
_

4

WOMEN

PACKERS, SHIPPING
MANUFACTURING ■

-

12

4

SHIPPING CLERKS ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) -------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

-

4

4 .1 0
3 .6 8

3 .3 2

-

40

3 .0 3 3 .1 8 -

3 .1 3
3 .2 6

-

24

3 .6 2
3 .4 9

40
33

-

-

3 .5 7
3 .4 2

85

-

-

87

32
21

TRUCKCRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1- 1/ 2 TONS) -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

-

-

RECEIVING CLERKS -------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

TRUCKDRIVERS
-------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------

-

*

30

3 .1 8

PACKERS, SHIPPING ------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

12

4

4 .0 5

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

4
”

110
4

3 .1 6

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ----MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------

"

14

25

8
~

-

10

_

“

-

_

17
17

2

-

-

-

12

B.

Establishment practices and supplementary w a g e provisions

T a b le

B -1 .

M in im u m

e n tra n c e

s a la rie s

fo r w o m e n

o ffic e w o rk e rs

(D istrib u tio n o f establish m en ts studied in a ll in du stries and in in du stry d ivis io n s by m inim u m entrance s a la ry fo r se le c te d c a te g o rie s
o f in exp erien ced w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s , W aterbu ry, Conn., M a rch 1972)
In experien ced typists
Manufacturing
Minim um w eek ly stra ig h t-tim e s a la r y 4

Other in exp erien ced c le r ic a l w o rk ers 5
Manufacturing

Nonmanufacturing

Based on standard w eek ly hours 6 of—

A ll
in du stries

A ll
schedules

Establish m ents studied___________________________________

65

34

Establish m ents having a s p e c ifie d m inim um ________________

40

A ll
schedules

37V2

A ll
in du stries
A ll
schedules

40

Nonm anufacturing

Based on standard w eek ly hours 6 o f40

XXX

31

XXX

XXX

65

34

XXX

A ll
schedules

31

37 V2

XX X

40

XX X

14

10

8

4

2

2

25

16

13

9

3

5

under $70.00— ________________________________
under $72.50--------------------------------------------under $75.00___________________________________
under $77.50___________________________________
under $80.00___________________________________
under $82.50___________________________________
under $ 85.00___________________________________
under $87.50___________________________________
under $90.00 ______
_____
under $92.50— ------------------------- -------------under $95.00------------------------------------- ------under $97.50___________________________________
o v e r _____________________________________________

_
3
2
4
1
2
1
1

_

_
2
3
1
1
1
*

_
1
1
1
1

_
1
1
-

_
1
_
1

1
1
6
3
-

1
2
2
-

1
2
7
1
1
1
-

_
1
4
1
2
_
1

_
1
1
1
-

_
3
1
1

Establish m ents having no sp e c ifie d m in im u m ------------------

6

5

XXX

1

XXX

XXX

15

E stablish m ents which did not em p loy w o rk ers
in this c a te g o ry _______________________________________________

45

19

XXX

26

XX X

XXX

25

$67.50
$70.00
$72.50
$75.00
$77.50
$80.00
$ 82.50
$ 85.00
$87.50
$90.00
$92.50
$95.00
$97.50

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

See footnptes at end o f ta b les.




.
2
1
4
1
1
1
-

8
3
1
1
1

8

1
1
1
-

8
10

-

XXX

7

XXX

XX X

XXX

15

XXX

XXX




13

T a b le

B -2 .

S h ift d iffe re n tia ls

( L a t e - s h i f t p a y p r o v is io n s fo r m a n u fa c tu rin g p la n t w o r k e r s b y ty p e and am ou n t o f p a y d if f e r e n t i a l ,
W a t e r b u r y , C on n . , M a r c h 1972)

P e r c e n t o f m a n u fa c tu rin g p la n t w o r k e r s —

L a t e -s h ift pay p ro v isio n

In e stab lish m en ts having p ro v is io n s 7
fo r late shifts
Second shift

T o ta l------------------------------------------------------------------

T h ir d o r other
shift

90. 5

71. 6

A c tu a lly w ork in g on late shifts

Second shift

19. 1

T h ird o r other
shift

3. 1

N o pay d iffe re n tia l fo r w o rk on late s h ift ---------

4. 0

4. 0

0 .2

0 .1

P a y d iffe re n tia l fo r w o rk on late s h ift --------------

86 . 5

67. 7

18. 9

3. 0

10 . 6

2. 4

T ype and am ount o f d iffe re n tia l:
U n ifo rm cents (p e r h o u r). ________________

52. 5

50. 0

5 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------f cents _ _ _
)
7 l cen ts____________________________________
/i
9 c e n t s ___ ______________________________
10 cen ts—___________________________________
12 c e n t s ___
_ _
_ _
15 c en ts---------------------------------------------------18 c en ts---------------------------------------------------18 3 c e n t s -------------------------------- ----- ----/5
20 c e n ts.___ —______ ______ ________________
2 2 ce n ts— — — --------- -------- . .
25 cen ts----------------------------------------------------

4 .4
3. 2
4. 0
17. 5
2. 0
16. 9
_
1. 2
3.4

_

-

19.2
4. 0
4. 4
1.8
1. 2
2. 8
9. 5
3 .4

U n ifo rm p e r c e n t a g e ------------------------------------

30. 3

17. 6

5 p e r c e n t --------------------------------------------------

6 p e r c e n t __________________________________
6 V2 p e rc e n t_________________________________
7 p e r c e n t ------------------------------------------------7 V2 p e rc e n t_______________________ _______
9 p e r c e n t _________ ______ _______________
----- ------------10 p e rc e n t ------- ---------15 p e rc e n t-----------------------------------------------O ther fo r m a l pay d iffe re n tia l______________

See footnotes at end o f ta b le s.

-

3.
1.
1.
6.
7.

3
5

8
3
0

-

9- 0
1.4
3. 7

1. 2

3. 7

-

-

.5
.9
3.9
.2
2.4
_
.5
1. 1

-

_

1. 5
1. 8
-

6. 3
8. 0

_
.4
-

.9
.5
( 8)
-

-

( 8)
.2
.5

-

*

7 .7

.6

1. 1

-

.
.
1.
2.

5

.2

6
2
2

-

-

-

1.9
.2

"

.6

-

.4
“

14

T a b le

B -3 .

S c h e d u le d

w e e k ly

h ours and days

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f p la n t w o r k e r s and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u s tr y d iv is io n s b y s c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u rs and d a y s
o f f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s , W a te r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r c h 1972)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

W e e k ly h o u rs and days
A l l in d u stries

_____

100

d a y s______________________________________
d a y s______________________________________
d ay s_________ ______ ______________________
5 d a y s___________________________________
38 h ou rs— 5 d a y s______________________________________
3 9 V4 h ou rs— 5 d a y s___________________________________
40 h ou rs— 5 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------42 V2 h o u rs— 5 V 2 d a y s ________________________________
43 h o u rs— 5 d a y s______________________________________
45 h ou rs— 5 d a y s______________________________________
4 6 % h ou rs— 6 d a y s___________________________________
38 h ou rs— 6 d a y s______________________________________
50 h o u r s ________________________________________________
5 d a y s _______________________________________________
5 V2 d a y s ____________________________________________
55 h o u rs— 5 V2 d a y s ............................ .................. .....

M an u factu rin g

n

A ll w o r k e r s _____________________

25 h ou rs— 5
35 h ou rs— 5
37 h ou rs— 5
3 7 V2 h o u rs—

S e e fo o tn o te at en d o f t a b le s .




_______

4

100

-

3
-

4

5

76

80
-

2
(’ )

2
3

2

1
1

3
4
1
1
-

2

2

3

2
2

P u b lic utilities

100

-

-

A ll in d u stries

100

( 9)

1
19
1

M an u factu rin g

P u b lic utilities

100

10 0

n

1
4
_

8

10

90

72

8
-

-

85
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

100
_
_
_

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

_

3
3
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

15

T a b le

B -4 .

P a id

h o lid a y s

(P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n o f p la n tw o rk e rs and o ffic e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u strie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y nu m ber o f p a id h o lid ay s p ro v id e d a n n u ally , W a t e r b u r y , Conn. , M a r c h 1972)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

Item
A ll in d u strie s

A l l w o r k e r s ______________________________________

W o r k e r s in esta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid h o lid a y s --------------------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in esta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid h o lid a y s ---------------------------------------------------

M an u factu rin g

P u b lic utilities

A l l in d u stries

M an u factu rin g

P u b lic u tilities

100

100

100

100

100

100

98

100

100

99

100

100

2

-

-

1
2
2
1
8

_

_

1

-

-

-

(9)
3
8
3
7
20
2
3

8
4
10
3
9
20
3
3

11
6
-

2
1
1
4
1

-

-

30
6

31
7

76

-

*

-

_
6
6
39
41
69
71
83
84
93
95
97
98

_
7
7
42
45
74
77
91
91
99
99
100
100

-

(9)

-

-

N u m b e r o f days
1 h o lid ay _______________________________________________
5 h o lid ay s - _______ _______________ _____________________
6 h o lid a y s _____________________________________________
6 h o lid ay s plu s 2 h a lf d a y s ________________________
7 h o lid a y s _____________________________________________
7 h o lid ay s plu s 1 h a lf d a y -------------------------------------7 h o lid ay s plu s 2 h a lf d a y s ________________________
8 h o lid a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------8 h o lid ay s plus 1 h a lf d ay __________________________
8 h o lid ay s plu s 2 h a lf d a y s ----------------------------------9 h o lid a y s _____________________________________________
9 h o lid ay s plus 1 h a lf d a y -------------------------------------9 holid ays plus 2 h a lf d a y s ----------------------------------9 h o lid ay s plus 3 h a lf d a y s ----------------------------------10 h o lid a y s .
----- -----------------------------------------------11 h o lid a y s ____________________________________________
12 h o lid a y s ---------------------------------------------------------------

_

-

8
-

-

8
4
(9)
7
11
4
2
1
30
22
1

_

_

2

-

-

-

3
-

10
5
(9)

10
15
6
3
36
10
-

1
-

4
-

20
74
-

T o ta l holiday tim e 1
0
12 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------------------------11 days o r m o r e -----------------------------------------------------10 V2 days o r m o r e ___________________________________
10 days o r m o r e -----------------------------------------------------9 V2 days or m o r e _____________________________________
9 days o r m o r e ------------------------------------------------------8 V2 d ays o r m o r e ---------------------------------------------------8 days o r m o r e ------------------------------------------------------7 V2 d ays o r m o r e _____________________________________
7 d ays o r m o r e - -----------------------------------------------------6 d ays o r m o re — --------------------------------------------------5 d ays o r m o r e ------------------------------------------------------1 day o r m o r e ----------------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end o f ta b le s .




-

76
76
83
83
89
89
100
100
100
100

1
23
24
56
60
79
79
91
91
96
97
99
99

10
10

49
54
79
79
95
95
98
98
100
100

_
-

20
94
94
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100

16

T a b le

B -5 .

P a id

v a c a tio n s

(P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n of p la n tw o rk e rs and o ffic e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s trie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s by v a catio n pay p r o v is io n s , W a t e r b u r y , C onn., M a r c h 1972)
P la n tw o rk e rs

O ffic e w o rk e r s

V a c a tio n p o lic y
A ll in d u strie s

A l l w o r k e r s — ___________________

_______________

M an u factu rin g

P u b lic utilities

A l l in d u strie s

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
41
58

100
30
70

100
97
3

100
95
5

100
93
7

100
100

-

*

-

-

-

39
16
-

47
10
-

_
73
-

-

-

10
70
1

77
_

-

7
60
7
9

63
8
29

63
9
27

27
73

9
91

7
93

3
97

40
16
43

45
19
35

10
90

4
1
95

4
1
95

_
100

18
21
61

20
26
55

_
100

3
1
96

4
1
95

100

18
21
61

20
26
55

3
1
96

4
1
95

100

(9 )
72
9
18

_

_

68
11
21

100

_

_
100
-

M ethod of paym ent
W o r k e r s in e sta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s________________________________________
L e n g t h -o f-t im e p a y m e n t________________________
P e rc e n ta g e paym ent______________________________
W o r k e r s in esta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid v a c a tio n s____________________________________

(9 )

-

A m ou n t of v acatio n pay 1
1
A ft e r 6 m onths of s e r v ic e
U n d e r 1 w eek___________________________________________
1 w eek ___________________________________________________
O v e r 1 and un der 2 w e e k s __________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________

_

*

A f t e r 1 y e a r of s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s __________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________
A f t e r 2 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
O v e r 1 and un der 2 w e e k s _________________________
2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

.

A f t e r 3 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w eek ___________________________________________________
O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s __________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________

-

.
-

A ft e r 4 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s _________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________

_
-

100

_

A f t e r 5 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s __________________________
3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------

(9 )
79

-

-

-

20

_

_

73
27

100
-

A f t e r 10 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s __________________________
3 w e e k s _________________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s __________________________
4 w e e k s _________________________________________________

See footnotes at end o f ta b le s.




(9 )

22
15
57
3

1

21
18
55

4
2

-

(’ )
13
1
83
3

_

_

13

4

2

96
-

81
4

17

T a b le

B -5 .

