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FEB 1 4 1972

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collection

AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e B a ltim o re , M a ry la n d , M e tro p o lita n A re a ,
A u g u st 1971

Bul l et i n 1 7 2 5 -1 6
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR /

Bureau of Labor Statistics

BUREAU

OF

LABOR

S T A T IS T IC S

R E G IO N A L

O F F IC E S

ALASKA

Region I

Region II

Region III

Region IV
S uite 5 4 0

1 6 03-J F K Federal Building
G overnm ent Center

341 N inth Ave., Rm. 1 0 2 5
N ew Y o rk , N .Y . 10001

4 0 6 Penn Square Building
1317 F ilb e rt S t.

1371 Peachtree S t. N E .

Boston, Mass. 0 2 2 0 3

Phone: 9 7 1 -5 4 0 5 (Area Code 212)

Philadelphia, Pa. 19107

A tla n ta , Ga. 3 0 3 0 9

Phone: 5 9 7 -7 7 9 6 (A rea Code 215)

Phone: 5 2 6 -5 4 1 8 (Area Code 404)

Phone: 2 2 3 -6 7 0 1 (Area Code 61 7 )
Region V

Region V I

Regions V II and V III

Regions IX and X
4 5 0 Golden Gate Ave.

8th Floor, 3 0 0 South Wacker Drive

1 1 0 0 Commerce S t., R m . 6B 7

Federal O ffice Building

Chicago, III. 6 0 6 0 6
Phone: 3 5 3 -1 8 8 0 .(Area Code 312)

Dallas, T e x . 7 5 2 0 2

911 W alnut S t., 10th Floor

Box 3 6 0 1 7

Phone: 7 4 9 -3 5 1 6 (Area Code 21 4)

Kansas C ity , M o . 6 4 1 0 6

San Francisco, C alif. 9 4 1 0 2

Phone: 37 4-24 81 (A rea Code 81 6)

Phone: 5 5 6 -4 6 7 8 (A rea Code 415)

Regions V II and V I I I w ill be serviced by Kansas C ity .
• •

Regions IX and X w ill be serviced by San Francisco.




AREA WAGE SURVEY

B u lle tin 1 7 2 5 -1 6
J a n u a ry 1 9 7 2

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
BUR EA U OF LABOR STATIS TIC S, Geoffrey H. Moore. Commissioner

T h e B a ltim o re , M a ry la n d , M e tro p o lita n A re a , A u g u s t 1971
CO NTENTS
Page

1.
4.

Introdu ction
W age trends fo r sele c te d occupational groups
T a b le s :

3.
5.

1. E stablish m en ts and w o rk e rs within scope of s u rv e y and number studied
2. Indexes of standard w eek ly s a la rie s and s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings fo r sele c te d occupational
grou ps, and p ercen ts of in c re a s e fo r selected period s
A.

6.
9.
12 .

13.
14.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21 .

Occupational e a rn in g s :
A - l.
O ffic e occupations— en and wom en
m
A - l a . O ffic e occupations—la fg e establishm ents— en and wom en
m
A -2 .
P r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ical occupations— en and women
m
A -2 a . P ro fe s s io n a l and tech n ical occupations—la r g e establishm ents— en and wom en
m
A - 3.
O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and tech n ical occupations—men and wom en com bined
A -3 a . O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and tech n ical occupations—la r g e establishm ents—
m en and women com bined
A -4 .
M aintenance and pow erplant occupations
A -4 a . M aintenance and pow erplant occupations— r g e establishm ents
la
A - 5.
C ustodial and m a te r ia l m ovem en t occupations
A -5 a . C ustodial and m a te r ia l m ovem en t occupations—la r g e establishm ents

24. Appendix.

Occupational d escrip tion s




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 2 04 02 —Price 35 cents

P re fa c e
The Bureau o f L ab or S ta tistics p ro g ra m of annual occupa­
tion a l w age su rveys in m e tro p o lita n a re a s is designed to p ro vid e data
on occupational ea rn in gs, and estab lish m en t p ra c tic e s and supplem en­
ta r y w age p ro v is io n s . It y ie ld s d eta iled data by sele c te d indu stry
d iv is io n fo r each o f the a rea s studied, fo r geograp h ic re g io n s , and
fo r the United States. A m a jo r co n sid era tion in the p ro g ra m is the
need fo r g r e a te r in sigh t into ( l ) the m o vem en t of w ages by occupa­
tion al c a te g o r y and s k ill le v e l, and (2) the stru ctu re and le v e l of wages
am ong a re a s and in du stry d iv is io n s .
A t the end of each su rvey, an individu al a re a b u lletin p r e ­
sents the re s u lts .
A ft e r com p letion of a ll individual a re a bu lletins
fo r a round of su rv e y s , two su m m ary bu lletins a re issu ed.
The
f i r s t b rin g s data fo r each o f the m etro p o lita n a rea s studied into one
b u lletin .
The second p resen ts in form a tion which has been p ro je c te d
fr o m in d ividu al m e tro p o lita n a re a data to re la te to geograp h ic region s
and the United States.
N in e ty a re a s c u rre n tly a re included in the p ro g ra m . In each
a re a , in fo rm a tio n on occupational earnings is c o lle c te d annually and on
esta b lish m en t p ra c tic e s and su pplem en tary wage p ro visio n s b ien n ially.
This b u lletin p resen ts resu lts of the su rvey in B a ltim o re ,
M d., in August 1971.
The Standard M etro p o lita n S ta tistica l A r e a , as
defin ed by the O ffic e of M anagem ent and Budget (fo r m e r ly the Bureau
o f the Budget) through January 1968, con sists of the c ity of B a ltim o re
and the counties of Anne A ru n d el, B a ltim o re , C a r r o ll, H a rfo rd , and
H ow ard.
This study was conducted by the B ureau's re g io n a l o ffic e in
P h ila d elp h ia , P a ., under the g e n e ra l d ire c tio n of Irw in L . Feigenbaum ,
A s s is ta n t R eg io n a l D ir e c to r fo r O peration s.




Note:
S im ila r re p o rts a re a v a ila b le fo r other a re a s .
back c o v e r .)

(See in sid e

C u rren t re p o rts on occupational earnings and supplem en­
ta ry w age p ro v is io n s in the B a ltim o re a rea a re a ls o a v a ila b le fo r
m a ch in ery (N o v e m b e r 1970), and paints and varn ish es (N o v e m b e r
1970); and on earn in gs only fo r s e le c te d laundry and d ry cleaning
occupations (August 1971). Union w age ra te s , in d ica tive of p r e ­
v a ilin g pay le v e ls , a r e a ls o a v a ila b le fo r building construction;
p rin tin g; lo c a l-tr a n s it op eratin g em p lo y e e s ; lo c a l tru c k d riv e rs
and h e lp e rs ; and g r o c e r y s to re e m p lo y ees.

In tro d u c tio n
T h is a re a is 1 o f 90 in which the U.S. D epartm ent o f L a b o r's
B ureau o f L a b o r S ta tistics conducts su rveys o f occupational earnings
and re la te d b en efits on an areaw id e b a s is .1

the A - s e r ie s ta b les, because e ith er ( l ) em ploym ent in the occupation is
too sm a ll to p ro v id e enough data to m e r it presen tation , o r (2) th ere is
p o s s ib ility of d is c lo s u re o f in dividu al establishm ent data. E arnings
data not shown se p a ra te ly fo r in du stry d ivision s a re included in the
o v e r a ll c la s s ific a tio n when a su b cla ssifica tio n of s e c re ta rie s o r tru ckd r iv e r s is not shown o r in fo rm a tio n to su b cla ssify is not availab le.

T h is bu lletin p resen ts cu rren t occupational em ploym ent and
earn in gs in form a tion obtained la r g e ly by m a il fro m the establishm ents
v is ite d by Bureau fie ld econ om ists in the la st p reviou s su rvey fo r
occupations rep o rted in that e a r lie r study. P e r s o n a l v is its w e re m ade
to nonrespondents and to those respondents rep o rtin g unusual changes
since the previou s su rvey.

O ccupational em ploym en t and earnings data a re shown fo r
fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s , i.e ., those h ire d to w ork a regu la r w e e k ly schedule.
E arn in gs data exclude p rem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on
w eeken ds, h olid a ys, and late shifts. N onproduction bonuses a re e x ­
cluded, but c o s t- o f- liv in g a llow an ces and in cen tive earnings a re in ­
cluded.
W h ere w e e k ly hours a re re p o rte d , as fo r o ffic e c le r ic a l
occupations, re fe r e n c e is to the standard w orkw eek (rounded to the
n ea rest h a lf hour) fo r w hich em p lo yees r e c e iv e th e ir regu la r straigh ttim e s a la rie s (e x c lu s iv e o f pay fo r o v e rtim e at reg u la r and/or p r e ­
m ium ra te s ). A v e r a g e w e e k ly earnings fo r these occupations have
been rounded to the n ea rest h a lf d o lla r.

In each a re a , data a re obtained fr o m re p re s e n ta tiv e estab ­
lishm ents within six broad indu stry d iv is io n s : M anufacturing; tra n s ­
p ortation , com m unication, and other public u tilitie s ; w h o lesa le trad e;
r e ta il trad e; finance, insu rance, and r e a l estate; and s e r v ic e s . M a jo r
industry groups excluded fr o m these studies a re govern m en t o p e ra ­
tions and the constru ction and e x tra c tiv e in d u stries. E stablishm ents
having fe w e r than a p r e s c r ib e d num ber o f w o rk e rs a re om itted because
they tend to furnish in su fficien t em ploym ent in the occupations studied
to w a rra n t inclusion. Separate tabulations a re p ro v id e d fo r each of
the broad industry d ivision s which m eet pu blication c r ite r ia .

T h ese su rveys m easu re the le v e l of occupational earnings in
an a rea at a p a rtic u la r tim e. C om p arison s o f individual occupational
a v e ra g e s o v e r tim e m ay not r e fle c t expected w age changes.
The
a v e ra g e s fo r in dividu al jobs a re a ffe c te d by changes in w ages and
em ploym ent pattern s. F o r exam p le, prop ortion s of w o rk e rs em ployed
by h igh- or lo w -w a g e fir m s m ay change o r high -w age w o rk e rs m ay
advance to b e tte r jobs and be rep la ced by new w o rk e rs at lo w e r rates.
Such shifts in em ploym ent could d e c re a s e an occupational a v e ra g e even
though m ost establish m en ts in an a re a in c re a s e w ages during the yea r.
T ren d s in earnings o f occupational grou ps, shown in table 2, are b etter
in d ica tors of w age trends than individu al jobs w ithin the groups.

T h ese surveys a re conducted on a sam ple basis because of
the u n n ecessary cost in vo lved in su rveyin g a ll establishm ents.
To
obtain optimum a ccu ra cy at m inim um cost, a g r e a te r p ro p o rtio n of
la r g e than o f sm a ll establishm ents is studied. In com bining the data,
h o w ever, a ll establishm ents a re given th e ir ap p rop riate w eight. E s ­
tim a tes based on the establishm ents studied a re p resen ted , th e re fo re ,
as rela tin g to a ll establishm ents in the in du stry grouping and a rea ,
except fo r those b elow the m inim um s iz e studied.
Occupations and E arnings
The occupations s e le c te d fo r study a re com m on to a v a r ie ty
o f m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing in d u stries, and a re o f the
fo llo w in g typ es:
( l ) O ffic e c le r ic a l; (2) p ro fe s s io n a l and tech n ical;
(3) m aintenance and pow erplan t; and (4) cu stodial and m a te r ia l m o v e ­
m ent. O ccupational c la s s ific a tio n is based on a u n iform set o f job
d escrip tio n s design ed to take account of in teresta b lish m en t v a ria tio n
in duties w ithin the sam e job.
The occupations sele c te d fo r study
a re lis te d and d e s c rib e d in the appendix. U nless o th erw ise in dicated,
the earnings data fo llo w in g the job title s a re fo r a ll in du stries c o m ­
bined. E arn in gs data fo r som e of the occupations lis te d and d esc rib e d ,
o r fo r som e in du stry d ivision s w ithin occupations, a re not p resen ted in

Th e a v e ra g e s p resen ted r e fle c t com p osite, areaw ide e s t i­
m ates.
In du stries and establish m en ts d iffe r in pay le v e l and job
staffin g and, thus, contribute d iffe r e n tly to the estim a tes fo r each job.
Th e pay rela tion sh ip obtainable fro m the a v e ra g e s m ay fa il to r e fle c t
a c c u ra te ly the w age spread o r d iffe r e n tia l m aintained among jobs in
individu al establish m en ts. S im ila r ly , d iffe re n c e s in a v e ra g e pay le v e ls
fo r m en and w om en in any o f the s e le c te d occupations should not be
assum ed to r e fle c t d iffe re n c e s in pay trea tm en t o f the sexes w ithin
individu al establish m en ts.
O th er p o s s ib le fa c to rs which m ay con­
tribu te to d iffe re n c e s in pay fo r m en and w om en include: D iffe re n c e s
in p ro g re s s io n w ithin estab lish ed rate ran ges, since only the actual
1
Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New York State
rates paid incumbents a re c o lle c te d ; and d iffe re n c e s in s p e c ific duties
Department of Labor. These areas are Binghamton (New York portion only) Rochester (office occupa­
p e rfo rm e d , although the w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d a p p ro p ria tely w ithin
tions only); Syracuse; and U tica-R om e. In addition, the Bureau conducts more liipited area studies in
the sam e su rv e y job d escrip tio n . Job d escrip tion s used in cla s s ify in g
65 areas at the request of the Employment Standards Administration of the U .S. Department of Labor.




1

2

em p lo yees in these su rveys a re u su ally m o re g e n e ra liz e d than those
used in in d ivid u al establish m en ts and a llo w fo r m in o r d iffe re n c e s
am ong estab lish m en ts in the s p e c ific duties p e rfo rm e d .
O ccu pational em ploym en t estim a tes re p re s e n t the tota l in a ll
estab lish m en ts w ithin the scope o f the study and not the number actu­
a lly su rveyed . B ecau se o f d iffe re n c e s in occupational stru ctu re among
esta b lish m en ts, the estim ates o f occupational em ploym ent obtained from
the sam ple o f estab lish m en ts studied s e r v e only to indicate the re la tiv e
im p orta n ce o f the jobs studied.
T h ese d iffe re n c e s in occupational
stru ctu re do not a ffe c t m a te r ia lly the a ccu ra cy of the earnings data.




E stab lish m en t P r a c tic e s and S u pplem entary W age P ro v is io n s

Tabulations on s e le c te d establish m en t p ra c tic e s and su pple­
m en ta ry w age p ro v is io n s (B - s e r ie s tab les) a re not p resen ted in this
bulletin.
In form ation fo r these tabulations is c o lle c te d b ien n ially.
T h ese tabulations on m inim um entrance s a la rie s fo r in ex p erien ced
w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s ; shift d iffe r e n tia ls ; scheduled w e e k ly hours;
paid h olid ays; paid vacation s; and health, in su ran ce, and pension
plans a re p resen ted (in the B - s e r ie s tab les) in p revio u s bu lletin s
fo r this area.

3

T a b le 1. Establishm ents and w o rk e rs within scope of survey and num ber studied in B altim ore, M d .,1
by m ajor industry division,2 A u gu st 1971
Minimum
employment
in establishments in scope
of study

Industry division

Number of establishments

Workers in establishments
Within scope of study4

Within scope
of study*

Studied

Studied
Number

Percent

A ll establishments
A ll divisions_______________________________
Manufacturing__________________________________
N onmanuf acturing______________________________
Transportation, communication, and
other public u tilitie s 5 _____________________
Wholesale tra d e _____________________________
Retail trade___ — _________________________
Finance, insurance, and real estate 6_____
Services 7___________________________________

847
100
-

100
50
100
50
50

225

299,828

100

200, 133

304
543

82
143

149, 792
150,036

50
50

104,585
95, 548

44
132
97
110
160

17
30
29
33
34

31, 018
16,683
50,616
26,330
25,389

10
6
17
9
8

26,700
5,668
36,242
16, 594
10,344

105

83

190,418

100

174,046

58
47

43
40

107, 095
83,323

56
44

96,729
77,317

6
2
22
13
4

6
2
16
12
4

24,337
1, 190
38, 852
13, 279
5,665

13
1
20
7
3

24, 337
1, 190
33,421
12, 704
5,665

L a rg e establishments
A ll divisions_______________________________
Manufacturing___________ _____________________
Nonmanufacturing___ _________________________
Transportation, communication, and
other public utilities 5 ____________________
Wholesale trade. _____________________
Retail trade_________________________________
Finance, insurance, and rea l estate 6 _____
Services 7___________________________________

-

500
-

500
500
500
500
500

1 The Baltim ore Standard M etropolitan Statistical A re a , as defined by the Bureau of the Budget through January 1968, consists of the city of
Baltim ore and the counties of Anne Arundel, Baltim ore, C a rroll, Harford, and Howard.. The "w ork ers within scope of study" estimates shown in this
table provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor fo rc e included in the survey. The estim ates are not intended,
however, to serve as a basis of comparison with other employment indexes fo r the area to measure employment trends or levels since (1) planning
of wage surveys requires the use of establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) sm all establishments
are excluded from the scope of the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual was used in classifying establishments by industry division.
3 Includes a ll establishments with total employment at or above the minimum lim itation. A ll outlets (within the area) of companies in such
industries as trade, finance, auto repair service, and motion picture theaters are considered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes a ll w orkers in a ll establishments with total employment (within the area) at or above the minimum limitation,
5 Abbreviated to "public u tilities" in the A -s e r ie s tables. Taxicabs and services incidental to water transportation w ere excluded. Local transit
operations in B altim ore are governm entally owned and operated and excluded by definition from the scope of the study.
6 Abbreviated to "finance" in the A -s e r ie s table.
7 Hotels and m otels; laundries and other personal services; business services; automobile rep air, rental, and parking; motion pictures; nonprofit
m embership organizations (excluding religious and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectural services.




Over one-half of the w orkers within scope of the survey ii i the B altim ore area w ere employed in manufacturing firm s.
following presents the m ajor industry groups and sp ecific industries as a percent of a ll manufacturing:
Industry groups
P rim a ry m etal industries_______________________________ 19
E le ctrica l equipment and supplies_____________________ 18
Transportation equipment______________________________ 11
Food and kindred products_____________________________
9
Apparel and other textile products_____________________
7
Machinery, except electrica l___________________________
6
Chemicals and allied products________________________
5
Printing and publishing__________________________________
5
Rubber and plastic products____________________________
5

The

Specific industries
Blast furnace and basic steel products________________ 17
Communication equipm ent_____________________________ 16
Ship and boatbuilding and repairing_____________________ 5

This information is based on estimates of total employment derived from universe m aterials compiled p rior to actual survey.
Proportions in various industry divisions may d iffer from proportions based on the results of the survey as shown in table 1 above.

W a g e T re n d s fo r S e le c te d O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s
P re s e n te d in table 2 a re indexes and p ercen ta ges o f change
in a v e ra g e s a la rie s o f o ffic e c le r ic a l w o rk e rs and in d u stria l n u rses,
and in a v e ra g e earnings o f s e le c te d p la n tw ork er groups. The indexes
a re a m ea su re o f w ages at a given tim e , ex p re s s e d as a percen t of
w ages during the base p e rio d . Subtracting 100 fro m the index yield s
the p ercen ta ge change in w ages fr o m the base p e rio d to the date of
the index.
The p ercen ta g es of change o r in c re a s e re la te to w age
changes betw een the in dicated dates. Annual ra tes of in c re a s e , w h ere
shown, r e fle c t the amount o f in c re a s e fo r 12 months when the tim e
p e rio d betw een su rveys was oth er than 12 m onths. Th ese computations
w e re based on the assum ption that w ages in c re a s e d at a constant rate
betw een su rveys. T h ese estim a tes a re m ea su res o f change in a v e r ­
ages fo r the a re a ; they a re not intended to m easu re a v e ra g e pay
changes in the establish m en ts in the area.

shows the p ercen ta ge change. The index is the product o f m u ltiplyin g
the base y e a r r e la tiv e (100) by the r e la tiv e fo r the next succeeding
y e a r and continuing to m u ltip ly (compound) each y e a r 's r e la tiv e by the
p reviou s y e a r 's index.
F o r o ffic e c le r ic a l w o rk e rs and in d u stria l n u rses, the w age
trends re la te to re g u la r w e e k ly s a la rie s fo r the n o rm a l w ork w eek ,
e x clu sive o f earnings fo r o v e rtim e .
F o r p la n tw ork er grou ps, they
m easu re changes in a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs, excluding
p rem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eekends, h olid a ys, and
late shifts. The p ercen ta g es a re based on data fo r s e le c te d k ey o ccu ­
pations and include m ost o f the n u m e ric a lly im portan t jobs w ithin
each group.
L im ita tio n s o f Data

M ethod o f Com puting
The indexes and p ercen ta ges of change, as m ea su res of
change in a re a a v e ra g e s , a re influ enced by: (1) g e n e ra l s a la ry and
w age changes, (2) m e r it o r other in c re a s e s in pay r e c e iv e d by in d i­
vidual w o rk e rs w h ile in the sam e job, and (3) changes in a v e ra g e
w ages due to changes in the la b o r fo r c e resu ltin g fro m la b or tu rn ­
o v e r, fo r c e expansions, fo r c e redu ction s, and changes in the p r o p o r ­
tions o f w o rk e rs em p loyed by establish m en ts w ith d iffe re n t pay le v e ls .
Changes in the la b or fo r c e can cause in c re a s e s o r d e c re a s e s in the
occupational a v e ra g e s without actual w age changes. It is co n ceiva b le
that even though a ll establish m en ts in an a re a gave w age in c re a s e s ,
a v e ra g e w ages m ay have d eclin ed because lo w e r-p a y in g establish m en ts
entered the a re a o r expanded th e ir w o rk fo r c e s .
S im ila r ly , w ages
m ay have rem ain ed r e la t iv e ly constant, y e t the a v e ra g e s fo r an a rea
m ay have ris e n c o n sid era b ly because h ig h er-p a y in g establishm ents
en tered the a rea.

