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t n & M ontgo^1^ C o '
3
D a V t0 public Library

SEP 131971
DOCUMENT c o lle c tio n

AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e W o rce s ter, M as sa ch u s etts,
M e t r o p o l i t a n A r e a , M a y 1971

B u lle tin 1 6 8 5 - 7 3
U.S. D EPA RTM ENT OF LABOR / Bureau of Labor Statistics

BUREAU

OF

LABOR

S T A T IS T IC S

R E G IO N A L

O F F IC E S

ALASKA

Region I
1603-A Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Region V
219 South Dearborn St.
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)




Region II
341 Ninth Ave., Rm. 1025
New York, N .Y . 10001
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region VI
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions V II and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

Regions V II and V III will be serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner

AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e W o rc e s te r, M a s s a c h u s e tts ,
M etro p o litan A re a , M a y 1971
Bulletin 1 6 8 5 -7 3
August 1971
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 — Price 30 cents




C o n te n ts

P r e fa c e

Page
The Bureau of Labor Statistics program of annual
occupational wage surveys in metropolitan areas is de­
signed to provide data on occupational earnings, and estab­
lishment practices and supplementary wage provisions. It
yields detailed data by selected industry division for each
of the areas studied, for geographic regions, and for the
United States. A major consideration in the program is
the need for greater insight into (1) the movement of wages
by occupational category and skill level, and (2) the struc­
ture and level of wages among areas and industry divisions.
At the end of each survey, an individual area bul­
letin presents the survey results. After completion of all
of the individual area bulletins for a round of surveys, two
summary bulletins are issued. The first brings data for
each of the metropolitan areas studied into one bulletin.
The second presents information which has been projected
from individual metropolitan area data to relate to geo­
graphic regions and the United States.
Ninety areas currently are included in the pro­
gram. In each area, information on occupational earnings
is collected annually and on establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions biennially.

Introduction_______________________________________________________________
Wage trends for selected occupational groups__________________________
Tables:
1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and
number studied___________________________________________________
2. Indexes of standard weekly salaries and straight-time
hourly earnings for selected occupational groups, and
percents of change for selected periods________________________
A.

3
5

Occupational earnings:
A - l . Office occupations—
men and women_______________________
A -2 . Professional and technical occupations—
men and
women_____________________________________________________
A -3 . Office, professional, and technical occupations—
men and women combined________________________________
A -4 . Maintenance and powerplant occupations--------------------------A -5 . Custodial and material movement occupations___________

9
10
11

Appendix. Occupational descriptions-----------------------------------------------------

14

This bulletin presents results of the survey in
W orcester, M a ss., in May 1971. The Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Area, as defined by the Bureau of the Budget
through January 1968, consists of the city of Worcester
and 21 towns in Worcester County. This study was con­
ducted by the Bureau's regional office in Boston, M a ss.,
under the general direction of Paul V. Mulkern, Assistant
Regional Director for Operations.




1
4

NOTE: Similar tabulations are available for other
areas. (See inside back cover.)
Union scales, indicative of prevailing pay levels in
the Worcester area, are also available for seven selected
building trades.

iii

6
8




In tro d u c tio n
This area is 1 of 90 in which the U.S. Department of Labor's
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings
and related benefits on an areawide b a sis.1

either (l) employment in the occupation is too small to provide enough
data to merit presentation, or (2) there is possibility of disclosure
of individual establishment data. Earnings data not shown separately
for industry divisions are included in all industries combined data,
where shown. Likewise, data are included in the overall classification
when a subclassification of secretaries or truckdrivers is not shown
or information to subclassify is not available.

This bulletin presents current occupational employment and
earnings information obtained largely by mail from the establishments
visited by Bureau field economists in the last previous survey for
occupations reported in that earlier study. Personal visits were made
to nonrespondents and to those respondents reporting unusual changes
since the previous survey.

Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for
full-time workers, i.e ., those hired to work a regular weekly schedule
in the given occupational classification. Earnings data exclude pre­
mium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-of-living
allowances and incentive earnings are included. Where weekly hours
are reported, as for office clerical occupations, reference is to the
standard workweek (rounded to the nearest half hour) for which em­
ployees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay
for overtime at regular and/or premium rates). Average weekly earn­
ings for these occupations have been rounded to the nearest half dollar.

In each area, data are obtained from representative estab­
lishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; trans­
portation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade;
retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major
industry groups excluded from these studies are government opera­
tions and the construction and extractive industries. Establishments
having fewer than a prescribed number of workers are omitted because
they tend to furnish insufficient employment in the occupations studied
to warrant inclusion. Separate tabulations are provided for each of
the broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.

These surveys measure the level of occupational earnings in
an area at a particular time. Comparisons of individual occupational
averages over time may not reflect expected wage changes. The
averages for individual jobs are affected by changes in wages and
employment patterns. For example, proportions of workers employed
by high- or low-wage firms may change or high-wage workers may
advance to better jobs and be replaced by new workers at lower rates.
Such shifts in employment could decrease an occupational average even
though most establishments in an area increase wages during the year.
Trends in earnings of occupational groups, shown in table 2, are better
indicators of wage trends than individual jobs within the groups.

These surveys are conducted on a sample basis because of
the unnecessary cost involved in surveying all establishments. To
obtain optimum accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of
large than of small establishments is studied. In combining the data,
however, all establishments are given their appropriate weight. E s ­
timates based on the establishments studied are presented, therefore,
as relating to all establishments in the industry grouping and area,
except for those below the minimum size studied.
Occupations and Earnings
The occupations selected for study are common to a variety
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries, and are of the
following types: (l) Office clerical; (2) professional and technical;
(3) maintenance and powerplant; and (4) custodial and material move­
ment. Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job
descriptions designed to take account of inter establishment variation
in duties within the same job. The occupations selected for study
are listed and described in the appendix. The earnings data following
the job titles are for all industries combined. Earnings data for some
of the occupations listed and described, or for some industry divisions
within occupations, are not presented in the A -se rie s tables, because
1
Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New York
Department of Labor. These areas are Binghamton (New York portion only); Rochester (o ffice occu ­
pations only); Syracuse; and U tica—Rome. In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies
in 77 areas at the request o f the Wage and Hour Division of the U. S. Department of Labor.




The averages presented reflect composite, areawide esti­
mates.
Industries and establishments differ in pay level and job
staffing and, thus, contribute differently to the estimates for each job.
The pay relationship obtainable from the averages may fail to reflect
accurately the wage spread or differential maintained among jobs in
individual establishments. Similarly, differences in average pay levels
for men and women in any of the selected occupations should not be
assumed to reflect differences in pay treatment of the sexes within
individual establishments. Other possible factors which may con­
tribute to differences in pay for men and women include: Differences
in progression within established rate ranges, since only the actual
State
rates paid incumbents are collected; and differences in specific duties
performed, although the workers are classified appropriately within
the same survey job description. Job descriptions used in classifying

1

2
employees in these surveys are usually more generalized than those
used in individual establishments and allow for minor differences
among establishments in the specific duties performed.
Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all
establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actu­
ally surveyed. Because of differences in occupational structure among
establishments, the estimates of occupational employment obtained from
the sample of establishments studied serve only to indicate the relative
importance of the jobs studied. These differences in occupational
structure do not affect materially the accuracy of the earnings data.




Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Tabulations on selected establishment practices and supple­
mentary wage provisions (B -series tables) are not presented in this
bulletin.
Information for these tabulations is collected biennially.
These tabulations on minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced
women office workers; shift differentials; scheduled weekly hours;
paid holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension
plans are presented (in the B -se rie s tables) in previous bulletins for
this area.




T a b le 1.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts an d w o rk e rs w ith in s c o p e o f s u rv e y an d n u m b e r s tu d ie d in W o r c e s te r , M a s s .,1

b y m a jo r in d u s try d iv is io n ,2 M a y 1971
N u m b e r o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts

M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s in s c o p e
o f stu d y

In d u stry d iv is io n

W ith in s c o p e
o f stu d y 3

S tu d ie d

295

96

5 5 ,1 8 0

100

3 4 ,4 6 6

50
-

167
128

47
49

3 2 ,3 0 4
2 2 , 8 76

59
41

1 9 ,4 7 1
1 4 ,9 9 5

50
50
50
50
50

16
21
61
18
12

10
6
15
9
9

4 , 721
1, 769
9 ,3 1 5
5 ,6 9 2
1 ,3 7 9

9
3
17
10
2

4 , 266
671
4 , 366
4 ,6 5 3
1 ,0 3 9

A l l d i v i s i o n s ______________________________________
M a n u fa c t u r in g ---------------------------------------------------------------N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and
o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 5 __________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e 6 ............. .........................— —
R e t a i l t r a d e 6_______________________________________
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e 6 _______
S e r v i c e s 6 7_________________________________________

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
W it h in s c o p e o f s t u d y 4

1
—

—

S t u d ie d
N um ber

P ercen t

—

1 T h e W o r c e s t e r S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f in e d b y t h e B u r e a u o f t h e B u d g e t t h r o u g h J a n u a r y 1 9 6 8 , c o n s i s t s o f t h e c i t y
o f W o r c e s t e r , a n d th e to w n s o f A u b u r n , B e r li n , B o y ls t o n , B r o o k fi e ld , E a s t B r o o k f i e ld , G r a ft o n , H o ld e n , L e i c e s t e r ,
M illb u r y , N o r th b o r o u g h ,
N o r t h b r i d g e , N o r t h B r o o k f i e l d , O x f o r d , P a x t o n , S h r e w s b u r y , S p e n c e r , S t e r l i n g , S u t t o n , U p t o n , W e s t b o r o u g h , a n d W e s t B o y l s t o n in W o r c e s t e r C o u n t y .
T h e " w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f s t u d y " e s t i m a t e s s h o w n in t h is t a b l e p r o v i d e a r e a s o n a b l y a c c u r a t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s i z e a n d c o m p o s i t i o n o f t h e l a b o r
f o r c e in c lu d e d in t h e s u r v e y .
T h e e s t i m a t e s a r e n o t i n t e n d e d , h o w e v e r , t o s e r v e a s a b a s i s o f c o m p a r i s o n w it h o t h e r e m p l o y m e n t i n d e x e s f o r t h e
a r e a t o m e a s u r e e m p l o y m e n t t r e n d s o r l e v e l s s i n c e ( 1 ) p la n n in g o f w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s t h e u s e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t d a t a c o m p i l e d c o n s i d e r a b l y in
a d v a n c e o f t h e p a y r o l l p e r i o d s t u d ie d , a n d ( 2 ) s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m t h e s c o p e o f t h e s u r v e y .
2 T h e 1 9 6 7 e d i t i o n o f t h e S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l w a s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s b y in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n .
3 I n c l u d e s a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t a t o r a b o v e t h e m i n i m u m l i m i t a t i o n .
A l l o u t le t s (w ith in t h e a r e a ) o f c o m p a n i e s in s u c h
in d u s t r ie s a s t r a d e , fin a n c e , a u to r e p a ir s e r v i c e , and m o t io n p ic t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s id e r e d a s 1 e s t a b lis h m e n t .
4 I n c l u d e s a l l w o r k e r s in a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t (w ith in t h e a r e a ) a t o r a b o v e t h e m in i m u m l i m i t a t i o n .
5 A b b r e v i a t e d t o " p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s " in t h e A - s e r i e s t a b l e s . T a x i c a b s a n d s e r v i c e s in c i d e n t a l t o w a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n w e r e e x c l u d e d .
6 T h i s in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n i s r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " a n d " n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g " in t h e S e r i e s A t a b l e s . S e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n
o f d a t a f o r t h i s d i v i s i o n i s n o t m a d e f o r o n e o r m o r e o f t h e f o l l o w i n g r e a s o n s : (1 ) E m p l o y m e n t in t h e d i v i s i o n i s t o o s m a l l t o p r o v i d e e n o u g h d a t a
t o m e r i t s e p a r a t e s t u d y , (2 ) t h e s a m p l e w a s n o t d e s i g n e d i n i t i a l l y t o p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , ( 3 ) r e s p o n s e w a s i n s u f f i c i e n t o r in a d e q u a t e t o
p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , a n d (4 ) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f in d iv i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t d a t a .
7 H o t e l s a n d m o t e l s ; l a u n d r i e s a n d o t h e r p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u t o m o b i l e r e p a i r , r e n t a l , a n d p a r k in g ; m o t i o n p i c t u r e s ;
n o n p r o f i t m e m b e r s h i p o r g a n i z a t i o n s (e x c l u d i n g r e l i g i o u s a n d c h a r i t a b l e o r g a n i z a t i o n s ) ; a n d e n g i n e e r i n g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .

A b o u t t w o - t h i r d s o f t h e w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f t h e s u r v e y in t h e W o r c e s t e r a r e a
w e r e e m p l o y e d in m a n u f a c t u r i n g f i r m s .
T h e f o l l o w i n g p r e s e n t s t h e m a j o r in d u s t r y g r o u p s
and s p e c i f ic in d u s t r ie s as a p e r c e n t o f a ll m a n u fa ctu rin g :
In d u stry g ro u p s

S p e c if ic in d u s t r ie s

M a c h i n e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ___21
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s _______ 15
S to n e , c la y , and g la s s
p r o d u c t s ____________________________14
F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s ______ 13
L e a t h e r an d le a t h e r p r o d u c t s —
6

M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m e t a llic
m i n e r a l p r o d u c t s _________________ 14
M e t a lw o r k in g m a c h i n e r y _________ 10
S p e c i a l i n d u s t r y m a c h i n e r y ------ 8
M is c e lla n e o u s p r im a r y
m e t a l p r o d u c t s ----------------------------- 7
B la s t fu r n a c e and b a s ic
s t e e l p r o d u c t s ____________________ 6
F o o t w e a r , e x c e p t r u b b e r ----------- 5

T h i s i n f o r m a t i o n i s b a s e d on e s t i m a t e s o f t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t d e r i v e d f r o m u n i v e r s e
m a t e r ia ls c o m p ile d p r io r to a ctu a l s u r v e y .
P r o p o r t i o n s in v a r i o u s in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s m a y
d i f f e r f r o m p r o p o r t i o n s b a s e d on t h e r e s u l t s o f t h e s u r v e y a s s h o w n in t a b l e 1 a b o v e .

W a g e T r e n d s fo r S e le c te d O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s
s h o w s th e p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e .
T h e i n d e x i s th e p r o d u c t o f m u l t i p l y i n g
th e b a s e y e a r r e l a t i v e ( 1 0 0 ) b y t h e r e l a t i v e f o r th e n e x t s u c c e e d i n g
y e a r and c o n t i n u i n g t o m u l t i p l y ( c o m p o u n d ) e a c h y e a r ' s r e l a t i v e b y the
p r e v io u s y e a r 's index.

P r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 2 a r e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e
in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s ,
and in a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .
The in d exes
a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g i v e n t i m e , e x p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t o f
w a g e s d u r i n g the b a s e p e r i o d .
S u b t r a c t i n g 100 f r o m th e i n d e x y i e l d s
th e p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e i n w a g e s f r o m th e b a s e p e r i o d t o t h e d a t e o f
the i n d e x .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e o r i n c r e a s e r e l a t e to w a g e
c h a n g e s b e t w e e n the i n d i c a t e d d a t e s .
Annual ra tes of in c r e a s e , w h ere
s h o w n , r e f l e c t th e a m o u n t o f i n c r e a s e f o r 12 m o n t h s w h e n th e t i m e
p e r i o d b e t w e e n s u r v e y s w a s o t h e r th a n 12 m o n t h s . T h e s e c o m p u t a t i o n s
w e r e b a s e d o n th e a s s u m p t i o n th at w a g e s i n c r e a s e d at a c o n s t a n t r a t e
betw een s u r v e y s .
T h e s e e s t i m a t e s a r e m e a s u r e s o f c h a n g e in a v e r ­
a g e s f o r th e a r e a ; t h e y a r e n o t i n t e n d e d t o m e a s u r e a v e r a g e p a y
c h a n g e s in th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in th e a r e a .

F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , th e w a g e
t r e n d s r e l a t e t o r e g u l a r w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r the n o r m a l w o r k w e e k ,
ex clu siv e of earn ings fo r o v e r tim e .
F o r plant w o r k e r g r o u p s , they
m e a s u r e c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c l u d i n g
p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
late s h ift s.
The p e r c e n t a g e s are b a s e d on data f o r s e le c t e d key o c c u ­
p a t i o n s and i n c l u d e m o s t o f th e n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t j o b s w ith in
each group.
L im itation s

o f D ata

M ethod o f C om putin g
T h e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e ,
as m e a s u r e s
of
ch a n g e in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e in flu e n c e d by:
( l ) g e n e r a l s a l a r y and
w a g e c h a n g e s , (2) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y i n d i ­
v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h i l e i n th e s a m e j o b , and (3) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e
w a g e s due to c h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e r e s u l t in g f r o m l a b o r tu r n ­
o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , and c h a n g e s i n the p r o p o r ­
t i o n s o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h d i f f e r e n t p a y l e v e l s .
C h a n g e s i n th e l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in the
o c c u p a t io n a l a v e r a g e s w ith ou t a ctu a l w a g e c h a n g e s .
It i s c o n c e i v a b l e
th at e v e n t h o u g h a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i n an a r e a g a v e w a g e i n c r e a s e s ,
a v era g e w ages m a y have d e c lin e d b e c a u s e lo w e r -p a y in g esta b lish m en ts
e n t e r e d th e a r e a o r e x p a n d e d t h e i r w o r k f o r c e s .
S im ila rly , w ages
m a y h a v e r e m a i n e d r e l a t i v e l y c o n s t a n t , y e t th e a v e r a g e s f o r an a r e a
m a y have r is e n c o n s i d e r a b ly b e c a u s e h ig h e r -p a y in g esta b lish m e n ts
e n t e r e d th e a r e a .

E a c h o f th e f o l l o w i n g k e y o c c u p a t i o n s w it h i n an o c c u p a t i o n a l
g r o u p w as a s s ig n e d a co n sta n t w eig h t b a s e d on its p r o p o r t io n a te e m ­
p l o y m e n t in th e o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p :
O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ( m e n a n d w o m e n ): O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ( m e n a n d w o m e n ) — S k i ll e d m a in t e n a n c e (m e n ) :
C a rp en ters
C o n t in u e d
B o o k k e e p i n g - m a c h in e
E le c t r ic ia n s
S e c r e t a r ie s
o p e r a to r s , cla s s B
M a ch in ists
S te n o g ra p h e r s , g e n e r a l
C le rk s , a c c o u n t i n g , cla s se s
M e c h a n ic s
S te n o g ra p h e r s , s e n io r
A and B
M e c h a n ic s ( a u t o m o t iv e )
S w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s , c la s se s
C le ik s , f i l e , c la s se s
A , B, a n d C
C le r k s , o r d e r
C le r k s , p a y r o ll
C o m p t o m e t e r o p e r a to r s
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s , cla s se s
A and B
O f f i c e b o y s a n d girls

The
p l i e d b y th e
in th e g r o u p
w ere related
g a t e f o r th e

A and B
T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
cla s s B
T y p is t s , cla s s e s A a n d B

P ain ters
P ip e fit t e r s
T o o l a n d d ie m a k e rs

In du stria l nurses ( m e n a n d w o m e n ):

U n s k ille d p la n t (m e n ) :
J a n itors, p o r te rs , a n d c le a n e r s

N u rses, in d u stria l (r e g is t e r e d )

L a b o re r s, m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g

T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s th e e f f e c t
o f c h a n g e s i n th e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d i n e a c h j o b i n ­
c l u d e d in th e d a t a .
The p e r c e n t a g e s of ch a n ge r e f le c t on ly ch anges
in a v e r a g e p a y f o r s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r s .
T h e y a r e not in f lu e n c e d by
c h a n g e s in s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , a s s u c h , o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
for o v ertim e.
W h e re n e c e s s a r y , data w e r e a d ju s te d to r e m o v e f r o m
th e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e a n y s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d
b y c h a n g e s i n th e s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .

a verage (m ean) earn ings fo r e a ch occu p a tio n w e r e m u lti­
o c c u p a t i o n a l w e i g h t , and th e p r o d u c t s f o r a ll o c c u p a t i o n s
w e r e totaled.
The a ggregates for 2 con secu tiv e yea rs
b y d i v i d i n g th e a g g r e g a t e f o r t h e l a t e r y e a r b y th e a g g r e ­
ea rlier year.
T h e r e s u l t a n t r e l a t i v e , l e s s 100 p e r c e n t ,




4




T a b le 2 .

In d e x e s o f s ta n d a rd w e e k ly s a la r ie s an d s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s

in

W o r c e s te r , M a s s ., M a y 1 9 7 0 an d M a y 1 9 7 1 , and p e rc e n ts o f c h a n g e ^ fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s
M a n u fa c t u r in g

A ll in d u s t r ie s
P e r io d

O ffic e
c le r ic a l
(m e n a n d
w om en)

I n d u s t r ia l
n u rses
(m e n and
w om en)

S k i ll e d
m a in t e n a n c e
tra d es
(m e n )

U n s k i ll e d
p la n t
w ork ers
(m e n )

O ffic e
cle r ic a l
(m e n a n d
w om en)

In d u s t r i a l
nu rses
(m e n a n d
w om en)

S k i ll e d
m a in t e n a n c e
tra d es
(m e n )

U n s k i ll e d
p la n t
w ork ers
(m e n )

124. 4
129. 4

117. 1
124. 8

118. 7
122. 1

124. 2
160. 7

119. 8
149. 5

132. 1
161. 4

3. 5
7. 0
3. 3
3. 5
2. 1
7. 6
5. 1
3 .0

I n d e x e s (J u n e 196 7 = 100)
M a y 1 9 7 0 ________________________________________________
M a y 1 9 7 1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------

120. 4
126. 5

124. 6
130. 8

117. 5
125. 4

116. 6
120. 1

120. 2
1 2 4 .4

I n d e x e s (J u n e 1961 = 100)
J u n e 1 9 6 7 ________________________________________________
M a y 1 9 7 1 ............................................- ..........................................

123. 6
156. 5

1 2 1 .0
1 5 1 .7

125. 9
164. 6

120. 8
150. 2

129. 0
154. 8

P e r c e n t s o f ch a n g e 1

1
1
7
3

3. 4
3. 2
1 .6
1. 1
2. 8
5. 7
5. 0
3 .9

4. 7
3 .9
4. 2
3. 3
1. 8
6. 8
5. 9
4. 2

3.
4.
3.
1.
2.
3.
5.
5.

7
2
2
5
0
1
2
5

1. 1
5. 6
1 .6
2- . 5
3. 2
6 .6
5. 7
6. 3

3 .4
2. 8
1 .4
.9
2. 8
5. 3
5 .2
3. 2

5. 2
5. 7

6. 3
6. 9

4. 4
4. 8

4. 1
4. 5

3 .9
4. 3

6. 0
6. 6

4. 5
4. 9

4. 9
5 .4

7 .9
5. 1

10. 3
5. 0

8. 4
6 .7

7. 4
3. 0

9. 7
3. 5

1 0 .4
4. 0

8. 5
6 .6

9. 8
2. 9

J u n e I 9 6 0 t o J u n e 1 9 6 1 ---------------------------------------------J u n e 1961 t o J u n e 1 9 6 2 ---------------------------------------------J u n e 196 2 t o J u n e 1 9 6 3 ---------------------------------------------J u n e 1 9 6 3 t o J u n e 1 9 6 4 ---------------------- ------------ ------J u n e 1 9 6 4 t o J u n e 1 9 6 5 ---------------------------------------------J u n e 1 9 6 5 t o J u n e 1 9 6 6 ---------------------------------------------J u n e 1 9 6 6 t o J u n e 1 9 6 7 ---------------------------------------------J u n e 1967 t o J u n e 1 9 6 8 ---------------------------------------------J u n e 1 9 6 8 t o M a y 1 969:
1 1 - m o n t h i n c r e a s e ------------------------------------------------A n n u a l r a t e o f i n c r e a s e ---------------------------------------

3 .6
4. 2
2. 7
1 .6
1 .9
5. 5
5. 7
6. 0

1.
5.
2.
0
3.
6.
6.
6.

M a y 1 9 6 9 t o M a y 1 9 7 0 -----------------------------------------------M a y 1 97 0 t o M a y 1 9 7 1 ------------------------------------------------

1
2

1
6
1

A l l c h a n g e s a r e i n c r e a s e s u n l e s s o t h e r w i s e in d i c a t e d .
T h is d e c l i n e
l a r g e l y r e f l e c t s e m p l o y e e t u r n o v e r w it h in

and

b etw een

h ig h - and

lo w -w a g e

e s t a b lis h m e n t s

ra th er

NOTE:
M o s t p r e v i o u s l y p u b l i s h e d i n d e x e s f o r t h e W o r c e s t e r a r e a u s e d J u n e 1 961 a s th e b a s e
p e r io d .
T h e y c a n b e c o n v e r t e d t o th e n e w b a s e p e r i o d b y d i v id in g t h e m b y th e c o r r e s p o n d i n g in d e x
n u m b e r s f o r J u n e 1 96 7 o n t h e J u n e 1961 b a s e p e r i o d a s s h o w n in th e t a b l e .
(T h e r e s u lt s h o u ld b e
m u lt ip lie d b y 1 0 0 .)

th a n

v
'

w age

d ecreases.