P a i d v a c a t i o n s ----- C o n t i n u e d

(P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n of p la n tw o rk e rs and o ffic e w o r k e r s in a l l in d u strie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s by vacatio n pay p r o v is io n s , W a t e r b u r y , Conn., M a r c h 1972)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O f f ic e w o r k e r s

V a c a tio n p o lic y
A l l in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

A l l in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

A m o u n t o f v a c a tio n p a y 11— C on tin u ed
A f t e r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e

1w e e k __________________________________________________
2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s _________________________
3 w e e k s ________________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s _________________________
4 w e e k s ______________________________________________

(9 )
18
15
61
5

1

_
16
18
58
5

2

_
-

1
00

(’ )

1
0
1
85

-

1

-

3

_

.

9

3

84

97

2
1

4

_
_

-

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e

1w e e k __________________________________________________
2 w e e k s _____________ _________________________________

1
1

3 w e e k s ________________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s _________________________
4 w e e k s ________________________________________________

56
5
28

(9 )

_

_

8

-

58

6

66
-

28

34

_

_

7
7

-

(9 )
5
61
34

_
2
58
40

_
3
32
_

64

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e

1w e e k __________________________________________________
2 w e e k s ________________________________________________
3 w e e k s _________________________________________ ____
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s -------------------------------4 w e e k s ________________________________________________
O v e r 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s _________________________
5 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------

(9 )

1
0
9
4
50
5

5
50

6

2
1

25

(9 )

_

_

10
0

(’ )
4

8
_

68

-

-

-

20

_
1
1
0

.

3
_

_

61

97

-

_

28

-

A f t e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e

1w e e k __________________________________________________
2 w e e k s ________________________________________________
3 w e e k s ________________________________________________
4 w e e k s ________________________________________________
O v e r 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s _________________________
5 w e e k s ________________________________________________

1
0
9
43
5
32

7
7
48

6

32

_
-

(9 )
4

8

_

_

1
1
0

_

30

51

-

-

-

70

37

36

53

3
24
_

72

A f t e r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e

1w e e k __________________________________________________
2 w e e k s . _____________________________________________

1
0

3 w e e k s _________________________ _______________________
4 w e e k s ________________________________________________
O v e r 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s _________________________
5 w e e k s ________________________________________________
6 w e e k s _____________________________________ ________

9
43
5
19
13

(9 )

_

-

(9 )

7
7
48

-

4

6
17
15

-

30
70
-

8

_

1
1
0

_
3
-

51

53

-

-

-

25

19

72

1
2

1
6

24

-

M a x im u m v a c a tio n a v a ila b le

1 w e e k __________________________________________________
2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
3 w e e k s ________________________________________________
4 w e e k s ________________________________________________
O v e r 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s _________________________
5 w e e k s ________________________________________________
6 w e e k s ______________________ _____________________

(9 )

1
0
9
42
5
19
13

_

7
7
48

6

17
15

_
-

(9 )
4

-

8

19
81

50
26

1
2

_

1
1
0
53

_
3
-

23

-

-

19
16

74
'

S ee footnotes at end o f ta b le s.




18

T a b le

B -6 .

H e a lth ,

in s u ra n c e , and

p e n s io n

p la n s

( P e r c e n t o f p la n t w o r k e r s and o f f ic e w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r ie s and in in d u s tr y d iv is io n s e m p lo y e d in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n b e n e f it s , W a t e r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r c h 1972)
P la n t w o r k e r s
T y p e o f b e n e fit and
fin a n c in g 12

A l l w o r k e r s ______________________________________

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g at
le a s t 1 o f the b e n e fit s show n b e l o w _____________
L i f e in s u r a n c e _____________________________ ____
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s ___
______________
A c c id e n t a l d e a th and d is m e m b e r m e n t
in s u r a n c e ____ ___________________________________
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s ____ ______________ _ _
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s ic k le a v e o r b oth 1 __________________________
3

O ffic e w o r k e r s

A l l in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa c tu rin g

1
00

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

1
00

98

10
0

10
0

99

10
0

10
0

92
77

97
82

10
0

98
79

99
79

10
0

80

80
77

85
82

97
76

89
84

90

86

99
55

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

A l l in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

56

92

96

83

96

96

10
0

S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e ___________
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s ___________________
S ic k le a v e (f u l l p a y and no
w a it in g p e r i o d ) _______________________________
S ic k le a v e ( p a r t ia l p a y o r
_______________________
w a itin g p e r i o d ) .

83
77

92

86

14
14

52
47

65
59

25
25

1
2

4

70

74

6
8

96

4

4

"

L o n g - t e r m d is a b ilit y in s u r a n c e _ __
_ __
N o n c o n t r ib u t o r y p la n s __ _
______________
H o s p it a liz a t io n in s u r a n c e _______________________
N o n c o n t r ib u t o r y p la n s __________________ _
_
S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e ____________________ ___________
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s ____ ____________
___
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e _
_________________
____
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s _______________________
M a jo r m e d ic a l in s u r a n c e ______________________
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s _______________________
D e n ta l in s u r a n c e __________________________________
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s _______________________
R e t ir e m e n t p e n s io n _______________________________
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s _______________________

5
5
95
82
94
80
93
80
67
51
9
9
90
80

3
3

49
49

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le s .




1
00
85

10
0
85
99
84
69
51
9
9
97

86

10
0
10
0
10
0
10
0
10
0
10
0
92
92

1
0
1
0
94
94

1
25

1
0
97
89
97
89
97
89
82
69

8
8

97
87

“

21
2
10
0
92

10
0
92
99
91
79
64
"
99

88

“
28
28

10
0
10
0
10
0
10
0
10
0
10
0
10
0
10
0
20
20
98
98

19

F o o tn o te s
A l l of these standard footnotes m ay not apply to this bulletin.

1 Standard hours r e f l e c t the w o rk w eek fo r which em p loyees r e c e i v e th eir regu la r s tra ig h t-tim e s a la r ie s (e x clu sive of pay fo r o v e r tim e
at re g u la r and/or p rem iu m r a te s ), and the earnings c o rresp on d to these w e e k ly hours.
2 The mean is computed f o r each job by totaling the earnings of a ll w o r k e r s and dividing by the number of w o r k e r s .
The median
designates position— half of the e m p lo yees surveyed r e c e i v e m o r e than the rate shown; half r e c e iv e less than the rate shown.
The middle
range is defined by 2 rates of pay; a fourth of the w o r k e r s earn less than the lo w e r of these rates and a fourth earn m o r e than the higher rate.
3 Exclu des p re m iu m pay fo r o v e r t im e and fo r w o rk on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
4 T h ese sa la rie s re la te to f o r m a l l y established minim um starting (hiring) re g u la r s tra ig h t-tim e sa la rie s that are paid fo r standard
w orkweeks.
5 Excludes w o r k e r s in s u b clerica l jobs such as m e s s e n g e r.
6 Data a re p resented fo r a ll standard w orkweeks combined, and for the m ost common standard w orkw eeks reported.
7 Includes a ll plantw orkers in establishments cu rre n tly operating late shifts, and establishments whose f o r m a l p r o visio n s c o v e r late
shifts, even though the establishments w e r e not c u rren tly operating late shifts.
8 L e s s than 0.05 percent.
9 L e s s than 0.5 percent.
1 A l l combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; fo r example, the proportion of w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g a
0
total of 9 days includes those with 9 full days and no half days, 8 full days and 2 half days, 7 full days and 4half days, and so on. P ro p o r tio n s
then w e r e cumulated.
1 Includes payments other than "le n g th of t i m e , " such as percen tage of annual earnings or fla t-s u m payments, converted to an equivalent
1
tim e basis ; fo r example, a payment of 2 percen t of
annual earnings was con sidered as 1 w e e k 's pay. P e r i o d s of s e r v i c e w e r e chosen a r b i t r a r i l y
and do not n e c e s s a r ily r e f l e c t the individual p r o visio n s fo r p r o g r e s s io n . F o r exam ple, the changes in proportio ns indicated at 10 y e a r s ' s e r v ic e
include changes in p ro v is io n s o c cu rrin g between 5 and 10 y e a rs . E s tim a te s a re cumulative. Thus, the proportion elig ib le fo r 3 w eeks' pay or
m o r e after 10 ye a rs includes those e lig ib le f o r 3 w eek s' pay o r m o r e after f e w e r ye a rs of s e r v ic e .
1 E stim ates listed after type of benefit a re fo r all plans fo r which at least a part of the cost is borne by the em p lo y e r. "N on con tribu tory
2
plans" include only those plans financed e n t ir e ly by the e m p loyer. Excluded are le g a lly r eq u ired p la n s, such as w o rk m e n 's compensation, social
secu rity, and ra ilro a d retirem en t.
1 Unduplicated total of w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g sick le a v e o r sickness and accident insurance shown se p a ra te ly below. Sick leave plans are
3
lim ite d to those which d e fin itely establish at lea st the minimum number of days' pay that can be expected by each em plo yee.
In form al sick
le a v e allowances determ ined on an individual basis are excluded.




A p p e n d ix .

O c c u p a tio n a l D e s c rip tio n s

T h e p r im a r y p u r p o s e o f p r e p a r in g jo b d e s c r ip t io n s fo r th e B u r e a u 's w a g e s u r v e y s is to a s s is t its f i e l d s t a ff in c la s s if y in g in to a p p r o p r ia t e
o c c u p a tio n s w o r k e r s who a r e e m p lo y e d u n d e r a v a r i e t y o f p a y r o ll t i t l e s and d if f e r e n t w o r k a r r a n g e m e n t s fr o m e s ta b lis h m e n t to e s ta b lis h m e n t and
f r o m a r e a to a r e a .
T h is p e r m it s th e g ro u p in g o f o c c u p a tio n a l w a g e r a t e s r e p r e s e n t in g c o m p a r a b le jo b c o n te n t.
B e c a u s e o f th is e m p h a s is on
in te r e s t a b lis h m e n t and in t e r a r e a c o m p a r a b ilit y o f o c c u p a tio n a l c o n te n t, th e B u r e a u 's jo b d e s c r ip t io n s m a y d i f f e r s ig n ific a n t ly fr o m th o s e in u s e in
in d iv id u a l e s ta b lis h m e n ts o r th o s e p r e p a r e d f o r o t h e r p u r p o s e s .
In a p p ly in g t h e s e jo b d e s c r ip t io n s , th e B u r e a u 's f i e l d e c o n o m is t s a r e in s t r u c t e d
to e x c lu d e w o r k in g s u p e r v is o r s ; a p p r e n t ic e s : l e a r n e r s ; b e g in n e r s ; t r a in e e s ; and h a n d ic a p p e d , p a r t - t i m e , t e m p o r a r y , and p r o b a t io n a r y w o r k e r s .

OFFICE
C L E R K , A C C O U N T IN G — C o n tin u ed

B I L L E R , M A C H IN E
P r e p a r e s s t a te m e n ts , b i l l s , and in v o ic e s on a m a c h in e o t h e r than an o r d in a r y o r e l e c t r o m a t ic t y p e w r it e r .
M a y a ls o k e e p r e c o r d s as to b illin g s o r s h ip p in g c h a r g e s o r p e r f o r m o th e r
c l e r i c a l w o r k in c id e n ta l to b illin g o p e r a t io n s . F o r w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s , b i l l e r s , m a c h in e , a r e
c l a s s i f i e d b y ty p e o f m a c h in e , as fo llo w s :
B i l l e r , m a c h in e (b illin g m a c h in e ). U s e s a s p e c ia l b illin g m a c h in e (c o m b in a tio n ty p in g
and a d d in g m a c h in e ) to p r e p a r e b ills and in v o ic e s f r o m c u s t o m e r s ' p u rc h a s e o r d e r s , i n t e r ­
n a lly p r e p a r e d o r d e r s , s h ip p in g m e m o r a n d u m s , e t c .
U s u a lly in v o lv e s a p p lic a tio n o f p r e ­
d e te r m in e d d is c o u n ts and s h ip p in g c h a r g e s and e n t r y o f n e c e s s a r y e x te n s io n s , w h ic h m a y o r
m a y not be c o m p u te d on th e b illin g m a c h in e , and t o t a ls w h ich a r e a u t o m a t ic a lly a c c u m u la te d
b y m a c h in e . T h e o p e r a t io n u s u a lly in v o lv e s a la r g e n u m b e r o f c a rb o n c o p ie s o f th e b ill b e in g
p r e p a r e d and is o fte n d on e on a fa n fo ld m a c h in e .
B i l l e r , m a c h in e (b o o k k e e p in g m a c h in e ).
U s e s a b o o k k e e p in g m a c h in e (w ith o r w ith ou t
a t y p e w r i t e r k e y b o a r d ) to p r e p a r e c u s t o m e r s ' b i l l s a s p a r t o f th e a c co u n ts r e c e iv a b le o p e r a ­
tio n . G e n e r a lly in v o lv e s th e s im u lta n e o u s e n t r y o f f ig u r e s on c u s t o m e r s ' l e d g e r r e c o r d . T h e
m a c h in e a u t o m a t ic a lly a c c u m u la te s fig u r e s on a n u m b e r o f v e r t i c a l c o lu m n s and c o m p u te s
and u s u a lly p r in ts a u to m a t ic a lly th e d e b it o r c r e d it b a la n c e s .
D o es not in v o lv e a k n o w l­
e d g e o f b o o k k e e p in g .
W o r k s fr o m u n ifo r m and sta n d a rd ty p e s o f s a le s and c r e d it s lip s .
B O O K K E E P IN G -M A C H IN E

