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AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e D allas, T e x a s , M etro po litan A re a ,
O c to b e r 1971

Bulletin 1725-26
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

/ Bureau of Labor Statistics

B U R E A U

O F

L A B O R

S T A T IS T IC S

R E G IO N A L

O F F IC E S

ALASKA

Reaion I
1603-JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Reqion V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 3 5 3 -1880 (Area Code 312)

••




Region II
341 Ninth Ave., Rm. 1003
New York, N .Y . 10001
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region VI
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions V II and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 10th Floor
Kansas C ity, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

Regions V II and V III will be serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.

AREA WAGE SURVEY
B ulletin 172 5 -2 6

M a rc h 1 9 7 2

U.S. DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR, J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
BUR EA U OF LABOR S TA TIS TIC S. Geoffrev H. Moore. Commissioner

T h e D a lla s , T e x a s , M e t r o p o lit a n A r e a , O c t o b e r 1971
CONTENTS
Paae

1.
4.

Introduction
W age trends fo r s e le c te d occupational groups

T a b les:
3.
5.

14.
15.
17.
18.
19.
20.
22.

24.

E stablishm ents and w o rk e rs within scope o f su rv e y and num ber studied
Indexes o f standard w e e k ly s a la rie s and s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings fo r s e le c te d occupational
grou p s, and percen ts o f in c re a s e fo r s e le c te d p eriod s

A.
6.
10.
12 .

1.
2.

Occupational earnings:
A - l.
O ffic e occupations— en and wom en
m
A - l a . O ffic e occupations— r g e establish m en ts—
la
men and wom en
A -2 .
P r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ica l occupations— en and wom en
m
A -2 a . P r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ica l occupations— r g e establish m en ts— en and wom en
la
m
A -3 .
O ffic e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and tech n ical occupations— en and wom en com bined
m
A -3 a . O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and tech n ical occupations— r g e ’ establish m en ts— en and wom en com bined
la
m
A -4 .
M aintenance and pow erplan t occupations
A -4 a . M aintenance and p ow erplan t occupations— r g e establishm ents
la
A - 5.
C ustodial and m a te r ia l m ovem en t occupations
A -5 a . C ustodial and m a te r ia l m ovem en t occupations— r g e establishm ents
la

Appendix.

O ccupational d escrip tio n s




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.. 20042 — Price 3R cents

Preface

Note:

T h e B ureau o f L a b o r S ta tistics p ro g ra m o f annual occu pa­
tion al w age su rveys in m e tro p o lita n a rea s is designed to p ro v id e data
on occupational e a rn in g s, and establish m en t p ra c tic e s and supplem en­
ta r y w age p r o v is io n s .
It yie ld s d eta iled data by s e le c te d industry
d iv is io n fo r each o f the a re a s studied, fo r geogra p h ic re g io n s , and
fo r the U nited S tates.
A m a jo r con sid era tion in the p ro g ra m is the
need fo r g r e a te r in sigh t into (1) the m ovem en t o f w ages by occu pa­
tion al c a te g o ry and s k ill le v e l, and (2) the stru ctu re and le v e l o f wages
among a re a s and in du stry d iv is io n s .

S im ila r re p o rts a re a v a ila b le fo r oth er a re a s .
back c o v e r .)

C u rren t re p o rts on occupational earnings and supplem en­
ta ry w age p ro v is io n s in the D allas a re a , a re also a v a ila b le fo r
m a ch in ery (N o v e m b e r 1970) and paints and va rn ish es (N o v e m b e r
1970).
Union w age r a te s , in d ica tive o f p r e v a ilin g pay le v e ls ,
a re a v a ila b le fo r building construction; p rin tin g; lo c a l-tr a n s it
operatin g em p lo yees; lo c a l tru c k d riv e rs and h e l p e r s ; and
g r o c e r y s to re em p lo y ees.

A t the end o f each s u rv e y , an individual a re a bu lletin p r e ­
sents the re s u lts .
A ft e r com p letion o f a ll individual a re a bulletins
fo r a round o f s u rv e y s , two su m m ary bu lletins a re issu ed.
Th e fir s t
b rin gs data fo r each o f the m etro p o lita n a rea s studied into one bu lletin .
T h e second p resen ts in fo rm a tio n which has been p ro je c te d fro m in d i­
vidu al m e tro p o lita n a r e a data to r e la te to g eo gra p h ic region s and the
U nited States.
N in e ty a re a s cu rre n tly a re included in the p ro g ra m .
In each
a r e a , in fo rm a tio n on occupational earnings is c o lle c te d annually and on
establish m en t p ra c tic e s and su pplem en tary w age p ro visio n s b ien n ia lly.
T h is b u lletin p resen ts resu lts o f the su rvey in D a lla s ,
T e x . , in O cto b er 1971. T h e Standard M etro p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a ,
as d efin ed by the O ffic e o f M anagem ent and Budget (fo r m e r ly the
Bureau o f the Budget) through January 1968, con sists o f C o llin , D a lla s,
Denton, E llis , Kaufm an, and R ock w a ll C ounties.
T h is study was
conducted by the B u reau 's re g io n a l o ffic e in D a lla s , T e x . , under the
g e n e ra l d ire c tio n o f Boyd B. O 'N e a l, A s s is ta n t R egio n a l D ir e c to r
fo r O p eration s.




(See in sid e

ii

In tro d u c tio n
T h is a re a is 1 o f 90 in which the U.S. D epartm ent of L a b o r's
Bureau o f L a b o r S ta tistics conducts su rveys o f occupational earnings
and re la te d b en efits on an a rea w id e b a s is .1

the A - s e r ie s ta b les, because e ith e r ( l ) em ploym ent in the occupation is
too sm a ll to p ro v id e enough data to m e r it p resen tation , o r (2) th ere is
p o s s ib ility o f d is c lo s u re o f in divid u al establishm ent data. E arnings
data not shown s e p a ra te ly fo r in du stry d ivision s a re included in the
o v e r a ll c la s s ific a tio n when a su b cla ssifica tio n o f s e c r e ta r ie s o r tru ckd r iv e r s is not shown o r in fo rm a tio n to su b cla ssify is not a va ila b le.

This bu lletin p resen ts cu rren t occupational em ploym ent and
earnings in form a tion obtained la r g e ly by m a il fr o m the establishm ents
v is ite d by Bureau fie ld econ om ists in the la st p revio u s su rvey fo r
occupations rep o rted in that e a r lie r study. P e r s o n a l v is its w e re m ade
to nonrespondents and to those respondents rep o rtin g unusual changes
since the p reviou s su rvey.

O ccupational em ploym ent and earnings data a re shown fo r
fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s , i.e ., those h ire d to w o rk a reg u la r w e e k ly schedule.
E arn in gs data exclude prem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on
w eeken ds, h olid a ys, and late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses a re e x ­
cluded, but c o s t- o f- liv in g allow an ces and in cen tive earnings a re in ­
cluded.
W h ere w e e k ly hours a re re p o rte d , as fo r o ffic e c le r ic a l
occupations, re fe r e n c e is to the standard w ork w eek (rounded to the
n e a re s t h a lf hour) fo r which em p loyees r e c e iv e th eir reg u la r stra igh ttim e s a la rie s (e x c lu s iv e o f pay fo r o v e rtim e at re g u la r and/or p r e ­
m ium ra te s ). A v e r a g e w e e k ly earnings fo r these occupations have
been rounded to the n ea rest h a lf d o lla r.

In each a re a , data a re obtained fr o m re p re s e n ta tiv e esta b ­
lishm ents w ithin six broad in du stry d iv is io n s : M anufacturing; tra n s ­
portation , com m unication, and other public u tilitie s ; w h o lesa le trad e;
r e ta il trad e; finance, insu rance, and r e a l estate; and s e r v ic e s . M a jo r
indu stry groups excluded fr o m these studies a re govern m en t o p e ra ­
tions and the con stru ction and e x tra c tiv e in d u stries. E stablish m en ts
having fe w e r than a p re s c r ib e d num ber o f w o rk e rs a re om itted because
they tend to furnish in su fficien t em ploym en t in the occupations studied
to w a rra n t inclusion. S eparate tabulations a re p ro v id e d fo r each of
the broad indu stry d ivision s which m e e t pu blication c r ite r ia .

T h ese su rveys m easu re the le v e l of occupational earnings in
an a rea at a p a rtic u la r tim e. C om p arison s o f individual occupational
a v e ra g e s o v e r tim e m ay not r e fle c t expected w age changes.
The
a v e ra g e s fo r in d ividu al jobs a re a ffe c te d by changes in w ages and
em ploym en t pattern s. F o r exam p le, prop ortion s of w o rk e rs em ployed
by h igh- o r lo w -w a g e fir m s m a y change o r h igh -w age w o rk e rs m ay
advance to b e tte r jobs and be re p la c e d by new w o rk e rs at lo w e r rates.
Such shifts in em ploym en t could d e c re a s e an occupational a v e ra g e even
though m ost establish m en ts in an a re a in c re a s e w ages during the yea r.
T ren d s in earnings o f occupational grou ps, shown in table 2, are b etter
in d ica tors o f w age trends than individu al jobs w ithin the groups.

T h ese su rveys a re conducted on a sam ple b a sis because of
the unn ecessary cost in vo lved in su rveyin g a ll establish m en ts.
To
obtain optimum a ccu ra cy at m inim um cost, a g r e a te r p ro p o rtio n of
la rg e than o f s m a ll establish m en ts is studied. In com bining the data,
h o w ever, a ll establishm ents a re giv e n th e ir ap p rop ria te w eight. E s ­
tim ates based on the establishm ents studied a re p resen ted , th e re fo re ,
as rela tin g to a ll establishm ents in the in du stry grouping and a rea ,
excep t fo r those b elow the m inim um s iz e studied.
Occupations and E arn in gs
The occupations s e le c te d fo r study a re com m on to a v a r ie ty
o f m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing in d u stries, and a re o f the
fo llo w in g typ es: ( l ) O ffic e c le r ic a l; (2) p ro fe s s io n a l and tech n ical;
(3) m aintenance and pow erplan t; and (4) cu stod ial and m a te r ia l m o v e ­
m ent. O ccupational c la s s ific a tio n is based on a u n iform set o f job
d escrip tio n s design ed to take account of in teresta b lish m en t v a ria tio n
in duties w ithin the sam e job.
The occupations s e le c te d fo r study
a re lis te d and d e s c rib e d in the appendix. U nless oth erw ise in dicated,
the earnings data fo llo w in g the job title s a re fo r a ll in d u stries c o m ­
bined. E arn in gs data fo r som e of the occupations lis te d and d esc rib e d ,
o r fo r som e in du stry d ivision s w ithin occupations, a re not p resen ted in

Th e a v e ra g e s p resen ted r e fle c t com p osite, areaw id e e s t i­
m ates.
In du stries and establish m en ts d iffe r in pay le v e l and job
staffin g and, thus, contribute d iffe r e n tly to the estim a tes fo r each job.
The pay rela tio n sh ip obtainable fr o m the a v e ra g e s m ay fa il to r e fle c t
a c c u ra te ly the w age spread or d iffe r e n tia l m aintained among job s in
individu al estab lish m en ts. S im ila r ly , d iffe re n c e s in a v e ra g e pay le v e ls
fo r m en and w om en in any o f the s e le c te d occupations should not be
assum ed to r e fle c t d iffe re n c e s in pay trea tm en t o f the sexes w ithin
in dividu al establish m en ts.
O th er p o s s ib le fa c to rs which m ay con ­
tribu te to d iffe re n c e s in pay fo r m en and w om en include: D iffe re n c e s
1
Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New York State in p ro g r e s s io n w ithin estab lish ed rate ra n ges, since only the actual
rates paid incum bents a re c o lle c te d ; and d iffe re n c e s in s p e c ific duties
Department of Labor. These areas are Binghamton (New York portion only) Rochester (office occupa­
p e rfo rm e d , although the w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d a p p ro p ria te ly w ithin
tions only); Syracuse; and U tica-R om e. In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies in
65 areas at the request of the Employment Standards Administration of the U .S. Department of Labor.
the sam e s u rv e y job d escrip tio n . Job d escrip tion s used in c la s s ify in g




1

2
em p loyees in these su rveys a re u su ally m o re g e n e ra liz e d than those
used in in dividu al establish m en ts and a llo w fo r m in or d iffe re n c e s
among estab lish m en ts in the s p e c ific duties p e rfo rm e d .
O ccupational em ploym en t e stim a tes rep re s e n t the tota l in a ll
establish m en ts w ithin the scope o f the study and not the number actu­
a lly su rveyed . B ecau se o f d iffe r e n c e s in occupational stru ctu re among
estab lish m en ts, the estim ates o f occu pation al em ploym ent obtained from
the sam ple o f establish m en ts studied s e r v e only to indicate the r e la tiv e
im p ortan ce o f the jobs studied.
T h e s e d iffe re n c e s in occupational
stru ctu re do not a ffe c t m a te r ia lly the a ccu ra cy of the earnings data.




E stab lish m en t P r a c tic e s and Supplem entary W age P r o v is io n s

Tabulations on s e le c te d establish m en t p ra c tic e s and su pple­
m en ta ry w age p ro v is io n s (B - s e r ie s tables) a re not p resen ted in this
bu lletin.
In form ation fo r these tabulations is c o lle c te d bien n ially.
T h ese tabulations on m inim um entrance s a la rie s fo r in ex p erien ced
w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s; shift d iffe re n tia ls ; scheduled w e e k ly hours;
paid h olid a ys; paid va ca tion s; and health, in su ran ce, and pension
plans a re p resen ted (in the B - s e r ie s tab les) in p revio u s bu lletins
fo r this area.

3

T a b le 1.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o rk e rs w ith in s c o p e o f s u rv e y an d n u m b e r s tu d ie d in D a lla s , T e x .,1

by m a jo r in d u s try d iv is io n , O c t o b e r 1 9 71
Minimum
employment
in establishments in scope
of study

Industry division

Number of establishments

W orkers in establishments
Within scope of study4

Within scope
of study3

Studied

Studied
Number

Percen t

A il establishments
-

1,514

251

320,942

100

157,423

50
-

498
1, 016

76
175

128, 190
192,752

40
60

63, 532
93,891

50
50
50
50
50

103
274
256
190
193

31
29
40
37
38

40, 067
29,254
60,619
35,788
27, 024

13
9
19
1
1
8

28, 343
6, 455
34,644
17,619
6,830

A ll divisions________________________________

-

90

74

137, 341

100

126,024

Manufacturing___ _____ _______________________
Nonmanufacturing___ - ---------------------------Transportation, communication, and
other public utilities 5--------------------------Wholesale trade 6 -------------------------------Retail trade--------------------------------- -------Finance, insurance, and real estate 7
_______
Services 8 8
---------------------------------------------

500
-

27
63

21
53

56, 267
81, 074

41
59

51, 693
74,331

500
500
500
500
500

16
4
21
20
2

13
4
18
17
1

27,
3,
32,
16,
1,

20
2
24
12
1

25,132
3, 105
30,742
14, 752
600

A ll divisions______________________________
Manufacturing--------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing_____________________________ Transportation, communication, and
______________________
other public utilities 5
Wholesale trade 6
_____________________________
Retail trade-------------------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate 7
_______
Services 6 8
___________________________________
Large establishments

455
105
945
369
200

' The Dallas Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea, as defined by the Office of Management and Budget (fo rm e rly the Bureau of the Budget)
through January 1968, consists of Collin, Dallas, Denton, E llis, Kaufman, and Rockwall Counties. The "w ork ers within scope of study" estimates
shown in this table provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor fo rc e included in the survey. The estimates
are not intended, however, to serve as a basis of comparison with other employment indexes fo r the area to m easure employment trends or levels
since (1) planning of wage surveys requires the use of establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and
(2) small establishments are excluded from the scope of the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual was used in classifying establishments by industry division.
3 Includes a ll establishments with total employment at or above the minimum lim itation. A ll outlets (within the area) of companies in such
industries as trade, finance, auto repair service, and motion picture theaters are considered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes a ll w orkers in all establishments with total employment (within the area) at or above the minimum limitation.
5 Abbreviated to "public u tilities" in the A -s e r ie s tables. Taxicabs and services incidental to water transportation w ere excluded. Dallas'
transit system is municipally operated and is excluded by definition from the scope of the study.
6 This industry division is represented in estimates fo r " a ll industries" and "nonmanufacturing" in the Series A tables. Separate presentation
of data for this division is not made fo r one or m ore of the following reasons: (1) Employment in the division is too sm all to provide enough data
to m erit separate study, (2) the sample was not designed in itially to perm it separate presentation, (3) response was insufficient or inadequate to
perm it separate presentation, and (4) there is possibility of disclosure of individual establishment data.
7 Abbreviated to "finance" in the A -s e r ie s tables.
8 Hotels and m otels; laundries and other personal services; business services; automobile rep air, rental, and parking; motion pictures;
nonprofit membership organizations (excluding religious and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectural services.




Over two-fifths of the workers within scope of the survey in the Dallas area w ere employed in manufacturing firm s,
presents the m ajor industry groups and specific industries as a percent of a ll manufacturing:
Industry groups
E le ctrica l equipment and supplies--------------------------- 28
Transportation equipment--------------------------------------- 20
Apparel and other textile products--------------------------8
Food and kindred products______________________________ 8
Machinery, except ele ctrica l___________________________
8
Fabricated m etal products._____________________________ 5
Printing and publishing__________________________________ 5

The following

Specific industries
Motor vehicles and equipment_____________
Communication equipment---------------------Electronic components and a ccessories—
Women's and m isses' outerwear-------------

17
13
-- 13
4

This information is based on estimates of total employment derived from universe m aterials compiled p rior to actual survey.
Proportions in various industry divisions may d iffer from proportions based on the results of the survey as shown in table 1 above.

W a g e T re n d s fo r S e le c te d O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s
P r e s e n te d in table 2 a re indexes and p ercen ta ges o f change
in a v e ra g e s a la rie s o f o ffic e c le r ic a l w o rk e rs and in d u stria l nu rses,
and in a v e ra g e earn in gs o f s e le c te d p la n tw ork er groups. The indexes
are a m ea su re o f w a ges at a given tim e , e x p re s s e d as a p ercen t of
w ages during the base p erio d . Subtracting 100 fro m the index yield s
the p ercen ta ge change in w ages fr o m the base p e rio d to the date of
the index.
The p e rcen ta g es of change o r in c re a s e re la te to w age
changes betw een the in dicated dates. Annual ra tes of in c re a s e , w h ere
shown, r e fle c t the amount o f in c re a s e fo r 12 months when the tim e
p e rio d betw een su rveys w as oth er than 12 m onths. T h ese com putations
w e r e based on the assum ption that w ages in c re a s e d at a constant rate
betw een su rv e y s . T h ese estim a tes a re m ea su res of change in a v e r ­
ages fo r the a re a ; they a re not intended to m easu re a v e ra g e pay
changes in the establish m en ts in the a rea.

shows the p ercen ta ge change. The index is the product o f m u ltiplyin g
the base y e a r re la tiv e (100) by the r e la tiv e fo r the next succeeding
y e a r and continuing to m u ltip ly (compound) each y e a r 's re la tiv e by the
p revio u s y e a r 's index.
F o r o ffic e c le r ic a l w o rk e rs and in d u stria l n u rses, the w age
trends re la te to re g u la r w e e k ly s a la rie s fo r the n o rm a l w ork w eek ,
e x clu sive o f earnings fo r o v e rtim e .
F o r p la n tw o rk er grou ps, they
m ea su re changes in a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs, excluding
p rem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eek en d s, h olid ays, and
late shifts. The p ercen ta ges a re based on data fo r s e le c te d k ey o ccu ­
pations and include m ost o f the n u m e ric a lly im p ortan t jobs w ithin
each group.
L im ita tio n s o f Data

M ethod o f Com puting
The indexes and p ercen ta ges o f change, as m ea su res of
change in a re a a v e r a g e s , a re in flu en ced b y: (1) g e n e ra l s a la ry and
w age changes, (2) m e r it o r other in c re a s e s in pay r e c e iv e d by in d i­
vidu al w o r k e r s w h ile in the sam e job , and (3) changes in a v e ra g e
w ages due to changes in the la b o r fo r c e resu ltin g fr o m la b or tu rn ­
o v e r, fo r c e expansions, fo r c e redu ction s, and changes in the p r o p o r ­
tions o f w o rk e rs em p loyed by establish m en ts w ith d iffe re n t pay le v e ls .
Changes in the la b o r fo r c e can cause in c re a s e s o r d e c re a s e s in the
occupational a v e ra g e s without actual w age changes. It is co n ceiva b le
that even though a ll establish m en ts in an a re a gave w age in c re a s e s ,
a v e ra g e w ages m ay have d eclin ed because lo w e r-p a y in g establish m en ts
en tered the a re a o r expanded th e ir w o rk fo r c e s .
S im ila r ly , w ages
m ay have rem a in ed r e la tiv e ly constant, y e t the a v e ra g e s fo r an a rea
m a y have ris e n c o n sid era b ly because h ig h er-p a y in g establishm ents
en tered the area.

Each o f the fo llo w in g k ey occupations w ithin an occupational
group was a ssign ed a constant w eigh t based on its p rop ortion a te e m ­
ploym ent in the occupational group:
Office clerical (men and women): Office clerical (men and women)— Skilled maintenance ( men):
Carpenters
Bookkeeping-machine
Continued
Electricians
Secretaries
operators, class B
Machinists
Stenographers, general
Clerks, accounting, classes
Mechanics
Stenographers, senior
A and B
Mechanics (automotive)
Switchboard operators, classes
Clerks, file, classes
Painters
A and B
A , B, and C
Pipefitters
Tabulating-m achine operators,
Clerks, order
Tool and die makers
class B
Clerks, payroll
Typists, classes A and B
Comptometer operators
Unskilled plant (men):
Keypunch operators, classes
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Industrial nurses (men and women):
A and B
Laborers, m aterial handling
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Office boys and girls

Th e use o f constant em ploym en t w eigh ts elim in a tes the e ffe c t
o f changes in the p ro p o rtio n o f w o rk e rs re p re s e n te d in each job in ­
cluded in the data.
The p e rcen ta g es o f change r e fle c t only changes
in a v e ra g e pay fo r s tra ig h t-tim e hours.
T h e y a re not influenced by
changes in standard w o rk sch edu les, as such, o r by p rem iu m pay
fo r o v e rtim e . W h ere n e c e s s a ry , data w e r e adjusted to rem o ve fro m
the indexes and p ercen ta ges o f change any sign ifica n t e ffe c t caused
by changes in the scope o f the su rvey.

The a v e ra g e (m ean) earnings fo r each occupation w e r e m u lti­
p lie d by the occu pational w eigh t, and the products fo r a ll occupations
in the group w e r e totaled.
The a g g re g a te s fo r 2 con secu tive y e a rs
w e r e re la te d by d ivid in g the a g g re g a te fo r the la te r y e a r b y the a g g r e ­
gate fo r the e a r lie r y e a r.
The resultant r e la tiv e , le s s 100 p ercen t,




4

T a b le 2 .