6

A.

Occupational earnings

T a b le A-1.

O f fic e o c c u p a tio n s —men and w o m e n

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Worcester, Mass. , M a y 1971)
Weekly earnings *
(stan lard)

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of— t

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly

i
65

Mean 2

Median 2

Middle range 2

(standard)

i
70

$

S
75

80

>

140

and
u n d er

-

70

75

80

85

s

150

-

i

160

-

-

150

160

170

MEN
$

$

$

$

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A
N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG --------

95

3 9 .5

1 6 0 .0 0

-

-

-

1

3 9 .0

1 5 0 .5 0

1 6 6 .5 0
1 6 0 .0 0

1 5 4 .0 0 -1 7 0 .0 0

35

1 4 0 .5 0 -1 6 7 .5 0

-

“

-

-

3
3

-

9
8

13
2

41
17

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B

28

3 8 .0

1 3 5 .5 0

1 3 8 .5 0

1 2 1 .0 0 -1 4 8 .5 0

2

-

8

6

1

4

34

3 9 .0

1 0 3 .0 0

9 7 .5 0

9 2 .5 0 -1 2 3 .0 0

31

3 8 .0

1 2 6 .0 0

1 2 6 .5 0

1 2 2 .5 0 -1 3 2 .5 0

28

3 8 .0

1 2 5 .5 0

1 2 5 .0 0

1 2 2 .0 0 -1 3 2 .5 0

61

3 9 .0

1 0 5 .0 0

1 0 6 .5 0

26
35

3 8 .5
3 9 .0

1 0 3 .0 0
1 0 6 .5 0

1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0

9 7 .5 0 -1 1 2 .5 0
9 2 .0 0 -1 1 6 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0 -1 1 2 .0 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A MANUFA CT UR IN G -------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG ----------

239
88

1 3 4 .5 0
1 3 7 .5 0

151

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

1 3 2 .5 0

1 3 1 .5 0
1 4 2 .0 0
1 2 3 .5 0

1 1 2 .0 0 -1 6 5 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0 -1 5 4 .0 0
1 1 0 .5 0 -1 6 6 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B MANUFA CT UR IN G -------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------

400
114

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

9 7 .5 0
9 7 .5 0
9 8 .0 0

8 7 .5 0 -1 2 4 .5 0
8 7 .5 0 -1 1 8 .0 0

286

1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0

1

WOMEN
BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) ---------------------BOOKKE EP IN G- MA CH IN E OP ERATORS
CLASS A -----------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G -------------BOOKKE EP IN G- MA CH IN E OPERATORS
CLASS B -----------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G -------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------

-

-

2

-

_
-

_

”

1

2

-

-

2

“

1

_

-

2

-

2
-

-

-

2

2

4
2
2

18
2

42

8 7 .5 0 -1 3 5 .0 0

-

16

11
31

26

3 7 .5

9 3 .0 0

9 1 .0 0

8 0 .0 0 -1 1 0 .5 0

-

1

6

8 1 .5 0

8 0 .5 0

7 5 .5 0 -

8 0 .0 0

7 5 .0 0 -

8 4 .5 0

27
21

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C -------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------

108

3 9 .0

8 9 .0 0

3 9 .0

8 4 .0 0
8 3 .5 0

7 7 .5 0 -

80

8 3 .0 0
8 3 .0 0

7 7 .0 0 -

8 9 .5 0

CLERKS, PAYROLL --------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G -------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------

131
83

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 2 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0

1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0

48

3 8 .5

1 2 2 .5 0

1 1 7 .5 0

9 3 .5 0 -1 2 1 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0 -1 4 6 .0 0

KE YPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A MA NU FA CT UR IN G -------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------

120

3 8 .5

57
63

3 9 .0
3 8 .0

1 1 1 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0

1 1 0 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0

1 0 2 .0 0 -1 1 8 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0 -1 1 4 .5 0
9 6 .0 0 -1 4 0 .5 0

KEYP UN CH OPERATORS, CLASS B MA NU FA CT UR IN G -------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------

158
40
118

3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0

1 0 0 .0 0
9 3 .0 0
1 0 2 .5 0

9 7 .5 0
9 6 . 50
9 8 .5 0

8 9 .0 0 -1 1 1 .0 0
8 8 .0 0 -1 0 1 .5 0
8 9 .0 0 -1 1 4 .0 0

i
i

"

2

OFFICE GIRLS -------------------

55

3 B .0

8 4 .0 0

7 7 .5 0 -

i

6

13

1
1

31

11
20

45

26

7 9 .5 0

i
i

21

85

3 7 .5
3 7 .5

1
71
26

2

100

See footnotes at end of tables,




O
i
n
«■
*
0
0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A -------CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B -------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------

29
28

8 5 .5 0

9 6 .5 0 -1 2 4 .5 0

9 0 .0 0

21

-

13
12

23

-

5

-

5

_
-

5
5

28

-

25
18
8
8

14

10

6

12

2

2

3
7

29
19

5
2

17

-

1

5

10

3

17

2

12

26

20

3
9

22

15

1

5

10

4

5

17

1

16

i
170

t
180

180

190

and
190

over

7
T a b l e A -1 .

O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — m e n a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Worcester, Mass., M a y 1971)
N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—

$
Average
weekly

Sex, occupation, and industry divisi

65

and
under

(standard)

70

70

t

t

*

t

*

90

80

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

95

75

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

140

39
13
26

39
26
13

93
25
18

55
27
28

33
19
19

I

190

I

150

i

160

i

170

i

180

130.50 128.50
131.00 131.00
130.00 127.00
161.00 166.00

---------------------

39

39.0
39.0
38 . 5
38.5

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S A ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

51
25
26

38.0
38.5
37.5

157.50
167.00
198.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

179
62
117

39.0
39.5
38.5

130.00 129.00
137.50 192.00
126.50 125.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------------------

191
90
51

39.0
39.0
38 . 5

130.00
129.50
131.00

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S 0 ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

103
75
28

39.0
39.0
39.5

STENOGRAPHERS,
G E N E R A L ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------

137
96
91

PUBLIC

UTILITIES

NONMANUFACTURING

NONMANUFACTURING

------------------------

976
259

222

75

OPERATORS,

CLASS

A

NONMANUFACTURING

1 7 0 .5 0

1 9 6 .0 0 -

1 7 8 .5 0

1 9 9 .5 0 1 2 8 .0 0 -

1 7 9 .5 0
1 7 9 .0 0

150

160

170

63
99
19
3

25
13

12

28
7
21

6

12

6

7
3
9

12

7
9
3

2
2

1 9 2 .5 0
1 9 0 .5 0

1 0 0 .0 0 -

1 6 5 .5 0

1 2 0 .0 0
117.00
128.00

119.00
118.50
122.50

1 1 1 .0 0 -

1 2 8 .0 0

39.5
39.5
38.5

108.00
109.00
117.50

103.50
101.50
111.50

9 6 .0 0 9 6 .5 0 -

1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0

9 9 .5 0 -

1 3 9 .5 0

110.50

1 1 2 .0 0

108.00
113.00

1 0 1 .5 0 9 9 .0 0 -

1 1 8 .5 0
1 2 7 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0

101.00
1 0 0 .0 0

100.50
100.50

8 9 .0 0 9 0 .5 0 -

1 0 9 .0 0
1 0 7 .5 0

39.0
39.0

98.00
99.00
99.50

1 0 0 .0 0
100.50
99.50

9 3 .0 0 9 9 .5 0 9 1 .5 0 -

1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0

37.5
37.0

95.00
99.50

96.00
95.00

87.0087.00-

105.00
109.50

6
6

13
13

19
19

107.00
101.00
108.50

19
3
11

9
3
6

22

32
17
15

19
12
7

39.0
38.5
39.0

96.00
91.00
98.00

99.50
89.00
98.00

86.0082.5088.00-

TYPISTS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING

196
109
92

38.5
39.0
37.5

89.00
86.00
92.50

89.00
87.00
92.00

81.50- 96.50
78.50- 93.00
85.00106.00




11

10

7

1

7
3
9

1 1 0 .5 0 1 2 7 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0 -1 5 9 .0 0

32
80

See footnotes at end of tables.

11

9

1 1 7 .0 0 1 2 2 .0 0 -

2?

10

135.00
136.00
129.00

112

------------------------

19
5
19

1 9 2 .5 0
1 5 1 .5 0
1 3 9 .5 0

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S A ----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1

1 0 1 .5 0 -

100
72

2

5

1 1 7 .0 0 1 2 6 .5 0 -

------------------------

1

6

38.5
38.0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
G E N E R A L ------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

NONMANUFACTURING

1

1 1 3 .5 0 -

------

S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B -----N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------SWITCHBOARD 0PERAT0R-RECEPTIONISTSM A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------

1 5 9 .0 0 -

25
9
16

1 9 3 .5 0
1 9 3 .0 0
1 9 5 .5 0

38.0
90.0

STENOGRAPHERS,
S E N I O R --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------SWITCHBOARD

165.00
173.50
159.50

1 1 5 .5 0 1 1 8 .5 0 1 1 2 .0 0 -

190

_
1 80

190

CONTINUED

S E C R E T A R I E S -------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

i

22

22

26
26

15
9
6

5

26
20
6

96
28
18

1
1

21
16
5

10
5
5

8

10

3
5

10

27
17

10
27
25

2
18
19
9

5
5
-

3

2

1

2

7
7

3
19

13
10
3

21
5
16

2

10
1
9
11
6

16
16

17
15
2

1

6
17

1

1

5
13

12

1

11
9
7
3

9
3

8
9
9

2
2

1
1

over

8
T a b le A - 2 .

P ro fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s —men and w o m e n

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Worcester, Mass., M a y 1971)
Weekly earnings
(standard)

1
100
Under
t
and
100 under

110

120

110

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N u m b e r of workers rec eiving straight-time we ekly earning s o f -S
S
$
S
$
%
t
»
l
$
%
t
$
*
t
*
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
260 270
280 290

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

2
2

2
2

3
3

9
9

8
5

4
3

1

-

1
~

*12
12

5
3

10

4
“

1

1

-

-

4
4

s

Number
of
workers

weekly
hours 1
(standard)

M ean 2

Median 2

Middle range 2

$

$

%

and
190

200

210

-

10
10

1
1

4
3

3
3

7
4

2
~

9

3

2

4

2

2

2

1

2

3

1

4

1

5

7

4

19

27
24

2

1
1

_

_

_

2

_

_

_

2

-

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

290

over

7
5

5
3

2

4
3

1
1

5

2

5

1
1

5
5

3
3

1
1

7
7

4
4

1
1

_

_

MEN
$
$
$
$
39.0 146.50 134.50 122.50-195.00
39.0 146.50 134.00 121.00-201.00

CO MPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG --------

AO
3A

CO MPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C
N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG --------

2B

38.0 114.00 111.50
38.0 111.00 104.00

CO MPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG --------

AI
35

38.5 240.00 232.50 21 3.00-269.00
38.5 243.00 242.50 21 3.50-275.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B --------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG --------

56
A2

38.5 199.50 197.50 17 5.00-229.50
38.5 201.50 195.00 169.00-246.50

CO MPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A

30

37.5 262.00 272.00 23 9. 00 -2 88 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A
MA NU FACTURING

88
85

39.5 192.50 194.00 180.50-203.50
39.5 192.00 193.00 179.50-203.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B
MA NU FA CT UR IN G

97
91

Al.O 165.00 168.00 156.50-176.50
41.0 164.50 167.00 15 6.00-176.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS c
MANUFA CT UR IN G

50
A1

41.5 146.50 147.50 138.00-156.00
41.5 144.00 146.50 137.00-152.00

46
38

39.0 148.00 147.00 134.00-162.00
39.5 144.50 145.50 132.50-156.00

37

96.00-127.00
93.00-115.00

9

_

_

_

~

“

~

-

_

_

-

~

”

_

_

_

“
-

-

*

-

-

_

~

~

_

_

9

9

~

_

_

-

3
3

4
4

5
5

5
5

10
9

17
15

5
5

ii

10

10

8

2
2

9
6

n

“

11
11

11

15
15

18
16

21
21

31
31

13
9

6

12

6

6

6
6

ii
9

WOMEN
NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) --MANUFA CT UR IN G ---------------------

* Wo rk er s were distributed as follows:
See footnotes at end of tables.




4 at $80 to $90; and 8 at $90 to $100.

3

19
2

2

2

“

_
“

-

9
T a b le A - 3 .

O ffic e , professional, and technical o cc u p atio n s —men and w o m e n c om bined

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Worcester, Mass., M a y 1971)

OFFICE

Number
of

Number
Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
[standard) (standard)

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE

34

3 9 .0

$
1 0 3 .0 0

31
28

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

1 2 6 .0 0
1 2 5 .5 0

OPERATORS.