E ach o f the fo llo w in g k ey occupations within an occupational
group w as a ssign ed a constant w eigh t based on its p rop ortion a te e m ­
ploym en t in the occupational group:
Office clerical (men and women): Office clerical (men and women)— Skilled maintenance (men):
Carpenters
Continued
Bookkeeping-machine
Electricians
Secretaries
operators, class B
Machinists
Stenographers, general
Clerks, accounting, classes
Mechanics
Stenographers, senior
A and B
Mechanics (automotive)
Switchboard operators, classes
Clerks, file, classes
Painters
A and B
A , B, and C
Pipefitters
Tabulating-machine operators,
Clerks, order
Tool and die makers
class B
Clerks, payroll
Typists, classes A and B
Comptometer operators
Unskilled plant (men):
Keypunch operators, classes
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Industrial nurses (men and women):
A and B
Laborers, material handling
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Office boys and girls

The use of constant em ploym en t w eigh ts elim in a tes the e ffe c t
of changes in the p ro p o rtio n o f w o rk e rs re p re s e n te d in each job in ­
cluded in the data.
The p ercen ta ges o f change r e fle c t only changes
in a v e ra g e pay fo r s tra ig h t-tim e hours.
T h e y a re not influenced by
changes in standard w o rk schedu les, as such, o r b y p rem iu m pay
fo r o v e rtim e . W h ere n e c e s s a ry , data w e r e adjusted to re m o v e fro m
the indexes and p ercen ta ges of- change any sign ifica n t e ffe c t caused
by changes in the scope o f the su rvey.

The a v e ra g e (m ean) earnings fo r each occupation w e re m u lti­
p lied by the occupational w eigh t, and the products fo r a ll occupations
in the group w e re totaled.
The a g g re g a te s fo r 2 con secu tive yea rs
w e r e re la te d by d ivid in g the a g g re g a te fo r the la te r y e a r by the a g g r e ­
gate fo r the e a r lie r y e a r.
The resultant r e la tiv e , le s s 100 p ercen t,




4

5

T a b le 2 .

In d e x e s o f s ta n d a rd w e e k ly s a la rie s an d s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s in

B a ltim o re , M d ., A u g u s t 1 9 7 0 an d A u g u s t 1 9 71, an d p e rc e n ts o f in c re a s e fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s
M anufactu ring

A l l in d u stries
P e r io d

O ffic e
c le r ic a l
(m en and
w om en )

In du strial
nurses
(m en and
w om en )

S k illed
m aintenance
tra d es
(m en )

U n s k illed
plant
w orkers
(m en )

O ffic e
c le r ic a l
(m en and
w om en )

In d u stria l
nurses
(m en and
w om en )

S k illed
m aintenance
tra d es
(m en)

U n s k illed
plant
wo rk e rs
(m en)

122.5
134.9

115.0
126.7

117.6
132.1

In dexes (O c to b e r 1967=100)
August 1970_________________________________________
August 1971___________________ _____________________

118.3
128.5

123.6
134.6

115.1
126.5

116.8
127.0

120.0
132.7

P e rc e n ts o f in c re a s e
S eptem b er 1959 to D e ce m b er I960:
15-month in c r e a s e ______________________________
Annual ra te o f i n c r e a s e _______________________

3.5
2.8

3.2
2.6

3.4
2.7

4.2
3.3

4.1
3.3

5.3
4.2

3.2
2.6

5.9
4.7

D ece m b er I960 to N o v e m b e r 1961:
11-month in c re a s e -------------------------------------Annual ra te o f i n c r e a s e _______________________

3.1
3.4

6.7
7.3

3.8
4.2

4.2
4.6

1.6
1.7

6.0
6.6

3.8
4.2

3.6
3.9

N o vem b er 1961 to N o vem b er 1962______________
N o v e m b e r 1962 to N o v e m b e r 1963------------------N o vem b er 1963 to N o vem b er 1964______________
N o v e m b e r 1964 to N o v e m b e r 1965_______________
N o v e m b e r 1965 to N o v e m b e r 1966______________
N o vem b er 1966 to O cto b er 1967:
11-m onth in c r e a s e _____________________________
Annual ra te o f in c r e a s e _______________________

2.8
3.5
3.9
3.4
3.8

3.9
1.4
1.4
1.4
4.0

1.8
2.5
3.7
3.1
6.6

.9
4.3
2.6
2.4
.9

3.1
3.5
1.5
1.4
3.8

3.3
1.8
.9
1.3
4.4

1.1
2.2
4.1
2.9
7.1

2.2
4.1
2.3
2.9
1.5

4.5
4.9

9.1
10.0

3.7
4.0

5.4
5.9

3.6
3.9

8.4
9.2

3.5
3.8

5.3
5.8

O cto b er 1967 to S eptem b er 1968:
11-month i n c r e a s e ____________________________
Annual ra te o f i n c r e a s e ------------------------------

5.8
6.3

6.7
7.3

6.4

7.8
8. 5

5.4
5.9

7.0
7.7

6.4

6.4

7.0

7.0

7 .0

S eptem b er 1968 to August 1969:
11-m onth in c re a s e _____________________________
Annual ra te o f i n c r e a s e --- ------------------------

5.1
5.6

8.1
8.9

3.1
3.4

4.9
5.4

5.4
5.9

7.2
7.9

2.5
2.7

5.7
6.2

August 1969 to A ugust 1970----------------------------August 1970 to August 1971______________________

6.4
8.6

7.2
8.9

4.9
9.9

3 .3
8.7

8.0
10.6

6.8
10.1

5.4
10 .2

4.5
12.3




6

A.

Occupational earnings

T a b le

A -1.

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

and

wom en

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly hours and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupations studied on an a r e a b a s is b y in d u stry d iv is io n , B a ltim o r e , M d ., A u gu st 1971)
W eekly earnings 1
( standard)

N u m ber of w o rk e rs

*
Average
weekly

S ex , occupation, and industry division

*

65
Middle range2

tin d er

t

65

(standard)

»

70

*

75

»

80

*

85

$

90

r e c e iv i n g s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—

is

95

$

100

s

110

$

120

*

130

$

140

$

150

*

160

«

170

s

180

$

190

$

200

r

210

and
under
130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

3

30
13
17

38
24
14

33

34
23

13
3

3

9
4
5

15
9

2

10
2

16
9
7

26
17
9

14

11
1

22
10
12
12

31
16
15
4

14

26
15

14

29
18

15

11

10

17
15
14

7
7
7

14
13
13

4
3

60

120

1

75

110

2

70

220
and

100

1
1

13
13

~

14
14

70
58

1

-

4

9

-

1

1
8

2
4

85

90

95

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
16

17

32
13
19

-

-

*

8

3
3
-

210

220

over

13

46
38

21
20
1
1

MEN
CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A --------------M A NUFACTURING ---------------------------------- —
NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------P UBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------

182
117

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

$
1 7 1 .5 0
1 8 0 .0 0
1 5 8 .5 0

299

$
1 6 6 .5 0
1 8 7 .0 0

$
$
1 4 2 .5 0 -2 0 4 .5 0
1 4 4 .5 0 -2 1 2 .0 0
1 3 8 .5 0 -1 7 7 .5 0
1 5 3 .0 0 -2 1 0 .5 0

-

36

4 0 .0

1 8 1 .0 0

1 5 3 .5 0
1 8 2 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B --------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------------

223

4 0 .0

1 3 1 .5 0

1 2 8 .0 0

1 0 7 .5 0 -1 5 4 .5 0

1

100

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 4 1 .5 0
1 2 3 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0

1 4 1 .5 0

1 2 0 .0 0 -1 6 7 .0 0

-

123
54

1 1 9 .0 0
1 4 1 .0 0

9 9 . 5 0 -1 4 4 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0 -1 5 2 .5 0

1

CLERKS, ORDER --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------------

129

3 9 .5

1 4 2 .5 0

1 1 1 .0 0 -1 7 7 .0 0

118
103

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 4 3 .0 0
1 4 5 . 50

1 3 8 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 5 0 .5 0

-

CLERKS, PAYROLL ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

132
130

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 8 5 .0 0

210.00
210.00

1 6 0 .5 0 -2 1 3 .0 0
1 6 4 .5 0 -2 1 3 .5 0

MESSENGERS (O F F IC E BOYSI --------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING -------------------------------F IN A N C E -----------------------------------------------

218
85

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

9 3 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0
8 7 .0 0

8 3 .0 0 -1 0 6 .5 0
9 7 .5 0 -1 0 8 .0 0
7 9 .5 0 - 9 5 .0 0

3 9 .0

9 6 . 00
1 0 2 .5 0
9 2 .0 0
8 4 .5 0

54

4 0 .0

1 8 0 .5 0

1 8 1 .0 0

1 6 6 .0 0 -2 1 1 .5 0

83

3 9 .5

1 4 5 .0 0

1 4 1 .0 0

1 2 7 .0 0 -1 7 1 .0 0

109

4 0 .0

9 2 .5 0 -1 1 9 .0 0

4 0 .0

1 0 4 .0 0
1 0 3 .0 0

1 0 3 .5 0

61

1 0 3 .0 0

9 4 .0 0 -1 0 9 .0 0

133
59

1 8 5 .5 0

88.00

1 1 1 .5 0 -1 7 5 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0 -1 8 0 .5 0

7 4 .5 0 -

9 3 .0 0

-

-

2
15

6
-

-

2
“

-

*

7
7

22

13

28

-

-

1

22

2
11

2

2
2

26

17

36
13
23

14

7

2

8

20

18

12

19
17

6

8
6
4

12
6

1

-

3

2

7
5

1

4

1

21

13

35
30

13

6

-

2
12

10

1

6

4
4
-

-

11
2
2

8
8

1
1

-

*

-

_
-

-

1
1

9

5

5
3

14
14
14

4
4
4

12
8

14
14
14

12
12

~

~

1

17
17

4
4

5
5

4
4

2
2

54
54

13
13

1

2

-

-

_

_

_

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

2

3

4

4

12

4

7

23

1

-

-

-

-

1
1

~

"

“

”

“

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

7
3
4

10

12
11
1

3
3

-

2

6

-

-

-

-

“

24

6

_
—

1

5

11
11

11
22

15

14

-

TABULATING -M ACHINE OPERATORS,

TABULATING -M ACHINE OPERATORS,
-

-

2
2

-

”

-

-

1

-

7

WOMEN

B IL L E R S ,

MACHINE

(B IL L IN G

NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

79

3 7 .5

9 9 .5 0

9 9 .5 0

8 8 .0 0 -1 1 4 .5 0

_

58

3 7 .0

9 4 .0 0

9 3 .0 0

86. 0 0 - 1 1 0 . 0 0

“

“

93

B IL L E R S ,

3 8 .0

1 1 4 .0 0

1 1 4 .5 0

1 0 2 .5 0 -1 2 8 .0 0

_

_

64

3 7 .0

112.00 112.00

1 0 2 .0 0 -1 2 4 .0 0

MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING

NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------------BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

172

3 8 .5

1 0 7 .5 0

1 0 7 .0 0

9 3 .0 0 -1 2 2 .5 0

MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

54
118

4 0 .0

1 2 3 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0

1 1 9 .0 0

1 1 5 .5 0 -1 4 0 .0 0

3 8 .0

100.00

9 0 . 5 0 -1 0 9 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCCUNTING, CLASS A --------------M A NUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUF A C T U R IN G -------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE -----------------------------------------------

913

3 8 .5

1 2 9 .5 0

169

3 9 .5
3 8 .0

1 4 8 .5 0

744

1 1 0 .0 0 -1 3 8 .5 0

97

4 0 .0

1 2 5 .0 0
1 4 3 .0 0

1 3 2 .5 0
1 4 7 .5 0
1 2 7 .0 0

90

3 9 .0

2 38

3 8 .0

See fo o tn o tes at end o f ta b le s .




1 1 2 .5 0 -1 4 0 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 -1 5 8 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0 -1 4 7 .5 0

1 1 2 .5 0

1 4 1 .5 0
1 1 7 .0 0

1 0 7 .5 0 -1 2 4 .0 0

1 1 8 .5 0

1 1 8 .0 0

1 0 8 .0 0 -1 2 9 .0 0

_

12

1
1

4

6
6

_
“

_

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

“

8
“

12
12

2

_

4
4

15
15

8
6

7
7

5
5

31
14

1
1

2
2

5
5

6

25
17

20
19

16
7

14
7

8
6
2

17

250
23
227
18
7
24

4

17
17

2

7

29

-

1
6

1

6
1

20
2

28

5

37
4
33

27
26

2

1

18

_

11

12

34

122

124

120

2

3
119

6

26
94

-

“

-

-

11

12

-

4

10
1

1

15
15
l

2
12

32
-

1
12

8
9
49

118
9
34
52

2
21
60

2

2
”

_

2
2

_
-

-

-

106
32
74
35

56
39
17
9

18
15
3

13
3

2

1
22

1

-

5
-

3

12

_

*

1
1

5

10
2

3
7

-

7
T a b le

A -1 .

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly hours and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a re a b a sis by in d u stry d iv is io n , B a ltim o r e , M d ., Au gu st 1971)
Weekly earnings *
(standard)

S ex , occupation, and indu stry division

Number
of
workers

N u m ber of w o rk e rs
s

t V ddye
e
hniirc 1
(standard]

Under
Mean ^

Median^

65

70

$
75

S
80

t
85

*
90

re c e iv in g

$
95

*
100

s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly e a r n in g s
t

$
110

120

t

t
130

140

150

o f—

i

t
160

%
170

*
180

S
190

t
200

$
210

220

and

Middle range ^
65

and

under
70

WOMEN -

t

»

75

80

85

90

95

95
14
81

100

110

120

130

111

237

246

216

11
100

37
200

51
165
40

135
41
94

140

150

160

170

180

50
15

27
14

13
3
10

10
5

5

3

1

13

5

1
4

1
-

6
-

1
4

5
-

3
-

3
-

190

210

220

over

-

-

i
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

200

CONTINUEO
$
1 0 2 .0 0

$
$
9 4 . 5 0 -1 1 6 .5 0

1 0 4 . 00
1 1 2 .0 0

1 1 1 .0 0
1 0 1 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0

9 6 .5 0 - 1 2 5 .5 0
9 4 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .5 0

-

1 0 3 .0 0
9 6 . 50

-

-

3 8 .0

1 0 2 .5 0
9 7 .0 0

1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 2 2 .0 0
9 2 .0 0 - 1 1 3 .5 0

1
-

100

3 9 .5

1 2 4 .0 0

1 1 8 .0 0

1 0 6 .5 0 - 1 4 2 .0 0

_

_

71

4 0 .0

1 2 6 .5 0

1 3 0 .0 0

1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 4 3 .0 0

-

544
100
444

3 9 .0
4 0 .0

9 2 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0

71

9 7 .5 0

8 5 .0 0

8 2 .5 0
8 4 .5 0

7 7 .5 0 -

281

3 8 .5
3 8 .5

8 9 .0 0
8 5 .0 0

8 8 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

8 1 .0 0 - 1 0 2 .5 0

3 8 .5

8 0 .0 0 -

8 9 .5 0

414
394
68

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 8 .5

8 0 .5 0
6 0 .0 0
7 5 .5 0

7 9 .0 0
7 8 .5 0
7 3 .0 0

7 1 .5 0 7 1 .5 0 6 8 .0 0 -

213

7 1 .0 0 -

8 1 .0 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------F IN A N C E -----------------------------------------------

1, 274
257
1 ,0 1 7
191

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS A --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS B --------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RETAIL T R A D E ------------------------------------

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS C --------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

143
279

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

$
1 0 5 .5 0
1 1 1 .5 0

37. 0

7 5 .5 0

7 6 .0 0

CLERKS, O R D E R --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------------WHOLESALE T R A D E -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

361

3 9 .0

1 0 7 .5 0

102
259
157

3
3
3
3

9 .5
9 .0
9 .5
8 .5

1 0 9 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0
9 1 .0 0

1 0 4 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0

CLERKS, PAYROLL ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NLNMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RE TA IL TRADE ------------------------------------

305
150
155
69

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 6 .0

COMPTOMETER O PERA TOR S--------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

254

102

3 8 .5

3
5

18

19

40

10

47

17
65

47

23

12
37

29

11

49

29

1
9

2
4

_

1

7

5

1

2

19

20

a

1

-

-

1

7

5

1

-

12

6

4

5
-

7
-

80
4
76

13

69
19

41
33

50

8

24
20
4

5

103
5
98
19

72
4

7
-

30
7
23
6

76

5
~

-

17

15
16

1
2

8 8 .5 0
8 6 .5 0

18
16

59
59

8 4 .5 0

1
15

28
24

78
78
9
58

3
-

8
-

9 6 . 0 0 -1 1 9 .5 0
8 0 .5 0 - 9 4 .0 0

8 8 .5 0 - 1 2 6 .0 0

_

1 0 1 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0
9 0 .0 0

8 7 .5 0 - 1 3 3 .0 0
8 9 .5 0 - 1 2 2 .5 0

-

9 4 .0 0 - 1 4 1 .5 0
7 9 .0 0 - 1 0 2 .0 0

-

1 2 5 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 1 8 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0

1 2 3 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0
1 1 9 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0

1 0 5 .5 0 - 1 4 1 .5 0
108. 0 0 -1 4 4 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0 - 1 3 6 .5 0
9 7 .0 0 - 1 2 0 .5 0

-

53
8

33
14

3

1

1

1

*

1

3

*

1

2

-

2
-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

2

-

8

14

1
1

-

-

3

—

—

3

2
2

4
-

12
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

9
5
4

14
9

1
1

5

10
7
3

2
2
-

3
3
-

-

“

6
5
1
1

~

*

“

“

“

“

-

-

-

-

3
3
-

-

_

_

-

-

-

15

53

15

4

11
7
4

11

22
31

11

31

40
18
22

39
23
16
8

-

29
8
21

45

19

24
21

16
3

11
-

11
5
6
4

9
2
7
6

10
5
5
4

60
29
31
19

30
13
17
13

46
23
23
a

19
7

24
17

14

76

35

27

9

3

8

3

-

10

3

40

14

11

2

1

3

2

“

27
3
24
7

74
20
54

164

58

32

44
35

6
-

2

1
-

51

21
37
5

25
7

29

96
63
33
16

79

61
103

*

1
1

114

209
42
167

107
40
67

7

10
104

175
69
106

10
8

-

-

3 ,3 3 2

3 8 .5

1 3 5 .0 0
1 4 6 .5 0
1 3 0 .5 0

1 3 1 .5 0

1 1 5 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .5 0

1 4 2 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0

1 2 8 .5 0 - 1 6 1 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0 - 1 4 5 .5 0

1 6 4 .5 0

1 6 8 .5 0

1 44 . 5 0 -1 8 4 .0 0
-

~

~

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25
4

53
19

21
-

34
-

14
103
-

13

-

2
19

1
17

8
62

44

7
6

18

15

16

16

14

2
-

4
-

2
-

4
-

“

-

1 0 6 .0 0

9 3 . 5 0 -1 2 0 .5 0

2

-

5

1 1 4 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0
1 2 8 .0 0

1 1 4 .0 0
1 0 3 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0

1 0 1 .5 0 - 1 2 8 .0 0
9 2 .0 0 - 1 1 7 .5 0
9 9 .0 0 - 1 6 2 .0 0

1
1
-

-

4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 0 5 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0

1 0 7 .5 0

1 0 0 .5 0 - 1 1 6 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0 - 1 2 9 .5 0

-

-

2
3
-

3 8 .5

9 8 .5 0

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

9 4 .0 0
9 2 .0 0

8 8 .5 0 - 1 0 7 .0 0

-

9 1 .0 0

8 4 .0 0 -

-

-

8 4 .0 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0

3

117

2
2
101
14
87
30
9

24

29

9

26

6

46

38

1

8
64

27
58

12
25

10
a

10

18

16

10

13

7
3

57

59

101

324

5
52
-

6

19

53
-

22
302

491
58

82

433

2

11

5

”

11
61
33
28
-

5
2
-

1

2
-

6
6

2

5

76

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

5

4

*

-

-

-

_

76

21

2

2

-

3

1

-

-

-

1

1

*

”

“

545

520

377

282

173

168

149
396

202
318

133

128

76

244

97
30

59
109

14

154
30
20

15

20

15

2

7
-

64

21

3

16

~

2

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

13
17

2
4

12
7

21
17

42
17

a
40

23
20
62

~

“

2

15

26

40

165

234

186

130

14
39

_

-

80

1
21
5

3

-

•

-

9 9 .0 0

-

10

8
6

-

-

-

30
29
1

4

26

-

15
5
10

15

9 2 .0 0

-

_

22
10
12

9

1

-

-

19

2
2

-

i
i

-

8

-

98
82




33
4

-

MESSENGERS (O F F IC E G I R L S ! ------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.

34

4

*

1

8
-

1 0 9 . 50

1 1 1 .0 0 - 1 5 5 .0 0

25
10

4
-

-

-

3
-

9 .0
9 .0
8 .5
8 .5

1 1 1 .0 0 - 1 3 8 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 3 1 .5 0

30
8

1
15

1

32
13
19
-

11
3

3
3
3
3

1 3 6 .0 0

11
1
1

16

-

i

1

40

1
3

3

1 ,0 7 1

1 2 9 .5 0
1 1 9 .0 0

45
38

12

4

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S ---------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL T R A D E -----------------------------------FINANCE -----------------------------------------------

1 3 4 .5 0
1 2 4 .5 0

34
34

1
10

-

1 1 2 .0 0 - 1 3 4 .0 0
117. 0 0 -1 3 6 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 3 2 .5 0
1 0 8 .5 0 - 1 2 3 .5 0

1 2 1 .0 0

13
13

-

1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 4 .0 0
1 1 6 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

4

-

1 2 3 .5 0
1 2 7 .0 0
1 2 0 .5 0
1 1 8 .0 0

3 8 .0

81
73

10
54

1
12
2
7

-

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .5

221
206
914

66
66

68
6
36

-

550
248
302
129

245

2
71

-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A --------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------FINANCE -----------------------------------------------

3 9 .5

76

-

1 0 6 .5 0

3 8 .0
3 9 .0

15
56

4
-

1 1 3 .0 0

1 0 7 .0 0
9 6 .5 0

5
71

4
28
28

3

112

974
2 ,3 5 8

2

1

9 4 .0 0 - 1 1 9 .0 0
9 9 . 0 0 -1 2 1 .0 0

SECRETARIES ------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------------P UBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE -----------------------------------------------

73
11
62

7
14

8 8 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0

1 0 6 .0 0

89
322

37
5
32

35
-

1 0 8 .5 0

123

13
11
2
-

33
213
49

3 7 .5
3 9 .5

270
801
194

1
-

50

-

-

"
68

56

22

29

35
33

27
29

19

43
30

72

3

4

11
16

19

2

4
-

3

8

5
1

1
1

i i
7

-

8
T a b le

A -1.