In d e x e s o f s ta n d a rd w e e k ly s a la rie s

an d s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s in

D a lla s , T e x ., O c t o b e r 1 9 7 0 a n d O c t o b e r 1 9 7 1 , an d p e rc e n ts o f in c re a s e fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s
A ll industries
P eriod

O ffice
clerica l
(men and
women)

Industrial
nurses
(men and
women)

Manufacturing

Skilled
maintenance
trades
(men)

Unskilled
pi ant workers
(men)

O ffice
clerica l
(men and
women)

Indu strial
nurses
(men and
women)

Skilled
maintenance
trades
(men)

Unskilled
plantworkers
(men)

(‘ )
(* )

122.4
127.4

128.9
132.1

Indexes (Novem ber 1967=100)
October 1970____________________________________
October 1971_________________ _________________

119.5
126.1

123.4
128.3

125.7
133.0

125.1
130.2

117.4
123.9

Percents of increase
October 1959 to N ovem ber 1960:
13-month increase___________________________
Annual rate of in c re a s e_____________________

2.5
2.3

3.5
3.2

3.0
2.8

2.5
2.3

1.5
1.4

1.2
1.1

1.0
.9

2.9
2.7

Novem ber 1960 to Novem ber 1961_____________
Novem ber 1961 to Novem ber 1962_____________
Novem ber 1962 to Novem ber 1963_____________
Novem ber 1963 to Novem ber 1964_____________
Novem ber 1964 to Novem ber 1965_____________
Novem ber 1965 to Novem ber 1966_____________
Novem ber 1966 to Novem ber 196 7_____________
Novem ber 1967 to Novem ber 1968_____________
N ovem ber 1968 to October 1969:
11-month increase___________________________
Annual rate of in c re a s e_____________________

3.3
2.1
2.9
3.7
2.8
4.6
5.1
6.2

3.4
4.3
2.1
0
7.1
6.6
7.5
8.2

4.7
1.9
3.7
4.6
3.5
2.1
4.3
7.5

2.7
2.9
4.4
2.4
2.9
4.7
6.0
8.5

2.3
1.2
3.5
3.2
2.6
2.9
4.0
4.5

4.6
3.8
(* )
( ')
(* )
C)
C)
(>)

4.4
1.9
3.9
4.7
3.7
3.2
3.8
8.2

26.7
2.7
5.1
1.8
4.0
1.4
5.8
9.3

5.7
6.2

6.1
6.7

8.8
9.6

7.7
8.4

4.3
4.7

(‘ )
( ')

8.1
8.9

8.0
8.8

October 1969 to October 1970__________________
October 1970 to October 1971__________________

6.4
5.5

7.5
4.0

7.4
5.8

7.0
4.1

7.7
5.5

( ')
(* )

4.6
4.1

9.2
2.5




1 Data do not m eet publication criteria .
2 The amount of this increase reflects changes in employment among establishments with different pay levels in addition to general wage changes.

6

A.

Occupational earnings

T a b le

A -1.

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

and

wom en

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex., October 1971)
Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

*
Average

1
55

Mean ^

M edian2

Middle range2

(standard)

$
60

*
65

70

%

s

*
75

80

s
85

*

*

90

95

10
0

t

*
105

$

10 10
1
2

$

$
130

t

$
140

150

$

t
160

170

$
180

$
190

and
under
60

20
0
and

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

10
0

105

10 10
1
2

130

140

150

34
3

82
33
49
15
17

16

160

170

85

69

73

48

80
5
75
19

180

190

20
0

MEN
CLERKS. ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------FINANCE ---------------------------------------CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -----------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------CLERKS, ORDER -------------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING --------------------------MESSENGERS (OFFICE BOYS! -----------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------FINANCE ----------------------------------------

470
125
345

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

$
1 4 8 .5 0
1 4 2 .5 0
1 5 0 .5 0

$
1 4 8 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0

$
$
1 3 6 .0 0 - 1 6 4 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0 - 1 5 8 .0 0

1 5 1 .0 0

1 3 8 .0 0 - 1 6 5 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0 - 1 7 1 .5 0
1 2 3 .5 0 - 1 4 1 .5 0

17

14

3 9 .0

1 5 6 .0 0

1 5 9 .5 0

50

3 8 .5

1 3 5 .0 0

1 3 7 .5 0

208

3 9 .5

1 2 4 .0 0

1 1 9 .0 0

1 0 5 .5 0 - 1 4 3 .0 0

-

-

-

-

_

-

188
91

3 9 .5

1 2 5 .5 0

1 2 2 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0

1 0 5 .5 0 - 1 4 4 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0 - 1 4 4 .5 0

-

-

—

-

-

-

1 0 4 .0 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0

_

-

_

-

-

1
0
1
0

4 0 .0

1 3 6 .0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 2 5 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0

1 2 8 .5 0

341
79

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

8 9 .0 0
9 7 .5 0

8 4 .5 0
9 5 .0 0

262
29
160

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

8 6 .5 0
8 5 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

8 3 .0 0
8 4 .0 0
8 1 .0 0

424

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A -----------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

122.00

50
50

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 7 6 .0 0
1 7 6 .0 0

1 7 4 .0 0
1 7 4 .0 0

175
60

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

100.00

1 0 4 .0 0
1 1 1 .5 0

102.00
111.00

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

7 4 .5 0 7 2 .5 0 -

9 8 .0 0
9 0 .0 0

4
3

1

1 0 3 .0 0 - 1 3 7 .0 0
7 5 .0 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0
8 4 .0 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0
7 3 .5 0 - 9 7 .0 0

14

3

96

526

18

_

-

-

~

14
-

71
71

-

14
13

51

—

8

25
9
16

2
1
1

1
2
1
2
13
13

67
14
53

18
5
13

36

1
0

6

3

2
1
2
1
2
0
2
0

—
4

31

8
1
1

13

32

25

13

18
a

25

2
2

2
2
2
0
6

-

10
1

42

56

-

105

42

56

29
17

1
2

1
1

2
1

1
2
-

8
8

39
—
39

2
1

-

-

7

19
15
4

1
1

7
—

6
4

7
4

2
2

-

-

_

_

-

-

4

1
0
1
0
8

-

-

8
6

1
0
6

2
2

6
6

2
0
2

2

23

24
-

17

16

1
0

4
-

36

1
2

14
4

6
6
8

1
0
1

19
9
28

9

13
15

4
3

“

1 5 5 .5 0 - 1 9 9 .0 0
1 5 5 .5 0 - 1 9 9 .0 0

1
2

15

34

15
14

34
23

-

5
5
4

142

71

17

_

40

7

-

12
0

7

18

1
2
5
5

4
4

19
16

29

9

1
1
8

3

1
0

1
0
1
0

_

*

6
6

8
8

3
3

~

*12
1
2

~

9

9

2
2

-

_

19

3

*

4

WOMEN

BILLERS, MACHINE ( B IL L I N G
MACHINE) ---------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

115

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
M A C H I N E ) ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A -----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

74
62

9 6 .0 0

9 3 .5 0 - 1 1 3 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0 - 1 1 8 .5 0
9 1 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .0 0

1 0 0 .5 0
9 8 .0 0

1 0 2 .5 0
1 0 1 .5 0

9 2 .0 0 - 1 1 0 .5 0
8 8 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0

8
-

-

_

-

1
2
-

“

“

_

8

i
i

2
2

3
3

_

_

_

-

“

-

1
2

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------FINANCE ---------------------------------------- *

_

2

1

9

2
2

2

_

1

9

2
2

269

4 0 .0

1 1 2 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0

1 1 3 .0 0

1 0 5 .5 0 - 1 2 0 .5 0

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 1 2 .5 0

1 1 2 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0

1 0 3 .5 0 - 1 2 3 .0 0
1 0 7 .5 0 - 1 1 8 .5 0

3 9 .5

9 6 .0 0

9 7 .5 0

8 5 .0 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0

_

166

3 9 .5

9 6 .0 0

9 8 .0 0

8 4 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0

-

1 , 313
458

3 9 .5

1 2 4 .5 0

1 2 0 .5 0

-

1

-

-

-

-

4
-

45

1 2 5 .0 0

1 0 6 .5 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 3 8 .5 0
1 0 4 .5 0 - 1 4 0 .5 0

_

4 0 .0

-

-

1

4

43

855
208

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1 2 4 .0 0

1 2 2 .5 0
1 1 9 .5 0

1 5 3 .5 0

1 5 2 .0 0

78

4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 6 .0 0
1 1 1 .5 0

1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 0 .5 0

9 5 .5 0 - 1 3 3 .0 0
9 9 .5 0 - 1 2 2 .0 0

* Workers were distributed as follows:
See footnotes at end of tables.




_

_
_

_

_

2
2

42

16

42

16

2

13

8
42
4

1 3 5 .0 0 - 1 6 8 .5 0

367

1

2
2

175

NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

25
24

1

8
8

4
4

77
192

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

35
34

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 at $210 to $ 220; 3 at $ 230 to $ 240; and 3 at $ 260 to $ 270.

1

1
3

7
26

38

1
1
27

2
2
1
1
1
1

5

27

5

24

32
29
3

27
5

2
2

2
0

107

1
2

95

2
1
2
1
~

29

51

4

16

1

26

51

4

16

-

8
8
2
0
6
8
6
40

118
48
70

10
0

243

49

79

51

164

1
1
3
48

9
34

21
1
8
8
123
18

4

15

75

65

6
~

48

1
0

6

~

_

_

_

—

—

-

38

_
—

_

_

_

_

_

~

-

-

~

-

145

136

49

57
3

39

6
8

62

1
0

77
38

74
32

39
26

14

34

4
-

8

-

8

15

54

24

39

2
2

1
-

-

_

_

-

-

""

“

1
1
1
1
1
0
1
—
-

_

_

-

-

14
14

1
2
1

1
0
-

1
0
1
0
-

7
T a b le

A -1 .

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex., October 1971)
W eekly earnings 1
( standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
*

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

55
M ean2

Median2

Middle range2

i

$

*

*

$

*

»

$

$

S

$

S

s

t

1 ------ ~i------ 1 ------ 1 -----170
180
190
200

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

120

130

140

150

160

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

40

32

56
56
10
34

67
6
61
~
15
46

215
17
198
10
48
113

183
27
156
13
32
86

217
21
196
18
51
71

264
25
239
22
44
96

248
33
215
13
67
86

186
48
138
14
64
26

188
95
93
17
29
4

135
49
86
38
9
16

113
14
99
74
9

58
12
46
21
1

30
30
5
-

6

40
10
30

6
4
-

106
106
106
-

20
20
20
-

42
42
42
-

-

2
2
2

9
9
9

27
27
27

10
10
6

11
11
9

13
13
9

7
7
6

18
17
9

7
7
2

-

3
3

3
3

_
-

-

4
4

_
-

-

3
3

-

-

_
-

34
34

10
10

_

-

-

-

19

2

3

3

-

-

3

3

—
-

i
i

and
under
60

WOMEN -

S

$

and
200 over

CONTINUED

CLERKS. ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ---------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------RETAIL T R A O E ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

2 ,2 0 6
347

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS A --------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

114

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS B --------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------RETAIL T R A D E ----------------------------FINANCE -------------------------------------CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS C --------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------FINANCE ------------------------------------CLERKS, ORDER ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

3 9 .5

$
1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0

$
1 0 0 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0

$
$
8 9 .0 0 - 1 1 8 .0 0
9 8 .0 0 - 1 1 9 .0 0

1 0 6 .5 0
1 4 3 .0 0

9 9 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0

8 7 .5 0 - 1 1 6 .5 0
1 1 8 .0 0 - 1 7 3 .0 0

1 ,8 5 9
417

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

389

4 0 .0

9 7 .0 0

9 8 .5 0

640

3 9 .0

8 9 .0 0

8 9 .0 0

8 7 .5 0 - 1 0 6 .0 0
8 1 .0 0 - 9 8 .5 0

-

113
79

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 4 . 50

9 9 .5 0
9 9 ,0 0

8 8 .5 0 - 1 1 6 .5 0
8 8 .0 0 - 1 1 6 .5 0

-

9 5 .5 0

9 1 .5 0

8 6 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .0 0

734
726

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

9 0 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
8 4 .0 0

8 5 .0 0

7 7 .0 0 -

73
480

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 ,0 8 3

3 9 .0

1, 064
899

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

22
0

614

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

110.00
102.00

412

4 0 .0

1 1 3 .5 0

8 2 .5 0
7 6 .0 0
7 5 .5 0
7 4 .5 0

97
97
7
87

126
125
9
79

86
85
8
77

89
85
10
48

80
80
3
50

32
32
7
15

14
14
3
1

14
13
3
1

4
3

_

9 5 .5 0

-

12
12

-

12

64
64
7
57

7 4 .5 0

7 0 .0 0 -

8 1 .5 0

7 0 .0 0 -

8 1 .5 0

190
190
178

170
169
117

103
93
81

22
22
4

10
10
3

12
12

“

299
297
268

-

7 9 .5 0

117
117
104

3
3

6 9 .0 0 -

152
15 1
144

~

1

20
10
10
4

36
22
14
8

19
6
13
4

73
41
32
10

17
4
13
12

89
26
63
15

63
5
58
17

127
35
92
30

48
28
20

82
15
67

-

1
1

11
10
1
1

—

1 0 1 .5 0 - 1 2 8 .0 0
9 4 .0 0 - 1 1 1 .0 0

-

19

2

-

1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 3 4 .0 0
9 8 ,0 0 - 1 2 6 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0 - 1 3 8 .0 0

_
-

_
—
-

_
-

1

19
1
18

15
11
4

42
28
14

43
28
15

9 7 .0 0 - 1 2 1 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0 - 1 3 2 .0 0

—
-

-

-

-

1

1
5

i
-

3
11

58
17
41
5
20
1

4
4

51
20
31
1
4
13

54
26
26
9
5
10

80
36
44
3
11
16

87
23
64
21
3
23

32
13
19
5
1
4

8

-

-

1 0 5 .0 0

9 6 .5 0 - 1 1 7 .0 0
9 5 .5 0 - 1 1 5 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0 - 1 6 2 .0 0

_
-

—

_
-

4
4

7
7

14
14

20
20

42
42

-

-

4

6

8

20

22

84
74
12
50

15
10
6

-

43
43
1
37

12
12

“

74
63
3
49

30
18

9 4 .5 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0

37
37
2
34

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

i
i

4

27
10
17

55

1 1 1 .5 0

1 0 3 .5 0 - 1 2 4 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 2 3 .0 0
1 0 2 .5 0 - 1 2 5 .0 0

55

126
6
120

-

~

-

-

i

-

2
5

7
31

18
71

191
24
167
4
32
50

227
68
159
10
35
72

280
39
241
19
39
90

182
51
131
17
15
77

150
21
129
76
9
14

52
5
47
5
1
6

_
-

24

27

32

46

55

-

-

-

101
22
79
3
7
21

168
39
129
6
6
94

225
41
184
8
16
138

100
12
86
7

171
50
121
14
2
105

54
24
30
2
2
6

_

-

104
1
103
10
10
31

6

-

6
1
1

-

28
24
9
10

32
32
3
9

9
9
6

2
2
1
1

_

5

7 4 .5 0
7 4 .0 0

-

1 0 8 .5 0
1 0 1 .5 0
1 1 0 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0

9 4 .5 0 - 1 2 1 .5 0
9 0 .5 0 - 1 1 6 .5 0

1 0 0 .5 0

337

8
8

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 2 5 .5 0
1 5 3 .0 0

54
89

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 0 7 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

397
358
38
234

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 0 8 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0
1 3 7 .0 0

3 9 .5

1 0 0 .5 0

1 0 4 .5 0
1 4 1 .0 0
1 0 2 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ---------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------RETAIL T R A D E ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

1 ,3 5 1
224
1 ,1 2 7

3 9 .5

1 1 5 .5 0

1 1 1 .5 0

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 4 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ---------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------RETAIL TRAOE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

1 ,1 3 0

3 9 .5

9 9 .0 0

189
941

4 0 .0

1 0 5 .5 0
9 8 .0 0

1 0 4 .0 0
9 9 .0 0

8 9 .5 0 - 1 0 8 .5 0
9 8 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .0 0
8 7 .5 0 - 1 0 6 .5 0

1 0 3 .0 0
9 5 .5 0

1 0 3 .5 0

9 1 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0

4 0 .0

9 7 .0 0

3 9 .0

9 6 .5 0

1 0 0 .5 0

8 7 .0 0 - 1 0 4 .0 0
8 5 .5 0 - 1 0 7 .0 0

MESSENGERS (OF FI CE GIRLSJ -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

226




69
69
16
53

9 5 .5 0
9 4 .0 0
8 9 .5 0

1 2 0 .5 0

See footnotes at end of tables.

-

7 3 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 -

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 1 8 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0
1 2 3 .5 0
1 5 0 .0 0

102.00
121.00

111.00

171

4 0 .0

1 4 3 .0 0

158

4 0 .0

1 0 8 .5 0

1 3 6 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0

1 2 4 .0 0 - 1 4 3 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .0 0

3 9 .0

1 0 9 .5 0

1 0 8 .5 0

9 9 .5 0 - 1 1 9 .5 0

100.00

_

-

1

1 3 2 .0 0 - 1 8 7 .5 0

421

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

_

-

7 7 .0 0 -

3 9 .5

54
62
622

_

8 5 .0 0

540
203

112.00

_
-

-

8 4 .0 0
8 2 .0 0

12
0

CLERKS, PAYROLL --------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

32
32

208

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 1 .0 0
8 0 .5 0

7 9 .0 0
7 9 .0 0

7 3 .5 0 7 3 .0 0 -

8 9 .5 0
8 9 .5 0

25
133

4 0 .0
3 9 .0

9 4 .0 0
7 6 .0 0

9 3 .5 0
7 5 .5 0

8 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 -

9 9 .5 0
8 2 .0 0

27

32

46

~
-

~

-

-

24

-

24

24

11
11

21
21

-

-

11

21

3
29

37

36
36
1
33

55
48
1
27

—
4

4

55
3
9
38
22
19

19

-

i

-

6

75
4
2

1

6
4
4

14

7

12

9

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
6

14
10

7
3

12
8

9
9

8
8

-

—

—

—
“

“

—

-

12
12
12

_
-

_
—
-

2
2
2

~

16

4

_
—
-

36
36
36

_
-

2
1

4

-

*

*

4

6

7

-

-

-

~

-

-

16

4
4

4

6

7

-

-

-

-

8
T a b le

A -1 .

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex., October 1971)
Weekly earnings 1
(stan lard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
*

M 2
t“

M edian2

55

*

60

f

$
65

70

$
75

*

80

S

85

$

90

$

S

t

95

100

t

t

105

no

$
120

$
130

140

*

S
150

t
160

*
170

i
180

t
190

Middle range2

u n der
60

200
and

'
65

70

75

80

85

90

95 - t o o

105

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

12
12
—
12

34
10
24
—
9
15

83
83
7
1
31

96
1
95
—
21
12

90
90
16
13
42

242
48
194
4
30
133

318
71
247
13
25
156

771
299
472
43
43
319

990
431
559
40
63
313

773
308
465
47
46
235

517
191
326
85
32
126

355
164
191
67
16
49

263
109
154
55
23
24

197
72
125
41
1
35

97
24
73
28
4
9

67
9
58
46
1

92
15
77
43
3

WOMEN - CONTINUED

MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------RETAIL TRAOE ---------------FINANCE ---------------------

5,000
1, 752
3,248
535
328
1, 517

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.0

$
132.00
134.50
131.00
153.50
123.50
123.00

$
128.50
130.50
127.50
151.50
123.00
121.50

$
$
115.50-146.00
120.00-148.00
111.50-144.50
131.50-176.50
106.50-139.00
109.00-133.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ----------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------FINANCE ---------------------

335
89
246
94

39.5
39.5
39.5
38.5

151.50
161.50
148.00
149.00

149.00
162.50
142.00
140.50

131.50-170.00
146.00-173.50
128.50-167.50
128.00-173.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------RETAIL T R A O E ----------------FINANCE ----------------------

1,294
427
867
131
99
442

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.0

139.50
142.00
138.50
167.00
132.00
129.50

136.50
143.00
134.00
165.00
135.00
129.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -----------MANUFACTURING----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------RETAIL TRAOE ----------------FINANCE ---------------------

1,708
753
955
225
118
413

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.0

132.50
128.50
135.50
157.50
126.00
125.00

128.00
125.50
131.00
155.00
126.00
126.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 -----------MANUFACTURING----------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------PUBLIC UTILITIES------------RETAIL T R A O E ---------------FINANCE ---------------------

1,614
473
1, 141
141
62
568

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.0

121.50
131.00
117.50
132.50
105.50

120.00 107.00-133.00
129.50 120.00-143.50
115.00 104.00-129.50
131.00 115.00-150.50
104.50 96.00-120.00
112.00 105.00-120.50

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -----------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES-----------RETAIL TRAOE ----------------FINANCE ----------------------

1,490
563
927
270
69
304

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
39.5
38.0

112.00
118.00
109.00
119.00
108.50
102.50

1 1 1 . 0 0 100.50-125.00
119.00 106. 00-128.00
106.00 96.50-122.00
117.00 102.50-138.00
108.00 102
.00-121.00
98.50 92.00-115.50

-

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR-----------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------FINANCE ---------------------

958

129.00
127.00
130.00
133.50
109.50

128.50
130.50
128.00
134.00
108.00

-

757
217
145

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5

SWITCHBOARO OPERATORS, CLASS A ---MANUFACTURING-----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES-----------FINANCE ----------------------

285
129
156
60
63

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5

114.50
114.00
114.50
126.50
103.00

113.00 102.00-124.50
1 1 1 .0 0
103.00-125.00
114.00 100.50-125.00
123.00 117.00-133.00
103.00 95.50-111.50

21
0

248
SWITCHBOARO OPERATORS, CLASS B ---_
NONMANUFACTURING -------------- - _ 230

See footnotes at end of tables




112.00

42.5 90.00
43.0 _89.50

86.00
85.00

-

—
—
-

*

3
3
—
1
2

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

12

2

2

-

12

—

—

-

-

-

-

—

12

2

2

-

12
8

51
10
41
2?

60
10
50
16

32
11
21
7

26
1
25
3

55
32
23
8

35
8
27
20

15
4
11
8

13
4
9
1

20
9
11
-

121.50-153.50
126.50-154.50
119.50-152.00
147.00-196.50
109.50-149.50
118.50-138.00

-

-

-

-

2

9

1

5

16

~
-

—
-

—
—

—
—
-

2
2

9
9

1
—
—
1

5
4
1

16
4
3
9

54
14
40
—
8
14

45
10
35
—
11
5

172
59
113
4
9
89

193
48
145
9
13
97

215
60
155
2
8
120

201
83
118
23
20
47

131
68
63
13
4
17

80
27
53
18
18
13

62
37
25
6
1
14

49
16
33
15
1

12
2
10
7
-

47
3
44
30
—
3

118.00-143.00
118.00-134.50
117.50-150.00
141.50-176.50
115.50-135.00
109.50-139.50

-

-

-

-

-

—
-

1
1

1
—
1

3
3

25
1
24

—
*

-

“
1

1

1
2

—
6

23
—
23
4
4
12

73
20
53
1
6
43

102
48
54
4
8
42

268
161
107
8
22
53

443
248
195
8
31
86

27 3
144
129
22
25
67

166
38
128
46
8
68

130
44
86
36
7
28

67
31
36
21
2
3

51
11
40
30
—
1

21
3
18
9
4
-

36
i
35
30
—
-

25
3
22
6
—
-

-

—
-

—
-

3
—
3
—
1
2

9
9
—
9

24
10
14
—
9
5

79
—
79
7
—
28

54
54
—
5
5

49
49
8
4
21

113
14
99
3
14
76

168
13
155
6
6
109

312
79
233
24
8
169

299
125
174
19
13
107

224
94
130
22
1
32

118
59
59
16
1
4

68
51
17
14
—
1

53
19
34
13
-

27
6
21
4
-

8
1
7
1
_
-

6
2
4
4
—

-

_
-

—
-

3
3
-

50
1
49
—
27

63
63
9
4
29

110
27
83
9
2
46

135
16
119
32
4
73

216
84
132
35
18
34

151
65
86
28
11
5

229
106
123
32
11
36

328
170
158
46
19
30

103
57
46
16

79
32
47
45

22
5
17
17

1
1
1

-

_

_

—
—

—
-

—
-

-

24

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
1
7

4
4

-

-

-

-

7

2

17
2
15
4
5

92
31
61
42

86
33
53
9
29

151
15
136
29
42

148
16
132
47
9

155
63
92
39
9

141
15
126
70
-

72
10
62
5
-

50
6
44
12
-

i
10
-

14
1
13
-

9
7
2
2
-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

1
1
1

3
3
2
1

15
3
12
11

25
5
20
1
9

60
41
19
—
13

25
15
IQ
2
a

58
16
42
20
15

55
34
21
14
3

27
12
15
15
-

3
3
—
-

2
—
2
—
-

5
5
4
-

4
4
2
-

—
-

—
-

3
3

40
40

65
65

39
39

27
23

11
9

13
13

is
7

8
7

7
7

1
1

8
O

_

_

-

-

_

113.00-143.50
107.50-138.50
115.00-145.50
123.50-144.00
102.50-114.00

81.00- 97.00
80.50- 94.00

-

-

-

—

-

“

—

_

8
8

—

-

—

n

—
-

_

—
—
—
—
-

9

T a o ie A-1.