C L A S S A ----------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE

O c c u p a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

OFFICE

OCCUPATIONS

BILLERS. MACHINE
(BILLING
M A C H I N E ) ---------------------------------

OPERATORS,

C L A S S B ---------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------

64
26

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

OCCUPATIONS

-

38

3 9 .0

CLERKS,
ACCOUNTING,
NONMANUFACTURING

CLASS A —
----------------

334
186

3 9 .0
3 8 .0

1 4 1 .5 0
1 3 6 .0 0

CLERKS,

CLASS

428
125
303

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 5 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0

26

3 7 .5

9 3 .0 0

—

M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------CLERKS,
CLERKS,

FILE,
FILE,

CLASS
CLASS

A

101

CLERKS,
FILE,
CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

8 2 .0 0

3 7 .5

7 9 .5 0

108
80

C

3 7 .5

85

B

NONMANUFACTURING

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

8 3 .0 0
8 3 .0 0

CLERKS,
O R D E R ---------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

34

3 8 .0

26

3 7 .5

1 1 6 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0

CLERKS,
P A Y R O L L -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------

135
85
50

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1 1 3 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS,
CLASS A
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------

120
57
63

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

1 1 1 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0

KEYPUNCH

160
41

3 8 .0
3 8 .5

1 0 0 .0 0

119

3 8 .0

9 2 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0

79
25
54

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

8 5 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
8 6 .0 0

CLASS

B

O F F I C E B O Y S A N D G I R L S -------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------

See footnote at end of tables.




3 9 .0
3 9 .0

222

3 8 .5
3 8 .5

34

$
1 3 0 .5 0
1 3 1 .0 0
1 3 0 .0 0
1 6 1 .0 0

51
25
26

3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 7 .5

1 5 7 .5 0
1 6 7 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS B
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------

179

1 3 0 .0 0
1 3 7 .5 0

OCCUPATIONS

-

Number
of
woiken

Weekly
earainfs 1
(standard)

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

$
9 6 .0 0
9 1 .0 0

3 9 .0

9 8 .0 0

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .5

9 2 .5 0

CONTINUED

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S A ------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

113

TYPISTS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING

196
104

-------------------------------------------------

NONMANUFACTURING

Weekly
hours 1
standard)

--------------------

32
81

92

8 9 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

1 4 8 .5 0

62

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

---

117

3 8 .5

1 2 6 .5 0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

C

141

3 9 .0

1 3 0 .0 0

M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------NONMANUFACTURING —

90
51

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1 2 9 .5 0
1 3 1 .0 0

COMPUTER

41

3 9 .0

NONMANUFACTURING

------------

35

3 9 .0

SECRETARIES,
CLASS D
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------

103
75
28

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 2 0 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING

CLASS C
------------

40

3 8 .5
3 8 .0

1 1 5 .5 0

29

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS,
C L A S S A ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------

47
40

3 8 .5
3 8 .0

2 3 7 .5 0
2 4 0 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS,
C L A S S B -------------

73

3 8 .5

1 9 2 .5 0

57

3 8 .5

1 9 3 .5 0

50

3 7 .5

1 6 7 .5 0

SECRETARIES,

CLASS

NONMANUFACTURING

---

137

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------NONMANUFACTURING —

1 0 8 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0

93
34

3 8 .0
4 0 .0

1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0

40

3 8 .0

1 1 4 .5 0

S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B -----N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

33
29

3 8 .5
3 8 .0

1 0 0 .0 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSM A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------

100
28

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

9 8 .0 0
9 9 .0 0
9 4 .5 0

26

3 7 .0

1 1 5 .0 0

65
60

3 7 .5
3 7 .0

9 5 .0 0
9 4 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS,

SWITCHBOARD

CLASS

B

96
41

SENIOR
-------

OPERATORS,

CLASS

A

72

TRANSCRI8ING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
G E N E R A L -----------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

CLASS

B

1 4 6 .0 0
1 4 6 .0 0

1 1 1 .5 0

NONMANUFACTURING

------------

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S C -------------

1 0 1 .0 0

OPERATORS,

---------------------------------

OPERATORS,

1 2 8 .0 0

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

TABULATING-MACHINE
OPERATORS,

O cc u p a tio n and in d u str y d iv is io n

OFFICE
476
254

SECRETARIES, CLASS A
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---

MANUFACTURING

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

CONTINUED

S E C R E T A R I E S --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G — --NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES

NONMANUFACTURING

B

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

of

1 0 6 .0 0
1 0 3 .0 0
1 0 7 .5 0

ACCOUNTING,

Average

Average

Average

O cc u p a tio n and in d u str y d iv is io n

COMPUTER SYSTEMS
BUSINESS,
CLASS

ANALYSTS,
A

30

3 7 .5

2 6 2 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN,

A

88

3 9 .5

85

3 9 .5

1 9 2 .5 0
1 9 2 .0 0

99
93

4 0 .5
4 1 .0

1 6 4 .5 0
1 6 4 .0 0

CLASS
MANUFACTURING

DRAFTSMEN,

CLASS
MANUFACTURING

DRAFTSMEN,

CLASS
MANUFACTURING

B

C
-----------------------------

52

4 1 .0

43

4 1 .5

1 4 5 .5 0
1 4 3 .0 0

NURSES,
INDUSTRIAL
( R E G I S T E R E D ) ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------

48
40

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 4 3 .0 0

1 4 6 .5 0

10
T a b le A - 4 .

M a in te n a n c e and p o w e r p la n t o ccupations

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Worcester, Mass., M a y 1971)
Hourly

ings 3
eam

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a rn i n g s o f---$
2.8 0

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of

workers

Mean2 Median2

Middle range 2

*
2.9 0

t
3 .1 0

S
3.2 0

i
3.30

$
3 .40

t
3.5 0

$
3.6 0

S
3 .7 0

»
3.8 0

i

%

i

3.0 0

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

4.1 0

$
$
*
4 . 20 4 . 30 4 . 4 0

*
4 .5 0

s
t
4 . 60 4 . 8 0

t
5 .0 0

*
5.2 0

2.9 0

Number

3.0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3.3 0

3.40

3 .50

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

4.1 0

4.2 0

4 . 30 4 . 40 4 . 5 0

4.6 0

4 . 80 5 . 0 0

5 .2 0

over

6
6

-

1
1

1
1

2
2

8
8

1
1

4
4

2
2

11
11

4
4

5
5

3
2

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

_

-

5
5

6
6

-

2
2

5
5

-

8
8

18
18

4
4

7
5

6
6

1
1

9
9

8
8

6
6

26
23

-

-

6
6

7
7

-

2
2

1
1

9
9

_

_

-

1
1

_

-

3
2

_

-

-

5
5

5
5

-

10
10

_

3
3

1
1

_

_

_

-

1
1

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

3
3

6
6

2
2

3
3

1
1

i
i

1
1

4
4

_

~

_

5
5

1
1

7
7

20
20

21
21

7
7

17
17

i
i

1
1

_
~

4
3
1

11
11

Unde i
S
and
2 . 8 0 under

%

MEN
56
51

$
4.0 0
3.8 0

$
3 .9 3
3 .9 1

$
3 .4 5 3 .4 4 -

$
4.1 6
4.0 8

116
111

4 .4 6
4.4 5

4 .3 6
4.3 5

4 .0 2 4 ,0 1 -

5 .0 1
5.0 0

-

-

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY
MANUFA CT UR IN G -----

36
35

4 .1 1
4 .1 0

4.1 1
4.0 9

3 .7 2 3 .7 1 -

4.3 5
4.1 9

_

-

FIREMEN, STATIONARY BOILER -------MA NU FACTURING --------------------

56
55

3 .3 3
3 .3 8

3.2 3
3 .2 8

2 .8 5 2 .8 6 -

3.9 2
3.9 2

5
3

18
18

_
-

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------

90
90

3.6 3
3 .6 3

3.3 9
3 .3 9

3 .3 4 3 .3 4 -

3.8 6
3.8 6

2
2

-

_

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE ----------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------

147
146

4.1 2
4.1 1

4 . 19
4.1 9

3 .6 9 3 .7 0 -

4.3 8
4.3 8

-

-

-

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) ---------------------MANU FA CT UR IN G -------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ---------------PUBLIC UT IL IT IE S --------------

83
29
54
44

4 .0 9
4.2 4
4 .0 2
4 .1 2

4.1 2
4 . 18
3.8 0
3.8 6

3 .7 4 4 .1 1 3 .7 2 3 .7 5 -

4 .5 9
4.6 5
4.5 3
4.5 6

_

_
~

MECHANICS, MA IN TE NA NC E ------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------

285
272

4 .0 1
4.0 0

4.0 0
4.0 1

3 .6 3 3 .6 3 -

4.1 9
4 .1 9

~

1
1

-

OILERS -------------------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------

40
40

3 .5 3
3 .5 3

3 .5 5
3 .5 5

3 .2 0 3 .2 0 -

3 .9 8
3.9 8

2
2

1
1

_

PIPEFITTERS, MA INTENANCE ---------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------

72
72

4.2 9
4 .2 9

4 .2 1
4.2 1

3 .9 4 3 .9 4 -

4.8 2
4.8 2

-

-

“

SH EET-METAL WORKERS, MA IN TE NA NC E MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------

38
38

3 .9 2
3.9 2

4.1 2
4 .1 2

3 .5 3 3 .5 3 -

4.3 3
4.3 3

_

1
1

-

“

198
198

3 .8 2
3 .8 2

3 .8 5
3.8 5

3 .6 4 3 .6 4 -

4 .0 0
4 .0 0

-

-

1
1

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE
MANUFA CT UR IN G ------ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE
MANUFA CT UR IN G ---------

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS
MA NU FA CT UR IN G —

See footnotes at end of tables.




-

-

-

-

"

“

2
2

-

*
1
1

4
4

2
2

-

-

6
6

-

*

-

i
i

5
5

41
41

11
11

1
1

6
6

-

_

8
8

2
2

13
13

14
14

24
24

5

1
1

_
-

6
6
3

17

5

-

-

17
17

5
4

_

~

_
-

_
~

_
-

-

“

2
2
-

-

-

5

3
3

8
8

12
12

-

7
7

6
6

-

_
“

_

-

2
2

-

~

_

5

_

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

-

-

8
8

62
62

9
9

1
1

1
1

13
13

20
20

23
23

31
27

6
6

20
18

15
15

4
4

1
1

2
2

_

7
7

_

“

“

2
2

_
~

2
2

-

~

2
2

1
1

17
17

4
4

3
3

5
5

2
2

1
1

6
6

2

_

-

_

4

“

9
9

2

”

3
3

_

“

2
2

-

2

2

l
1

3
3

5
5

7
7

2
2

12
12

10
10

24
24

5
5

18
18

12
12

1
1

8
8

4
4

_

_

-

i

_
i
i

5
5

6
5

_
-

10
10

5
5

_

18
12
6
6

5
1

-

7
4

4
64
64

-

ii
u

-

6
6

43
43

1
1

5
5

21
21

5

_

-

5

-

1
1

7
7

4
4

_

4

-

i
i

_
-

_

_

11
T a b le A -5 .

C u sto d ial and m a te ria l m o v em e n t o ccu p atio n s

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Worcester, Mass., M a y 1971)
N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings^

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of
workers

t
S
$
i
»
i
)
$
t
t
*
*
*
$
$
s
$
*
t
*
*
t
*
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2 80 3.00 3. 20 3 40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 * .80 5 .00 5.20 5.40 5.60
M ean 2

M e d ian 2

M iddle range 2

and
under

-

and

5 .00 5 .20 5.40 5.60

4.40 4.60

o
C
O

>■
*

O

1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3 00 3.20 3. 40 3 60 3.80 4.00

-

17
2
15

2
2
*

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

2
2

19
19

over

MEN
GUARDS AND WATC HM EN ----------------MANU FA CT UR IN G -------------------GUARDS
MA NU FA CT UR IN G -------------------WATCHMEN
MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------

301
157

$
2.41
2.82

$
2.44
2,93

$
$
1.68- 3.07
2.43- 3.19

95

8*

3.06

3.10

2.76- 3.36

*

-

~

30
20

21
16

30
20

25
21

12
4

44
39

19
19

21
14

*
*

*

-

-

2

6

17

2

28

14

11

*

“

2.43

2.09- 3.04

-

-

-

-

20

14

14

*

2

11

5

3

2.65
2.86
2.35

2.76
3.00
2.21

2.15- 3.04
2.72- 3.08
2.05- 2.65

_
-

_
-

*
*
-

9
2
7

149
37
112

*9
22
27

31
5
26

55
32
23

86
61
25

124
116
8

27
26
1

19
9
10

20
18
2

LABORERS, MATERIAL HAND LI NG ------MANU FA CT UR IN G -------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

373
293
80

2.87
2.86
2.91

2.81
2.79
2.82

2.43- 3.17
2.54- 3.16
1.86- 4.16

_
-

8

20
20

16
16
-

30
20
10

16
16

32
32
“

64
64
“

22
7
15

101
101

12
12

9
9

2
2
“

2
2

ORDER
FILLERS ----------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------