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t- tim e w e e k ly h ou rs and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a s is by in d u stry d iv is io n , B a ltim o r e , M d ., A u gu st 1971)

Number of w o r k e r s re c e i v in g s t ra ig h t -t i m e w ee k ly earn ings of—
S ex , occupation, and in du str y divis ion

Number
of
workers

S
weekly
hours *
(standard]

Under
Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range 2

S
65

*

70

S

t

75

80

$

85

t

90

$

l

95

100

$

110

S

*

120

130

140

S
S
s
%
S
$
*
15 0
160
170
180 190
200 210

and
under

*

65

*

220
and

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

ov er

31

W EN - CONTINUED
OM
SECRETARIES - CONTINUED
SECRETARIES, CLASS A --------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

253
53
200
101

38.0
39.5
3 8 .0
38.5

f
14 4 .0 0
16 3 . 0 0
139.00
141.0 0

$
$
$
139.00 1 1 9 .5 0 -16 6 .0 0
153.00 136.50-202.00
136.50 1 1 7 .0 0 - 1 6 1 .0 0
1 3 7 . 5 0 12 4. 0 0 - 1 5 3 . 0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS B --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ---------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

673
120
553
59
309

38. 5
39.5
38.0
38.5
38.5

139.00
1 6 5 .0 0
13 3 .50
1 6 7 .0 0
123.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

1,288
455
833
82
81
55
395

38.5
39.5
38.0
38 .0
40 .0
3 9. 0
38.0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING -------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

1,051
346
705
80
109

-

-

-

-

-

14

3

-

15

-

-

-

-

-

14

3

-

15
15

32
8
24
5

31
17

37
9
28
19

25
7
18
15

22
6
16
11

19
4
15
-

14
1
13
7

4
1
3
1

8
8
3

21
12
9
8

3
2
1
-

5
3
2

134.50 11 7 .0 0 - 1 5 7 .0 0
163.50 1 3 4 .5 0 -19 2 .5 0
131.00 11 4 .5 0 -14 7 .5 0
1 7 6 .0 0 1 5 1 . 5 0 - 1 7 9 . 0 0
122.50 1 1 1 .5 0 - 1 3 6 .0 0

-

-

~
-

-

13
13
10

-

-

-

-

20
3
17
2
12

47
47
38

109
6
103
81

98
13
85
54

12 4
12
112
10
69

60
7
53
2
26

55
11
44
7
7

26
14
12
3

52
5
47
30
9

22
16
6
—

22
17
5
-

13
4
9
8
-

9
9
-

3
3
-

13 7 . 0 0
153.00
12 8. 00
149 .0 0
14 0 . 5 0
1 2 5 . 50
116.5 0

135.00
15 0 . 5 0
123.50
1 5 6 .5 0
144.50
13 0. 0 0
117.0 0

_
-

-

-

2
-

2
2

14
14

28
28

38
4
34

90
51
39
16
7

80
47
33
6
4

24
11
13
11
1

8
8
-

7

-

1
1
-

7
4
16

145
90
55
12
15
6
3

-

-

193
93
100
6
15
14
20

-

7
3
4

146
75
71
7
11
5
36

9
9

2
“

210
32
178
10
1
9
95

25
18
7

-

170
12
158
3

-

103
4
99
ii
6
4
75

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

38.0
39.5
37.5
3 9. 0
37.0

12 5.5 0
129.00
123.50
129.50
110.50

12 4 . 0 0 1 1 1 . 0 0 - 1 3 7 . 5 0
12 9 . 5 0 1 2 1 . 0 0 - 1 3 7 . 5 0
12 0. 00 1 0 8 . 5 0 - 1 3 7 . 0 0
116.0 0 110.00-148.00
109.50 10 2.0 0 -12 1.5 0

2
-

16
5
11
3
1

28
6

159
18
14 1
10
37

180
32
148
27

206
104
102

213
106
107

28
7
21
5

8
6
2

3
1

7

2

_

_

-

-

2

7
7

2
-

-

-

22

20

6

99
26
73
14
3

57
21
36
3

6

43
12
31
5
12

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NGNMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTIL ITIE S ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

762
194
568
197
78
243

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
3 9. 0
39.0

119.00
12 5.5 0
117.0 0
1 3 8 .0 0
117.0 0
10 2. 50

116.0 0
12 7 . 0 0
10 9 . 5 0
145.50
119.0 0
98.00

9 8 .0 0 -13 7.00
112.00 -136.50
96 .0 0 -137 .50
109.00-165.00
104. 5 0 - 1 2 5 . 5 0
8 9.0 0 -113 .0 0

59
4
55

82
13
69
10
2
49

106
18
88
24
20
35

102
33
69
14
12
31

101
52
49
21
20
4

60
29
31
11
4
16

57
12
45
16
13
12

42
14
28
26

28
7
21
21

41
3
38
38

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FI NA NC E --------------------------------------

549
207
342
179

38.0
38.5
3 7.5
38.0

12 1.50 119 .5 0
127.00 131.00
118.00 115.0 0
1 1 0 . 5 0 10 8 . 5 0

10 7.00 -140 .50
118.00-143.00
105.50-127.50
102.00-121.50

13

7
2
5
-

2

1

-

-

_

-

-

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

10 5
66

3 9. 0 1 1 6 . 0 0
38.5 110.50

-

_

-

-

-

SWITCHBCARO OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

287
253
34
102
61

87.0 0 -113.50
38.5 10 1.50
95 .0 0
99 .00
8 6.0 0 -110 .50
38.5
93 .00
3 9 . 0 1 3 8 .5 0 1 3 0 . 5 0 1 2 7 . 0 0 - 1 5 7 . 0 0
8 2.50-100 .50
38.0
90.00
88.00
9 9 .5 0
92 .0 0-107.50
38.5 101.00

5
5

376
139
237
25
99

38.5
38.5
38.5
39.0
39.5

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------

See fo o tn o tes at end o f ta b le s .




105.50
10 4. 00
1 0 6. 00
119 .5 0
10 9 . 5 0

118.00-153.00
138. 5 0 - 1 6 6 .0 0
112.00-144.50
12 5.0 0 -169.0 0
115.0 0-159 .50
103.50-148.00
108.00-124.00

120.50 100.00-132.00
112.50
90. 5 0 - 1 2 3 . 5 0

10 2 . 5 0
94.00-117.00
10 3 . 5 0
92.0 0-109.0 0
95.00-120.00
101.00
12 1.5 0 103.00-129.00
94.0 0-123.0 0
10 6 . 5 0

-

2

-

-

2

“

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

“

“

2

19

22
2

-

3
126

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

6

19

-

-

-

*

6

14

53

56
6
50
16
7
21

-

-

11
11
11

22
10
12
10

6
3
3
3

31
6
25
10

104
17
87
68

111
21
90
29

80
43
37
30

39
28
11
7

89
69
20
“

33
8
25
11

9
8

8
6

1
1

16
10

9
7

20
16

22
3

4
3

5
2

54
53

40
38

22
17

35
29

21
20
14
4

20
4
4

_

16
15
13

41
5
36
9
23

“

-

-

-

-

2

1
20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

8
8

1
1

10
10

18
18

18
17

-

5

6

1
-

4
-

11
5

10
1

37
7

8
7

1
12

22

27
26
3
17
5

-

5

5

-

~

-

5

28
19
9
7

10
8
2

60
20
40

-

-

56
1
55
4
12

100
63
37
5
20

37
11
26
2
2

-

5
4

1

16

4

-

2

-

13

2

-

1
1

2
2

1

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
2
7
2
2

_

13
7
6

9

1
1

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

9
3
6

-

-

-

9
T a b le

A -1 .

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m e n

a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(Av er ag e st ra ig h t -t i m e we ek ly hours and earn ings for s el ec t ed occupations studied on an a re a b as is by indu stry divis ion, B a l t im o r e , Md., August 1971)
W eekly earnings 1
(standard)

S ex , occupation, and indu stry division

Number
of
workers

Num ber
$

Average
weekly
hours1
|
standard)

Median2

M ean2

$

Under ^
$
and
65
under

Middle range2

70

i

S

s

75

80

85

r ec ei vi ng st ra ig h t -t i m e we ekly earning s

t

$
90

s

t

100

120

120

130

46
13
33
20

100

11 0

110

95

95

S

8
41

t

130

o f—

t
$
t
t
$
$
$
$
170
180 190 200 210
220
140 150
160
and

75

80

85

90

13

70

o f Vworkers

i

23

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

26

20
20

29
28

7
5
2

9
6
3

1
1

2
2

ov er

220

210

W EN - CONTINUED
OM
$

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

$

$

$
17

63
125

__ .
114
331

3 9 . 0 10 7 . 0 0 1 0 6. 00
3 8 .5

98. 00

8 6 .0 0 - 1 2 4 .0 0

931
96
146
538

9 1 .0 0
94.00
8 5. 50

31

139
35

*?!!*^? i
ini « n
%
11 5* 00 108*00
38.5
94.50
93 .0 0

39.5
38.5
38.0

24

88. 0 0 -1 0 9 .0 0

97 .0 0

26

77

73
23

67
35
8 6 .5 0 -

13
10 2. 00
14 0 .5 0
13
8
83. 0 0 - 1 0 5 . 0 0
88.00104.50
7 9 . 0 0 - 9 0 .5 0

92 .5 0
93.50
85.0 0

78

13

1 0 0. 50

8 1.5 0 8 9 .5 0 -

WHOLESALE TRADE-----------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

17

11

51

168

11

50

15 9
8

10

20

122

165
23
142
15
115

19 5
30
165
25
12 7

12
154
18
136

107
16
91
14

84

53

27
22
5

44
52

V*

93

2

2

17

_

2

See footnotes at end of tab le s.

T a b le A -1a.

O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — la r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s — m e n a n d w o m e n

(A v e ra g e s t ra ig h t -t i m e w eek ly hours and earnings f or s el ec t ed occupations studied in estab lishm ent s employing 500 w o r k e r s or m o r e by industry div is ion , B a l t im o r e , Md. , August 1971)
Weekly earnings 1
( standard)

Num ber of w o r k e r s rec ei vi ng s t ra ig h t -t i m e w eek ly earnings of—
t

Se x, occupation, and industry division

60

weekly
Middle range2
(standard)

65

$
CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING-----------PU B LIC U T I L I T I E S ---------

218
140
78
27

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING -----------------

96

MESSENGERS (O F FIC E B O Y S ! ---MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------

166
84
82

See footn otes at end o f tab les




4 0 .0
39.5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

176.5 0
184.50
16 2 . 0 0
190 .0 0

$

186.50 1 4 2 . 5 0 1 9 6 .5 0 1 4 8 . 0 0 157 .50 138 .0 0 19 7.50 1 6 5 .0 0 -

4 0 .0 1 4 2 . 5 0 1 4 0 . 5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 7 .0 0 14 4 .5 0
9 8 .5 0
96 .0 0
39.5
4 0 .0 10 2 . 5 0 1 0 5 . 5 0
9 4. 50 8 5 .5 0
39.5

118.00 12 2.50-

$

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

t

100

*

110

*

120

*

130

i

140

*

15 0

»

160

$

17 0

t

180

*

190

I

200

I

210

and
under
70

75

80

85

90

95

100

110

120

211.00
213.00
19 1.0 0
212.00

130

140

24

150

160

170

16
9
7

1*

18
10

18

1

17

21

8

7

59
57

1

13
8

1

2

1

15

20

10

11

1 6 7 .0 0
168.50

8 4 .5 0 107.50
9 7 .5 0 108.0 0
8 0 . 0 0 - 9 4. 0 0

220
and

5

7
13
5

1
9
6

1

3

21

2

18

180

190

200

210

26
17

11

46
38

18
17

2
2

8
8

1
1

13

1
1

220 ov er

1
1

10
T a b le

A -1 a .

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s — la rg e

e s ta b lis h m e n ts —m e n

a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t- tim e w e e k ly hours and earn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied in esta b lish m en ts em p lo yin g 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e by in d u stry d iv is io n , B a ltim o r e , M d.
W eekly earnings 1
(standard)

S ex , occupation, and indu stry division

Number
of
workers

*
Average
weekly
M edian2

Middle range2

(standard)

$

$
60

M ,an>

Au gu st 1971)

Num ber of w o r k e r s r ec ei vi n g st ra ig ht - time w eek ly earnings of65

i

70

75

80

t

t

t

85

90

95

100

120

$

i

l

110

130

140

150

*
160

"5

t

170

180

1 ------- 5------- i -----

190

200

210

and
under
65

220
and

70

75

80

85

90

1

17

2

4

7

3

5

5

5

-

-

-

5
4

5
4

5
2

11
2
9
i

26
11
15
7

24
3
21
3
ro

40
11
29
3

80
16
64
15

95

100

140

150

160

170

180

120

130

8

9

-

6

It

-

-

-

26
3
23
6

48
6
42
29

37
16
21
13

199
11
188
7

38
22
16
1

25
18
7
1

9
7
2
-

10
3
7
-

142
28
114
29

132
21
111
46

91
24
67
-

41
15
26
2

17
11
6

6
3
3

7
5
2

2
1
1

12
1
11

49
11
38

15
9
6

24
20
4

16
1
15

4
4

2
1
1

_

-

40
36

13
10

1
1

_
-

-

_
-

3
3

2
2

190

2
2

_
-

11 0

200

210

220 over

WOMEN

$
t
3 8 . 5 10 5 . 00 1 0 2 . 0 0

$
$
80.00-137.00

~

136.00
151.0 0
131.50
114.0 0

137.00 124.00-140.00
14 6 .0 0 1 3 0 . 0 0 - 1 6 2 . 5 0
136.00 119 .0 0 -13 8 .5 0
1 1 7 . 5 0 1 1 0 . 0 0 -1 2 4 . 0 0

-

110.00
116.0 0
10 8 . 5 0
10 3. 0 0

10 8 . 5 0
114.50
10 8.0 0
10 4 . 5 0

9 8 .0 0 -12 1.50
9 8 .0 0 -13 0.50
98 .0 0 -119.0 0
9 6 .0 0 -113 .5 0

-

287
52
235
66
106

39.0
96 .0 0
91.00
8 1.0 0 -106 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 1 0 . 0 0 1 1 7 . 5 0 1 0 2 . 5 0 - 1 2 3 . 0 0
93 .0 0
38.5
8 7. 0 0
80.50-102.00

183
169
87

3 8*0
38*0

CLERKS, ORDER -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL T R A D E -----------------------------

135
91
88

38.5
38 .0
38.0

80.50-107.0 0
78 .50-104.00
78. 0 0 - 1 0 2 . 5 0

-

CLERKS, PAYROLL --------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

146
89
57

3 9 . 0 1 3 1 . 0 0 12 8 . 0 0 1 0 8 . 5 0 - 1 4 8 . 0 0
3 9 . 5 1 4 6 . 5 0 14 2 . 5 0 1 2 4 . 5 0 - 1 6 7 . 5 0
3 8 . 5 1 0 7 . 5 0 10 8.5 0
9 2 .50 -119 .0 0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS ---------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

177
57

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE -------------------------------------KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B --------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------P UBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------R E TA IL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE -----------------------------------------------

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------------------------------------

70

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ---------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------R E TA IL TRADE -----------------------------

447
108
339
68

38.5
39.5
38.5
3 9. 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------R E TA IL TRADE -----------------------------

635
160
47 5
11 9
ro

39.0
39.5
38.5
39.0

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS B ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

CLERKS f F I L E , CLASS C ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

1

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

3
1
2
2

18
5
13
12

-

-

16
3
13

44
1
43
15

53
1
52

26
26

24
4
20

3
i

6
6

28
28
22

46
46
36

25
20
16

6
6

10
10

3
3
3

7
7
7

23
19
19

13
5
5

9
7
7

5
1
1

25
21
21

29
21
21

9
3
3

7
1
1

2
-

1
1

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

_

4

3
3

4

-

4

9
2
7

4

-

4

15
6
9

22
8
14

14
10
4

13
9
4

23
22
1

7
5
2

6
5
1

9
9
-

37.0 113.00 1 1 1 .5 0
9 4 .50 -12 4 .50
3 9.5 128.00 120.50 1 1 0 .5 0 -1 5 6 .0 0

_

_

13
-

14
2

9
2

10
3

27
5

35
14

27
11

9
2

3
1

8
3

3
2

_

10

-

10

339
162
17 7
87

39.5 123.50
4 0 .0 1 2 7 . 0 0
3 9.5 120.50
39.0 11 5 .5 0

1 2 0. 00 1 1 1 . 0 0 - 1 3 4 . 5 0
12 2. 00 1 1 5 . 5 0 - 1 4 2 . 0 0
118.00 10 8.0 0-13 2 .50
114.0 0 105.50-120.00

_

“

-

8
6
2
2

13
3
10
7

56
12
44
28

91
45
46
29

62
42
20
10

36
9
27
3

41
16
25
5

25
24
1
1

1
1
1

2
2
-

658
165
493
188
74
196

39.0
4 0 .0
39.0
38.5
38.5
39.0

113.50
113.00
113.50
128.50
113.00
10 0.0 0

1 0 7. 00
93.50-128 .50
110.50
93.00-130.00
105.50
93.50-128 .0 0
12 5.5 0
98 .5 0 -162.0 0
112.50 101.00 -135.50
96 .00
88.00-109.00

i

_
-

5
2
3

60
10
50
24
3
20

120
26
94
27
21
39

67
20
47
7
9
18

75
23
52
24
8
16

47
19
28

7
5
2

10
8
2

80
4
76
76

-

2

“

-

G IR L S ) -------------------

72

39.0

93.50

S E C R E T A R IE S -------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------

1,884
718
1,166
199
154
493

39.5
4 0 .0
3 9. 0
39.5
39.0
3 8 .5

14 1.50
14 8 .0 0
137.50
173.00
13 0 . 0 0
11 9 .0 0

21 3
117
96
24
11
13

130
62
68
26
2
3

MESSENGERS

(O F F IC E

R E T A IL TRADE --------------------------------------FINANCE ---------------------------------------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




1

u

UJ.

82. 00
8 1. 0 0

1

UJ. uu

86.00
86.00

*

7 6 .0 0 - 97 .0 0
7 6 . 0 0 - 9 6 .5 0

" * W
V
96 .0 0
93.50
91.50

96 . 50
96 .00
95.50

92 .0 0

83« 0 0 -1 0 2. 0 0

138 .0 0 1 2 2 . 0 0 - 1 5 8 . 0 0
14 5 .0 0 1 3 0 . 5 0 - 1 6 2 . 0 0
134.00 11 7 .0 0 - 1 5 5 .5 0
17 5.50
133.50 1 2 1 .5 0 -1 3 9 .5 0
117.5 0 107.50-130.50

i

-

4

3

1

7

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

“

10
4
6

34
14
20

68
14
54

-

-

-

1
16

8
46

69
10
59
30
1
25

15

9

9

10

13

3

8

~

-

-

21
5

2

-

3

3

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

4

8

23
6
17

38
7
31

132
22
11 0

213
47
166

260
91
169

337
139
198

222
96
126

-

-

-

2

2
2

3
5

1
16

4
27

8
99

16
12 7

25
89

60
79

19
29

.

2

3
3

1
1

7
7

1
1

3
3

1
1

4

-

1
1
1

2
2

3
3

37
16
21
19
1

16
14
2
2
-

3
3

5
5
-

1

3
-

-

-

4

1

2
4

-

7
3

4

1

2
2

-

-

-

0

7
3

-

140
57
83
50
1

58
15
43
30

1

41
23
18

11
2

10
6
4
4
-

11
T a b le

A -1 a .

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s — la rg e

e s ta b lis h m e n ts — m en

a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e ra g e s t r a ig h t - t i m e we ekl y hours and earnings for s el ec t ed occupations studied in es tablishm ents employing 500 w o rk e rs or m o r e by indu stry div is ion , B a l t im o r e , Md. , August 1971)
W eekly earnings 1
(standard)

S ex, occupation, and industry division

of

Number of w o rk e rs re c ei vi ng straig ht -t im e w eek ly earnings of—

s

Number
weekly

workers

Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range2

(standard]

s

60
and
under
65

S

t

$

S

S

$

s

$

s

$

*

$

$

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

11 0

120

130

140

150

160

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

7

13
13

22
22
19

12

16
10

1

60
10

25

*
$
180
170

$

190

$
$
$
200 210
220
and

180

190

200

210

220 ov er

W EN - CONTINUED
OM
SECRETARIES

- CONTINUED
100
79
j9

317
83
133
MANUFACTURING-------------------------------

338

$
$
$
$
1 5 1 . 5 0 1 4 4 .0 0 1 3 1 . 5 0 - 1 6 6 , 0 0
nn*" }^ k . 5 0
30*
137* 00 136* 00
39 0 1 4 8 . 5 0 1 4 0 . 5 0
4 0 .0
134.50
39*0 126* 50

3
ro

126.00-175.50

21

39

36

12 1.00 -162 .0 0

21

33

33

36

54
235

17

4
60

12
88

20
61

44
38

10

39 5 1 3 1 00 13** 00
4 0 .0 130 .0 0 130 .5 0 1 2 1 . 0 0 - 1 3 8 . 0 0

7n

23
8

13

53

79

53

21

18

27

68

76

87

1 rr

133
^67

1

13

27
14

11

3

*

1 3 0 . 5 0 140 .0 0 1 1 6 . 5 0 - 1 4 5 . 0 0
70 n
3 0 * “ 10 7. 00 1 0 7 . 5 0 1 0 1 . 5 0 - 1 1 4 . 0 0
"

3

18
40
22
14

27
25
10

30
16

17

18

21

:
1

_

2

*

9

1

20
17
3

34

15

45
31

8
13

3

2

6
1

1

9

8

i

*

74

18

12

14

76

Z3

2

^3

w

IT
36

10
3

33

38

3^

34

8

21
13
8

85

Z

1 2 6 . 5 0 126 J 50 1 1 1 . 0 0 - 1 4 2 . 0 0
70 ^
99.50 -158 .50
TO ^ 14 2 .0 0 1 4 9 . 5 0 1 1 6 . 5 0 - 1 6 8 . 5 0
39 0

3
1

^7

11

3 9.5 154 .50 1 5 1 .5 0 1 4 1 .5 0 -16 7 .0 0
111.0 0 -15 2.5 0
30* " 163* 50 166* 50
3 8 .5 1 1 4 . 0 0 1 1 5 . 0 0 1 0 5 . 5 0 - 1 2 3 . 0 0

60'
256

76

6

39

72
8

2

8

1 °3 00 1 o/ 00
}
1

63

39*0 i n o o n i
3 9 . 0 i t a * '■ n 130 50
30. ^ 95* 00 92.0 0

8 1.0 0 -113 .0 0

50

39.5 115.0 0

10 8.5 0

94.50-130.50

370
91
255

11 5* 50
39 0 1 0 1 . 0 0
96*00
3 9 . 5 12 0 . 5 0 1 1 2 . 5 0
92.0 0
38.5
91.50

88.00-108.00
103.00-150.50
8 6 .0 0 - 98.00

717

TO
/n

309
76
262

30"
38.5
38.5

1^6
34
I'Li^r 1L 1 KA UL
SWITCHBOARC OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

f3

ro
2

-

-

-

-

-

9

6

8

1

9

3
17

14

11
1

2

1

10

2

11

9

2

2

-

7

-

13

1

9

*2
42

60
6
50

61
13
48

"6
24
29

28
16

36
16
3

4

-

24

27

29
28
1

-

9

15
13

9

9
1

2

-

-

-

-

i

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
3

1
1

2
2

2

“
“

“

”
“

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GCN ERAL
71 T

PUBLIC UTILITIES

-----------------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




100. 50
n

07

on

8 5.0 0-109 .50

13
1

42

60

56

86

124

65

48

68

44

47
15
32

63

98
11
83

47
8
32

39

52
11
27

27
19

i i / * on
^

*

^

94. 00
88.00

89* 00
94.0 0
87.00

8 3 . 5 0 - 99 .00
82.00-110.50
8 2 . 5 0 - 93 .0 0

60

22

i

20
20

“

12
T a b le

A -2 .