O ffice o ccu p a tio n s— men and w om en---- Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex., October 1971)
Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
Number
of
workers

1

1

*

S

*

*

$

S

$

*

hours1
(standard)

Mean*

Median *

Middle range2

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

60

Sex, occupation, and industry division

55

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

—
—

—
—
-

*
—
-

c

41
61
6
-

73
23
50
6
21
12

105
61
66
1
16
12

$

S

*

t

f

*

$

i

1 —
1 ----190
200

105

110

120

130

160

150

160

170

180

105 _ L L 3

120

130

160

150

160

170

180

190

200

86
10
76
22
30

168
15
133
12
20
60

131
67
86
3

65
16
31
1

11
2
9
—
—

3

16
16
8
—

2
1
1
—

10
10
-

8
—
8
8
—

15

—

15
15
-

—
-

10
10

15
10

6
6

19
18

10
10

_

_

26
10
16
“

16
16

22
2
20

1
—
1
1

—
—

-

—
—

100

and
'under

and
o ve r

W EN - CONTINUED,
OM
SWITCH6OAR0 OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUF ACTUR I N G ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

769
199
570
55
87
162

$
$
3 9 .5 1 0 6 .0 0 1 0 2 .5 0
6 0 .0 1 0 7 .5 0 1 0 6 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 0 6 .0 0 1 0 1 .5 0
6 0 .0 1 6 6 .0 0 1 5 2 .5 0
9 6 .5 0
9 6 .5 0
6 0 .0
3 8 .0 1 0 2 .5 0 1 0 2 .0 0

$
$
9 3 .0 0 - 1 1 3 .5 0
9 3 .5 0 - 1 1 6 .0 0
9 3 .0 0 - 1 1 3 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0 -1 9 1 .0 0
9 0 .0 0 - 1 0 2 .0 0
9 7 .0 0 - 1 0 9 .0 0

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 2 1 .5 0 1 3 0 .5 0
1 2 3 .0 0 1 3 1 .5 0

1 0 1 .5 0 -1 3 8 .0 0
1 0 1 .5 0 -1 3 9 .0 0

la
—
n

—

2
2

66
36
30
-)
1
17

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

58
52

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

780
60
720
502

3 9 .5 1 0 6 .5 0 1 0 6 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 2 3 .5 0 1 2 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 0 3 .0 0 1 0 3 .5 0
3 9 .0
9 6 .5 0
9 9 .5 0

9 2 .5 0 - 1 1 7 .5 0
1 0 3 .5 0 -1 3 3 .0 0
9 1 .0 0 - 1 1 7 .0 0
8 6 .0 0 - 1 0 7 .5 0

TYPIST S, CLASS A ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------F INA NC E--------------------------------------

1 ,0 2 3
185

3 9 .5 1 0 1 .5 0 1 0 0 .5 0
6 0 .0 1 0 9 .5 0 1 1 0 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 0 0 .0 0
9 8 .0 0
6 0 .0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 1 6 .0 0
9 3 .0 0
3 9 .5
9 3 .0 0

9 1 .0 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0 -1 1 7 .0 0
8 9 .5 0 - 1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 5 .0 0 -1 2 3 .5 0
8 7 .0 0 - 1 0 0 .5 0

TYPIST S, CLASS B ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TR ADE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

1 ,7 9 7
166
1 ,6 3 1
171
96
1 ,0 9 6

See footnotes at end of tables




838

165
557

3 9 .0
6 0 .0
3 9 .0
6 0 .0
6 0 .0
3 8 .5

9 3 .0 0
8 6 .0 0
1 0 2 .5 0 1 0 3 .5 0
9 2 .0 0
8 5 .0 0
1 5 1 .0 0 1 8 6 .5 0
9 2 .5 0
9 2 .5 0
8 3 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

7 9 .5 0 - 9 8 .0 0
9 6 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0
7 8 .5 0 - 9 6 .5 0
9 7 .5 0 - 1 9 3 .0 0
8 6 .0 0 - 1 0 2 .5 0
7 5 .5 0 - 8 9 .5 0

—

—

32
32
32

_
“

—
-

-

18
18

27
27
27

29
2
27
27

59
1
58
55

66
1
63
31

62
6
58
58

129
10
119
96

69
6
65
69

160
5
155

77

89
13
76
22

11
11

19
19

73
2
71

129
7
122

116
9
105

175
32
163

10

19

68

106

165
12
133
6
119

107
30

1

81

99

66

117
70
67
26
7

105
21
86
56
1

196
4
190
8

370
16
354

136
39
95
23
7
65

127
16
111
12
8
29

72
11
61
2
17
62

16
10

12
259

165
4
161
10
23

79
56
23

6

258
10
248
7
17
173

1

-

18

-

—

1

16

97

-

-

168

1

16

97

168
3

-

-

1

16

—

2
91

-

—

163

—

165

—

6

—

99

8

2
2

77

2
2

3

3

-

31

1

—
“

10
10
10

3

—

—
2

13

4

—

8

“

_
-

-

—

-

10
10
—

6

-

-

-

—

6

—

*

—
_

_

—

_
—

1
1

-

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

3

3

—

2

6

10

86

-

2

6
6

10
10

84

—
—

2

86

10
T a b le A-1a.

O f fic e o c c u p a t io n s— large e sta b lish m e n ts— men and w o m e n

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied] in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Dallas, Tex.
Weekly earnings1
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

Numbe r o f w o r k e r s re c e i v i n g straight -tim e w e e k ly earnings o f—
S

*
65

Mean 2

Median2

Middle range2

October 1971)

Under
and
*
under
65
70

t
70

$
75

$
80

$

s

85

90

$

$
95

100

*
105

120

*

S

t

n o

130

140

*

s

150

160

t

i

170

180

i
190

$
200

210
and

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

-I2 Q

130

140

150

160

170

180

1?0

200

210

over

8

n o

17
14
8

23
23
15

24
20
11

25
24
8

30
29
19

21
21
13

4
4
1

3
3
-

3
-

i
—

15
15
14

18
18
15

4
4
-

1
1
-

7
7
4

10
10
8

-

_
-

_
-

6
—
6
4
—

1
—
1
—

2
2
—
1

—

-

20
20
20
—

—
-

—
—

-

M
EN
CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -----------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------------------

160
143
75

$
3 9 .5 1 5 2 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 5 2 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 5 2 .5 0

$
1 5 2 .5 0
1 5 3 .5 0
1 5 6 .5 0

$
$
1 3 6 .5 0 - 1 6 8 .5 0
1 3 7 .5 0 -1 6 8 .5 0
1 3 7 .5 0 -1 6 8 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -----------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

118
118
67

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 2 8 .5 0
1 2 8 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0

1 2 5 .5 0
1 2 5 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0

1 0 7 .5 0 -1 4 3 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0 -1 4 3 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0 -1 4 3 .5 0

_
-

-

“

_
-

_
-

12
12
-

3
3
-

_
“

5
5
2

18
18
8

13
13
10

12
12
6

MESSENGERS COFFICE BOYS) ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

119
80
54

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5

8 7 .0 0
8 5 .0 0
8 3 .5 0

8 5 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
8 4 .5 0

7 9 .5 0 - 9 6 .0 0
7 9 .0 0 - 9 5 .0 0
7 7 .0 0 - 9 3 .0 0

-

6
6
5

9
9
7

16
7
5

29
20
12

18
13
10

8
6
4

20
14
8

4
3
3

3
—

2
—

4
2

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS
MANUFACTURING ------------NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----RETAIL TRADE -----------FINANCE ---------------------

506
184
322
126
62
128

3 9 .0 1 2 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 2 6 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 2 5 .5 0
3 7 .5 1 4 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 1 7 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 0 7 .5 0

1 2 4 .5 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0
1 4 5 .5 0
1 1 9 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0

1 1 1 .5 0 -1 4 0 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0 -1 3 7 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0 -1 4 5 .5 0
1 3 3 .5 0 -1 5 9 .5 0
9 5 .0 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0 -1 1 7 .0 0

-

-

—
-

1
1

4
4

10
2
8

19
—
19

22
1
21

29
5
24

31
6
25

—
-

-

—

1

1
3

7
1

8
11

6
15

3
21

3
22

101
52
49
8
4
37

80
46
34
12
8
14

80
38
42
31
8
3

49
22
27
19
8

39
9
30
26
4

32
3
29
26
1

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

841
100
741
249
270
210

3 9 .5 1 1 2 .5 0 1 0 3 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 0 3 .0 0 1 0 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 1 4 .0 0 1 0 3 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 2 .0 0 1 7 0 .0 0
4 0 .0
9 6 .5 0
9 9 .0 0
3 9 .0
8 9 .5 0
9 1 .5 0

9 0 .5 0 - 1 3 5 .5 0
9 2 .5 0 - 1 1 3 .0 0
9 0 .5 0 - 1 3 7 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0 -1 7 3 .0 0
8 6 .5 0 - 1 0 7 .0 0
8 2 .0 0 - 9 8 .5 0

_
—

21
—
21
7
14

33
6
27
—
11
16

56
3
53
—
30
23

68
11
57
—
29
28

74
11
63
—
26
37

86
15
71
5
29
37

95
14
81
10
43
27

82
8
74
7
52
12

45
19
26
9
14
2

24
7
17
8
9

91
4
87
74
9

12
2
10
9
1

2
2
1
—

2
2
—

-

24
—
24
10
14

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS B ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

290
286
178

3 9 .0 1 0 2 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 0 2 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
3 9 .0

9 2 .0 0
9 2 .0 0
9 0 .0 0

8 6 .5 0 - 9 9 .5 0
8 6 .0 0 - 9 9 .5 0
8 6 .0 0 - 9 4 .5 0

2
2
2

7
7
-

11
11
7

8
8
4

28
28
19

66
66
58

62
60
48

37
37
31

14
14
7

5
5
1

7
6
1

2
1

1
1

—

-

-

34
34

6
6

—

-

-

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS C ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

439
433
381

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

7 6 .5 0
7 6 .5 0
7 6 .5 0

7 1 .5 0 - 8 2 .0 0
7 1 .5 0 - 8 2 .0 0
7 1 .0 0 - 8 2 .0 0

25
24
24

53
53
49

116
114
94

97
97
88

95
94
86

39
37
33

8
8
4

6
6
3

CLERKS, ORDER -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRA DE -----------------------------

115
109
98

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 0 6 .5 0 1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0 1 0 4 .5 0
9 9 .5 0 1 0 3 .0 0

9 5 .0 0 - 1 1 2 .5 0
9 5 .0 0 - 1 1 2 .5 0
9 3 .5 0 - 1 1 0 .5 0

_
-

1
1
1

1
1
1

4
4
4

8
8
8

4
4
4

11
10
10

16
13
12

15
15
15

17
17
17

26
26
26

3
1

-

_
—

2
2

_

3
3

3
3

-

1
1

-

CLERKS, PAYROLL --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------- :---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

128
105
46

3 9 .0 1 2 5 .5 0 1 2 5 .0 0
3 8 .5 1 2 7 .0 0 1 2 6 .0 0
3 7 .5 1 4 4 .5 0 1 3 6 .0 0

1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 3 7 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0 -1 3 9 .0 0
1 3 0 .5 0 -1 6 6 .0 0

-

-

_

1
1

-

6
6
-

9
6
2

5
5
-

13
10
1

18
14
5

22
13
3

26
23
17

6
5
1

6
6
6

3
3
3

8
8
8

“

-

-

1
1
-

2
2

~

2
2
-

-

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS---------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TR A DE ------ ;----------------------

284
270
230

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 0 2 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0

1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 3 .0 0
1 0 2 .5 0

9 6 .0 0 - 1 1 2 .0 0
9 5 .5 0 - 1 1 1 .0 0
9 5 .0 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0

-

-

7
7
6

14
14
8

16
16
16

24
24
22

37
37
34

56
55
49

39
39
37

74
64
50

6
4
4

-

6
6
-

1
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

4
4
4

-

-

-

~

-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------- —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TRA DE ----------------------------FINA NC E --------------------------------------

623
164
459
97
151
192

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 6 .5 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0
1 2 9 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0

1 1 4 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 3 4 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0

1 0 7 .0 0 -1 2 5 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0 -1 2 2 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0 -1 2 8 .0 0
122. 5 0 -1 3 7 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0 -1 1 4 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0 -1 2 4 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

3
5

18
13

32
10

117
50
67
10
32
25

164
37
127
12
39
64

122
42
80
10
15
55

14
1
13
5
1

3
—
3
-

—
—

—
-

—
-

-

-

59
16
43

-

-

38
6
32

-

—
-

8
—
8

-

-

2
—
2

—
-

i
i

4

W EN
OM

See footnotes at end of tables




7 6 .5 0
7 6 .5 0
7 6 .0 0

-

—

96
12
84
60
9
14

6

—
—
-

106
106
106
-

-

-

-

11
O ffic e o c c u p a t io n s— large e sta b lish m e n ts— men and w o m e n -----Continued

T a b l e A-1a.

October 1971)

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Dallas, Tex.
W eekly earnings 1
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
i

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard]

jUnder
M ean2

Median2

t
65

Middle range2

65

70
WOMEN -

i

$
70

75

T

t

)
90

95

100

r

*
1 05

110

t

I
120

130

$

$

F
140

150

1 60

3
1 70

$
180

*
1 90

*
2 00

210

and
75

80

$
103.50
104.00
103.50
103.00

$
102.50
102.50
102.50
103.50

$
$
9 6 .0 0 -1 0 8 .5 0
9 7 .50-111 .00
9 5 .50-108 .50
9 1 .0 0 -1 1 5 .0 0
96.00-107 .00

82

39.5
39.5
39.5

80.00
79.50
76.00

78.50
78.00
75.00

7 2 .5 0 - 87.00
7 2 .0 0 - 86.50
7 0 .5 0 - 80.50

S E C R E T A R IE S -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S -------------------R ETA IL TRADE --------------------------FINANCE -----------------------------------

2,419
1,061
1,358
274
254
771

40.0
4 0.0
39.5
4 0 .0
4 0.0
39.5

134.50
138.00
132.00
158.00
123.00
122.50

130.50
133.50
128.00
154.50
123.00

118.50-149.00
123.00-150.50
114.50-146.50
143.00-176.00
108.00-135.50
111.00-133.00

-

-

“

—
-

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

96
63

39.5 161.50 160.50 138.50-187.00
39.5 152.00 152.00 132 .50-164.50

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

SECR ETAR IES, CLASS B ------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PU B LIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------R ETA IL T R A D E --------------------------FINANCE ----------------------------------

479
193
286
63
57
150

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0.0
4 0 .0
40.0
39.5

147.00 145.50 132 .00-161.00
152.00 149.00 140.50-162.00
144.00 141.00 125 .00-161.00
168.00 166.00 152 .50-186.00
123.50 122.50 104 .50-139.00
135.00 135.50 124.00-147.00

NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PU B LIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------FINANCE ----------------------------------

1,057
516
541
138
118
250

4 0 .0
40.0
40 .0
4 0 .0
40.0
39.5

134.00
131.00
136.50
156.50
126.00
125.50

SECR ETAR IES, CLASS D ------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------R ETA IL T R A D E -------------------------FINANCE ----------------------------------

772
319
453
50
355

4 0 .0
40.0
39.5
40 .0
39.5

125.00 123.00 111.50-137.00
136.00 134.00 123 .00-149.50
117.50 116.50 106.50-127.00
110.00 109.00 101.00-123.00
114.50 115.50 106.50-123.50

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -----------------NONMANUFACTURING----------------------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------R ETA IL TRADE -------------------------FINANCE ----------------------------------

643
348
226
58
55

4 0 .0
40 .0
40 .0
39.5
40.0

116.00
113.00
117.00
106.50

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR -------------------NONMANUFACTURING----------------------PUB LIC U T IL IT IE S -------------------FINANCE ----------------------------- ----

396
349
155
104

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----MANUFACTURING---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PU B LIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------

526
92
434
54
317

39.5
4 0 .0
39.5
39.0
39 .0

MESSENGERS (O F FIC E G I R L S ) -------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------FINANCE ----------------------------------

125

11
1

CLASS C -------------------

M ANUFACTURING

85

85

90

95

100

105

14

130

110-

140

20
10
10
2
6

2
2
1

-

-

—

-

-

150

1 60

1 70

1 80

4

6
6

210

over

-

7

2 00

-

-

-

-

7

4

190

CONTINUED

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ----------MANUFACTURING---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PU B LIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------F I N A N C E ------------------------ ----------

SECR ETAR IES,

t

t
80

and
under

-----------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of tables.




101.00 102.00

122.00

130.00
127.50
133.50
153.00
126.00
126.50

120 .00-145.00
119.50-137.50
121.00-151.00
142.50-174.50
115.50-135.00
115.50-136.00

100.00

116.00
108.00
113.50
105.50
98.50

103.00-127.50
100 .00-125.50
102 .50-130.00
101 .50-115.00
94.5 0 -1 0 4 .5 0

40 .0
4 0 .0
40 .0
39.5

131.00
129.50
134.00
111.50

128.50
128.00
135.50
109.50

112 .50-144.00
112 .00-143.00
125.50-143.50
104.00-116.50

138
62
76
27

40 .0
40.0
4 0 .0
40.0

117.50 116.50 104.00-126.00
118.00 120.00 110.00-127.00
117-50 112.00 100.00-126.00
128.50 121.50 116.00-135.00

73
69

39.5
39.5

96.00
96.00

95.00
94.00

87.0 0 -1 0 6 .5 0
86.5 0 -1 0 6 .0 0

—
—

-

1
0

-

1
0

-

-

3
3
3

15
15
15

1
0

3
—
3
3

14
3
11

44
1
43
10
23

43
12
31
3
21

86
22
64
6
52

139
25
114
8
94

79
7
72
7
59

69
15
54
14
38

27
27
24

26
19
18

19
16
16

12
12
2

6
6
1

9
9
1

2
2
1

4
2
1

-

3
3
-

4

8

12
12

22
1
21

38

8

1
11

9
12

13
25

124
33
91
3
21
66

374
146
2 28
8
40
1 76

507
2 60
247
9
55
1 82

373
184
189
24
42
1 23

293
1 50
143
68
16
55

2 36
1 26
110
48
16
37

1 20
62
58
31

1
7

89
13
76
1
26
49

_

_

_

-

-

-

2
2

2
2

4
4

7
7

12
9

7
6

77
32
45
2
8
35

-

-

1
2

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

38

-

_
-

2
—

60
24
36
28
4
1

22
9
13
8
1

23
7
16
10
“

22
8
14
4

11

89
38
51
32
1
9

13
12

14
7

7
3

7
3

7
3

6
1

8
4

1 03
59
44
12
4
28

68
38
30
9
4
17

34
13
21
11
3
7

34
17
17
6
1
6

34
16
18
15
1

9
2
7
4
-

5
—
5

8
3
5
-

“

“

17
3
14
9
4

4

12
2
10
6

8

-

_

-

2

1

1

5

4

9

10

-

-

-

2

1

1

5

4

9

10

24
1
23

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

1

4
1

3
1

8
1

7
3

6
17

51
12
39
1
9
29

_

_

-

-

-

1

-

1

—

3

-

14

1

7
1

1

3

45
20
25

-

—

—

-

1

1

1
2

8
17

174
114
60
1
22
37

2 73
164
1 09
4
31
73

1 96
101
95
15
25
55

1 08
36
72
40
8
20

94
38
56
24
7
16

48
23
25
12
2
3

38
11
27
24

“

16
1
15
1
6
8

-

-

1

6
6
1
5

172
84
88
13
75

87
48
39
1
32

75
54
21
1
4

61
49
12

24
19
5

-

1 65
31
1 34
8
1 22

10
6

1

66
13
53
6
46

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—
-

3
3

1
2

-

—
-

-

-

-

-

1
-

—
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

6

14

—
6

4
10

8

10

18

8

10
5
5

18
4
14

62
12
50
10
40

41
28
9
2
16

61
50
29
4
17

89
63
35
18
10

70
44
28
11
5

111
50
32
11
5

136
48
36
8
2

53
10
8

69
47
45

4

11
9

33

38
34
5
24

64
57
20
30

58
53
30
9

55
51
36
9

6
6

15
5
10

33

27
19

11

16
17

8
6
6
2

4

“
-

—

4

-

*
-

-

-

_

-

—

-

-

—
“

-

-

_

3

“

3

4
4

-

2

—
-

3

6

7
7

-

-

30

3

27

16

13
5

—

3
2

8

-

13
1

8
3

-

2

8

5

3

11
11

12
12

6
4

10
10

8
7

8
7

3

3

1
1

3
3

3

8

-

64
59

-

1

4

2
1
1

-

3
2

-

2
2

“
-

6
1
5

—
-

—
-

—
-

—

—
-

-

7

-

-

-

6
1
1

1
1
1

—
-

16
11
2

22
16
3

-

8
7

14
13

-

—
-

—
-

—
-

4

-

—
“

—
-

_

1

3

2

5

3

-

-

2

5
4

—
-

-

l

3
-

*

-

-

4
2

-

-

—
*

12
T a b le A-1a.

O f fic e o c c u p a t io n s— large e sta b lish m e n ts—men and w o m e n -----Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Dallas, Tex. , October 197H
Weekly eamings 1
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Number of workers receiving
t

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

iUnder
Mean2

Median2

s
65

Middle range2

*

65

*

70

$

t

80

75

$

$

85

90

$
95

100

i

*

120

11 0

105

t

S

130

14 0

$

i

150

160

1 ------ $

170

180

i
190

$
200

and
under

210

and

70

W EN OM

traight-time weekly earnings of—
r*

S

75

80

85

90

— 9 ±

-100

105

—
-

2
2
2

1
1
1

1
1
1

11
9
9

8
7
7

18
17
17

38
34
34

50
40
40

-

1
1
—
1

3

89
9
80

94
6

36
—
31

58
12
46
6

3

23
23
20

42

—
-

8
68

22
62

1
1
1

21
21
19

71
71
8
57

125
119
4
109

145
135
7
111

59

37
33
12
13

J2 Q

130

24
20
20

25
22
21

5

77
24
53
22
26

102

23

15
15
13

no

140

150

73
17
56
54
1

10
2

—
-

160

17 0

1

-

8
8

1
1

-

—
-

-

—
-

180

190

1

-

-

-

1
—

—
—

—

—

2

—

10
10
10

38
38
38

200

210

CONTINUED

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL----- — -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------FINANCE -------------------------------

181
153
152

$
3 9 . 0 10 0 . 5 0
3 9 . 0 10 0.0 0
3 9 . 0 10 0.0 0

$
101.00
101.00
10 0 . 5 0

$
$
9 5.50 -10 6.5 0
95.00-106.00
95.00-106.00

TYPISTS, CLASS A -----------------------MANUFACTURING-----------------------NCNMANUF ACTUR I N G ------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------FINANCE -------------------------------

577
144
433
145
259

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
39.5

104.50
110.50
102.50
115.0 0
96 .0 0

103.50
112.50
101.50
116.0 0
97.50

9 6 .0 0 -114.50
105.50-118.00
94.50 -10 9.5 0
105.00-123.50
91.0 0-102.50

TYP IST S, CLASS B -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------FINANCE -------------------------------

684
655
107
490

39.0
95.00
88.00
88.00
39.0
95.00
4 0 .0 1 3 8 . 5 0 1 0 4 . 5 0
8 6 .5 0
38.5
8 6 .5 0

8 2 . 0 0 - 96 .00
8 1 . 5 0 - 96 .00
9 5 .5 0 -19 1 .5 0
80.50- 92.50

-

3

3
2
30
30
30

3
—

6

38
107
103
7
88

55
17
31

88

68

34
24
7

22
2

18

-

2

2

—

—
—
-

See footnotes at end of tables

T a b le A -2 .

P ro fe ssio n a l and te ch n ica l o ccu p a tio n s— men and wom en

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex. , October 1971)
W eekly earnings 1
( standard)
Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—

* *
80

Middle range2

90

* »
100

11 0

*

120

i

130

t

140

* *
15 0

160

»

17 0

$

$

152
116

40 .0 160.50 163.50
4 0 .0 1 6 1 . 0 0 16 6. 0 0

14 6 .0 0 14 7 .5 0 -

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING - FINANCE ---------------

408
63
345

212

39.5
4 0 .0
39.5
39.0

135.50
134.50
136.00
135.50

124.00126.00124.00 12 4 .50 -

1 5 2 .0 0
151.0 0
152 .5 0
155.00

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C
NONMANUFACTURING ------------FINANCE -------------------------

124
98
56

40 .0 1 1 5 .0 0 120.50
40 .0 112 .50 118.00
95 . 0 0
4 0 .0 1 0 6 . 5 0

9 7 .0 0 94.009 2 .0 0 -




190

t

i

200

i

21 0

220

I

230

i

240

i

250

I

260

128.50 4
12 6 . 0 0 4
126.50 4

$ 1
---- --270

280

and

173.00
173.50

See footnotes at end of tables.

