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L

a .

v

i




Dayton & W ont
Public Library
OCT

6

W t

DOCUMENT COLLECTION

AR EA WAGE SURVEY
lville, S o u th C aro lin a, M e tro p o lita n A re a ,
M a y 1971

ill

B

■

B u lle tin 1 6 8 5 -7 8
U.S. D EPA R TM EN T OF LABOR / Bureau of Labor Statistics

B U R E A U

O F

L A B O R

S T A T IS T IC S

R E G IO N A L

O F F IC E S

ALASKA

Region I
1603-A Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Region V
219 South Dearborn St.
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)




Region II
341 Ninth Ave., Rm. 1025
New York, N .Y . 10001
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region 1 1
1
406 Penn Square Building
1317 F ilbertS t.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region VI
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions V II and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

Regions V II and V III will be serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.

U.S. DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR
J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
BUR EA U OF LABOR STATISTICS
Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner




AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e G reen ville, S o u th C aro lin a, M etro p o litan A re a ,
M ay 1971
B u lle tin 1 6 8 5 -7 8
August 1971

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 — Price 35 cents




C o n te n ts

P re fa c e

Page
T h e B u re a u of L a b o r S ta tistics p r o g r a m o f annual
occu p a tion a l w age
surveys
in m e t r o p o l i t a n
a r e a s is d e ­
s ig n e d to p r o v i d e d a ta o n o c c u p a t io n a l e a r n i n g s , a n d e s t a b ­
lish m e n t p r a c t ic e s and s u p p le m e n ta ry w a g e p r o v is io n s .
It
y ie ld s d e ta ile d d ata b y s e le c t e d in d u s try d iv is io n f o r e a c h
o f the a r e a s s tu d ie d , f o r g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n s , a n d f o r the
U n ited S ta te s.
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in th e p r o g r a m is
t h e n e e d f o r g r e a t e r i n s i g h t i n t o (1) t h e m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s
b y o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e g o r y a n d s k i l l l e v e l , a n d (2) th e s t r u c ­
tu re and le v e l o f w ag es am on g a re a s and in d u stry d iv isio n s.

I n t r o d u c t i o n ___________________________________________________________________________________
W a g e t r e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s _________________________________
T a b le s :
1.
2.

A t the end o f e a c h s u r v e y , an in d ivid u a l a r e a b u l ­
le tin p r e s e n t s the s u r v e y r e s u l t s .
A ft e r c o m p le t io n o f a ll
o f the in d iv id u a l a r e a b u lle tin s fo r a rou n d o f s u r v e y s , tw o
s u m m a r y bu lletin s a r e iss u e d .
T h e f i r s t b r in g s data f o r
e a c h o f the m e t r o p o li t a n
a r e a s s tu d ie d into o n e b u lle tin .
T h e s e c o n d p r e s e n t s in fo r m a tio n w h ich has b e e n p r o je c t e d
f r o m in d ivid u a l m e tr o p o lita n a r e a
data to r e l a t e to g e o ­
g r a p h ic r e g io n s and the U n ited S ta te s.

A.

N in ety a r e a s cu r r e n tly a r e
i n c lu d e d in th e p r o ­
gram .
In e a c h a r e a , i n f o r m a t i o n o n o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s
is c o l l e c t e d
an n u ally and on e s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and
su p p le m e n ta ry w a g e p r o v is io n s b ien n ia lly .

B.

T h is
bu lletin p re s e n ts
resu lts
o f t h e s u r v e y in
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , in M a y 1 9 7 1 .
T h e S tan dard M e tro p o lita n
S t a t is t ic a l A r e a , a s d e fin e d b y the B u r e a u o f the B u d g e t
through Jan uary 1968, co n sists of G re e n v ille and P ick en s
C ou n ties.
T h is stu d y w a s c o n d u c te d b y the B u r e a u 's r e ­
g ion a l o ffic e
in A t la n t a , G a . , u n d e r
the g e n e r a l d i r e c ­
tion o f D o n a ld M . C r u s e , A s s is t a n t R e g io n a l D i r e c t o r fo r
O p era tion s.




1
5

E s t a b lis h m e n t s and w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y and
n u m b e r s t u d i e d ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Indexes o f stan d ard w ee k ly s a la rie s and s tr a ig h t-tim e
h o u rly ea rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o cc u p a tio n a l g r o u p s , and
p e r c e n t s o f i n c r e a s e f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s -----------------------------------------

6

O ccu p a tio n a l ea rn in g s:
A -l.
O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s —m e n a n d w o m e n ____________________________
A - 2.
P r o fe s s io n a l and te ch n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s —
m e n a n d w o m e n _______________________________________________________
A -3 .
O ffic e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and te ch n ic a l o cc u p a tio n s —
m e n a n d w o m e n c o m b i n e d ________________________________________
A -4 .
M a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s ____________________
A - 5.
C u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s -------------------

10
11
12

E sta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and s u p p le m e n ta ry w a g e p r o v is io n s :
B -l.
M in im u m en tra n ce s a la rie s fo r w om en o ffice
w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------B -2 .
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------B -3 .
S c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s --------------------------------------------------------------------B -4 .
P a i d h o l i d a y s ____________________________________________________________
B -5 .
P a i d v a c a t i o n s __________________________________________________________
B -6 .
H e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , a n d p e n s i o n p l a n s _________________________

13
14
15
16
17
19

A p p e n d ix .

O c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s _____________________________________________

NOTE:
areas.

iii

4

(S ee

S im ila r
in sid e

ta b u la tion s

back

c o v e r.)

are

a v a ilab le

for

other

7
9

21




In tro d u c tio n
T h i s a r e a i s 1 o f 90 in w h ic h th e U .S . D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r 's
B u rea u of L a b o r S ta tistics con du cts su rv e y s o f o ccu p a tion a l ea rn in g s
a n d r e l a t e d b e n e f i t s o n a n a r e a w i d e b a s i s . 1 In t h i s a r e a , d a t a w e r e
ob ta in ed b y p e r s o n a l v is its of B u re a u fie ld e c o n o m is t s to r e p r e s e n t ­
a tiv e
e s ta b lis h m e n ts
w ith in s ix
b ro a d in d u stry
d ivision s:
M anu­
fa ctu rin g ; tra n s p o rta tio n , co m m u n ica tio n , and oth er p u b lic u tilities;
w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e ta il tra d e ; fin a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e sta te ; and
serv ices.
M a jo r in d u stry g rou p s
exclu d ed fr o m
these
stu dies a re
g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a tio n s and the c o n s t r u c tio n and e x t r a c t iv e in d u s tr ie s .
E s t a b lis h m e n t s h a vin g f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e
o m i t t e d b e c a u s e t h e y t e n d t o f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in th e
occu p ation s
stu died to w a rr a n t in clu s io n .
S e p a ra te tab u la tion s
are
p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h o f the b r o a d in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w h ic h m e e t p u b l i ­
ca tio n c r it e r ia .

O c cu p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t and ea rn in g s
data a r e
shown for
fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s , i.e ., th ose h ir e d to w o r k a re g u la r w e e k ly sch ed u le
in the g iv e n o c c u p a t io n a l c la s s if ic a t io n .
E a r n in g s data e x c lu d e p r e ­
m iu m
pay for
ov ertim e
and fo r w ork
on w eek en d s,
h o lid a y s , and
late s h ifts .
N on p rod u ction b o n u s e s a re
e x c lu d e d , but c o s t -o f - liv in g
a llo w a n ce s and in cen tiv e e a rn in g s a re in clu d ed . W h e re w e e k ly h ou rs
a r e r e p o r t e d , as f o r o ffic e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s , r e f e r e n c e is to the
s ta n d a r d w o r k w e e k ( r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r ) f o r w h ic h e m ­
p lo y e e s re c e iv e th eir re g u la r s tra ig h t-tim e sa la rie s (e x clu siv e of pay
f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u la r a n d /o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ).
A v era g e w eek ly e a rn ­
in g s f o r t h e s e o c c u p a t io n s h a v e b e e n r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o lla r .

T h e s e s u r v e y s m e a s u r e th e l e v e l o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s in
an a r e a at a p a r t i c u l a r t i m e .
C o m p a r is o n s of in d ivid u a l o cc u p a tio n a l
averages
o v e r tim e m a y not r e fle c t e x p e c te d w a g e
ch an ges.
The
a v e r a g e s fo r in d ivid u a l jo b s a r e a ffe c te d b y ch a n g e s
in w a g e s
and
e m p lo y m e n t p a ttern s.
F o r e x a m p le , p r o p o r tio n s of w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d
by h ig h - o r lo w -w a g e fir m s m a y ch an ge o r h ig h -w a g e w o r k e r s m a y
a d v a n ce to b e tte r jo b s and b e r e p la c e d b y n ew w o r k e r s at lo w e r ra te s.
S u ch s h ifts in e m p lo y m e n t c o u ld d e c r e a s e an o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e
ev en though m o s t e s ta b lis h m e n ts
in an a r e a i n c r e a s e w a g e s d u rin g
the y e a r .
T r e n d s in e a r n i n g s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s , s h o w n in t a b le
2, a r e b e t t e r i n d i c a t o r s o f w a g e t r e n d s t h a n i n d i v i d u a l j o b s w i t h i n
the g r o u p s .

T h e s e s u rv e y s a re con d u cted on a sa m p le b a s is b e c a u s e of
the u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t in v o lv e d in s u r v e y in g a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s .
To
o b ta in o p tim u m
a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n o f
l a r g e than o f s m a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s is s tu d ie d .
In c o m b i n i n g t h e d a t a ,
h o w e v e r , a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts a re g iv e n th e ir a p p ro p ria te w eig h t. E s ­
tim a te s b a s e d on the e s ta b lis h m e n ts stu d ied a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
as r e la tin g to a ll e s t a b l is h m e n t s in the i n d u s t r y g r o u p in g a n d a r e a ,
e x c e p t fo r th o s e b e lo w the m in im u m s iz e stu died .
O ccu p a tio n s

and E a rn in g s

T h e o cc u p a tio n s s e le c te d f o r stu dy a re c o m m o n to a v a r ie ty
of m an u fa ctu rin g
and n on m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s trie s,
and a re
o f the
follow in g ty p es:
(l) O ffice cle r ic a l;
(2) p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l ;
(3) m a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t ; a n d (4) c u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m ent.
O c c u p a tio n a l c la s s if ic a t io n is b a s e d on a u n ifo r m
set o f job
d e s c r ip tio n s d e s ig n e d to tak e a c c o u n t o f in t e r e s ta b lis h m e n t v a r ia tio n
in d u t ie s w it h in th e s a m e j o b .
T he occu p a tion s
s e le c t e d f o r stu dy
a r e l i s t e d an d d e s c r i b e d in the a p p e n d ix . T h e e a r n in g s d a ta fo llo w in g
the jo b title s a r e f o r a ll'in d u s t r ie s c o m b in e d .
E a r n in g s d ata f o r s o m e
o f the o c c u p a t io n s lis t e d and d e s c r i b e d , o r fo r s o m e in d u s tr y d iv is io n s
w ith in o c c u p a t io n s , a r e n ot p r e s e n t e d in the A - s e r i e s t a b le s , b e c a u s e
e i t h e r ( l ) e m p l o y m e n t in th e o c c u p a t i o n is t o o s m a l l to p r o v i d e e n o u g h
d a ta t o m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e
o f in d iv id u a l e s ta b lis h m e n t data. E a r n in g s data not s h o w n s e p a r a t e ly
f o r i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s a r e i n c lu d e d in a ll in d u s t r i e s c o m b i n e d
data,
w h ere show n.
L i k e w i s e , d a ta a r e i n c l u d e d in t h e o v e r a l l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n
w h e n a s u b c la s s ific a t io n o f s e c r e t a r i e s o r t r u c k d r iv e r s is not sh ow n
o r in fo r m a tio n to s u b c la s s ify is not a v a ila b le .

The
averages presented
re fle ct co m p o site , a rea w id e
esti­
m ates.
In d u stries
and e s ta b lis h m e n ts
d i ffe r in p a y l e v e l a n d jo b
sta ffin g and, th u s, c o n tr ib u te d iffe r e n t ly to the e s tim a t e s f o r e a c h jo b .
T h e p a y r e la t io n s h ip o b ta in a b le f r o m the a v e r a g e s m a y fa il to r e f l e c t
a c c u r a t e l y th e w a g e s p r e a d o r d i f f e r e n t i a l m a i n t a i n e d a m o n g j o b s in
in d iv id u a l e s t a b l is h m e n t s . S i m i l a r l y , d i f f e r e n c e s in a v e r a g e p a y l e v e l s
f o r m e n a n d w o m e n in a n y o f th e s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s h o u ld n o t b e
a s s u m e d to r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y t r e a t m e n t o f th e s e x e s w it h in
in d iv id u a l e s ta b lis h m e n ts .
O th er p o s s ib le fa c t o r s w h ich m a y
con­
tr ib u te to d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y f o r m e n and w o m e n in c lu d e : D if f e r e n c e s
in p r o g r e s s i o n w ith in e s t a b l is h e d
rate ra n g es,
s in c e o n ly the a c t u a l
r a t e s p a id i n c u m b e n t s a r e c o l l e c t e d ; a n d d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c d u tie s
p e r f o r m e d , a lth o u g h the w o r k e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d
a p p r o p r ia te ly w ith in
th e s a m e s u r v e y j o b d e s c r i p t i o n . J o b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g
e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d th a n t h o s e
u s e d in in d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
and a llow fo r m in o r d iffe r e n c e s
a m o n g e s t a b l is h m e n t s in the s p e c i f i c d u tie s p e r f o r m e d .

1
Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New York State
O c cu p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t
estim a tes
r e p r e s e n t th e t o t a l in
Department of Labor. These areas are Binghamton (New York portion only); Rochester (office o cc u­
a ll e s t a b l is h m e n t s w ith in the s c o p e o f the s tu d y and n ot the n u m b e r
pations only); Syracuse; and Utica—Rome. In addition, the Bureau conducts more limited area studies
a ctu a lly s u rv e y e d .
B e c a u s e o f d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
in 77 areas at the request of the Wage and Hour Division of the U. S. Department of Labor.




1

2

a m o n g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , the e s t im a t e s o f o c c u p a t io n a l e m p lo y m e n t o b ­
ta in e d f r o m the s a m p le o f e s ta b lis h m e n t s s tu d ie d s e r v e o n ly to in d ica te
the
rela tiv e
im p o rta n ce
o f the jo b s
stu died .
These
d ifferen ces
in
o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e d o n ot a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y the a c c u r a c y o f the
e a r n in g s data.
E sta b lish m en t P r a c t ic e s

and S u p p le m e n ta ry W age P r o v is io n s

I n fo r m a t io n is p r e s e n t e d (in the B - s e r i e s ta b le s ) on s e le c t e d
e sta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and s u p p le m e n ta ry w a g e p r o v is io n s as th ey
re la te to plan t and o ffic e w o r k e r s .
D ata fo r in d u stry d iv isio n s not
p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly a r e in c lu d e d in th e e s t im a t e s f o r " a l l in d u s t r ie s ."
A d m in is tr a tiv e , e x e c u tiv e , and p r o fe s s io n a l e m p lo y e e s , and c o n s t r u c ­
tion w o r k e r s w h o a re u tiliz e d as a s e p a ra te w o r k f o r c e a re ex clu d e d .
"P la n t
w orkers"
in clu d e w o r k in g
forem en
and a ll
n on su p erv isory
w o r k e r s (in c lu d in g l e a d m e n an d t r a i n e e s ) e n g a g e d in n o n o f f i c e f u n c ­
tio n s.
" O ffic e w o r k e r s " in clu d e w o rk in g
s u p e r v is o r s and n o n su p e r ­
v is o ry w ork ers p erform in g
c le r ic a l o r re la te d fu n ction s.
C afeteria
w o r k e r s a n d r o u t e m e n a r e e x c lu d e d in m a n u fa c t u r in g in d u s t r ie s , but
in c lu d e d in n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g in d u s t r i e s .
M in im u m e n tr a n c e s a la r ie s f o r w o m e n o f f ic e w o r k e r s (tab le
B - l ) r e la te o n ly to the e s t a b lis h m e n t s v is ite d .
B e c a u s e o f the o p t im u m
sa m p lin g te ch n iq u es u s e d ,
and the p r o b a b ilit y that la r g e e s t a b lis h ­
m ents
are m o re
lik e ly to h a v e f o r m a l e n tra n c e ra te s
for w ork ers
a b o v e the s u b c l e r i c a l l e v e l than s m a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s , th e ta b le is
m o r e - r e p r e s e n t a t i v e o f p o l ic i e s in m e d iu m a n d la r g e e s t a b lis h m e n t s .
S h ift d iffe r e n t ia l d a ta (ta b le B - 2 ) a r e lim it e d to p la n t w o r k e r s
in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s .
T h is
i n f o r m a t i o n is p r e s e n t e d b o th in
t e r m s o f (1) e s t a b l i s h m e n t p o l i c y , 2 p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f t o t a l p la n t
w orker
e m p lo y m e n t,
a n d (2) e f f e c t i v e p r a c t i c e , p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s
o f w o r k e r s a c t u a lly e m p l o y e d o n th e s p e c i f i e d s h ift at th e t im e o f the
survey.
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g v a r i e d d i f f e r e n t i a l s ,
the a m o u n t
a p p ly in g to a m a j o r i t y w a s u s e d o r , if n o a m o u n t a p p lie d to a m a jo r it y ,
the c l a s s i f ic a t i o n " o t h e r " w a s u s e d .
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in w h i c h s o m e
l a t e - s h i f t h o u r s a r e p a id at n o r m a l r a t e s , a d iffe r e n t ia l w a s r e c o r d e d
o n l y i f it a p p l i e d t o a m a j o r i t y o f t h e s h i ft h o u r s .
T h e s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s (t a b le B - 3 ) o f a m a j o r i t y o f the
f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s in an e s t a b l is h m e n t a r e t a b u la te d as a p p ly in g to
a ll o f th e p la n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s o f that e s ta b lis h m e n t .
S ch ed u led
w e e k ly h o u rs a r e th o s e w h ich a m a jo r it y of fu ll-t im e e m p lo y e e s w e r e
ex p e cte d to w o rk , w h eth er they w e r e
p a id f o r at s t r a ig h t - t im e
or
o v ertim e rates.
P a id h o lid a y s ; p a id v a c a t io n s ; and h ea lth ,
in su ra n ce,
and
p e n s io n p lan s
(ta b les B - 4
throu gh B -6 ) a re trea ted
s ta tis tic a lly on
the b a s is that t h e s e a r e a p p lic a b le to a ll p la n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s if
2
An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met either of the following con­
ditions: (1) Operated late shifts at the time of the survey, or (2) had formal provisions covering
late shifts. An establishment was considered as having formal provisions if it (1) had operated late
shifts during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2) had provisions in written form for operating
late shifts.




a m a jo r it y o f su ch w o r k e r s a re e lig ib le o r m a y e v e n tu a lly q u a lify fo r
the p r a c t i c e s lis t e d . S u m s o f in d iv id u a l i t e m s in t a b le s B - 2 t h r o u g h
B - 6 m a y not eq u a l to ta ls b e c a u s e o f rou n d in g.
D a ta o n p a id h o lid a y s (ta b le B - 4 ) a r e l i m i t e d to data o n h o l i ­
d ays g ra n te d a n n u ally on a f o r m a l b a s is ; i.e .,
(l) a re p ro v id e d fo r
in w r i t t e n f o r m , o r (2) h a v e b e e n e s t a b l i s h e d b y c u s t o m .
H olid a y s
o r d in a r ily g ra n ted a re in clu d ed ev e n though th ey m a y fa ll on a n o n ­
w o r k d a y and the w o r k e r is n ot g r a n te d a n o th e r d a y off.
The first
p a r t o f t h e p a i d h o l i d a y s t a b l e p r e s e n t s t h e n u m b e r o f w h o l e a n d “h a l f
h o lid a y s a ctu a lly gra n ted .
T h e s e c o n d p a rt c o m b in e s w h o le and ha lf
h olid a y s to sh ow total h o lid a y t im e .