OPERATOR

O p e r a t e s a b o o k k e e p in g m a c h in e (w ith o r w ith o u t a t y p e w r i t e r k e y b o a r d ) to k e e p a r e c o r d
o f b u s in e s s t r a n s a c t io n s .
C la s s A .
K e e p s a s e t o f r e c o r d s r e q u ir in g a k n o w le d g e o f and e x p e r ie n c e in b a s ic
b o o k k e e p in g p r in c ip le s , and f a m i l i a r i t y w ith th e s tr u c tu r e o f th e p a r t ic u la r a c c o u n tin g s y s te m
u s e d . D e t e r m in e s p r o p e r r e c o r d s and d is tr ib u tio n o f d e b it and c r e d it it e m s to be u sed in e a ch
p h a s e o f th e w o r k .
M a y p r e p a r e c o n s o lid a te d r e p o r t s , b a la n c e s h e e ts , and o t h e r r e c o r d s
b y hand.
C la s s B .
K e e p s a r e c o r d o f on e o r m o r e p h a s e s o r s e c tio n s o f a s e t o f r e c o r d s u s u a lly
r e q u ir in g l i t t l e k n o w le d g e o f b a s ic b o o k k e e p in g . P h a s e s o r s e c tio n s in c lu d e a cc o u n ts p a y a b le ,
p a y r o ll, c u s t o m e r s ' a c c o u n ts (n o t in c lu d in g a s im p le ty p e o f b illin g d e s c r ib e d u n d er b i l l e r ,
m a c h in e ), c o s t d is t r ib u t io n , e x p e n s e d is t r ib u t io n , in v e n t o r y c o n t r o l, e tc . M a y c h e c k o r a s s is t
in p r e p a r a t io n o f t r i a l b a la n c e s and p r e p a r e c o n tr o l s h e e ts f o r the a c c o u n tin g d e p a r tm e n t.
C L E R K , A C C O U N T IN G
P e r f o r m s o n e o r m o r e a c c o u n tin g c l e r i c a l ta s k s such a s p o s tin g to r e g i s t e r s and le d g e r s ;
r e c o n c ilin g bank a c c o u n ts ; v e r i f y i n g th e in t e r n a l c o n s is t e n c y , c o m p le t e n e s s , and m a t h e m a t ic a l
a c c u r a c y o f a c c o u n tin g d o c u m e n ts ; a s s ig n in g p r e s c r ib e d a c c o u n tin g d is tr ib u tio n c o d e s ; e x a m in in g
and v e r i f y i n g f o r c l e r i c a l a c c u r a c y v a r io u s ty p e s o f r e p o r t s , l i s t s , c a lc u la tio n s , p o s tin g , e tc .;
o r p r e p a r in g s im p le o r a s s is t in g in p r e p a r in g m o r e c o m p lic a t e d jo u r n a l v o u c h e r s .
M ay w ork
in e it h e r a m a n u a l o r a u to m a te d a c c o u n tin g s y s te m .
T h e w o r k r e q u i r e s a k n o w le d g e o f c l e r i c a l m e th o d s and o f f i c e p r a c t ic e s and p r o c e d u r e s
w h ic h r e la t e s to th e c l e r i c a l p r o c e s s in g and r e c o r d in g o f tr a n s a c t io n s and a c c o u n tin g in fo r m a t io n .
W ith e x p e r ie n c e , th e w o r k e r t y p i c a l l y b e c o m e s fa m i l i a r w ith th e b o o k k e e p in g and a c c o u n tin g t e r m s
and p r o c e d u r e s u sed in th e a s s ig n e d w o r k , but is not r e q u ir e d to h a v e a k n o w le d g e o f th e fo r m a l
p r i n c i p l e s o f b o o k k e e p in g and a c c o u n tin g .




NO TE:

P o s it io n s

are

on th e b a s is o f th e fo llo w in g d e fin it io n s .

C la s s B .
U n d e r c lo s e s u p e r v is io n , fo llo w in g d e t a ile d in s t r u c t io n s and s ta n d a r d iz e d p r o ­
c e d u r e s , p e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e r o u tin e a c c o u n tin g c l e r i c a l o p e r a t io n s , such as p o s tin g to
l e d g e r s , c a r d s , o r w o r k s h e e ts w h e r e id e n t ific a t io n o f it e m s and lo c a tio n s o f p o s tin g s a r e
c l e a r l y in d ic a te d ; c h e c k in g a c c u r a c y and c o m p le t e n e s s o f s t a n d a r d iz e d and r e p e t it iv e r e c o r d s
o r a c c o u n tin g d o c u m e n ts ; and c o d in g d o c u m e n ts u s in g a fe w p r e s c r i b e d a c c o u n tin g c o d e s .
CLERK,

F IL E

F i l e s , c l a s s i f i e s , and r e t r i e v e s m a t e r ia l in an e s t a b lis h e d f i l i n g s y s t e m . M a y p e r f o r m
c l e r i c a l and m a n u a l ta s k s r e q u ir e d to m a in ta in f i l e s . P o s it io n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d in to l e v e l s on the
b a s is o f th e fo llo w in g d e fin it io n s .
C la s s A .
C l a s s i f i e s and in d e x e s f i l e m a t e r i a l such a s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , r e p o r t s , te c h ­
n ic a l d o c u m e n ts , e t c . , in an e s t a b lis h e d fi l i n g s y s t e m c o n ta in in g a n u m b e r o f v a r ie d s u b je c t
m a t t e r f i l e s . M a y a ls o f i l e th is m a t e r i a l . M a y k e e p r e c o r d s o f v a r io u s ty p e s in c o n ju n c tio n
w ith th e f i l e s .
M a y le a d a s m a ll g ro u p o f lo w e r l e v e l f i l e c l e r k s .
C la s s B . S o r ts , c o d e s , and f i l e s
in g s o r p a r t ly c l a s s i f i e d m a t e r i a l b y
c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e a id s .
A s req u ested ,
w a r d s m a t e r i a l . M a y p e r f o r m r e la t e d

u n c la s s ifie d m a t e r i a l b y s im p le (s u b je c t m a t t e r ) h e a d ­
f in e r s u b h e a d in g s . P r e p a r e s s im p le r e la t e d in d e x and
lo c a t e s c l e a r l y id e n t ifie d m a t e r ia l in f i l e s and f o r ­
c l e r i c a l ta s k s r e q u ir e d to m a in ta in and s e r v i c e f i l e s .

C la s s C .
P e r f o r m s ro u tin e f i l i n g o f m a t e r i a l th a t has a lr e a d y b e e n c l a s s i f i e d o r w h ich
is e a s i l y c l a s s i f i e d in a s im p le s e r i a l c l a s s if ic a t io n s y s t e m (e . g . , a lp h a b e tic a l, c h r o n o lo g ic a l,
o r n u m e r ic a l). A s r e q u e s te d , lo c a t e s r e a d ily a v a ila b le m a t e r i a l in f i l e s and fo r w a r d s m a ­
t e r i a l ; and m a y f i l l out w ith d r a w a l c h a r g e . M a y p e r f o r m s im p le c l e r i c a l and m a n u a l ta s k s
r e q u ir e d to m a in ta in and s e r v i c e f i l e s .
C LE R K , ORDER
R e c e iv e s c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s f o r m a t e r ia l o r m e r c h a n d is e b y m a i l , p h on e, o r p e r s o n a lly .
D u tie s in v o lv e a n y c o m b in a tio n o f the fo l l o w i n g : Q u o tin g p r i c e s to c u s t o m e r s ; m a k in g out an o r d e r
s h e e t lis t in g th e it e m s to m a k e up th e o r d e r ; c h e c k in g p r ic e s and q u a n titie s o f it e m s on o r d e r
s h e e t; and d is tr ib u tin g o r d e r s h e e ts to r e s p e c t iv e d e p a r tm e n ts to be f i l l e d . M a y c h e c k w ith c r e d it
d e p a r tm e n t to d e t e r m in e c r e d it r a t in g o { c u s t o m e r , a c k n o w le d g e r e c e ip t o f o r d e r s f r o m c u s t o m e r s ,
f o llo w up o r d e r s to s e e th at th e y h a v e b e e n f i l l e d , k e e p f i l e o f o r d e r s r e c e iv e d , and c h e c k s h ip p in g
in v o ic e s w ith o r ig in a l o r d e r s .
C LERK,

PAYRO LL

C o m p u te s w a g e s o f c o m p a n y e m p lo y e e s and e n t e r s th e n e c e s s a r y d a ta on the p a y r o ll
s h e e ts . D u tie s in v o lv e : C a lc u la tin g w o r k e r s ' e a r n in g s b a s e d on t im e o r p r o d u c tio n r e c o r d s ; and
p o s tin g c a lc u la te d d ata on p a y r o ll s h e e t, sh o w in g in fo r m a t io n such as w o r k e r 's n a m e , w o r k in g
d a y s , t im e , r a t e , d e d u c tio n s f o r in s u r a n c e , and to t a l w a g e s d u e. M a y m a k e out p a y c h e c k s and
a s s is t p a y m a s t e r in m a k in g up and d is t r ib u t in g p a y e n v e lo p e s .
M a y u se a c a lc u la tin g m a c h in e .

T h e B u rea u h a s d is c o n tin u e d c o lle c t in g d a ta f o r o i l e r s

20

c l a s s i f i e d in to l e v e l s

C la s s A .
U n d e r g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n , p e r fo r m s a c c o u n tin g c l e r i c a l o p e r a tio n s w h ich
r e q u ir e th e a p p lic a tio n o f e x p e r ie n c e and ju d g m e n t, f o r e x a m p le , c l e r i c a l l y p r o c e s s in g c o m ­
p lic a t e d o r n o n r e p e t it iv e a c c o u n tin g t r a n s a c t io n s , s e le c t in g a m o n g a s u b s ta n tia l v a r i e t y o f
p r e s c r ib e d a c c o u n tin g c o d e s and c l a s s if ic a t io n s , o r t r a c in g tr a n s a c t io n s th ro u g h p r e v io u s
a c c o u n tin g a c tio n s to d e t e r m in e s o u r c e o f d is c r e p a n c ie s .
M a y b e a s s is t e d b y one o r m o r e
c la s s B a c c o u n tin g c le r k s .

and p lu m b e r s .

21
CO M PTO M ETER O PERATO R

S E C R E T A R Y — Continued

P r im a r y duty is to o pera te a C om p to m eter to p e r fo rm m a th em a tica l com putations. This
job is not to be confused with that o f sta tis tic a l o r oth er type o f c le rk , which m a y in volve f r e ­
quent use o f a C om p tom eter but, in which, use o f this m achine is incidental to p erfo rm a n ce o f
oth er duties.

N O T E : The te r m "c o rp o ra te o ffic e r , " used in the le v e l definitions follow in g, r e fe r s to
those o ffic ia ls who have a sign ifican t c o rp o ra te -w id e p olicym aking ro le with rega rd to m a jo r
com pany a c tiv itie s . The t it le " v ic e p r e s id e n t ," though n o rm a lly in d ica tive o f this ro le , does not
in a ll cases iden tify, such position s. V ic e presiden ts whose p r im a ry re sp o n sib ility is to act p e r ­
sonally on individual ca ses o r tran saction s (e .g ., approve o r deny individual loan o r c re d it actions;
a d m in ister individual tru st accounts; d ir e c tly su p ervise a c le r ic a l sta ff) a re not con sid ered to be
"c o rp o ra te o ffic e r s " fo r purposes o f applying the fo llo w in g le v e l d efin itio n s .

K EYPU NC H O PERATO R
O perates a keypunch m achine to r e c o r d
tabulating cards o r on tape.

o r v e r ify

alphabetic

and/or num eric

data on
C la ss A

P o sition s a re c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis o f the fo llow in g defin itio n s.
a ll,
C lass A . W ork re q u ires the a pplication o f e x p erien c e and judgm ent in s ele ctin g p r o c e ­
dures to be fo llo w ed and in search in g fo r , in te rp retin g , selectin g , o r coding item s to be
keypunched fr o m a v a r ie ty o f sou rce docum ents. On occa sion m a y also p e r fo rm som e routine
keypunch w ork. M ay tra in in exp erien ced keypunch o p era to rs.
C lass B.
W ork is routine and re p e titiv e . Under clo s e su p ervision o r fo llo w in g sp e cific
proced u res o r in stru ction s, w orks fr o m va riou s standardized sou rce documents which have
been coded, and fo llow s sp e cified p roced u res which have been p r e s c r ib e d in d eta il and re q u ire
little o r no selectin g , coding, o r in te rp retin g o f data to be re cord ed . R e fe rs to su p erviso r
prob lem s a ris in g fro m erron eou s item s o r codes o r m is s in g in form ation .

2. S e c re ta r y to a co rp o ra te o ffic e r (oth er than the ch airm an o f the board o r p resid en t)
o f a com pany that em p loys, in a ll, o v e r 5,000 but fe w e r than 25,000 p e rs o n s ; o r
3. S e c re ta r y to the head, im m ed ia tely below the co rp o ra te o ffic e r le v e l,
segm en t o r su b sid iary o f a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 25,000 p e rs o n s .

P e r fo r m s va rio u s routine duties such as running erra n d s, operatin g m in o r o ffic e m a ­
chines such as sea le rs o r m a ile r s , opening and distribu tin g m a il, and other m in o r c le r ic a l w ork.
Exclude position s that re q u ire operation o f a m o to r ve h ic le as a sign ifican t duty.

SECRE TARY
A ssig n ed as person a l s e c re ta ry , n o rm a lly to one in dividu al. Maintains a clo se and high ly
re sp o n siv e relation sh ip to the d a y-to -d a y w ork o f the s u p erviso r. W orks f a ir ly independently r e ­
c eiv in g a m inim um o f deta iled su p ervision and guidance. P e r fo r m s v a rie d c le r ic a l and s e c re ta ria l
duties, usually including m o st o f the fo llo w in g :
a. R e c e iv e s telephone c a lls , person a l c a lle r s , and in com ing m a il, answ ers routine in ­
q u irie s , and routes tech nical in qu iries to the p ro p e r persons;
and r e v is e s the s u p e r v is o r's file s ;

c.