$

190

200

8
5

210

10
10

220

230

-

1

$

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING -------------

137.50
136.00
137.50
138 .50

180

and
under
_90__ 100__110 __ 120__L30__ 140__150__160__170__ 180

$

t

20
15
30
9

29
28
25

82

21

70

13
10
5

12

39
30

18
9

20
14

25
19

36
31

98
18
80
51

57
8
49
23

33
8
25
16

54
5
49
42

22
3
19
8

18

7

-

1

10

6

-

7

2

-

-

1
-

-

-

2

-

-

2
-

-

-

4
4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

240

250

260

270

280 ov er

13

T a b le A -2 .

P ro fe ssio n a l and technical o ccu p a tio n s— men and w om en---- Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex. , October 1971)
Weekly earnings *
( standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
woikers

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
$

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

Me“ 2

Median2

Middle range2

80
and
under
90

HEN -

$

1

I

I

i
120

I

90

100

110

130

-

—

—

—

-

100

11 0

120

130

140

i

I

14 0

150

—

—

15 0

160

I

»

i

*
190

s

160

17 0

180

200

—

—

—

—

—

170

180

190

200

t

i

I

210

220

230

—

—

210

220

230

240

I

i
250

—

—

240

—

i
260

I
270

280

—

—

260

270

280

over

17
9
8
2

9
4
5
2

20
11
9
2

12
1
11
2

6
2
4
1

1

250

and

CONTINUED

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

203
74
129
63

4 0 .0
39.5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

$
22 6. 00
2 3 0 .5 0
2 23 .5 0
212.50

$
22 6. 00
232 .0 0
222.50
210.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B --------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

268
63
205
43
75

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

186.50
188.50
185.50
17 9.5 0
180 .0 0

184.50 171.50-204.00
19 7.50 16 5.0 0-2 14.00
18 4 .0 0 1 7 3 . 0 0 - 2 0 1 . 0 0
1 7 3 . 5 0 1 6 5 .0 0 - 2 0 2 . 5 0
18 2. 00 1 7 1 . 5 0 - 1 9 7 . 0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

264
74
190
70

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

277.00
285.50
274.00
25 3. 00

278.50
286.00
26 4.5 0
249.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

150
105

4 0 . 0 224. 00 23 0 .5 0 2 0 7 . 5 0 - 2 4 1 . 0 0
4 0 .0 2 2 2 . 5 0 22 9. 00 1 9 9 .0 0 - 2 4 2 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A --------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

351
300
51

4 0 . 0 1 9 5 . 5 0 19 8 .0 0 1 7 6 . 5 0 - 2 1 5 . 0 0
4 0 .0 1 9 5 .0 0 19 9. 0 0 1 7 3 . 5 0 - 2 1 5 . 0 0
4 0 .0 1 9 7 . 5 0 19 6. 0 0 1 8 4 . 5 0 - 2 1 6 . 5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS 8 ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

588
45 8
130
30

4 0 .0
40 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C --------------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

290
218
72

3 9 . 5 13 4 . 0 0 1 3 8 .5 0 1 2 0 . 5 0 - 1 4 8 . 0 0
3 9 . 5 1 3 7 . 5 0 14 2 .0 0 1 2 9 . 0 0 - 1 4 9 . 0 0
4 0 .0 1 2 3 . 0 0 1 2 0 . 5 0 1 0 9 . 0 0 - 1 3 1 . 0 0

52

ELECTRONIC T E C W UC IA N S -------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

177
135

2 4 6 .0 0 - 3 0 4 . 5 0
269.50-30 5.50 I
243.00-304.50
240.50-266.00

160.50 143 .5 0 -176 .0 0
163.50 14 8 .5 0 -1 7 7 .5 0
139.50 12 6 .0 0 -16 7 .5 0
17 1.0 0 157 .0 0-189 .0 0

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—
—
—

3
1
2
2

9
9
9

5
1
4
4

29
10
19
8

24
7
17
9

17
7
10
4

24
8
16
8

28
13
15
10

-

2
2
—
2

-

2
2
2

11
6
5
3
2

9
5
4
3
1

9
9
1
7

29
6
23
13
4

32
8
24
6
10

57
4
53
3
24

32
4
28
2
12

42
10
32
7
4

19
9
10
2
4

14
7
7
3
1

9
4
5
1

1
—
1

—
-

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

—
-

—
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

10

-

-

—

—

—

—

—

-

—

-

1
1

10
2

7
3
4
4

8
8
4

18
4
14
5

34
3
31
22

14
2
12
7

25
7
18
8

4
4

2
2

12
12

11
9

13
9

14
9

17
9

37
22

20
12

9
6

7
7

4
4

32
28
4

33
33
-

31
21
10

73
52
21

41
39
2

51
44
7

65
58
7

-

—
-

—
-

-

—

82
73
9
2

56
49
7
7

42
35
7
-

26
20
6
6

1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

—

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

_

*
2
2

1
1

-

-

-

—

4
4

20
20

4
4
-

8
4
4
-

61
19
42
-

53
33
20
2

89
67
22
4

75
70
5
3

91
83
8
6

42
20
22

28
14
14

41
23
18

39
33
6

82
80
2

53
43
10

-

19 *12 8
47
8
11
81
5
12

_
-

-

-

3
3

112.50 11 7 .5 0

10 5.50-123.0 0

4

8

14

21

i

3 9 .5 186.50 185.50
4 0 .0 1 7 7 . 0 0 1 8 2. 00

16 5.0 0-2 05.50
16 1.5 0 -18 8 .5 0

-

-

-

-

4
4

5
5

22
22

24
20

10
10

56
50

9
9

9
9

6
6

10
-

22

41
41

1
-

5
2

-

28
26

-

-

-

—

—

-

1
1

-

-

*

o
o
4-

ORAFTSMEN-TRACERS -----------------------------

159 .50
163.00
147 .50
173.50

$
$
202.50-247.50
210.00-250.50
19 9.50-2 43.50
19 1.0 0-23 3.0 0

-

W EN
OM
COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B -----------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------

92
77

4 0 .0 1 2 7 . 5 0 1 1 8 . 5 0 1 1 6 . 0 0 - 1 5 1 . 5 0
40.0 12 9.50 119.0 0 1 1 6 .5 0 -1 5 2 .0 0

7
3

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

87
72

3 9.5 17 7.0 0 175.0 0
3 9 .5 17 6 .5 0 177.0 0

155.0 0-192.00
150.50-190.50

_

_

_

_

-

~

11
17

9
5

12
7

9
9

15
15

8
8

2
1

6
1

3
3

4
4

1
1

_

-

1
1

_

-

-

"

-

-

NURSES,

74

3 9 . 5 1 5 6 . 5 0 1 5 9 .5 0

14 6 .0 0 -171.0 0

-

-

4

4

6

14

10

16

11

6

2

-

1

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED! -----

9
4

1
* Workers were distributed as follows: 53 at $280 to $300; 40 at $300 to $320; 23 at $320 to $340; and 12 at $340 and over.
See footnotes at end of tables




-

“

14

T a b le A -2 a .

P ro fe ssio n a l and technical o c c u p a tio n s— large e sta b lish m e n ts— men and wom en

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more
by industry division, Dallas, Tex., October 1971)
Weekly

Sex, occupation, and industry division

amings 1
ard)

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
$

Number
of
workers

t
80

Average
weekly
Mean 2

Median ^

Middle range2

(standard)

t
90

t
100

*

110

*

120

»

130

*

14 0

*

150

i

I

160

17 0

I

180

i

t

190

200

*

210

$

220

i

230

*

240

250

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

260

270

280

-

and
under
90

1--------- i--------- i ------—

and

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

over

4

3

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

15

22

21

21

6

3

3

7
15

4

1

5

5

7

2

2

2

1
2
2

2

12

15
9
6

9

2

-

-

-

-

-

23
16
8

18
11
5

*6 1
18
5

MEN

$
$
$
$
155.50 153.00 14 0 .5 0 -1 71.0 0

-

-

3

6

11

15

15

10

13

-

2

7

-

—

-

2
1

7
4

8
8
5

33
10
23
14

52
18
34
16

26
8
18
8

24
6
18
9

17
5
12
7

18
3
15
8

4
3

13
10

13
9

20
11

18
10

7
6

-

1
1

—
—
—

—
—
—

-

-

-

187
50
137
72

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C ---------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

76
50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

149
52
97
58

40 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

22 2.00
23 0 .5 0
216.00
209.00

2 0 3 .0 0 -2 3 9 . 5 0
214.00 -246.50
198.00-233.50
18 9.50-231.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

125
83
32

4 0 .0 1 9 1 . 0 0 19 0 . 5 0
4 0 .0 1 8 4 . 0 0 1 8 1 . 0 0
4 0 .0 1 8 2 . 5 0 1 7 9 . 0 0

174.0 0-209.50
170.50-200.50
16 5.50 -20 3.50

158
89
53

4 0 .0 2 7 2 . 0 0 2 7 0 .5 0 24 9 .0 0 -2 8 9 . 0 0
40 .0 2 6 1 . 5 0 260.50 2 4 5 . 0 0 - 2 7 7 . 5 0
4 0 . 0 2 5 3 . 0 0 2 4 9 .5 0 2 4 1 . 0 0 - 2 6 3 . 5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ---------------------------

82

4 0 .0 2 26.0 0 23 0 .5 0 2 1 5 . 0 0 - 2 3 8 . 5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A --------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

184
169

4 0 .0 19 8 .0 0 2 0 1 . 0 0 1 9 1 . 0 0 - 2 1 2 . 5 0
4 0 .0 1 9 7 .0 0 200 .50 1 9 0 . 0 0 - 2 1 1 . 5 0

_

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B --------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

227
206

4 0 .0 1 6 3 . 5 0 1 6 7 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 6 3 . 5 0 1 6 7 .0 0

15 4 .5 0 -17 7 .5 0
155.00-178.00

-

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ---------------------------

135

4 0 . 0 1 3 8 . 5 0 14 2 . 0 0

131.50 -148 .50

-

ELECTRONIC TECHNICIANS --------------------

115

3 9 . 5 1 9 5 .0 0 1 8 9 . 5 0

172.00-227.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

* Workers were distributed as follows:
See footnotes at end of tables.




O

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B ---------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

O

82

4*

CLASS A -----------

COMPUTER OPERATORS,

138.50 12 9.0 0 -154.0 0
13 8 .0 0 1 3 1 . 0 0 - 1 5 3 . 0 0
13 8 .5 0 1 2 7 . 0 0 - 1 5 5 . 0 0
1 3 8 .0 0 1 2 7 . 0 0 - 1 5 5 . 0 0

-

40.0 122.50 12 5.5 0 1 1 1 .5 0 - 1 3 3 .0 0
40.0 122.00 12 5.5 0 10 9.50 -134 .0 0

_

39.5
4 0 .0
39.5
39.5

140.50
14 1 .5 0
1 40 .0 0
140.50

221.00
22 9. 00
216.50
211.50

“

”

—

—

—

3

—
—

—
—

—
—

—
—

—
-

1
2
2

9
—
9
9

4
4

13
8

-

-

~

-

2
-

4
4
3

6
6
1

12
10
7

21
21
6

17
13
3

12
8
2

-

—

_

-

—
-

-

17
7

9

-

7

4

8
13
8

21
11
7

15
6
2

9
2
1

5
1
-

i
i
-

—

1
1
1

_

1

5
2
2

4
4
4

11
7
5

21
18
16

14
12
7

10

-

1
1

2
-

-

4

10

9

15

25

13

3

1

-

-

4
4

8
8

9
9

4
4

17
16

45
40

41
39

34
34

21
14

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

14
12

ii
7

35
32

59
53

43
41

31
27

15
15

-

1
1

16

29

50

23

3

-

-

1

10

16

10

22

9

9

6

1
1

-

4
4

4
4

10
10

2

7

5

-

-

-

_

_

34 at $ 280 to $ 300; 15 at $ 300 to $ 320; 9 at $ 320 to $ 340; and 3 at $ 340 and over.

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

10

22

-

-

-

-

-

15
T a b le A - 3 .

Office, professional, and technical oc c u p a t io n s— men and w o m e n c om bin ed

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex., October 1971)
Average

Average

Occupation and industry divis ion

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

121

$
1 0 9 .5 0
1 2 9 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0
1 3 7 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----RETAIL TRAOE ------------FINANCE ----------------------

1 ,3 5 4
226
1 ,1 2 8
172
158
421

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 5 .5 0
1 1 4 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0
1 4 3 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ---------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------RETAIL TRADE —
FINANCE -----------

1 ,1 5 8
189
969
54
62
630

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

9 9 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0
9 7 .5 0
1 0 3 .0 0
9 5 .5 0
9 6 .5 0

567
97
470
54
293

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

8 6 .0 0
9 5 .5 0
8 4 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
8 0 .0 0

1 0 0 .5 0
9 8 .0 0

269
77
192

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 1 2 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0
1 1 2 .5 0

180
167

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ---MANUFACTURING -----NONMANUFACTURING PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRADE -----FINANCE --------------

1 ,7 8 3
583

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B —
MANUFACTURING ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---PUBLIC UTILITIES RETAIL TR ADE -------FINANCE -----------------

2 ,4 1 4
367
2 , 047
508
399
673

1,200
304
115
417

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

9 6 .0 0
9 6 .0 0

3 9 .5 1 3 0 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 8 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 3 1 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 5 4 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 5 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 1 4 . 50
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
39« 0

1 0 8 .5 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 4 2 .0 0
9 7 .0 0
8 9 .5 0

MESSENGERS (OFFICE BOYS AND GIRLS )MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
FINANCE
SECRETARIES
MANUFACTURING ---NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL T R A O E ------

FINANCE --------------CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING
FINANCE -----------

118
117
79

3 9 .5 1 0 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 0 5 .0 0
9 5 .5 0
4 0 .0

CLERKS, FI LE, CLASS B
NONMANUFACTURING —
RETAIL TRAOE -----FINANCE ---------------

746
738
73
481

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

9 2 .0 0
9 1 .5 0
8 4 .0 0
8 2 .5 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C
' NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
FINANCE ---------------

1 ,0 9 9
1, 080
28
899

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

7 6 .0 0
7 6 .0 0
8 6 .5 0
7 4 .5 0

CLERKS, ORDER
MANUFACTURING -------NONHANUFACTURING - RETAIL TRAOE -----CLERKS, PAYROLL-----MANUFACTURING ---NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES -----RETAIL TRA DE ------------FINANCE ----------------------

See footnotes at end of tables.




1 ,1 4 0
304
836
106
562
213
349
92
55
89

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 7 .0 0
114.501
1 1 7 .5 0
1 0 1 .5 0

3 9 .5 1 2 0 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 1 3 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 5 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 5 2 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 0 6 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 1 7 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS
MANUFACTURING-----NONMANUFACTURING FINANCE -------------

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS
MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING - PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRADE -

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

408
50
358
38
234

$
3 9 .5 1 0 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 1 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 0 3 .5 0

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

181
60

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING

MANUFACTURING ----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

Number
of
workers

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
BILLERS. MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) --------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------

Occupation and industry divis ion

5, 008
1 ,752
3 ,2 5 6
538
328
1 ,5 2 0

3 9 .5 1 3 2 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 3 4 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 3 1 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 5 3 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 3 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 2 3 .0 0

336
89
247
94

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 5 2 .0 0
1 6 1 .5 0
1 4 8 .5 0
1 4 9 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING ---PUBLIC UTILITIES RETAIL TRAOE -------FINANCE -----------------

1 ,3 0 1
427
874
134
99
445

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 4 0 .0 0
1 4 2 .0 0
1 3 8 .5 0
1 6 7 .5 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING ---PUBLIC UTILITIES RETAIL TRADE -------FINANCE ----------------

1 ,7 0 8
753
955
22 5
118
413

4 0 .0 1 3 2 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 8 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 3 5 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 26. 00
3 9 .0 1 2 5 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C
MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRADE
FINANCE --------

1 ,6 1 4
473
1 ,1 4 1
141
62
568

3 9 .5 1 2 1 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 3 1 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 1 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 3 2 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 0 5 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 1 2 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ---MANUFACTURING --------------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRAOE -----FINANCE ---------------

1 ,4 9 1
563
928
271
69
304

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

$
1 1 2 .0 0
1 1 8 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0
1 1 9 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR
MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
FINANCE ---------------

958
201
757
217
145

4 0 .0 1 2 9 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 2 7 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 3 0 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 3 3 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 0 9 .5 0

SHITCHBOARC OPERATORS, CLASS A -----MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --PUBLIC UTILITIES
FINANCE

285
129
156
60
63

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 4 .5 0
1 1 4 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0
1 2 6 .5 0
1 0 3 .0 0

SWITCHBOARO OPERATORS, CLASS B
NONMANUFACTURING —

248
230

4 2 .5
4 3 .0

9 0 .0 0
8 9 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRAOE
FINANCE --------

769
199
570
55
87
142

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

1 0 6 .0 0
1 0 7 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0
1 4 4 .0 0
9 6 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING

60
51

3 9 .5 1 6 9 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 7 4 .5 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING

104
95

3 9 .5 1 2 4 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 5 .5 0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL-------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------FINANCE -----------------------

780
60
720
502

3 9 .5 1 0 4 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 2 3 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 0 3 .0 0
3 9 .0
9 6 .5 0

TY PISTS, CLASS A ---MANUFACTURING--NONHANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
FINANCE --------------

1,0 3 5
189
846
153
557

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

TYPISTS, CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING ------NONMANUFACTURING PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRADE ----FINANCE --------------

1, 826
166
1 ,6 6 0
200
94
1 ,0 9 6

9 4 .5 0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0 1 0 2 .5 0
3 9 .0
9 3 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 6 .0 0
4 0 .0
9 2 .5 0
3 8 .5
8 3 .5 0

1 0 1 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0
1 1 5 .5 0
9 3 .0 0

16

T a b le A -3 .

O ffice, profession al, and technical o c c u p a tio n s— men and w om en com b ined---- Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex., October 1971)
Average

Average

Occupation and industry division

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUE11
160

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS B
MANUFACTURING-----------------NONMANUFACTURING
RETAIL TRADE —
FINANCE -----------

500
78
422
56

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C NONMANUFACTURING --------------FINANCE
COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A —
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING ---FINANCE -----------------




122

$
4 0 .0 160.001
4 0 .0 161.00;

212

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 3 5 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0
1 3 6 .0 0
1 3 0 .5 0
1 3 8 .5 0

164
125
81

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 1 4 .5 0

238
76
162
87

4 0 .0 2 2 3 .0 0
3 9 .5 2 2 9 .5 0
4 0 .0 220.00
4 0 .0 210 .5 0 !

110.00

1 0 5 .0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B —
MANUFACTURING -----NONMANUFACTURING - PUBLIC UTILITIES
FINANCE ---------------

Occupation and industry division

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

PROFESSIONAL ANO TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C —
NONMANUFACTURING FINANCE -------------

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

$
1 8 4 .0 0
1 8 7 .0 0
1 8 3 .5 0
1 7 9 .5 0
1 7 5 .5 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

355
78
277

1 4 8 .0 0
1 4 8 .0 0
1 4 4 .5 0

2 7 7 .5 0
2 7 4 .0 0
2 5 1 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------FINANCE -----------------------

282
203
73

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B — ---------MANUFACTURING ---------------NONMANUFACTURING - PUBLIC UTILITIES

185
55
130
25

4 0 .0 2 2 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 2 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 2 5 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 1 9 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING - NONMANUFACTURING

361
30C
61

4 0 .0 1 9 5 . 5 0
4 0 . 0 1 9 5 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 9 7 . 5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES

611
469
142
38

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
40.0
4 0 .0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING

330
246
84

3 9 .5 133.00
3 9.5 137.00
4 0 .0 1 2 2 . 5 0

DRAFTSMEN-TRACERS —
ELECTRONIC TECHNICIANS
MANUFACTURING ---------NURSES,

INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

57

o
o
*

COMPUTER OPERATORS? CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING -------------

See footnotes at end of tables.

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

Occupation and industry division

159 .50
163.50
147 .50
16 9. 0 0

113.00

135

3 9 .5 186.50
4 0 .0 1 7 7 . 0 0

74

39.5 156 .50

n i

17
T a b le A -3a.

Office, p rofession al, and technical o c c u p a t io n s — large e s t a b lis h m e n t s — men and w o m e n c om b in ed

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Dallas, Tex. , October 1971)
Av

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
woikers

Av rage
Number
of

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 eamings 1
(standard1 (standard)

Occupation and industry division

S E C R E T A R I E S -----------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------F I N A N C E -----------------------

2 ,4 2 2
1,061
1,3 6 1
275
254
771

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 eamings 1
(standard) (standard)

Occupation and industry division

Weekly
Weekly
hours * earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

I OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

OFFICE 0CCUPAT10NS|

Avtrag,
Number
of

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------FINANCE -----------------------

959
100
859
316
280
235

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B — ----------NONMANUFACTURING---------------FINANCE -----------------------

302
298
179

3 9 .0 1 0 4 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 0 4 .5 0
3 9 .0
8 9 .5 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C -------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------FINANCE -----------------------

439
433
381

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

7 6 .5 0
7 6 .5 0
7 6 .0 0

CLERKS, O R D E R ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------RETAIL T R A D E ------------------

150
132
102

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 2 0 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0
1 0 1 .0 0

CLERKS, PAYROLL -------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------

133
110
50

3 9 .0 1 2 5 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 2 7 .0 0
3 7 .5 1 4 3 .5 0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------RETAIL T R A D E ------------------

285
2 70
230

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 0 2 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ------MANUFACTURIN G------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------FINANCE -----------------------

626
166
460
98
151
192

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 6 .5 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0
1 2 9 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------FINANCE -----------------------

526
92
434
54
317

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 3 .0 0
1 0 1 .0 0

MESSENGERS I0FFICE BOYS AND GIRLS)—
MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------FINANCE -----------------------

See footnotes at end of tables.




244
53
191
36
136

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 4 .5 0
1 0 3 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0
1 4 8 .5 0
9 7 .5 0
9 0 .5 0

8 3 .5 0
8 9 .5 0
8 1 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
79.00!