The
s u m m a r y o f v a c a t io n p la n s (ta b le B -5 ) is lim it e d to a
s ta tis tica l m e a s u r e o f v a ca tio n p r o v is io n s .
It i s n o t i n t e n d e d a s a
m e a s u r e o f the p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s a c t u a lly r e c e i v i n g s p e c i f i c b e n e ­
fits.
P r o v is io n s o f an e s ta b lis h m e n t fo r a ll len gth s o f s e r v ic e w e r e
ta b u la ted as a p p ly in g to a ll plan t o r o ffic e w o r k e r s o f the e s t a b lis h ­
m ent,
r e g a r d le s s o f len gth o f s e r v ic e .
P rov ision s
fo r p aym en t on
o th e r than a tim e b a s is w e r e c o n v e r t e d to a tim e b a s i s ; fo r e x a m p le ,
a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t o f a n n u a l e a r n in g s w a s c o n s i d e r e d a s the e q u i v ­
alen t o f 1 w e e k 's
pay.
O n ly b a s ic p la n s a r e in clu d e d .
E stim a tes
e x c lu d e v a c a tio n b on u s and v a c a t io n -s a v in g s p lan s
and th o s e w h ich
offer "exten d ed "
or "sa b b a tica l"
b en efits b ey on d
b a s ic p la n s w ith
q u a lify in g len g th s o f s e r v ic e .
S u ch e x c l u s i o n s a r e t y p i c a l in the s t e e l,
a lu m in u m , and ca n in d u s trie s .

D ata on h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , and p e n s io n p la n s (tab le B -6 ) in ­
clu d e th o s e p la n s f o r w h ic h the e m p lo y e r p a y s at le a s t a p a r t o f the
co s t. S uch p lan s in clu d e th ose u n d e rw ritte n b y a c o m m e r c ia l in su ra n ce
c o m p a n y a n d t h o s e p r o v id e d th r o u g h a u n io n fun d o r p a id d i r e c t l y b y
the e m p l o y e r out o f c u r r e n t o p e r a t in g fu n d s o r f r o m a fu n d s e t a s id e
f o r th is p u r p o s e . A n e s t a b lis h m e n t w a s c o n s i d e r e d to h a v e a p la n if
th e m a j o r i t y o f e m p l o y e e s w a s e l i g i b l e t o b e c o v e r e d u n d e r the p la n ,
e v e n if l e s s than a m a j o r i t y e le c t e d to p a r t ic ip a t e b e c a u s e e m p lo y e e s
w ere
r e q u ir e d to c o n tr ib u t e t o w a r d the c o s t o f th e p la n .
L e ga lly
re q u ire d p lan s,
s u ch as w o r k m e n 's
com p en sa tion ,
socia l secu rity,
and r a ilr o a d r e tir e m e n t w e r e ex clu d ed .
S ic k n e s s
and a ccid en t in su ra n ce
is l i m i t e d to that ty p e o f
in s u ra n c e u n d er w h ich p r e d e t e r m in e d ca s h p a y m e n ts a re m a d e d ir e c t ly
to the in s u r e d d u rin g illn e s s o r a c c id e n t d is a b ility .
In fo r m a tio n is
p r e s e n t e d f o r a ll s u c h p la n s to w h ic h the e m p lo y e r c o n tr ib u t e s . H o w ­
e v e r , in N e w Y o r k and N e w J e r s e y , w h ic h h a v e e n a c t e d t e m p o r a r y
d is a b ility in s u r a n c e la w s w h ich r e q u ir e e m p lo y e r co n tr ib u tio n s ,
p lan s
a r e in c lu d e d o n ly if the e m p l o y e r ( l ) c o n t r ib u t e s m o r e th a n is l e g a l l y
r e q u i r e d , o r (2) p r o v i d e s t h e e m p l o y e e w i t h b e n e f i t s w h i c h e x c e e d th e
req u irem en ts
o f the la w .
T a b u la tio n s o f p a id
s ic k le a v e p lan s a re
2
The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island do not require employer
contributions.

3
l im it e d to f o r m a l p l a n s 4 w h ich p r o v id e f u ll p a y o r a p r o p o r t io n o f the
w o r k e r 's p a y d u rin g a b s e n c e f r o m w o r k b e c a u s e o f i l l n e s s . S e p a r a te
ta b u la tio n s a r e p r e s e n t e d a c c o r d in g to ( l ) p la n s w h ich p r o v id e f u ll p a y
and no w a itin g p e r io d , and (2) p la n s w h ich p r o v id e e ith e r p a r t ia l p a y
o r a w a itin g p e r io d . In ad d itio n to th e p r e s e n ta t io n o f the p r o p o r t io n s
of w o r k e r s w ho a r e p r o v id e d s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r p a id
s ic k l e a v e , an u n d u p lic a te d to ta l is sh ow n o f w o r k e r s w ho r e c e iv e
e ith e r o r b o th ty p e s o f b e n e fit s .
4 An establishment was considered as having a formal plan if it established at least the
minimum number of days of sick leave available to each employee.
Such a plan need not be
written, but informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, were excluded.




M a j o r m e d ic a l in s u r a n c e in c lu d e s th o s e p la n s w h ic h a r e d e ­
s ig n e d to p r o t e c t e m p lo y e e s in c a s e o f s i c k n e s s and in ju r y in v o lv in g
e x p e n s e s b e y o n d the c o v e r a g e o f b a s i c h o s p it a liz a t io n , m e d i c a l , and
s u r g ic a l p la n s . M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e r e f e r s to p la n s p r o v id in g f o r c o m ­
p le te o r p a r t ia l p a y m e n t o f d o c t o r s ' f e e s .
D e n ta l in s u r a n c e u s u a lly
c o v e r s f i l l i n g s , e x t r a c t io n s , and X - r a y s .
E x c lu d e d a r e p la n s w h ich
c o v e r o n ly o r a l s u r g e r y o r a c c id e n t d a m a g e .
P la n s m a y b e u n d e r ­
w r it te n b y c o m m e r c i a l in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s o r n o n p r o fit o r g a n iz a tio n s
o r th e y m a y b e p a id f o r b y the e m p lo y e r out o f a fund s e t a s id e f o r
th is p u r p o s e . T a b u la tio n s o f r e t i r e m e n t p e n s io n p la n s a r e lim it e d to
th o se p la n s that p r o v id e r e g u la r p a y m e n t s f o r the r e m a in d e r o f the
w o r k e r 's l i f e .

4

T a b le

1.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts

and

w o rk e rs

w ith in

scope

o f s u rve y

and

n u m b e r s tu d ie d

in G r e e n v ill e , S .C .,1 b y m a jo r in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n ,2 M a y 1 9 7 1

N u m b e r o f e s t a b l is h m e n t s

In d u s try d iv is io n

M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s in s c o p e
o f stu d y

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s
W it h in s c o p e o f s t u d y

W it h in s c o p e
o f stu d y*

S tu d ie d
T o t a l4

S tu d ie d

P la n t
N um ber

A l l d i v i s i o n s _______________________________________
M a n u fa c t u r in g ----------------------------------------------------------------N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ______________________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 5___________________________
W h o l e s a le t r a d e -----------------------------------------------------R e t a il t r a d e _________________________________________
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e --------------S e r v i c e s 8_____________________________________ _____

O ffic e

P ercen t

T o ta l4

2 74

106

6 7 ,2 0 3

10 0

5 2 ,8 9 8

6 .0 7 0

3 6 .7 6 4

-

160
114

58
48

5 2 ,3 7 6
1 4 ,8 2 7

78
22

4 4 ,0 1 1
8 ,8 8 7

3, 169
2 ,9 0 1

2 6 ,7 3 9
1 0 ,0 2 5

50
50
50
50
50

23
17
41
18
15

11
6
13
7
11

2 ,9 9 3
1 ,3 8 6
6 ,3 2 0
2 , 177
1 ,9 5 1

5
2
9
3
3

1 ,8 8 1

374

2 , 192
579
4 ,2 4 7
1 ,4 3 2
1 ,5 7 5

50

(‘ )
(6)

(‘ )

C)

(‘ )
(6 )

(6)

( )

1 T h e G r e e n v i l l e S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f in e d b y th e B u r e a u o f th e B u d g e t t h r o u g h J a n u a r y 1 9 6 8 , c o n s i s t s o f G r e e n v i l l e a n d P i c k e n s C o u n t i e s .
T h e " w o r k e r s w ith in
s c o p e o f s t u d y " e s t i m a t e s s h o w n in t h is t a b l e p r o v i d e a r e a s o n a b l y a c c u r a t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f th e s i z e a n d c o m p o s i t i o n o f t h e l a b o r f o r c e in c lu d e d in th e s u r v e y .
T h e e s t i m a t e s a r e n o t in t e n d e d ,
h o w e v e r , to s e r v e a s a b a s i s o f c o m p a r i s o n w ith o t h e r e m p l o y m e n t in d e x e s f o r th e a r e a to m e a s u r e e m p l o y m e n t t r e n d s o r l e v e l s s i n c e (1 ) p la n n in g o f w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s t h e u s e o f
e s t a b l is h m e n t d a ta c o m p i l e d c o n s i d e r a b l y in a d v a n c e o f th e p a y r o l l p e r i o d s t u d ie d , a n d (2 ) s m a l l e s t a b l is h m e n t s a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .

2 The

1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification M a n u a l w a s us ed in classifying establishments by industry division.

3 I n c l u d e s a l l e s t a b l is h m e n t s w ith t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t a t o r a b o v e th e m in i m u m li m i t a t i o n .
A l l o u t le t s (w ith in th e a r e a ) o f c o m p a n i e s in s u c h in d u s t r ie s a s t r a d e , f i n a n c e , a u to r e p a i r s e r v i c e ,
a n d m o t io n p i c t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s i d e r e d a s 1 e s t a b l is h m e n t .
4 I n c lu d e s e x e c u t i v e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d o t h e r w o r k e r s e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s e p a r a t e p la n t a n d o f f i c e c a t e g o r i e s .
5 A b b r e v i a t e d t o " p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s " in t h e A - a n d B - s e r i e s t a b l e s .
T a x i c a b s a n d s e r v i c e s in c id e n t a l t o w a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n w e r e e x c l u d e d .
6 T h is in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n is r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " a n d " n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g " in th e S e r i e s A t a b l e s , a n d f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " in th e S e r i e s B t a b l e s .
S e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n o f
d a ta f o r t h is d i v i s i o n is n o t m a d e f o r o n e o r m o r e o f th e f o l lo w i n g r e a s o n s : (1 ) E m p lo y m e n t in th e d i v i s i o n is t o o s m a l l to p r o v i d e e n o u g h d a ta t o m e r i t s e p a r a t e s t u d y , (2 ) th e s a m p l e w a s n o t d e s ig n e d
i n i t i a l l y to p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , (3 ) r e s p o n s e w a s i n s u f f i c i e n t o r in a d e q u a t e t o p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , a n d (4 ) t h e r e is p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f in d iv id u a l e s t a b l is h m e n t d a ta .
7 W o r k e r s f r o m t h is e n t ir e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n a r e r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " a n d " n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g " in th e S e r i e s A t a b l e s , b u t f r o m th e r e a l e s t a t e p o r t i o n o n l v in
e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " in th e S e r i e s B t a b l e s .
S e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f d a t a f o r t h is d i v i s i o n is n o t m a d e f o r o n e o r m o r e o f th e r e a s o n s g iv e n in f o o t n o t e 6 a b o v e .
8 H o t e ls a n d m o t e l s ; l a u n d r i e s a n d o t h e r p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u t o m o b i le r e p a i r , r e n t a l , a n d p a r k in g ; m o t io n p i c t u r e s ; n o n p r o f i t m e m b e r s h i p o r g a n i z a t i o n s ( e x c l u d i n g r e l i g i o u f
a n d c h a r i t a b l e o r g a n i z a t i o n s ) ; a n d e n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .




A l m o s t f o u r - f i f t h s o f th e w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y in th e G r e e n v i l l e a r e a
w e r e e m p l o y e d in m a n u fa c t u r in g f i r m s .
T h e f o l lo w i n g p r e s e n t s th e m a j o r in d u s t r y g r o u p s
a n d s p e c i f i c in d u s t r i e s a s a p e r c e n t o f a l l m a n u fa c t u r in g :
In d u stry g ro u p s
T e x t i l e m i l l p r o d u c t s ____
A p p a r e l an d o th e r t e x tile
p r o d u c t s ---------------------------M a ch in e ry , e x cep t
e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t a n d
s u p p l i e s -----------------------------C h e m ic a ls and a llie d
p r o d u c t s ___________________

S p e c i f i c in d u s t r ie s
45
16
11
- 8
7

W e a v in g m i l l s , c o t t o n ____________ 17
W e a v in g m i l l s ,
s y n t h e t i c s ___________________________15
S p e c ia l in d u s t r y
m a c h i n e r y __________________________ 7
W o m e n 's a n d m i s s e s '
o u t e r w e a r __________________________ 7
E le c t r o n ic c o m p o n e n ts and
a c c e s s o r i e s ________________________ 5
F l o o r c o v e r i n g m i l l s ______________ 5
M e n 's a n d b o y s '
f u r n i s h i n g s ________________________ 5
P la s t ic s m a te r ia ls and
s y n t h e t i c s -------------------------------------- 5

T h is i n f o r m a t i o n is b a s e d o n e s t i m a t e s o f t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t d e r i v e d f r o m u n i v e r s e
m a te r ia ls c o m p ile d p r io r to a ctu a l s u r v e y .
P r o p o r t i o n s in v a r i o u s in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s m a y
d i f f e r f r o m p r o p o r t i o n s b a s e d on th e r e s u l t s o f th e s u r v e y a s s h o w n in t a b l e 1 a b o v e .