R ela y s m e ssa g es fr o m s u p erviso r to subordinates;

e. R ev iew s co rresp o n d en ce, m em orandum s, and re p orts p rep a red
s u p e r v is o r's signature to assu re p roced u ra l and typographic a ccu racy;

by oth ers fo r the

M ay also p e r fo rm oth er c le r ic a l and s e c re ta ria l tasks o f com parab le nature and d ifficu lty .
The w ork ty p ic a lly re q u ires know ledge o f o ffic e routine and understanding o f the orga n ization ,
p r o g ra m s , and proced u res re la ted to the w ork o f the s u p erviso r.
Exclusions
Not a ll position s that a re title d " s e c r e t a r y " possess the above c h a ra c te ris tic s .
o f position s which a re excluded fr o m the definition a re as fo llo w s:
"p e r s o n a l"

4. S e c re ta r y to the head o f an individual plant, fa c to ry , etc. (o r other equivalent le v e l
o f o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 5,000 p erso n s; o r
5. S e c re ta r y to the head o f a la rg e and im portan t o rga n izatio n a l segm ent (e .g ., a m id dle
m anagem ent su p e rv is o r o f an o rga n izatio n a l segm ent often in volvin g as many as s e v e ra l
hundred p erso n s) o r a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 25,000 p e r s o n s .
C la ss C

2. S e c re ta r y to the head o f an individual plant, fa cto ry , etc. (o r oth er equivalent le v e l
o f o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in a ll, fe w e r than 5,000 p e r s o n s .
C lass D

P e r fo r m s stenographic and typing w ork.

which do not m e et the

3. S e c re ta r y to the head, im m ed ia tely b elow the o ffic e r le v e l, o v e r eith er a m a jo r
c o rp o ra te -w id e functional a c tiv ity (e .g ., m a rk etin g, re s e a rc h , o p era tio n s, in du strial r e la ­
tion s, etc .) m- a m a jo r geograph ic o r o rga n izatio n a l segm ent (e .g ., a re g io n a l h eadquarters;
a m a jo r d iv is io n ) o f a company that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 5,000 but few er than 25,000
e m p lo y e e s ; or

1. S e c re ta r y to an execu tive o r m a n a geria l person whose re sp o n sib ility is not equ ivalent
to one o f the sp e c ific le v e l situations in the definition fo r cla ss B, but whose orga n ization a l
unit n o rm a lly num bers at lea st s e v e ra l dozen em p loy ees and is usually divid ed into o rg a n iz a ­
tion al segm ents which a re often, in turn, fu rth er subdivided. In som e com panies, this le v e l
includes a w ide range o f orga n izatio n a l echelons; in o th ers, only one o r two; jor

M aintains the s u p e r v is o r's calen dar and m akes appointm ents as instructed;

d.

f.

1. S e c re ta r y to the chairm an o f the board o r p resid en t o f a com pany that em p loys, in
fe w e r than 100 p ers o n s ; o r

2. S e c re ta r y to a co rp o ra te o ffic e r (oth er than the ch airm an o f the board o r p resid en t)
o f a com pany that em ploys, in a ll, o v e r 100 but fe w e r than 5,000 p e rs o n s ; o r

M ESSENGER (O ffic e Boy o r G irl)

E sta b lish es, m ain tain s,

o f a m a jo r

C la ss B
a ll,

b.

1. S e c re ta r y to the chairm an o f the board o r p resid en t o f a com pany that em p loys, in
o v e r 100 but fe w e r than 5,000 p erso n s; o r

a.

P o sition s

s e c re ta ry

b.

1. S e c re ta r y to the s u p erviso r o r head o f a s m a ll o rga n izatio n a l unit (e .g ., fe w e r than
about 25 o r 30 p erso n s); o r
2. S e c re ta r y to a n on su pervisory sta ff sp e c ia lis t, p ro fe ssio n a l em p loyee, a d m in istra ­
tiv e o ffic e r , o r a ssistan t, s k ille d technician o r ex p ert. (N O T E : Many com panies assign
sten ogra ph ers, ra th er than s e c re ta rie s as d es c rib e d above, to this le v e l o f s u p erviso ry o r
n on su p erviso ry w o r k e r .)

Exam ples

concept d es crib e d

S TE N O G R A P H E R
above;

Stenographers not fu lly tra in ed in s e c re ta ria l type duties;

c. Stenographers servin g as o ffic e assistan ts to a group o f p ro fe ssio n a l, tech n ical, or
m a n a geria l persons;
d. S e c re ta r y position s in which the duties a re eith er substantially m o re routine o r sub­
sta n tia lly m o re com p lex and resp o n sib le than those c h a ra c te riz e d in the definition;

P r im a r y duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to tra n s c rib e the dictation. M ay
also type fr o m w ritten copy. M ay o p era te fr o m a stenographic pool. M ay o cca sio n a lly tra n s c rib e
fro m v o ic e re co rd in g s ( if p r im a ry duty is tra n scrib in g fr o m re co rd in g s, see T ra n scrib in g-M a ch in e
O p era to r, G en era l).
N O T E : Th is job is distingu ished fro m that o f a s e c re ta ry in that a s e c re ta ry n o rm a lly
w orks in a con fiden tial relatio n sh ip with only one m an ager o r execu tive and p erfo rm s m o re
resp o n sib le and d is c re tio n a ry tasks as d e s crib e d in the s e c re ta ry job definition.
S tenographer, G en eral

e. A ssista n t type position s which in vo lv e m o re d iffic u lt or m o re resp o n sib le tech ­
n ica l, a d m in istra tive, s u p erviso ry , o r s p e c ia lize d c le r ic a l duties which a re not ty p ic a l of
s e c r e ta r ia l w ork.




D ictation in vo lv es a n orm al routine vo cabu lary. M ay m aintain file s , keep sim ple re c o r d s ,
o r p e r fo rm oth er r e la t iv e ly routine c le r ic a l tasks.

22
T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R (E le c tr ic Accounting Machine O p era to r)— Continued

S TE N O G R A P H E R — Continued

P o sition s a re c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis o f the fo llo w in g defin itio n s.

S tenograp her, S enior
D ictation in v o lv e s a v a rie d tech n ical o r s p e c ia lize d vo ca b u la ry such as in le g a l b r ie fs
o r re p o rts on s c ie n tific re s e a rc h . M ay also set up and m aintain file s , keep re c o r d s , etc.
OR
P e r fo r m s stenographic duties re q u irin g sig n ific a n tly g r e a te r independence and resp o n ­
s ib ility than sten ogra ph er, ge n era l, as evid enced by the fo llow in g:
W ork re q u ire s a high
d e g re e o f stenographic speed and a ccu racy; a thorough w orkin g knowledge o f ge n era l business
and o ffic e p roce d u re; and o f the sp e c ific business opera tio n s, orga n ization , p o lic ie s , p r o c e ­
du res, file s , w ork flo w , etc. Uses this know ledge in p e rfo rm in g stenographic duties and
resp o n sib le c le r ic a l tasks such as m aintaining follow u p file s ; a ssem blin g m a te r ia l fo r re p o rts,
m em orandum s, and le t t e r s ; com posing sim ple le tte r s fr o m ge n era l in stru ction s; read ing and
routing in com ing m a il; and answ erin g routine qu estion s^ etc.
S W ITC H B O AR D O P E R A T O R
C lass A . O perates a sin gle- o r m u ltip le-p ositio n telephone sw itchboard handling incom ing,
outgoing, intraplant o r o ffic e c a lls . P e r fo r m s fu ll telephone in form a tion s e r v ic e o r handles
com p lex c a lls , such as con feren ce, c o lle c t, o v e rs e a s , o r s im ila r c a lls , eith er in addition to
doing routine w ork as d es crib e d fo r sw itch board o p era to r, cla ss B, o r as a fu ll-tim e
assignm ent. (" F u l l " telephone in form a tion s e r v ic e o ccu rs when the establish m ent has v a rie d
functions that a re not re a d ily understandable fo r telephone in form ation pu rposes, e .g ., because
o f o verla p p in g o r in te rre la te d functions, and consequently presen t frequent problem s as to
which extensions a re a ppropria te fo r c a lls .)
C la ss B . O perates a sin gle- o r m u ltip le-p ositio n telephone sw itchboard handling in com ing,
outgoing, intraplant o r o ffic e c a lls . M a y handle routine long distance c a lls and re c o rd to lls .
M ay p e r fo rm lim ite d telephone in form a tion s e r v ic e . (" L im it e d " telephone in form a tion s e r v ic e
o ccu rs i f the functions o f the establish m ent s e r v ic e d a re re a d ily understandable fo r telephone
in form a tion pu rp oses, o r i f the requ ests a re routine, e.g ., givin g extension num bers when
s p e c ific names a re fu rn ish ed, o r i f co m p le x c a lls a re r e fe r r e d to another o p e ra to r.)
T h ese cla s s ific a tio n s do not include sw itchboard o p era to rs in telephone com panies who
a s s is t cu sto m ers in p lacin g c a lls .
SW ITC H B O A R D O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
In addition to p e rfo rm in g duties o f o p era to r on a s in gle-p o sitio n o r m o n ito r-ty p e sw itch ­
bo a rd , acts as re ce p tio n is t and m a y also type o r p e r fo rm routine c le r ic a l w ork as pa rt o f re gu la r
du ties. Th is typing o r c le r ic a l w ork m a y take the m a jo r pa rt o f this w o r k e r 's tim e w hile at
sw itchboard.
T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R (E le c tr ic Accounting M achine O p era to r)
O perates one o r a v a r ie ty o f m achines such as the ta bu lator, ca lcu la tor, c o lla to r, in te r ­
p r e te r , s o r te r , reprodu cin g punch, etc. Excluded fro m this defin itio n a re w orkin g s u p erviso rs.
A ls o excluded a re o p era to rs o f e le c tr o n ic d ig ita l com pu ters, even though they m ay also o pera te
E A M equipment.

C la ss A . P e r fo r m s com plete rep ortin g and tabulating assignm ents including d ev isin g
d ifficu lt co n trol panel w irin g under gen era l su p ervision . A ssign m en ts ty p ic a lly in volv e a
v a rie ty o f long and co m p lex re p o rts which often a re ir r e g u la r o r n on recu rrin g, re qu irin g
som e planning o f the nature and sequencing o f opera tio n s, and the use o f a v a rie ty o f m a ­
chines. Is ty p ic a lly in volv ed in tra in in g new o p era to rs in m achine operations o r tra in in g
lo w e r le v e l o p era to rs in w irin g fr o m d ia gra m s and in the opera tin g sequences o f long and
com p lex re p o rts .
Does not include position s in which w irin g re s p o n s ib ility is lim ite d to
sele ction and in sertio n o f p r e w ire d boards.
C lass B . P e r fo r m s w ork a cco rd in g to establish ed p roce d u res and under sp e c ific in ­
stru ctions. A ssignm ents ty p ic a lly in vo lv e co m p lete but routine and re c u rrin g re p orts o r parts
o f la r g e r and m o re co m p lex re p o r ts . O perates m o re d iffic u lt tabulating o r e le c tr ic a l a c ­
counting m achines such as the tabu lator and ca lcu la tor, in addition to the sim p ler m achines
used by cla ss C o p e ra to rs . M ay be requ ired to do som e w irin g fr o m d ia gra m s. M ay tra in
new em p loy ees in b asic m achine o peration s.
C lass C . Under s p e c ific in stru ction s, o perates sim ple tabulating o r e le c tr ic a l accounting
m achines such as the s o rte r , in te rp r e te r, reprodu cin g punch, c o lla to r, etc. A ssign m en ts
ty p ic a lly in vo lv e portions o f a w ork unit, fo r exa m ple, individual so rtin g o r co lla tin g runs,
o r re p e titiv e o p era tio n s. M ay p e r fo rm sim ple w irin g fr o m d ia gra m s, and do som e filin g w ork.
T R A N S C R IB IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R , G E N E R A L
P r im a r y duty is to tra n s c rib e dictation in volvin g a n orm a l routine vo ca b u la ry fr o m
tra n scrib in g -m a ch in e re c o r d s . M ay also type fr o m w ritten copy and do sim ple c le r ic a l w ork.
W ork ers tra n scrib in g dictation in volvin g a v a rie d tech nical o r s p e c ia lize d vo ca b u la ry such as
le g a l b r ie fs o r re p o rts on sc ie n tific re s e a rc h a re not included. A w o rk e r who takes dictation
in shorthand o r by Stenotype o r s im ila r m achine is c la s s ifie d as a sten ograph er.
T Y P IS T
U ses a ty p e w r ite r to m ake co p ies o f va riou s m a te r ia ls o r to m ake out b ills a fte r ca lc u la ­
tions have been m ade by another perso n . M ay include typing o f sten cils, m a ts, o r s im ila r m a te ­
r ia ls fo r use in duplicating p ro c e s s e s . M ay do c le r ic a l w ork in volvin g lit t le sp e cia l tra in in g, such
as keeping sim ple r e c o r d s , filin g re c o rd s and re p o rts , o r so rtin g and d istribu tin g in com ing m a il.
C la ss A . P e r fo r m s one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g : Typin g m a te r ia l in fin a l fo rm when
it in volves com bining m a te r ia l fr o m s e v e ra l so u rces; o r re s p o n s ib ility fo r c o r r e c t sp ellin g,
sy llab ica tio n , punctuation, e tc ., o f tech nical o r unusual w ords o r fo re ig n language m a te ­
ria l; o r planning layout and typing o f co m p licated sta tis tic a l ta b les to m ain tain u n iform ity
and balance in spacing. M ay type routine fo rm le t t e r s , v a ry in g d eta ils to suit circu m sta n ces.
C lass B . P e r fo r m s one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g : Copy typing fr o m rough o r c le a r
d rafts; o r routine typing o f fo rm s , insurance p o lic ie s , etc.; o r setting up sim ple standard
tabulations; o r copying m o r e com plex tables a lrea d y set up and spaced p r o p e rly .