TYPISTS, CLASS A ----------------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------FINANCE ---------------------

585
144
441
153
259

4 0 .0 1 0 5 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 10 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 0 3 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 1 5 .5 0
3 9 .5
9 6 .0 0

97
64

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 6 2 .5 0
1 5 3 .0 0

TYPISTS, CLASS B ----------------N O N M ANUFACTURING-------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------FINANCE ---------------------

686
657
109
490

3 9 .0
9 5 .0 0
3 9 .0
9 5 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 3 9 .0 0
3 8 .5
8 6 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS 8 -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------F I N A N C E -----------------------

481
193
288
64
57
150

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 4 7 .5 0
1 5 2 .0 0
1 4 4 .0 0
1 6 8 .5 0
1 2 3 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------RETAIL T R A D E -----------------FINANCE -----------------------

1 ,0 5 7
516
541
138
118
250

SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 ------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------FINANCE -----------------------

772
319
453
50
355

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 2 5 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------FINANCE -----------------------

644
349
227
58
55

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 1 6 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR -------------N O N M ANUFACTURING---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------FINANCE -----------------------

396
349
155
104

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 3 1 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0
1 3 4 .0 0
1 1 1 .5 0

SWITCHBOARO OPERATORS. CLASS A ---MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------

138
62
76
27

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 8 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 2 8 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B ---NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

73
69

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

9 6 .0 0
9 6 .0 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ----------------------------

53

3 9 .5

1 3 2 .0 0

181
153
152

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 0 0 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS
ICOMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A

4 0 .0 1 3 4 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 3 1 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 3 6 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 6 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 6 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 2 5 .5 0

86

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING ------FINANCE ---------------

194
55
139
72

3 9 .5 1 4 1 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 4 1 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 4 1 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 4 0 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C
NONMANUFACTURING -------

92
53

4 0 .0 1 2 4 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 2 1 .0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------MANUFACTURING ----------NCNMANUF A C T U R I N G -------FINANCE ---------------

167
54
113
68

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B --------MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----

157
51
106
34

4 0 .0 1 8 9 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 0 3 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 8 2 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 8 2 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------NONMANUFACTURING -------FINANCE ---------------

165
91
55

4 0 .0 2 7 1 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 6 0 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 5 1 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B --------MANUFACTURING -----------

97
54

4 0 .0 2 2 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 2 7 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A --------MANUFACTURING -----------

187
169

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 9 8 .0 0
1 9 7 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B --------MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES ------

244
215

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 6 3 .5 0
1 6 4 .0 0

29

O
O
*

3 9 .0
4 0 .0 1 2 8 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 3 4 .0 0
3 8 .0 1 4 8 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 8 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 0 9 .0 0

O
O
4-

666
201
465
201
95
138

$
4 0 .0 1 3 5 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 3 8 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 3 2 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 5 8 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 2 3 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 2 2 .5 0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
G E N E R A L ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------F I N A N C E -----------------------

CLERKS. ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------FINANCE -----------------------

1 6 0 .0 0

ELECTRONIC T E C H N I C I A N S ----

115

3 9 .5

1 9 5 .0 0

1 5 5 .0 0

2 1 8 .5 0
2 2 8 .0 0
2 1 4 .0 0
2 0 8 .0 0

18
T a b le A - 4 .

M ainten an ce and p o w e rp la n t occupation s

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex., October 1971)
N um ber of w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e arn ing s

Hourly earnings^

t
»
$
$
2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0
i

Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

workers

Mean 2 Median2

Middle range 2

s
*
$
t
3 . 10 3 .2 0 3 . 30 3 .4 0

*
*
*
.5 0 3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 . 80 3 .9 0
t

and
:$ l
2 .6 0 under
2 .7 0

of —

t
t
«
t
4. 00 4 . 20 4 .4 0 4 .6 0

*
4 .8 0

s
5 .0 0

i
5 .2 0

5 .4 0

4. 20 4 .4 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

over

%

and
1
2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3. 20 3 .3 0

3 . 40 3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0 3 .8 0

3. 90 4 .0 0

4 .6 0 4 .8 0

MEN

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE ------------

79

$
4 .1 8

$
4 .3 9

$
$
3 . 7 9 - 4 .4 9

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE --------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

307
225
62

4 .1 2
4 .1 0
4 .1 9

3 .9 6
3 .8 8
4 .1 5

3 . 6 9 - 4 .7 1
3 .5 9 - 4 .6 4
3 . 9 1 - 4 .7 2

_
-

ENGINEERS, S T A T I O N A R Y -------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------

220
108
112
36

4 .0 3
4 .1 5
3 .9 2
4 .3 8

4 .0 7
4 .4 0
3 .7 5
4 .6 8

3 .4 0 3 .3 4 3 .4 5 3 .5 5 -

4 .4 8
4 .4 7
4 .6 2
5 .1 5

_
-

STATIONARY B O I L E R --------

79

3 .1 3

3 .0 4

2 . 8 9 - 3 .0 8

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES ------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

191
95
96

3 .1 9
3 .4 8
2 .9 0

3 .1 3
3 .4 6
2 .9 4

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE ----------MANUFACTURING -------------------

117
86

4 .1 4
4 .3 4

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE! --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------RETAIL TRAOE ------------------

746
163
583
517
52

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE ------------MANUFACTURING ------------------TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ---------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

FIREMEN,

See footnotes at end of tables




2

6

6

_
*

1
1

2
2

7
5
2

1
1

4
4

-

3
3

11
11

-

-

4
4

-

-

10

10

2

48

2 .8 7 - 3 .4 6
3 . 0 9 - 4 .1 1
2 . 6 8 - 3 .1 3

8
2
6

23
23

11
11

9
6
3

20

4 .2 3
4 .2 7

3 . 5 0 - 4 .7 3
4 . 1 5 - 4 .8 6

_

_

-

_

-

“

~

“

~

4 .7 3
3 .9 5
4 .9 4
5 .0 6
4 .1 0

5 .1 8
3 .8 5
5 .3 2
5 .3 3
4 .1 4

4 .0 9 3 .3 9 4 .5 5 5 .1 5 3 .8 8 -

1 ,0 2 5
954

3 .8 9
3 .8 4

3 .7 6
3 .7 2

151
151

4 .6 0
4 .6 0

4 .6 6
4 .6 6

“
—

_

_

3

_

-

—
-

-

—
-

3 . 4 8 - 4 .2 5
3 . 4 1 - 4 .2 1

-

-

4 . 2 6 - 5 .0 3
4 . 2 6 - 5 .0 3

_

5 .3 5
4 .4 8
5 .3 7
5 .3 7
4 .5 3

3
-

-

7

13

-

-

3

2

~

8

10

22

4

9

3
2
1

2
2
-

52
47
5

5
4
1

18
14
4

43
42
1

27
6
21

12
7
5

30
27
3

11
8
3

52
20
32

10
10
-

21
21
“

27
25
2

10
6
4

9
9
5

10
—
10
9

9
1
8

13
1
12
1

2
—
2

2
1
1
1

16
3
13
1

17
16
1

45
41
4

6

1
5
2

6
6
-

27
10
17
17

-

-

-

-

-

4

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

i

1

3

-

19
9
10

23
1
22

11
11

8
8

20
20

_
-

14
14

-

_
-

_
-

25
25

_

_
-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1

2
i

5
“

3
“

18
1

15
15

_

1
1

_

_

9
5

2
2

20
20

_

_

~

5
1
4

8

21
1
20
18
2

11
1
10

23
19

5
4
1

27
18
9

22
20
2
-

10
10
-

1

42
34
8
7
1

307
307
-

45
45
44
i

72
72

21
21

180
180

6
6
6
“

14
3
11
11

40
40

22
22

63
60

-

_

_

40
40

-

*

2
2

_

_

_

3

3

2
2

-

3

5

-

11
11
-

27
27

7

7

24
6
18
18

36
8
28
26
2

44

7

-

6
6

—

-

-

1
1
-

2
2
-

-

-

“

1

4

2
2

7

-

4

21
21
_

4

8
6
2
2

~

~

76
76
76
-

86
86

28
28

89
89

51
43

112
108

8
-

60
12

59
59

39
39

32
32

-

2

3
3

15
15

20
20

2
2
2
2

20

4
4

56
56

_

_

2
0

5
5

4

2

19
25
10
15

310

3

_

19

T a b le A -4a .

M aintenance and pow erplant o ccu p a tio n s—large establishm ents

(A verag e stra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e arn ing s fo r se le cte d occupations studied in establish m e n ts em ploying 500 w o rk e rs o r m o re by in d u stry d iv is io n , D a lla s , T e x . , O cto b e r 1971)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s re c e iv in g s tr a ig h t- tim e h o u rly earn in gs o f—

Hourly earnings3
t
2 .6 0

Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

workers

Mean*

Median2

Middle range 2

*
$
2 .7 0 2 .8 0

$
*
2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0

$
i
i
t
i
1
1
3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .8 0

t

*
$
$
*
3 .9 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0

*
S
4 .6 0 4 .8 0

5 .0 0

*
5 .2 0

$
5 .4 0

t
5 .6 0

4 .0 0 . 4 .2 0

4 .8 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

over

6
6

and
under
2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0 3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .7 0 3 .8 0 3 .9 0

4 .4 0 4 .6 0

3 .2 0 3 .3 0

3 .4 0

1
1

-

3
2
1

2
2
-

3
—
3

5
4
1

15
11
4

9
8
1

6
6
-

12
7
5

30
27
3

11
8
3

47
15
32

-

1
1
-

2
2

7
6
1

6
6

1

6
1
5

9
1
8

2
2

2
1
1

8
3
5

17
16
1

45
41
4

6
1
5

6
6

17
17

1
1
*

i
i
-

1
1

-

-

7
7

27
27

7
7

4

2
2

10
10

-

_

20
18

44
25
10
15

89
86
86
~

20
20
19
1

3 .5 0 3 .6 0

5 .0 0

MEN
ELECTRICIANS. MAINTENANCE --------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

154
97
57

$
4 .2 8
4 .2 4
4 .3 4

$
4 .2 8
4 .2 4
4 .6 7

$
$
3 . 8 8 - 4 .7 2
3 . 8 7 - 4 .5 8
4 . 0 0 - 4 .7 5

—
—

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY -------------MANUFACTURING------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

137
73
64

4 .3 2
4 .3 2
4 .3 2

4 .4 2
4 .4 2
4 .4 2

3 . 9 8 - 4 .5 5
4 . 2 6 - 4 .4 7
3 . 7 2 - 5 .1 1
3 .1 4

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES -------

90

2 .9 8

3 .0 0

2 .8 1 -

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE ----------MANUFACTURING -------------------

86
55

4 .1 1
4 .4 1

4 .2 3
4 .2 7

3 . 4 7 - 4 .4 8
4 . 2 2 - 4 .5 8

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE)--------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------RETAIL T R A D E ------------------

311
270
218
52

4 .6 6
4 .7 3
4 .8 8
4 .1 0

5 .1 3
5 .1 9
5 .3 2
4 .1 4

4 . 0 2 - 5 .3 6
4 . 0 8 - 5 .3 7
4 . 4 5 - 5 .3 9
3 .8 8 - 4 .5 3

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE -----------MANUFACTURING -------------------

339
281

4 .3 0
4 .2 2

4 .2 4
4 .1 8

TOOL AND DIE M A K E R S ---------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

105
105

4 .7 6
4 .7 6

5 .0 1
5 .0 1

See footnotes at end of tables.




-

1
1

2
2

—

“

_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

11

11

13

22

1

8

-

_

1
~

1
”

5
“

3

-

7

17

-

-

“

~

~

1

18
1

-

-

“

“

1
—
—

_

_

_

—

—
-

-

—

11
11
11

4
4
3
1

9
8
7
1

8
5
4
1

21
20
18
2

12
9
5
4

3 . 8 3 - 4 .8 1
3 .7 4 - 5 .0 0

_

_

2
2

8
8

14
14

1
1

12
12

6
6

4
4

4 . 5 3 - 5 .0 5
4 . 5 3 - 5 .0 5

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

2
2

16
16
_

5
4

4
2

-

-

—

_

—
-

”

4

2

18

8
4
2
2

~

-

28
28
28
~

17
17

19
19

14
14

36
30

51
51

8
-

46
2

14
14

39
39

32
32

-

2
2

2
2

1
1

5
5

22
22

12
12

3
3

56
56

_

-

2
1
1

_

-

—

-

-

—

-

_

i
i

—

25
25
25

20
T a b le A - 5 .

C ustodial and material m ovem ent occupations

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex. , October 1971)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly e r i g 2
anns

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
t
S
S
$
*
S
$
$
%
t
*
S
1.60 1.70 1.80 l .90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.3 0 2.4 0 2.5 0 2.60 2.80 3.00

Number
o
f
wo k r
res

Median2

Middle r nge 2
a

$
*
*
S
$
$
$
S
S
$
3. 20 3.4 0 3.6 0 3.8 0 4. 00 4 .20 4.40 4.60 4.8 0 5.00

and
un der

1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.2 0 2.30 2.4 0 2.50 2.6 0 2.8 0 3.0 0 3.20

3.40 3 .6 0 3.80 4.0 0 4.2 0 4 .40 4.60 4.80 5.0 0 5.2 0

HEN

$
1.79
3.31
1.76

$
1.732.591.72-

192

3.44

3.47

3.11- 3.77

1,422
291
1,131

GUAROS
MANUFACTURING ------------------WATCHMEN
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

$
2.21
3.19
1.96

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN ---------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

$ '
2.64
3.73
1.88

658
-

658

66
3
63

44
3
41

15
-

6
-

15

6

26
-

26

57
50
7

21
7
14

29
11
18

29
7
22

46
27
19

60
29
31

36
25
11

52
31
21

85
65
20

32
17
15

11
11
“

5
5

4

140
140

-

4

26

29

25

16

60

17

11

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

3

3

50

3

11

3

1

-

-

15

5

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

2.41 1135
18
2.87
2.17 1117
—
3.16
2.39
2.23 184

372
4
368

153
76
77
1
36
21

360
41
319
8
51
43

232
73
159
1
51
18

296
143
153
7
28
69

197
98
99
3
12
31

155
117
38
6
7
19

81
40
41
11
7

227
97
130
73
35
12

143
119
24
13
11

98
8
90
60
3

20
14
6
4
2

193
171
22
12

5
5

27
10
17

12

_

_

—
—

—
-

—

12
2
10
10

_

-

4
1
3

36
40

136
19
117
1
13
10

8

-

-

-

51
20
31

259

113

259

113

—

—

-

3

6

8

304
244
60
17
25

159
29
130
38
32

85
67
18
2
7

123
105
18
7
2

35
14
21
2
-

434
81
353
239
-

_

1

64
9
55
13
23

-

-

120
57
63
35
18

-

2.27- 4.14

249
166
83
46
28

-

2 . 3 5 - 3 .7 4

176
36
140
15
116

—

2 .9 5

127
28
99
36
5

3
3

2.68

120
4
116
54
14

_

—

29
1l
18

_

—

2.52

2.19- 3.64
2.37- 3.09
2.04- 3.73

2.48
3.37
2.32
2.38

2.132.692.072.16-

_

118

19

82

33
5

94
35
59
11

76
48
28
“

28
18
10

26
7
19

106
86
20

90
10
80

80
80

161
34

183
5
178
83

33

118

113
1
112
26

161

—
-

204
10
194
62

2.81
2.85
2.79

2.49
3.14
2.41

2.30- 3.30
2.20- 3.26
2.30- 4.20

_

2

25
15
10

3

75

47
8
39

6
3
3

27
6
21

11

376
153
223
61

3.01
3.17
2.90
3.25

3.09
3.19

3.43
3.71
3.17
4.25

28

3.25

2.512.652.422.48-

25
15
10
-

SHIPPING CLERKS -------------------MANUFAC T U R I N G ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

160
76
84

3.12
2.94
3.28

2.95
2.73
2.98

2.71- 3.43
2.62- 3.36
2.90- 3.50

-

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ----MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

326
213
113

3.04
2.85
3.39

2.88

2.61- 3.73
2.30- 3.27
2.84- 3.77

TRUCKDRIVERS ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------

7,363
1,298
6,065
3,471
810

3.92
3.18
4.08
4.97
3.05

3.87
3.21
5.10
5.14

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1-1/2 T O N S ! --------------------MANUFAC T U R I N G ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------RETAIL T R A D E -------- ---------

1,237
157
1,080
433

2.67
2.62

99

2.71

2.39

2.34- 3.41

JANITORS, PORTERS, ANO CLEANERS --MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------RETAIL T R A O E -----------------FINANCE ------------------------

3,858
1, 056
2, 802

2.14
2.58
1.97
3.00

300
447

2.22

2.04
2.45
1.78
2.81
2.13
1.79

1.692.221.662.711.971.66-

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANOLING ------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------

2,737
875
1, 862

2.79
2.76
2.81

2.64

504

3 .0 4

482

3.11

ORDER
FILLERS --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------RETAIL T R A D E ------------------

1,809
366
1, 443
429

2.83
3.30
2.70
2.96

PACKERS, SHIPPING -----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

458
157
301

RECEIVING CLERKS ------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------

See footnotes at end of tables




222

1.91

2.68
2.52

2.68

2.86

2.76
3.72

3.73
3.77
3.56
3.88

2.68

2.752.922.715.122.43-

5.14
3.29
5.15
5.17
3.93

2.54
2.48
2.55
2.53

2.242.242.242.28-

3.11
2.93
3.15
2.69

—

—

19

-

—

19
3

82
26
15
15
-

-

-

-

-

19

48
10
38

-

_

-

-

1

-

2

-

—

-

—

—

-

-

-

-

*

-

1
1

-

2
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

3

75

11

51
14
37
1

-

11
1

—

—

28
15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

30

47

2

-

-

-

-

30

47

“

30

24

_

30

24

-

-

-

-

30
30

24
24

-

2

20
20

14
14
-

21
20
1

204
26
178

157
34
123

269
37
232

-

~
138
2
136

2

44

6

27

58

2

106
4
102
32

69
20
49
1

208
37
171
25

36

-

2
2

-

36
27

-

_

11

60
58
2

41
41
-

1
1
-

-

30
17
13
1

24
2
22
4

86
32
54
6

11
6
5
5

49
27
22
8

30
29
1
1

48
10
38

1
1

17
2
15

-

-

16
14
2

-

—

16
15
1
-

-

*

35
25
10

8
8
-

14
14
~

59
40
19

35
16
19

14
10
4

27
26
1

178
46
132
9
39

439
69
370
83
128

509
25
484
21
101

423
298
125
6
29

166
93
73
3
20

465
403
62
20
24

74
24
50
39

170
16
154
108

132
15
117
77

58
4
54
16

39
8
31
2

35
12
23
7

_
-

286
1
285

—

-

12
12

-

-

—

—

—

-

-

-

-

—

-

194

-

-

"

-

-

132
36
96
96

181
30
151
~

83

_

_

_

—

—
—

-

—

83
83

—
—

-

-

-

-

._

78

_

_

_

_

-

-

78

-

_

13
10
3
2

15
-

-

—

-

_

15
15

-

-

-

-

1

16

_

_

-

-

-

~

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

10
10
18
10
8

-

4

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

92
35
57

4

-

-

-

144
30
114
9
18

345
6
339
213
39

263
44
219

12
12
7
5

340
165
175
7
168

94
10
84
5

129
2
127
19

12

-

-

33

-

12
12

1

146
20
126
7
15
18
5
13
6

-

-

-

-

-

16

~

-

-

-

-

_

3086

-

-

-

-

-

-

3086
3086

-

1

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

21
T a b le A -5.

Custodial and material m ovem ent o c c u p a t io n s -----Continued

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Dallas, Tex. , October 1971)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly ear i g 3
nns

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wor e s
kr

S
S
*
$
$
S
$
$
$
t
$
$
$
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.6 0 2.8 0 3.0 0
Mean 2 Median*

Middle r n e 2
ag

and
under
1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.4 0 2.5 0 2.6 0 2.80 3.00 3.2 0

MEN - CONTINUED

t
5
1 ------ %
*
i
t
$
*
S
3.20 3 .4 0 3.60 3.8 0 4.0 0 4.2 0 4.40 4.60 4. 80 5.00

3.40 3.6 0 3.8 0 4.0 0 4.20 4.4 0 4.6 0 4.80 5.00 5.20

|
1

TRUCKORIVERSf- CONTINUED
TRUCKDRIVERS. MEDIUM (1-1/2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 T0NS1 ---------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------RETAIL T R A D E ------------------

3,870
496
3,374
2,335
168

$
4.19
3.32
4.32
5.07
2.87

$
5.11
2.99
5.12
5.15
2.69

$
2.822.812.835.122.38-

$
5.16
4.41
5.16
5.17
3.39

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) ------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------

1,218
107
1,111
774

4.51
3.39
4.61
4.79

5.11
3.27
5.12
5.14

4.123.214.295.11-

5.15
3.82
5.16
5.17

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) ------MANUFACTURING -------------------

538
538

3.17
3.17

3.22
3.22

2.98- 3.27
2.98- 3.27

TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT) -------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

1,421
884
537

2.93
2.86
3.05

2.73
2.77
2.64

2.57- 3.05
2.62- 2.99
2.40- 3.68

JANITORS, PORTERS, ANO CLEANERS --MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------FINANCE -----------------------

1,576
82
1,494
48
68
116

1.76
2.44
1.72
2.46
2.04
1.76

1.69
2.30
1.69
2.35
2.06
1.69

1.652.201.642.111.941.65-

1.79
2.40
1.77
2.93
2.16
1.98

852

365

44

852

365

44

1
64

7

PACKERS, SHIPPING -----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

346
251
95

2.22
2.27
2.09

2.31
2.33
2.02

1.97- 2.38
2.04- 2.39
1.96- 2.19

36
36

5
5

199
132
67
3
12

70
30
40
1
16

51
27
24
9
6

42
16
26
2
11

164
2
162
119
4

28
11
17
15

29
15
14
8

7

4

7
6

4
3

22
20
2
~

67
52
15
4

4
4
"■

37
2
35
7

55
33
22

99
—
99

162
162

23

—

23
“

-

30

-

_

98
22
76

79
14
65

52
52

102
2
100

12

—
—

5

2

31

-

35
35

312
312

4
4

_

412
307
105

197
173
?4

95
95

7
7

66
66

177
53
124
20

334
10
324
8
23

83

6
6

~

89
22
67
3
“
6

-

83
83

—

14
4
10

29
4
25

46
1
45

26
1
25

56
16
40

224
162
62

27
8
19
2

115
6
109

27
21
6

33
22
11

8
3

9
2

—

6

17

5
4

7

6

9

20
16

1

“

3

i

2
4

i
i
“

16
14
2

40

46
20
26

8
4

12
8

4

i
i

10
6
4

40
33

4

121
114
7

_

*
84
38
46

5

1 168
—
1 168
“

_

-

147
140
7
7
“

-

25
25

65

-

—
—

-

2176

- 2176
—2176

“
_

—
“

_
-

_

_

_
-

_
-

665

—

665
665

_
-

17
17

6
23

59
6
53
10
14
11

-

10
—
10
7
3

-

5
5

30

5

-

65

60

-

60

WMN
OE

See footnotes at end of tables




—
—

—
-

—
-

-

40

9

3
2

-

i

7

-

-

—

1
1

“
-

-

12
12

—

1
1

—

-

—

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

11
11

—

-

-

-

22

T a b le A -5a .

C u sto d ial and material m ovem ent o ccu p a tio n s—large establishm ents

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t- tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d occupations stu died in estab lish m en ts em p lo yin g 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e by in d u stry d iv is io n , D a lla s , T e x . , O c to b e r 1971)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of

Hourly ea n n s
rig3

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wo k r
res

*
$
$
t
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90
Mean3 Median2

Middle r nge 2
a

153

$
3 .1 3
3 .3 7
2 .8 3

$
3 .1 3
3 .4 0
2 .7 4

$
$
2 . 7 0 - 3 .6 7
3 . 0 3 - 3 .7 5
2 .4 6 - 3 .1 6

GUARDS
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

182

3 .4 1

3 .4 3

1 ,5 7 0
5 79
991
177
1 85
57

2 .3 3
2 .7 6
2 .0 8
2 .8 4
2 .3 6
2 .0 6

2 .2 2

2 .0 7

1 . 7 0 - 2 .8 2
2 . 2 6 - 3 .4 2
1 . 6 6 - 2 .3 9
2 . 6 6 - 3 .1 1
2 . 0 9 - 2 .5 6
1 .9 3 - 2 .2 6

LABORERS, MATERIAL H A N D L IN G --------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------P U B LIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------R E TA IL T R A D E -------------------------------------

910
2 47
6 63
94
478

3 .1 7
3 .0 1
3 .2 4
2 .9 4
3 .1 2

3 .0 1
3 .0 6
2 .9 1
2 .8 5
2 .6 9

2 .3 4 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2 .6 4 2 .2 7 -

4 .1 2
3 .7 3
4 .1 4
3 .2 3
4 .1 4

ORDER

673
73
600
3 69

3 .4 2
3 .3 7
3 .4 3
3 .0 9

3 .8 2
3 .4 9
3 .8 3
2 .5 5

2 .3 9 2 .7 5 2 .3 7 2 .2 6 -

4 .1 4
3 .8 5
4 .1 6
3 .8 9

$
s
s
$
S
t
$
$
$
$
S
$
I
$
*
$
.60 2.8 0 3 . 0 3.20 3.4 0 3. 60 3.8 0 4.00 4.2 0 4.4 0 4.6 0 4.8 0 5.0 0
0
2.3 0 2.40 2 50 2
.