W a g e T r e n d s fo r S e le c te d O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s
P r e s e n t e d in ta b le 2 a r e in d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f ch a n ge
in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s o f o f f ic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and in d u s t r ia l n u r s e s ,
and in a v e r a g e e a r n in g s o f s e le c t e d p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .
T h e in d e x e s
a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g iv e n t i m e , e x p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t o f
w a g e s d u rin g the b a s e p e r io d .
S u b tr a c tin g 100 f r o m the in d e x y ie ld s
the p e r c e n ta g e c h a n g e in w a g e s f r o m the b a s e p e r io d to the d ate o f
the in d e x .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f ch a n g e o r i n c r e a s e r e la t e to w age
c h a n g e s b e tw e e n the in d ic a te d d a t e s .
A nnual r a te s o f in c r e a s e , w here
sh o w n , r e f l e c t the am o u n t o f i n c r e a s e fo r 12 m o n th s w hen the tim e
p e r io d b e tw e e n s u r v e y s w a s o th e r th an 12 m o n t h s . T h e s e c o m p u ta tio n s
w e r e b a s e d on the a s s u m p t io n th a t w a g e s i n c r e a s e d at a c o n s ta n t ra te
b e tw e e n s u r v e y s .
T h e s e e s t i m a t e s a r e m e a s u r e s o f ch a n g e in a v e r ­
a g e s f o r the a r e a ; th e y a r e not in ten d e d to m e a s u r e a v e r a g e pay
c h a n g e s in the e s t a b li s h m e n t s in the a r e a .

sh o w s the p e r c e n ta g e c h a n g e .
T h e in d e x i s the p ro d u c t o f m u ltip ly in g
the b a s e y e a r r e la t iv e (1 0 0 ) b y the r e la t iv e f o r the n ext s u c c e e d in g
y e a r and co n tin u in g to m u lt ip ly (c o m p o u n d ) e a c h y e a r 's r e la t iv e b y the
p r e v io u s y e a r 1s in d e x .
F o r o f f ic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and in d u s t r ia l n u r s e s , the w age
tr e n d s r e la t e to r e g u la r w e e k ly s a l a r i e s f o r the n o r m a l w o r k w e e k ,
e x c lu s iv e o f e a r n in g s f o r o v e r t i m e .
F o r p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s , th e y
m e a s u r e c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t -t i m e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , e x c lu d in g
p r e m iu m p ay f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and
la te s h i f t s .
T he p e r c e n t a g e s a r e b a s e d on d ata f o r s e le c t e d k e y o c c u ­
p a tio n s and in c lu d e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y im p o r ta n t jo b s w ithin
each grou p .
L im it a t io n s

o f D a ta

M e th o d o f C o m p u tin g
T h e in d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e ,
as m e a s u r e s
of
ch a n g e in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e in flu e n c e d b y :
(1) g e n e r a l s a l a r y and
w age c h a n g e s , (2) m e r i t o r o th e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e iv e d b y in d i­
v id u a l w o r k e r s w h ile in the s a m e jo b , and (3) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e
w a g e s due to c h a n g e s in the la b o r f o r c e r e s u ltin g f r o m la b o r tu r n ­
o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s io n s , f o r c e r e d u c t io n s , and c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r ­
tio n s o f w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d b y e s t a b li s h m e n t s w ith d iffe r e n t p ay l e v e l s .
C h a n g e s in the la b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in the
o c c u p a tio n a l a v e r a g e s w ithout a c tu a l w a g e c h a n g e s .
It i s c o n c e iv a b le
that e v e n th ou gh a ll e s t a b li s h m e n t s in an a r e a g a v e w age i n c r e a s e s ,
a v e r a g e w a g e s m a y h av e d e c lin e d b e c a u s e lo w e r -p a y in g e s t a b li s h m e n t s
e n te r e d the a r e a o r e x p a n d e d t h e ir w o r k f o r c e s .
S im ila r ly , w ages
m a y have r e m a in e d r e l a t iv e l y c o n s ta n t, y e t the a v e r a g e s f o r an a r e a
m a y h av e r i s e n c o n s id e r a b ly b e c a u s e h ig h e r -p a y in g e s t a b li s h m e n t s
e n te r e d the a r e a .

E a c h o f the fo llo w in g k ey o c c u p a tio n s w ith in an o c c u p a tio n a l
g r o u p w a s a s s ig n e d a c o n s ta n t w e ig h t b a s e d on its p r o p o r tio n a te e m ­
p lo y m e n t in the o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p :
Office clerical (m en and women):
Bookkeeping-machine
operators, class B
Clerks, accounting, classes
A and B
Clerks, file, classes
A , B, and C
Clerks, order
Clerks, payroll
Comptometer operators
Keypunch operators, classes
A and B
Messengers (office boys or
girls)

The
p lie d b y the
in the g r o u p
w e r e r e la t e d
gate f o r th e

Office clerical (men and women)— Skilled maintenance (men):
Continued
Carpenters
Electricians
Secretaries
Machinists
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Mechanics
Switchboard operators, classes
Mechanics (automotive)
Painters
A and B
Tabulating-machine operators,
Pipefitters
Tool and die makers
class B
Typists, classes A and B
Unskilled plant (men):
Industrial nurses (men and
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners
women):
Laborers, material handling
Nurses, industrial (registered)

T h e u s e o f c o n s ta n t e m p lo y m e n t w e ig h ts e li m in a t e s the e ffe c t
o f c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r t io n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h jo b i n ­
clu d e d in the d a ta .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f ch a n g e r e f le c t o n ly c h a n g e s
in a v e r a g e p a y f o r s t r a i g h t -t i m e h o u r s .
T h e y a r e not in flu e n c e d by
c h a n g e s in sta n d a rd w o r k s c h e d u le s , as su c h , o r b y p r e m iu m pay
fo r o v e r tim e .
W h e r e n e c e s s a r y , d a ta w e r e a d ju ste d to r e m o v e f r o m
the in d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f ch a n g e any s ig n ific a n t e ff e c t c a u s e d
b y c h a n g e s in the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .

a v e r a g e (m e a n ) e a r n in g s f o r e a c h o c c u p a tio n w e r e m u l t i ­
o c c u p a tio n a l w e ig h t, and the p r o d u c ts f o r a ll o c c u p a tio n s
w e r e to ta le d .
T h e a g g r e g a t e s fo r 2 c o n s e c u tiv e y e a r s
b y d iv id in g the a g g r e g a t e f o r the la t e r y e a r b y the a g g r e ­
e a r lie r y e a r .
T h e r e s u lta n t r e l a t i v e , l e s s 100 p e r c e n t,




5




Table 2.

Indexes of standard w eekly salaries and straight-tim e hourly earnings for selected occupational groups in

Greenville, S.C., M ay 1 9 7 0 and M ay 1971, and percents of increase for selected periods
A ll in d u s t r ie s
P e r io d

O ffic e
c le r ic a l
(m e n and
w om en)

In d u s tr ia l
nu r s e s
( m e n an d
w om en)

S k ille d
m a in te n a n ce
tra d es
(m e n )

M a n u f a c t u r in g
U n s k ille d
p la n t
w ork ers
(m e n )

O ffic e
c le r ic a l
(m e n and
w om en )

I n d u s tr ia l
n u rses
(m e n and
w om en)

S k ille d
m a in te n a n c e
tra d es
(m e n )

U n s k ille d
p la n t
w ork ers
(m e n )

I n d e x e s ( M a y 19 6 7 = 100)
M a y 1 9 7 0 -------------------------------------------------------------------------M a y 1 9 7 1 ________________________ _______ - ............................

119. 7
125. 6

1 2 1 .1
124. 4

123. 0
1 2 9 .4

122. 7
127. 7

120. 7
125. 8

121. 1
124. 4

123. 7
130. 6

120. 9
125. 6

123. 5
153. 5

130. 3
170. 1

132. 7
166. 7

I n d e x e s ( A p r i l 1 9 6 1 = 100
M a y 1 9 6 7 ----- ------------- ------------------------------------------------------M a y 1 9 7 1 --------------------------------------------------------------------------

128. 6
1 6 1 .6

123. 5
153. 5

129. 2
167. 1

129. 2
164. 9

126. 1
158. 7

P e r c e n ts o f in c r e a s e
M a y I9 6 0 to A p r i l 1961:
1 1 - m o n t h i n c r e a s e ------------------------------------------------A n n u a l r a t e o f i n c r e a s e ----------------------------------------

2. 7
2 .9

2. 1
2. 3

1. 5
1 .6

2. 0
2. 2

3. 7
4. 0

2. 1
2. 3

1 .8
2. 0

1. 7
1. 9

A p r i l 196 1 t o M a y 1 9 6 2 :
1 3 - m o n t h i n c r e a s e -------------------------- ----------------------A n n u a l r a t e o f i n c r e a s e ----------------------------------

3. 3
3. 0

. 7
. 7

5. 2
4. 8

4. 8
4. 4

2. 6
2. 4

. 7
. 7

5. 5
5. 1

4. 5
4. 1

1 9 6 3 -------- ------------- ----------------------1964 ----------- -------- — — 1 9 6 5 ---------------------------------- ---------1 9 6 6 - - _____ _________ __________
19 6 7 ---------------------- ----------------- --1 9 6 8 ----------------------------------------------1 9 6 9 - ---------------------------------------------1 9 7 0 ------------------------------------------------1 9 7 1 -------------------------------------------------

3. 3
4. 3
3. 1
6 .4
5. 3
6. 1
6. 1
6 .4
5. 0

4. 7
4. 5
3. 0
1. 8
6 .9
7. 0
5. 6
7. 2
2. 7

1. 1
4 .9
4. 4
4. 8
5. 8
6 .7
6. 8
8. 0
5. 2

1.
5.
4.
3.
5.
8.
7.
4.
4.

3. 5
3. 0
3. 4
6. 3
4. 9
6 .4
6. 5
6. 5
4. 2

4. 7
4. 5
3. 0
1. 8
6. 9
7. 0
5 .6
7. 2
2. 7

. 7
5. 2
4. 4
5. 6
5. 8
6. 4
7. 0
8. 6
5 .6

1. 6
6. 2
3. 7
7. 1
5. 9
6 .9
7. 0
5. 7
3 .9

M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay

1962
1 96 3
1964
1 96 5
1 96 6
196 7
1968
1969
1970

to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to

M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay

5
7
3
9
9
7
7
8
0

NOTE:
M o s t p r e v i o u s l y p u b l i s h e d i n d e x e s f o r th e G r e e n v i l l e a r e a u s e d A p r i l 19 6 1 a s t h e b a s e
p e r io d .
T h e y c a n b e c o n v e r t e d t o th e n e w b a s e p e r i o d b y d i v i d i n g t h e m b y t h e c o r r e s p o n d i n g i n d e x
n u m b e r s f o r M a y 1 96 7 o n t h e A p r i l 1961 b a s e p e r i o d a s s h o w n i n t h e t a b l e .
(T h e r e s u lt s h o u ld b e
m u l t i p l i e d b y 1 0 0 .)

7

A.

O ccu p atio n al earnings

T a b le A -1 .

O f f ic e o c c u p a tio n s — m e n a n d w o m e n

(A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and ea rn in g s fo r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is b y in d u s tr y d i v is i o n , G r e e n v il le , S. C . , M a y 1971)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight- time weekly earnings of—
$

Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of

s
60

weekly
Mean 2

M edian 2

Middle range2

(standard)

$
65

$
70

*
75

t

%

80

85

t
90

$

*
95

100

s
105

«
110

$
115

$

120

125

S

s
130

$

i

140

150

$
160

170

t

180

and
under
65

S
190
and

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

2

115

120

125

130

140

150

160

170

180

2

190 over

MEN
l'O

19

$

$

$

1

40.0 140.00 13'* '0

1

2

40 0
40.0 134. 0 1 1.00

3

2
5

,, AA

21

30

24

40.0

lO T .O O

107.00

51
31

39.0
38.5

85.50
79.00

84.50
75.00

109

40.0

88.00

84

40.0

85.00

87.00
102.50
84.50

72

1 in r\r • in
, An nn 100.50-124.00
Art C r|
30'0 107 00 105*00

*

03 "0

0'

1

*

1

WOMEN

BILLERS,

MA CHI NE

(BILLIN G

BILLERS,

MA C HI NE

(BOOKKEEPING

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE

3
8
8

73.00- 97.00
70.00- 92.00

8
8

*

5
7

OPERATOR S,

39.5
75

39.5

80.50- 96.50
89.50109.00
79 .5 0- 91.00

90.50
92.50

22

20

13

22

16

11

11

13
8
15

1 3
2

5
5

49
25

10

86.50- 98.00

18

37 - . 024
0
16

83.00- 95.50

92.00

25
22

11

^1

3

12

15

1
8

'

7

.

10
1

5

1

10
3
1
1

1
1

1
1

1
28

39.5

98.00 100.00

91.50- 10 7. 00

39.5
40.0
38.5

87.50
87.00
89.50

81.50- 94.00
81.00- 93.50
82.50- 98.50

254
161

ill cn ill nn
'0*0 1 1 0 5 0 110*50
39.0 112.50 113.00
108.00

*

m

N ON MA NUF ACT URI NG

*

84 .5 0- 10 3. 50

194
150
44
o L w K L 1A K 1LJ

30 5 97 00 95 00
40.0
93.50
94.50
39.5 102.00 100.00

37

ORDER

40.0
99.00 101.00
39.5 102.00 112.00

46
2^

CL ERKS*

-----------------

A ll w o r k e r s w e r e at $ 220 to $ 230.

S ee fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le s .




88.50
88.00
90.50

90 .5 0-115.50
91 .0 0-117.00
14

11

1

1

£

8

30
24

38
30
8

48
41

11

5

8
1

7
1

9

21
16
41

3
98 .0 0- 13 2. 00

3

1

5

1
22
14
8

11

12
12

*
2

18
18

*

-

4
1

6
8

1

39
ii

18

30
14

33

21

50

19

11

15
1

4

31

9

1

2

1

-

-

8

T a b le A -1 .

O f fic e o c c u p a tio n s — m e n a n d w o m e n ----- C o n tin u e d

(Average straight-time weekiy hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Greenville, S. C. , M a y 1971)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of

S

Average
weekly

60

workers

Mean 2

M edian 2

Middle range2

(standard)

S

$
65

$
70

75

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings oJ
$
$
t
$
$
*
S
$
$
$
t
$
105
110
85
90
95
100
80
130
140
150
115
120
125

SECRETARIE S

-

-

75

80

85

-

~

_

-

-

•“

3

-

-

-

CLA SS

$

105

110

115

120

1

2

7

4

3
1
2

6
4
2

11
1
10

12
10
2

11
8
3

5
4
1

4
2
2

13
4
9

12
6
6

-

11
10
1

6
5
l

9
8
1

13
8
5

12
7
5

ii
6
5

16
5
11

11
10
1

28
9
19

3
1
2

2
1
1

1
-

_

90

95

-

-

$

$

20

A

3 9 .5

1 3 9 .0 0

1 3 9 .5 0

81
AO

1 2 0 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0

1 0 9 .0 0 -1 3 6 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0 -1 3 1 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0 -1 3 8 .0 0

41

1 2 0 .0 0

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C -------------MA NU FA C TU R IN G --------------------NONMA NUF ACT URI NG -----------------

138
82
56

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 1 4 .5 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 2 2 .5 0

1 1 6 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0
1 2 3 .5 0

1 0 1 .5 0 -1 3 0 .0 0
9 4 .5 0 -1 2 5 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0 -1 3 6 .0 0

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S 0 -------------MA NU FA C TU R IN G ---------------------

176

3 9 .5

1 0 2 .0 0

1 0 4 .0 0

9 3 .5 0 -1 1 3 .0 0

3

-

4

118
58

4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 0 5 .5 0
9 5 .0 0

1 0 6 .0 0
9 6 .0 0

1 0 0 .5 0 -1 1 5 .5 0
8 5 .5 0 -1 0 9 .0 0

“
3

“

4

138
99

4 0 .0

9 6 .0 0

9 3 .5 0

-

2

4

4 0 .0
3 9 .0

9 5 .0 0

9 4 .0 0

2

4

9 9 .0 0

9 3 .5 0

8 3 .5 0 -1 0 4 .0 0
8 3 .0 0 -1 0 5 .0 0
8 6 .0 0 -1 0 3 .0 0

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 3 .5 0
1 0 5 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0

1 1 3 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0
1 2 1 .0 0

1 0 2 .0 0 -1 2 4 .0 0
9 7 .0 0 -1 1 2 .5 0
1 1 1 .0 0 -1 2 9 .5 0

_

N ON MA NUF ACT URI NG

-----------------

G EN ERA L

---------------------------------

M AN UF A CT U RI NG ------------------------------------------------N ON MA NUF ACT URI NG ----------------------------------------S T E N O G R A P H E R S , S E N I O R ----------------------------------MA NU FA C TU R IN G ------------------------------------------------N ON MA NUF A CT URI NG -----------------------------------------

39
94
40
54

B ----------

16

3 9 .0

8 6 .0 0

8 7 .5 0

7 7 .5 0 -

S W IT C HB O AR D O P E R A T O R - R E C E P T I O N I S T S MA NU FA C TU R IN G ------------------------------------------------N ON MA NUF ACT URI NG -----------------------------------------

94
61
33

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

9 1 .5 0
9 4 .0 0
8 6 .5 0

9 2 .0 0
9 3 .5 0
8 7 .5 0

8 6 .5 0 - 9 9 .0 0
9 0 .0 0 -1 0 2 .0 0
7 9 .0 0 - 9 6 .0 0

19

3 9 .0

1 0 0 .0 0

9 7 .0 0

125

130

140

150

160

170

180

190 over

CLASS

l

_

_

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

_

1

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

*

-

-

1

2

_

_

_
-

2
11
5
6

2
1
1

10
2
8

20
14
6

12
6
6

35
27
8

23
20
3

20
13
7

18
16
2

11
9
2

4
3
1

2
2
-

5
5

33
25
8

17
7
10

12
9
3

16
10
6

18
13
5

11
9
2

2
2

3
3
-

2
1

3
3
-

4
3

-

-

-

-

1

3
3
-

1

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

13
12
1

7
2

12
7
5

11
a
3

12
3
9

10

7

5

2

i

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

2

i

-

2
2

-

-

“

“

“

-

10

7

6
2
4

6

1

-

-

-

-

"

"

8
6
2

23
22
1

11
3
8

13
13
“

2
1
1

5
5

11

i
i

~

“

21
10

10

-

-

-

s

-

6

2

5

-

-

4

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
-

O PE RA TOR S,

B ------------------------------------------------------------------------

9 2 .0 0

8 5 .5 0 -1 0 8 .5 0

“

“

5

11

14

10

3

-

11

7 4 .5 0 7 9 .5 0 -

8 8 .0 0
9 1 .0 0

-

8

20

21

2

12

7 5 .5 0

7 1 .5 0 -

8 5 .5 0

8

18

9

9
8
1

4
4

7 7 .0 0

25
14
11

2
2

3 7 .5

13
9
4

1

4 0 .0

8 1 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

3 8 .0
3 8 .5

51
52

O

See footnotes at end of tables

“

8 1 .0 0
8 5 .5 0

66
103

o

B --------------------MA NU FA C TU R IN G --------------------N ON MA NUF A CT URI NG ----------------CLA SS

I
T
O
'

T R A N S C R I B IN G -M A C H I N E O PE RATOR S,
G ENERAL -------------------------------




9 7 .0 0

_

-

7
7

-

3

5
_

5
4
i

3
1

“

8 9 .0 0 -1 1 2 .5 0

O PE RATOR S,

TAB UL A T IN G-M ACH INE

TYPISTS,

190

CONTINUED

1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 8 .0 0
1 1 8 .5 0

CLASS

100

1

70

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

S W IT C HB O AR D

180

and

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B -------------M AN UF A CT U RI NG --------------------N ON MA NUF ACT URI NG -----------------

STE NOG RAPHERS,

170

CONTINUED

$
SE CH CT ARICSy

S

i

i

160

and
under
65

WOMEN

t

1

9

T a b le A - 2 .