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R — Continued

C O M PU TER O PER ATO R
M o n ito rs and o p era tes the co n trol console o f a d ig ita l com puter to p ro ce ss data accordin g
to o pera tin g in stru ction s, u su ally p rep a red by a p r o g ra m e r . W ork includes m o st o f the fo llo w in g :
Studies in stru ction s to determ in e equipment setup and o pera tion s; loads equipment with re qu ired
item s (tape r e e ls , ca rd s, e tc .); sw itches n ec e s s a ry a u x ilia ry equipment into c ir c u it, and starts
and o p era tes com puter; m akes adjustm ents to com puter to c o r r e c t operatin g prob lem s and m e et
sp e cia l conditions; re v ie w s e r r o r s m ade during operation and determ in es cause o r r e fe r s prob lem
to s u p erviso r o r p r o g ra m e r ; and m aintains operatin g re c o r d s . M a y test and a ssist in c o rr e c tin g
p ro g ra m .
F o r w age study pu rp oses,

com puter o p era to rs a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:

C la ss A . O perates independently, o r under on ly ge n era l d irection , a com puter running
p ro g ra m s with m o st o f the fo llo w in g c h a ra c te ris tic s : N ew p rog ra m s a re freq u en tly tested
and introduced; scheduling requ irem en ts a re o f c r itic a l im portan ce to m in im iz e downtim e;
the p ro g ra m s a re o f co m p lex design so that id en tifica tion o f e r r o r sou rce often re q u ires a
w orkin g know ledge o f the total p ro g ra m , and a ltern a te p rog ra m s m ay not be a va ila b le. M ay
g iv e d ire c tio n and guidance to lo w e r le v e l o p era to rs.
C lass B. O perates independently, o r under only ge n era l d irection , a com pu ter running
p ro g ra m s with m o st o f the fo llo w in g c h a ra c te ris tic s : M ost o f the p rog ra m s a re establish ed
production runs, t y p ic a lly run on a r e g u la rly re c u rrin g ba sis; there is lit t le o r no testin g




o f new p ro g ra m s re q u ired ; a ltern a te p ro g ra m s a re provid ed in ca se o rig in a l p rog ra m needs
m a jo r change o r cannot be c o rr e c te d within a reason able tim e .
In com m on e r r o r situ a­
tion s, diagnoses cause and takes c o r r e c tiv e action. Th is usually in vo lv es applying p re v io u s ly
p ro g ra m ed c o r r e c t iv e steps, o r using standard c o rr e c tio n tech niqu es.
OR
O perates under d ir e c t su p ervisio n a com puter running p ro g ra m s o r segm en ts o f p ro g ra m s
with the c h a ra c te ris tic s d e s crib e d fo r c la ss A . M ay a s s is t a h igh er le v e l o p era to r by in de­
pendently p e rfo rm in g le s s d ifficu lt tasks assigned, and p e r fo rm in g d iffic u lt tasks fo llo w in g
deta iled in stru ction s and with frequ ent r e v ie w o f operations p e rfo rm e d .
C la ss C . W orks on routine p ro g ra m s under clo s e su p ervision . Is expected to develop
w orkin g know ledge o f the com puter equipment used and a b ility to detect prob lem s in volved in
running routine p ro g ra m s . U su ally has r e c e iv e d som e fo rm a l tra in in g in com pu ter operation.
M ay a s s is t h igh er le v e l o p era to r on com p lex p ro g ra m s .
C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M E R , BUSINESS
C on verts statem ents o f business p ro b le m s, ty p ic a lly p rep a red by a system s analyst, into
a sequence o f d eta iled in stru ction s which a re re q u ire d to so lv e the p rob le m s by autom atic data
p ro ce ssin g equipment. W orking fr o m charts o r d ia g ra m s, the p r o g ra m e r d evelop s the p r e c is e in ­
structions which, when en tered into the com puter system in coded language, cause the m anipulation

23
C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M E R , BUSINESS— Continued
o f data to a ch ieve d e s ire d re su lts . W ork in volv es m ost o f the fo llo w in g : A p p lies know ledge o f
com pu ter c a p a b ilitie s , m a th em a tics, lo g ic em ployed by com pu ters, and p a rticu la r subject m a tter
in volv ed to analyze charts and d ia gra m s o f the p rob le m to be p rogra m ed ; develop s sequence
o f p ro g ra m steps; w rite s d eta iled flo w charts to show o rd e r in which data w ill be p roce ssed ;
co n v erts these ch arts to coded in stru ction s fo r m achine to fo llo w ; tests and c o r r e c ts p ro g ra m s;
p rep a res in stru ction s fo r opera tin g personn el during production run; an a lyzes, re v ie w s , and a lte rs
p ro g ra m s to in cre a s e opera tin g e ffic ie n c y o r adapt to new requ irem en ts; m aintains re c o rd s o f
p ro g ra m developm en t and re v is io n s . (N O T E : W ork ers p e rfo rm in g both system s analysis and p r o ­
gra m in g should be c la s s ifie d as system s analysts i f this is the s k ill used to d eterm in e th e ir pay.)
Does not include em p loy ees p r im a r ily resp o n sib le fo r the m anagem ent o r su p ervisio n o f
oth er e le c tro n ic data p ro c e s s in g em p lo y ees, o r p r o g ra m e r s p r im a r ily concern ed with s cie n tific
and/or en gin eerin g p ro b le m s.
F o r wage study pu rp oses,

p r o g ra m e r s a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:

C lass A . W orks independently o r under only gen era l d ire c tio n on com p lex prob lem s which
re q u ire com petence in a ll phases of p rog ra m in g concepts and p r a c tic e s . W orking fro m d ia ­
gram s and charts which id en tify the nature o f d e s ire d re su lts , m a jo r p ro c e s s in g steps to be
accom plished , and the relation sh ips betw een va rio u s steps o f the prob lem so lvin g routine;
plans the fu ll ran ge o f p rog ra m in g actions needed to e ffic ie n tly u tilize the com puter system
in ach ievin g d es ire d end products.
A t this le v e l, p rog ra m in g is d iffic u lt because com pu ter equipment m u st be o rg a n ized to
produce s e v e ra l in te rre la te d but d iv e rs e products fro m numerous and d iv e rs e data elem en ts.
A w ide v a r ie ty and ex ten sive num ber o f in tern al p ro c e s s in g action s must o ccu r. Th is re q u ires
such actions as developm en t o f com m on operation s which can be reused, establish m ent of
lin kage points betw een o p era tio n s, adjustm ents to data when p ro g ra m requ irem en ts exceed
com puter sto ra ge ca pa city, and substantial m anipulation and resequ encing o f data elem en ts
to fo rm a h igh ly in tegra ted p ro g ra m .
M ay p rovid e functional d ire c tio n to lo w e r le v e l p r o g ra m e r s who a re assigned to a ssist.
C la ss B . W orks independently o r under only ge n era l d irectio n on re la t iv e ly sim ple
p ro g ra m s , o r on sim ple segm ents o f com p lex p ro g ra m s .
P r o g ra m s (o r segm en ts) usually
p ro c e s s in form a tion to produce data in two o r th ree v a rie d sequences o r fo rm a ts. R ep orts
and listin g s a re produced by refin in g, adapting, a rra y in g , o r making m in o r additions to or
deletion s fr o m input data which a re re a d ily a va ila b le.
W hile numerous re c o rd s m a y be
p ro c e s s e d , the data have been re fin e d in p r io r actions so that the a ccu ra cy and sequencing
o f data can be tested by using a few routine checks. T y p ic a lly , the p ro g ra m deals with
routine re co rd -k ee p in g type o pera tion s.
OR
W orks on co m p lex p rog ra m s (as d es crib e d fo r cla ss A ) under clo se d ire c tio n o f a h igh er
le v e l p r o g ra m e r o r su p e rv is o r. M ay a s s is t h igh er le v e l p r o g ra m e r by independently p e r ­
fo rm in g le s s d iffic u lt tasks a ssigned, and p e rfo rm in g m o re d ifficu lt tasks under fa ir ly clo se
d irection .
M ay guide o r in stru ct lo w e r le v e l p r o g ra m e r s .
C la ss C . M akes p ra c tic a l applications o f p rog ra m in g p r a c tic es and concepts usually
lea rn ed in fo rm a l tra in in g co u rses . A ssign m en ts a re design ed to develop com petence in the
application o f standard proced u res to routine p rob le m s. R e c e iv e s clo se su p ervision on new
aspects o f assignm ents; and w ork is re v ie w e d to v e r ify its accu ra cy and conform ance with
re q u ired p roced u res.
C O M P U T E R SYS TEM S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS
A n a ly ze s business p rob le m s to fo rm u la te proced u res fo r solvin g them by use o f ele c tro n ic
data p ro c e s s in g equipment. D evelops a com plete d es crip tio n o f a ll sp ecifica tion s needed to enable
p r o g ra m e r s to p re p a re re q u ired d ig ita l com puter p ro g ra m s . W ork in volv es m ost of the fo llo w in g :
A n a ly ze s su b jec t-m a tter operations to be automated and id en tifie s conditions and c r it e r ia re qu ired
to a ch ieve s a tis fa c to ry re su lts ; sp e c ifie s number and types o f re c o rd s , file s , and documents to
be used; outlin es actions to be p e rfo rm e d by personn el and com puters in su ffic ien t d eta il fo r
p resen tation to m anagem ent and fo r p rog ra m in g (ty p ic a lly this in volves prep a ra tion o f w ork and
data flo w ch a rts); coordin ates the developm en t o f test prob lem s and p a rticip ates in tr ia l runs of
new and r e v is e d sy stem s: and recom m en ds equipment changes to obtain m o re e ffe c tiv e o v e r a ll
o p era tio n s. (N O T E : W o rk ers p e rfo rm in g both system s analysis and p rog ra m in g should be c la s ­
sifie d as system s analysts i f this is the sk ill used to d eterm in e th e ir pay.)
Does not include em p loy ees p r im a r ily resp o n sib le fo r the m anagem ent o r su p ervision
o f other e le c tro n ic data p ro ce ssin g em p lo y ees, o r system s analysts p r im a r ily concerned with
sc ie n tific o r en gin eerin g p rob lem s.
F o r w age study pu rp oses,

system s analysts a re c la s s ifie d as fo llow s:

C la ss A .
W orks independently o r under only gen era l d irectio n on com p lex p roblem s invo lv in g a ll phases o f system s a n a lysis. P ro b le m s a re co m p lex because o f d iv e rs e sou rces o f
input data and m u ltip le-u se requ irem en ts o f output data. (F o r exam ple, develop s an in tegrated
produ ction scheduling, in ven tory co n trol, cost a n a lysis, and sales analysis r e c o r d in which




C O M P U T E R SYS TEM S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS— Continued
e v e r y item o f each type is au tom a tica lly p ro ce ssed through the fu ll system o f re c o rd s and
a ppropria te follow u p actions a re in itia ted by the com puter.) C o n fers with persons concern ed to
determ in e the data p ro ce ssin g p rob le m s and advises su b jec t-m a tter personn el on the im p lic a ­
tions o f new o r re v is e d system s o f data p ro c e s s in g o peration s. M akes recom m en dation s, i f
needed, fo r a p proval o f m a jo r system s in stalla tion s o r changes and fo r obtaining equipment.
M ay p rovid e functional d irectio n to lo w e r
a ssist.