P ro fe s s io n a l

and te c h n ic a l

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

and

wom en

(Av er ag e st ra ig h t -t i m e w eek ly hours and earnings for s el ec t ed occupations studied on an a r e a bas is by indu stry divis ion, B al t im or e, Md., Augus t 1971)
Weekly earnings
(standard)

S e x , occupa tion, and indu stry division

Number
of
workers

1

Number of w o r k e r s re c ei vi n g s t ra ig ht -t im e we ek ly earning s of—
*

%
Average
hours1
(standard)

80
M ean2

M edian2

Middle range2

t
90

$
100

t
110

S

%

120

130

$
140

$

$
15 0

160

*

i

170

180

t

190

$

t

200

210

(
22 0

*
230

t

t
240

250

S
260

*
270

and
under

280
and

90
M
EN
COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

220
64

$
$
$
$
3 9 . 5 1 7 4 . 5 0 1 6 4 .0 0 1 4 0 . 5 0 - 2 1 2 . 0 0
4 0 . 5 1 7 3 . 0 0 16 4. 0 0 1 5 7 . 0 0 - 1 9 7 . 0 0

73
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

38.0 147.50 141.0 0

102
160
69

13 8 .0 0
4 0 . 5 1 4 9 .5 0 14 3 . 0 0
3 9 . 0 1 3 7 . 0 0 130 .00
3 8 .5 136.00 129.50

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

-

-

-

14
1

12
1

28
2

20
6

22
16

25
9

17
6

9
5

9
4

4
2

16
6

6
6

38

-

-

-

-

-

11

10

15

^5

8

11

4

41
17

46
28

22

4

57
9

14
3

15
2

8
3

7

1

"

2

-

-

3

-

-

-

1

17

w

11

*9

2

^5

2

6

22
1

2

10

A7
29

40
2

13
5

7

-

-

-

-

12 6.0 0 -170 .5 0
133.50 -158 .00
12 5 .0 0 147.50
120.0014 4 .5 0

58

12 7 . 0 0 1 2 2 . 5 0 1 0 8 . 0 0 39*0
107.0038.5 1 1 7 .5 0 119.5 0 10 7 .0 0 -

140 .00 1
138 .0 0 1
12 5 .0 0 1

68

212.50 211.00 18 3.0 03 9 . 0 206 .00 200.50 1 7 8 . 0 0 -

17

242.00
22 4. 50

126
FINANCE

2
3

17
3

25
16

25

18

10

15

12

1

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,

**

3
3

2

2
1

8

2

3

JJ?
1-8

2
2

7

6

280 o v e r

1

3

7

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
2* 7

39# \

104

3 8* 5

in ~ * ? n
174* SO

Q

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
53

12 4.50-152.50

3 8 . 5 13 9 . 0 0

5

1

7

2

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
141
103
53

4 0 .0
4 0 .0 2 7 4 . 5 0 2 7 7 . 0 0 2 5 1 . 5 0 - 3 0 2 . 5 0
39. 5
2 0 0 . ->0

100

39*0 2 2 5 . 5 0 226. 00 1 9 7 . 0 0 - 2 4 7 . 0 0

42'
315
110

219 00 219 50
4 0.0 2 2 3 . 5 0 22 9. 00 2 0 3 .0 0 - 2 4 7 . 0 0
40 .0 20 5. 50
19 3.50-219 .0 0

159

FINANCE

t 0*0 176* 50 17 1* 0 0

2
1

3
2

7
3
3

2

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,

UKA1 1 -j " LN , v L Aj < A
j
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

*

10

l

17

11

31
12

45

44
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

4

18

5

22
8

22
22

34
29

28
11

49

1 7 A Rfl
i nn nn

291
250

16
LO

1 4 3 . 0 0 140*50 1 2 9 . 5 0 - 1 5 5 . 0 0
112.50

104.50-119.00

535

4 0 .0 18 9 .0 0 1 8 4 . 5 0

113.50

x n *n

108

39.0 170.00 172.00

9

63

101

36

8

i

52
45

58

165.0 0-210 .0 0

ZU2

;

27

9

1
56

60

10

2

1

76

55

48

61

1

34

iff

7

21

5

i f l l * UU
106* n n 10 2.00

2

25

29

23

56

-

-

23

CO

W EN
OM
NURSES,

INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) -----

* Wo rk er s w e r e distr ib ute d as follows:
* * W o rk er s w e r e dis tributed as follow s:
See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




155.0 0 -18 8 .5 0

-

-

-

37 at $290 to $300; and 1 at $320 to $330.
30 at $280 to $300; 29 at $300 to $320; and 5 at $320 and o v er .

i

5

11

5

11

18

14

21

10

5

6

1

-

13
T a b le A -2 a .

P ro fe s s io n a l

a n d t e c h n ic a l o c c u p a t i o n s — la r g e e s t a b li s h m e n t s — m e n

and w o m e n

(A ve rag e s t ra ig h t -t i m e we ekl y hours and earn ings for s el ec t ed occupations studied in est abl is hm ent s employing 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e by industry division, B a l t im o re , Md., August 1971)
W eekly earnings *
( standard)

S e x , occu pation , and in d u stry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

N u m b er o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly earn in g
$

$

Under

weekly
Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range2

(standard)

$

100

*
110

$
120

s

$
130

140

»
150

«
160

s

$
170

180

*
200

190

t

s

$
210

220

o f—
t

230

250

t

i

$

$
240

260

270

"1
280

and
under

100

n o

290

and
120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

210

200

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

290

over

MEN
$
*92

3 9 .5 '

$

1 92* 00

3 9 .5

$

3 9 .5

51

3 9 .0

1 5 1* 50
1 4 2 .5 0
1 3 3 .0 0

3 9 .5

1 2 7 .0 0

69

3 9 .0

1 2 7 .0 0

1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0

66

3 9 .5

t 2 t . 30

39* 5
3 9 .5

1 2 6 .0 0 -

1 6 1 .5 0

1 2 0 .0 0 -

1 4 2 .5 0

l

13

14

1

12

1
2

7

1 0 7 .5 0 -1 3 9 .5 0

f f

t8

15

to
14

5

9
2
2

2

9
2
3
2

2

1

i

2

JJ

2

1

PR0GRAM ERS,

C OM PUTER

^7

2 2 6*5 0

54

2

2

17

2 1 0 .5 0

l^ "* * 00
1 4 0 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0

r
._

C OM PUTER

32

2

9

j

10
1 2 7 .5 0 -1 6 1 .0 0

^T4
84

,,

$

i"~ * r o

PROGRAM ERS,

9

J

C OM PUTER

SYSTEM S

COM PUTER

SYSTEM S

1 7 1 .0 0

1 7 3 .0 0

1 5 9 .0 0 -1 8 4 .5 0

^^
^
2 7 0*0 0

F IN A N C E

2 8 2 .0 0
2 0 6 .0 0

2 4 9 .0 0 -3 0 3 .5 0

CLASS

13

16

J
2

1

1

9

j

3

2

3

2

4

11
3

38

3
39. 5
2

41

3
9

1

2

**3 3
24

8

ANALYSTS,

A ------------------------------------

3 9 .5

2 2 8 .0 0

2 2 6 .5 0

324

4 0 .0

2 2 2 .0 0

2 2 4 .0 0

2 0 4 .0 0 -2 4 3 .0 0

^ 0 *0

2 0 5*0 0

1

2 0 7 .5 0 -2 4 4 .5 0

2 0 4*0 0

71

-

-

167
139

1 4 8 .5 0

1 4 8 .0 0

1 3 1 .0 0 -1 6 7 .0 0

1 4 8 .0 0

TRACERS

2

5

1

16

1 4 7 .0 0

1 2 9 .5 0 -

1 6 6 .5 0

1 0 6 .5 0 -

9

10
20

-

-

-

-

J

1

?nn

O R A T T j HCN

8

ANALYSTS,

57
DRAFTSM EN ,

-

8
8

2
2

2

j

^9

23

27

15

18

17

14

5

11

4

9

16

11

21

43

9
2

47

53

14

18

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

i

20

j

9
g

2

16

9

4

2

16

1 2 8 .0 0

1 1 8 .5 0

*
4 0 .0

21

WOMEN

NURSES,

IN D U S T R IA L

(R E G IS T E R E D !

------

*
Wor ker s we re distributed as follows:
** Wor ker s we re distributed as follow s:
See footnotes at end of table s.




98

3 9 .0

1 7 0 .0 0

1 7 2 .5 0

1 5 5 .5 0 -1 8 8 .5 0

-

-

37 at $290 to $300; and 1 at $320 to $330.
8 at $290 to $300; 20 at $300 to $320; and 5 at $320 and over .

9

5

5

1

-

-

-

14
T a b le

A -3 .

O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, a n d

te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s — m e n

and w o m e n

c o m b in e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly hou rs and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a s is b y in d u stry d iv is io n , B a ltim o r e , M d. , A u gu st 1971)
Average

Average

Occupation and indu stry divis ion

Number
of

Weekly
earnings *
(standard) (standard)
Weekly

MACHINE (BILLING

MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE!------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

122
54
68

79
58

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

$
1 0 4 .0 0
1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 3 .5 0

3 7 .5
3 7 .0

9 9 .5 0

3 8 .0

1 1 4 .0 0

3 7 .0

1 1 2 .0 0

9 4 .0 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS 8 --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

Number
of

Weekly
hours 1
[standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
BILLERS,

Occupation and industry division

93
64

180
54
126

3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

1 0 8 .5 0
1 2 3 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

553
207
346
179

38.0
38.5
37.5
38.0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

1,078
270
808
197
123
89
325

39.0
39.0
38.5
38.5
4 0 .0
39.0
38.5

109.50
114.0 0
108.00
128.50
1 0 5. 00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------

108
69

39.0 11 7.0 0
38.5 112.00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B --------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------------------

287
2 53
34
102
61

38.5 101.50
38.5
99 .00
39.0 138.50
90.00
38.0
3 8.5 101.00

MESSENGERS (OFFICE BOYS AND GI RL S )MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

316
101
215
72
93

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------

376
139
237
25
99

38.5
38.5
38.5
39 .0
39.5

3,375
989
2, 3 86
270
224
206
914

38.5
39.5
38 .0
39.0
39.5
39.0
3 8 .0

135.50
14 6 .0 0
131.00
168.00
134.50
124.50
121.00

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A ---------------------------------------------

72

3 9. 0 1 6 5 .5 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ----------------------------- ------ — --------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------------

130
83
35

3 9 . 0 1 3 8 .5 0
3 8 . 5 13 6 . 5 0
3 9 . 0 1 4 7 .5 0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ----------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------------------

258
63
195
125

3 8 . 5 10 5.00
3 9. 0 10 7. 00
3 8 . 5 10 4. 50
3 8.5
98.00

TY PI ST S, CLASS A ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------------------

860
316
544
148
337

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
38.5

TYP IST S, CLASS B ------------------------------MANUFACTURING----------------------- -------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------WHOLESALE TR ADE -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------------FI NANC E ------------------— — ------ ----------- —

1,179
244
935
96
146
539

1 1 1 .0 0

9 8 .5 0

39.0
95.50
4 0 .0 1 0 2 . 5 0
3 9 . 0 92 .0 0
39.0 103.50
39.0
85.00

3 9 .0

1 3 9 .5 0
1 6 5 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0

4 0 .0

95

3 9 .0

1 4 6 .5 0
1 1 3 .5 0

241

3 8 .5

1 1 8 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------WHOLESALE TRA DE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

1 ,4 9 7

3 8 .5

1 0 9 .5 0

SECRETARIES ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

357
1 ,1 4 0
245

3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0

146
335

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1 2 0 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0
1 0 2 .5 0
9 9 . 50

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

256
53
203
101

3 8 .0
39.5
3 8 .0
38.5

1 4 4 .0 0
1 6 3. 00
139.00
141.0 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

106

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS B ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TR A DE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

567
102
465
71
285

SECRETARIES, CLASS B --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------------------

673
120
553
59
309

38.5
39.5
38.0
38.5
38.5

139 .0 0
1 6 5 .0 0
133.50
1 6 7 .0 0
123.50

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS C ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

429

3 7 .5

8 3 .0 0

409

3 7 .5

8 3 .0 0
7 5 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TR A DE -----------------------------

1,289
4 56
833
82
81
55
395

38.5
39.5
38.0
38.0
4 0 .0
3 9. 0
3 8 .0

137.00
153.00
12 8 . 0 0
14 9 .0 0
14 0 .5 0
12 5.5 0
116.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS D --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------WHOLESALE TRA OE ------------------------

1,065
360
705
80
109

38 .0
39.5
37.5
3 9. 0
37.0

12 5 .0 0
128.50
123.50
129.50
110.50

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

777
194
583
212
78
243

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
3 9. 0
39.0

1 2 0. 00
12 5.5 0
118.50
140 .00
117.0 0
10 2 . 5 0

3 8 .5
3 8 .5

9 4 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0
9 2 .0 0
8 5 .0 0
8 5 .0 0

68

3 8 .5

216

3 7 .0

7 5 .5 0

CLERKS, ORDER -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------WHOLESALE TRAOE -----------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------

490
113

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 1 7 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0

377
260

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 8 .0 0
1 2 8 .0 0

117

3 8 .5

9 5 .0 0

CLERKS, PA YROLL--------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

437

3 9 .0

1 4 3 .0 0

280

3 9 .5

1 5 7 .0 0

157
69

3 8 .0
3 8 .5

1 1 8 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS ---------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

256

3 7 .5

1 0 9 .0 0

114

3 9 .5

1 1 4 .0 0 J

See fo o tn o te at end o f ta b le s




CONTINUED

123.50
127.00
12 0 . 5 0
118.00

3 9 .5
3 8 .5

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

Weekly
eamings 1
(standard)

39.0
39.5
38.0
3 8 .5

351
861
156

1 3 1 .0 0

Weekly
hours 1
[standard)

550
248
302
129

1 ,2 1 2

1 2 7 .5 0

Number
of

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRAOE ----------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------

77

Average

Occupation and industry division

12 2 . 0 0
127.00
119.0 0
110.50

105.50
10 4. 00
10 6. 00
119.5 0
109.50

110.50
119.50
10 5. 00
12 4 .0 0
95.0 0

38.5
9 4 .5 0
39.5 115.50
38.0
89.00
39.5
9 1 .0 0
38.5
94.00
3 8 .0
8 5. 50

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS
COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A --------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------------------

242
70
172
82

39.5
4 0 .0
39.0
38.5

173.00
17 1.0 0
1 7 4 .0 0
14 9 .0 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B -----------1
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE

305
111
194
83

39.5
40.5
39.0
38.5

138 .00
147.50
1 3 3 .0 0
134.50

15
T a b le

A -3 .

O ffic e ,

p ro fe s s io n a l,

a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s — m e n

and w o m e n

c o m b i n e d ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v er ag e s t ra ig ht -t im e we ek ly hours and earnings f o r s el ec t ed occupations studied on an a r e a b as is by indu stry divis ion, B al t im or e, Md., August 1971)
Av erage

Average

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
woikers

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

PROFESSIONAL AND ibCHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

Occupation and industry division

Number
of

Weekly
hours 1
(standard]

Weekly
eamings 1
(standard)

Average

Occupation and industry division

Number

of

W
eekly
Weekly
hours * earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

PROFESSIONAL ANO TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED
$

_r
30

"

117

62

3 9 .0

53

3 8 .5

143
105

4 0 .0

371
212
159

4 0 .0
39.5
4 0 .0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ---------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------

297
253

3 9 .0 1 43.50
3 9 .0 1 42.50

2 7 7 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN-TRACERS -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

109
67

3 9 .5 1 14 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 08.50

ELECTRONIC TECHNICIANS ---------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

543
341
202

4 0 .0 188. 50
4 0 .0 1 89.50
4 0 .0 1 86 .0 0

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) M ANUFACTURING-------------------------

111
81

3 9 .0
39.5

50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A -------------------------

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
uUj 1 iLo ^ y LLA5j A

2 7 3 .0 0
2 7 3 .5 0

3 8 .5

55

2 0 7 *0 0
2 1 0 .5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ------------------------------------

COMPUTER PROGRAMERSt

131

3 9 *0
3 8 .5




140

3 9 .0

2 2 9 .5 0

3 9 .0

2 2 6 .5 0

2 0 0 * 50
1 7 6 .5 0

431

M ANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------

See footnote at end of ta b le s.

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

105

3 0 *0

$
178 .5 0
180 .0 0
176 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

1 3 8 .5 0
1 4 0 .0 0

4 0 .0

2 1 7 .5 0

320
111

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 2 2 .0 0
2 0 5 .5 0

170 .5 0
1 74.00

16
T a b le

A -3 a .

O ffic e ,

p ro fe s s io n a l,

a n d t e c h n ic a l o c c u p a t i o n s — la r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s — m e n

and w o m e n

c o m b in e d

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s f o r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d in e s t a b lis h m e n t s e m p lo y in g 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e b y in d u s t r y d iv is i o n , B a l t i m o r e , M d . , A u g u s t 1971)
Average

Average

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
standard) (standard)

of

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
70

-

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

of

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

CONTINUED

1n

665
248
417
73

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 4 9 .5 0
1 7 0 .0 0
1 3 7 .0 0
1 1 " . 00

79

1 ^C* 5 0
1 3 7 .0 0

SECRETARIESt CLASS 3

iS n
i'n

UL

NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

CLERKS,

F IL E ,

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
3 6 .5
3 9 .0

1 0 0 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0
9 7 . 50
8 7 .0 0
8 3 .5 0

195

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

__

__

103
93

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 2 3 .5 0
1 2 7 .0 0

87

3 9 .0

1 1 5 .5 0

3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 6 3 .5 0

604

3 9 .5

1 3 1 .0 0
1 3 0 .0 0

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 2 6 .5 0
1 3 0 .0 0

It*
3 9 .0

67

3 8 .5

665
165
191
19

rv>* r\
r\
90 50
9 2 .5 0

3 9 .0 1 1 3 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 1 3 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 1 3 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 2 9 .0 0
•

n in n * nn

238
96
142
72

See fo o tn o te at end o f ta b le s .




39 5 1 4 2 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 8 .0 0

493

rUuL i L U 1i L 1 I iLu

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

910
719

„ » r-^

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

1 5 4 .5 0

54

SECRET ARIE^ v CL A j j

0

103

3 9 .0

1 4 0 .5 0

125

3 9 .0

1 2 4 .0 0

56

NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

3 9 .5

2 1 6 .0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS.

PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S
1 AA

86
54

33 0 130 00
3 8 .5 1 1 9 .0 0

1

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

3 9 .0

63

38. 5

1 0 8 .0 0
9 ^ .0 0

50

3 9 .5

1 1 5 .0 0

3 8 .0
3 9 .0

1 3 2 .0 0

PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

276
UKAi

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B

L L mjj

/ r> n
, 0 *0 2 2 2 .0 0

261

1
3

2 0 5 .0 0

3 9 . 5 i no .0 0
1 0 8 nn
60

9 7 . 00
1 0 2 .0 0
9 3 .5 0
1 0 3 .^ 0

??