2.00 2.10 2.20

2.30 2.4 0 2.50

3 .0 9 - 3 .7 5

J A N IT O R S , PORTERS, AND CLEANERS -----MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------P UBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------R E TA IL TRADE ------------------------------------FINANCE ------------------------------------------------

2.00 2.10 2.20

and
under
1.70 1.80 1.90

MEN

S

t

t

353

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN-------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

20 0

F IL L E R S -------------------------------------------

MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------R E T A IL TRADE -------------------------------------

2 .7 9
1 .8 0
2 .7 8

2 .2 0

4
3

-

1

1
1

3
“

3

18
18

7
~
7

19
5
14

162

6
8

28

4
388
388
-

1

11
1
-

I l l

-

2

5

1

3
—
3
—
3

_
-

_
-

-

1

—

39
39

1

2
2
5
17

5
7

1
6
1
0

6

19

93
27

6
6
8
36

1
0

6

8

18
4
14
14

3
3
3

5
5
5

62
62
62

-

6

-

1
1
8
-

96
44
52

1

43
4
27

2
2

11
1
51
7
24

1
2

138
26

5
5

12
1

2

2
2

34
34
34

-

-

12
1

46

2
2

1
2

16

3

6

5

7
3

1
2
38

2. 60 2.8 0
2
1
5
16
29
7

2
2
1
1
7

29
7

2
2
4

26
128
106

1

34
7
27
4
23

36
3
33

6
8
6
8

5
5
5

26
15

4
4
-

6
8
-

1
1
1
1

46
27
19

124
39
85
63
19

41
9
32
14
18

6

32
4
28

3.0 0 3. 2 3.4Q 3.6 0 3. 80 4.00 4.20 4 .4 0 4.6 0 4.80 5.0 0 5.20
0

8

25

49
29

2
0

29

36
25

1
1

25
-

2
2
1
1
1
1

6
6
8

6

58
55
3

4

93
23
70
38
32

46
37
9

3
3
“

6
2

64
60
4

17
17
~

16

60

17

1

181
171

_
-

4

17
17
—

1
0

—

9
9
7

16
14

7

2

3
3
“

2
2

90

2

-

1
1

29
16
13

2
2

1
0
80
-

96
81
15
15
_
-

1

3
-

5
5

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

8
2
6
6

_
-

-

-

3
3
-

_
—
-

“
~

-

~

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

~

8

_
-

286
1

-

285
—
194

-

132
36
96
96

151
151

83
83
83

—

~
-

S H I P P I N G -------------------------------------

132

3 .6 0

4 .2 2

2 .6 9 - 4 .2 6

-

-

-

5

2

1

3

1

9

6

9

1

1
0

6

1

-

-

-

78

-

-

-

R E C E IV IN G CLERKS --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

84
50

3 .5 3
3 .4 8

3 .7 2
3 .4 4

3 . 2 1 - 3 .7 9
3 .0 8 - 4 .3 2

-

_

_

-

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

3
3

_

4
i

4
4

6
6

5
5

1
0
8

30

_

3
3

15
15

_

_

_

~

-

-

TRUCKDRIVERS
--------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------P U B LIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------R E TA IL TRADE -------------------------------------

1 ,4 4 1
136
1 , 3 05
828
369

4 .5 0
3 .2 9
4 .6 2
5 .0 7
3 .8 5

5 .1 1
3 .4 2
5 .1 2
5 .1 5
4 .0 4

3 .8 5 2 .9 2 4 .1 3 5 .1 2 3 .4 2 -

—

_
-

_
-

2

5

2
1

2
2
8

37
7
30

73
5

~

4

2

3

1

14

2
0

24

18

169
44
125
33

15
15
15

5
—
5
5

—
-

2

37
14
23
3

~

2
2
1
0
1
2
1
1
1

27
17

4

8
8

40

2

3
3

3

-

3
—
3

~

80 2
802
802
~

91

3 .5 6
3 .6 8
3 .6 9

3 . 0 8 - 3 .7 8
3 .0 8 - 3 .8 9
3 . 3 1 - 3 .9 1

_
~

_
-

_

4
4
4

2
2
1

1
1
1

_
~

_
_

5
5
5

1
0

9
7
7

15
5
5

2
0
19
19

1
2
1
2
1
2

6
6
6

1
1
1

_
“

_
-

_

2
2
2

_
“

_
“

_
-

_
-

_

_

1
1

2

3

13
5

19

13

26

-

1
1

8
-

7
4

15
15

-

_
-

_
-

8

3
3
—
3

“

502
502
502
“

25
23

39

1
1

1
1

168
168

_

6

-

300
300
28
28

PACKERS,

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIG H T (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 T O N S ) --------------------------------- ---------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------R E TA IL T R A D E -------------------------------- —

5 .1 6
3 .8 3
5 .1 6
5 .1 7
4 .4 5

65

3 .3 6
3 .3 8
3 .4 1

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLU DING 4 TONS) --------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------R ETAIL T R A D E -------------------------------------

684
74
610
5 15
95

4 .6 2
3 .0 3
4 .8 1
5 .1 0
3 .2 4

5 .1 3
2 .9 7
5 .1 4
5 .1 5
3 .1 9

4 . 0 1 - 5 .1 7
2 . 6 2 - 3 .4 2
5 .1 1 - 5 .1 7
5 . 1 2 - 5 .1 7
2 .8 1 - 3 .8 4

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TR A ILE R TY P E ) --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

555
520

4 .6 8
4 .7 3

5 .1 1
5 .1 1

2 54
113
141

3 .7 6
3 .1 9
4 .2 1

3 .7 1
3 .1 9
4 .2 6

3 . 5 2 - 4 .2 7
2 .6 9 - 3 .7 3
3 .6 7 - 4 .3 7

-

2 .5 7

2 .5 1

2 .1 8 -

-

1

-

2

14

4 . 4 3 - 5 .1 5
4 . 4 5 - 5 .1 6

TRUCKERS, POWER (F O R K L IF T ) ----------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

-

68

-

1
1
1

2

2
1

2

“

6
6

2
2
8

-

16

14

1
0
6
1

14

1

-

5

1
1

~

_
~

~

-

-

2

2

-

2
1
1

~

4

4

7

-

1
1

8
8

~
“

27
26

1

1
0

—

1
0
2

-

4

24
15
9
9

25

2
8

17

1

16

1
1

2
2

1
1
1
1

1
0
1
0

“

-

6

8
2
6

2
1
1

15
15

2
2

~

-

6

2
0
2
0
2

13

1

6
8
14
39

2
1
1

-

8

18
6
168
168

2
2

16
16
~

84
38
46

-

_
-

65
65

~

_
-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

WOMEN
PACKERS,

S H IP P IN G -------------------------------------

t
See fo o tn o tes at end o f tab les.




”

2 .7 7

7

1

1
0

7

23

F o o tn o te s

1 Standard hours r e fle c t the w o rk w eek fo r which em p loyees r e c e iv e th e ir re g u la r s tra ig h t-tim e s a la rie s (e x c lu s iv e o f pay fo r o v e rtim e
at re g u la r and/or p rem iu m ra te s ), and the earnings co rresp o n d to these w e e k ly hours.
2 The m ean is com puted fo r each job by totalin g the earnings o f a ll w o rk e rs and d ividin g b y the num ber o f w o rk e rs .
The m edian
designates position — h a lf of the em p loyees su rveyed r e c e iv e m o re than the rate shown; h a lf r e c e iv e le s s than the rate shown.
The m id d le
range is defined by 2 rates o f pay; a fourth of the w o rk e rs earn le s s than the lo w e r o f these rates and a fourth earn m o re than the h igh er rate.
3 E xclu des p rem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eekends, h olid a ys, and late shifts.




A p p e n d ix . O c c u p a tio n a l D e s c r ip t io n s
The prim a ry purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations w orkers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and
from area to area. This perm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on
inter establishment and interarea com parability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions m ay d iffe r significantly from those in use in
individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed
to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learn ers; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-tim e, tem porary, and probationary w orkers.

O FFICE
C LER K, ACCOUNTING— Continued

B IL L E R , MACHINE
P repares statements, b ills , and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or electrom atic typew riter. May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform other
cle rica l work incidental to billing operations. F or wage study purposes, b ille rs , machine, are
classified by type of machine, as follows:

Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A . Under general supervision, perform s accounting c le ric a l operations which
require the application of experience and judgment, fo r example, c le ric a lly processing com ­
plicated or nonrepetitive accounting transactions, selecting among a substantial va riety of
prescribed accounting codes and classifications, or tracing transactions through previous
accounting actions to determine source of discrepancies. May be assisted by one or m ore
class B accounting clerks.

B ille r, machine (billing m achine). Uses a special billing machine (combination typing
and adding machine) to prepare bills and invoices from custom ers' purchase orders, in ter­
nally prepared orders, shipping memorandums, etc. Usually involves application of p re ­
determined discounts and shipping charges and entry of necessary extensions, which may or
m ay not be computed on the billing machine, and totals which are automatically accumulated
by machine. The operation usually involves a la rge number of carbon copies of the b ill being
prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.
B ille r, machine (bookkeeping machine). Uses a bookkeeping machine (witn or without
a typ ew riter keyboard) to prepare custom ers' bills as part of the accounts receivable opera­
tion. Generally involves the simultaneous entry o f figu res on custom ers' ledger record. The
machine automatically accumulates figures on a number of vertical columns and computes
and usually prints automatically the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowl­
edge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of sales and credit slips.

Class B . Under close supervision, following detailed instructions and standardized p ro ­
cedures, perform s one or m ore routine accounting cle rica l operations, such as posting to
led gers, cards, or worksheets where identification of item s and locations of postings are
cle a rly indicated; checking accuracy and completeness o f standardized and repetitive records
or accounting documents; and coding documents using a few prescrib ed accounting codes.
C LERK, F IL E
F iles , cla ssifies, and retrieves m aterial in an established filin g system. May perform
cle rica l and manual tasks required to maintain file s . Positions are cla ssified into levels on the
basis of the following definitions.
Class A . C lassifies and indexes file m aterial such as correspondence, reports, tech­
nical documents, etc., in an established filin g system containing a number o f varied subject
m atter file s . May also file this m aterial. May keep records of various types in conjunction
with the file s. May lead a small group o f low er lev el file clerks.

BOOKKEEPING-M ACHINE O PERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (with or without a typew riter keyboard) to kee. a. .ecord
o f business transactions.

Class B . Sorts, codes, and file s
ings or partly classified m aterial by
cro s s-referen ce aids. As requested,
wards m aterial. May perform related

Class A . Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge o f and experience in basic
bookkeeping principles, and fa m iliarity with the structure of the particular accounting system
used. Determ ines proper records and distribution of debit and credit item s to be used in each
phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records
by hand.

Class C . P erform s routine filin g of m aterial that has already been classified or which
is easily classified in a simple serial classification system (e.g ., alphabetical, chronological,
or num erical). As requested, locates readily available m aterial in file s and forwards m a­
teria l; and m ay f i l l out withdrawal charge. May perform simple c le rica l and manual tasks
required to maintain and service files.

Class B. Keeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, custom ers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described under b iller,
machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or assist
in preparation of tria l balances and prepare control sheets fo r the accounting department.
C LERK, ACCOUNTING
P e rform s one or m ore accounting cle rica l tasks such as posting to registers and ledgers;
reconciling bank accounts; verifyin g the internal consistency, completeness, and mathematical
accuracy of accounting documents; assigning prescribed accounting distribution codes; examining
and verifyin g fo r cle rica l accuracy various types of reports, lists, calculations, posting, etc.;
or preparing simple or assisting in preparing m ore complicated journal vouchers. May work
in either a manual or automated accounting system.

C LER K, ORDER
Receives custom ers' orders fo r m aterial or m erchandise by m ail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the follow in g: Quoting prices to customers; making out an order
sheet listing the item s to make up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be fille d . May check with credit
department to determine credit rating o^ customer, acknowledge receipt of orders from customers,
follow up orders to see that they have been filled, keep file o f orders received, and check shipping
invoices with original orders.

The work requires a knowledge of cle rica l methods and office practices and procedures
which relates to the c le rica l processing and recording of transactions and accounting information.
With experience, the w orker typically becomes fam iliar with the bookkeeping and accounting term s
and procedures used in the assigned work, but is not required to have a knowledge o f the form al
principles o f bookkeeping and accounting.




unclassified m aterial by sim ple (subject m atter) head­
finer subheadings. P repares simple related index and
locates clea rly identified m aterial in file s and fo r ­
cle rica l tasks required to maintain and service file s.

C LER K, P A Y R O L L
Computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve: Calculating w orkers' earnings based on tim e or production records; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such as w ork er's name, working
days, tim e, rate, deductions fo r insurance, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and
assist paymaster in making up and distributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.

NOTE: The Bureau has discontinued collecting data for oilers and plumbers.

24

25
COM PTOM ETER OPERATOR

SEC RETA R Y — Continued

P rim a ry duty is to operate a Com ptom eter to p e rfo rm m athem atical com putations. This
job is not to be confused with that of sta tistic a l or other type of cle rk , which m ay involve fr e ­
quent u se of a Com ptom eter but, in which, use of this m achine is incidental to perform an ce of
other duties.

N O TE: The te rm "co rp o rate o ffice r, " used in the level definitions following, r e fe r s to
those o ffic ials who have a significan t corporate-w ide policym aking role with regard to m ajo r
company a ctiv itie s. The title "v ice p r e s id e n t," though n orm ally indicative of this role, does not
in all c a s e s identify such p ositio n s. Vice p resid en ts whose p rim ary resp on sibility is to act p e r ­
sonally on individual c a s e s or tran sa ctio n s (e .g ., approve o r deny individual loan or cred it action s;
adm in ister individual tru st accounts; d ire ctly su p e rv ise a c le r ic a l staff) a re not con sidered to be
"co rp o rate o ffic e r s " for p u rp o ses of applying the following level definition s.

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
O p erates a keypunch m achine to rec o rd or v erify alphabetic an d /o r num eric data on
tabulating c a rd s or on tape.
P o sitio n s a re c la ss ifie d into le v e ls on the b a sis of the following definitions.
C la s s A . Work req u ires the application of experien ce and judgment in selectin g p ro ce ­
d u res to be followed and in search in g fo r, in terp retin g, selectin g, or coding item s to be
keypunched from a v ariety of so urce docum ents. On o ccasion m ay a lso p erform som e routine
keypunch work. May train inexperienced keypunch o p e ra to rs.
C la s s B . Work is routine and repetitive. Under c lo se sup ervision o r following sp ecific
p ro ced u res or in stru ctio n s, works from v ariou s stan dardized source docum ents which have
been coded, and follows sp ecified p ro ced u res which have been p re sc rib e d in d etail and requ ire
little or no selectin g, coding, o r in terpretin g of data to be record ed . R e fe rs to su p e rv iso r
p roblem s a risin g from erron eous item s or codes or m issin g inform ation.
M ESSENGER (Office Boy or Girl)
P e rfo rm s v ario u s routine duties such a s running e rra n d s, operating m inor office m a ­
chines such as s e a le r s or m a ile r s , opening and distributing m ail, and other m inor c le r ic a l work.
Exclude positions that requ ire operation of a m otor vehicle as a significant duty.
SEC RETA R Y
A ssigned a s p erso n al se c r e ta r y , norm ally to one individual. M aintains a clo se and highly
resp on siv e relation sh ip to the day-to-day work of the su p e rv iso r. Works fa irly independently r e ­
ceiving a m inim um of detailed supervision and guidance. P e rfo rm s varied c le r ic a l and s e c r e ta r ia l
duties, usually including m ost of the following:
a. R eceiv es telephone c a lls , p erso n al c a lle r s , and incoming m ail, an sw ers routine in ­
q u irie s, and routes technical in q uiries to the p roper p e rso n s;
b.

E sta b lish e s, m ain tain s, and r e v ise s the su p e rv iso r 's file s;

c.

M aintains the su p e rv iso r 's calen dar and m ak es appointm ents a s in structed;

d.

R elay s m e s s a g e s from su p e rv iso r to subordinates;

e. Review s correspondence, m em oran dum s, and rep o rts p rep ared by others for the
s u p e rv iso r 's signature to a ss u r e p ro ced u ral and typographic accu racy;
f.

May a lso p e rfo rm other c le r ic a l and s e c r e ta r ia l ta sk s of com parable nature and difficulty.
The- work typ ically req u ire s knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
p ro g ra m s, and p ro ced u res related to the work of the su p e rv iso r.
E xclu sio n s

2. S e c re ta ry to a corp orate o fficer (other than the chairm an of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 but few er than 25, 000 p e rso n s; or
3. S e c re ta ry to the head, im m ediately below the corp orate officer level, of a m ajo r
segm ent or su b sid iary of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 25,000 p e rso n s.
C la ss B
1. S e c re ta ry to the chairm an of the board or p resid en t of a company that em ploys, in
a ll, few er than 100 p e rs o n s ; or
2. S e c re ta ry to a corp orate o fficer (other than the chairm an of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 100 but few er than 5,000 p e rso n s; or
3. S e c re ta ry to the head, im m ediately below the officer le v e l, over either a m ajo r
corporate-w ide functional activity (e .g ., m arketing, re se a rc h , operations, in du strial r e la ­
tion s, etc.) jjr a m ajo r geographic or organ izational segm ent (e .g ., a region al h ead quarters;
a m ajo r division) of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
e m p loy ees; or
4. S e c re ta ry to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in a ll, over 5,000 p e rso n s; or
5. S e c re ta ry to the head of a la rg e and im portant organizational segm ent (e.g ., a m iddle
m anagem ent su p e rv iso r of an organ izational segm ent often involving a s many a s se v e ra l
hundred p e rso n s) or a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 25,000 p e rso n s.
C la s s C
1. S e c re ta ry to an executive or m an ag e rial p erson whose resp on sibility is not equivalent
to one of the sp ecific level situations in the definition for c la s s B, but whose organ izational
unit n orm ally num bers at le a s t se v e ral dozen em ployees and is usually divided into o rg an iza ­
tional segm ents which a re often, in turn, furth er subdivided. In som e com panies, th is level
includes a wide range of organ izational echelons; in oth ers, only one or two; o r
2. S e c re ta ry to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in a ll, few er than 5,000 p e r s o n s .

1. S e c re ta ry to the su p e rv iso r or head of a sm a ll organ izational unit (e.g ., few er than
about 25 or 30 p e rso n s); jor
2. S e c re ta ry to a nonsupervisory sta ff sp e c ia list, p ro fe ssio n al em ployee, a d m in istra ­
tive o ffic e r, or a ss is ta n t, sk illed technician o r exp ert. (NOTE: Many com panies a ssig n
sten o g rap h e rs, rath e r than s e c r e ta r ie s a s d escrib e d above, to this level of su p e rv iso ry or
n onsupervisory w orker.)

E xam ples

a.

P o sitio n s which do not m eet the "p e r so n a l" se c r e ta r y concept d escrib e d above;

b.

Sten ographers not fully train ed in se c r e ta r ia l type duties;

c. Sten ographers servin g a s o ffice a ss is t a n t s to a group of p ro fe ssio n al, technical, or
m an ag e rial p e rso n s:
d. S ec re ta ry positions in which the duties a re either substan tially m ore routine or sub­
stan tially m o re com plex and resp o n sib le than those c h a ra c te riz e d in the definition;
e. A ssista n t type positions which involve m o re d ifficult or m o re resp on sible tech ­
n ical, adm in istrativ e, su p e rv iso ry , o r sp ec ia lize d c le r ic a l duties which a re not typical of
s e c r e ta r ia l work.




1. S e c re ta ry to the chairm an of the board or p resid en t of a company that em ploys, in
a ll, over 100 but few er than 5,000 p e rso n s; or

C la ss D

P erfo rm s stenographic and typing work.

Not a ll positions that a re titled " s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s the above c h a ra c te ris tic s .
of positio n s which a re excluded from the definition a re a s follow s:

C la s s A

STENOGRAPHER
P rim a ry duty is to take dictation usin g shorthand, and to tran scrib e the dictation. May
a lso type from written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool. May o ccasion ally tra n sc rib e
from voice record in g s (if p rim a ry duty is tran scrib in g from reco rd in g s, see Transcribin g-M achin e
O perator, G eneral).
N O TE: This job is distinguished from that of a se c r e ta r y in that a se c r e ta r y norm ally
works in a confidential relation sh ip with only one m an ager or executive and p e rfo rm s m ore
resp on sib le and d iscre tio n a ry ta sk s a s d escrib e d in the s e c r e ta r y job definition.
Sten ographer, General
Dictation involves a norm al routine vocabulary. May m aintain file s, keep sim ple r e c o r d s,
or p erform other relativ e ly routine c le r ic a l ta s k s .

26
TABULATING-M ACHINE OPERATOR (E lectric Accounting Machine O perator)— Continued

STENOGRAPHER— Continued
Sten ographer, Senior
D ictation involves a v arie d technical o r sp ec ia lize d vocabulary such a s in le g al brie fs
o r rep o rts on scien tific r e se a r c h . May a lso set up and m aintain file s , keep r e c o r d s, etc.
OR
P e rfo rm s stenographic duties requiring significan tly g r e a te r independence and resp o n ­
sib ility than sten o grap h er, ge n e ral, a s evidenced by the following: Work re q u ires a high
d egree of stenographic speed and a c cu rac y ; a thorough working knowledge of general bu sin e ss
and office p roced ure; and of the sp ecific bu sin e ss o p eration s, organization, p o lic ie s, p ro c e ­
d u res, file s , workflow, etc. U se s this knowledge in perform in g stenographic duties and
resp o n sib le c le r ic a l ta s k s such a s m aintaining followup file s ; assem b lin g m a te ria l for rep o rts,
m em oran dum s, and le tte r s ; com posing sim ple le tte r s from gen eral in stru ction s; reading and
routing incoming m ail; and answ ering routine q uestio n s^ etc.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
C la s s A. O p erates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office c a lls . P e rfo rm s full telephone inform ation se rv ic e or handles
com plex c a lls , such a s con feren ce, co llect, o v e r s e a s , or sim ila r c a lls , either in addition to
doing routine work a s d esc rib e d fo r sw itchboard o p e rato r, c la ss B, or a s a fu ll-tim e
assign m en t. ( " F u ll" telephone inform ation se rv ic e o ccu rs when the establishm ent has v arie d
functions that a re not read ily understandable for telephone inform ation p u rp o se s, e .g ., becau se
of overlapping or in terrelate d functions, and consequently p resen t frequent p roblem s as to
which extension s a re app ro p riate fo r c a lls.)
C la s s B . O p erates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant o r office c a lls . May handle routine long distance c a lls and reco rd to lls.
May p e rfo rm lim ited telephone inform ation s e r v ic e . ("L im ite d " telephone inform ation se rv ic e
o c c u rs if the functions of the establishm ent serv ic e d a re read ily understandable for telephone
inform ation p u rp o se s, o r if the req u ests a re routine, e .g ., giving extension num bers when
sp ec ific nam es a re fu rn ished, o r if com plex c a lls a re re fe rre d to another op erator.)
T h ese c la ssific a tio n s do not include sw itchboard o p e ra to rs in telephone com panies who
a s s i s t cu sto m e rs in placing c a lls .
SWITCHBOARD O PER A TO R -R ECEPTIO N IST
In addition to perform in g duties of o p erato r on a sin gle-p osition o r m onitor-type sw itch­
b oard, a c ts a s recep tio n ist and m ay a lso type o r p e rfo rm routine c le r ic a l work a s p art of reg u lar
d u ties. This typing or c le r ic a l work m ay take the m ajo r p art of this w o rk e r's tim e while at
sw itchboard.
TABULATING-M ACHINE OPERATOR (E le c tric Accounting Machine O perator)
O p erates one o r a v arie ty of m achines such a s the tab ulator, ca lcu lato r, co llato r, in te r­
p re te r, s o rte r , reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from th is definition a re working su p e rv iso r s.
A lso excluded a re o p e ra to rs of e lectro n ic d igital co m p uters, even though they m ay a lso operate
EAM equipment.