le v e l system s analysts who are assign ed to

C la ss B . W orks independently o r under only ge n era l d irectio n on problem s that a re
r e la t iv e ly uncom plicated to a nalyze, plan, p ro g ra m , and o p era te. P ro b le m s a re o f lim ited
c o m p le x ity because sou rces o f input data a re hom ogeneous and the output data a re c lo s e ly
re la ted .
(F o r exa m p le, develop s system s fo r m aintaining d ep osito r accounts in a bank,
m aintaining accounts re c e iv a b le in a re ta il establish m ent, o r m aintaining in ven tory accounts
in a m anufacturing o r w h o lesa le establish m ent.) C o n fers with persons concern ed to determ in e
the data p ro c e s s in g problem s and advises su b jec t-m a tter personn el on the im p lica tio n s o f the
data p ro c e s s in g system s to be applied.
OR
W orks on a segm ent o f a com p lex data p ro ce ssin g schem e o r system , as d es c rib e d fo r
cla ss A . W orks independently on routine assignm ents and r e c e iv e s in stru ction and guidance
on co m p lex a ssignm ents. W ork is re v ie w e d fo r a ccu ra cy o f judgm ent, com plian ce with in ­
stru ctions, and to insu re p ro p e r alinem ent with the o v e r a ll system .
C la ss C . W orks under im m edia te su p ervision , c a rr y in g out analyses as assigned, usually
o f a sin gle a c tiv ity .
A ssignm ents a re design ed to develop and expand p ra c tic a l ex p erien c e
in the application o f p roced u res and s k ills re q u ired fo r system s a n alysis w ork. F o r exa m ple,
m ay a s s is t a h igh er le v e l system s analyst by p rep a rin g the d eta iled sp ecifica tion s re q u ired
by p r o g ra m e r s fr o m in form a tion d evelop ed by the h igh er le v e l analyst.
DRAFTSM AN
C la ss A . Plan s the graphic presen tation o f com plex item s having d istin ctive design
fea tu res that d iffe r s ig n ific a n tly fro m establish ed d raftin g p reced en ts. W orks in c lo s e sup­
port with the design o rig in a to r , and m ay recom m en d m in o r design changes. A n a ly ze s the
e ffe c t o f each change on the deta ils o f fo rm , function, and po sition a l relationships o f c o m ­
ponents and p a rts.
W orks with a m inim um o f su p e rv is o ry assista n ce. C om pleted w ork is
re v ie w e d by design o rig in a to r fo r con sisten cy with p r io r en gin eerin g d eterm in a tion s. May
eith er p rep a re draw in gs, o r d ire c t th e ir p rep a ra tion by lo w e r le v e l draftsm en.
C la ss B . P e r fo r m s nonroutine and com p lex draftin g assignm ents that re q u ire the a p p li­
cation o f m o st o f the standardized draw in g techniques re g u la rly used. Duties ty p ic a lly in ­
vo lv e such w ork as: P r e p a re s w orkin g draw ings o f su bassem blies with ir r e g u la r shapes,
m u ltip le fu n ction s, and p r e c is e p o sition al relation sh ips betw een com ponents; p rep a res a r c h i­
tectu ra l draw in gs fo r constru ction o f a building including d eta il draw ings o f foundations, w all
sectio n s, flo o r plans, and ro o f. U ses accep ted form u la s and manuals in making n ecess a ry
com putations to d eterm in e quantities o f m a te r ia ls to be used, load ca p a cities, strength s,
s tre s s e s , etc.
R e c e iv e s in itia l in stru ction s, re qu irem en ts, and advice fro m su p e rv is o r.
C om p leted w ork is checked fo r tech n ical adequacy.
C lass C . P r e p a re s d etail draw in gs o f sin gle units o r parts fo r en gin eering, construction,
m anufacturing, o r re p a ir pu rp oses. Typ es o f draw ings p rep a red include iso m e tric p rojectio n s
(dep ictin g th ree dim ensions in accu rate s c a le ) and section al view s to c la r ify positioning o f
components and con vey needed in form a tion . C on solid ates d eta ils fro m a number o f sou rces
and adjusts o r tra n sp o ses sca le as re q u ired . Suggested m ethods o f approach, applicable
p reced en ts, and advice on sou rce m a te r ia ls a re given with in itia l assignm ents. Instructions
a re le s s com plete when assignm ents re cu r.
W ork m ay be spot-ch ecked during p r o g re s s .
D R A F T S M A N -T R A C E R
C opies plans and draw in gs p rep a red by oth ers by p lacin g tra cin g cloth or paper o v e r
draw in gs and tra c in g with pen o r pen cil.
(D oes not include tra cin g lim ite d to plans p r im a r ily
con sistin g o f stra igh t lin es and a la rg e sca le not re q u irin g clo s e d elin eation .)
AND /O R
P r e p a re s sim ple o r re p e titiv e draw ings o f e a s ily visu a liz e d item s .
during p r o g re s s .

W ork is c lo s e ly su pervised

E L E C T R O N IC T E C H N IC IA N
W orks on va riou s types o f ele c tro n ic equipment o r system s by p erfo rm in g one o r m o re
o f the fo llow in g opera tio n s: M odifyin g, in sta llin g, re p a irin g , and overh au ling. T h ese operations
re q u ire the p erfo rm a n ce o f m ost o r all o f the fo llo w in g tasks: A ssem b lin g, testin g, adjusting,
ca lib ra tin g, tuning, and alining.
W ork is n on rep etitive and re q u ires a know ledge o f the th e ory and p ra c tic e of ele c tro n ic s
pertain in g to the use o f gen era l and s p e c ia lize d ele c tro n ic test equipment; trou ble analysis; and
the operation , relatio n sh ip , and alinem en t o f ele c tro n ic sy stem s, su bsystem s, and c ircu its having
a v a r ie ty o f component pa rts.

24
E L E C T R O N IC T E C H N IC IA N — Continued

NU RSE, IN D U S T R IA L (R e g is te r e d )

E le c tr o n ic equipment o r system s w orked on ty p ic a lly include one o r m o re of the fo llo w in g :
Ground, v e h ic le , o r a irb o rn e radio com m unications system s, r e la y sy stem s, navigation aids;
a irb o rn e o r ground ra d a r system s; radio and te le v is io n tra n sm ittin g o r re co rd in g system s; e l e c ­
tro n ic com pu ters; m is s ile and sp a ce cra ft guidance and co n trol system s; in d u stria l and m e d ica l
m easu rin g, in dicating and c o n trollin g d e v ic e s ; etc.

A re g is te r e d nurse who giv es nursing s e r v ic e under g e n era l m e d ic a l d irection to i l l or
injured em p loyees o r other persons who becom e i l l o r su ffer an accident on the p rem ise s o f a
fa c to ry o r other establish m ent. Duties in volve a com bination of the fo llo w in g : G iving fir s t aid
to the i l l or in jured; attending to subsequent d ressin g o f em p lo y e e s ' in ju rie s ; keeping re cord s
o f patients trea ted ; p rep a rin g accident rep orts fo r com pensation o r oth er pu rposes; a ssistin g in
ph ysical exam inations and health evaluations o f applicants and em p loy ees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing out p rog ra m s in volvin g health education, accident preven tion , evalu ation o f plant environm ent,
o r other a c tiv itie s a ffec tin g the health, w e lfa re , and safety o f a ll p erson n el. N u rsing su p erviso rs
o r head nurses in establish m ents em ploying m o re than one nurse a re excluded.

(E xclu de production a s s e m b le rs and t e s t e r s , cra fts m en , draftsm en , d es ig n e rs , en gin eers,
and rep a irm en of such standard e le c tr o n ic equipment as o ffic e m achines, ra dio and te le v is io n
re c e iv in g s e ts .)

M A IN T E N A N C E A N D P O W E R P L A N T
C A R P E N T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E

M A C H IN IS T , M A IN T E N A N C E

P e r fo r m s the ca rp en try duties n e c e s s a r y to constru ct and maintain in good re p a ir bu ild­
ing w oodw ork and equipment such as bins, c r ib s , cou nters, benches, p a rtitio n s, d o ors, flo o r s ,
s ta irs , casin gs, and t r im m ade o f w ood in an establish m ent. W ork in volves m ost o f the fo llo w in g :
Planning and layin g out of w ork fr o m blu eprin ts, draw in gs, m o d els , o r verb a l in stru ction s; using a
v a rie ty o f c a rp e n te r's han dtools, p orta ble p o w er to o ls , and standard m easuring in stru m en ts; m ak­
ing standard shop computations relatin g to dim ension s o f w ork; and selectin g m a te ria ls n ece s s a ry
fo r the w ork. In g e n e ra l, the w ork o f the m aintenance ca rp en ter re q u ires rounded tra in in g and
ex p erien ce usually acq u ired through a fo r m a l a ppren ticesh ip o r equivalent tra in in g and ex p erien c e.

Prod u ces rep la cem en t parts and new parts in m aking re p a irs o f m e ta l part’s of m ech an ical
equipment operated in an establish m ent. W ork in volv es m ost o f the fo llo w in g : In terp retin g w ritten
in stru ction s and s p e cifica tio n s; planning and layin g out o f w ork; using a v a r ie ty o f m a ch in ist's
handtools and p recisio n m easu rin g in stru m en ts; setting up and operatin g standard m achine too ls;
shaping of m e ta l parts to clo s e to le ra n c es; m aking standard shop com putations relatin g to dim en ­
sions o f w ork , too lin g, fee d s, and speeds o f m achining; know ledge o f the w orkin g p ro p e rtie s of
the com m on m e ta ls; sele ctin g standard m a te r ia ls , p a rts, and equipm ent re q u ired fo r his w ork;
and fittin g and a ssem blin g parts into m echan ical equipment. In ge n e ra l, the m a ch in ist's w ork
n o rm a lly re q u ires a rounded tra in in g in m ach in e-sh op p ra c tic e usually a cq u ired through a fo rm a l
apprenticeship o r equ ivalent tra in in g and ex p erien c e.

E L E C T R IC IA N , M A IN T E N A N C E
P e r fo r m s a v a r ie ty of e le c tr ic a l tra d e functions such as the in stallation , m aintenance, or
re p a ir o f equipment fo r the gen era tio n , distribu tion , o r u tiliza tio n o f e le c tr ic en ergy in an esta b ­
lish m en t. W ork in vo lv es m ost o f the fo llo w in g : In sta llin g o r re p a irin g any o f a v a rie ty o f e le c ­
t r ic a l equipment such as g e n e ra to rs , tr a n s fo r m e r s , sw itch boards, c o n tr o lle r s , circ u it b rea k ers ,
m o to rs, heating units, conduit sy stem s, o r oth er tra n sm iss ion equipment; w orkin g fr o m blu e­
prin ts, d raw in gs, layouts, or other s p e cifica tio n s; locatin g and diagnosing trou ble in the e le c tr ic a l
sy stem o r equipm ent; w orkin g standard com putations re la tin g to load requ irem en ts of w irin g or
e le c tr ic a l equipm ent; and using a v a rie ty o f e le c tr ic ia n 's handtools and m easu ring and testin g
in stru m en ts. In g e n e ra l, the w ork of the m aintenance e le c tr ic ia n re q u ires rounded tra in in g and
ex p erien c e usually acqu ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r equ ivalent tra in in g and ex p erien c e.
E N G IN E E R , S T A T IO N A R Y
O perates and m aintains and m ay also su p ervise the operation o f station ary engines and
equipment (m ech a n ica l o r e le c t r ic a l) to supply the establish m ent in which em ployed w ith p o w er,
heat, r e fr ig e r a tio n , o r a ir-co n d itio n in g . W ork in v o lv e s : O perating and maintaining equipment
such as steam en gin es, a ir c o m p r e s s o rs , g e n e ra to rs , m o to r s , tu rbines, ven tilatin g and r e f r i g ­
eratin g equipm ent, steam b o ile rs and b o ile r - fe d w a te r pumps; making equipment re p a irs; and
keeping a re c o rd of operation o f m a ch in ery , tem p era tu re, and fu el consumption. M ay also su­
p e r v is e these o peration s. Head o r ch ief en gin eers in establishm ents em ploying m o re than one
en gin eer a re exclu d ed .
F IR E M A N , S T A T IO N A R Y B O IL E R
F ir e s station ary b o ile rs to furnish the establish m ent in which em ployed with heat, pow er,
o r steam . F eeds fu els to fir e by hand o r op era tes a m ech a n ica l sto k er, gas, o r o il bu rn er; and
checks w a te r and sa fety v a lv e s .
M ay clean , o il, o r a ssist in rep a irin g b o ile rr o o m equipment.
H E L P E R , M A IN T E N A N C E TR A D E S
A s s is ts one o r m o re w o rk e rs in the sk ille d m aintenance tra d es, by p erfo rm in g sp e cific
o r ge n e ra l duties o f le s s e r s k ill, such as keeping a w o rk e r supplied with m a te ria ls and too ls;
cleaning w orkin g a rea , m achine, and equipm ent; a ssistin g journeym an by holding m a te ria ls or
to o ls; and p e rfo rm in g other unskilled tasks as d ire c te d by journeym an. Th e kind o f w ork the
h elp er is p erm itted to p e r fo rm v a r ie s fr o m trade to tra d e: In som e trades the h elp er is confined
to supplying, liftin g , and holding m a te ria ls and to o ls , and clean ing w orking a rea s; and in others
he is p erm itted to p e r fo rm sp e c ia lize d machine o peration s, o r parts o f a tra d e that a re also
p e r fo rm e d by w o rk e rs on a fu ll-tim e basis.
M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A T O R , T O O L R O O M
S p ecia liz es in the operation o f one o r m o re types o f machine to o ls, such as jig b o re r s ,
c y lin d r ic a l o r su rface g r in d e rs , engine lathes, or m illin g m achines, in the construction of
m ach in e-sh op t o o ls , ga ges, jig s , fix tu res, or d ies. W ork in vo lv es m ost o f the fo llo w in g : Planning
and p erfo rm in g d ifficu lt m achining operations; p ro ce ssin g item s requ irin g com plicated setups or
a high d e g re e o f accu ra cy; using a v a rie ty o f p re c is io n m easu rin g instrum ents; sele ctin g feed s,
speeds, too lin g, and operation sequence; and m aking n e c e s s a ry adjustments during operation
to ach ieve re q u isite to le ra n c es or dim ension s. M ay be re q u ired to re co g n iz e when too ls need
d ressin g, to d ress to o ls , and to s ele ct p rop e r coolants and cutting and lu bricatin g o ils .
For
cro s s -in d u s try w age study pu rp oses, m a ch in e-too l o p era to rs, to o lro o m , in to o l and die jobbing
shops a re excluded fr o m this cla s s ific a tio n .