165
29

3.40
3.01

3.63
2.89

3.06- 3.67
2.51- 3.28

-

_
"

"

-

-

1
1

10
10

_

25
5

10

108
2

-

PACKERS, SHIPPING MANU FA CT UR IN G —

120
119

3.78
3.79

3.46
3.48

2.93- 5.14
2.94- 5.14

-

_

_

1

~

-

-

15
15

8
8

_
-

-

20
20

14
14

_
"

*
*

*
*

RECE IV IN G CLERKS --

67
38
29

3.28
3.12
3.*9

3.29
3.16
3.67

2.96- 3.67
2.93- 3.**
3.25- 3.78

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

4
*

4
*

12
11
1

8
6
2

6
5
1

15
10
5

SHIPPING CLERKS --------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------

33
29

3.26
3.26

3.19
3.18

3.07- 3.53
3.06- 3.54

_

_

-

-

_

-

2
2

1
1

-

14
13

*
2

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ----MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------

54
33

3.11
3.29

3.09
3.35

2.95- 3.48
3.08- 3.63

_

_

_

_

_

_

5

5

8

16
15

TRUCKDRIVERS
-----------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G -------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------

605
19*
411
186

3.95
3.85
3.99
*.80

3.96
4.11
3.91
4.85

3.34- 4.82
3.50- 4.33
3.32- 4.85

_

_
-

_

-

-

_
-

*
2
2

9
*
5

7
2
5

7
7
-

73
2
71

17
12
5

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM (1-1/2 TO
AND INCLUDING A TONS) ----------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------

108
41

3.31
3.57

2.99
3.87

2.93- 3.87
2.78- 3.98

_

_

_

_

7
7

50
“

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS
TRAILER TYPE) -------------------MA NU FACTURING -------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------

340
110
230
130

4.26
4.13
4.32
4.81

4.33
4.31
4.81
4.86

3.884.133.864.83-

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) ------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------

127
102

3.88
3.94

3.66
4.80

3.32- 4.84
2.90- 4.85

TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT) -------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------

313
19*

3.57
3.50

3.73
3.48

3.20- 3.84
2.98- 3.94

See footnotes at end of tables.




8

13
1
12

-

2
2

-

8
8

3
3

13
2
ii

_

11
10

-

*
*

*
*

63
14
*9

“
9
*
5

8
8

1
1

3
3

2
2

3
3

4

1

-

4

1

-

1
1

”

ii
10

_

19
18
1

100
23
77

41
41
-

4.84
4.36
4.86
4.88

_
~

4
4

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

“

_

_

_
-

_

_

"

"

5
5

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

_

2
2

_

3
1

3
“

2
2

28
20

35
10
25

1

69
69

2
2

1

16
6
10

5
5

“

1

_
-

1
1

-

-

-

-

*

*

*

“

“

"

-

-

“

*

65
61
4
*

1
1
“

-

183
1
182
182

-

-

-

*
4

5
1

1
1

_

34
34
-

60
60
-

3
3

_

-

00
oo

M A N U F A C T U R I N G --NONMANUFACTURING

1

2.55

573
332
241

09

73

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS —
MANU FA CT UR IN G -------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

21
21

1
-

21
21

8
2

15
1

1
“

3

31
26

27
22

20
20

12
12

35
34

99
2

59
48

13
13

_

_
“

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

8
8

-

“
1
1

-

1
1
130
130
130
52
52
l
1

_

_

*

*

_

_

_

-

“

~

“

_

_

_

3
3

*
*

-

-

"

12
T a b le A -5 .

C u sto d ial and m a te ria l m o v em e n t o c c u p a tio n s -----C o ntin u ed

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Worcester, Mass., M a y 1971)




13

Footnotes

1 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t th e w o r k w e e k f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e o f p a y f o r o v e r t i m e at
r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , a n d th e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d t o t h e s e w e e k l y h o u r s .
2 T h e m e a n i s c o m p u t e d f o r e a c h j o b b y t o t a l i n g th e e a r n i n g s o f a l l w o r k e r s a n d d i v i d i n g b y th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s . T h e m e d i a n d e s i g n a t e s
p o s i t i o n — h a l f o f th e e m p l o y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e th a n th e r a t e s h o w n ; h a l f r e c e i v e l e s s than th e r a t e s h o w n . T h e m i d d l e r a n g e i s d e f i n e d b y
2 r a t e s o f p a y ; a f o u r t h o f th e w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s th a n t h e l o w e r o f t h e s e r a t e s a nd a f o u r t h e a r n m o r e than th e h i g h e r r a t e .
3 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , a nd l a t e s h i f t s .




A p p e n d ix.

O c c u p a tio n a l D es crip tio n s

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different wo r k arrangements from establishment to establishment and
from area to area.
This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
Because of this emphasis on
interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions m a y differ significantly from those in use in
individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes.
In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed
to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

OFFICE
BILLER,

CLERK,

MACHINE

Prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or electromatic typewriter. M a y also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform other
clerical wo rk incidental to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, machine, are
classified by type of machine, as follows:
Biller, machine (billing machine). Uses a special billing machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
Fisher, Burroughs, etc., which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills
and invoices from customers' purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping m e m o ­
randums, etc. Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and shipping charges,
and entry of necessary extensions, which m a y or m a y not be computed on the billing machine,
and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine. The operation usually involves
a large n u m b e r of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold
ma ch in e.
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine). Uses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand, Elliott
Fisher, Remington Rand, etc., which m a y or m a y not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare
customers' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simulta­
neous entry of figures on customers' ledger record. The machine automatically accumulates
figures on a nu m b e r of vertical columns and computes, and usually prints automatically the
debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Wo r k s fr om uniform
and standard types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs,
National Cash Register, with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business
transactions.
Class A. Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic
bookkeeping principles, and familiarity with the structure of the particular accounting system
used. Determines proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each
phase of the work. M a y prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records
by hand.
Class B. Keeps a record of one or m o r e phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, customers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described under biller,
machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. M a y check or assist
in preparation of trial balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.
CLERK,

ACCOUNTING

Class A. Under general direction of a bookkeeper or accountant, has responsibility for
keeping one or m o r e sections of a complete set of books or records relating to one phase
of an establishment's business transactions. W o r k involves posting and balancing subsidiary
ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable; examining and coding
invoices or vouchers with proper accounting distribution; and requires judgment and experi­
ence in making proper assignations and allocations. M a y assist in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal entries; and m a y direct class B accounting clerks.
Class B. Under supervision, performs one or m o r e routine accounting operations such
as posting simple journal vouchers or accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in
voucher registers; reconciling bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by
general ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data. This job does not require a knowl­
edge of accounting and bookkeeping principles but is found in offices in which the m o r e routine
accounting wo r k is subdivided on a functional basis a m o n g several workers.




14

FILE

Class A . In an established filing system containing a n u m b e r of varied subject matter
files, classifies and indexes file material such as correspondence, reports, technical docu­
ments, etc. M a y also file this material. M a y keep records of various types in conjunction
with the files. M a y lead a small group of lower level file clerks.
Class B . Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple (subject matter) head­
ings or partly classified material by finer subheadings. Prepares simple related index and
cross-reference aids. A s requested, locates clearly identified material in files and forwards
material.
M a y perform related clerical tasks required to maintain and service files.
Class C . Performs routine filing of material that has already been classified or which
is easily classified in a simple serial classification system (e.g., alphabetical, chronological,
or numerical). As requested, locates readily available material in files and forwards m a ­
terial; and m a y fill out withdrawal charge. Performs simple clerical and manual tasks re­
quired to maintain and service files.
CLERK,

ORDER

Receives customers' orders for material or merchandise by mail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the following: Quoting prices to customers; making out an order
sheet listing the items to m a k e up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be filled. M a y check with credit
department to determine credit rating of customer, acknowledge receipt of orders fr o m customers,
follow up orders to see that they have been filled, keep file of orders received, and check shipping
invoices with original orders.
CLERK,

PAYROLL

Co mputes wages of c o m p a n y employees and enters the necessary data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers' earnings based on time or production records; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such as worker's name, working
days, time, rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. M a y m a k e out paychecks and
assist paymaster in making up and distributing pay envelopes. M a y use a calculating machine.
COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
Pr im ar y duty is to operate a C o mp to me te r to perform mathematical computations. This
job is not to be confused with that of statistical or other type of clerk, which m a y involve fre­
quent use of a C o mp to me te r but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to performance of
other duties.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Class A . Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combination keypunch machine to
transcribe data fr om various source documents to keypunch tabulating cards. Performs sa m e
tasks as lower level keypunch operator but, in addition, wo r k requires application of coding
skills and the making of s o m e determinations, for example, locates on the source document
the items to be punched; extracts information f r o m several documents; and searches for and
interprets information on the document to determine information to be punched. M a y train
inexperienced operators.

15
K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R — Continued
Class B. Under close supervision or following specific procedures or instructions,
transcribes data fr om source documents to punched cards. Operates a numerical and/or
alphabetical or combination keypunch machine to keypunch tabulating cards. M a y verify cards.
Working fr om various standardized source documents, follows specified sequences which have
been coded or prescribed in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting
of data to be punched. Problems arising from erroneous items or codes, missing information,
etc., are referred to supervisor.

S E C R E T A R Y — Continued
d. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that employs, in all, over 5, 000 persons; or
e. Secretary to the head of a large and important organizational segment (e.g., a middle
m a n a g e m e n t supervisor of an organizational segment often involving as m a n y as several
hundred persons) of a c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 25, 000 persons.
Class C

OFFICE B O Y O R GIRL
Performs various routine duties such as running errands, operating minor office m a ­
chines such as sealers or mailers, opening and distributing mail, and other minor clerical work.
SECRETARY
Assigned as personal secretary, normally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the day-to-day wo r k activities of the supervisor. Works fairly inde­
pendently receiving a m i n i m u m of detailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied clerical
and secretarial duties, usually including mo st of the following: (a) Receives telephone calls,
personal callers, and incoming mail, answers routine inquiries, and routes the technical inquiries
to the proper persons; (b) establishes, maintains, and revises the supervisor's files; (c) maintains
the supervisor's calendar and m a k e s appointments as instructed; (d) relays me ssages fr om super­
visor to subordinates; (e) reviews correspondence, m e m o r a n d u m s , and reports prepared by others
for the supervisor's signature to assure procedural and typographic accuracy; and (f) performs
stenographic and typing work.
M a y also perform other clerical and secretarial tasks of comparable nature and difficulty.
The wo r k typically requires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
programs, and procedures related to the wo rk of the supervisor.
Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled "secretary" possess the above characteristics. Examples
of positions which are excluded fr o m the definition are as follows: (a) Positions which do not meet
the "personal" secretary concept described above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in secretarial
type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a group of professional, technical,
or managerial persons; (d) secretary positions in which the duties are either substantially m o r e
routine or substantially m o r e complex and responsible than those characterized in the definition;
and (e) assistant type positions which involve m o r e difficult or m o r e responsible technical, a d m i n ­
istrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical duties which are not typical of secretarial work.
N O T E : The te rm "corporate officer," used in the level definitions following, refers to
those officials w h o have a significant corporate-wide policymaking role with regard to major
c o m p a n y activities. The title "vice president," though normally indicative of this role, does not
in all cases identify such positions. Vice presidents whose primary responsibility is to act per­
sonally on individual cases or transactions (e.g., approve or deny individual loan or credit actions;
administer individual trust accounts; directly supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be
"corporate officers" for purposes of applying the following level definitions.
Class A
a. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a c o m p a n y that employs, in
all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 persons; or
b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a c o mp an y that employs, in all, over 5, 000 but fewer than 25, 000 persons; or
c. Secretary to the head (immediately below the corporate officer level) of a major
segment or subsidiary of a c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 25, 000 persons.
Class B
a. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a c o m p a n y that employs, in
all, fewer than 100 persons; or
b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a c o mp an y that employs, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 persons; or
c. Secretary to the head (immediately below the officer level) over either a major
corporate-wide functional activity (e.g., marketing, research, operations, industrial relations, etc.) or a major geographic or organizational segment (e.g., a regional headquarters;
a major division) of a c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
employees; or




a. Secretary to an executive or managerial person whose responsibility is not equivalent
to one of the specific level situations in the definition for class B, but whose subordinate staff
normally n u mb er s at least several dozen employees and is usually divided into organizational
segments which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In s o m e companies, this level includes
a wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; or_
b. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that employs, in all, fewer than 5, 000 persons.
Class D
a. Secretary to the supervisor or head of a small organizational unit (e.g., fewer than
about 25 or 30 persons); 0 £
b. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional employee, administra­
tive officer, or assistant, skilled technician or expert. (N O T E ; M a n y companies assign
stenographers, rather than secretaries as described above, to this level of supervisory or
nonsupervisory worker.)
STENOGRAPHER,