1K A U L

275 50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,

53

XL

39 5 2 1 3 .5 0
- •
39 *0 “ J!*

1 3 0 .5 0

126

MESSENGERS (O F F IC E BOYS AND G IR L S I-

CONTINUED

3 7 .0 1 1 3 .5 0
39e 5 1 2 9 .3 0

339
162

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS -----------------------

3 9 .0

148
273

PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S -----------------------

39 5 156 50
3 9 .5 1 7 0 .5 0
3 0 « 5 1 0 0 . --0

179
59

1 K A lJL

I f ) “i
- *n i
3 0 *^
3 8 .0

256
200
50

K L I A 1L

139

FINANCE

9 1 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
7 7 .0 0

CLASS C -----------------------

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

SECRET ARIES » CLASS C

*

306
54
252
66
106

87

CLASS B -----------------------

Weekly
hours 1
[standard)

RETAIL TRAOC

i An*
1 '1 50
1 2 6 .5 0

359

1 1 4 .5 0
1 2 5 .0 0

•
CLERKS, F IL E ,

Number
of

$

133

L 1M 1 L

O ccupation and in du stry d iv is io n

$
3 8 .5 1 0 5 .0 0

731
230

NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv is io n

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A jj D

Average
Number

Number

O ccu pation and in d u stry d iv is io n

a .n n
*

« i o nn
1
*

101

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 7 0 .5 0
1 7 4 .0 0

IQ ^
1 0 5 .5 0
FINANCE

NURSES,

INDUSTRIAL

(REGISTERED) -----

7
5

17
T a b le A -4 .

M a in te n a n c e and p o w e rp la n t o cc u p a tio n s

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly earn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a sis by in d u stry d iv is io n , B a ltim o r e , M d. , August 1971)
Hourly earnings ^

S ex , occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Mean 2

Median2

Num ber of wo rk e rs re ceiving s t ra ig h t -t i m e hourly earnings of—
i
$
i
$
i
i
t
1
*
$
s
S
t
S
*
$
$
*
S
*
$
t
T j 2*90 3 .0 0 3 . 1 0 3 . 2 0 3 . 3 0 3 . 40 3 . 5 0 3 .6 0 3 . 70 3 .8 0 3 .9 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 10 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4. 80 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 .4 0 5 . 6 0 5. 80
T
Under
Middle range 2 s
and
and
2. 90 under
3 .0 0 3 . 10 3 . 2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3. 50 3. 60 3 . 7 0 3. 80 3 .9 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 10 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4. 8 0 5. 0 3 5 . 2 0 5 .4 0 5 . 6 0 5. 8 0

over

HEN
$

$

4.53

4.57

4.08- 5 .1 1

03

10

4 . 04

3 .92

704
573

4.53
4.60

4.41
4.50

4 . 1 1 - 4.93
4 .1 0 - 4.99

07

'0 6

/* q i

74

4 .10

4.39

4.02- 4 .7 1

132

4.35

4.36

4 . 1 5 - 4.65

782
uu

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE --------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

$

181

MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

$

4.85

4.89
4.<: j

4 .4 5 - 5.38

/* 7 «

7* 7 7

2

-

1

-

6

1

17
12

9

11
8

4.09
-

~

-

8
“

4
4

5
3

7
7

9
4

2
1

18
18

14
9

27
27

38
2
36
34
77
71

28

5

13

25

11

29

7

15

-

2

72
72

8
8

17
17

10
40
29

138
68

83
81

36
30

91
85

29
20

19
19

8

MANUFACTURING ------------------------------MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM —

MECHANICS,

1
U

15
7
-

1

-

8

-

1

-

-

-

4

1
-

3

~
4

5

1

1

8
8

4

9

10

26

-

“

-

-

-

“

6

16

27

25

26

5

7

1

-

-

-

55

174

26

22

AUTOMOTIVE
??
/n
™
'0 6

i/n
1 0

J o/

*
5. 30

4 . 1 7 - 5.02
4 .U J 3 . 3 3

150

4.82

4.73

4 . 6 1 - 5.30

298

i

MILLWRIGHTS ---------------------------------------

i
i

7*««
z*Z;

3.05

3.55

3 .2 5

452

4.69

4.66
4.0 /

8

4.51

4.52

4 .1 9 - 4.75

5*01

167

8

72

8

25

8

3

19

15 5

_

I*
10
4

26

19

03
77

z*

\~i~i

14 7
_

_

66

T7
in*

151
ro

608

70

3
2
1

8

*

ii
-

-

-

-

-

i

39

-

180

1

352
UJ

36

-

-

2

2

7

5

13

30
-

12

18

3
3

Vft

ro

1
84

28

58

4 .2 8 - 5.22

-

1
2

2

3.9 5

407




47
1
1

NONMANUFACTURING

See footn otes at end o f tables

r7
*

0

J*

4 .3 4

?* 93

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —

3

fr

» *??

1
7
67
r 1 r Cr XI I LHj f H X I 1 L^iAPIvL
MP

*
*

3 69

Tin

62

n

£
tS

33

34

26

2

22

68
frtJ

45

18

4

7

-

-

18
T a b le

A -4 a .

M a in te n a n c e

and

p o w e r p la n t o c c u p a tio n s — la rg e e s t a b lis h m e n ts

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied in esta b lish m en ts e m p lo y in g 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e by in d u stry d iv is io n , B a ltim o r e , M d ., August 1971)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings^

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$

Mean 2

Median2

Middle range 2

S
Under2 *90 3.0 0 3 . 1 0
$
and
2«90 under
i

t
$
t
t
%
s
$
i
i
$
*
$
$
t
(
$
$
1
$
3. 20 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 . 50 3 .6 0 3. 70 3. 80 3. 90 4 . 00 4. 10 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4. 80 5 . 0 0 5. 20 5 .4 0 5 . 6 0 5 . 8 0
and

3.0 0 3. 10 3 .2 0 3. 30 3 .4 0 3. 50 3 .6 0 3 . 7 0 3. 80 3. 90 4. 00 4 . 10 4. 20 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4.80 5.00 5 . 2 0 5 . 4 0 5 . 6 0 5. 8 0

over

MEN

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE-------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------

251
162
89
65

$
4 .4 6
4 .6 1
4 .1 8
4 . 10

$ •
4 .4 1
4 .6 3
4 .0 6
4 .0 4

$
4 .0 3
4 .1 4
3 .8 8
3 .9 2

-

$
4 .9 5
5 .1 3
4 .5 4
4 .0 9

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE ---------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

575
469
106

4 .6 1
4 .6 7
4 . 34

4 .5 3
4 .6 3
4 .2 6

4 .1 9 4 .1 0 4 .2 2 -

4 .9 9
5 .0 6
4 .3 0

-

“

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY ----------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

256
206
50

4 .5 0
4 .4 8
4 .5 8

4 .5 8
4 .5 7
4 .7 8

4 .0 7 4 .1 2 4 .0 4 -

4 .8 7
4 .7 9
5 .0 8

-

-

FIREMEN, STATIONARY BOILER -------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

66
55

4 .0 9
4 .1 7

4 . 19
4 .3 8

3 .6 4 4 .0 4 -

4 .5 5
4 .7 2

1
1

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM —
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

132
132

4 . 35
4 .3 5

4 .3 6
4 . 36

4 .1 5 4 .1 5 -

4 .6 5
4 .6 5

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE -------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

76 4
700

4 . 88
4 .9 3

4 .9 1
4 .9 3

4 .4 2 4 .5 4 -

5 .4 0
5 .5 1

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE! -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------

22 6
146
80
65

4 .3 0
4 .4 4
4 .0 5
3 .9 6

4 .2 9
4 .4 6
3 .9 5
3 .8 6

3 .9 9 4 .1 2 3 .7 5 3 .6 7 -

4 .7 3
4 .7 7
4 .6 6
4 .4 5

1 ,7 6 5

4 .8 0

4 .8 6

4 .7 3 -

5 .1 8

M IL LW RI G HT S-----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

148
148

4 .8 2
4 .8 2

4 .7 2
4 .7 2

4 .6 1 4 .6 1 -

5 .3 0
5 .3 0

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE ----------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

141
10 4

4 . 16
4 .2 4

3 .9 3
4 .1 8

3 .6 6 3 .6 9 -

4 .8 1
4 .8 3

3
2

P IP EF IT T ER S, MAINTENANCE -----------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

443
405

4 .7 1
4 .7 4

4 .6 7
4 .6 8

4 .2 9 4 .3 5 -

5 .2 2
5 .2 6

”

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------

167
137

4 .5 1
4 .5 5

4 .5 2
4 .5 5

4 .1 9 4 .1 7 -

4 .7 5
4 .7 8

-

-

30

4 .3 1

4 .2 6

4 .2 2 -

4 .3 0

-

TOOL AND OIE MAKERS--------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

375
37 0

4 .9 8
4 .9 8

5 .0 2
5 .0 2

4 .9 2 4 .9 2 -

5 .0 9
5 .1 0

MECHANICS,

MAINTENANCE---------------------

See footnotes at end of tables.




-

_
-

2
1
1
-

6
6
-

1
1
-

16
4
12
12

9
6
3
3

11
8
3
3

36
2
34
34

29
25
4
i

6
5
1
1

19
13
6
-

39
25
14
10

11
11
-

29
29
-

7
7
-

15
15
-

-

4
4
•

2
2

3
3
“

7
2
5

2
1
1

-

10
9
i

27
27
“

73
71
2

16
14
2

122
52
70

47
45
2

36
30
6

89
83
6

29
20
9

19
19
“

-

-

1
1

3
3

8
7
1

5
5
“

10
9
1

13

8
7
1

22

*

16
16

29
29

15

17
16
1

50
47
3

31
19
12

21
21
-

17
7
10

*

8
8

3
“

1
“

1
1

-

4

“

“

-

8
8

7
4

6
6

10
10

16
16

_

-

-

i
1

-

4
4

-

3
3

4
4

5
5

1
1

1
1

6
6

16
16

27
27

25
25

26
26

5
5

15
15

22
22

36
36

12
10

99
48

97
96

13
13

189
188

19
14
5
5

5
5
5

17
17
17

2
-

23
16
7
2

27
21
6
6

18
17
1
1

19
19
-

53
27
26
16

17
17
-

9

10

9

59

43

110

42

71

15 7

613

171

435

1
1

1
1

4
4
i

”

1
1

1
1

4
i

1
1

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

26
26

70
70

6
6

-

*

4
4

36
36

23
21

14
11

11
11

4

7

1

10
10

10
10

20
18

-

“

3
2

-

13
13

-

2
1

1

3
3

11
4

30
30

5
4

10
10

68
58

61
60

84
71

28
28

22
19

68
68

45
45

_

~

4
4

1
1

-

7
4

5
5

-

12
12

18
18

33
12

34
33

26
21

2
2

18
18

4
4

7
7

_

_

”

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

21

1

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
14

-

16
16

9
6

38
36

90
90

159
159

8
8

2
2

39
39

_

2
2
-

-

2
2
2

_
-

-

3
3
3

7
7
7

1
1
1

“

2

1

4

8

4

8

8

-

5
4

4
i

2
1

-

-

-

“

*

3

“

-

-

-

-

1

-

*

”

-

-

2
“

*

“

-

3

i
i
-

-

9

4

2

7

-

6
2
4
“

72
72
*

-

17
17

-

2
2

3
3
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

7
7

1
1

_

_

-

-

-

32
26

55
55

17 4
17 4

_

_
-

12
12
~

-

~

16
16

_

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

1

_

-

2
2

_

_

3
~

-

19

Table A -5 .

Custodial and material m ovement occupations

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a sis b y in d u s try d iv is io n , B a ltim o r e , M d ., Au gu st 1971)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

t
t
s
t
t
l
*
$
1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2.0 0 2. 10 2 . 2 0 2. 40 2 . 6 0 2. 80 3 .0 0 3 .2 0

S
S
S
t
%
S
s
i
t
$
3.4 0 3 .6 0 3. 80 4.00 4. 20 4 . 4 0 4.60 4. 80 5. 00 5 . 2 0

1 . 7 0 1 . 80 1 . 9 0 2.00 2. 10 2. 20 2 .4 0 2. 60 2. 80 3. 00 3. 20 3 . 4 0

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

3.6 0 3 .8 0 4« 00 4. 20 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4.80 5.00 5. 20 ov er

S

t

1.60 1.70
Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range 2

s

S

$
and
1 . 6 0 under

MEN

GUARDS ANC WATCHMEN---------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------

$
2 .3 3

$
1 .9 0

$
1 .7 9 -

$
2 .9 0

1 , 742

3 .4 4
2 .0 5

3 .5 5
1 .8 5

2 .8 5 1 .7 7 -

3 .9 7
2 .0 5

359

3 .5 6

3 .6 5

3 .3 3 -

3 .9 8

2 ,1 7 1
429

GUARDS
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------WATCHMEN
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------JANITORS, PORTERS, ANO CLEANERS —
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------WHOLESALE TRAOE -------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------FINANCE -------------------------------------------

50
50

551
551

507
507

140
140

121
9
11 2

121
47
74

51
34
17

27
16
11

31
5
26

61
20
41

97
46
51

89
51
38

71
30
41

91
87
4

36
13
23

16
16
“

54
54
“

-

-

-

56

“

-

-

-

-

-

6

1

28

23

5

5

5

45

51

30

87

13

6

54

-

-

-

-

-

57
i

70

2 .8 1

2 .6 2

2 .2 8 -

3 .1 4

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

19

11

11

-

15

1

-

-

-

-

10

-

-

-

-

-

5 , 376

2 .1 7

1. 6

1 , 139

3 .1 3
1 .9 2

1 .8 2
3 .3 1

6 2 .8 8 1 .6 5 -

2 .6 6
3 .4 0
1 .9 8

175
39
136
57
19
10
25

177
91
86
17
10
47
8

232
161
71
33
12
10

125
94
31
7
24

95
53
42
29
13

_
-

_
-

-

-

3
-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2 .1 2

166
56
110
18
11
31
38

438
343
95
8
82

1 .9 2 -

160
45
115
8
11
51
23

-

37
51

161
27
134
5
22
83

8
6
2

3 .0 7

17 3
38
135
7
11
44
34

123
123
-

3 .1 6
2 .7 7

459
34
425
27
366

5
2
3

1 .8 7 -

505
4
501
51
26

237
15
222

2 .7 1 2 .1 3 -

6 2131
8
6 2123
7
49
6
-

359
241
118
65
53

281
245
36
36

243
153
90
70
20

80
64
16
16
-

248
198
50
15
35

149
113
36
36

193
146
47
47

7
7
7
-

127
49
78
78
-

_
-

68
68
-

4, 237
189

1 . 70
2 .7 9

2 .9 3
2 .4 7

72
502

2 .4 4

2 .5 7
2 .2 5

670

2 .0 6

1 .9 7

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING ----------MANUFACTURING----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

3, 128

3 .3 7

3 .2 8

2 .7 5 -

4 .0 2

1 ,9 2 7

3 .5 2
3 . 12
4 .0 6

3 .5 2
3 .0 6
3 .7 7

397
553

2.66

3 .0 1

2
2
3
2

-

4 .1 5
3 .7 2
4 .9 2
3 .0 6

3 .0 8

3 .0 4

2 .4 4 -

3 .6 1

ORDER
FILLERS --------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NCNMANUF A C T U R IN G ---------------------------WHOLESALE T R A D E -------------------------RETAIL T R A D E ---------------------------------

I t 950
495
1 ,4 5 5
762
681

3 . 34
3 .1 8
3 .4 0
3 .3 4
3 .4 8

3 .4 7

2 .7 9 -

3 .5 9

3 .2 5
3 .4 9
3 .5 3
3 .4 5

2
2
2
3

-

3 .5 6
3 .6 0
3 .5 9
4 .2 1

PACKERS, SHIPPING --------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------k ET A IL TRADE ----------------------------------

999

3 .6 1
3 .6 6

3 .6 4
3 .4 2

2 .7 9 2 .7 9 -

4 .2 5
4 .0 5

3 .5 8
2 .5 6

4 .2 1

2.22

2 .8 5 2 .0 6 -

RECEIVING CLERKS -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------

390
106

3 .4 6

3 .4 4

284
152

3 .4 3
3 .4 7
3 .6 1

3 . 37
3 .4 5
3 .6 7

3
3
3
2

S HIPP ING CLERKS -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------RETAIL TRAOE ----------------------------------

184
96

3 .6 4

3 .6 7

3 .3 2 -

4 .1 5

3 .5 3

3 .4 9

88

3 .7 6

3 .6 8

3 .1 5 3 .3 9 -

4 .1 3
4 .2 3

57

3 .6 8

3 .6 8

3 .4 6 -

SH IPP ING ANO RECEIVING C L E R K S -------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NCNMANUF A C T U R I N G -----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE*

227

3 .6 6

3 .4 9

3 .0 9 -

90
137

3 .6 5

3 .6 0

3 .4 1 -

4 .1 5

3 .6 6

3 .4 5

2 .8 5 -

4 .2 7

63

3 .3 8

3 . 24

2 .7 4 -

4 .2 1

1,

201
239

352
64 7

68

* Workers were distributed as follows:
** A ll workers were at $ 5 . 2 0 to $ 5 . 4 0 .
See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




53

at

$ 5 ,8 0

to

.9
.4
.3
.1

.7
.9
.6
.2

.0
.0
.1
.8

$6;

5
2
9
8

3
5
7
1

7
3
1
3

-

_
-

12
12

10
10

25
25

18
18

64
13
51

147
71
76

163
70
93

276
183
93

85
49
36

194
152
42

-

-

10

7
18

14
4

40
11

48
28

57
36

93

16
20

42

379
11 2
267
3
200
64

_
-

16
16
-

-

15
8
7
7
-

5
2
3
3

41
11
30
28
1

11
9
2
2

48
2
46
35
4

109
50
59
30
25

2 52
60
192
128
64

67
35
32
i
31

90
29
61
23
38

97
61
36
16
20

752
120
632
326
306

10
9
i
i

_
-

247
79
168
168

186
186
186

-

-

_
-

-

4
4
-

-

24
24
“

7
7

8
8
-

ii
ii
ii

41
22
19
10

24
2
22
13

47
3
44
4

32
16
16
11

56
14
42

31
28
3
1

98
41
57
“

9
9
-

99
51
48

61
43
18
18

-

8
8
-

364
4
360

-

1
1
-

_
-

_
-

4 .2 6
3 .6 1

78
*78
-

3 .7 6
3 .8 0
3 .7 3
4 .4 0

_

_

-

_

-

1

2

3

34

18

-

*

-

“

-

1
1

2
2

3
3

34
22

18
10

29
25
4
2

33
7
26
13

37
24
13
4

94
12
82
“

50
12
38
34

17
16
1
-

5
4
i
-

26
1
25
25

41
5
36
36

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

~
“

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

9
8
1
1

2
2
-

32
13
19

15
4
n

28
10
18
18

12
8
4

31
23
8
8

20
6
14
8

1
1

8
8
-

-

_
-

3

5
4
i
i

18
18

3

4 .1 3

_
-

-

4 .1 9

-

-

_

-

_

-

_

1

20
8
12
7

17
17
13

18

6
6

4

22
12
10
10

20
14

25
15
10
10

-

_

-

2
24
2 ** 24
2

and

25

-

at

$ 6 .2 0

-

to

-

$ 6 .4 0 .

-

-

1

3

4

14
9

4

10

18

46
25
21

9
9

8

3

1

4

6

4

-

4

4

20
T a b le A -5 .

C u s t o d ia l a n d m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupations studied on an a re a b a sis b y in d u stry d iv is io n , B a ltim o r e , M d ., Au gu st 1971)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

Sex, occupation, and industry division
workers

Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range 2

$
$
Under 1 . 6 0 1 . 7 0
$
and
1 . 6 0 under
1.70

1. 8 0

$
t
s
i
$
(
s
$
$
$
1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2.0 0 2. 10 2 . 2 0 2. AO 2. 60 2. 80 3 .0 0 3 . 2 0

s
$
%
t
S
S
t
$
S
*
3. AO 3 . 6 0 3 .8 0 A. 00 A. 20 A.AO A. 60 A . 80 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0

a„
1 . 9 0 2.00 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . AO 2 . 6 0 2. 80 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 . AO 3. 60 3 . 80 A. 00 A. 20 A. AO A . 60 A. 80 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0

over

M
EN - CONTINUED
TRUCKDRIVERS -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TR A DE -----------------------------

A , 077
1 , A97
2,5 80
1,055
1,060
377

$
3.9 7
3.7 9
A . 08
A. 91
3 .5 0
3 .7 3

$
3 .9 8
3 .9 5
A. 36
5. 1A
3.2 2
3 .9 1

$
3 .2 2 3 . AA—
3 . 1 A—
5.112.8 93 .1 5 -

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

5A6
329
21 7

3.A8
3 .9 6
2.76

3 .6 A
A. 25
2.69

2 . 6 9 - A . 50
3 . 8 1 - A . 5A
2 . 3 8 - 3 .0 8

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING A T0NS1 ----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

1,071
277
79A
261
A08
123

3 .53
3 .1 3
3.6 7
5.02
2 .9 8
3 .0 9

3 .15
3 .0 7
3 .17
5.15
2.95
3.1A

2.8 62.A 92.925.122.7A 3 .0 2 -

$
A .7 A
A . 17
5.13
5 .17
A . 62
A. 39

3 .9 7
3 .70
5.12
5.17
3 .1 3
3.2 A

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER A TONS,
TRAILER TYPE I ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NGNMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------WHOLESALE TRAOE ------------------------

1,621
293
1,32 8
633
5A2

A.A5
3.69
A. 61
5.16
A. 05

A . 71
3.7 A
A. 85
5.15
A. 61

3 .9 6 3 .3 3 A . 3 7—
5.13 3 .2 5 -

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER A TONS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE! -----------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------

37A
267
107

3.9 7
A. 13
3 .5 7

A. 13
A . 13
3.A5

3 . 6 8 - A . 62
3 . 9 A - A . 61
2 . 5 6 - A.6A

TRUCKERS, POWER ( FORKLIFT 1 ------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------

2, 319
1,992
327
165

3 .8 1
3.8 5
3 .56
3 .8 0

3.8 8
3.9 1
3 .53
3.7 9

3 .3 7 3 .3 6 3 .A 13 .5 3 -

A . 29
A.A6
A . 22
A . 25

1,712
283
1 , A29
57

1.91
2. A 3
1.80
1.97

1.82
2.19
1.79
1.98

1.6 9 2 .111.6 71.70 -

1.90
2.73
1.86
2.18

117
59

2.26
2 . AO

2.19
2.53

1 . 9 8 - 2. 5 A
1 .8 9 - 2.73

5 .1A
A . 15
5.15
5.18
A . 73

8
8
-

22
8
1A

-

-

1A

“

_

-

“

8
8
“

-

-

22
8
1A

_

6

6

-

A
2

_

_

_

~

-

-

_

_

39
28
11

69
2
67

136
77
59

2A 1
23
218

20A
77
127
6
50
61

300
97
203
9
18A
9

89
31
58
35
6
17

231
111
120
20
57
AO

529
A22
107
95

171
10

2A5
A8
19 7
3
18 A
3

~
3

30
2A

A6
5

16
8
8

33
33

62
3
59

58
32
26

21
5
16

-

1

1A

1A

25
2
23
26
12
1A
11

-

170
15A
16
16

11

23
97

37
15
22

57
56
1

5
5
*

50
50

125
125

6A
53
11

_
-

11
11

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

238
238

_

11

“

-

-

-

-

261
60
12
12

891

-

-

21
-

21

891
871
20
“

-

•
-

*

_

-

-

-

*

“

-

_

_

-

-

6
6

19
16
3

20
20

99
75
2A

111
10
101

176
1A
162

-

21
2

93
8

159
2

50
61

16
9

-

3

8
12

3

115
36
79
12
57
10

4
4

2
2

2
2

52
10
A2

11
2
9

22
22

2 52
8A
168

25
15
10

20
11
9

2A
2A

117

39
25
1A

282
5
277

21

-

95
87
8

117

-

A2

-

9

“

168

“

*

*

8

20

1A

261

-

2
2

1
1

6
2
A

AA
A2
2

50
50
“

95
95
-

3

6
4
2

116
72
AA

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

226
11 6
11 0
38

199
152
A7
21

A27
A27
-

60
60

51
51

A61
A61

12
12

-

-

18
A
1A

-

5

11
1
10

-

*

“

-

“

“

A
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

“

_

-

-

-

-

2
2

1A

21

16

21

16

in

“

27
2
25

“

*

“

1A

6
6
-

-

-

3A
3A
-

59
23
36

15
3
12
5

33
23
10
3

113
11 0
3
3

210
197
13
13

15 1
151

563
19
5AA
2

52
21
31
5

37
16
21
11

122
93
29
3

2A
10
1A
3

23
13
10
7

77
56
21
3

25
21
A

8
6
2

17
17

-

-

8
8

16

13

16

18
10

19
15

13
12

-

A
A

-

2
2

*

-

_

_

159
48

1

193
73
120

A10
89
3 21

21

-

273
2A9
2A
16
8
“

-

-

-

-

238

*

-

-

2A2
160
82
82

-

-

21

-

653
-

653
633
20

-

-

_
-

W EN
OM
JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ----MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRAOE ----------------------------PACKERS, SHIPPING ------MANUFACTURING---------

See footnotes at end of tables.