M E C H A N IC , A U T O M O T IV E (M aintenance)
R ep a irs au tom obiles, buses, m o tortru ck s, and t ra c to rs o f an establishm ent. W ork in ­
v o lv e s m ost o f the fo llo w in g : Exam ining autom otive equipment to diagnose sou rce o f trou ble; d is ­
a ssem blin g equipment and p erfo rm in g re p a irs that in vo lv e the use o f such handtools as w ren ch es,
ga ges, d r ills , o r s p e c ia lize d equipment in disa ssem b lin g o r fittin g p a rts; rep la cin g broken o r
d e fe c tiv e parts fr o m stock; grind ing and adjusting v a lv e s ; re a s sem b lin g and in stallin g the va riou s
a ssem b lies in the v e h ic le and m aking n e c e s s a ry adjustm ents; and alinin g w h e e ls , adjusting brakes
and ligh ts, o r tightening body b olts. In ge n era l, the w ork o f the au tom otive m echanic re q u ires
rounded tra in in g and e x p erien c e usually acqu ired through a fo rm a l appren ticesh ip or eq u ivalen t
tra in in g and ex p erien c e.
Th is cla s s ific a tio n does not include m echan ics who re p a ir c u sto m ers' v eh icles in auto­
m o b ile re p a ir shops.
M E C H A N IC , M A IN T E N A N C E
R ep a irs m a ch in ery o r m echan ical equipm ent o f an establish m ent. W ork in volves m ost
o f the fo llo w in g : Exam ining m achines and m ech a n ica l equipment to diagnose sou rce o f trou ble;
dism antling o r p a rtly dism antling m achines and p e r fo rm in g re p a irs that m a in ly in volve the use
o f handtools in scra p in g and fittin g pa rts; rep la cin g broken o r d e fe c tiv e parts w ith item s obtained
fro m stock; o rd erin g the production o f a replacem en t part by a machine shop o r sending o f the
m achine to a m achine shop fo r m a jo r re p a irs ; p rep a rin g w ritten sp e cifica tion s fo r m a jo r re p a irs
o r fo r the production o f parts o rd ered fr o m m achine shop; re a s sem b lin g m achines; and making
a ll n ec e s s a ry adjustments fo r operation. In ge n era l, the w ork o f a maintenance m echanic re q u ires
rounded tra in in g and e x p erien c e usually acqu ired through a fo r m a l apprenticeship or equivalent
tra in in g and ex p erien c e.
Excluded fr o m this cla s s ific a tio n a re w o rk e rs w hose p rim a ry duties
in volve setting up o r adjusting m achines.
M IL L W R IG H T
In sta lls new m achines o r heavy equipment, and d ism antles and in sta lls m achines o r heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout a re requ ired . W ork in vo lv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g :
Planning and layin g out o f the w ork; in te rp retin g blueprints o r oth er s p e cifica tio n s; using a v a rie ty
of handtools and rig g in g ; m aking standard shop computations re la tin g to s tre s s e s , strength o f
m a te r ia ls , and cen ters o f g r a v ity ; alinin g and balancing of equipm ent; s ele ctin g standard to o ls ,
equipment, and parts to be used; and in stallin g and m aintaining in good o rd e r pow er tra n sm ission
equipment such as d riv e s and speed re d u cers . In g e n era l, the m illw rig h t's w ork n orm a lly re q u ires
a rounded train ing and e x p erien c e in the trade acqu ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship or
equivalent tra in in g and ex p erien c e.
P A IN T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
Pain ts and re d eco ra tes w a lls , w oodw ork, and fix tu res o f an establishm ent. W ork in volves
the fo llo w in g : K n ow ledge of su rface p e c u lia ritie s and types o f paint requ ired fo r d ifferen t a p p lica ­
tion s; p rep a rin g su rface fo r painting by re m o vin g old fin ish o r by placin g putty o r f ille r in nail

25
P A IN T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E — Continued

S H E E T - M E T A L W O RKER, M A IN T E N A N C E — Continued

h oles and in te rs tic e s ; and applying paint with sp ra y gun o r brush. M ay m ix c o lo r s , o ils , white
lea d , and oth er paint in gred ien ts to obtain p ro p e r c o lo r o r co n sisten cy. In g e n era l, the w ork o f the
m aintenance pain ter re q u ires rounded tra in in g and e x p erien c e usually a cq u ired through a fo rm a l
appren ticesh ip o r equ ivalent tra in in g and e x p erien c e.

up and o pera tin g a ll a v a ila b le types o f sh eet-m e ta l w orkin g m achines; using a v a rie ty o f handtools
in cutting, bending, fo rm in g , shaping, fittin g , and assem b lin g; and in stallin g sh eet-m eta l a rtic le s
as re q u ired . In g e n era l, the w ork o f the m aintenance sh eet-m eta l w o rk er re q u ires rounded
tra in in g and e x p erien c e u su ally acq u ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r equivalent tra in in g
and ex p erien c e.

P I P E F I T T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
In sta lls o r re p a irs w a ter, steam , gas, o r oth er types o f pipe and p ip efittin gs in an
establish m ent. W ork in vo lv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g : L a yin g out o f w ork and m easu rin g to loca te
po sition o f pipe fr o m draw ings o r oth er w ritten sp e cifica tio n s; cutting va rio u s s iz e s o f pipe to
c o r r e c t lengths with ch isel and h am m er o r o xy ac etylen e torch o r pipe-cu ttin g m ach in es; threadin g
pipe with stocks and d ies; bending pipe by h an d-driven o r p o w e r-d riv e n m ach in es; a ssem blin g
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to h an gers; m aking standard shop com putations re la tin g to
p r e s s u re s , flo w , and s iz e o f pipe requ ired ; and m aking standard tests to d eterm in e w hether fin ­
ish ed pipes m e et sp e cifica tio n s. In g e n era l, the w ork o f the m aintenance p ip e fitte r re q u ire s
rounded tra in in g and e x p erien c e u su ally acq u ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r equivalent
tra in in g and ex p erien c e. W ork ers p r im a r ily engaged in in stallin g and re p a irin g building sanitation
o r heating system s a re exclu ded.
S H E E T -M E T A L W O RKER, M A IN T E N A N C E
F a b ric a te s , in s ta lls , and m aintains in good re p a ir the sh eet-m eta l equipm ent and fix tu res
(such as m achine guards, g r e a s e pans, sh elves, lo c k e r s , tanks, v e n tila to rs , chutes, ducts, m eta l
ro o fin g ) o f an establishm ent. W ork in vo lv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and la yin g out a ll
types o f sh eet-m eta l m aintenance w ork fro m blu eprints, m o d els , o r other sp e cifica tio n s; setting

T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R
(D ie m a k er; ji g m a k er; tool m a k er; fix tu re m a k e r; gage m a k e r)
C on stru cts and re p a irs m ach in e-sh op to o ls , g a g es, jigs,* fix tu res o r dies fo r fo rg in g s ,
punching, and oth er m e ta l-fo rm in g w ork.
W ork in vo lv es m o st o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and
la yin g out o f w ork fro m m o d els, blu eprints, d raw in gs, o r oth er o ra l and w ritten sp ecifica tion s;
using a v a r ie ty o f to o l and die m a k e r's handtools and p r e c is io n m easu rin g instrum ents; u nder­
standing o f the w orkin g p r o p e rtie s o f com m on m etals and a llo y s ; settin g up and opera tin g o f
m achine too ls and re la ted equipment; making n ecess a ry shop com putations re la tin g to dim ensions
o f w ork, speeds, fee d s, and too lin g o f m ach in es; h e a t-trea tin g o f m e ta l parts during fa b rica tio n
as w ell as o f fin ish ed too ls and dies to ach ieve re qu ired q u alities; w orkin g to clo s e to le ra n c es;
fittin g and assem b lin g o f parts to p r e s c r ib e d to le ra n c es and allow a n ces; and selectin g a ppropria te
m a te r ia ls , to o ls , and p ro c e s s e s . In gen era l, the tool and die m a k e r’ s w ork re q u ires a rounded
tra in in g in m ach in e-sh op and to o lro o m p r a c tic e usually a cq u ired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship
o r equ ivalent tra in in g and ex p erien c e.
F o r c ro s s -in d u s tr y w age study pu rposes, tool and die m a k e rs in too l
shops a re excluded fr o m this cla ssifica tio n .

and die jobbing

C U S T O D I A L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
P A C K E R , S H IP P IN G — Continued

GU ARD A N D W A T C H M A N
Guard. P e r fo r m s routine p o lic e duties, e ith er at fix ed post o r on tou r, m aintaining o rd e r ,
using a rm s o r fo r c e w h ere n ec e s s a ry . Includes gatem en who a re stationed at gate and check
on iden tity o f em p loy ees and oth er person s en terin g .

and s iz e o f con ta in er; in sertin g en clo su res in container; using e x c e ls io r o r other m a te r ia l to
p reven t b reakage o r dam age; c lo sin g and sea lin g con tain er; and applying la b els o r en terin g
id en tifyin g data on con tain er.
P a c k e rs who also m ake wooden boxes o r c ra te s a re exclu ded.

W atchm an. M akes rounds o f p r e m is e s p e r io d ic a lly in p rotectin g p ro p e rty against fir e ,
theft, and ille g a l entry.

S H IP P IN G A N D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K

J A N IT O R , P O R T E R , OR C L E A N E R
(S w eeper; charwom an; ja n itr e s s )
Cleans and keeps in an o r d e r ly ' condition fa c to ry w orkin g a rea s and w ash room s, o r
p r e m is e s o f an o ffic e , apartm ent house, o r c o m m e rc ia l o r oth er establish m ent. Duties in vo lv e
a com bination o f the fo llo w in g ; Sweeping, m opping o r scrubbing, and polish ing flo o r s ; re m o vin g
chips, trash , and other refu se; dusting equipment, fu rn itu re, o r fix tu res; polish in g m eta l fi x ­
tu res o r trim m in gs; p rovid in g supplies and m in o r m aintenance s e r v ic e s ; and clean ing la v a to r ie s ,
sh ow ers, and re s tro o m s . W ork ers who s p e c ia lize in window washing a re exclu ded.

P r e p a re s m erch a n d ise fo r shipm ent, o r r e c e iv e s and is re s p o n sib le fo r incom ing ship­
m ents o f m erch a n d ise o r oth er m a te r ia ls . Shipping w ork in v o lv e s : A kn ow ledge o f shipping p r o ­
ced u res, p r a c tic e s , rou tes, a va ila b le m eans o f tran sportation , and ra tes; and prep a rin g re c o rd s
o f the goods shipped, m akin g up b ills o f ladin g, posting w eight and shipping ch a rge s, and keeping
a file o f shipping re c o r d s .
M ay d ir e c t o r a s s is t in p rep a rin g the m erch a n d ise fo r shipm ent.
R ec eivin g w ork in v o lv e s : V e r ify in g o r d irectin g others in v e r ify in g the c o rr e c tn e s s of shipments
against b ills o f ladin g, in v o ic e s , o r oth er re c o rd s ; checking fo r sh ortages and re je c tin g dam ­
aged goods; routing m erch a n d ise o r m a te r ia ls to p rop e r departm ents; and maintaining n e c e s s a ry
re c o rd s and file s .
F o r w age study pu rp oses, w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s:
R e c e iv in g c le rk
Shipping c le r k
Shipping and r e c e iv in g clerk

L A B O R E R , M A T E R IA L H A N D L IN G
(L o a d e r and unloader; handler and sta cker;
w arehousem an o r w arehou se h elp er)

s h elver;

tru ck e r;

stockman o r stock h elp er;

A w o rk er em ployed in a w areh ou se, m anufacturing plant, sto re, o r o th er establish m ent
w hose duties in vo lv e one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g ; Loading and unloading va rio u s m a te r ia ls and
m erch a n dise on o r fr o m fre ig h t c a rs , tru cks, o r oth er tra n sp o rtin g d ev ices; unpacking, sh elvin g,
o r p lacin g m a te r ia ls o r m erch a n d ise in p ro p e r sto ra ge location ; and tra n sp o rtin g m a te r ia ls o r
m erch a n d ise by handtruck, c a r, o r w h e elb a rrow . Lon gsh orem en , who load and unload ships a re
exclu d ed .
ORD ER F IL L E R
(O rd e r p ic k e r; stock s e le c to r ; w arehou se stockman)
F ills shipping o r tra n s fe r o rd e r s fo r fin ish ed goods fr o m stored m erch a n dise in a c c o rd ­
ance with sp ecifica tion s on sales slips, cu s to m e rs ' o r d e r s , o r oth er in stru ction s. M ay, in addition
to fillin g o rd e r s and in dicating item s fille d o r om itted, keep re c o rd s o f outgoing o rd e r s , re q u i­
sitio n additional stock o r re p o rt sh ort supplies to su p e rv is o r, and p e r fo rm oth er re la te d duties.