GENERAL

P r im ar y duty is to take dictation involving a normal routine vocabulary fr o m one or m o r e
persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine; and transcribe dictation. M a y
also type fr o m written copy. M a y maintain files, keep simple records, or perform other relatively
routine clerical tasks. M a y operate fr om a stenographic pool. Does not include transcribingmachine work. (See transcribing-machine operator.)
STENOGRAPHER,

SENIOR

P r im ar y duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary
such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research fr o m one or m o r e persons either in short­
hand or by Stenotype or similar machine; and transcribe dictation. M a y also type fr o m written
copy. M a y also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.
OR
Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and responsi­
bility than stenographers, general as evidenced by the following: W o r k requires high degree of
stenographic speed and accuracy; and a thorough working knowledge of general business and office
procedures and of the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures, files,
workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in performing stenographic duties and responsible clerical
tasks such as, maintaining followup files; assembling material for reports, m e m o r a n d u m s , letters,
etc.; composing simple letters fr om general instructions; reading and routing incoming mail; and
answering routine questions, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine w o r k .
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Class A . Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office calls. Pe rf o r m s full telephone information service or handles
complex calls, such as conference, collect, overseas, or similar calls, either in addition to
doing routine wo r k as described for switchboard operator, class B, or as a full-time
assignment. ("Full" telephone information service occurs w h e n the establishment has varied
functions that are not readily understandable for telephone information purposes, e.g., because
of overlapping or interrelated functions, and consequently present frequent problems as to
which extensions are appropriate for calls.)
Class B . Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office calls. M a y handle routine long distance calls and record tolls.
M a y perform limited telephone information service. ("Limited" telephone information service
occurs if the functions of the establishment serviced are readily understandable for telephone
information purposes, or if the requests are routine, e.g., giving extension n u m b e r s w h e n
specific n a m e s are furnished, or if complex calls are referred to another operator.)

16
T A B U L A T I N G - M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R — Continued

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
In addition to performing duties of operator on a single-position or monitor-type switch­
board, acts as receptionist and m a y also type or perform routine clerical wo rk as part of regular
duties. This typing or clerical wo rk m a y take the major part of this worker's time while at
switchboard.

Class C . Operates simple tabulating or electrical accounting machines such as the
sorter, reproducing punch, collator, etc., with specific instructions. M a y include simple
wiring from diagrams and so m e filing work. The wo rk typically involves portions of a wo rk
unit, for example, individual sorting or collating runs or repetitive operations.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR,

GENERAL

TABULATING-MACHINE OPER AT OR
Class A . Operates a variety of tabulating or electrical accounting machines, typically
including such machines as the tabulator, calculator, interpreter, collator, and others.
Pe rforms complete reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs difficult
wiring as required. The complete reporting and tabulating assignments typically involve a
variety of long and complex reports which often are of irregular or nonrecurring type re­
quiring s o m e planning and sequencing of steps to be taken. A s a m o r e experienced operator,
is typically involved in training new operators in machine operations, or partially trained
operators in wiring from diagrams and operating sequences of long and complex reports.
Does not include working supervisors performing tabulating-machine operations and day-today supervision of the wo r k and production of a group of tabulating-machine operators.
Class B . Operates m o r e difficult tabulating or electrical accounting machines such as the
tabulator and calculator, in addition to the sorter, reproducer, and collator. This wo r k is
performed under specific instructions and m a y include the performance of s o m e wiring from
diagrams. The wo r k typically involves, for example, tabulations involving a repetitive
accounting exercise, a complete but small tabulating study, or parts of a longer and m o r e
complex report. Such reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where the pro­
cedures are well established. M a y also include the training of ne w employees in the basic
operation of the machine.

Pr im ar y duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal routine vocabulary from
transcribing-machine records. M a y also type from written copy and do simple clerical work.
Workers transcribing dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal
briefs or reports on scientific research are not included. A worker w h o takes dictation in short­
hand or by Stenotype or similar machine is classified as a stenographer, general.
TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to m a k e copies of various material or to m a k e out bills after calcula­
tions have been m a d e by another person. M a y include typing of stencils, mats, or similar m a t e ­
rials for use in duplicating processes. M a y do clerical wo r k involving little special training, such
as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and distributing incoming mail.
Class A . Performs one or m o r e of the following: Typing material in final form w h e n i
t
involves combining material fr o m several sources or responsibility for correct spelling,
syllabication, punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language material;
and planning layout and typing of complicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity and
balance in spacing. M a y type routine form letters varying details to suit circumstances.
Class B . Performs one or m o r e of the following; Copy typing fr om rough or clear drafts;
routine typing of forms, insurance policies, etc.; and setting up simple standard tabulations,
or copying m o r e complex tables already setup and spaced properly.

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COMPUTER OPERATOR

CO MP UT ER PROGRAMER,

Monitors and operates the control console of a digital computer to process data according
to operating instructions, usually prepared by a programer. W o r k includes mo st of the following;
Studies instructions to determine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
items (tape reels, cards, etc.); switches necessary auxiliary equipment into circuit, and starts
and operates computer; m a k e s adjustments to computer to correct operating problems and me et
special conditions; reviews errors m a d e during operation and determines cause or refers problem
to supervisor or programer; and maintains operating records. M a y test and assist in correcting
program.

Converts statements of business problems, typically prepared by a systems analyst, into
a sequence of detailed instructions which are required to solve the problems by automatic data
processing equipment. Working fr o m charts or diagrams, the p r og ra me r develops the precise
instructions which, w h e n entered into the computer system in coded language, cause the m a n i p u ­
lation of data to achieve desired results. W o r k involves mo st of the following; Applies knowledge
of computer capabilities, mathematics, logic employed by computers, and particular subject matter
involved to analyze charts and diagrams of the problem to be programed. Develops sequence
of p r o g r a m steps, writes detailed flow charts to show order in which data will be processed;
converts these charts to coded instructions for machine to follow; tests and corrects programs;
prepares instructions for operating personnel during production run; analyzes, reviews, and alters
p r og ra ms to increase operating efficiency or adapt to n e w requirements; maintains records of
p r o g r a m development and revisions. (N O T E ; W o rk er s performing both systems analysis and pr o­
graming should be classified as systems analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)

For wa ge study purposes,

computer operators are classified as follows;

Class A . Operates independently, or under only general direction, a computer running
prog ra ms with mo st of the following characteristics; N e w p r og ra ms are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requirements are of critical importance to minimize downtime; the
p r og ra ms are of complex design so that identification of error source often requires a working
knowledge of the total program, and alternate p r og ra ms m a y not be available. M a y give
direction and guidance to lower level operators.
Class B . Operates independently, or under only general direction, a computer running
p r og ra ms with mo st of the following characteristics; Mo st of the p r og ra ms are established
production runs, typically run on a regularly recurring basis; there is little or no testing
of n e w p r og ra ms required; alternate p r og ra ms are provided in case original p r o g r a m needs
major change or cannot be corrected within a reasonable time. In c o m m o n error situations,
diagnoses cause and takes corrective action. This usually involves applying previously pro­
g r a m e d corrective steps, or using standard correction techniques.

BUSINESS

Does not include employees primarily responsible for the m a n a g e m e n t or supervision of
other electronic data processing (EDP) employees, or progra me rs primarily concerned with
scientific and/or engineering problems.
For wa g e study purposes, programers are classified as follows;
Class A . W o r k s independently or under only 'general direction on complex problems which
require competence in all phases of programing concepts and practices. Working fr o m dia­
g r a m s and charts which identify the nature of desired results, ma jo r processing steps to be
accomplished, and the relationships between various steps of the pr ob le m solving routine;
plans the full range of programing actions needed to efficiently utilize the computer system
in achieving desired end products.

OR
Operates under direct supervision a computer running p r og ra ms or segments of prog ra ms
with the characteristics described for class A. M a y assist a higher level operator by inde­
pendently performing less difficult tasks assigned, and performing difficult tasks following
detailed instructions and with frequent review of operations performed.
Class C . W o r k s on routine p r og ra ms under close supervision. Is expected to develop
working knowledge of the computer equipment used and ability to detect problems involved in
running routine programs. Usually has received s o m e formal training in computer operation.
M a y assist higher level operator on complex programs.




At this level, programing io uilficult because computer equipment mu s t be organized to
produce several interrelated but diverse products f r o m nu me r o u s and diverse data elements.
A wide variety and extensive n u m b e r of internal processing actions mu s t occur. This requires
such actions as development of c o m m o n operations which can be reused, establishment of
linkage points between operations, adjustments to data w h e n p r o g r a m requirements exceed
computer storage capacity, and substantial manipulation and re sequencing of data elements
to fo r m a highly integrated program.
M a y provide functional direction to lower level pr og ra me rs w h o are assigned to assist.

17
COMPUTER PROGRAMER,

C O M P U T E R SYSTEMS ANALYST,

B U S I N E S S — Continued

Class B . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on relatively simple
programs, or on simple segments of complex programs. P r o g r a m s (or segments) usually
process information to produce data in two or three varied sequences or formats. Reports
and listings are produced by refining, adapting, arraying, or making minor additions to or
deletions from input data which are readily available. While nume ro us records m a y be
processed, the data have been refined in prior actions so that the accuracy and sequencing
of data can be tested by using a few routine checks. Typically, the p r og ra m deals with
routine record-keeping type operations.
OR
Wo rk s on complex prog ra ms (as described for class A) under close direction of a higher
level pr ogramer or supervisor. M a y assist higher level pr ogramer by independently pe r ­
forming less difficult tasks assigned, and performing m o r e difficult tasks under fairly close
direction.
M a y guide or instruct lower level programers.

BUSINESS

Analyzes business problems to formulate procedures for solving th em by use of electronic
data processing equipment. Develops a complete description of all specifications needed to enable
programers to prepare required digital Computer programs. W o r k involves mo st of the following;
Analyzes subject-matter operations to be automated and identifies conditions and criteria required
to achieve satisfactory results; specifies n u m b e r and types of records, files, and documents to
be used; outlines actions to be performed by personnel and computers in sufficient detail for
presentation to m a n a g e m e n t and for programing (typically this involves preparation of wo r k and
data flow charts); coordinates the development of test problems and participates in trial runs of
ne w and revised systems; and r e c o m m e n d s equipment changes to obtain m o r e effective overall
operations. (N O T E : Wo rk er s performing both systems analysis and programing should be clas­
sified as systems analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)
Does not include employees primarily responsible for the m a n a g e m e n t or supervision of
other electronic data processing (EDP) employees, or systems analysts primarily concerned with
scientific or engineering problems.
For wa ge study purposes,

OR
Wo rk s on a segment of a complex data processing sc heme or system, as described for
class A. W o r k s independently on routine assignments and receives instruction and guidance
on complex assignments. W o r k is reviewed for accuracy of judgment, compliance with in­
structions, and to insure proper alinement with the overall system.
Class C . Wo r k s under immediate supervision, carrying out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. Assignments are designed to develop and expand practical experience
in the application of procedures and skills required for systems analysis work. For example,
m a y assist a higher level systems analyst by preparing the detailed specifications required
by programers from information developed by the higher level analyst.
DRAFTSMAN

Class C . M a k e s practical applications of programing practices and concepts usually
learned in formal training courses. Assignments are designed to develop competence in the
application of standard procedures to routine problems. Receives close supervision on new
aspects of assignments; and wo r k is reviewed to verify its accuracy and conformance with
required procedures.
C O M P U T E R SYSTEMS ANALYST,

B U S I N E S S — Continued

maintaining accounts receivable in a retail establishment, or maintaining inventory accounts
in a manufacturing or. wholesale establishment.) Confers with persons concerned to determine
the data processing problems and advises subject-matter personnel on the implications of the
data processing systems to be applied.

systems analysts are classified as follows:

Class A . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on complex problems
involving all phases of systems analysis. P r ob le ms are complex because of diverse sources
of input data and multiple-use requirements of output data. (For example, develops an inte­
grated production scheduling, inventory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis record in
which every item of each type is automatically processed through the full system of records
and appropriate followup actions are initiated by the computer.) Confers with persons con­
cerned to determine the data processing problems and advises subject-matter personnel on
the implications of ne w or revised systems of data processing operations. M a k e s r e c o m ­
mendations, if needed, for approval of major systems installations or changes and for
obtaining equipment.
M a y provide functional direction to lower level systems analysts w h o are assigned to
assist.
Class B . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on problems that are
relatively uncomplicated to analyze, plan, program, and operate. Prob le ms are of limited
complexity because sources of input data are homogeneous and the output data are closely
related. (For example, develops systems for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank,