12

-

12
-

A70
A70
15
8
8

263
2
261
8
-

5

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

21
T a b le

A -5 a .

C u s to d ia l

and m a te ria l

m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t io n s — la r g e

e s ta b lis h m e n ts

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Baltimore, Md. , August 1971)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of-

Hourly earnings3

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

1 ---- t
$
t
i
$
$
*
$
t
t
I
*
t
i
*
t
8
$
*
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4. 20 4.40 4.60 4.80

i
M ean2

M edian2

t

t

Middle range 2

'

un der

and

1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2,20 2.30 2.40 2,50 2.60 2,70 2.80 3.00 3. 20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4,20 4,40 4,60 4. 80 o v e r
HEN
GUARDS AND WATCHMEN-------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------GUARDS
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

1,251
337

$
2.56
3 .6 8

$
2 .0 9
3.8 2

$
$
1 . 8 7 - 3.40
3 . 3 8 - 4 .0 0

1
"
-

3.69

3 .8 1

3 . 3 9 - 3 .9 9

2,670
865

2.45
3.32

2 .2 0
3.35

1 . 6 6 - 3 . 2 7 1053
3« 06— 3 . 4 7
-

166
403
69

2.91
2.58
2.12

2.79
2.52
2. 12

2 . 7 1 - 3.0 9
2 .0 3 - 3.23
2 .0 1 - 2.24

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANOLING -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

2, 094
1,537
557
139
418

3.6 2
3.73
3.3 1
3 .5 3
3.23

3 .5 7
3.6 1
3 .3 5
3 .7 0
3 .2 0

3.2 03.2 4 2.673 .3 5 2.49-

ORDER FILLERS ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRA OE -----------------------------

876
307
569
557

3.4 7
3 .3 0
3.56
3.59

3 .4 7
3.43
3.47
3.4 7

PACKERS, SHIPPING ----------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------- —
RE TA IL TRAOE ------------------------------------

287
224
63
55

3 .9 7
4.35
2.61
2.64

RECEIVING CLERKS ------------------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRAOE ---- — ---------------------

196
55
141
130

SHIPPING CLERKS -------------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------

47

30

107
82

89
53

1
24

23
13

-

_

-

—

327
215
112
65
47

270
240
30

65
64
1
1
-

233
198
35

30

221
137
84
70
14

-

-

1

5

10

5

5

1

4

5

5

41

62
12

51
3

43
9

27
8

32
8

62
23

44
25

76
10

134
64

165
108

421
329

36
14

5
22
21

4
25
4

4
10
4

_

14
6

18
17
1

4
3
1

53
4
-

17
47
2

29
12

8
82

5

_

4 .17
4.20
3 .7 8
3.7 5
4.04

—
-

“

-

2.972.743 .4 1 3 .4 2 -

4.16
4 .11
4.22
4.23

-

3 .6 2
3.72
2.29
2.29

3 . 0 73 .4 3 2.0 52.0 4-

5.91
5.94
3 .6 2
3.6 3

3 .71
3.6 7
3.72
3.7 6

3 .6 9
3.7 7
3.69
3 .71

3 .3 0 3 .3 6 3 .1 5 3 .18 -

4.37
3 .8 9
4.50
4.51

95
52

3 .6 3
3 .44

3 .6 6
3 .3 5

3 . 3 1 - 3 .9 9
3 . 1 4 - 3 .8 9

-

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS --------

68

3.46

3 .4 4

3 .9 7

-

TRUCKDRIVERS -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NCNMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRADE------------------------------

1,319
977
342
11 8
212

4.01
4.07
3 .8 4
3 .6 7
3 .9 8

3 .99
4 .01
3 .8 9
3 .64
4 .31

3 .9 13 .9 4 3 .5 2 3 .4 5 3 .6 3-

4.25
4.20
4.33
3.9 5
4.37

-

TRUCKORIVERS, LIGHT IUN0ER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS! ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

289
233
56

4.18
4.37
3.3 9

4.29
4.52
3.49

3 .9 3- 4 .55
4 .23 - 4.56
3 .1 8 - 3.6 5

“

“

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS I ----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------- --— *

160
86
74

3 .6 3
3 . 84
3 . 38

3 .70
3.9 4
3 .5 7

3 .4 7 - 3 .9 6
3 . 7 9 - 3 .9 8
3 .2 1 - 3 .6 7

-

-

-

—

—

-

25
6

24
12

25
5

57
42

73
47

30
13

16
16

54
54

87

13

6

54

-

2
2

123
123

8
6

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

2

-

—

-

149
113
36
36

193
146
47

_

117
117

-

“

”

—

-

-

—

*
-

4
4

-

5

39
14
25

26
15
11

53
29
24

89
47
42

52
32
20

36
24
12

20
12
8

75
60
15

4

“

5

25

11

24

42

20

12

8

15

120
74
46
3
43

5
2
3
3

2

6

4
-

6
2

4

13
3
10
8

32
13
19
19

56
47
9
9

49
31
18
18

29
9
20
20

9
7
2
2

335
62
273
273

10
9
1
1

-

186

-

46
32
14
12

79
79

2
1

11
9
2
2

-

-

-

186
186

12

8

2

4
3
1

7

19
18
1

9
9

51
51

-

—

-

-

-

-

i

”

-

“

61
43
18
18

4

-

12
10
2

-

-

2
2

10
9
1

-

i

_

-

-

-

12
10

8
6

2
2

-

7
6

-

1

2

2

1

6

1

3

8

7
3

15

-

2
2

2
2

1
1

6
6

1

3
3

8
7

4

-

1
1

2

11
10

16
10
6
4

_

-

-

1

-

_

2
2

_

_

14
14

14
13

-

-

-

_

“
-

-

-

-

10
10

3
1
2
2

-

-

-

-

—

10

-

”

—

-

-

“

—

“

4

“

-

—

17
17

21

-

21

*

21

12
12

-

4
2
2

5
1
4

2
-

2

2

10
3
7
3
3

37
26
11
6
4

44
25
19
9
9

69
17
52
35
17

86
23
63
20
40

429
388
41
29
11

“

5
1
4

2

3

-

2

-

-

2

3

_
—
-

-

2

3

36
36

-

2

-

41

-

15

3

3
2
1

26
1
25
25

-

-

3

2

-

-

4

2

-

_

1

—

~

-

*78
78

_

21

3

4

1
1

-

5

1

-

_

1

5

1

-

4

4
4

14
6

7

1

—

8

2

1

—
-

“

-

2

—

*

2

2

-

12
8

-

*

-

19
1

5

3

—
-

47

5
4

. “

-

1

-

-

5
4
1

-

1

—

17
16
1

-

3

4

—

-1

35
3
32
31

1

2

-

35

-

5
4

3
—

-

_ -

• _
“

-

-

“

-

* Workers were distributed as follows: 53 at $5.80 to $6; and 25 at $6.20 to $6.40.




87
87

31

22
6

See footnotes at end of tables

51
30

61

32
10

9
5

41
5

79

33
2

40
5

10
4

131

12
2

57
1

6
1

265
”

1
rh
O

319

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ----MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NCNMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

109

133
”

264
248
16
16

170
73
97

”

5

~

97

-

-

154
154
-

7

1

-

-

23
1
22

39
38
1

50
50

125
125

1

19
2
17

4
4

7

*

“

”

6
2

4

11
2
9

26
12
14

26

3

64
53
11

—

—

•

-

*

-

-

4
22

11
11
—

-j

w

22
T a b le A -5 a .

C u s to d ia l

and

m a te ria l

m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s — la rg e

e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ------C o n t i n u e d

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, B a l t im o r e , Md. , August 1971)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t- tim e h o u rly earn in gs o f —

Hourly earnings^

$
*
1 . 60 1 . 7 0

Sex, occupation, and industry division
workers

Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range 2

and
'under

1.70

MEN -

TRUCKDRIVER^ -

t
$
t
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
*
*
$
$
t
t
$
t
t
$
*
1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2.00 2 . 1 0 2. 20 2 . 3 0 2 . 4 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2. 70 2 . 8 0 3 .0 0 3 . 2 0 3 . 4 0 3 . 6 0 3 .8 0 4 . 0 0 4 .2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0

1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2.0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2.3 0 2 . 4 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 80 -3.00 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 . 8 0 4. 00 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4. 8 0 o v e r

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

TRUCKORIVERS> HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TR A ILE R TYPE I --------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

311
17 4

$
4 .11
3 .9 5

$
4 . 19
4.13

$
$
4 .0 5 - 4 .37
3 .7 3 - 4 .18

TRU CKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
OTHER THAN TR A ILE R TY P E ! --------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

160
153

4.01
4.03

4 .11
4 .11

3 .9 6 - 4 .1 6
3 .9 7- 4 .16

-

(RUCKERS, POWER (F O R K L IF T ) ----------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------R E TA IL TRAOE -------------------------------------

1,804
1,637
16 7
14 1

3.9 9
4.00
3.8 9
3 .9 1

3 .9 7
3.9 7
3 .8 0
4.21

3.6 83 .7 0 3 .6 23 .5 9 -

—
“

TRUCKERS, POWER (OTHER THAN
F O R K L IF T ) ----------------------------------------------------

165

4.32

4.4 1

3 .4 6 - 5.60

527
88

2.06
2.99

1.78
2.92

1.6 6 - 2.46
2 .7 0 - 3 .3 3

4.60
4.61
4.25
4.26

1
1

~

-

18
15
3
3

-

-

-

-

5

“

-

-

-

-

8
8

-

-

1
1

-

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

11
1

20
11

8
8

87
87

1
-

6
2

2

2
106
106

22
22

50
50

95
95

27
27

94
65
29
29

163
116
47
21

427
427

60
60

19

-

2
2

41

11

9

17
17

5
5

11
1

3
3

129
128
1
1

-

WOMEN

J A N IT O R S , PORTERS, AND CLEANERS -----MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------- *

* A ll workers were at $5. 60 to $5. 80.
See footnotes at end of tables.




227

46

47

28

18

12

9
1

6

5

9
4

23
18

28
12

25
21

8
6

97

25
25

5
5

_

4
4
242
160
82
82

51
51
—

43

21

461
46 1
“

12
12
-

* 42

23

F o o tn o te s

1 Standard hours r e fle c t the w ork w eek fo r which em p loyees r e c e iv e th e ir reg u la r s tra ig h t-tim e s a la rie s (e x c lu s iv e o f pay fo r o v e rtim e
at re g u la r and/or prem iu m r a te s ), and the earnings co rresp o n d to these w e e k ly hours.
2 The mean is com puted fo r each job by totaling the earnings o f a ll w o rk e rs and d ividin g by the num ber o f w o rk e rs .
The m edian
designates position — h a lf of the em p loyees su rveyed r e c e iv e m o re than the rate shown; h a lf r e c e iv e le s s than the rate shown.
The m iddle
range is defined by 2 rates o f pay; a fourth o f the w o rk e rs earn le s s than the lo w e r o f these rates and a fourth earn m o re than the h igh er rate.
3 E xcludes p rem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.




A p p e n d i x . O c c u p a t i o n a l D e s c r ip t i o n s
The p rim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions fo r the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations w orkers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and
from area to area. This perm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on
interestablishm ent and interarea com parability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions may d iffe r significantly from those in use in
individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed
to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-tim e, tem porary, and probationary workers.

O F F IC E
C LERK, ACCOUNTING— Continued

B IL LE R , MACHINE
Prep a res statements, b ills, and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or electrom atic typew riter. May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform other
cle rica l work incidental to billin g operations. F or wage study purposes, b ille rs , machine, are
classified by type of machine, as follows:

Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A . Under general supervision, perform s accounting c le ric a l operations which
require the application of experience and judgment, fo r example, c le ric a lly processing com ­
plicated or nonrepetitive accounting transactions, selecting among a substantial va riety of
prescribed accounting codes and classifications, or tracing transactions through previous
accounting actions to determine source of discrepancies. May be assisted by one or m ore
class B accounting clerks.

B ille r , machine (billing m achine). Uses a special billing machine (combination typing
and adding machine) to prepare bills and invoices from custom ers' purchase orders, in ter­
nally prepared orders, shipping memorandums, etc. Usually involves application of p r e ­
determined discounts and shipping charges and entry o f necessary extensions, which may or
may not be computed on the billing machine, and totals which are automatically accumulated
by machine. The operation usually involves a la rge number o f carbon copies o f the b ill being
prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.

Class B . Under close supervision, following detailed instructions and standardized p ro ­
cedures, perform s one or m ore routine accounting c le rica l operations, such as posting to
led gers, cards, or worksheets where identification of items and locations of postings are
cle a rly indicated; checking accuracy and completeness o f standardized and repetitive records
or accounting documents; and coding documents using a few prescribed accounting codes.

B ille r, machine (bookkeeping m achine). Uses a bookkeeping machine (with or without
a typ ew riter keyboard) to prepare custom ers' bills as part of the accounts receivable opera­
tion. G enerally involves the simultaneous entry o f figures on custom ers' ledger record. The
machine automatically accumulates figures on a number of vertical columns and computes
and usually prints automatically the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowl­
edge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of sales and credit slips.

C LERK, F IL E
F iles , cla ssifies, and retrieves m aterial in an established filin g system. May perform
cle rica l and manual tasks required to maintain file s. Positions are classified into levels on the
basis of the following definitions.
Class A . C lassifies and indexes file m aterial such as correspondence, reports, tech­
nical documents, etc., in an established filing system containing a number o f varied subject
m atter file s. May also file this m aterial. May keep records of various types in conjunction
with the file s . May lead a sm all group of low er lev el file clerks.

BOOKKEEPING-M ACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (with or without a typew riter keyboard) to keep a record
o f business transactions.

Class B . Sorts, codes, and file s
ings or partly classified m aterial by
cro s s-referen ce aids. As requested,
wards m aterial. May perform related

Class A . Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge o f and experience in basic
bookkeeping principles, and fa m iliarity with the structure of the particular accounting system
used. Determ ines proper records and distribution of debit and credit item s to be used in each
phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records
by hand.
Class B. Keeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, custom ers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described under b iller,
m achine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or assist
in preparation of tria l balances and prepare control sheets fo r the accounting department.
C LERK, ACCOUNTING
P e rfo rm s one or m ore accounting cle rica l tasks such as posting to registers and ledgers;
reconciling bank accounts; verifyin g the internal consistency, completeness, and mathematical
accuracy of accounting documents; assigning prescribed accounting distribution codes; examining
and verifyin g fo r cle rica l accuracy various types of rep orts, lists, calculations, posting, etc.;
or preparing simple or assisting in preparing m ore complicated journal vouchers. May work
in either a manual or automated accounting system.
The work requires a knowledge of cle rica l methods and office practices and procedures
which relates to the cle rica l processing and recording of transactions and accounting information.
With experience, the w orker typically becomes fam iliar with the bookkeeping and accounting term s
and procedures used in the assigned work, but is not required to have a knowledge o f the form al
principles of bookkeeping and accounting.




unclassified m aterial by simple (subject m atter) head­
finer subheadings. Prepares simple related index and
locates clea rly identified m aterial in files and fo r ­
cle rica l tasks required to maintain and service file s.

Class C . P erform s routine filin g of m aterial that has already been classified or which
is easily classified in a simple serial classification system (e.g., alphabetical, chronological,
or num erical). As requested, locates readily available m aterial in file s and forwards m a­
teria l; and m ay fi l l out withdrawal charge. May perform simple c le ric a l and manual tasks
required to maintain and service file s.
C LER K, ORDER
R eceives custom ers' orders fo r m aterial or merchandise by m ail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the follow in g: Quoting prices to customers; making out an order
sheet listing the items to make up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be fille d . May check with credit
department to determine credit rating o^ customer, acknowledge receipt of orders from customers,
follow up orders to see that they have been filled , keep file of orders received, and check shipping
invoices with original orders.
C LER K, P A Y R O L L
Computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve: Calculating w orkers' earnings based on tim e or production records; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such as w ork er's name, working
days, tim e, rate, deductions fo r insurance, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and
assist paymaster in making up and distributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.

NOTE: The Bureau has discontinued collecting data for oilers and plumbers.

24

25
C O M PTOM ETER O PERATOR

SE CR ETAR Y— Continued

P rim a ry duty is to operate a Comptometer to perform mathematical computations. This
job is not to be confused with that o f statistical or other type of clerk, which may involve fr e ­
quent use of a Comptometer but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to perform ance of
other duties.

N O TE : The term "corporate office r, " used in the level definitions following, refers to
those officia ls who have a significant corporate-w ide policymaking role with regard to m ajor
company activities. The title "v ic e p resid en t," though norm ally indicative of this role, does not
in all cases identify such positions. V ice presidents whose prim ary responsibility is to act p e r­
sonally on individual cases or transactions (e.g., approve or deny individual loan or credit actions;
adm inister individual trust accounts; directly supervise a c le rica l staff) are not considered to be
"corporate o ffic e rs " fo r purposes of applying the following level definitions.

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Operates a keypunch machine to record or v e rify alphabetic and/or numeric data on
tabulating cards or on tape.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.

1. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that employs, in
all, over 100 but few er than 5,000 persons; or

Class A . Work requires the application o f experience and judgment in selecting p roce­
dures to be followed and in searching fo r, interpreting, selecting, or coding item s to be
keypunched from a va riety of source documents. On occasion may also perform some routine
keypunch work. May train inexperienced keypunch operators.
Class B . Work is routine and repetitive. Under close supervision or following specific
procedures or instructions, works from various standardized source documents which have
been coded, and follows specified procedures which have been prescribed in detail and require
little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. R efers to supervisor
problems arising from erroneous item s or codes or m issing information.

2. Secretary to a corporate o ffic e r (other than the chairman of the board or president)
o f a company that employs, in all, over 5, 000 but few er than 25, 000 persons; or
3. Secretary to the head, im m ediately below the corporate office r level, o f a m ajor
segment or subsidiary o f a company that employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.
Class B
1. Secretary to the chairman o f the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
all, few er than 100 persons; or
2. Secretary to a corporate o ffice r (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a company that employs, in all, over 100 but few er than 5,000 persons; or

MESSENGER (O ffice Boy or Girl)
Perform s various routine duties such as running errands, operating m inor office m a­
chines such as sealers or m ailers, opening and distributing m ail, and other m inor cle rica l work.
Exclude positions that require operation of a m otor vehicle as a significant duty.
SECRETARY
Assigned as personal secretary, norm ally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the day-to-day work of the supervisor. Works fa ir ly independently r e ­
ceiving a minimum of detailed supervision and guidance. P erform s varied cle rica l and secretarial
duties, usually including most of the following:
a. Receives telephone calls, personal ca llers, and incoming m ail, answers routine in­
quiries, and routes technical inquiries to the proper persons;
b.

Establishes, maintains, and revises the supervisor's files;

c.

Maintains the supervisor's calendar and makes appointments as instructed;

d.

Relays m essages from supervisor to subordinates;

e. Reviews correspondence, memorandums, and reports prepared by others for the
supervisor's signature to assure procedural and typographic accuracy;
f.

Class A

3. Secretary to the head, im m ediately below the office r lev el, over either a m ajor
corporate-w ide functional activity (e.g., marketing, research, operations, industrial relations, etc.) or a m ajor geographic or organizational segment (e.g., a regional headquarters;
a m ajor division) o f a company that employs, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
em ployees; or
4. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of o fficia l) that employs, in all, over 5,000 persons; or
5. Secretary to the head of a large and important organizational segment (e.g., a middle
management supervisor of an organizational segment often involving as many as several
hundred persons) or a company that employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.
Class C
1. Secretary to an executive or m anagerial person whose responsibility is not equivalent
to one o f the specific level situations in the definition for class B, but whose organizational
unit norm ally numbers at least several dozen employees and is usually divided into organiza­
tional segments which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In some companies, this level
includes a wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; m;
2. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
o f officia l) that employs, in all, few er than 5,000 persons.
Class D

P erform s stenographic and typing work.

May also perform other cle rica l and secretarial tasks of comparable nature and difficulty.
The work typically requires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
program s, and procedures related to the work of the supervisor.
Exclusions
Not a ll positions that are titled "s e c re ta ry " possess the above characteristics.
of positions which are excluded from the definition are as follows:
a.

Positions which do not m eet the "personal"

b.

1. Secretary to the supervisor or head of a small organizational unit (e.g., few er than
about 25 or 30 persons); m2. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional employee, adm inistra­
tive o ffic e r , or assistant, skilled technician or expert. (NOTE: Many companies assign
stenographers, rather than secretaries as described above, to this level of supervisory or
nonsupervisory w orker.)

Examples

Stenographers not fully trained in secreta ria l type duties;

secretary concept described above;

c. Stenographers serving as o ffice assistants to a group of professional, technical, or
managerial persons;
d. Secretary positions in which the duties are either substantially m ore routine or sub­
stantially m ore complex and responsible than those ch aracterized in the definition;

STENOGRAPHER
P rim a ry duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to transcribe the dictation. May
also type from written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool. May occasionally transcribe
from voice recordings (if prim ary duty is transcribing from recordings, see Transcribing-Machine
Operator, General).
N O TE : This job is distinguished from that of a secretary in that a secretary norm ally
works in a confidential relationship with only one manager or executive and perform s m ore
responsible and discretionary tasks as described in the secretary job definition.
Stenographer, General

e. Assistant type positions which involve m ore difficult or m ore responsible tech­
nical, adm inistrative, supervisory, or specialized cle rica l duties which are not typical of
secretarial work.