T R U C K D R IV E R
D riv e s a tru ck w ithin a city o r in du strial a re a to tra n sp o rt m a te r ia ls , m erch andise,
equipm ent, o r m en betw een va rio u s types o f establish m ents such as: M anufacturing plants, fre ig h t
depots, w areh ou ses, w h o lesa le and re ta il establish m en ts, o r betw een re ta il establishm ents and
c u sto m ers' houses o r p la ces o f bu siness. M ay also load o r unload tru ck with o r without h elp ers,
m ake m in o r m ech an ical re p a irs , and keep tru ck in good w orkin g o rd e r . D riv e r-s a le s m e n and
o v e r - th e - r o a d d r iv e r s a re exclu d ed .
fo llo w s:

F o r w age study pu rposes, tru c k d riv e r s a re c la s s ifie d by siz e and type o f equipment, as
( T r a c t o r - t r a ile r should be rated on the basis o f t r a ile r ca p a city.)
T r u c k d riv e r (com bin ation o f s iz e s lis te d se p a ra te ly )
T r u c k d riv e r, ligh t (under IV 2 tons)
T r u c k d riv e r, m edium (IV 2 to and including 4 tons)
T r u c k d riv e r, h eavy (o v e r 4 tons, t r a ile r type)
T r u c k d riv e r, h eavy (o v e r 4 tons, oth er than t r a ile r type)

T R U C K E R , PO W ER
P A C K E R , S H IP P IN G
P r e p a re s fin ish ed produ cts fo r shipment o r sto ra ge by placin g them in shipping con ­
ta in ers, the sp e cific operations p e r fo rm e d being dependent upon the type, s iz e , and number
o f units to be packed, the type o f container em ployed, and m ethod o f shipment. W ork re q u ires
the p lacin g o f item s in shipping contain ers and m ay in vo lv e one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g ;
K n ow led ge o f va rio u s item s o f stock in o rd e r to v e r ify content; selection o f a ppropria te type




O perates a m an u ally c o n tro lled gasolin e- o r e le c tric -p o w e re d tru ck o r tr a c t o r to tra n sp o rt
goods and m a te r ia ls o f a ll kinds about a w areh ou se, m anufacturing plant, o r other establishm ent.
F o r w age study pu rp oses,
T r u c k e r,
T r u c k e r,

w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d by type o f truck,

p o w er (fo r k lift)
pow er (o th er than fo r k lift)

as fo llow s:

A v a ila b le O n R e q u e s t
The follow in g areas are surveyed p e rio d ic a lly fo r use in adm inistering the S ervice Contract A ct of 1965.
available at no cost while supplies last from any o f the BLS regional o ffic e s shown on the inside front cover.

A laska
Albany, Ga.
Alpena, Standish, and Tawas C ity, Mich.
A m a rillo , Tex.
A s h e v ille , N.C.
Atlantic C ity, N.J.
Augusta, G a —S.C.
Austin, T ex.
B a k ersfield , C a lif.
Baton Rouge, La.
B ilo x i, Gulfport, and Pascagoula, M iss.
B rid gep ort, N orw alk, and Stam ford, Conn.
Charleston, S.C.
C la rk s v ille , Tenn., and Hopkinsville, Ky.
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ga.— la.
A
Crane, Ind.
Dothan, Ala.
Duluth-Superior, M in n —W is.
Durham, N.C.
E l Paso, Tex.
Eugene, O reg.
F a rg o — oorhead, N. Dak.—
M
Minn.
F a y e tte v ille , N.C.
Fitchburg— eom in ster, M ass.
L
F o rt Smith, A rk .—
Okla.
F re d e ric k —
Hagerstown, Md.—Pa.—W. Va.
G reat F a lls , Mont.
G reensboro-W inston Salem—
High Point, N.C.
H arrisb u rg, Pa.
H untsville, A la.
K n oxville, Tenn.

Copies o f public releases are

Lared o, T ex.
Las V egas, N ev.
Lexington, Ky.
L ow er E astern Shore, Md.—
Va.
Macon, Ga.
M arquette, Escanaba, Sault Ste. M a rie , Mich.
M eridian, M iss.
M iddlesex, Monmouth, Ocean and Som erset
C os., N.J.
M obile, A la ., and Pensacola, F la.
M ontgom ery, A la.
N ash ville, Tenn.
New London— roton-N orw ich, Conn.
G
Northeastern Maine
Ogden, Utah
Orlando, Fla.
Oxnard-Ventura, C alif.
Panama C ity, F la.
Pine Bluff, A rk .
Portsm outh, N.H.—Maine— ass.
M
Pueblo, Colo.
Reno, N ev.
Sacram ento, C alif.
Santa Barbara, C a lif.
Shreveport, La.
Springfield—
Chicopee— olyoke, M ass.—Conn.
H
Stockton, C a lif.
Tacom a, Wash.
Topeka, Kans.
Tucson, A r iz .
V a lle jo —
Napa, C alif.
Wichita F a lls , Tex.
W ilm ington, D e l—
N.J.—
Md.

The eleventh annual rep ort on sa la ries fo r accountants, auditors, ch ief accountants, attorneys, job analysts, d irecto rs o f personnel,
buyers, chem ists, engineers, engineering technicians, draftsm en, and c le r ic a l em ployees. O rder as BLS Bulletin 1693, National
Survey o f P ro fe s s io n a l, A dm in istrative, Technical, and C le ric a l Pay, June 1970, $1.00 a copy, fro m the Superintendent o f Documents,
U.S. Governm ent Prin tin g O ffice, Washington, D.C., 20402, or any o f its region al sales o ffic e s .




☆

U . S . GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE/1 972—745-1 05/79

A re a W a g e S u rv ey s
A list of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A d ire c to ry o f area wage studies including m ore lim ited studies conducted at the request
of the Employment Standards Adm inistration of the Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins m ay be purchased from the Superintendent
of Documents, U.S. Government Printing O ffice, Washington, D.C., 20402, or fro m any o f the BLS regional sales o ffic e s shown on the inside front cover.
A re a
Akron, Ohio, July 1971 1 ----------------------------------------Albany-Schenectady—T roy, N .Y ., M ar. 1972.............. ...
Albuquerque, N. M ex., M ar. 1971______________________
Allentow n-Bethlehem -Easton, P a —
N.J., May 1.971____
Atlanta, Ga., May 1971------------------------------------------B altim ore, Md., Aug. 1971-------------------------------------Beaumont—P o rt Arthur-O range, T ex ., May 1971 1____
Binghamton, N .Y ., July 1971 1--------------------------------Birm ingham , A la ., M ar. 1971 1 ------------------------------Boise C ity, Idaho, Nov. 1971--------------------------- -------Boston, M ass., Aug. 1971_____ _____ ____________________
Buffalo, N .Y ., Oct. 1971-----------------------------------------Burlington, Vt., Dec. 1971-------------------- -----------------Canton, Ohio, May 1971--------- -------------- --- >.__________
Charleston, W. Va., M ar. 1971...... .............. ..... ............_
Charlotte, N.C., Jan. 1972 1____________________________
Chattanooga, Tenn.—Ga., Sept. 1971-------------------------Chicago, III., June 1971 1 ------------------ ------ --------------Cincinnati, O h io -K y —
Ind., Feb. 1971 1________________
C leveland, Ohio, Sept. 1971_________________ ___________
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1971------------------------- ------- ----D allas, T ex ., Oct. 1971------------------------------------------Davenport—
Rock Islan d -M olin e, Iowa—
111., Feb. 1971__
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1971 1_______________________________
Denver, C olo., Dec. 1971 1 -------------------------------------Des M oines, Iowa, May 1971____________________________
D etroit, M ich., Feb. 1971 1-------------------------------------Durham, N.C. (to be surveyed in 1972)
F ort Lauderdale—
Hollywood and West Palm
Beach, F la. (to be surveyed in 1972)
F o rt Worth, Tex., Oct. 1971.............. ............................. .
Green Bay, W is., July 1971------------------------------------G reen ville, S.C., May 1971 1-----------------------------------Houston, T ex., A pr. 1971 1______________________________
H untsville, A la., February 1972 1---------------------------Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1971-----------------------------------Jackson, M iss., Jan. 1972_______________________________
Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 1971----------------------------------Kansas City, M o.-K ans., Sept. 1971____________________
Law rence—H averh ill, M a s s —N .H ., June 1971_________
L ittle Rock—
North L ittle Rock, A rk ., July 1971_________
Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa AnaGarden G rove, C alif., M ar. 1971 1 ___________________
L o u is v ille , Ky.—Ind., Nov. 1971 1 _______________________
Lubbock, T ex., M ar. 1971______________________________
M anchester, N .H ., July 1971-----------------------------------M em phis, T e n n — rk ., Nov. 1971 1_____________________
A
M iam i, F la ., Nov. 1971------------------------------------------Midland and Odessa, T ex., Jan. 1972 1________________
M ilwaukee, W is., May 1971..............................................

Bulletin number
and p rice
1685-87,
1725-49,
1685-58,
1685-75,
1685-69,
1725-16,
1685-68,
1725-6,
1685-63,
1725-27,
1725-11,
1725-34,
1725-25,
1685-71,
1685-57,
1725-48,
1725-14,
1685-90,
1685-53,
1725-17,
1725-19,
1725-26,
1685-51,
1725-36,
1725-44,
1685-70,
1685-77,

40
30
30
30

cents
cents
cents
cents
40cents
35cents
35cents
35cents
40cents
30cents
40cents
45cents
25cents
30 cents
30 cents
35cents
30cents
70cents
45cents
40cents
30cents
35cents
30cents
35cents
35cents
30cents
50cents

1725-21,
1725-3,
1685-78,
1685-67,
1725-50,
1725-23,
1725-38,
1725-39,
1725-18,
1685-83,
1725-4,

30cents
30cents
35cents
50cents
35cents
30cents
30cents
30cents
35cents
30cents
30cents

1685-66,
1725-29,
1685-60,
1725-2,
1725-40,
1725-28,
1725-37,
1685-76,

50cents
35cents
30cents
30cents
35cents
30cents
30cents
35cents

1 Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




A re a
M inneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 1972 1_______________
Muskegon-Muskegon Heights, M ich., June 1971_________
Newark and J ersey City, N.J., Jan. 1972 1______________
New Haven, Conn., Jan. 1972 1 --------------------------------New Orleans, La., Jan. 1972------------------------------------New York, N .Y ., A pr. 1971--------------------------------------N orfollv-Portsm outh and Newport News—
Hampton, Va., Jan. 1972.----------- --------------------------Oklahoma C ity, Okla., July 1971 1.....................................
Omaha, Nebr.—Iowa, Sept. 1971 1________________________
P a te rs o n -C lifto n -P a s s a ic , N.J., June 1971_____________
Philadelphia, P a —N.J., Nov. 1970...____________________
Phoenix, A r iz ., June 1971----------------------- ---------------Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 1972..................................................
Portland, Maine, Nov. 1971 1 -----------------------------------Portland, O r e g —Wash., May 1971_______________________
Poughkeepsie—
Kingston—
Newburgh,
N .Y . (to be surveyed in 1972)
Providen ce—Paw tucket-W arw ick, R . I — ass.,
M
May 1971 1 -----------------------------------------------------------Raleigh, N .C ., Aug. 1971-----------------------------------------Richmond, Va., M ar. 1971----------------------------------- ---R och ester, N .Y . (o ffic e occupations only), July 1971 1__
R ockford, III., May 1971-----------------------------------------St. Louis, Mo.—
III., M ar. 1971 *_________________________
Salt Lake City, Utah, Nov. 1971_________________________
San Antonio, T ex ., May 1971 1---------------------------------San Bernardino— iv e rs id e — n tario, C alif.,
R
O
Dec. 1971--------------------------------------------- ----------------San D eigo, C a lif., Nov. 1971 1 -------- --------------- ---------San F ran cisco—
Oakland, C a lif., Oct. 1971 1.....................
San Jose, C a lif., Aug. 1971 1------------------------------------Savannah, Ga., May 1971-----------------------------------------Scranton, Pa., July 1971-----------------------------------------S ea ttle-E verett, Wash., Jan. 1972_______________________
Sioux F a lls, S. Dak., Dec. 1971.................. ......................
South Bend, Ind., M ar. 1971.................. .............................
Spokane, Wash., June 1971 --------------------------------------Syracuse, N .Y ., July 1971 * . — .......... .......................... .
Tampa—
St. P etersb u rg, F la ., Nov. 1971 1.......................
Toledo, O hio-M ich., A pr. 1971 1................................... .
Trenton, N.J., Sept. 1971....... .................................. .........
U tica-R om e, N .Y ., July 1971 1------------------------------ --Washington, D .C .-M d .-V a ., A pr. 1971____ _____________
W aterbury, Conn., M ar. 1972*_____________ _____ _______
W aterloo, Iowa, Nov. 1971.............................. .......... .........
Wichita, Kans., A pr. 1971 ---------------------------------------W orcester, M ass., May 1971------- ---------------------------York, Pa., Feb. 1971............................................................
Youngstown-W arren, Ohio, Nov. 1971*_________________

Bulletin number
and p rice
1725-45, 50 cents
1685-82, 30 cents
1725-52, 50 cents
1725-41, 35 cents
1725-35, 30 cents
1685-89, 65 cents
1725-42,
1725-8,
1725-13,
1685-84,
1685-34,
1685-86,
1725-46,
1725-22,
1685-85,

30 cents
35 cents
35 cents
35 cents
50 cents
30 cents
40 cents
35 cents
35 cents

1685-80,
1725-5,
1685-62,
1725-7,
1685-79,
1685-65,
1725-24,
1685-81,

40
30
30
35
30
50
30
35

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1725-43,
1725-32,
1725-33,
1725-15,
1685-72,
1725-1,
1725-47,
1725-30,
1685-61,
1685-88,
1725-10,
1725-31,
1685-74,
1725-12,
1725-9,
1685-56,
1725-53,
1725-20,
1685-64,
1685-73,
1685-50,
1725-51,

30
35
50
35
30
30
30
25
30
30
35
35
40
30
35
40
35
30
30
30
30
35

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

FIRST CLASS MAIL

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

POSTAGE A N D FEES PAID

W ASHING TO N, D.C. 20212

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

O F F IC IA L BUSINESS

'

PENALTY FOR P R IV A TE USE, $300




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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102