Class A . Plans the graphic presentation of complex items having distinctive design
features that differ significantly from established drafting precedents. W o r k s in close sup­
port with the design originator, and m a y r e c o m m e n d minor design changes. Analyzes the
effect of each change on the details of form, function, and positional relationships of c o m ­
ponents and parts. W o r k s with a m i n i m u m of supervisory assistance. Completed wo r k is
reviewed by design originator for consistency with prior engineering determinations. M a y
either prepare drawings, or direct their preparation by lower level draftsmen.
Class B . Perf or ms nonroutine and complex drafting assignments that require the appli­
cation of mo st of the standardized drawing techniques regularly used. Duties typically in­
volve such w o r k as: Prepares working drawings of subassemblies with irregular shapes,
multiple functions, and precise positional relationships between components; prepares archi­
tectural drawings for construction of a building including detail drawings of foundations, wall
sections, floor plans, and roof. Uses accepted formulas and manuals in making necessary
computations to determine quantities of materials to be used, load capacities, strengths,
stresses, etc.
Receives initial instructions, requirements, and advice fr om supervisor.
Completed wo r k is checked for technical adequacy.
Class C . Prepares detail drawings of single units or parts for engineering, construction,
manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types of drawings prepared include isometric projections
(depicting three diminsions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning of
components and convey needed information. Consolidates details fr om a n u m b e r of sources
and adjusts or transposes scale as required. Suggested methods of approach, applicable
precedents, and advice on source materials are given with initial assignments. Instructions
are less complete w h e n assignments recur. W o r k m a y be spot-checked during progress.
DRAFTSMAN-TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing cloth or paper over
drawings and tracing with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracing limited to plans primarily
consisting of straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
and/or
Prepares simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized items. W o r k is closely supervised
during progress.
N U R S E , I N D U S T R I A L (Registered)
A registered nurse w h o gives nursing service under general medical direction to ill or
injured employees or other persons w h o b e c o m e ill or suffer an accident on the premises of a
factory or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of employees' injuries; keeping records
of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or other purposes; assisting in
physical examinations and health evaluations of applicants and employees; and planning and carry­
ing out prog ra ms involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment,
or other activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety of all personnel.

M AINTENANCE AND PO W ER PLA N T
CARPENTER,

MAINTENANCE

P e rf or ms the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain in good repair building
w o o d w o r k and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs,
casings, and trim m a d e of wo o d in an establishment. W o r k involves mo st of the following: Planning
and laying out of w o r k fr om blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal instructions using a variety




CARPENTER,

M A I N T E N A N C E — Continued

of carpenter's handtools, portable power tools, and standard measuring instruments; making
standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work; and selecting materials necessary
for the work. In general, the w o r k of the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

18
ELECTRICIAN,

MA IN TE NA NC E

MECHANIC,

P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y of electrical t r a d e fu nc ti on s s u c h a s the installation, m a i n t e n a n c e ,
or r e p a i r of e q u i p m e n t for t h e g e n e r a t i o n , distribution, o r utilization of electric e n e r g y in a n
establishment.
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g ; Installing o r r e p a i r i n g a n y of a v a r i e t y of
electrical e q u i p m e n t s u c h a s g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , s w i t c h b o a r d s , cont ro ll er s, circuit b r e a k ­
e r s, m o t o r s , h e a t i n g units, co n d u i t s y s t e m s , o r o t h e r t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u i p m e n t ; w o r k i n g f r o m
bl ue pr in ts , d r a w i n g s , la youts, o r o t h e r specifications; locating a n d d i a g n o s i n g t r o u b l e in the
electrical s y s t e m o r e q u i p m e n t ; w o r k i n g s t a n d a r d c o m p u t a t i o n s relating to l o a d r e q u i r e m e n t s of
w i r i n g o r electrical e q u i p m e n t ; a n d u s i n g a v a r i e t y of electrician's h a n d t o o l s a n d m e a s u r i n g a n d
testing i n s t r u m e n t s .
In g e n e r a l , the w o r k of the m a i n t e n a n c e e l ec tr ic ia n r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a i n ­
ing a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u i v a l e n t trai ni ng a n d
experience.
ENGINEER,

STATIONARY

O p e r a t e s a n d m a i n t a i n s a n d m a y a l so s u p e r v i s e the o p e r a t i o n of s t a t i o n a r y e n g i n e s a n d
e q u i p m e n t ( m e c h a n i c a l o r electrical) to s u p p l y the e s t a b l i s h m e n t in whicfr e m p l o y e d w i t h p o w e r ,
heat, re frigeration, o r air-co nd it io ni ng .
W o r k in vo lv es :
Operating an d maintaining equi pm en t
s u c h a s s t e a m e n g i n e s , air c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o t o r s , tu r b i n e s , ventilating a n d r e f r i g ­
e r at in g e q u i p m e n t , s t e a m bo i l e r s a n d b o i l e r - f e d w a t e r p u m p s ; m a k i n g e q u i p m e n t r e pa ir s; a n d
k e e p i n g a r e c o r d of o p e r a t i o n of m a c h i n e r y , t e m p e r a t u r e , a n d fuel c o n s u m p t i o n .
M a y also s u ­
p e r v i s e t h e s e op er a t i o n s .
H e a d o r chief e n g i n e e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g m o r e t h a n o n e
engineer are ex c l u d e d .
FIREMAN,

STATIONARY

BOILER

F i r e s st at i o n a r y bo i l e r s to f u r n i s h the e s t a b l i s h m e n t in w h i c h e m p l o y e d w i t h heat, p o w e r ,
or s t e a m .
F e e d s fuels to fire b y h a n d o r o p e r a t e s a m e c h a n i c a l s t ok er , o r g a s o r oil b u r n e r ;
a n d c h e c k s w a t e r a n d sa fe ty va l v e s . M a y cl ean, oil, o r as si st in r e p a i r i n g b o i l e r r o o m e q u i p m e n t .
HELPER,

M A I N T E N A N C E

TRADES

A s s i s t s o n e o r m o r e w o r k e r s in the skilled m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s , b y p e r f o r m i n g specific
o r g e n e r a l duties of l e s s e r skill, s u c h a s k e e p i n g a w o r k e r s u p p l i e d w i t h m a t e r i a l s a n d tools;
c l e a n i n g . w o r k i n g a r e a , m a c h i n e , a n d e q u i p m e n t ; a s s i st in g j o u r n e y m a n b y h o l d i n g m a t e r i a l s or
tools; a n d p e r f o r m i n g o t h e r un sk il le d t a s k s a s d i r e c t e d b y j o u r n e y m a n .
T h e k i n d of w o r k the
h e l p e r is p e r m i t t e d to p e r f o r m v a r i e s f r o m t r a d e to trade:
In s o m e t r a d e s the h e l p e r is c o n ­
fined to su pp ly in g, lifting, a n d h o l d i n g m a t e r i a l s a n d tools a n d c l e a n i n g w o r k i n g a r e a s ; a n d in
o t h e r s h e is p e r m i t t e d to p e r f o r m s p e c i a l i z e d m a c h i n e o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t s of a t r a d e that a r e
a l s o p e r f o r m e d b y w o r k e r s o n a f u l l -t im e basis.
MA CH IN E- TO OL

OPERATOR,

T O O L R O O M

S p e c i a l i z e s in the o p e r a t i o n of o n e o r m o r e t y p e s of m a c h i n e tools, s u c h a s jig b o r e r s ,
cy li nd ri ca l o r s u r f a c e g r i n d e r s , e n g i n e lathes, o r m i l l i n g m a c h i n e s , in th e c o n s t r u c t i o n of
m a c h i n e - s h o p tools, g a g e s , jigs, fixtures, o r dies.
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : P l a n ­
n i ng a n d p e r f o r m i n g difficult m a c h i n i n g o p e r a t i o n s ; p r o c e s s i n g i t e m s r e q u i r i n g c o m p l i c a t e d s e t u p s
o r a h i g h d e g r e e of a c c u r a c y ; u s i n g a v a r i e t y of p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; se lecting fe ed s,
s p e e d s , tooling, a n d o p e r a t i o n s e q u e n c e ; a n d m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y a d j u s t m e n t s d u r i n g o p e r a t i o n to
a c h i e v e re qu is it e t o l e r a n c e s o r d i m e n s i o n s .
M a y b e r e q u i r e d to r e c o g n i z e w h e n tools n e e d d r e s s ­
ing, to d r e s s tools, a n d to select p r o p e r c o o l a n t s a n d cutting a n d lubr ic at in g oils. F o r c r o s s i n d u s t r y w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , m a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s , t o o l r o o m , in tool a n d die j o b b i n g s h o p s
a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m this classification.
MACHINIST,

M A IN TE NA NC E

P r o d u c e s r e p l a c e m e n t p a r t s a n d n e w p a r t s in m a k i n g r e p a i r s of m e t a l p a r t s of m e c h a n ­
ical e q u i p m e n t o p e r a t e d in a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
W o r k in vo l v e s m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : I n t e rp re ti ng
w r i t t e n inst ru ct io ns a n d specifications; p l a n n i n g a n d la yi ng out of w o r k ; u s i n g a v a r i e t y of m a ­
chinist's h a n d t o o l s a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; setting u p a n d o p e r a t i n g s t a n d a r d m a c h i n e
tools; s h a p i n g of m e t a l p a r t s to cl o s e t o l e r a n c e s ; m a k i n g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s relating to
d i m e n s i o n s of w o r k , tooling, f e ed s, a n d s p e e d s of m a c h i n i n g ; k n o w l e d g e of the w o r k i n g p r o p e r t i e s
of the c o m m o n m e t a l s ; se le ct in g s t a n d a r d m a t e r i a l s , pa rt s, a n d e q u i p m e n t r e q u i r e d for his w o r k ;
a n d fitting a n d a s s e m b l i n g p a r t s into m e c h a n i c a l e q u i p m e n t .
In g e n e r a l , the m a c h i n i s t ' s w o r k
n o r m a l l y r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d t r ai ni ng in m a c h i n e - s h o p p r a c t i c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r eq ui v a l e n t t r ai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e .

MECHANIC,

A U T O M O T I V E

(Maintenance)

R e p a i r s a u t o m o b i l e s , b u s e s , m o t o r t r u c k s , a n d t r a c t o r s of a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
W o r k in­
v o l v e s m o s t of th e f o l l o w i n g : E x a m i n i n g a u t o m o t i v e e q u i p m e n t to d i a g n o s e s o u r c e of trouble;
d i s a s s e m b l i n g e q u i p m e n t a n d p e r f o r m i n g r e p a i r s that i n vo lv e t h e u s e of s u c h h a n d t o o l s as
w r e n c h e s , g a g e s , drills, o r s p e c i a l i z e d e q u i p m e n t in d i s a s s e m b l i n g o r fitting parts; r e p l a c i n g
b r o k e n o r de fe ct iv e p a r t s f r o m stock; g r i n d i n g a n d ad ju st in g v a lv es ; r e a s s e m b l i n g a n d installing




A U T O M O T I V E

(Maintenance)—

Continued

the v a r i o u s a s s e m b l i e s in the ve h i c l e a n d m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y a d j u s t m e n t s ; a n d alining w h e e l s ,
ad ju st in g b r a k e s a n d lights, o r tighte ni ng b o d y bolts.
In g e n e r a l , the w o r k of the a u t o m o t i v e
m e c h a n i c r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r ai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n ­
tice sh ip o r eq ui v a l e n t trai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
MECHANIC,