P r o fe s s io n a l an d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s — m e n a n d w o m e n

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Greenville, S.C. , M a y 1971)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of
workers

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
t

*

%
Average

*

S

$

s

$

$

$

$

$

t

$

$

$

$

t

S

S

$

95

100

105

n o

115

120

125

130

135

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

90

Sex, occupation, and industry division

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

over

“

2
2

4
2

6
6

2

~

4
2

3

~

~

3
2

3
3

1
-

1
l

2
1

2
2

i

-

85
Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range2

(standard)

and
under

and

MEN

30
20

39.5
40.0

$
125.00
122.00

$
122.00
121.00

$
$
113.00-134.00
112.00-129.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B ------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------

26
17

39.5
40.0

182.00
179.00

189.00
187.50

164.50-201.00
164.00-197.50

CLASS

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS
MANUFACTURING
DRAFTSMEN, CLASS
MANUFACTURING

-----------------------

53

R -------------------------------------------

142

-------------------------------------------------

A

C

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3
2

_

no

128.00-174.00
119.50-177.00

-

“

58
51

40.0
40.0

126.50
128.50

122.50
123.50

112.00-141.00
115.50-140.00

1
~

3
2

147.00

146.00

115.00
115.00

109.00
109.00

102.00-132.50
102.00-132.50

O
o

21
21

_

_

5
5
_

_

15
15

See footnotes at end of tables.




4
3

2
2

6
3

6

8

7

4

3

1

2

4

8
6

22
13

14
3

13
13

17
17

3

i
i

4
4

4
4

12
12

-

9

5
3

1
1

8
5

4
4

9
9

7
7

1
1

1
1

9
9

2

4
4

-

-

-

-

~

8
8

~

12

1

1

1
1

2
2

1
1

1
1

9

HOMEN

40.0
40.0

4
2

8
5

142.00-149.50

N U R S E S , I N D U S T R I A L ( R E G I S T E R E D ) ------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------------

_

1

2
-

154.50-196.00

149.00
149.50

18

TECHNICIANS

2
1

3

172.50

152.50
155.00

--------------------------------

ELECTRONIC

3

18

177.50

40.0
40.0

o
o

DRAFTSMEN,

*

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S 8 -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------

1
1

3
3

4
4

4
4

1
1

1
1

2
2

-

_

“

-

“
1

“

~~

10

T a b le A - 3 .

O f f ic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s — m e n a n d w o m e n c o m b in e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Greenville, S. C. , M a y 1971)
Average

Occupation and industry division

OFFICE

Number
of

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard) (standard)
Weekly

OCCUPATIONS

BILLERS. MACHINE (BILLING
M A C H I N E ) ----------------------

Av rage

Occupation and industry division

OFFICE

24

40.0

$
107.00

OCCUPATIONS

MESSENGERS

(OFFICE

-

BOYS

Number
of

Weekly
hours *
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE

CONTINUED
AND

GIRLS)-

Average

Occupation and industry division

27

39.0

84.00

OCCUPATIONS

TABULATING-MACHINE
MANUFACTURING

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
M A C H I N E ) ---------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------

51

31

39.0
38.5

85.50
79.00

S E C R E T A R I E S ---------------------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------CLERKS,

FILE,

CLASS

C

109
25
BA

40.0
40.0
40.0

88.00
98.00
85.00

97
60
37

40.0
40.5
39.0

118.00
121.50
112.50

180
104
76

39.5
40.0
39.5

90.50
88.50
93.50

39.0

77.50

C L E R K S , P A Y R O L L ---MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING

79
50
29

39.5
39.5
39.5

98.50
96.00
102.00

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------

37
28

39.5
40.0

98.00
97.00

195
151

39.5
40.0
38.5

87. 50
87.00
89.50

See footnotes at end of tables.




64

25
18

UTILITIES

-------------------

109.50

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE

OPERATORS,

CLASS

B

--------------------------

20
NONMANUFACTURING
S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------

81
40
41

39.5
40.0
38.5

138
82
56

39.5
40.0
38.5

114.50
108.50
122.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S 0 --------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------

177
118
59

39.5
40.0
39.0

102.00
105.50
96.00

139
99
40

40.0

38.5
40.0
37.5

81.00
85.50
77.00

34
24

39.5
40.0

125.00
122.00

32
18

39.0
40.0

176.50
178.50

120.00
119.50
120.00

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C --------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------

----------------------

38.0

103
51
52

95.00

MANUFACTURING

--------------------------

’U

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------------COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B --------------------------------------------

1 vv.
.

39.5

----------------------

94
40
54

39.5

-----

16

39.0

86.00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSM A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

94
61
33

40.0
40.0
39.5

91.50
94.00
86.50

53

113.50
105.00
120.00

NONMANUFACTURING
SWITCHBOARD

OPERATORS,

CLASS

B

177.50

142
110
DRAFTSMEN, CLASS
MANUFACTURING
ELECTRONIC

C ------------------------------------------------

TECHNICIANS

-----------------

N U R S E S , I N D U S T R I A L ( R E G I S T E R E D ) ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------- 1

40.0
40.0

152.50

61
51

40.0
40.0

126.00
128.50

O

111.00
116.50
99.50

$
104.00
102.00

OPERATORS,

--------------------------------------------------

o

40.0
39.5
40.0

B

40.0

39.5
40.0

CONTINUED

18

*

74
51
23

CLASS

23

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

o
o

C L E R K S , O R D E R ------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS,
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING

111.50
110.50

TYPISTS,

30

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------

39.5
40.0

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

66
PUBLIC

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S B ------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------

416
254

-

Number
of

21
21

40.0
40.0

147.00
115.00
115.00

11

T a b le A -4 .

M a i n t e n a n c e a nd p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied

an area basis by industry division, Greenville, S.C., May 1971)

Hourly earnings^

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Number of workers
t
$
i
$
t
i
t
t
2 .0 0 2 .10 2.20 2 .3 0 2 . A0 2 .50 2 .6 0 2.70 2 .80
and
under
2 .1 0 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2 .6 0 2.70 2.80 2.90

1
Mean 2

M edian2

Middle range 2

receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
^
s
$
s
i
i
I
t
I
I
i
I
$
i
$
2 .9 0 3.00 3.10 3 .20 3.30 3.40 3 .50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3 .9 0 4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4 .2 0
and
3.00 3 .10 3.20 3,30 3,40 3.50 3 .60 3.70 3 .8 0 3*90 4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4 ,20 over

MN
E
C A R P E N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

56
54

$
2.81
2.80

$
2.83
2.83

$
$
2 .5 4 - 3.10
2 .5 3 - 3.07

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

161
160

3.29
3.29

3.19
3.20

2 .9 8 - 3.60
2 .9 8 - 3.59

E N G I N E E R S , S T A T I O N A R Y ------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------

31
24

3.20
3.14

3. 17
3.16

2 .8 3 - 3.56
2 .8 4 - 3.54

-

-

_

“

”

”

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

40
39

2.46
2.46

2.33
2.29

2 .2 1 - 2.92
2 .2 1 - 2.93

9
9

-

M A C H I N I S T S , M A I N T E N A N C E ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------

118
118

3.06
3.06

3.06
3.06

2 .8 6 - 3.28
2 .8 6 - 3.28

-

-

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
( M A I N T E N A N C E ) -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -------

75
23
52
40

3.24
3.18
3.26
3.18

3.26
3.25
3.45
2.83

2 .6 8 3 .0 3 2 .6 7 2 .6 4 -

378
375

3.32
3.32

3.33
3.33

3 .0 6 - 3.66
3 .0 5 - 3.66

-

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE •
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------

18
16

2.75
2.71

2.84
2.75

2 .5 9 - 3.01
2 .5 8 - 2.94

-

-

-

-

T O O L A N O D I E M A K E R S --M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------

64
64

3.91
3.91

3.96
3.96

3 .6 7 - 4.16
3 .6 7 - 4.16

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------

3.66
3.44
3.70
3.76

-

-




3
3
-

6
6

3
3

-

-

-

”

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

“

2
2

u
a

2
2

1

~

“

6
5
6
6

-

-

_

_

-

-

4
4

-

-

“

*

* Workers were distributed as follows: 3 at $4.20 to $4.30 and 8 at $4.40 to $4.50.
See footnotes at end of tables.

4
4

-

-

6
6

6
6

3

1
1

-

4

-

8
8

14
14

-

3
3

8
8

20
20

12
12

3
3

1
“

3
3

-

-

-

16
16

14
14

3
3
2

2
2
2

_
“

5
5

8
8

2
2

3
1

11
11

27
27

5
5

11
11

14
14

_

1

1
1

1

~

7
7

-

~

12
12

:

:

:

:

5
5

29
29

3
3

20
20

15
15

1
1

4
4
-

i

8
6
2

-

-

18
4
14
14

3

2
2

3
3

17
17

21
21

5
5

57
57

1
1

3
3

3
3

_

4
4

2
2

11
11

8

10
10

4
4

-

7

1

~

:

:

:
-

5

-

-

1
1

-

:

2
2

3
3

1

“

_

6
6

-

7

13
13

"

8

_
-

1
“

_

1

:
2
2

-

_

_

-

-

5
5

39
39

_

-

16
2
14
5

43
43

*

-

-

-

5
5
5

2
2
2

40
40

7
6

4
4

_

7

10
10

*11
11

4
2

-

-

-

*

-

i
i
50
48

10
10

1
1

5
5

-

-

29
29

7
7

8
8

4
4

-

-

6
6

-

_

29
29

-

7
7

2
2

9
9

7

12

T a b le A -5 .

C u s t o d i a l an d m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Greenville, S.C., May 1971)
H
ourly earnings3

M
iddle range 2

$

$

(

$

*

$

$

i

$

1 .80

1.90

2 .00

2 .10

2.20

2 .30

2 . A0

2 .50

2.60

2.70

2.80

3

00

3.20

3. A 0

3.60

3.80

4.00

A . 20

4.40

A . 60

A . 80

1.80

1 .90

2.00

2 .10

2 .20

2.30

2 .A0

2.50

2

2.70

2.80

3.00

3 20

3. A 0

3.60

3.80

A . 20

4.40

A . 60

o
C
O
>
r

M
edian2

t

1.70

5.00

31

M c
ean

%

1 .60

o
o
>
#
■

Number of workers receiving straight-time hour y earnings of—
$
$
$
t
$
$
s
$
t
$
$

$

1.70

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N L
of
w
orkers

208

30

12

25
19

12
11

10
10

12

17

11

10

50

29

AA

23

3

_

_

2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

12

5

11

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

-

12

1

11

-

-

1

“

-

-

-

-

3
3

2
2

-

18
18

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

*

*

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

_

1

_

_

-

_

-

3

-

“

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
9

1
1

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

~

-

8
8

3
3
1

-

_
-

220
-

-

-

-

220
220

and
under
60

MEN
$

$
370
128

$

<:.u

$

Z.U 1

22
22

12

10
10

1

WATCHMEN
11U

LABORERS,

PORTERS,

MATERIAL

NONMANUFACTURING

AND

CLEANERS

HANDLING

----

----------

---------------------

531

1.93

162

JANITORS,

30

J

1•

515
A20
95

2.17

2.08

2.57

2.57

1

1.89

1.73-

108

77

L. 1

A8

37

1.9A-

2.A1

19

7

2.A5-

2.82

3

3

•

*

2.10

89
82

76
23

A 1
1

144

57

-

4

___

29
-

18

4

7A
67
7

8
8

11

16

12

49

37

17

-

13

2A

15

2A

13
13

1

C

*
*

12
12

10
10

1
1

9
9

7
3

1A
1A

28
28

15
15

-

_

1

-

3

-

-

-

6

10

11

1

1

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

3

* *

P A C K E R S , S H I P P I N G -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------

8

1A3
139

2.31
2.31

2.36
2.38

1.891.89-

2.52
2.53

2A
2A

-

59

2.69

2.55-

2.94

_

_

---------------------

29

2.70
2.69
2.71

2.81

2.56-

2.88

S H I P P I N G C L E R K S --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------

2A
21

2.85
2.93

2.97
2.99

2.662.75-

3.12
3.13

A5

2.70

2.76

2.A9-

589
187
A02
2A2

3.28
2.A5
3.67
4.60

2.66
2.A6
A . 81
4.85

2.222.252.22A . 82-

A . 83
2.65
A . 85
A . 87

65
60

2.16

T R U C K D R I V E R S , M E D I U M ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
A N D I N C L U D I N G A T O N S ) --------------

207

2.50

2.21

2.0A-

2.59

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

132
A2

2.65
3.A9

2.20
2.90

2.0A2.25-

3.01
A . 85

-

T R UC KO RI VE RS , HE AV Y (OVER A TONS,
T R A I L E R T Y P E ) -------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------

215
55
160

A.2A
2.85
A . 72

A . 83
2.92
A . 85

3.082.61A.82-

A . 86
3.02
A . 87

-

--------------

31A

2.3A

2.26

2.07-

2.61

1

9

3

~

16
5
ii

i

_

4
4

1
1

5
5

2.91

RECEIVING

CLERKS

--------------------------

NONMANUFACTURING

i

TRUCKDRIVERS,

TRUCKERS,

POWER

LIGHT

12
~

3
2
1

22
13
9

25
6
19

61

7
5A

22
12
10
-

63
15
48
21

13
13
-

(FORKLIFT)

AND

CLEANERS

See footnotes at end of tables.




35
23
12

-

2.21

ii
11
-

7
7

-

34
20
1A

15
6
9

-

_

~

_
-

1
-

2
-

_
-

1
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

20

~

-

-

-

-

“

-

20
20

-

150

15
27

1

1

3

2

LA

18

A5

20

36

3

2

17

3

7

7

9

-

3

-

2

16

38
-

10
-

21
21

-

-

5

-

-

7

9

-

-

“

-

-

*

3
i

2
2

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

AJ

i

-

i

8
8

93

22

8
8

12

-

-

-----

120
95
25

1.81
1.82
1.7A

1.79
1.79
1.69

1.721.7A1.65-

1.90
1.95
1.85

20
1A

44
A2

27
20

-

44
44

2A

2

2

WOMEN
PORTERS,

44
44
-

(UNDER

'

JANITORS,

-

8

'

TRUCKDRIVERS
-----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

-

_

5

20

11

ii
18
8

8
8

~

8
8

-

-

27
20
7

6
6

-

-

-

*

-

5

33

36

3

-

i

5

33

1
-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

~
2

-

"

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

2

-

-

-

150

-

13

B.

E s ta b lis h m e n t practices and su p p lem en tary w a g e provisions

T a b le

B -1 .

M in im u m

en tra n c e

s a la rie s fo r w o m e n

o ffic e w o rk e r s

(Distribution of establishments studied in all industries and in industry divisions by minimum entrance salary for selected categories
of inexperienced women office w ork ers, G reenville, S .C . , May 1971)
Inexperienced typists
Manufacturing
Minimum weekly straight-tim e sa la ry4

All
industries

Other inexperienced cle rica l workers
Nonmanufacturing

All
schedules

40

All
schedules

Establishments studied-------------------------------------------------

106

58

XXX

48

Establishments having a specified minimum_______________

30

17

16

13

1
6
3

_

_

2
3
4
1
1
-

1
3
1
1

$60.00
$62.50
$65.00
$67.50
$70.00
$72.50
$75.00
$77.50
$80.00
$82.50
$85. 00
$87.50
$90.00

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$62.50________________________________
$65. 00------------------------------------------------$67. 50________________________________
$70.00------------------------------------------------$72. 50------------------------------------------------$75. 00________________________________
$77.50________________________________
$80.00------------------------------------------------$82.50------------------------------------------------$85.00------------------------------------------------$87. 50________________________________
$90.00------------------------------------------------$92.50________________________________

4
1
1
1
1

3
2
2
3
4
1
1
1
-

Establishments having no specified m inim um --------------------

11

5

XXX

6

Establishments which did not employ workers
in this category------------------------------------------------------------------

65

36

XXX

29

See footnotes at end of tables.