P osition s a re c la ss ifie d into le v e ls on the b a sis of the following definitions.
C la s s A . P e rfo rm s com plete reporting and tabulating assig n m en ts including devising
difficult control panel w iring under general su p ervision . A ssign m en ts typically involve a
variety of long and com plex r e p o rts which often a re ir r e g u la r or n onrecurring, requiring
som e planning of the nature and sequencing of o p eration s, and the u se of a variety of m a ­
chines. Is ty p ically involved in training new o p e ra to rs in m achine operations or train in g
low er level o p e ra to rs in w iring from d iag ram s and in the operating sequences of long and
com plex re p o rts. Does not include positions in which w iring resp o n sib ility is lim ited to
selection and in sertion of prew ired b o ard s.
C la s s B . P e rfo rm s work accordin g to e stablish ed p ro ced u re s and under sp ecific in ­
stru ctio n s. A ssignm ents typ ically involve com plete but routine and recu rrin g rep o rts or p arts
of la r g e r and m ore com plex re p o rts. O perates m ore d ifficult tabulating or e le ctric a l a c ­
counting m achines such a s the tabulator and ca lcu lato r, in addition to the sim p ler m achines
used by c la s s C o p e ra to rs. May be requ ired to do som e w iring from d iag ram s. May train
new em ployees in b a sic m achine operations.
C la ss C . Under sp ecific in stru ction s, op e ra tes sim ple tabulating or e le ctric a l accounting
m achines such a s the s o rte r , in terp rete r, reproducing punch, co llato r, etc. A ssignm ents
typ ically involve portions of a work unit, for exam ple, individual sortin g or collating runs,
or repetitive op eratio n s. May p erform sim ple w iring from d ia g r a m s, and do som e filing work.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
P rim a ry duty is to tra n sc r ib e dictation involving a n orm al routine vocabulary from
tran scrib in g-m ach in e re c o r d s. May a lso type from written copy and do sim p le c le r ic a l work.
W orkers tran scrib in g dictation involving a v a rie d technical or sp e cia lize d vocabulary such as
le g al b rie fs or rep o rts on scien tific re se a r c h a re not included. A w orker who tak es dictation
in shorthand or by Stenotype or s im ila r m achine is c la ss ifie d a s a sten ograp h er.
TY PIST
U se s a typew riter to m ake copies of v ariou s m a te r ia ls or to m ake out b ills after c a lc u la ­
tions have been m ade by another p erso n . May include typing of ste n c ils, m a ts , or s im ila r m a te ­
r ia ls for u se in duplicating p r o c e s s e s . May do c le r ic a l work involving little sp ecia l train in g, such
a s keeping sim p le r e c o r d s, filing reco rd s and re p o rts, o r sortin g and distribu ting incoming m ail.
C la s s A. P e rfo rm s one o r m o re of the following: Typing m a te ria l in final form when
it involves com bining m a te ria l from se v e r a l so u rc e s; or resp o n sib ility fo r c o rre ct spelling,
syllabication , punctuation, e tc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language m a te ­
r ia l; or planning layout and typing of com plicated s ta tistic a l tab le s to m aintain uniform ity
and balance in sp acin g. May type routine form le tte r s , varying d etails to suit c ircu m sta n ce s.
C la s s B . P e rfo rm s one or m o re of the follow ing: Copy typing from rough or cle ar
d ra fts; or routine typing of fo rm s, in su ran ce p o lic ie s, e tc.; or setting up sim ple standard
tabulations; or copying m ore com plex tab les alread y se t up and spaced properly.

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
COM PUTER OPERATOR
M onitors and o p e ra tes the control console of a digital com puter to p r o c e ss data according
to operating in stru ctio n s, u su ally p rep a re d by a p ro g ra m e r. Work includes m ost of the follow ing:
Studies! in struction s to determ ine equipment setup and op eration s; loads equipment with required
item s (tape r e e ls , c a rd s , e tc .); sw itches n e c e ssa r y au xiliary equipment into circu it, and sta r ts
and o p erates com puter; m ak es adjustm en ts to com puter to c o rre c t operating p roblem s and m eet
s p e c ia l conditions; review s e r r o r s m ade during operation and determ in es cau se or r e fe r s problem
to su p e rv iso r or p ro g ra m e r; and m ain tain s operating r e c o r d s. May te st and a s s i s t in correctin g
p ro g ram .
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, com puter o p e ra to rs a re c la ss ifie d a s follow s:
C la s s A. O perates independently, o r under only gen eral d irection , a com puter running
p ro g ra m s with m o st of the following c h a ra c te ris tic s : New p ro g ra m s a re frequently tested
and introduced; scheduling req u irem en ts a re of c r itic a l im portance to m inim ize downtime;
the p ro g ra m s a re of com plex d esign so that identification of e rr o r sou rce often re q u ires a
working knowledge of the total p ro g ra m , and altern ate p ro g ra m s m ay not be availab le. May
give direction and guidance to low er lev el o p e ra to rs.
C la ss B . O perates independently, o r under only g en eral d irection , a com puter running
p ro g ra m s with m o st of the following c h a ra c te ris tic s : M ost of the p ro g ra m s a re e stablish ed
production ru n s, typ ically rim on a re g u larly rec u rrin g b a s is ; there is little o r no testin g




COM PUTER OPERATOR— Continued
of new p ro g ra m s requ ired ; altern ate p ro g ra m s a re provided in c a se origin al p rogram needs
m ajo r change or cannot be co rrecte d within a reaso n ab le tim e. In common e rr o r situ a ­
tion s, diagn oses cau se and tak e s co rrectiv e action. This u su ally involves applying p reviou sly
p rogram ed co rrectiv e ste p s, or using standard co rrectio n techniques.
OR
O perates under d ire ct su p ervision a com puter running p ro g ra m s or segm ents of p ro g ra m s
with the c h a ra c te ristic s d escrib e d fo r c la s s A. May a s s i s t a higher level operator by inde­
pendently perform in g le s s difficult ta sk s a ssig n e d , and p erform in g difficult ta sk s following
detailed in struction s and with frequent review of operations p erform ed.
C la s s C . Works on routine p ro g ram s under clo se su p ervision . Is expected to develop
working knowledge of the com puter equipment used and ability to d etect problem s involved in
running routine p r o g ra m s. U sually has received som e form al train in g in com puter operation.
May a s s i s t higher level op erator on com plex p ro g ra m s.
COM PUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS
Converts statem en ts of bu sin e ss p ro b le m s, typ ically p rep are d by a sy stem s an alyst, into
a sequence of d etailed in stru ction s which a re requ ired to solve the p roblem s by autom atic data
p ro c e ssin g equipm ent. Working from ch a rts or d ia g r a m s, the p ro g ra m e r develops the p r e c ise in ­
stru ction s which, when entered into the com puter sy stem in coded langu age, ca u se the m anipulation

27
COM PUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS— Continued
of data to achieve d esired r e s u lts. Work involves m o st of the following: A pplies knowledge of
com puter c a p a b ilitie s, m ath em atics, logic employed by co m p u ters, and p articu lar subject m atter
involved to analyze ch arts and d iag ram s of the problem to be p rogram ed ; develops sequence
of p ro g ram step s; w rites detailed flow ch arts to show o rd e r in which data will be p r o c e sse d ;
con verts th ese c h arts to coded in struction s for m achine to follow; te sts and c o r r e c ts p ro g ra m s;
p re p a re s in struction s fo r operating p erson nel during production run; a n aly zes, review s, and a lte r s
p ro g ra m s to in c re a se operating efficien cy or adapt to new requ irem en ts; m aintains reco rd s of
p rog ram developm ent and rev isio n s. (NOTE: W orkers perform in g both sy stem s a n aly sis and p ro ­
gram in g should be c la ss ifie d a s sy stem s an aly sts if th is is the sk ill used to d eterm ine their pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim a rily resp o n sib le fo r the m anagem ent or su p ervision of
other electro n ic data p ro c e ssin g em p loy ees, or p ro g ra m e r s p rim a rily concerned with scien tific
an d /or engineering p ro b lem s.
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, p ro g ra m e rs a re c la ss ifie d a s follow s:
C la ss A. Works independently or under only general direction on com plex p roblem s which
req u ire com petence in a ll p h ases of p ro gram in g concepts and p r a c tic e s. Working from d ia ­
g ram s and ch arts which identify the nature of d esired r e s u lts, m ajo r p ro c e ssin g step s to be
accom plished, and the relation sh ip s between v ario u s step s of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of program ing actions needed to efficien tly utilize the com puter sy stem
in achieving d esired end produ cts.
At th is lev el, program ing is difficult b ecau se com puter equipment m u st be organ ized to
produce se v e ral in terrelated but d iv erse products from num erous and d iv erse data elem ents.
A wide variety and extensive number of internal p ro c e ssin g actions m ust occu r. This req u ires
such actions a s developm ent of common operations which can be reu sed , establishm ent of
linkage points between op eratio n s, adjustm en ts to data when p rogram requ irem en ts exceed
com puter sto rag e capacity, and substan tial m anipulation and resequencing of data elem ents
to form a highly integrated p ro g ram .
May provide functional direction to low er level p ro g ra m e rs who a re a ssig n e d to a s s is t .
C la s s B . Works independently o r under only gen eral direction on relativ e ly sim ple
p ro g ra m s, or on sim ple segm ents of com plex p r o g ra m s. P ro g ra m s (or segm ents) usually
p r o c e ss inform ation to produce data in two o r three v arie d sequen ces o r fo rm ats. R eports
and listin g s a re produced by refining, adapting, arra y in g , or m aking m inor additions to or
deletions from input data which a re read ily av ailab le . While num erous re c o rd s m ay be
p ro c e sse d , the data have been refined in p rio r actions so that the accu racy and sequencing
of data can be te ste d by using a few routine ch eck s. Ty p ically, the p rogram d eals with
routine record-keepin g type o p eration s.
OR
Works on com plex p ro g ram s (as d escrib e d fo r c la s s A) under clo se direction of a higher
level p ro g ra m er or su p e rv iso r. May a s s i s t higher lev el p ro g ra m er by independently p e r ­
form ing le s s difficult ta s k s a ssig n e d , and perform in g m o re difficu lt ta sk s under fa irly clo se
d irection .
May guide or in struct lower level p ro g ra m e rs.
C la s s C . M akes p rac tic a l application s of p rogram in g p rac tic e s and concepts usually
learn ed in fo rm al train in g c o u r se s. A ssign m en ts a re designed to develop com petence in the
application of standard p ro ced u res to routine p ro b le m s. R e ce iv e s close sup ervision on new
a sp e c ts of assig n m e n ts; and work is review ed to v erify its accu racy and conform ance with
req u ired p ro c ed u re s.
COM PUTER SYSTEM S ANALYST, BUSINESS
A nalyzes bu sin e ss problem s to form ulate p ro ced u res fo r solving them by use of electron ic
data p ro c e ssin g equipment. Develops a com plete d escrip tio n of all sp ecification s needed to enable
p ro g ra m e rs to p rep are requ ired digital com puter p ro g ra m s. Work involves m o st of the following:
A nalyzes su b ject-m atter operations to be autom ated and id en tifies conditions and c r ite r ia required
to achieve sa tisfa c to ry r e su lts; sp e c ifie s number and types of r e c o r d s, file s , and docum ents to
be used; outlines actions to be p erform ed by person nel and com puters in sufficien t detail for
presentation to m anagem ent and for program ing (typically this involves p rep aration of work and
data flow ch arts); coordin ates the developm ent of te st p roblem s and p articip a tes in tr ia l runs of
new and rev ise d sy ste m s; and recom m ends equipment changes to obtain m ore effective o v e ra ll
o p eratio n s. (NOTE: W orkers p erform in g both sy ste m s a n a ly sis and program ing should be c la s ­
sified as sy stem s an aly sts if this is the sk ill used to determ ine th eir pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim a rily resp o n sible fo r the m anagem ent or supervision
of other electron ic data p ro c e ssin g em p loy ees, or sy stem s a n aly sts p rim a rily concerned with
scien tific or engineering p ro blem s.
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, sy stem s an alysts are c la ssifie d a s follow s:
C la ss A. Works independently or under only gen eral direction on com plex p roblem s in ­
volving all p h ases of sy stem s a n a ly sis. P ro b lem s a re com plex becau se of d iv erse so u rce s of
input data and m u ltip le-u se requ irem ents of output data. (F o r exam ple, develops an integrated
production scheduling, inventory control, co st a n a ly sis, and s a le s a n aly sis reco rd in which




COM PUTER SYSTEM S AN ALYST, BUSINESS— Continued
every item of each type is autom atically p ro c e sse d through the full system of reco rd s and
app rop riate followup actions a re initiated by the computer.) C on fers with p erson s concerned to
determ ine the data p ro c e ssin g p roblem s and a d v ise s su b ject-m atter personnel on the im p lic a ­
tions of new or rev ise d sy ste m s of data p ro ce ssin g op eration s. M akes recom m endations, if
needed, for approval of m a jo r sy stem s in stallation s or changes and for obtaining equipment.
May provide functional direction to low er level sy stem s an alysts who are a ssig n e d to
a s s is t .
C la s s B . Works independently or under only general direction on problem s that a re
relativ e ly uncom plicated to analyze, plan, p ro g ram , and op erate. P rob lem s a re of lim ited
com plexity be cau se so u rc e s of input data are hom ogeneous and the output data a re clo sely
related . (F o r exam ple, develops sy ste m s for m aintaining depositor accounts in a bank,
m aintaining accounts receivable in a r e ta il establishm ent, or m aintaining inventory accounts
in a m anufacturing or w holesale establishm ent.) C on fers with p e rso n s concerned to determ ine
the data p ro c e ssin g p roblem s and ad v ise s su b ject-m atter personnel on the im plication s of the
data p ro ce ssin g sy ste m s to be applied.
OR
Works on a segm ent of a com plex data p ro c e ssin g schem e or sy stem , a s d escrib e d for
c la s s A. Works independently on routine a ssign m en ts and rece iv e s instruction and guidance
on com plex a ssig n m e n ts. Work is review ed fo r accu racy of judgm ent, com pliance with in ­
stru ction s, and to in su re p roper alinem ent with the o v e ra ll sy stem .
C la s s C . Works under im m ediate sup ervision , carry in g out a n alyses a s assig n ed , usually
of a single activity. A ssignm ents a re designed to develop and expand p ractica l experience
in the application of p roced u res and sk ills requ ired for sy stem s a n aly sis work. F o r exam ple,
m ay a s s i s t a higher level sy ste m s an alyst by p rep aring the detailed sp ecification s requ ired
by p ro g ra m e r s from inform ation developed by the higher level analyst.
DRAFTSMAN
C la s s A . P lan s the graphic presentation of com plex item s having distinctive design
fe a tu re s that d iffer significan tly from estab lish e d drafting p reced en ts. Works in clo se sup­
port with the d esign o rig in ato r, and m ay recom m end m inor design changes. A nalyzes the
effect of each change on the d etails of form , function, and p ositional relation sh ips of com ­
ponents and p a r t s . Works with a m inim um of su p e rv iso ry a ss is ta n c e . Com pleted work is
review ed by design origin ator for con sisten cy with p rio r engineering d eterm in ations. May
either p rep a re d raw in gs, or d irect th eir p rep aration by lower level draftsm en.
C la s s B . P e rfo rm s nonroutine and com plex drafting assign m en ts that requ ire the a pp li­
cation of m o st of the stan dardized drawing techniques reg u larly used. Duties typ ically in ­
volve such work a s: P re p a re s working draw ings of su b a sse m b lie s with ir r e g u la r sh ap es,
m ultiple functions, and p r e c ise p ositional relation sh ip s between com ponents; p re p a re s a rc h i­
te ctu ral draw ings for construction of a building including detail draw ings of foundations, wall
sectio n s, floor p lan s, and roof. U se s accepted form u las and m anuals in m aking n e c e ssa r y
com putations to determ ine quantities o f m a te r ia ls to be used, load c a p a citie s, stren gth s,
s t r e s s e s , etc. R e ce iv e s in itial in stru ction s, requ irem en ts, and advice from su p e rv iso r.
Com pleted work is checked for technical adequacy.
C la s s C . P re p a re s d etail draw ings of single units or p a rts for engineering, construction,
m anufacturing, o r re p a ir p u rp o se s. Types of draw ings p rep ared include iso m e tric p rojection s
(depicting three dim ensions in accu rate scale ) and section al views to cla rify positioning of
components and convey needed inform ation. C on solidates d etails from a number of so u rces
and a d ju sts or tr a n sp o se s sc a le as requ ired . Suggested m ethods of approach, applicable
p reced en ts, and advice on so u rce m a te r ia ls a re given with in itial assig n m en ts. Instructions
a re le s s com plete when assig n m en ts pecur. Work m ay be spot-checked during p r o g r e s s.
DRAFTSM AN -TRACER
Copies plans and draw ings p rep ared by others by placing tracin g cloth or p ap er over
draw ings and tracin g with pen o r pencil. (Does not include tracin g lim ited to plans p rim a rily
con sistin g of straig h t lin es and a la rg e sc a le not requ iring clo se delineation.)
AND/OR
P re p a re s sim p le o r repetitive draw ings of e a sily visu alize d ite m s. Work is closely su p erv ised
during p r o g r e s s.
ELECTR O N IC TECHNICIAN
Works on variou s types of electron ic equipment or sy ste m s by p erform in g one or m ore
of the following o p eration s: Modifying, in stallin g , rep airin g , and overhauling. These operations
requ ire the p erform an ce of m o st or all of the following ta s k s : A ssem blin g, testin g, adjusting,
calibratin g, tuning, and alining.
Work is nonrepetitive and re q u ires a knowledge of the theory and p ractice of ele ctro n ics
pertaining to the use of general and sp ecia lize d electron ic te st equipment; trouble a n a ly sis; and
the operation, relation sh ip , and alinem ent of electron ic s y ste m s, su b sy stem s, and circu its having
a variety of component p a r ts .

28
ELECTR O N IC TECHNICIAN— Continued

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (R e g istere d )

E lectro n ic equipment or sy ste m s worked on typ ically include one or m ore of the following:
Ground, vehicle, or airb o rn e rad io com m unications s y ste m s, relay sy ste m s, navigation a id s;
airborn e or ground ra d a r sy ste m s; rad io and telev isio n tran sm ittin g or recording sy ste m s; e le c ­
tronic com puters; m is s ile and sp a c e c ra ft guidance and control sy ste m s; in d u strial and m ed ical
m easu rin g , indicating and controlling d ev ices; etc.

A re g iste re d n u rse who gives n ursing se rv ic e under g en eral m ed ical direction to ill or
injured em ployees or other p e rso n s who becom e ill or su ffer an accident on the p re m ise s of a
factory or other establishm ent. Duties involve a com bination of the following: Giving fir s t aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent d re ssin g of em ployees' in ju rie s; keeping reco rd s
of patients treated ; prep arin g accident rep o rts for com pensation or other p u rp o se s; a ssistin g in
p h ysical exam inations and health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing out p ro g ra m s involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environm ent,
or other a ctiv ities affecting the health, w elfare, and safety of a ll person nel. N ursing su p e rv iso rs
or head n u rse s in e stablish m en ts employing m ore than one n urse a re excluded.

(Exclude production a s s e m b le r s and t e s t e r s , craftsm e n , d raftsm en , d e sig n e rs, e n gin eers,
and rep airm en of such stan dard electron ic equipment a s office m achines, radio and television
receivin g s e t s .)

M A IN T E N A N C E A N D P O W E R P L A N T
C A R P EN T ER , MAINTENANCE

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

P e rfo rm s the carp en try duties n e c e ssa r y to con struct and m aintain in good re p a ir build­
ing woodwork and equipment such a s bin s, c r ib s , coun ters, bench es, p artition s, d o o rs, flo o rs,
s t a ir s , c a sin g s, and tr im m ade of wood in an establish m en t. Work involves m ost of the following:
Planning and laying out of work from b lu ep rin ts, d raw in gs, m o d e ls, or verb al in stru ction s; using a
variety of c a rp e n te r's handtools, portable power to o ls, and stan dard m easu rin g in strum en ts; m ak ­
ing standard shop com putations relatin g to dim ensions of work; and selectin g m a te r ia ls n e c e ssa r y
for the work. In g e n e ral, the work of the m aintenance carp en ter re q u ires rounded train in g and
experien ce usually acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experien ce.

P rod u ces replacem en t p arts and new p a rts in m aking r e p a ir s of m etal p a rts of m ech an ical
equipment operated in an establish m en t. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Interpreting written
in struction s and sp ecificatio n s; planning and laying out of work; using a v a rie ty of m ach in ist's
handtools and p recisio n m easu rin g in strum en ts; setting up and operating stan dard m achine to o ls;
shaping of m etal p a rts to clo se to le ran ces; m aking stan dard shop com putations relatin g to dim en­
sion s of work, tooling, fe e d s, and sp eeds of m achining; knowledge of the working p ro p e rtie s of
the common m e ta ls; selectin g stan dard m a te r ia ls , p a r ts , and equipment requ ired for his work;
and fitting and asse m b lin g p arts into m ech an ical equipm ent. In g e n e ral, the m ach in ist's work
n orm ally req u ires a rounded train in g in m achine-shop p ractice usually acqu ired through a fo rm al
apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and experien ce.

E LEC TR IC IA N , MAINTENANCE .
P e rfo rm s a v arie ty of e le c tr ic a l trad e functions such a s the in stallation , m aintenance, or
re p a ir of equipment fo r the generation , d istribution, or utilization of e le ctric energy in an e sta b ­
lishm ent. Work involves m o st of the follow ing: Installin g or rep airin g any of a variety of e le c ­
tr ic a l equipment such a s g e n e rato rs, tr a n sfo r m e r s, sw itch boards, c o n tro llers, circu it b r e a k e r s,
m o to rs, heating u n its, conduit s y ste m s, or other tra n sm issio n equipment; working from blue­
p rin ts, draw ings, layouts, or other sp ecificatio n s; locating and diagnosing trouble in the e le ctric a l
sy stem or equipm ent; working standard com putations relatin g to load requ irem ents of w iring or
e le c tric a l equipment; and usin g a v arie ty of e le c tric ia n 's handtools and m easu rin g and testin g
in strum en ts. In ge n e ral, the work of the m aintenance e le ctrician req u ires rounded train in g and
experien ce usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and experien ce.
ENG IN EER, STATIONARY
O perates and m ain tain s and m ay a lso su p e rv ise the operation of station ary engines and
equipment (m echanical or e le c tric a l) to supply the establish m en t in which employed with pow er,
heat, refrig e ratio n , or air-conditioning. Work in volves: Operating and m aintaining equipment
such a s steam engin es, a ir c o m p r e s so r s , g e n e rato rs, m o to rs, turbin es, ventilating and r e fr ig ­
eratin g equipm ent, steam b o ile rs and b o iler-fed w ater pum ps; making equipment r e p a ir s; and
keeping a reco rd of operation of m achinery, te m p e ratu re , and fuel consumption. May a lso su ­
p e rv ise th ese o p eration s. Head or chief engin eers in establish m en ts employing m ore than one
engineer a re excluded.
FIREM AN, STATIONARY BO ILER
F ir e s station ary b o ile rs to furnish the establishm ent in which employed with heat, power,
or steam . F ee d s fu els to fire by hand or o p e rates a m ech an ical stoker, g a s, or oil burn er; and
checks w ater and safety v a lv e s. May clean , oil, or a s s i s t in rep airin g boilerroom equipment.
H E L P E R , MAINTENANCE TRADES
A s s is t s one or m ore w o rk ers in the sk illed m aintenance tra d e s, by p erform in g sp ecific
or ge n e ral duties of le s s e r sk ill, such a s keeping a w orker supplied with m a te r ia ls and to o ls;
cleaning working a re a , m achine, and equipment; a ss is tin g journeym an by holding m a te r ia ls or
too ls; and p erform in g other unskilled ta s k s a s d irected by journeym an. The kind of work the
helper is perm itted to p e rfo rm v a rie s from trad e to trad e : In som e trad es the helper is confined
to supplying, lifting, and holding m a te r ia ls and to o ls, and cleaning working a r e a s ; and in others
he is perm itted to p erfo rm sp ec ia lize d m achine o p eratio n s, or p arts of a trad e that a re a lso
p erform ed by w ork ers on a fu ll-tim e b a s is .
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
S p e c ia lize s in the operation of one or m o re types of m achine to o ls, such a s jig b o r e rs ,
cy lin d rical or su rfa c e g rin d e rs, engine la th e s, or m illing m achines, in the construction of
m achine-shop t o o ls , g a g e s, ji g s , fix tu re s, or d ies. Work involves m ost of the following: Planning
and p erform in g difficult m achining operations; p ro c e ssin g item s requiring com plicated setups or
a high degree of accu racy ; using a v arie ty of p recisio n m easu rin g in strum ents; selectin g fe e d s,
sp ee d s, tooling, and operation sequence; and m aking n e c e ssa r y adjustm en ts during operation
to achieve req u isite to le ran c es or dim en sion s. May be requ ired to recogn ize when tools need
d re ssin g , to d r e s s to o ls, and to se le c t p roper coolants and cutting and lubricatin g o ils. F o r
c ro ss-in d u stry wage study p u rp o se s, m achine-tool o p e ra to rs, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing
shops a re excluded from th is c la ssific a tio n .




MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (Maintenance)
R e p a irs autom obiles, b u se s, m o to rtru ck s, and t r a c to r s of an establishm ent. Work in ­
volves m ost of the following: Exam ining autom otive equipment to diagn ose sou rce of trouble; d is ­
assem b lin g equipment and perform in g r e p a ir s that involve the u se of such handtools a s w renches,
g a g e s, d r ills , or sp ecia lize d equipment in d isa sse m b lin g or fitting p a r ts ; replacin g broken or
defective p a rts from stock; grinding and adjusting v a lv e s; rea sse m b lin g and in stallin g the variou s
a sse m b lie s in the vehicle and m aking n e c e s sa r y adjustm en ts; and alining w heels, adjusting brakes
and ligh ts, or tightening body bolts. In ge n e ral, the work of the autom otive m echanic re q u ires
rounded train in g and experien ce usually acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experien ce.
This c la ssific a tio n does not include m ech an ics who r e p a ir c u sto m e rs' veh icles in auto­
m obile r e p a ir shops.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R e p a irs m achinery or m ech an ical equipment of an establish m en t. Work involves m ost
of the following: Exam ining m achines and m ech an ical equipment to diagn ose source of trouble;
dism antling or p artly dism antling m achines and perform in g r e p a ir s that m ainly involve the use
of handtools in scrap in g and fitting p a r ts; replacin g broken or defective p a rts with item s obtained
from stock; ordering the production of a replacem en t p art by a m achine shop or sending of the
m achine to a m achine shop for m ajo r r e p a ir s; p rep arin g written sp ecificatio n s for m ajo r re p a irs
or for the production of p a rts ordered from m achine shop; rea sse m b lin g m achines; and making
a ll n e c e ssa r y adjustm en ts for operation. In g e n e ral, the work of a m aintenance m echanic req u ires
rounded train in g and experien ce usually acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and exp erien ce. Excluded from this c la ssific a tio n a re w ork ers whose p rim ary duties^
involve setting up or adjusting m achines.
MILLWRIGHT
In sta lls new m achines or heavy equipment, and d ism an tles and in sta lls m achines or heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout a re requ ired . Work involves m ost of the following:
Planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other sp ecificatio n s; using a variety
of handtools and rigging; m aking standard shop com putations relatin g to s t r e s s e s , strength of
m a te r ia ls , and cen ters of gravity ; alining and balancing of equipm ent; selectin g stan dard to o ls,
equipment, and p arts to be used; and in stallin g and m aintaining in good ord er power tra n sm issio n
equipment such a s d riv e s and speed r e d u c e rs. In g e n e ral, the m illw rig h t's work n orm ally req u ires
a rounded training and experien ce in the trad e acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or
equivalent train in g and exp erien ce.
PAIN TER, MAINTENANCE
P ain ts and red e co ra te s w a lls, woodwork, and fix tu res of an establish m en t. Work involves
the following: Knowledge of su rfa ce p e cu lia ritie s and types of paint requ ired for different ap p lica ­
tion s; p rep arin g su rfa c e fo r painting by rem oving old fin ish or by placing putty or fille r in nail

29
PA IN TER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

SH E E T -M E T A L WORKER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

holes and in te r s tic e s ; and applying paint with sp ra y gun or brush. May m ix co lo rs, o ils, white
lead , and other paint in gredien ts to obtain p ro per co lo r o r co n sisten cy. In gen eral, the work of the
m aintenance painter re q u ires rounded train in g and experien ce u su ally acqu ired through a form al
apprenticesh ip or equivalent train in g and experien ce.

up and operating all available types of sh eet-m etal working m achines: using a variety of handtools
in cutting, bending, form ing,, shaping, fitting, and assem b lin g ; and installin g sh eet-m etal a rtic le s
a s requ ired . In g en eral, the work of the m aintenance sh eet-m etal w orker req u ires rounded
train in g and experien ce usually acqu ired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experien ce.

P IP E F IT T E R , MAINTENANCE
In sta lls or r e p a ir s w ater, steam , g a s , or other types of pipe and pipefittings in an
establish m en t. Work involves m o st of the following: Laying out of work and m easu rin g to locate
p osition of pipe from draw ings or other written sp ecificatio n s; cutting v a rio u s s iz e s of pipe to
c o rre c t lengths with ch isel and ham m er or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting m achines; threading
pipe with sto ck s and d ie s; bending pipe by hand-driven o r pow er-driven m ach in es; assem b lin g
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to h an g e rs; m aking stan dard shop com putations relatin g to
p r e s s u r e s , flow, and size of pipe requ ired ; and m aking standard te sts to determ ine whether fin­
ished p ipes m eet sp ecificatio n s. In gen eral, the work of the m aintenance p ip efitter re q u ires
rounded train in g and experien ce usually acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
train in g and exp erien ce. W orkers p rim a rily engaged in in stallin g and rep airin g building sanitation
or heating sy ste m s a re excluded.
S H E E T -M E T A L WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F a b r ic a te s , in sta lls , and m ain tain s in good re p a ir the sh eet-m etal equipment and fix tu res
(such a s m achine g u a r d s , g r e a se pan s, sh e lv es, lo c k e rs, tan k s, ve n tilato rs, chutes, ducts, m etal
roofing) of an establishm ent. Work involves mo.st of the follow ing: Planning and laying out all
types of sh eet-m etal m aintenance work from blu ep rin ts,, m o d e ls, or other sp ecificatio n s; setting

TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(Die m ak er: jig m ak er; tool m ak e r; fixture m ak er; gage m aker)
C on structs and r e p a ir s m achine-shop to o ls, g ag e s, jig s,' fix tu res or d ies for fo rg in g s,
punching, and other m etal-form in g work. Work involves m o st of the following: Planning and
laying out of work from m od els, blu ep rin ts, draw ings, or other o ral and written sp ecificatio n s;
using a v arie ty of tool and die m a k e r 's handtools and p recisio n m easu rin g instrum ents; under­
standing of the working p ro p e rtie s of common m eta ls and allo y s; setting up and operating of
m achine tools and related equipment; m aking n e c e ssa ry shop com putations relating to dim ensions
of work, sp ee d s, fe e d s, and tooling of m ach in es; h eat-treatin g of m etal p arts during fabrication
a s well a s of finished tools and d ies to achieve requ ired qualities; working to clo se to le ran ces;
fitting and asse m b lin g of p arts to p re sc rib e d to le ran ces and allow ances; and selectin g appropriate
m a te r ia ls , to o ls, and p r o c e s s e s . In gen eral, the tool and die m a k e r 's work req u ires a rounded
train in g in m achine-shop and toolroom p ractice u su ally acqu ired through a form al apprenticeship
or equivalent train in g and experien ce.
F o r c r o ss-in d u str y wage study p u rp o se s, tool and die m ak e rs in tool and die jobbing
shops a re excluded from th is cla ssific a tio n .

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
GUARD AND WATCHMAN
G uard. P e rfo rm s routine police d uties, either at fixed p ost or on tour, m aintaining ord e r,
using a rm s or fo rce where n e c e ssa ry . Includes gatem en who a re stationed at gate and check
on identity of em ployees and other p e rso n s en terin g.
W atchman. M akes rounds of p r e m ise s p e rio d ically in protecting property again st fir e ,
theft, and ille g a l entry.
JANITOR, PO RTER, OR CLEANER
(Sw eeper; charwoman: ja n itre ss)
C leans and keeps in an o rd e rly condition facto ry working a re a s and w ash room s, or
p r e m ise s of an o ffice, apartm ent house, or co m m ercial or other establishm ent. Duties involve
a com bination of the following; Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing flo o rs; rem oving
chips, tr a sh , and other refu se; dusting equipment, fu rn iture, or fix tu res; polishing m etal fix ­
tu r e s or trim m in g s; providing supplies and m inor m aintenance s e r v ic e s; and cleaning la v a to rie s,
sh ow ers, and re str o o m s. W orkers who sp ec ia lize in window washing a re excluded.
LA BO RER , M A TERIAL HANDLING

PACK ER, SHIPPING— Continued
and size o f container; in sertin g e n clo su re s in container; using e x c e lsio r or other m a te ria l to
prevent break age or dam age; closin g and sealin g container; and applying labels or entering
identifying data on container. P a c k e rs who a lso m ake wooden boxes or c r a te s a re excluded.
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING C LE R K
P re p a re s m erch an d ise for shipm ent, or re c e iv e s and i s resp on sible for incoming ship­
m ents of m erch an d ise or other m a te r ia ls . Shipping work involves: A knowledge of shipping p ro ­
ce d u re s, p r a c tic e s, rou tes, av ailable m ean s of tran sp ortation , and r a te s; and preparing reco rd s
of the goods shipped, m aking up b ills of lading, posting weight and shipping ch a rg e s, and keeping
a file of shipping r e c o r d s. May d ire ct or a s s is t in p rep arin g the m erch an d ise for shipment.
R eceiving work in v o lv es: V erifying or directin g others in verifying the co rre c tn e ss of shipm ents
again st b ills of lading, in voices, or other r e c o rd s; checking for sh ortages and rejectin g dam ­
aged goods; routing m erch an d ise or m a te r ia ls to p roper departm ents; and m aintaining n e c e ssa ry
re c o rd s and file s .
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, w ork ers a re c la ss ifie d a s follows:
R eceiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receivin g clerk
TRUCKDRIVER

(L o ad er and unloader; handler and stac k e r; sh elv er; tru ck e r; stockm an o r stock h elp er;
w arehousem an or w arehouse helper)
A w orker em ployed in a w arehouse, m anufacturing plant, sto re , or other establishm ent
whose duties involve one or m o re of the following: Loading and unloading v a rio u s m a te r ia ls and
m erch an d ise on or from freight c a r s , tru c k s, or other tran sp o rtin g d evices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing m a te r ia ls or m erch an d ise in p ro per sto ra g e location; and tran sp ortin g m a te r ia ls or
m erch an d ise by handtruck, c a r , or w heelbarrow . Longshorem en, who load and unload ships a re
exclu ded.

D rives a truck within a city o r in du strial a re a to tran sp o rt m a te r ia ls , m erch an d ise,
equipm ent, or m en between v a rio u s types of e stablish m en ts such a s: M anufacturing plants, freight
depots, w areh ou ses, w holesale and r e ta il estab lish m e n ts, or between re ta il establish m en ts and
cu sto m e rs' hou ses o r p la c e s of b u sin e ss. May a lso load or unload truck with or without h e lp e rs,
m ake m inor m ech an ical r e p a ir s, and keep tru ck in good working ord e r. D riv e r-sa le sm e n and
o v e r-th e -ro ad d riv e r s a re excluded.

ORDER F IL L E R

follow s:

(O rder p ick er; stock se le c to r; w arehouse stockm an)
F ills shipping or tr a n sfe r o rd e rs fo r finished goods from stored m erch an d ise in a c co rd ­
ance with sp ecificatio n s on s a le s s lip s, c u sto m e rs' o r d e r s, o r other in stru ctio n s. May, in addition
to filling o r d e r s and indicating item s filled or om itted, keep re c o rd s of outgoing o r d e r s, req u i­
sition additional stock or rep o rt sh ort sup p lies to su p e rv iso r, and p erform other relate d duties.
PACKER, SHIPPING
P re p a re s finished products for shipment or sto ra g e by placing them in shipping con­
ta in e r s, the sp ecific operations perfo rm ed being dependent upon the type, s iz e , and number
of units to be packed, the type of container em ployed, and method o f shipment. Work re q u ires
the placing of item s in shipping con tain ers and m ay involve one or m o re of the following:
Knowledge of v ario u s ite m s of stock in o rd er to v e rify content; selection of app rop riate type




F o r wage study p u rp o se s, tru ck d riv e rs a re c la ss ifie d by size and type of equipment, as
( T r a c to r - tr a ile r should be rated on the b a sis of t r a ile r capacity.)
T ru ck d river (com bination of s iz e s liste d sep arately )
T ru ck d riv er, light (under lVz tons)
T ru ck d riv er, m edium (IV 2 to and including 4 tons)
T ru ck d riv er, heavy (over 4 tons, t r a ile r type)
T ru ck d riv er, heavy (over 4 tons, other than tr a ile r type)

TRU CKER, POWER
O p erates a m anually controlled gasoline- or electric-pow ered truck o r tr a c to r to tran sp o rt
goods and m a te r ia ls of a ll kinds about a w arehouse, m anufacturing plant, or other establishm ent.
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, w ork ers a re c la ss ifie d by type of truck , a s follow s:
T ru ck e r, power (forklift)
T ru ck e r, power (other than forklift)

A v a ila b le O n R e q u e s t----The follow in g areas are surveyed p e rio d ic a lly fo r use in adm inistering the S ervice Contract A ct of 1965.
available at no cost while supplies last from any of the BLS region al o ffic e s shown on the inside front cover.

Alaska
Albany, Ga.
Alpena, Standish, and Tawas C ity, Mich.
A m a rillo , Tex.
A s h e v ille , N.C.
A tlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, G a —S.C.
Austin, Tex.
B a k ersfield , C alif.
Baton Rouge, La.
B ilo x i, Gulfport, and Pascagoula, M iss.
B rid gep ort, N orw alk, and Stam ford, Conn.
Charleston, S.C.
C la rk s v ille , Tenn., and Hopkinsville, Ky.
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ga.— la.
A
Crane, Ind.
Dothan, A la.
Duluth— u p erior, M in n —W is.
S
Durham, N.C.
E l Paso, Tex.
Eugene, O reg.
F a rgo—
Moorhead, N. Dak.—Minn.
F a y e tte v ille , N.C.
Fitchburg— eom in ster, M ass.
L
F o rt Smith, A rk.—
Okla.
F re d e ric k —
Hagerstown, M d —Pa.—W. Va.
G reat F a lls , Mont.
Greensboro—
Winston Salem—
High Point, N.C.
H arrisb u rg, Pa.
Huntsville, A la.
K n o x ville, Tenn.

Copies o f public releases are

Lared o, T ex.
Las V egas, Nev.
Lexington, Ky.
L ow er E astern Shore, Md.—Va.
Macon, Ga.
M arquette, Escanaba, Sault Ste. M a rie , Mich.
M eridian, M iss.
M iddlesex, Monmouth, Ocean and S om erset
C os., N.J.
M ob ile, A la ., and Pensacola, F la.
M ontgom ery, A la.
N ash ville, Tenn.
New London—
Groton—
Norw ich, Conn.
N ortheastern Maine
Ogden, Utah
Orlando, Fla.
Oxnard—
Ventura, C alif.
Panama City, F la.
Pine Bluff, A rk.
Portsm outh, N.H.—
Maine— ass.
M
Pueblo, Colo.
Reno, Nev.
Sacram ento, C alif.
Santa B arbara, C a lif.
*
Shreveport, La.
Springfield—
Chicopee—
Holyoke, M ass.—Conn.
Stockton, C alif.
Tacom a, Wash.
Topeka, Kans.
Tucson, A r iz .
V a lle jo —
Napa, C alif.
Wichita F a lls , Tex.
W ilm ington, D e l—
N.J.—
Md.

The eleventh annual rep ort on salaries for accountants, auditors, chief accountants, attorneys, job analysts, d irecto rs o f personnel,
buyers, chem ists, engineers, engineering technicians, draftsm en, and c le r ic a l em ployees. O rder as BLS Bulletin 1693, National
Survey o f P ro fessio n a l, A d m in istrative, Technical, and C le ric a l Pay, June 1970, $1.00 a copy, from the Superintendent o f Documents,
U.S. Governm ent P rin tin g O ffice, Washington, D.C., 20402, or any o f its region al sales o ffices.

☆

U.

S.

G O V E R N M E N T




P R IN T IN G

O F F IC E :

1 9 7 2 -7 4 5

1 0 1 /4 9

A r e a W a g e S u rv ey s
A lis t of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A d ire c to ry of area wage studies including m ore lim ited studies conducted at
the request of the Em ploym ent Standards Adm inistration of the Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins m ay be purchased from the
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Governm ent P rin tin g O ffice, Washington, D .C., 20402, or from any of the BLS regional sales offices shown on
the inside front cover.
Bulletin number
Area

and p r i c e

Akron, Ohio, July 1971 1
---------------------------------------- 1685-87,
40 cents
Albany—
Schenectady—T ro y, N .Y ., M ar. 1971 1---------- 1685-54,
35 cents
Albuquerque, N. M e x ., M ar. 1971____________________ 1685-58,
30 cents
Allentown—
Bethlehem—
Easton, Pa.—
N.J., M ay 1971— 1685-75, 30 cents
Atlanta, G a., May 1971----------------------------------------- 1685-69, 40 cents
B altim ore, M d ., Aug. 1971____________________________ 1725-16,
35 cents
Beaumont— o r t Arthur—
P
Orange, T ex ., M ay 1971 1---- 1685-68,
35 cents
Binghamton, N .Y ., July 1971 1------------------------------- 1725-6,
35 cents
Birm ingham , A la ., M ar. 1971 1 ----------------------------- 1685-63, 40 cents
B oise City, Idaho, Nov. 1970 1------------------------------- 1685-21,
35 cents
Boston, M ass., Aug. 1971-------------------------------------- 1725-11, 40 cents
Buffalo, N .Y ., Oct. 19701_____________________________
1685-43,
50 cents
Burlington, V t., Dec. 1971-----)------------------------------- 1725-25,
25 cents
Canton, Ohio, May 1971_______________________________ 1685-71,
30 cents
Charleston, W. V a ., M ar. 1971------------------------------ 1685-57, 30 cents
C harlotte, N .C ., Jan. 1971_____________________________ 1685-48,
30 cents
Chattanooga, Tenn.-G a., Sept. 1971------------------------ 1725-14, 30 cents
Chicago, 111., June 1970---------------------------------------- 1660-90,
60 cents
Cincinnati, Ohio—
Ky.—
Ind., Feb. 1971 1-------------------- 1685-53, 45 cents
C leveland, Ohio, Sept. 1971----------------------------------- 1725-17, 40 cents
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1971------------------------------------ 1725-19,
30 cents
D allas, T ex ., Oct. 1971......1
----------------------------------- 1725-26,
35 cents
D avenport-Rock Island-M oline, Iowa—
111.,
Feb. 1971______________________________________________ 1685-51,
30 cents
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 19701______________________________ 1685-45, 40 cents
D enver, C olo., Dec. 1970_______________ __________ ____ 1685-41, 35 cents
Des M oines, Iowa, May 1971--------------------------------- 1685-70, 30 cents
D etroit, M ich., Feb. 1971 1------------------------------------ 1685-77,
50 cents
F o rt Worth, T ex ., Oct. 1971----- 1--------------------------- 1725-21,
30 cents
G reen Bay, W is ., July 1971 ----------------------------------- 1725-3,
30 cents
G reen ville, S.C., May 1971 1--------------------------------- 1685-78, 35 cents
Houston, T ex., Apr. 1971 1 ------------------------------------ 1685-67,
50 cents
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1971--------------------------------- 1725-23,
30 cents
Jackson, M iss., Jan. 1971 1 ----------------------------------- 1685-39,
35 cents
Jacksonville, F la ., Dec. 19701------------------------------ 1685-37, 35 cents
Kansas City, M o.-K ans., Sept. 1971 --------- ------- ------ 1725-18,
35 cents
Law rence— averh ill, M ass.—
H
N.H ., June 1971---------- 1685-83, 30 cents
L ittle Rock-North L ittle Rock, A rk ., July 1971------- 1725-4,
30 cents
Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa A n a Garden G rove, C a lif., M ar. 1971 1 ----------------------- 1685-66,
50 cents
L o u isville, Ky.—
Ind., Nov. 1970--------------- —----------- 1685-27, 30 cents
Lubbock, T ex ., M ar. 1971_____________________________ 1685-60, 30 cents
M anchester, N .H ., July 1971---------------------------------- 1725-2,
30 cents
Memphis, Tenn.— r k ., Nov. 1970--------------------------- 1685-30, 30 cents
A
M iam i, F la ., Nov. 1970 1...-------------- ---------- -------- — 1685-29, 40 cents
Midland and Odessa, T e x ., Jan. 1971---------------------- 1685-40, 30 cents
Milwaukee, W is ., May 1971---------------------------------- 1685-76,
35 cents
Minneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn., J an. 1971------------------- 1685-44, 40 cents
l Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




A re a
Muskegon—
Muskegon Heights, M ich., June 1971____
Newark and J e rs e y City, N.J., Jan. 1971____________
New Haven, Conn., J an. 1971________________________
New O rleans, L a ., J an. 1971 1________________________
New Y ork, N .Y ., Apr. 1971---------------------------------N orfolk—
Portsm outh and New port News—
Hampton, V a „ J an. 1971 1 __________________________
Oklahoma City, O kla., July 1971 1___________________
Omaha, Nebr.—
Iowa, Sept. 1971 1 -------------------------Paterson — lifton— a s s a ic , N .J., June 1971_________
C
P
Philadelphia, P a.— .J ., Nov. 1970------------------------N
Phoenix, A r i z . , June 1971-----------------------------------Pittsburgh, P a ., Jan. 1971 1--------------------------------Portland, M aine, Nov. 1971 1 ---------------------------Portland, O reg.— ash., May 1971____________________
W
P rovid en ce—
Pawtucket— arwick, R.I.— a ss.,
W
M
M ay 1971 1 -------------------------------------------------------Raleigh, N .C ., Aug. 1971-------------------------------------Richmond, V a ., M ar. 1971----------------------------------R ochester, N .Y . (o ffic e occupations only),
July 1971 1 -------------------------------------------------------Rockford, 111., M ay 1971 -------------------------------------St. L o u is , M o.—
111., M ar. 1971 1---------------------------Salt Lake C ity, Utah, Nov. 1971______________________
San Antonio, T e x ., May 1971 1________________________
San B ernardino— iv e rs id e — ntario, C a lif.,
R
O
Dec. 1970 1-------------------------------------------------------San D iego, C a lif., Nov. 1970_________________________
San F ra n cisco—
Oakland, C a lif., Oct. 1970___________
San Jose, C a lif., Aug. 1971 1-------------------------------Savannah, G a., May 1971______________________________
Scranton, P a ., July 1971______________________________
Seattle— verett, W ash., J an. 1971 1__________________
E
Sioux F a lls , S. Dak., Dec. 1970 1 ____________________
South Bend, Ind., M ar. 1971__________________________
Spokane, W ash., June 1971___________________________
Syracuse, N .Y ., July 1971 1 --------------------------------Tam pa—
St. P etersb u rg, F la ., Nov. 1970_____________
Toledo, Ohio— ich ., A pr. 1971 1_____________________
M
Trenton, N .J ., Sept. 1971---------------------------- -------Utica—
Rom e, N .Y ., July 1971 1 ----------------------------Washington, D.C.—
Md.—V a ., Apr. 1971__________ ____
W aterbury, Conn., M ar. 1971------------------------------W aterloo, Iowa, Nov. il971----------------------------------W ichita, K an s., A pr. 1971-----------------------------------W o rcester, M a ss., May 1971------------------------------Y ork , P a ., Feb. 1971------------------------------------------Youngstown-W arren, Ohio, Nov. 1970_______________

Bulletin number
and price
1685-82,
1685-47,
1685-35,
1685-36,
1685-89,

30 cents
40 cents
30 cents
40 cents
65 cents

1685-46,
1725-8,
1725-13,
1685-84,
1685-34,
1685-86,
1685-49,
1725-22,
1685-85,

35 cents
35 cents
35 cents
35 cents
50 cents
30 cents
50 cents
35 cents
35 cents

1685-80,
1725-5,
1685-62,

40 cents
30 cents
30 cents

1725-7,
1685-79,
1685-65,
1725-24,
1685-81,

35 cents
30 cents
50 cents
30 cents
35 cents

1685-42,
1685-20,
1685-23,
1725-15,
1685-72,
1725-1,
1685-52,
1685-38,
1685-61,
1685-88,
1725- 10,
1685-17,
1685-74,
1725-12,
1725-9,
1685-56,
1685-55,
1725-20,
1685-64,
1685-73,
1685-50,
1685-24,

40 cents
30 cents
40 cents
35 cents
30 cents
30 cents
35 cents
35 cents
30 cents
30 cents
35 cents
30 cents
40 cents
30 cents
35 cents
40 cents
30 cents
30 cents
30 cents
30 cents
30 cents
30 cents

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W A S H IN G T O N , D .C . 2 0 2 1 2

O F F IC IA L B U S IN E S S

PENALTY FOR PRIV ATE USE, $300




FIRST CLASS MAIL
PO S TA G E A N D FE E S P A ID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102