Dictation involves a normal routine vocabulary. May maintain file s, keep simple records,
or perform other rela tiv ely routine cle rica l tasks.

26
STENOGRAPHER— Continued

TAB U LA TIN G -M A C H IN E O PERATO R (E lectric Accounting Machine Operator)— Continued

Stenographer, Senior

Positions are classified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.

Dictation involves a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs
or reports on scientific research. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.
OR
P e rform s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and respon­
sib ility than stenographer, general, as evidenced by the following: Work requires a high
degree of stenographic speed and accuracy; a thorough working knowledge of general business
and o ffice procedure; and of the specific business operations, organization, policies, proce­
dures, file s , w orkflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in perform ing stenographic duties and
responsible c le ric a l tasks such as maintaining followup file s; assembling m aterial fo r reports,
memorandums, and letters; composing simple letters from general instructions; reading and
routing incoming m ail; and answering routine questions^ etc.
SWITCHBOARD O PERATO R
Class A . Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office calls. P erform s full telephone information service or handles
com plex calls, such as conference, co llect, overseas, or sim ilar calls, either in addition to
doing routine work as described fo r switchboard operator, class B, or as a fu ll-tim e
assignment. (" F u ll" telephone information service occurs when the establishment has varied
functions that are not readily understandable for telephone information purposes, e.g., because
of overlapping or interrelated functions, and consequently present frequent problem s as to
which extensions are appropriate fo r calls.)
Class B . Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office calls. May handle routine long distance calls and record tolls.
May perform lim ited telephone information service. ("L im ite d " telephone information service
occurs i f the functions of the establishment serviced are readily understandable fo r telephone
information purposes, or if the requests are routine, e.g., giving extension numbers when
specific names are furnished, or i f complex calls are referred to another operator.)
These classifications do not include switchboard operators in telephone companies who
assist customers in placing calls.
SWITCHBOARD O PE R A TO R -R E C E PTIO N IST '
In addition to perform ing duties of operator on a single-position or m onitor-type switch­
board, acts as receptionist and may also type or perform routine c le rica l work as part of regular
duties. This typing or c le ric a l work may take the m ajor part of this w orker's tim e while at
switchboard.
TA B U LA TIN G -M A C H IN E OPERATO R (E le ctric Accounting Machine Operator)
Operates one or a variety of machines such as the tabulator, calculator, collator, in ter­
p reter, sorter, reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from this definition are working supervisors.
A lso excluded are operators of electronic digital computers, even though they may also operate
EAM equipment.

Class A . P e rform s complete reporting and tabulating assignments including devising
difficult control panel w iring under general supervision. Assignments typically involve a
va riety of long and complex reports which often are irregu la r or nonrecurring, requiring
some planning o f the nature and sequencing of operations, and the use o f a va riety of m a­
chines. Is typ ically involved in training new operators in machine operations or training
low er lev el operators in wiring from diagrams and in the operating sequences of long and
complex reports. Does not include positions in which wiring responsibility is lim ited to
selection and insertion of prew ired boards.
Class B . P erform s work according to established procedures and under specific in­
structions. Assignments typically involve complete but routine and recurring reports or parts
of la rg e r and m ore complex reports. Operates m ore difficult tabulating or electrica l ac­
counting machines such as the tabulator and calculator, in addition to the sim pler machines
used by class C operators. May be required to do some w iring from diagram s. May train
new employees in basic machine operations.
Class C . Under specific instructions, operates simple tabulating or electrica l accounting
machines such as the sorter, interpreter, reproducing punch, collator, etc. Assignments
typically involve portions of a work unit, fo r example, individual sorting or collating runs,
or repetitive operations. May perform simple w iring from diagram s, and do some filing work.
TRANSCRIBING-M ACHINE O PERATOR, G ENERAL
P rim a ry duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal routine vocabulary from
transcribing-m achine records. May also type from written copy and do simple cle rica l work.
Workers transcribing dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as
legal briefs or reports on scientific research are not included. A w orker who takes dictation
in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine is classified as a stenographer.
T Y P IS T
Uses a typew riter to make copies of various m aterials or to make out bills after calcula­
tions have been made by another person. May include typing of stencils, m ats, or sim ilar m ate­
rials fo r use in duplicating processes. May do c le rica l work involving little special training, such
as keeping simple records, filin g records and reports, or sorting and distributing incoming m ail.
Class A . P erform s one or m ore of the follow ing: Typing m aterial in final form when
it involves combining m aterial from several sources; or responsibility fo r correct spelling,
syllabication, punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language m ate­
rial; or planning layout and typing of complicated statistical tables to maintain uniform ity
and balance in spacing. May type routine form letters, varying details to suit circum stances.
Class B . P erform s one or m ore of the follow in g: Copy typing from rough or clear
drafts; or routine typing of form s, insurance p o licies, etc.; or setting up simple standard
tabulations; or copying m ore complex tables already set up and spaced properly.

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
COM PUTER OPERATO R
M onitors and operates the control console of a digital computer to process data according
to operating instructions, usually prepared by a program er. Work includes most of the follow in g:
Studies instructions to determine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
items (tape! ree ls, cards, etc.); switches necessary auxiliary equipment into circuit, and starts
and operates! computer; makes adjustments to computer to co rrect operating problem s and m eet
special conditions; review s erro rs made during operation and determines cause or refers problem
to supervisor or program er; and maintains operating records. May test and assist in correcting
program .
F or wage study purposes, computer operators are classified as follows:
Class A . Operates independently, or under only general direction, a computer running
program s with m ost of the following ch aracteristics: New program s are frequently tested
and introduced; scheduling requirements are of critica l importance to m inim ize downtime;
the program s are of complex design so that identification of e r r o r source often requires a
working knowledge of the total program , and alternate program s may not be available. May
give direction and guidance to low er lev el operators.
Class B. Operates independently, or under only general direction, a computer running
program s with most of the following characteristics: Most o f the programs are established
production runs, typically run on a regu larly recurring basis; there is little or no testing




COMPUTER O PERATO R— Continued
of new program s required; alternate program s are provided in case original program needs
m ajor change or cannot be corrected within a reasonable tim e. In common e rro r situa­
tions, diagnoses cause and takes co rrective action. This usually involves applying previously
program ed co rrective steps, or using standard correction techniques.
OR
Operates under direct supervision a computer running program s or segments of program s
with the characteristics described fo r class A . May assist a higher lev el operator by inde­
pendently perform ing less difficult tasks assigned, and perform ing difficult tasks following
detailed instructions and with frequent review of operations perform ed.
Class C . Works on routine program s under close supervision. Is expected to develop
working knowledge o f the computer equipment used and ability to detect problem s involved in
running routine program s. Usually has received some form al training in computer operation.
May assist higher le v e l operator on complex program s.
COMPUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS
Converts statements of business problem s, typically prepared by a systems analyst, into
a sequence of detailed instructions which are required to solve the problem s by automatic data
processing equipment. Working from charts or diagram s, the program er develops the precise in­
structions which, when entered into the computer system in coded language, cause the manipulation

27
COMPUTER PROGRAM ER, BUSINESS— Continued
of data to achieve desired results. Work involves most of the following: Applies knowledge of
computer capabilities, mathematics, logic employed by computers, and particular subject m atter
involved to analyze charts and diagrams of the problem to be programed; develops sequence
of program steps; w rites detailed flow charts to show order in which data w ill be processed;
converts these charts to coded instructions for machine to follow; tests and corrects program s;
prepares instructions fo r operating personnel during production run; analyzes, review s, and alters
program s to increase operating efficiency or adapt to new requirements; maintains records of
program development and revisions. (NOTE: Workers perform ing both systems analysis and p ro ­
graming should be classified as systems analysts i f this is the skill used to determine their pay.)
Does not include employees p rim a rily responsible for the management or supervision of
other electronic data processing em ployees, or program ers p rim a rily concerned with scientific
and/or engineering problem s.
F or wage study purposes, program ers are classified as follows:
Class A . Works independently or under only general direction on complex problems which
require competence in all phases of program ing concepts and practices. Working from dia­
grams and charts which identify the nature of desired results, m ajor processing steps to be
accomplished, and the relationships between various steps of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of programing actions needed to efficiently utilize the computer system
in achieving desired end products.
At this level, programing is difficult because computer equipment must be organized to
produce several interrelated but diverse products from numerous and diverse data elements.
A wide variety and extensive number of internal processing actions must occur. This requires
such actions as development of common operations which can be reused, establishment of
linkage points between operations, adjustments to data when program requirements exceed
computer storage capacity, and substantial manipulation and resequencing of data elements
to form a highly integrated program .
May provide functional direction to low er level program ers who are assigned to assist.
Class B . Works independently or under only general direction on rela tively simple
program s, or on simple segments of complex program s. Program s (or segments) usually
process information to produce data in two or three varied sequences or form ats. Reports
and listings are produced by refining, adapting, arraying, or making m inor additions to or
deletions from input data which are readily available. While numerous records may be
processed, the data have been refined in p rior actions so that the accuracy and sequencing
of data can be tested by using a few routine checks. Typically, the program deals with
routine record-keeping type operations.
OR
Works on complex programs (as described fo r class A ) under close direction of a higher
level program er or supervisor. May assist higher level program er by independently p e r­
form ing less difficult tasks assigned, and perform ing m ore difficult tasks under fa ir ly close
direction.
May guide or instruct low er level program ers.
Class C . Makes practical applications of programing practices and concepts usually
learned in form al training courses. Assignments are designed to develop competence in the
application of standard procedures to routine problem s. Receives close supervision on new
aspects of assignments; and work is review ed to v e r ify its accuracy and conformance with
required procedures.
COMPUTER SYSTEMS A N A LY S T, BUSINESS
Analyzes business problems to formulate procedures fo r solving them by use of electronic
data processing equipment. Develops a complete description of all specifications needed to enable
program ers to prepare required digital computer program s. Work involves most of the following:
Analyzes subject-m atter operations to be automated and identifies conditions and criteria required
to achieve satisfactory results; specifies number and types of records, file s , and documents to
be used; outlines actions to be perform ed by personnel and computers in sufficient detail for
presentation to management and for programing (typically this involves preparation of work and
data flow charts); coordinates the development of test problems and participates in tria l runs of
new and revised systems; and recommends equipment changes to obtain m ore effective overall
operations. (NOTE: Workers perform ing both systems analysis and programing should be clas­
sified as systems analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)
Does not include employees p rim a rily responsible fo r the management or supervision
of other electronic data processing em ployees, or systems analysts p rim a rily concerned with
scientific or engineering problem s.
F or wage study purposes,

systems analysts are classified as follows:

Class A . Works independently or under only general direction on complex problems in­
volving all phases of systems analysis. Problem s are complex because of diverse sources of
input data and m ultiple-use requirements of output data. (F o r example, develops an integrated
production scheduling, inventory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis record in which




COM PUTER SYSTEMS A N A L Y S T, BUSINESS— Continued
every item of each type is automatically processed through the full system o f records and
appropriate followup actions are initiated by the computer.) Confers with persons concerned to
determine the data processing problem s and advises subject-m atter personnel on the im plica­
tions of new or revised systems of data processing operations. Makes recommendations, i f
needed, for approval of m ajor systems installations or changes and for obtaining equipment.
May provide functional direction to low er level systems analysts who are assigned to
assist.
Class B . Works independently or under only general direction on problems that are
rela tively uncomplicated to analyze, plan, program , and operate. Problem s are of lim ited
com plexity because sources of input data are homogeneous and the output data are closely
related. (F o r example, develops systems fo r maintaining depositor accounts in a bank,
maintaining accounts receivable in a retail establishment, or maintaining inventory accounts
in a manufacturing or wholesale establishment.) Confers with persons concerned to determine
the data processing problems and advises subject-m atter personnel on the implications of the
data processing systems to be applied.
OR
Works on a segment of a complex data processing scheme or system, as described for
class A. Works independently on routine assignments and receives instruction and guidance
on complex assignments. Work is review ed fo r accuracy of judgment, compliance with in­
structions, and to insure proper alinement with the overall system.
Class C. Works under immediate supervision, carrying out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. Assignments are designed to develop and expand practical experience
in the application of procedures and skills required for systems analysis work. F or example,
may assist a higher le v e l systems analyst by preparing the detailed specifications required
by program ers from information developed by the higher level analyst.
DRAFTSM AN
Class A . Plans the graphic presentation of complex items having distinctive design
features that d iffer significantly from established drafting precedents. Works in close sup­
port with the design originator, and may recommend m inor design changes. Analyzes the
effect of each change on the details o f form , function, and positional relationships of com ­
ponents and parts. Works with a minimum of supervisory assistance. Completed work is
review ed by design originator for consistency with p rior engineering determinations. May
either prepare drawings, or direct their preparation by low er level draftsmen.
Class B. P erform s nonroutine and complex drafting assignments that require the appli­
cation o f m ost of the standardized drawing techniques regularly used. Duties typically in­
volve such work as: P repares working drawings of subassemblies with irregu la r shapes,
multiple functions, and precise positional relationships between components; prepares archi­
tectural drawings for construction of a building including detail drawings of foundations, wall
sections, floor plans, and roof. Uses accepted formulas and manuals in making necessary
computations to determine quantities o f m aterials to be used, load capacities, strengths,
stresses, etc.
R eceives initial instructions, requirements, and advice from supervisor.
Completed work is checked fo r technical adequacy.
Class C . Prepares detail drawings of single units or parts for engineering, construction,
manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types of drawings prepared include isom etric projections
(depicting three dimensions in accurate scale) and sectional views to cla rify positioning of
components and convey needed information. Consolidates details from a number of sources
and adjusts or transposes scale as required. Suggested methods of approach, applicable
precedents, and advice on source m aterials are given with initial assignments. Instructions
are less complete when assignments recur. Work may be spot-checked during progress.
D R A FTSM AN -TRACE R
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing cloth or paper over
drawings and tracing with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracing lim ited to plans p rim a rily
consisting of straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
AND/OR
Prepares simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized item s. Work is closely supervised
during p rogress.
ELECTRO NIC TECHNICIAN
Works on various types of electronic equipment or systems by perform ing one or m ore
of the following operations: Modifying, installing, repairing, and overhauling. These operations
require the perform ance of m ost or all of the following tasks: Assem bling, testing, adjusting,
calibrating, tuning, and alining.
Work is nonrepetitive and requires a knowledge of the theory and practice of electronics
pertaining to the use o f general and specialized electronic test equipment; trouble analysis; and
the operation, relationship, and alinement of electronic systems, subsystems, and circuits having
a variety of component parts.

28
ELEC TRO N IC TECHNICIAN— Continued

NURSE, IN D USTRIAL (R egistered )

E lectronic equipment or systems worked on typically include one or m ore of the following:
Ground, vehicle, or airborne radio communications systems, relay systems, navigation aids;
airborne or ground radar systems; radio $nd television transmitting or recording systems; e le c ­
tronic computers; m is s ile and spacecraft guidance and control systems; industrial and m edical
measuring, indicating and controlling devices; etc.

A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general m edical direction to i l l or
injured employees or other persons who become i l l or suffer an accident on the prem ises of a
factory or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the follow in g: Giving fir s t aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of em ployees' injuries; keeping records
of patients treated; preparing accident reports fo r compensation or other purposes; assisting in
physical examinations and health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing out programs involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment,
or other activities affecting the health, w elfa re, and safety of a ll personnel. Nursing supervisors
or head nurses in establishments employing m ore than one nurse are excluded.

(Exclude production assem blers and testers, craftsm en, draftsmen, designers, engineers,
and repairm en of such standard electronic equipment as office machines, radio and television
receivin g sets.)

M A IN T E N A N C E A N D P O W E R P L A N T
C AR PE N TE R , M AIN TEN AN CE

MACHINIST, M AINTENANCE

P e rform s the carpentry duties necessary to cqnstruct and maintain in good repair build­
ing woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors,
stairs, casings, and trim made of wood in an establishment. Work involves most of the follow ing:
Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, m odels, or verbal instructions; using a
variety of carpenter's handtools, portable power tools, and standard measuring instruments; mak­
ing standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work; and selecting m aterials necessary
for the work. In general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a form a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of m etal parts of mechanical
equipment operated in an establishment. Work involves most of the follow in g: Interpreting written
instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a va riety o f machinist's
handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of m etal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to dimen­
sions of work, tooling, feeds, and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties of
the common m etals; selecting standard m aterials, parts, and equipment required for his work;
and fitting and assembling parts into mechanical equipment. In general, the machinist's work
norm ally requires a rounded training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

E L E C TR IC IA N , M AIN TEN AN CE
P e rform s a va riety of ele ctrica l trade functions such as the installation, maintenance, or
repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric energy in an estab­
lishment. Work involves most of the follow in g: Installing or repairing any of a variety of e le c ­
trical equipment such as generators, tran sform ers, switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers,
m otors, heating units, conduit system s, or other transmission equipment; working from blue­
prints, drawings, layouts, or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the ele ctrica l
system or equipment; working standard computations relating to load requirements of w iring or
ele ctrica l equipment; and using a va riety of electrician 's handtools and measuring and testing
instruments. In general, the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
ENGINEER, STATIO N A RY
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of stationary engines and
equipment (mechanical or e le c tric a l) to supply the establishment in which employed with power,
heat, refrigeration , or air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment
such as steam engines, a ir com pressors, generators, m otors, turbines, ventilating and r e fr ig ­
erating equipment, steam boilers and b o iler-fe d water pumps; making equipment repairs; and
keeping a record of operation of m achinery, tem perature, and fuel consumption. May also su­
pervise these operations. Head or chief engineers in establishments employing m ore than one
engineer are excluded.
FIREM AN , STATIO N A RY BOILER
F ire s stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which employed with heat, power,
or steam. Feeds fuels to fir e by hand or operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; and
checks w ater and safety valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom equipment.
H E LP E R , M AINTENANCE TRADES
A ssists one or m ore w orkers in the skilled maintenance trades, by perform ing specific
or general duties of les se r skill, such as keeping a w orker supplied with m aterials and tools;
cleaning working area, machine, and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding m aterials or
tools; and perform ing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind of work the
helper is perm itted to perform varies from trade to trade: In some trades the helper is confined
to supplying, lifting, and holding m aterials and tools, and cleaning working areas; and in others
he is perm itted to perform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are also
perform ed by w orkers on a fu ll-tim e basis.
M A C H INE -TO O L OPERATO R, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or m ore types of machine tools, such as jig borers,
cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes, or m illing machines, in the construction of
machine-shop to o ls , gages, jig s , fixtures, or dies. Work involves most of the following: Planning
and perform ing difficult machining operations; processing item s requiring complicated setups or
a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of precision measuring instruments; selecting feeds,
speeds, tooling, and operation sequence; and making necessary adjustments during operation
to achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions. May be required to recognize when tools need
dressing, to dress tools, and to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils. F or
cross-industry wage study purposes, m achine-tool operators, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing
shops are excluded from this classification.




MECHANIC, AU TO M O TIVE (Maintenance)
Repairs automobiles, buses, m otortrucks, and tractors of an establishment. Work in­
volves most of the follow in g: Examining automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble; d is­
assembling equipment and perform ing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches,
gages, d rills , or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts; replacing broken or
defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassem bling and installing the various
assem blies in the vehicle and making necessary adjustments; and alining wheels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the automotive mechanic requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.
This classification does not include mechanics who repair custom ers' vehicles in auto­
m obile repair shops.
M ECHANIC, M AIN TEN AN CE
Repairs m achinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment. Work involves most
of the follow ing: Examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
dismantling or partly dismantling machines and perform ing repairs that mainly involve the use
of handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items obtained
from stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a machine shop or sending of the
machine to a machine shop fo r m ajor repairs; preparing written specifications fo r m ajor repairs
or for the production of parts ordered from machine shop; reassem bling machines; and making
all necessary adjustments fo r operation. In general, the work of a maintenance mechanic requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. Excluded from this classification are w orkers whose prim ary duties
involve setting up or adjusting machines.
M ILLW RIG H T
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dismantles and installs machines or heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout are required. Work involves most of the follow in g:
Pieinning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a variety
of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations relating to stresses, strength of
m aterials, and centers of gravity; alining and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools,
equipment, and parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order power transmission
equipment such as drives and speed reducers. In general, the m illw righ t's work norm ally requires
a rounded training and experience in the trade acquired through a form al apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.
PA IN T E R , M AIN TEN AN CE
Paints and redecorates w alls, woodwork, and fixtures of an establishment. Work involves
the follow ing: Knowledge of surface peculiarities and types of paint required for different applica­
tions; preparing surface fo r painting by rem oving old finish or by placing putty or fille r in nail

29
P A IN T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E — Continued

S H E E T - M E T A L W O R K E R , M A IN T E N A N C E --- Continued

h oles and in te r s t ic e s ; and applying paint w ith sp ra y gun o r brush. M ay m ix c o lo r s , o ils , w hite
lea d , and o th er paint in gre d ien ts to obtain p r o p e r c o lo r o r c o n s isten c y . In g e n e ra l, the w ork o f the
m ain tenan ce p a in te r re q u ir e s rounded tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a cq u ired through a fo r m a l
a p p ren tice sh ip o r eq u iva len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

up and o p era tin g a ll a v a ila b le typ es o f s h e e t-m e ta l w ork in g m ach in es; using a v a r ie ty o f handtools
in cutting, bending, fo rm in g , shaping, fittin g , and a ssem b lin g; and in sta llin g sh eet-m e ta l a r t ic le s
as re q u ire d .
In g e n e r a l, the w ork o f the m ain tenan ce sh e e t-m e ta l w o rk e r re q u ire s rounded
tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a cq u ired through a fo r m a l a p p ren ticesh ip o r equ ivalen t tra in in g
and e x p e r ie n c e .