-

3
3
6

-

3
2

-

2
3
1
_
1

Manufacturing
All
industries

Base i on standard weekly hou rs6 of—

All
schedules

40

Nonmanufacturing

Based on standard weekly hou rs6 of—
40

All
schedules

40

XXX

106

58

XXX

48

XXX

7

46

28

27

18

12

5
3

1
4
2

3
1

_

_

_

4
3
7

2

2

_

_

_

2
_
_
1
1
_
1
_
1
1

1
9
5
6
3
9

_

7
1
3
1
1

5
3
_
4
3
7
_
3
1
1
1
-

XXX

18

7

XXX

11

XXX

XXX

42

23

XXX

19

XXX

_

2

1

_

_

_

3
1
1

4

2

_

_
_

-

2
_
1

_

2
1




T a b le B -2 .

S h ift differentials

(L a t e -s h ift p a y p r o v is io n s f o r m a n u fa ctu rin g plant w o r k e r s b y typ e and am ount o f p a y d iffe r e n t ia l,
G r e e n v ille , S .C ., M ay 1971)
^All plant w o r k e r s in m a n u fa c tu r in g = 100 p e rc e n t)
P e r c e n t o f m a n u fa ctu rin g plant w o r k e r s ---In e s ta b lis h m e n ts having p r o v is io n s 7
fo r la te sh ifts

L a t e -s h ift pay p r o v is io n

A c tu a lly w ork in g on late sh ifts

S e co n d sh ift

T h ir d o r oth e r
sh ift

S e co n d sh ift

T h ir d o r oth er
sh ift

T o ta l___________________________________________

79.2

75.7

19.4

13.3

------

45.9

7.5

12.8

1.4

P a y d iffe r e n t ia l fo r w o r k on la te s h ift --------------

33.3

68.2

6.6

11.9

U n ifo rm c e n ts (p e r h o u r ) --------------------------

28.8

63.3

6.2

11.6

5 c e n t s ___________________________________
8 c e n t s ___________________________________
10 c e n t s __________________________________
12 c e n t s __________________________________
14 c e n t s __________________________________
15 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------18% c e n t s -----------------------------------------------

12.1
3.9
5.4
1.8
3.9
1.7

4 0 .4
1.0
9.9
2.6
3.9
3.9
1.7

2.1
1.1
1.3
.5
.3
.9

9.3
.1
.6
.5

____

4.5

4.9

.5

.3

4 p e r c e n t ________________________________
5 p e r c e n t ------------------- ----------------------------7V2 p e r c e n t _____________________________

2.8
.4
1.3

2.8
2.1

.5
-

.1
.3

N o p a y d iffe r e n t ia l f o r w o r k on la te sh ift

T y p e and am oun t o f d iffe r e n t ia l:

U n ifo rm p e r c e n t a g e _____ __________

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le s .

1.0
(8)
-

15

Table B-3.

Scheduled weekly hours

(Percent distribution of plant and office w orkers in all industries and in industry divisions by scheduled weekly hours
of firs t-s h ift w ork ers, G reenville, S.C ., May 1971)
Plant workers

Office workers

Weekly hours
A ll industries

A ll w ork ers_________________

100

Manufacturing

100

Public utilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

5

-

-

.

29

97
1

63
8

_

_

Public utilities

100

1
36 V4 h o u rs ---------------------------------------------------------

1
37V2 h o u rs ______________________
40 h ou rs _________________________
Over 40 and under 48 hours_____
48 h ou rs _________________________
50 h ou rs --------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of tables.




1

1
70
2
21
2

2

_

7

72
2
23
1

93

80
2
_

_
_

7

16

Table B-4.

Paid holidays

(P ercen t distribution of plant and office w orkers in all industries and in industry divisions by number of paid holidays provided annually, G reenville, S.C ., May 1971)
Plant workers

O ffice workers

Item
All industries

Manufacturing

Public utilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

Public utilities

A ll w orkers--------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid h olid ays---------------------------------------------------W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid h olid ays------------------------------------ *---------

89

88

100

93

87

100

11

12

7

13

1
6
6
9
36
(9)
8
7
15
(!)
(9)

2
5
7
11
32
“
8
8
14
-

Number of days
1 holiday________________________________________
2 holid a ys----------------------------------------------------------3 h olid a ys----------------------------------------------------------4 h olid ays----------------------------------------------------------5 h olid a ys----------------------------------------------------------5 holidays plus 2 half d a y s_____________________
6 h olid ays-----------------------------------------------------------7 h olid ays----------------------------------------------------------8 h olid ays----------------------------------------------------------9 h olid a ys----------------------------------------------------------10 holidays----------------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

7
~
3
3
8
~
68
11

1
2
4
45
( 9)
8
14
18
1
(9)

2
3
7
36
9
10
21
“

-

8
4
7
1
73
7
-

Total holiday tim e 1
0
10 days__________________________________________
9 days or m o r e --------------------------------------------------8 days or m o r e --------------------------------------------------7 days or m o r e _________________________________
6 days or m o r e --------------------------------------------------5 days or m o r e --------------------------------------------------4 days or m o r e _________________________________
3 days or m o r e _________________________________
2 days or m o r e _________________________________
1 day or m ore___________________________________

See footnotes at end of tables.




(9)
1
16
22
30
66
76
82
88
89

-

14
22
30
63
73
81
86
88

-

11
79
79
90
93
93
100
100
100

( 9)
1
19
33
41
86
90
92
93
93

-

21
32
40
76
83
86
87
87

_

7
79
79
88
92
92
100
100
100

17

Table B-5.

Paid vacations

(P ercent distribution of plant and office w orkers in all industries and in industry divisions by vacation pay p rov ision s, G reenville, S. C. , May 1971)
Plant workers
Vacation policy
A ll industries
A ll w ork ers-------------------------------------------------

Manufacturing

O ffice workers
Public utilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

Public utilities

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
44
56

100
33
67

100
100

-

100
93
7

100
86
14

100
100

-

-

-

-

-

-

27
10
(9)

28
8
-

_

38
3
-

8
39
6
4

12
30
11
(9)

_
37
4
-

90
10

91
9

80
20

37
63

44
56

79
21

79
1
21

86
1
13

31
69

16
84

24

7

76

93

62
7
31

70
8
22

-

7

8

13

-

-

93

92

87

100

61
7
32
-

68
8
24
'

-

-

8

12

-

-

93
-

89
3

82
6

100
-

9
2
82
(’ >
7

8
2
84
7

7
93
-

5
(9)
86
1
8

7
82
11

9
1
62
3
20
4

8
2
67
4
15
5

5
46
i
44
4

7
53
1
36
4

Method of payment
W orkers in establishments providing
paid vacations--------------------------------------------------Length -of-tim e paym ent------------------------------Percentage payment_________________________
W orkers in establishments providing
no paid vacations______________________________

-

Amount of vacation pay 1
1
A fter 6 months of serv ice
Under 1 week-----------------------------------------------------1 week__________________________________________
Over 1 and under 2 w eek s---------------------------------2 w eek s------------------------------------------- ----------------A fter 1 year of serv ice
1 week__________________________________________
2 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------After 2 years of serv ice
1 week----------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 w eek s--------------------------------2 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------

-

-

A fter 3 years of service
1 week----------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 w eek s--------------------------------2 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------

-

_

A fter 4 years of service
1 week__________________________________________
Over 1 and under 2 w eek s---------------------------------2 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------3 w eek s_________________________________________

7

_

A fter 5 years of s ervice
1 week__________________________________________
Over 1 and under 2 w eek s--------------------------------2 w eek s_________________________________________
Over 2 and under 3 w eek s--------------------------------3 weeks - ______________________________________

-

_
100

-

A fter 10 years of serv ice
1 week----------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 w eek s---------------------------------2 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 w eek s--------------------------------3 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------4 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------See footnotes at end of tables.




7

-

8
85
-

_
14
86
-

18

T a b le

B -5 .

P a id

v a c a t i o n s ----- C o n t i n u e d

(P ercent distribution of plant and office w orkers in all industries and in industry divisions by vacation pay p rov ision s, G reenville, S. C. , May 1971)
Plant workers
Vacation policy

A ll industries

Manufacturing

O ffice workers
Public utilities

All industries

Manufacturing

Public utilities

Amount of vacation pay 1 — Continued
1
A fter 12 years of s ervice
1 week__________________________________________
Over 1 and under 2 w eek s______________________
2 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ---------------------------------3 w eek s_________________________________________
Over 3 and under 4 w eek s---------------------------------4 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------

8
2
66
4
16

9
1
56
2
22
(9)
9

8
2
62
2
17
9

9
1
55
2
15
2
11
6

8
2
61
2
13
1
7
7

3
8
82
-

32
1
26
31
5

39
1
30
14
9

_
9
9
82
-

9
1
55
2
10
14
8

8
2
61
2
8
12
8

7
3
57
33

5
32
1
24
30
9

7
39
1
26
16
11

9
9
52
29

9
1
55
2
10
14
5
2

8
2
61
2
8
12
5
3

7
3
57
33

5
32
1
24
30
8
1

7
39
1
26
16
9
2

-

5

7

_

9
1
62
3
20
(9)
4

5

-

7

-

8

41
5
45
4

-

85
-

_
9

-

53
1
36
-

4

-

91
-

-

After 15 years o f serv ice
1 week-----------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 w eek s ______________________
2 w eek s --------------------------------------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 w eek s---------------------------------3 w eek s --------------------------------------------------------------Over 3 and under 4 w eek s ---------------------------------4 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------

7
-

5
-

60
8
25

7
-

32
1
52

39
1
39

-

-

10

14

_
9
-

77
_
14

After 20 years of s ervice
1 week-----------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 \veeks---------------------------------2 w eek s_________________________________________
Over 2 and under 3 w eek s ---------------------------------3 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------Over 3 and under 4 w eek s---------------------------------4 w eek s_________________________________________
5 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------

7
-

5
-

7
-

_

A fter 25 years o f serv ice
1 week-----------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 w eek s---------------------------------2 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 w eek s---------------------------------3 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------4 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------5 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------

.

Maximum vacation available*
1 week----------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 w eek s ---------------------------------2 w eek s _________________________________________
Over 2 and under 3 w eek s______________________
3 w eek s_________________________________________
4 weeks __ ---------------------------------------------------5 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------------6 w eek s ---------------------------------------------------------------

* Estimates of provisions for 30 years of serv ice are identical.
See footnotes at end of tables.




_

9
9
52
29

19

T a b le B - 6 .

H e a lth , in s u ra n c e , and p e n s io n

p la n s

(P ercent of plant and office w orkers in all industries and in industry divisions em ployed in establishm ents providing
health, insurance, or pension benefits, G reenville, S.C ., May 1971)
Plant workers
Type of benefit and
financing 1
2

A ll industries

Manufacturing

Office workers
Public utilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

Public utilities

A ll w ork ers--------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

rkers in establishm ents providing at
east 1 of the benefits shown b elow ----------------

99

100

100

100

100

100

Life insu ra n ce----------------------------------------------Noncontributory p lan s___________________
A ccidental death and dism em berm ent
insurance----------------------------------------------------N oncontributory p lan s-------------------- --------Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both 13------------------------------------

94
34

93
35

100
78

99
48

98
45

100
74

51
20

49
18

65
62

59
33

46
28

68
61

62

58

85

76

64

74

Sickness and accident insurance-------------N oncontributory p lan s--------------- --------Sick leave (full pay and no
waiting period)---------------------------------------Sick leave (partial pay or
waiting period )----------------------------------------

55
21

57
23

25
21

54
21

54
23

20
12

7

2

23

45

36

32

4

-

41

6

-

34

Hospitalization insurance-----------------------------N oncontributory p lan s-----------------------------Surgical insurance__________________________
N oncontributory p lan s-----------------------------M edical in surance----------------------------------------N oncontributory p la n s-----------------------------M ajor m edical insu ra n ce— -------------- -------- —
N oncontributory p lan s-----------------------------Dental insu ra n ce------------------------------------------N oncontributory p lan s-----------------------------Retirem ent pension__________________________
N oncontributory p lan s------------------------------

94
36
93
36
73
24
81
25
2
1
62
58

94
36
93
36
71
23
80
25

100
97
100
97
84
81
82
79
21
21
82
82

99
43
99
43
86
34
94
38
2

98
43
98
43
83
31
90
33

100
93
100
93
92
84
95
87
7
7
66
66

See footnotes at end of tables.




-

63
61

C)

68
56

-

68
53

20
F o o tn o te s

A l l o f t h e s e s ta n d a r d f o o t n o t e s m a y n o t a p p ly to th is b u lle t in .

1 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o r k w e e k f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e o f p a y f o r o v e r t i m e at
r e g u la r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
2 T h e m e a n is c o m p u t e d f o r e a c h j o b b y t o ta lin g the e a r n i n g s o f a ll w o r k e r s and d iv id in g b y the n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s . T h e m e d i a n d e s ig n a t e s
p o s i t i o n — h a lf o f the e m p l o y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e than the ra te s h o w n ; h a lf r e c e i v e l e s s than the ra te sh o w n . T h e m id d le r a n g e is d e fin e d b y
2 r a t e s o f p a y ; a f o u r t h o f the w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s than th e l o w e r o f t h e s e r a t e s and a f o u r t h e a r n m o r e than th e h i g h e r r a t e .
3 E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and late sh ifts.
4 T h e s e s a l a r i e s r e la t e to f o r m a l l y e s t a b lis h e d m i n i m u m s ta r tin g (h irin g ) r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s that a r e p a id f o r s ta n d a r d
w orkw eeks.
5 E x c lu d e s w o r k e r s in s u b c l e r i c a l jo b s su ch as m e s s e n g e r o r o f f i c e g ir l.
6 D a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k s c o m b i n e d , an d f o r the m o s t c o m m o n s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k s r e p o r t e d .
7 I n c lu d e s a ll p la n t w o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s c u r r e n t l y o p e r a t i n g la te s h i f t s , and e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w h o s e f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s c o v e r la te
s h ift s , e v e n th o u g h the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w e r e n ot c u r r e n t l y o p e r a t in g la t e s h ifts .
8 L e s s than 0.0 5 p e r c e n t .
9 L e s s than 0 .5 p e r c e n t .
10 A l l c o m b i n a t i o n s o f f u l l a n d h a l f d a y s t h a t a d d t o t h e s a m e a m o u n t a r e c o m b i n e d ; f o r e x a m p l e , t h e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g a t o t a l
o f 9 d a y s in c lu d e s t h o s e w ith 9 fu ll d a y s and no h a lf d a y s , 8 fu ll d a y s and 2 h a lf d a y s , 7 fu ll d a y s and 4 h a lf d a y s , and s o on. P r o p o r t i o n s then
w e r e cum u lated .
1 I n c lu d e s p a y m e n t s o t h e r than " l e n g t h o f t i m e , " s u c h as p e r c e n t a g e o f a n n u al e a r n in g s o r f l a t - s u m p a y m e n t s , c o n v e r t e d to an e q u iv a le n t
1
tim e b a s is ; fo r e x a m p le , a p a y m en t o f 2 p e rc e n t of annual e a rn in g s w a s c o n s id e r e d as 1 w e e k 's pay. P e r io d s o f s e r v ic e w e r e ch o s e n a r b it r a r ily
a n d d o n o t n e c e s s a r i l y r e f l e c t t h e i n d i v i d u a l p r o v i s i o n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n . F o r e x a m p l e , t h e c h a n g e s i n p r o p o r t i o n s i n d i c a t e d a t 10 y e a r s ' s e r v i c e
i n c l u d e c h a n g e s i n p r o v i s i o n s o c c u r r i n g b e t w e e n 5 a n d 10 y e a r s . E s t i m a t e s a r e c u m u l a t i v e . T h u s , t h e p r o p o r t i o n e l i g i b l e f o r 3 w e e k s ' p a y o r
m o r e a f t e r 10 y e a r s i n c l u d e s t h o s e e l i g i b l e f o r 3 w e e k s ' p a y o r m o r e a f t e r f e w e r y e a r s o f s e r v i c e .
12 E s t i m a t e s l i s t e d a f t e r t y p e o f b e n e f i t a r e f o r a l l p l a n s f o r w h i c h a t l e a s t a p a r t o f t h e c o s t i s b o r n e b y t h e e m p l o y e r . " N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y
p la n s " in c lu d e o n ly t h o s e p la n s fin a n c e d e n t i r e l y b y the e m p l o y e r . E x c l u d e d a r e l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d p la n s , s u c h a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n s a t i o n , s o c i a l
s e c u r i t y , and r a i l r o a d r e t ir e m e n t .
1 U n d u p lica ted tota l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a ccid e n t in s u r a n c e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly b e lo w . S ick le a v e plan s a r e
3
l i m i t e d to t h o s e w h ic h d e f i n i t e l y e s t a b l i s h at l e a s t th e m i n i m u m n u m b e r o f d a y s ' p a y that c a n b e e x p e c t e d b y e a c h e m p l o y e e . I n f o r m a l s i c k l e a v e
a l l o w a n c e s d e t e r m i n e d o n an in d iv id u a l b a s i s a r e e x c lu d e d .




A p p e n d ix .

O c c u p a tio n a l D e s c r ip tio n s

The prim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the B ureau's wage surveys is to a ssist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations workers who are em ployed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and
from area to area. This perm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representing com parable job content. Because of this emphasis on
interestablishm ent and interarea com parability of occupational content, the B ureau's job descriptions m ay differ significantly from those in use in
individual establishm ents or those prepared fo r other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field econom ists are instructed
to exclude working sup ervisors; apprentices; lea rn ers; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-tim e, tem porary, and probationary w orkers.

O F F IC E
CLERK, ACCOUNTING— Continued

BILLER, MACHINE
P rep a res statements, b ills, and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or e le ctro m atic typewriter. May also keep record s as to billings or shipping charges or p erform other
c le rica l work incidental to billing operations. F or wage study purposes, b ille rs , machine, are
cla ssified by type of machine, as follow s;

Positions are cla ssified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A . Under general supervision, perform s accounting cle rica l operations which
require the application of experience and judgment, fo r exam ple, cle rica lly processin g co m ­
plicated or nonrepetitive accounting transactions, selecting among a substantial variety of
p rescrib ed accounting codes and classification s, or tracing transactions through previous
accounting actions to determine source of d iscrepan cies. May be assisted by one or m ore
class B accounting clerks.

B iller, machine (billing m achine). Uses a special billing machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
F ish er, Burroughs, e tc., which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills
and invoices from cu stom ers' purchase ord ers, internally prepared ord e rs, shipping m em o­
randums, etc. Usually involves application of predeterm ined discounts and shipping charges,
and entry of n ecessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing machine,
and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine. The operation usually involves
a large number of carbon copies of the b ill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold
machine.

Class B . Under close supervision, following detailed instructions and standardized p r o ­
cedures, p erform s one or m ore routine accounting cle rica l operations, such as posting to
led gers, cards, or worksheets where identification of item s and locations of postings are
cle a rly indicated; checking accu racy and com pleteness of standardized and repetitive records
or accounting documents; and coding documents using a few p rescrib ed accounting codes.

B iller, machine (bookkeeping m achine). Uses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand, Elliott
F ish er, Remington Rand, e tc., which may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare
cu stom ers' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the sim ulta­
neous entry of figures on cu stom ers' ledger record . The machine automatically accumulates
figures on a number of v ertica l colum ns and com putes, and usually prints automatically the
debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform
and standard types of sales and credit slips.

CLERK, FILE
Class A . In an established filing system containing a number of varied subject matter
file s, cla ssifie s and indexes file m aterial such as correspon den ce, reports, technical docu­
m ents, etc. May also file this m aterial. May keep record s of various types in conjunction
with the file s. May lead a sm all group of low er level file clerks.
Class B . Sorts, cod es, and files unclassified m aterial by sim ple (subject matter) head­
ings or partly cla ssified m aterial by finer subheadings. P repares sim ple related index and
c r o s s -re fe re n c e aids. As requested, locates clea rly identified m aterial in files and forw ards
m aterial.
May perform related cle rica l tasks required to maintain and service files.

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott F ish er, Sundstrand, Burroughs,
National Cash R egister, with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business
transactions.

Class C . P erfo rm s routine filing of m aterial that has already been cla ssified or which
is easily cla ssified in a sim ple serial cla ssification system (e.g ., alphabetical, chronological,
or num erical). As requested, locates readily available m aterial in files and forw ards m a­
terial; and may fill out withdrawal charge. P erfo rm s sim ple cle rica l and manual tasks re ­
quired to maintain and s ervice files.

Class A . Keeps a set of record s requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic
bookkeeping p rin cip les, and fam iliarity with the structure of the particular accounting system
used. Determ ines p roper record s and distribution of debit and credit item s to be used in each
phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records
by hand.
Class B. Keeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections of a set of record s usually
requiring little knowledge of b asic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable,
p ayroll, cu stom ers' accounts (not including a sim ple type of billing described under b ille r,
m achine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory con trol, etc. May check or assist
in preparation of trial balances and prepare con trol sheets fo r the accounting department.

CLERK, ORDER

CLERK, ACCOUNTING
P erform s one or m ore accounting c le rica l tasks such as posting to registers and ledgers;
reconcilin g bank accounts; verifying the internal con sistency, com pleteness, and mathematical
accu racy of accounting docum ents; assigning p rescrib ed accounting distribution codes; examining
and verifying for cle rica l accu racy various types of rep orts, lists, calculations, posting, etc.;
or preparing sim ple or assisting in preparing m ore com plicated journal vouchers. May work
in either a manual or automated accounting system .




CLERK, PAYROLL
Computes wages of company em ployees and enters the necessary data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve; Calculating w ork ers' earnings based on tim e or production re co rd s; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing inform ation such as w o rk e r's name, working
days, tim e, rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and
a ssist paym aster in making up and distributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.

The work requires a knowledge of cle rica l methods and office p ra ctices and procedures
which relates to the cle rica l p rocessin g and recording of transactions and accounting information.
With experience, the w orker typically b ecom es fam iliar with the bookkeeping and accounting term s
and p rocedu res used in the assigned w ork, but is not required to have a knowledge of the form al
principles of bookkeeping and accounting.

NOTE;

R eceives cu stom ers' ord ers for m aterial or m erchandise by m ail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the follow ing: Quoting p rice s to cu stom ers; making out an order
sheet listing the item s to make up the ord er; checking p rices and quantities of item s on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be filled. May check with credit
department to determ ine credit rating of custom er, acknowledge receipt of ord ers from custom ers,
follow up orders to see that they have been filled, keep file of ord ers received, and check shipping
invoices with original ord ers.

Since the last survey in this area, the Bureau has discontinued collecting data for o ile rs and plum bers.

21

22
COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
P rim a ry duty is to operate a Com ptom eter to p erform mathematical computations. This
job is not to be confused with that of statistical or other type of clerk, which may involve fr e ­
quent use of a Comptom eter but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to perform ance of
other duties.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Operates a keypunch machine to record or verify alphabetic and/or num eric data on
tabulating cards or on tape.
Positions are cla ssified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A . Work requires the application of experience and judgment in selecting p r o c e ­
dures to be followed and in searching for, interpreting, selecting, or coding item s to be
keypunched from a variety of source documents. On occasion may also p erform som e routine
keypunch work. May train inexperienced keypunch operators.
Class B . Work is routine and repetitive. Under close supervision or following specific
procedures or instructions, works from various standardized source, documents which have
been coded, and follow s specified procedu res which have been p rescrib ed in detail and require
little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. Refers to supervisor
problem s arising from erroneous item s or codes or m issing information.
MESSENGER (Office Boy or Girl)
P erform s various routine duties such as running errands, operating minor o ffice m a­
chines such as sealers or m ailers, opening and distributing m ail, and other minor cle rica l work.
Exclude positions that require operation of a m otor vehicle as a significant duty.
SECRETARY

Class B
a. S ecretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
all, fewer than 100 p erson s; or
b. S ecretary to a corporate o ffice r (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5, 000 p e rso n s; or
c. S ecretary to the head (im m ediately below the o ffice r level) over either a m ajor
corporate-w ide functional activity (e .g ., marketing, resea rch , operations, industrial rela tions, etc.) or"a m ajor geographic or organizational segment (e .g ., a regional headquarters;
a m ajor division) of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 but fewer than 25,000
em p loyees; or
d. S ecretary to the head of an individual plant, fa ctory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 p e rso n s; or
e. S ecretary to the head of a large and important organizational segment (e .g ., a middle
management supervisor of an organizational segment often involving as many as several
hundred persons) of a company that em ploys, in all, over 25, 000 p e rso n s.
Class C
a. S ecretary to an executive or m anagerial p erson whose responsibility is not equivalent
to one of the specific level situations in the definition fo r cla ss B, but whose subordinate staff
norm ally numbers at least several dozen em ployees and is usually divided into organizational
segments which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In some com panies, this level includes
a wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; jor
b. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in all, fewer than 5, 000 p e rso n s.

Assigned as personal secreta ry, norm ally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the d a y-to-d ay work activities of the supervisor. Works fairly inde­
pendently receiving a minimum of detailed supervision and guidance. P erform s varied cle rica l
and secreta rial duties, usually including m ost of the follow ing: (a) R eceives telephone ca lls,
personal ca lle rs, and incom ing m ail, answers routine inquiries, and routes the technical inquiries
to the proper persons; (b) establishes, maintains, and revises the su p ervisor's file s; (c) maintains
the su p ervisor's calendar and makes appointments as instructed; (d) relays m essages from super­
v is o r to subordinates; (e) reviews corresp on den ce, m em orandum s, and reports prepared by others
for the su p ervisor's signature to assure p rocedural and typographic accu racy; and (f) p erform s
stenographic and typing work.
May also p erform other cle rica l and secreta rial tasks of com parable nature and difficulty.
The work typically requires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
program s, and p rocedu res related to the work of the supervisor.
Exclusions

Not all positions that are titled "s e c re ta ry " p ossess the above ch aracteristics. Examples
of positions which are excluded from the definition are as follow s: (a) Positions which do not meet
the "p erson al" secreta ry concept d escribed above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in secretarial
type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a group of p rofessional, technical,
or m anagerial p ersons; (d) secreta ry positions in which the duties are either substantially m ore
routine or substantially m ore com plex and responsible than those ch aracterized in the definition;
and (e) assistant type positions which involve m ore difficult or m ore responsible technical, admin­
istrative, supervisory, or specialized c le rica l duties which are not typical of secreta rial work.
NOTE; The term "corp ora te o ffic e r ," used in the level definitions following, re fe rs to
those officia ls who have a significant corporate-w ide policymaking role with regard to m ajor
company activities. The title "v ic e p resid en t," though norm ally indicative of this role, does not
in all cases identify such positions. V ice presidents whose prim ary responsibility is to act p e r­
sonally on individual cases or transactions (e.g ., approve or deny individual loan or credit actions;
adm inister individual trust accounts; d irectly supervise a cle rica l staff) are not considered to be
"corp ora te o ffice rs " for purposes of applying the following level definitions.
Class

SECRETARY— Continued

A

a. S ecretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 p erson s; or
b. S ecretary to a corporate o ffice r (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 but fewer than 25, 000 p erson s; or
c. Secretary to the head (im m ediately below the corporate o ffice r level) of a m ajor
segment or subsidiary of a company that em ploys, in all, over 25,000 p erson s.




Class D
a. Secretary to the supervisor or head of a sm all organizational unit (e.g ., few er than
about 25 or 30 p ersons); or^
b. S ecretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional em ployee, adm inistra­
tive office r, or assistant, skilled technician or expert. (NOTE: Many com panies assign
stenographers, rather than secreta ries as d escribed above, to this level of supervisory or
nonsupervisory w orker.)
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
P rim a ry duty is to take dictation involving a norm al routine vocabulary from one or m ore
persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar m achine; and transcribe dictation. May
also type from written copy. May maintain file s , keep sim ple re co rd s, or p erform other relatively
routine cle rica l tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool. Does not include transcribin gmachine w ork. (See transcribing-m achine operators.)
STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
P rim ary duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary
such as in legal b riefs or reports on scientific resea rch from one or m ore persons either in short­
hand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from written
copy. May also set up and maintain file s, keep re co rd s, etc.
OR
P erform s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and resp onsi­
bility than stenographers, general as evidenced by the following: Work requires high degree of
stenographic speed and accu racy; and a thorough working knowledge of general business and office
procedures and of the specific business operations, organization, p o lic ie s, p roced u res, file s,
workflow , etc. Uses this knowledge in perform ing stenographic duties and responsible cle rica l
tasks such as, maintaining followup file s; assem bling m aterial fo r rep orts, m emorandum s, letters,
etc.; com posing sim ple letters from general instructions; reading and routing incom ing m ail; and
answering routine questions, etc. Does not include transcribing-m achine w ork.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Class A . Operates
outgoing, intraplant or
com plex ca lls, such as
doing routine work as

a single- or
office calls.
con ference,
d escribed

m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
P erform s full telephone inform ation s ervice or handles
co lle ct, o versea s, or sim ilar ca lls, either in addition to
for switchboard operator, cla ss B, or as a full-tim e

23
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR— Continued

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (E lectric Accounting Machine Operator)----Continued

assignment. ("F u ll" telephone inform ation service occu rs when the establishment has varied
functions that are not readily understandable for telephone inform ation purposes, e .g ., because
of overlapping or interrelated functions, and consequently present frequent problem s as to
which extensions are appropriate for calls.)

Class B . P erform s work according to established procedures and under specific in­
structions. Assignm ents typically involve com plete but routine and recurring reports or parts
of larger and m ore com plex reports. Operates m ore difficult tabulating o r ele ctrica l a c­
counting machines such as the tabulator and calculator, in addition to the, sim pler machines
used by cla ss C operators. May be required to do some wiring from diagram s. May train
new em ployees in basic machine operations.

Class B . Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office ca lls. May handle routine long distance calls and record tolls.
May p erform lim ited telephone inform ation service. ("L im ited" telephone inform ation service
occu rs if the functions of the establishment serviced are readily understandable for telephone
inform ation purposes, or if the requests are routine, e .g ., giving extension numbers when
sp ecific names are furnished, or if com plex calls are referred to another operator.)

Class C . Under specific instructions, operates sim ple tabulating or ele ctrica l accounting
machines such as the so rte r, interpreter, reproducing punch, colla tor, etc. Assignments
typically involve portions of a work unit, for exam ple, individual sorting or collating runs,
or repetitive operations. May perform sim ple wiring from diagram s, and do some filing work.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL

In addition to perform ing duties of operator on a sin gle-position or m onitor-type switch­
board, acts as receptionist and may also type or perform routine cle rica l work as part of regular
duties. This typing or cle rica l work may take the m ajor part of this w ork er's time while at
switchboard.

P rim a ry duty is to transcribe dictation involving a norm al routine vocabulary from
transcribing-m achine record s. May also type from written copy and do sim ple cle rica l work.
W orkers transcribing dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as
legal b riefs or reports on scientific resea rch are not included. A w orker who takes dictation
in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine is cla ssifie d as a stenographer, general.

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (E lectric Accounting Machine Operator)
TYPIST
Operates one or a variety of m achines such as the tabulator, calculator, colla tor, inter­
p reter, sorter, reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from this definition are working supervisors.
A lso excluded are operators of electron ic digital com puters, even though they may also operate
EAM equipment.

Uses a typewriter to make copies of various m aterial or to make out bills after ca lcu la ­
tions have been made by another person. May include typing of sten cils, m ats, or sim ilar m ate­
rials for use in duplicating p ro ce s s e s. May do cle rica l work involving little special training, such
as keeping simple re co rd s, filing record s and reports, or sorting and distributing incom ing mail.

Positions are cla ssified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
C lass A . P erform s one or m ore of the follow ing: Typing m aterial in final form when
it involves combining m aterial from several sources or responsibility fo r co r re ct spelling,
syllabication, punctuation, e tc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language m ate­
ria l; and planning layout and typing of com plicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity
and balance in spacing. May type routine form letters varying details to suit circum stances.

Class A . P erform s com plete reporting and tabulating assignments including devising
difficult con trol panel wiring under general supervision. Assignm ents typically involve a
variety of long and com plex reports which often are irregular or nonrecurring, requiring
som e planning of the nature and sequencing of operations, and the use of a variety of machines.
Is typically involved in training new operators in machine operations or training low er level
operators in wiring from diagram s and in the operating sequences of long and com plex reports.
Does not include positions in which wiring responsibility is lim ited to selection and insertion
of prew ired boards.

P R O F E S S IO N A L

AND

T E C H N IC A L

COMPUTER OPERATOR— Continued

COMPUTER OPERATOR
M onitors and operates the control console of a digital com puter to p ro ce ss data according
to operating instructions, usually prepared by a p rogram er. Work includes m ost of the follow ing:
Studies instructions to determ ine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
item s (tape reels, ca rd s, etc.); switches n ecessary auxiliary equipment into circu it, and starts
and operates com puter; makes adjustments to com puter to co r re ct operating problem s and meet
special conditions; reviews e rr o rs made during operation and determ ines cause or refers problem
to supervisor or program er; and maintains operating record s. May test and assist in correcting
program .
F or wage study purposes, com puter operators are cla ssified as follow s:
Class A . Operates independently, or under only general d irection, a com puter running
program s with m ost of the following ch a ra cteristics: New program s are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requirem ents are of critica l importance to m inim ize downtime; the
program s are of com plex design so that identification of e rr o r source often requires a working
knowledge of the total p rogram , and alternate program s may not be available. May give
direction and guidance to low er level operators.
Class B . Operates independently, or under only general d irection, a com puter running
program s with m ost of the following ch aracteristics: Most of the program s are established
production runs, typically run on a regularly recurring basis; there is little or no testing
of new program s required; alternate program s are provided in case original program needs
m ajor change or cannot be corrected within a reasonable tim e. In com m on e rr o r situations,
diagnoses cause and takes correctiv e action. This usually involves applying previously p ro ­
gram ed correctiv e steps, or using standard correction techniques.
OR
Operates under d irect supervision a com puter running program s o r segments of program s
with the ch aracteristics d escribed for cla ss A. May a ssist a higher level operator by inde­
pendently perform ing less difficult tasks assigned, and perform ing difficult tasks following
detailed instructions and with frequent review of operations perform ed.




Class B . P erfo rm s one or m ore of the follow ing: Copy typing from rough or clear
drafts; routine typing of form s, insurance p o licie s, etc.; and setting up sim ple standard
tabulations, or copying m ore com plex tables already setup and spaced properly.