P I P E F I T T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
In sta lls o r re p a ir s w a te r, stea m , ga s, o r o th er typ es o f pipe and p ip e fittin g s in an
esta b lish m en t. W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : L a y in g out o f w ork and m e a s u rin g to lo c a te
p o sition o f pipe fr o m d raw in gs o r o th er w ritte n s p e c ific a tio n s ; cutting v a rio u s s iz e s o f pipe to
c o r r e c t lengths w ith c h is e l and h a m m er o r o xy a c e ty le n e to rc h o r p ip e -cu ttin g m a ch in es; th rea d in g
pipe with stocks and d ie s ; bending pipe by h an d -d riven o r p o w e r - d r iv e n m a ch in es; a ssem b lin g
pipe with cou plings and fa sten in g pipe to h an gers; m akin g standard shop com putations r e la tin g to
p r e s s u re s , flo w , and s iz e o f p ipe re q u ire d ; and m akin g standard te sts to d e te rm in e w heth er fin ­
ish ed pipes m e e t s p e c ific a tio n s .
In g e n e ra l, the w o rk o f the m ain tenan ce p ip e fitte r re q u ir e s
rounded tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su ally a cq u ired through a fo r m a l a p p ren ticesh ip o r eq u ivalen t
tra in in g and e x p e rie n c e . W o rk e rs p r im a r ily en gaged in in s ta llin g and re p a irin g building sanitation
o r heating sy stem s a re ex clu d ed .
S H E E T - M E T A L W O R K E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
F a b r ic a te s , in s ta lls , and m ain tain s in good re p a ir the sh e e t-m e ta l equipm ent and fix tu re s
(such as m ach in e gu ards, g r e a s e pans, sh e lv e s , lo c k e r s , tanks, v e n tila to rs , chutes, ducts, m e ta l
ro o fin g ) o f an esta blish m en t. W ork in v o lv e s m o st o f the fo llo w in g : Plan nin g and la y in g out a ll
types o f sh e e t-m e ta l m ain tenan ce w ork fr o m b lu ep rin ts, m o d e ls , o r oth er s p e c ific a tio n s ; settin g

T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R
(D ie m a k e r; j i g m a k e r; to o l m a k e r; fix tu r e m a k e r; gage m a k e r)
C on stru cts and re p a ir s m a ch in e-sh op to o ls , ga g es, jig s ,’ fix tu re s o r dies fo r fo rg in g s ,
punching, and o th er m e ta l- fo r m in g w o rk .
W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and
la yin g out o f w ork fr o m m o d e ls , b lu ep rin ts, d raw in gs, o r oth er o ra l and w ritten s p e cifica tio n s;
u sing a v a r ie t y o f to o l and die m a k e r 's handtools and p r e c is io n m ea s u rin g in stru m en ts; u n d er­
standing o f the w ork in g p r o p e r t ie s o f com m on m e ta ls and a llo y s ; settin g up and op era tin g o f
m ach in e to o ls and re la te d equipm ent; m akin g n e c e s s a r y shop com putations re la tin g to dim ension s
o f w o rk , speed s, fe e d s , and to o lin g o f m a ch in es; h e a t-tre a tin g o f m e ta l p a rts during fa b rica tio n
as w e ll as o f fin ish ed to o ls and dies to a ch ieve re q u ir e d q u a lities ; w orkin g to c lo s e to le ra n c e s ;
fittin g and a ssem b lin g o f p a rts to p r e s c r ib e d to le ra n c e s and a llow a n ces; and s ele ctin g a p p rop ria te
m a t e r ia ls , to o ls , and p r o c e s s e s . In g e n e ra l, the to o l and die m a k e r 's w ork re q u ire s a rounded
tra in in g in m a ch in e-sh op and to o lro o m p r a c tic e u su a lly a cq u ired through a fo rm a l appren ticesh ip
o r equ iva len t tra in in g and e x p e rie n c e .
F o r c r o s s -in d u s tr y w a ge study p u rp oses,
shops a re exclu ded fr o m this c la s s ific a tio n .

too l and die m a k e rs in to o l and die jobbin g

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
P A C K E R , S H IP P IN G — Continued

GUARD AN D W ATC H M AN
G u ard. P e r fo r m s rou tine p o lic e du ties, e ith e r at fix ed post o r on tou r, m ain tain in g o r d e r ,
using a rm s o r fo r c e w h e re n e c e s s a r y . Inclu des gatem en who a re stationed at gate and check
on id en tity o f e m p lo y ees and o th er p erso n s e n te rin g .

and s iz e o f co n ta in er; in s e rtin g e n clo su res in co n ta in er; using e x c e ls io r o r oth er m a t e r ia l to
p re v e n t b rea k a ge o r dam age; c lo s in g and sea lin g co n ta in er; and applying la b els o r en terin g
id en tifyin g data on co n ta in er.
P a c k e rs who a lso m ake wooden boxes o r cra te s a re ex clu d ed .

W atchm an. M akes rounds o f p r e m is e s p e r io d ic a lly in p ro tectin g p r o p e rty again st fi r e ,
theft, and ille g a l en try.

S H IP P IN G A N D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K

J A N IT O R , P O R T E R , OR C L E A N E R
(S w e e p e r ; c h a rw o m a n ; ja n it r e s s )
C lean s and keeps in an o r d e r ly cond ition fa c to r y w ork in g a rea s and w a sh roo m s , o r
p r e m is e s o f an o ffic e , apartm ent house, o r c o m m e r c ia l o r o th er esta blish m en t. D uties in vo lv e
a com bin ation o f the fo llo w in g : Sw eepin g, m opping o r scru bbin g, and polish in g flo o r s ; re m o vin g
ch ips, tra sh , and o th er re fu se; dusting equipm ent, fu rn itu re, o r fix tu re s ; p o lish in g m e ta l fi x ­
tu res o r trim m in g s ; p ro vid in g supplies and m in o r m ain tenan ce s e r v ic e s ; and clea n in g la v a to r ie s ,
sh o w ers, and r e s tr o o m s . W o rk ers who s p e c ia liz e in w indow w ashin g a re exclu d ed .

P r e p a r e s m e rch a n d is e fo r shipm ent, o r r e c e iv e s and is re sp o n s ib le fo r in com in g sh ip­
m ents o f m e rch a n d is e o r o th er m a t e r ia ls . Shipping w ork in v o lv e s ; A kn ow ledge o f shipping p r o ­
c ed u res, p r a c tic e s , ro u tes, a va ila b le m ean s o f tra n sp o rta tio n , and ra tes; and p rep a rin g re c o r d s
o f the goods shipped, m akin g up b ills o f la din g, posting w eigh t and shipping ch a rge s, and keeping
a f ile o f shipping re c o r d s .
M a y d ir e c t o r a s s is t in p re p a rin g the m erch a n d ise fo r shipm ent.
R e c e iv in g w ork in v o lv e s : V e r ify in g o r d ir e c tin g o th ers in v e r ify in g the c o rr e c tn e s s o f shipm ents
again st b ills o f la d in g, in v o ic e s , o r o th er r e c o r d s ; ch eckin g fo r sh ortages and r e je c tin g dam ­
aged goods; rou ting m e rch a n d is e o r m a t e r ia ls to p r o p e r dep artm en ts; and m ain tain in g n e c e s s a r y
re c o r d s and file s .
F o r w age study p u rp ose s, w o r k e r s a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s :
R e c e iv in g c le r k
Shipping c le r k
Shipping and re c e iv in g c le r k

L A B O R E R , M A T E R IA L H A N D L IN G
(L o a d e r and u nloader; h an dler and sta ck er;
w areh ou sem an o r w a reh ou se h e lp e r )

s h e lv e r ;

tru c k e r;

stockm an o r stock h e lp e r;

A w o r k e r em p loy ed in a w areh ou se, m an u facturing plant, s to re , o r o th er esta blish m en t
w hose duties in v o lv e one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g : L oad in g and unloading v a rio u s m a t e r ia ls and
m e rch a n d is e on o r fr o m fr e ig h t c a rs , tru cks, o r o th er tra n sp o rtin g d e v ic e s ; unpacking, sh elvin g,
o r p la cin g m a te r ia ls o r m e rch a n d is e in p r o p e r s to ra ge lo ca tio n ; and tra n s p o rtin g m a te r ia ls o r
m e rch a n d is e by handtruck, c a r , o r w h e e lb a rro w . L o n g sh o re m en , who load and unload ships a re
e x clu d ed .
O RD ER F I L L E R
(O rd e r p ic k e r; stock s e le c to r ; w areh ou se stockm an)
F ills shipping o r tr a n s fe r o r d e r s fo r fin ish ed goods fr o m sto red m e rch a n d is e in a c c o r d ­
ance w ith sp e c ific a tio n s on sales slip s , c u s to m e r s ' o r d e r s , o r o th er in stru ction s. M a y, in addition
to fillin g o r d e r s and in dica tin g item s fille d o r o m itted , keep r e c o r d s o f outgoing o r d e r s , re q u i­
sitio n additional stock o r re p o r t sh ort su pplies to s u p e r v is o r, and p e r fo r m o th er re la te d du ties.

T R U C K D R IV E R
D riv e s a tru ck w ithin a c ity o r in d u stria l a re a to tra n sp o rt m a te r ia ls , m e rch a n d is e,
equipm ent, o r m en b etw een va rio u s types o f esta b lish m en ts such as: M anufacturing plants, fr e ig h t
dep ots, w a reh ou ses, w h o lesa le and r e ta il esta b lish m en ts, o r betw een r e ta il establish m en ts and
c u s to m e r s ' houses o r p la c e s o f bu sin ess. M a y a lso load o r unload tru ck with o r without h e lp e rs ,
m ake m in o r m e ch a n ica l r e p a ir s , and keep tru ck in good w ork in g o r d e r .
D r iv e r -s a le s m e n and
o v e r - t h e - r o a d d r iv e r s a re ex clu d ed .
fo llo w s :

F o r w a ge study p u rp oses, t r u c k d r iv e r s a re c la s s ifie d by s iz e and type o f equipm ent, as
(T r a c t o r - t r a i l e r should be ra ted on the b asis o f t r a ile r c a p a city.)
T r u c k d r iv e r (co m b in a tion o f s iz e s lis te d se p a r a te ly )
T r u c k d r iv e r , lig h t (under lVz tons)
T r u c k d r iv e r , m ed iu m (I V 2 to and in clu ding 4 ton s)
T r u c k d r iv e r , h ea vy (o v e r 4 ton s, t r a ile r typ e)
T r u c k d r iv e r , h ea vy (o v e r 4 ton s, o th er than t r a ile r typ e)

TR U C K E R , POW ER
P A C K E R , S H IP P IN G
P r e p a r e s fin ish ed produ cts fo r shipm ent o r s to ra g e by p lacin g them in shipping con­
ta in e r s , the s p e c ific op era tio n s p e r fo r m e d bein g dependent upon the type, s iz e , and num ber
o f units to be packed, the type o f co n ta in er em p loy ed , and m eth od o f shipm ent. W ork re q u ir e s
the pla cin g o f item s in shipping co n ta in ers and m a y in v o lv e one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g :
K n ow led ge o f v a rio u s ite m s o f stock in o r d e r to v e r i fy content; se le c tio n o f a p p ro p ria te type




O p era te s a m a n u ally c o n tr o lle d ga so lin e- o r e le c tr ic -p o w e r e d tru ck o r t r a c t o r to tra n sp o rt
goods and m a te r ia ls o f a ll kinds about a w a reh ou se, m an u factu ring plant, o r oth er esta blish m en t.
F o r w a ge study p u rp oses,
T ru ck er,
T ru ck er,

w o r k e r s a re c la s s ifie d by typ e o f tru ck ,

p o w er (fo r k lif t )
p o w er (o th e r than fo r k lift )

as fo llo w s :

A v a ila b le O n R e q u e s t----The following areas are surveyed periodically for use in administering the Service Contract Act of 1965.
available at no cost while supplies last from any of the BLS regional offices shown on the inside front cover.

Alaska
Albany, Ga.
Alpena, Standish, and Tawas City, Mich.
Am arillo, Tex.
Asheville, N.C.
Atlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, G a —S.C.
Austin, Tex.
Bakersfield, Calif.
Baton Rouge, La.
Biloxi, Gulfport, and Pascagoula, Miss.
Bridgeport, Norwalk, and Stamford, Conn.
Charleston, S.C.
Clarksville, Tenn., and Hopkinsville, Ky.
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, G a —Ala.
Crane, Ind.
Dothan, Ala.
Duluth—
Superior, Minn.—Wis.
Durham, N.C.
El Paso, Tex.
Eugene, Oreg.
Fargo—
Moorhead, N. Dak.—
Minn.
Fayetteville, N.C.
Fitchburg—
Leom inster, M ass.
Fort Smith, Ark.—
Okla.
Frederick—
Hagerstown, M d - P a .- W . Va.
Great Falls, Mont.
Greensboro—
Winston Salem—
High Point, N.Q.
H arrisburg, Pa.
Huntsville, Ala.
Knoxville, Tenn.

Copies of public releases are

Laredo, Tex.
Las Vegas, Nev.
Lexington, Ky.
Lower Eastern Shore, Md.—
Va.
Macon, Ga.
Marquette, Escanaba, Sault Ste. M arie, Mich.
Meridian, M iss.
Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean and Somerset
Cos., N.J.
Mobile, Ala., and Pensacola, Fla.
Montgomery, Ala.
Nashville, Tenn.
New London—
Groton—
Norwich, Conn.
Northeastern Maine
Ogden, Utah
Orlando, Fla.
Oxnard-Ventura, Calif.
Panama City, Fla.
Pine Bluff, Ark.
Portsmouth, N.H.—Maine— ass.
M
Pueblo, Colo.
Reno, Nev.
Sacramento, Calif.
Santa Barbara, Calif.
Shreveport, La.
Springfield—
Chicopee—
Holyoke, Mass.—Conn.
Stockton, Calif.
Tacoma, Wash.
Topeka, Kans.
Tucson, A riz.
Vallejo—
Napa, Calif.
Wichita Falls, Tex.
Wilmington, D e l—
N.J.—
Md.

The eleventh annual report on salaries for accountants, auditors, chief accountants, attorneys, job analysts, directors of personnel,
buyers, chemists, engineers, engineering technicians, draftsmen, and clerical employees. Order as BLS Bulletin 1693, National
Survey of Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical Pay, June 1970, $1.00 a copy, from the Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or any of its regional sales offices.




A r e a W a g e S u rv ey s
A list of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A directory of area wage studies including more limited studies conducted at
the request of the Employment Standards Administration of the Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins may be purchased from the
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or from any of the BLS regional sales offices shown on
the inside front cover.

Area

Bulletin number
and price

Akron, Ohio, July 1971 1 _______________________________ 1685-87,
Albany—
Schenectady—Troy, N .Y ., M ar. 1971 1________ 1685-54,
Albuquerque, N. M ex., Mar. 1971------------------------------ 1685-58,
Allentown—
Bethlehem—
Easton, Pa.—
N.J., May 1971 — 1685-75,
Atlanta, G a ., May 1971----------------------------------------------- 1685-69,
Baltimore, M d., Aug. 1971____t
----------------------------------- 1725-16,
Beaumont—
Port Arthui—Orange, Tex., May 1971 1 ---- 1685-68,
Binghamton, N .Y ., July 1971 1 _________________________ 1725-6,
Birmingham, Ala., M ar. 1971 1 _______ .. ---------------------- 1685-63,
'Boise City, Idaho, Nov. 1970 1 _________________________ 1685-21,
Boston, M ass., Aug. 1971____r_________________________ 1725-11,
Buffalo, N .Y ., Oct. 1970 1______________________________ 1685-43,
Burlington, V t., Mar. 1971 1 ___________________________ 1685-59,
Canton, Ohio, May 1971_______________________________ 1685-71,
Charleston, W. V a ., M ar. 1971--------------------------------- 1685-57,
Charlotte, N.C., Jan. 1971____________________________ 1685-48,
Chattanooga, Tenn.— a., Sept. 1971----- --------------------- 1725-14,
G
Chicago, 111., June 1970________________________________ 1660-90,
Cincinnati, Ohio—
Ky.—Ind., Feb. 1971 1----------------------- 1685-53,
Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1970 1------------------------------------- 1685-28,
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1970 1
-------------------------------------- 1685-33,
Dallas, Tex., Oct. 1970 1 ------------------------------------------- 1685-22,
Davenport—
Rock Island—
Moline., Iowa—
111.,
Feb. 1971------------------------------------------------------------------ 1685-51,
------------------------------------------- 1685-45,
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1970 1
Denver, Colo., Dec. 1970------------------------------------------- 1685-41,
Des Moines, Iowa, May 1971------------------------------------- 1685-70,
Detroit, Mich., Feb. 1971 1------------------------ ----------------- 1685-77,
Fort Worth, Tex., Oct. 1970 1------------------------------------ 1685-25,
Green Bay, W is., July 1971,---- ---------------------------------- 1725-3,
Greenville, S.C., May 1971 1___________—
----— 1685-78,
Houston, Tex., Apr. 1971 1--------------------------------------- — 1685-67,
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1970 1
_________________________
1685-31,
Jackson, M iss., Jan. 1971 1
---------------------------------------- 1685-39,
Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 1970 1
----------------------------------- 1685-37,
Kansas City, Mo.-Kans., Sept. 1970 1------------------------ 1685-16,
Lawrence—
Haverhill, M ass.—
N.H., June 1971------------- 1685-83,
Little Rock—
North Little Rock, Ark., July 1971----- — 1725-4,
Los Angeles—
Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa A naGarden Grove, Calif., M ar. 1971 1
___________________ 1685-66,
Louisville, Ky.—Ind., Nov. 1970_________ _— -------------- 1685-27,
Lubbock,. T ex., M ar. 1971------------... ------ ...---------- 1685-60,
Manchester, N.H., July 1971— — ---------------------------- 1725-2,
Memphis, Tenn.— rk ., Nov. 1970— — -------A
— 1685-30,
Miami, Fla., Nov. 1970 1
_______________________________ 1685-29,
Midland and Odessa, Tex., Jan. 1971-------------------------- 1685-40,
Milwaukee, W is., May 1971----- —— --------- ------------ -1685-76,
Minneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn., Jan.1971_______________ 1685-44,

4U
35
30
30
40
35
35
35
40
35
40
50
35
30
30
30
30
60
45

50
40
50

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

30 cents
40 cents
35 cents
30 cents
50 cents
35 cents
30 cents
35 cents
50 cents
40 cents
35 cents
35 cents
45 cents
30 cents
30 cents
50
30
30
30
30
40
30
35
40

l Da
 ta on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.


cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Area
Muskegon—
Muskegon Heights, Mich., June 1971_____
Newark and Jersey City, N.J., Jan. 1971------------------New Haven, Conn., Jan. 1971___________________________
New Orleans, La., Jan. 1971 1_________________________
New York, N .Y., Apr. 1970 1 ___________________________
Norfolk—
Portsmouth and Newport News—
Hampton, Va., Jan. 1971 1 ____________________________
Oklahoma City, Okla., Julv ,1971 1-----------------------------Omaha, Nebr.—Iowa, Sept. 1971 1 ______________________
Pater son—
Clifton—
Passaic, N.J., June 1971___________
Philadelphia, Pa.—
N.J., Nov. 197 0-----------------------------Phoenix, A r iz ., June 1971_____________________________
Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 1971 1 ____________________________
Portland, Maine, Nov. 1970----------------------------------------Portland, Oreg.—Wash., May 1971_____________________
Providence—
Pawtucket—
Warwick, R.I.— ass.,
M
May 1971 1 _____________________________________________
Raleigh, N.C., Aug. 1971_______________________________
Richmond, Va., M ar. 1971----------------------------------------Rochester, N.Y. (office occupations only),
July 1971 1 _____________________________________________
Rockford, 111., May 1971_______________________________
St. Louis, Mo.—
111., Mar. 1971 1---------------------------------Salt Lake City, Utah, Nov. 1970 1 ------------------------------San Antonio, Tex., May 1971 1 -----------------------------------San Bernardino—
River side—
Ontario, Calif.,
Dec. 1970 1_____________________________________________
San Diego, Calif., Nov. 1970--------------------------------------San Francisccr-Oakland, Calif., Oct. 1970-----------------San Jose, Calif., A u g .'1971 1 -------------------------------------Savannah, Ga., May 1971______________________________
Scranton, Pa., July 1971________________________________
Seattle—
Everett, Wash., Jan. 197 1 1---------------------------Sioux Falls, S. Dak., Dec. 1970 1_______________________
South Bend, Ind., M ar. 1971--------------------------------------Spokane, Wash., June 1971----------------------------------------Syracuse, N .Y ., July; 1971 1 ---------------------------------------Tampa—
St. Petersburg, Fla., Nov. 1970_____________ __
Toledo, Ohio—
Mich., Apr. 1971 1 ______________________
Trenton, N.J., Sept. 1971— ---------------------------------------Utica-Rome, N .Y ., July 1971 1-----------------------------------Washington, D.C.—
Md.— a ., Apr. 1971________________
V
Waterbury, Conn., Mar. 1971------------------------------------Waterloo, Iowa, Nov. 1970 1____________________________
Wichita, Kans., Apr. 1971-----------------------------------------W orcester, M ass., May 1971------------------------------------York, P a ., Feb. 1971-------------------------------------------------Youngstown— arren, Ohio, Nov. 1970_________________
W

Bulletin number
and price
1685-82,
1685-47 , •
1685-35,
1685-36,
1660-89,

30 cents
40 cents
30 cents
40 cents
75 cents

1685-46,
1725-8,
1725-13,
1685-84,
1685-34,
1685-86,
1685-49,
1685-19,
1685-85,

35 cents
35 cents
35 cents
35 cents
50 cents
30 cents
50 cents
30 cents
35 cents

1685-80,
1725-5,
1685-62

40 cents
30 cents
30 cents

1725-7,
1685-79,
1685-65,
1685-26,
1685-81,

35 cents
30 cents
50 cents
35 cents
35 cents

1685-42,
1685-20,
1685-23,
1725-15,
1685-72,
1725-1,
1685-52,
1685-38,
1685-61,
1685-88,
1725-10,
1685-17,
1685-74,
1725-12,
1725-9,
1685-56,
1685-55,
1685-32,
1685-64,
1685-73,
1685-50,
1685-24,

40 cents
30 cents
40 cents
35 cents
30 cents
30 cents
35 cents
35 cents
30 cents
30 cents
35 cents
30 cents
40 cents
30 cents
35 cents
40 cents
30 cents
35 cents
30 cents
30 cents
30 cents
30 cents

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

FIRST CLASS MAIL

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

PO STA G E A N D FE E S P A ID

W A S H IN G T O N , D .C . 2 0 2 1 2

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

O F F IC IA L B U S IN E S S

PENALTY FOR PRIV A TE USE, $300





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102