Class C . Works on routine program s under close supervision. Is expected to develop
working knowledge of the com puter equipment used and ability to detect problem s involved in
running routine program s. Usually has received some form al training in com puter operation.
May assist higher level operator on com plex program s.
COMPUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS
Converts statements of business problem s, typically prepared by a system s analyst, into
a sequence of detailed instructions which are required to solve the problem s by automatic data
p rocessin g equipment. Working from charts or diagram s, the p rogram er develops the p re cise
instructions which, when entered into the computer system in coded language, cause the manipu­
lation of data to achieve desired results. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Applies knowledge
of com puter capabilities, mathem atics, logic employed by com puters, and particular subject matter
involved to analyze charts and diagrams of the problem to be program ed. Develops sequence
of program steps, w rites detailed flow charts to show ord er in which data w ill be p rocessed ;
converts these charts to coded instructions fo r machine to follow ; tests and co r re cts program s;
prepares instructions fo r operating personnel during production run; analyzes, review s, and alters
program s to increase operating efficien cy or adapt to new requirem ents; maintains record s of
program development and revisions. (NOTE: W orkers perform ing both system s analysis and p ro ­
graming should be cla ssified as system s analysts if this is the skill used to determ ine their pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim arily responsible fo r the management or supervision of
other electronic data p rocessin g (EDP) em ployees, or p rogram ers prim arily concerned with
scientific a n d /or engineering problem s.
F or wage study purposes, program ers are cla ssifie d as follow s:
Class A . Works independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s which
require com petence in all phases of program ing concepts and pra ctices. Working from dia­
gram s and charts which identify the nature of desired results, m ajor p rocessin g steps to be
accom plished, and the relationships between various steps of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of program ing actions needed to efficiently utilize the com puter system
in achieving desired end products.

24
COMPUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS— Continued
At this level, program ing is difficult because com puter equipment must be organized to
produce several interrelated but diverse products from numerous and diverse data elements.
A wide variety and extensive number of internal p rocessin g actions must occu r. This requires
such actions as development of com m on operations which can be reused, establishment of
linkage points between operations, adjustments to data when program requirem ents exceed
com puter storage capacity, and substantial manipulation and re sequencing of data elements
to form a highly integrated program .
May provide functional direction to low er level program ers who are assigned to assist.
Class B. Works independently o r under only general direction on relatively sim ple
program s, or on sim ple segments of com plex program s. P rogram s (or segments) usually
p rocess inform ation to produce data in two or three varied sequences or form ats. Reports
and listings are produced by refining, adapting, arraying, or making m inor additions to or
deletions from input data which are readily available. While numerous record s may be
p rocessed , the data have been refined in p rio r actions so that the a ccu racy and sequencing
of data can be tested by using a few routine checks. Typically, the program deals with
routine record-keepin g type operations.
OR
Works on com plex program s (as d escribed for class A) under clo se direction of a higher
level program er or supervisor. May a ssist higher level program er by independently p e r ­
form ing less difficult tasks assigned, and perform ing m ore difficult tasks under fa irly close
direction.
May guide or instruct low er level program ers.
Class C . Makes p ractical applications of program ing p ractices and concepts usually
learned in form al training cou rses. Assignm ents are designed to develop com petence in the
application of standard p rocedu res to routine problem s. R eceives close supervision on new
aspects of assignm ents; and work is reviewed to ,v e r ify its a ccu racy and conform ance with
required procedu res.
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST, BUSINESS
Analyzes business problem s to form ulate p rocedu res for solving them by use of electronic
data p rocessin g equipment. Develops a com plete description of all specifications needed to enable
program ers to prepare required digital com puter program s. Work involves m ost of the follow ing:
Analyzes subject-m atter operations to be automated and identifies conditions and criteria required
to achieve satisfactory results; specifies number and types of re co rd s, file s, and documents to
be used; outlines actions to be perform ed by personnel and com puters in sufficient detail for
presentation to management and for program ing (typically this involves preparation of work and
data flow charts); coordinates the development of test problem s and participates in trial runs of
new and revised system s; and recom m ends equipment changes to obtain m ore effective overall
operations. (NOTE; W orkers perform ing both system s analysis and program ing should be c la s ­
sified as system s analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST, BUSINESS— Continued
maintaining accounts receivable in a retail establishm ent, or maintaining inventory accounts
in a manufacturing or wholesale establishm ent.) C onfers with persons concerned to determine
the data p rocessin g problem s and advises su bject-m atter personnel on the im plications of the
data p rocessin g system s to be applied.
OR
Works on a segment of a com plex data p rocessin g schem e or system , as described for
class A. Works independently on routine assignments and receiv es instruction and guidance
on com plex assignm ents. Work is reviewed fo r accu ra cy of judgment, com pliance with in­
structions, and to insure prop er alinement with the overall system .
Class C . Works under imm ediate supervision, carrying out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. Assignm ents are designed to develop and expand p ractical experience
in the application of procedu res and skills required fo r system s analysis work. F or example,
may a ssist a higher level system s analyst by preparing the detailed specifications required
by p rogram ers from inform ation developed by the higher level analyst.
DRAFTSMAN
Class A . Plans the graphic presentation of com plex items having distinctive design
features that differ significantly from established drafting precedents. Works in close sup­
port with the design originator, and may recom m end m inor design changes. Analyzes the
effect of each change on the details of form , function, and positional relationships of co m ­
ponents and parts. Works with a minimum of supervisory assistance. Completed work is
reviewed by design originator for consistency with p rio r engineering determ inations. May
either prepare drawings, or d irect their preparation by low er level draftsmen.
Class B. P e rfo rm s nonroutine and com plex drafting assignments that require the appli­
cation of m ost of the standardized drawing techniques regularly used. Duties typically in­
volve such work as; P rep ares working drawings of subassem blies with irregular shapes,
multiple functions, and p re cise positional relationships between com ponents; prepares a rch i­
tectural drawings fo r construction of a building including detail drawings of foundations, wall
sections, floor plans, and roof. Uses accepted form ulas and manuals in making necessary
computations to determ ine quantities of m aterials to be used, load capacities, strengths,
s tre sse s, etc.
R eceives initial instructions, requirem ents, and advice from supervisor.
Completed work is checked for technical adequacy.
Class C . P repares detail drawings of single units or parts fo r engineering, construction,
manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types of drawings prepared include isom etric p rojections
(depicting three dim ensions in accurate scale) and sectional views to cla rify positioning of
components and convey needed information. Consolidates details from a number of sources
and adjusts or transposes scale as required. Suggested methods of approach, applicable
precedents, and advice on source m aterials are given with initial assignm ents. Instructions
are less com plete when assignments recur. Work may be spot-checked during p ro g re ss.
DRAFTSMAN-TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing cloth or paper over
drawings and tracing with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracing lim ited to plans p rim arily
consisting of straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
AND/OR

Does not include em ployees prim arily responsible fo r the management or supervision of
other electronic data p rocessin g (EDP) em ployees, or system s analysts p rim arily concerned with
scientific or engineering problem s.
F or wage study purposes,

system s analysts are cla ssified as follow s;

Class A . Works independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s
involving all phases of system s analysis. Problem s are com plex because of diverse sources
of input data and m ultiple-use requirem ents of output data. (F or exam ple, develops an inte­
grated production scheduling, inventory con trol, cost analysis, and sales analysis record in
which every item of each type is automatically p rocessed through the full system of records
and appropriate followup actions are initiated by the com puter.) C onfers with persons con ­
cerned to determine the data p rocessin g problem s and advises subject-m atter personnel on
the im plications of new or revised system s of data p rocessin g operations. Makes re co m ­
mendations, if needed, for approval of m ajor system s installations or changes and for
obtaining equipment.
May provide functional direction to low er level system s analysts who are assigned to
assist.
Class B. Works independently or under only general direction on problem s that are
relatively uncom plicated to analyze, plan, program , and operate. P roblem s are of limited
com plexity because sources of input data are homogeneous and the output data are clo se ly
related. (F or exam ple, develops system s for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank,




P repares sim ple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized item s. Work is clo s e ly supervised
during p rog ress.
ELECTRONIC TECHNICIAN
Works on various types of electronic equipment or system s by perform ing one or m ore
of the following operations; Modifying, installing, repairing, and overhauling. These operations
require the perform ance of m ost or all of the following tasks; A ssem bling, testing, adjusting,
calibrating, tuning, and alining.
Work is nonrepetitive and requires a knowledge of the theory and pra ctice of electronics
pertaining to the use of general and specialized electron ic test equipment; trouble analysis; and
the operation, relationship, and alinement of electron ic system s, subsystem s, and circu its having
a variety of component parts.
E lectronic equipment or system s worked on typically include one or m ore of the following;
Ground, veh icle, or airborne radio com m unications system s, relay system s, navigation aids;
airborne or ground radar system s; radio and television transmitting or recording system s; e le c ­
tronic com puters; m issile and spacecraft guidance and con trol system s; industrial and m edical
m easuring, indicating, and controlling d evices; etc.
(Exclude production a ssem blers and testers, craftsm en, draftsm en, d esigners, engineers,
and repairm en of such standard electron ic equipment as office m achines, radio and television
receiving sets.)

25
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (Registered)

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (R egistered)--- Continued

A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general m edical direction to ill or
injured em ployees or other persons who becom e ill or suffer an accident on the p rem ises of a
fa ctory or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the follow ing: Giving first aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of em ployees' injuries; keeping records

of patients treated; preparing accident reports for com pensation or other purposes; assisting in
physical examinations and health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing out program s involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment,
or other activities affecting the health, w elfare, and safety of all personnel.

M A IN T E N A N C E

AND

POW ERPLAN T

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

P erform s the carpentry duties n ecessary to construct and maintain in good repair building
woodwork and equipment such as bins, cr ib s , counters, benches, partitions, doors, flo o rs, stairs,
casings, and trim made of wood in an establishment. Work involves m ost of the following: Planning
and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, m odels, or verbal instructions using a variety
of ca rp en ter's handtools, portable power tools, and standard m easuring instrum ents; making
standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work; and selecting m aterials n ecessary
fo r the work. In general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

P roduces replacem ent parts and new parts in making repairs of metal parts of m echanical
equipment operated in an establishment. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Interpreting written
instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m achinist's
handtools and p recision m easuring instrum ents; setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of m etal parts to clo se toleran ces; making standard shop computations relating to dimen­
sions of work, tooling, feed s, and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties of
the com m on m etals; selecting standard m aterials, parts, and equipment required for his work;
and fitting and assem bling parts into m echanical equipment. In general, the m achinist's work
norm ally requires a rounded training in m achine-shop practice usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
P erform s a variety of electrica l trade functions such as the installation, maintenance,
or repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of e le ctric energy in an
establishment. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Installing or repairing any of a variety
of electrica l equipment such as gen erators, tra n sform ers, switchboards, co n tro lle rs, circu it
b rea k ers, m otors, heating units, conduit system s, or other transm ission equipment; working
from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in
the electrica l system or equipment; working standard computations relating to load requirem ents
of wiring or electrica l equipment; and using a variety of e le ctricia n 's handtools and m easuring
and testing instrum ents. In general, the work of the maintenance electricia n requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of stationary engines and
equipment (m echanical or electrica l) to supply the establishment in which em ployed with power,
heat, refrigeration , or air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment
such as steam engines, air co m p re s so rs , gen erators, m otors, turbines, ventilating and r e fr ig ­
erating equipment, steam b oilers and b o ile r -fe d water pumps; making equipment rep a irs; and
keeping a record of operation of m achinery, tem perature, and fuel consumption. May also su­
p ervise these operations. Head or ch ief engineers in establishments employing m ore than one
engineer are excluded.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
F ires stationary b oilers to furnish the establishment in which em ployed with heat, power,
or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or operates a m echanical stoker, or gas or oil burner;
and checks water and safety valves. May clean, oil, or a ssist in repairing b oilerroom equipment.
HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES
A ssists one or m ore workers in the skilled maintenance trades, by perform ing specific
or general duties of le s s e r skill, such as keeping a w orker supplied with m aterials and tools;
cleaning working area, machine, and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding m aterials or
tools; and perform ing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind of work the
helper is perm itted to p erform varies from trade to trade: In som e trades the helper is con­
fined to supplying, lifting, and holding m aterials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in
others he is perm itted to p erform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are
also perform ed by w orkers on a fu ll-tim e basis.
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or m ore types of machine tools, such as jig b o re rs,
cylin d rical or surface grinders, engine lathes, or m illing m achines, in the construction of
m achine-shop tools, gages, jig s , fixtures, or dies. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Planning
and perform ing difficult machining operations; p rocessin g item s requiring com plicated setups or
a high degree of accu racy; using a variety of precision m easuring instrum ents; selecting feeds,
speeds, tooling, and operation sequence; and making n ecessary adjustments during operation
to achieve requisite tolerances or dim ensions. May be required to recognize when tools need
dressing, to dress tools, and to select p roper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils. For
cross-in d u stry wage study purposes, m achine-tool operators, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing
shops are excluded from this classification.


http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
■fe,
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (Maintenance)
Repairs autom obiles, buses, m otortrucks, and tractors of an establishment. Work in­
volves m ost of the follow ing: Examining automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble; d is ­
assem bling equipment and perform ing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches,
gages, d rills, or specialized equipment in disassem bling or fitting parts; replacing broken or
defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassem bling and installing the various
assem blies in the vehicle and making necessary adjustments; and alining w heels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the automotive m echanic requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs m achinery or m echanical equipment of an establishment. Work involves m ost
of the follow ing: Examining machines and m echanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
dismantling or partly dismantling machines and perform ing repairs that m ainly involve the use
of handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken o r defective parts with item s obtained
from stock; ordering the production of a replacem ent part by a machine shop or sending of the
machine to a machine shop fo r m ajor repairs; preparing written specifications fo r m ajor repairs
or for the production of parts ordered from machine shop; reassem bling m achines; and making
all n ecessary adjustments fo r operation. In general, the work of a maintenance m echanic requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. Excluded from this cla ssification are workers whose prim ary duties
involve setting up or adjusting machines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dismantles and installs m achines or heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout are required. Work involves m ost of the follow ing:
Planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a variety
of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations relating to stre ss e s, strength of
m aterials, and centers of gravity; alining and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools,
equipment, and parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good ord er power transm ission
equipment such as drives and speed reducers. In general, the m illw right's work norm ally requires
a rounded training and experience in the trade acquired through a form al apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.
PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and red ecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an establishment. Work involves
the follow ing: Knowledge of surface p eculiarities and types of paint required for different applica­
tions; preparing surface for painting by rem oving old finish or by placing putty or fille r in nail
holes and in terstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush. May m ix c o lo r s , o ils, white
lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper co lo r or consistency. In general, the work of the
maintenance painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam , gas, or other types of pipe and pipefittings in an
establishment. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Laying out of work and m easuring to locate
position of pipe from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to
co r re ct lengths with ch isel and hammer o r oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machine; threading
pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or p ow er-d riven m achines; assem bling

2 6
TOOL AND DIE MAKER

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE— Continued
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to
p ressu res, flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard tests to determine whether fin­
ished pipes m eet specifications. In general, the work of the maintenance pipefitter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. W orkers prim arily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation
or heating system s are excluded.
SHEET-M ETAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F abricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-m etal equipment and fixtures
(such as machine guards, grease pans, shelves, lock ers , tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal
roofing) of an establishment. W ork involves m ost of the following: Planning and laying out all
types of sheet-m etal maintenance work from blueprints, m odels, or other specifications; setting
up and operating all available types of sheet-m etal working m achines; using a variety of handtools
in cutting, bending, form ing, shaping, fitting, and assem bling; and installing sheet-m etal articles
as required. In general, the work of the maintenance sheet-m etal w orker requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.

C U S T O D IA L

AND

(Die m aker; jig m aker; tool m aker; fixture m aker; gage m aker)
Constructs and repairs m achine-shop tools, gages, jig s, fixtures or dies fo r forgings,
punching, and other m etal-form ing work. W ork involves m ost of the follow ing: Planning and
laying out of work from m odels, blueprints, drawings, or other ora l and written specifications;
using a variety of tool and die m ak er's handtools and p re cisio n m easuring instruments; under­
standing of the working properties of com m on m etals and alloy s; setting up and operating of
machine tools and related equipment; making n ecessa ry shop computations relating to dimensions
of work, speeds, feed s, and tooling of m achines; heat-treating of m etal parts during fabrication
as w ell as of finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities; working to close toleran ces;
fitting and assem bling of parts to p re scrib e d tolerances and allow ances; and selecting appropriate
m aterials, tools, and p ro ce s s e s. In general, the tool and die m ak er's work requires a rounded
training in m achine-shop and toolroom p ractice usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship
or equivalent training and experience.
F or cro ss-in d u stry wage study purposes, tool and die m akers in tool and die jobbing
shops are excluded from this classification.

M A T E R IA L

GUARD AND WATCHMAN
Guard. P erform s routine p olice duties, either at fixed post or on tour, maintaining
ord er, using arm s or force where necessary. Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate
and check on identity of em ployees and other persons entering.
Watchman. Makes rounds of prem ises periodically in protecting property against fire,
theft, and illegal entry.
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER

MOVEMENT

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
P repares m erchandise for shipment, or receives and is responsible for incoming ship­
ments of m erchandise or other m aterials. Shipping work involves: A knowledge of shipping
p rocedures, p ra ctices, routes, available means of transportation, and rate; and preparing r e c ­
ords of the goods shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges, and
keeping a file of shipping re co rd s. May direct or assist in preparing the m erchandise for ship­
ment. Receiving work involves: V erifying or directing others in verifying the correctness of
shipments against bills of lading, invoices, or other re co rd s; checking for shortages and rejecting
damaged goods; routing m erchandise or m aterials to proper departments; and maintaining n eces­
sary records and files.

(Sweeper; charwoman; janitress)
F or wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
Cleans and keeps in an ord erly condition factory working areas and w ashroom s, or
prem ises of an office, apartment house, or com m ercial or other establishment. Duties involve
a combination of the follow ing; Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing flo o rs; removing
chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures
or trim m ings; providing supplies and minor maintenance se rv ice s; and cleaning lavatories, show­
ers , and restroom s. W orkers who specialize in window washing are excluded.
LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper; w a re­
houseman or warehouse helper)
A worker em ployed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store, or other establishment
whose duties involve one or m ore of the follow ing: Loading and unloading various m aterials and
m erchandise on or from freight ca rs, trucks, or other transporting d evices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing m aterials or m erchandise in proper storage location; and transporting m aterials or
m erchandise by handtruck, car, or wheelbarrow. Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are
excluded.

Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCKDRIVER
Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport m aterials, m erchandise,
equipment, or men between various types of establishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight
depots, warehouses, wholesale and retail establishm ents, or between retail establishments and
custom ers* houses or places of business. May also load or unload truck with or without helpers,
make minor mechanical rep airs, and keep truck in good working order. D riv er-salesm en and
over-th e-roa d drivers are excluded.
F or wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and type of equipment,
as follow s: (T ra cto r-tra ile r should be rated on the basis of tra iler capacity.)

ORDER FILLER
(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
F ills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored m erchandise in a cco r d ­
ance with specifications on sales slips, customers* ord ers, or other instructions. May, in addition
to filling orders and indicating items filled or omitted, keep record s of outgoing ord ers, requi­
sition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and p erform other related duties.

T ruckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
T ruckdriver, light (under lV2 tons)
Truckdriver, medium (lV2 to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)
TRUCKER, POWER

PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage b^ placing them in shipping con­
tainers, the specific operations perform ed being dependent uponxthe type, size, and number of
units to be packed, the type of container em ployed, and method of shipment. Work requires the
placing of items in shipping containers and may involve one or m ore of the following: Knowl­
edge of various items of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size
of container; inserting enclosures in container; using e x celsior or other m aterial to prevent
breakage or damage; closing and sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying
data on container. Packers who also make wooden boxes or crates are excluded.




Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or e lectric-p ow ered truck or tractor to
transport goods and m aterials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other
establishment.
F or wage study purposes, workers are cla ssified by type of truck, as follow s:
T rucker, power (forklift)
T rucker, power (other than forklift)

A v a ila b le O n R e q u e s t----T h e f o l l o w i n g a r e a s a r e s u r v e y e d p e r i o d i c a l l y f o r u s e in a d m i n i s t e r i n g the S e r v i c e C o n t r a c t A c t o f 1965.
a v a i l a b l e at n o c o s t w h i le s u p p lie s la s t f r o m any o f the B L S r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s show n on the in s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .

A bilen e, Tex.
A laska
A l b a n y , Ga.
A l e x a n d r i a , La.
A lp e n a , Standish, and T a w a s C it y , M ic h .
A m a rillo, Tex.
Ann A r b o r , M ic h .
A s h e v i l l e , N .C.
A t la n t ic C it y , N.J.
A u g u s t a , G a.—S.C .
A u s t in , T e x .
B a k e r s f i e l d , C a lif.
B a to n R o u g e , L a .
B i l l i n g s , M on t.
B i l o x i , G u l f p o r t , and P a s c a g o u l a , M i s s .
B r i d g e p o r t , N o r w a l k , and S t a m f o r d , Conn.
C h a r l e s t o n , S .C .
Cheyenne, W yo.
C l a r k s v i l l e , T e r m ., and H o p k i n s v i l l e , K y.
C o lo ra d o Springs, C olo.
^ C o l u m b i a , S.C.
C o l u m b u s , Ga.—A la .
C r a n e , Ind.
D e c a t u r , 111.
Dothan, A la .
Duluth— u p e r i o r , M inn.—W i s .
S
D u r h a m , N .C .
El P a s o , Tex.
Eugene, O reg.
F a r g o — o o r h e a d , N. Dak.—Minn.
M
F a y e t t e v i l l e , N .C .
F i t c h b u r g —L e o m i n s t e r , M a s s .
F o r t S m ith , A r k . —O kla.
F r e d e r i c k — a g e r s t o w n , M d . - P a . - W . Va.
H
G r e a t F a l l s , Mon t.
G r e e n s b o r o - W i n s t o n S a le m —High P o i n t , N .C .
H a rrisb u rg, Pa.
H a r t f o r d , Conn.
H u n ts v ille , A la .

C o p i e s o f p u b lic r e l e a s e s a r e

K n o x v i l l e , Ten n.
L aredo, Tex.
L a s V e g a s , Nev.
L e x in g t o n , K y.
L o w e r E a stern Shore, M d .-V a .
L y n c h b u r g , Va.
_ X M a c o n , Ga.
M a d i s o n , W is .
M a r q u e t t e , E s c a n a b a , Sault Ste. M a r i e , Mich ,
M eridian, M iss.
M i d d l e s e x , M o n m o u th , O c e a n and S o m e r s e t
C o s . , N.J.
M o b i l e , A l a . , and P e n s a c o l a , F la .
M o n t g o m e r y , Ala .
N a s h v i l l e , Ten n.
N ew L o n d o n — r o t o n — o r w i c h , Conn.
G
N
N o r t h e a s t e r n M a in e
O g d e n , Utah
O r l a n d o , F la .
O x n a r d — e n tu r a , C a lif .
V
P a n a m a C it y , F la .
P i n e B lu ff , A r k .
P o r t s m o u t h , N.H.—M a in e — a s s .
M
P u e b l o , C o lo .
R e n o , Nev.
S a c r a m e n t o , C a lif.
S a lin a , K a ns .
S a lin a s — o n t e r e y , C a lif.
M
Santa B a r b a r a , C a lif.
S h r e v e p o r t , La.
S p r i n g f i e l d - C h i c o p e e — o l y o k e , M a s s . —Conn.
H
S to ck to n , C a lif.
T a c o m a , W ash .
T o p e k a , K ans.
Tucson, A riz.
V a l d o s t a , Ga.
V a lle j o— a p a , C a l i f .
N
W ic h it a F a l l s , T e x .
W il m in g t o n , D e l.—N .J .—Md.

T h e e le v e n t h annual r e p o r t on s a l a r i e s f o r a c c o u n t a n t s , a u d i t o r s , c h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s , a t t o r n e y s , j o b a n a l y s t s , d i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l ,
b u y e r s , c h e m i s t s , e n g i n e e r s , e n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s , d r a f t s m e n , and c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s .
O r d e r as B L S B u lle tin 1693, N a tiona l
S u r v e y o f P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d m i n i s t r a t i v e , T e c h n i c a l , and C l e r i c a l P a y , June 1 9 7 0 , $ 1 . 0 0 a c o p y , f r o m th e S u p e rin te n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s ,
U.S. G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W a s h in g t o n , D . C . , 2 0 4 02 , o r any o f it s r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s .







A r e a W a g e S u rv ey s
A l i s t o f the l a t e s t a v a ila b le b u ll e tin s is p r e s e n t e d b e l o w . A d i r e c t o r y o f a r e a w a g e s tu d ie s in clu d in g m o r e l i m i t e d s tu die s c o n d u c t e d at the
r e q u e s t o f the W a g e and H o u r D i v i s i o n o f the D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r is a v a ila b le on r e q u e s t . B u lle t in s m a y b e p u r c h a s e d f r o m the S u pe rin te n de n t o f
D o c u m e n t s , U.S. G o v e r n m e n t P r in t in g O f f i c e , W a s h in g t o n , D . C . , 20402, o r f r o m any o f the BLS r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s show n on the in s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .

A rea
A k r o n , O h i o , J u ly 1970___________________________________
Alb a ny—S c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N . Y . , M a r . 1971 1 ________
A l b u q u e r q u e , N. M e x . , M a r . 1971_______________________
A lle n to w n —B e t h le h e m —E a s t o n , P a . —N . J . , M a y 1971__
A tla n ta, G a . , M a y 1971-----------------------------------------------------B a l t i m o r e , M d . , Aug. 1970 1 _____________________________
B e a u m o n t — o r t A r t h u i—O r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1971 1 -----P
B in g h a m to n , N . Y . , J u ly 1970 ____________________________
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , M a r . 1971 1 --------------------------------------B o i s e C it y , Idaho, Nov. 1970 1 __________________________
B o s t o n , M a s s . , Aug. 1970 1 ______________________________
B u ff a lo , N . Y . , O c t . 1970 1 ________________________________
B u r lin g t o n , V t ., M a r . 1971 1 _____________________________
Canton , O h i o , M a y 1971__________________________________
C h a r l e s t o n , W. V a . , M a r . 1971------------------------------------C h a r l o t t e , N . C . , Jan. 1971---------------------------------------------C h a t ta n o o g a , T e n n . - G a . , Sept. 1970 1 ---------------------------C h i c a g o , 111., June 1970---------------------------------------------------C in c in n a t i, Ohicr-Ky.—I n d ., F e b . 1971 1 --------------------------C l e v e l a n d , O h i o , Sept. 1970 1 ------------------------------------------C o l u m b u s , O h i o , O c t . 1970 1 _____________________________
D a l l a s , T e x . , O ct . 1970 1 -------------------------------------------------D a v e n p o r t — o c k Isla nd— o l i n e , Iowa—111.,
R
M
F e b . 197 1---------------------------------------------------------------------------D a yto n , O h i o , D e c . 1970 1 -------------------------------------------------D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1970 -------------------------------------------------D e s M o i n e s , Iow a, M a y 1971------------------------------------------D e t r o i t , M i c h . , F e b . 1971 1----------------------------------------------F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , O ct . 1970 1 -----------------------------------------G r e e n B a y , W i s . , J u ly 1970 1 ------------------------------------------G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M a y 1971 1-------------------------------------------H o u s t o n , T e x . , A p r . 1971 1 ----------------------------------------------I n d ia n a p o lis , Ind., O ct . 1970 1___________________________
J a c k s o n , M i s s . , Jan. 1971 1 ______________________________
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , D e c . 1970 1 ---------------------------------------K a n s a s C it y , M o . —K a n s . , Sept. 1970 1 ---------------------------L a w r e n c e —H a v e r h i l l , M a s s . —N .H ., June 1 9 7 0 1-----------L it tle R o ck —N o r t h L ittle R o c k , A r k . , J u ly 1970 1 -------L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h and A n a h e im —Santa A n a G a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , M a r . 1971 1 ____________________
L o u i s v i l l e , K y.—I n d . , N ov. 1970--------------------------------------L u b b o c k , T e x . , M a r . 1971-----------------------------------------------M a n c h e s t e r , N .H ., J u ly 1 9 7 0 1 __________________________
M e m p h i s , T e n n . - A r k . , N o v . 1970-----------------------------------M i a m i , F l a . , N o v. 1 9 7 0 * --------------------------------------------------M id la n d and O d e s s a , T e x . , Jan. 197 1----------------------------M i l w a u k e e , W i s . , M a y 1971______________________________
M i n n e a p o l i s —St. P a u l , M in n ., Jan. 1971-------------------------

 D a t a o n e s t a b l i s h m e n t


B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r i c e
1660-88,
1685-54,
1685-58,
1685-75,
1685-69,
1 6 8 5- 18,
1685-68,
1685-6,
1685-63,
1685-21,
16 8 5- 1 1,
1685-43,
1685-59,
1685-71,
1685-57,
1685-48,
1685-10,
1660-90,
1685-53,
1685-28,
1685-33,
1685-22,

40

30 c e n ts
35cen ts
30ce nts
30 c e n ts
40 c e n ts
50cen ts
35 c e n ts
30 ce n ts
40 c e n ts
35cents
50 c e n ts
50ce nts
35ce n ts
30c e n ts
30ce nts
30cen ts
35c e n t s
60 c e n ts
4 5 cen ts
50ce nts
cen ts
5 0 cen ts

1685-51,
1685-45,
1685-41,
1685-70,
1685-77,
1685-25,
1685-4,
1685-78,
1685-67,
1685-31,
1685-39,
1685-37,
1685-16,
1660-82,
1685-1,

30cents
40 cen ts
35ce n ts
30c e n ts
50c e n t s
35ce n ts
35c e n ts
35ce n ts
50c e n ts
40 ce n ts
35ce nts
35ce n ts
45 c e n t s
35c e n ts
35c e n ts

1685-66,
1685-27,
1685-60,
1685-2,
1685-30,
1685-29,
1685-40,
1685-76,
1685-44,

50ce n ts
30ce nts
30cen ts
35c e n t s
30ce n ts
40 ce nts
30ce nts
35ce n ts
40 cen ts

practices a n d s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e provisions are also presented.

A rea
M u s k e g o n — u s k e g o n H e i g h t s , M i c h . , June 1 9 7 0 1______
M
N e w a r k and J e r s e y C ity, N . J . , Jan. 197 1---------------------New H aven, C o n n ., Jan. 1971_____________________________
N ew O r l e a n s , L a . , Jan. 1971 1___________________________
N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , A p r . 1 9 7 0 1_____________________________
N o r f o lk —P o r t s m o u t h and N e w p o r t N ew s—
H a m p to n , V a . , Jan. 1971 1 ---------------------------------------------O k la h o m a C it y , O k la ., J u ly 1970________________________
O m a h a , N e b r . - I o w a , Sept. 1970 1 _______________________
P a t e r sort— lif t o n — a s s a i c , N . J . , June 1970 1__________
C
P
P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . - N . J . , Nov. 1970_______________________
P h o e n i x , A r i z . , M a r . 1 9 7 0 1---------------------------------------------P i t t s b u r g h , P a . , Jan. 1971 1---------------------------------------------P o r t l a n d , M a in e , N o v. 1970----------------------------------------------P o r t l a n d , O r e g . - W a s h . , M a y 1970 1_____________________
P r o v i d e n c e —P a w t u c k e t - W a r w i c k , R.I.—M a s s . ,
M a y 1 9 7 0 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------R a l e i g h , N . C . , Aug. 1970 1________________________________
R i c h m o n d , V a . , M a r . 1971________________________________
R o c h e s t e r , N .Y . ( o f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s o n ly ),
A u g . 1970__________________________________________________
R o c k f o r d , 111., M a y 1970 1 ________________________________
St. L o u i s , M o . —111., M a r . 1971 1_________________________
Salt L a ke C it y , Utah, N o v. 1970 1________________________
San A n t o n io , T e x . , M a y 1970_____________________________
San B e r n a r d i n o — i v e r s i d e — n t a r i o , C a l i f . ,
R
O
D e c . 1970 1-------------------------------------------------------------------------San D i e g o , C a l i f . , Nov. 1970---------------------------------------------San F r a n c i s c c r - O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , O ct. -1970--------------------San J o s e , C a l i f . , A u g . 1970----------------------------------------------Savannah, G a . , M a y 1971_________________________________
S c r a n t o n , P a . , J u ly 1970 1_________________________________
Seattle—E v e r e t t , W a s h ., Jan. 1971 1_____________________
S io u x F a l l s , S. D a k ., D e c . 1970 1
________________________
South B e n d , Ind., M a r . 1971---------------------------------------------Sp o k a n e , W a s h . , June 1970 1 _____________________________
S y r a c u s e , N . Y . , J u ly 1 9 7 0 ________________________________
Tam pa—
St. P e t e r s b u r g , F l a . , N o v . 1970------------------------T o l e d o , O h ic r -M ic h ., A p r . 1971 1________________________
T r e n t o n , N . J . , Sept. 1970 1 _______________________________
Utica—R o m e , N . Y . , J u ly 1 9 7 0 ____________________________
W a s h in g t o n , D . C . - M d . - V a . , A p r . 197 1_________________
W a t e r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r . 1971____________________________
W a t e r l o o , Iow a, N o v . 1970 1
______________________________
W i c h it a , K a n s . , A p r . 1971-------------------------------------------------W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , M a y 1971------------------------------------------Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1971---------------------------------------------------------Youngs towrr— a r r e n , O h i o , N o v . 1970__________________
W

B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r i c e
1660-85,
1685-47,
1685-35,
1685-36,
1660-89,

35 ce n ts
40 ce n ts
30cen ts
40 cen ts
75 ce n ts

1685-46,
1685-5,
16 8 5- 14,
1660-87,
1685-34,
1660-70,
1685-49,
1685- 19,
1660-77,

35 ce n ts
30 ce n ts
35 ce n ts
45 ce n ts
50 cen ts
35ce n ts
50ce n ts
30cen ts
40 c e n ts

1660-72,
1685-12,
1685-62,

30 ce n ts
35ce n ts
30 ce n ts

1685-7,
1660-75,
1685-65,
1685-26,
1 6 6 0 -7 1 ,

30ce n ts
35ce n ts
50ce n ts
35ce n ts
30ce n ts

1685-42,
1685-20,
1685-23,
1685-13,
1685-72,
1685-3,
1685-52,
1685-38,
1685-61,
1660-86,
1685-8,
1685- 17,
1685-74,
1 6 85- 15,
1685-9,
1685-56,
1685-55,
1685-32,
1685-64,
1685-73,
1685-50,
1685-24,

40 ce n ts
30ce n ts
40 ce n ts
30 ce n ts
30 ce n ts
35ce n ts
35cen ts
35ce nts
30cents
35c e n ts
30ce n ts
30ce n ts
40 ce n ts
35ce n ts
30ce n ts
40 ce nts
30ce nts
35ce nts
30 ce n ts
30c e n ts
30cen ts
30ce nts

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W ASHING TO N, D.C.

20212

O F F IC IA L BUSINESS
PE NALTY FOR P R IV A TE USE, $300




POSTAGE AND FEES PAID

U.S. DEPA RTM ENT OF LABOR
I
-------------------------------------------------------------

1

FIRST CLASS M A IL


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102