MA IN TE NA NC E

R e p a i r s m a c h i n e r y o r m e c h a n i c a l e q u i p m e n t of a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
W o r k involves m o s t
of the f o l l o w i n g : E x a m i n i n g m a c h i n e s a n d m e c h a n i c a l e q u i p m e n t to d i a g n o s e s o u r c e of trouble;
d i s m a n t l i n g o r p a r t l y d i s m a n t l i n g m a c h i n e s a n d p e r f o r m i n g r e p a i r s that m a i n l y i n vo lv e the u s e
of h a n d t o o l s in s c r a p i n g a n d fitting parts; r e p l a c i n g b r o k e n o r de fe ct iv e p a r t s w i t h i t e m s o b t a i n e d
f r o m stock; o r d e r i n g the p r o d u c t i o n of a r e p l a c e m e n t p a rt b y a m a c h i n e s h o p o r s e n d i n g of the
m a c h i n e to a m a c h i n e s h o p for m a j o r r e p a i r s ; p r e p a r i n g w r i t t e n sp ecifications for m a j o r r e p a i r s
o r for the p r o d u c t i o n of p a r t s o r d e r e d f r o m m a c h i n e sh op ; r e a s s e m b l i n g m a c h i n e s ; a n d m a k i n g
all n e c e s s a r y a d j u s t m e n t s for o p er at io n.
In g e n e r a l , the w o r k of a m a i n t e n a n c e m e c h a n i c r e ­
q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r ai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r
e q u i v a l e n t tr aining a n d e x p e r i e n c e . E x c l u d e d f r o m this classification a r e w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y
duties i n vo lv e setting u p o r a d j u st in g m a c h i n e s .
MILLWRIGHT
Installs n e w m a c h i n e s o r h e a v y e q u i p m e n t , a n d d i s m a n t l e s a n d installs m a c h i n e s o r
h e a v y e q u i p m e n t w h e n c h a n g e s in the plant la yo ut a r e r e q u i r e d .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t of the fol­
l o w i n g : P l a n n i n g a n d la yi ng out of the w o r k ; i n t e rp re ti ng b l u e p r i n t s o r o t h e r specifications; u s i n g
a v a r i e t y of h a n d t o o l s a n d rigging; m a k i n g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s relating to s t r e s s e s ,
s t r e n g t h of m a t e r i a l s , a n d c e n t e r s of gravity; alining a n d b a l a n c i n g of e q u i p m e n t ; se le ct in g s t a n d ­
a r d tools, e q u i p m e n t , a n d p a r t s to b e u s e d ; a n d installing a n d m a i n t a i n i n g in g o o d o r d e r p o w e r
t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u i p m e n t s u c h as dr iv es a n d s p e e d r e d u c e r s .
In g e n e r a l , the m i l l w r i g h t ' s w o r k
n o r m a l l y r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d t r ai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e in the t r a d e a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r eq ui v a l e n t t r ai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
OILER
L u b r i c a t e s , w i t h oil o r
e q u i p m e n t of a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
PAINTER,

grease,

the

moving

pa r t s

or w e a r i n g

surfaces

of m e c h a n i c a l

M A I N T E N A N C E

P a i n t s a n d r e d e c o r a t e s w a ll s, w o o d w o r k , a n d fixtures of a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
W o r k in­
v o l v e s the f o l l o w i n g : K n o w l e d g e of s u r f a c e peculiarities a n d t y p e s of paint r e q u i r e d for different
applications; p r e p a r i n g s u r f a c e for pain ti ng b y r e m o v i n g old finish o r b y p l a c i n g putty o r filler
in nail h o l e s a n d interstices; a n d a p p l y i n g paint w i t h s p r a y g u n o r b r u s h .
M a y m i x c o lo rs , oils,
w h i t e lead, a n d o t h e r paint i n g r e d i e n t s to o b ta in p r o p e r co l o r o r c o n s i s t e n c y .
In g e n e r a l , the
w o r k of the m a i n t e n a n c e pa i n t e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d tr ai n i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h
a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u i v a l e n t trai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
PIPEFITTER,

M A IN TE NA NC E

Installs o r r e p a i r s w a t e r , s t e a m , g a s, o r o t h e r t y p e s of p i pe a n d pipefittings in a n
establishment.
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : L a y i n g out of w o r k a n d m e a s u r i n g to lo­
cate p o si ti on of p i pe f r o m d r a w i n g s o r o t h e r w r i t t e n specifications; cutting v a r i o u s si z e s of pipe
to c o r r e c t l e ng th s w i t h ch isel a n d h a m m e r o r o x y a c e t y l e n e t o r c h o r pi pe - c u t t i n g m a c h i n e ; t h r e a d ­
ing pipe w i t h s t o c k s a n d dies; b e n d i n g p i p e b y h a n d - d r i v e n o r p o w e r - d r i v e n m a c h i n e s ; a s s e m b l i n g
p i p e w i t h c o u p l i n g s a n d f a s t en in g p i pe to h a n g e r s ; m a k i n g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s relating
to p r e s s u r e s , flow, a n d size of p i p e r e q u i r e d ; a n d m a k i n g s t a n d a r d tests to d e t e r m i n e w h e t h e r
fini sh ed p i p e s m e e t specifications.
In g e n e r a l , the w o r k of the m a i n t e n a n c e pipefitter r e q u i r e s
r o u n d e d trai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r eq ui v a l e n t
trai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
W o r k e r s p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in installing a n d r e p a i r i n g buil di ng s a n i t a ­
tion o r h e a t i n g s y s t e m s a r e e x c l u d e d .
PL UM BE R,

M A I N T E N A N C E

K e e p s the p l u m b i n g s y s t e m of a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t in g o o d o r d e r . W o r k in volves: K n o w l e d g e
of s a n i t a r y c o d e s r e g a r d i n g installation of v e n t s a n d t r a p s in p l u m b i n g s y s t e m ; installing o r r e ­
pa i r i n g p i p e s a n d fixtures; a n d o p e n i n g c l o g g e d d r a i n s w i t h a p l u n g e r o r p l u m b e r ' s s n a k e . In
g e n e r a l , the w o r k of the m a i n t e n a n c e p l u m b e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r ai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l l y
a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u i v a l e n t t r ai ni ng a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
S H E E T - M E T A L

WORKER,

M A I N T E N A N C E

F a b r i c a t e s , installs, a n d m a i n t a i n s in g o o d r e p a i r the s h e e t - m e t a l e q u i p m e n t a n d fix­
t u r e s ( s u c h a s m a c h i n e g u a r d s , g r e a s e p a n s , s h e l v e s , l o c k e r s , t a nk s, ventilators, ch u t e s , ducts,
m e t a l roofing) of a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : P l a n n i n g a n d la ying
out all t y p e s of s h e e t - m e t a l m a i n t e n a n c e w o r k f r o m b l ue pr in ts , m o d e l s , o r o t h e r specifications;
setting u p a n d o p e r a t i n g all av ai la bl e t y p e s of s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k i n g m a c h i n e s ; u s i n g a v a r i e t y of

19
S H E E T - M E T A L

WORKER,

MA IN TE NA NC E—

Continued

T O O L

h a n d t o o l s in cutting, b e n d i n g , f o r m i n g , sh ap i n g , fitting, a n d a s s e m b l i n g ; a n d installing sh ee tm e t a l articles a s re qu i r e d .
In g e n e r a l , the w o r k of the m a i n t e n a n c e s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r r e q u i r e s
r o u n d e d tr aining a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r eq ui va le nt
training a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
T O O L

AN D

DIE

(Die m a k e r ;

M A K E R
jig m a k e r ;

tool m a k e r ;

fixture m a k e r ;

gage

maker)

C o n s t r u c t s a n d r e p a i r s m a c h i n e - s h o p tools, g a g e s , jigs, fixtures o r dies for forgings,
p u n c h i n g , a n d ot h e r m e t a l - f o r m i n g w o r k .
W o r k i n vo lv es m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : P l a n n i n g a n d
laying out of w o r k f r o m m o d e l s , blueprints, d r a w i n g s , o r o t h e r o r al a n d w r i t t e n specifications;

AN D

DIE

M A K E R - Continued
-

u s i n g a v a ri et y of tool a n d die m a k e r ' s h a n d t o o l s a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; u n d e r ­
s t a n d i n g of the w o r k i n g p r o p e r t i e s of c o m m o n m e t a l s a n d alloys; setting u p a n d o p e r a t i n g of
m a c h i n e tools a n d related e q u i p m e n t ; m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s relating to d i m e n s i o n s
of w o r k , s p e e d s , feeds, a n d tooling of m a c h i n e s ; he at -t re at in g of m e t a l pa r t s d u r i n g fabrication
as w e ll as of finished tools a n d dies to a c h i e v e r e q u i r e d qualities; w o r k i n g to cl os e to le r a n c e s ;
fitting a n d a s s e m b l i n g of pa rt s to p r e s c r i b e d t o l e r a n c e s a n d a l l o w a n c e s ; a n d se le ct in g a p p r o p r i a t e
m a t e r i a l s , tools, a n d p r o c e s s e s .
In g e n e r a l , the tool a n d die m a k e r ' s w o r k r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d
training in m a c h i n e - s h o p a n d t o o l r o o m pr ac t i c e us u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p
o r eq ui v a l e n t tr aining a n d e x p e r i e n c e .

shops

F o r c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w a g e study p u r p o s e s ,
a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m this classification.

tool a n d

die m a k e r s

in tool a n d die j o b b i n g

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
G U A R D

AN D

SHIPPING

W A T C H M A N

G u a r d . P e r f o r m s rout in e po li ce duties, ei ther at fixed p o s t o r
order, using a r m s or force w h e r e n e c e s s a r y .
In cl u d e s g a t e m e n w h o
a n d c h e c k o n identity of e m p l o y e e s a n d ot h e r p e r s o n s e n t e r i n g .
W a t c h m a n . M a k e s rounds
theft, a n d illegal entry.
JANITOR,

PORTER,

(Sweeper;

O R

of p r e m i s e s

o n tour, m a i n t a i n i n g
a r e st at io ne d at gate

peri od ic al ly in p r o t ec ti ng p r o p e r t y agai ns t fire,

CL EA NE R

charwoman;

A N D

For

MA TE RI AL

HANDLING

A w o r k e r e m p l o y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u f a c t u r i n g plant, store, o r ot h e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t
w h o s e duties in vo lv e o n e o r m o r e of the f o l l o w i n g : L o a d i n g a n d u n l o a d i n g v a r i o u s m a t e r i a l s a n d
m e r c h a n d i s e o n o r f r o m freight ca r s , tr u c k s , o r ot h e r t r a n s p o r t i n g d e vi ce s; u n p a c k i n g , shelving,
o r p l ac in g m a t e r i a l s or m e r c h a n d i s e in p r o p e r s t o r a g e location; a n d t r a n s p o r t i n g m a t e r i a l s or
m e r c h a n d i s e b y h a n d t r u c k , car, o r w h e e l b a r r o w .
L o n g s h o r e m e n , w h o l o ad a n d u n l o a d sh ip s a r e
excluded.

study pu r p o s e s ,

R e c e i v i n g cl e r k
S h i p p i n g cl e r k
Sh ip pi ng a n d receiving

workers

are

classified as

follows:

cl er k

D r i v e s a t r u c k w i t h i n a city o r industrial a r e a to t r a n s p o r t m a t e r i a l s , m e r c h a n d i s e ,
e q u i p m e n t , o r m e n b e t w e e n v a r i o u s t y p e s of e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s u c h as: M a n u f a c t u r i n g plants, freight
de p o t s , w a r e h o u s e s , w h o l e s a l e a n d retail e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , or b e t w e e n retail e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d
c u s t o m e r s ' h o u s e s o r p l a c e s of b u s i n e s s .
M a y a l s o l o ad o r u n l o a d t r u c k w i t h o r w i t h o u t h e l p e r s ,
m a k e m i n o r m e c h a n i c a l re pa i r s , a n d k e e p t r u c k in g o o d w o r k i n g o r d e r .
D r i v e r - s a l e s m e n and
ov er - t h e - r o a d drivers are e x c l u d e d .
F o r w a g e st u d y p u r p o s e s , t r u c k d r i v e r s a r e classified b y size a n d t y p e of e q u i p m e n t ,
a s follows:
( T r a c t o r - t r a i l e r s h o u l d b e r a t e d o n the ba s i s of trailer capacity.)

FILLER

(Order

picker;

s t o c k selector; w a r e h o u s e

stockman)

Fills s h ip pi ng or t r a n s f e r o r d e r s for fi nished g o o d s f r o m s t o r e d m e r c h a n d i s e in a c c o r d ­
a n c e w i t h specifications o n sales slips, c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s , o r o t h e r instructions. M a y , in addition
to filling o r d e r s a n d indicating i t e m s filled or o m i t t e d , k e e p r e c o r d s of o u t g o i n g o r d e r s , r e q u i ­
sition additional st o c k o r r e p o r t sh o r t su pp l i e s to s u p e r v i s o r , a n d p e r f o r m o t h e r rela te d duties.

T r u c k d r i v e r ( c o m b i n a t i o n of si ze s listed sepa ra te ly )
T r u c k d r i v e r , light ( u n d e r lV2 tons)
T r u c k d r i v e r , m e d i u m (1V* to a n d in cl ud in g 4 tons)
T r u c k d r i v e r , h e a v y (o v e r 4 tons, trailer type)
T r u c k d r i v e r , h e a v y (o v e r 4 tons, ot h e r t h a n trailer type)

TRUCKER,
PACKER,

P O W E R

SHIPPING

P r e p a r e s finished p r o d u c t s for s h i p m e n t or s t o r a g e b y p l ac in g t h e m in sh ip p i n g c o n ­
tainers, the specific o p e r a t i o n s p e r f o r m e d b e i n g d e p e n d e n t u p o n the type, size, a n d n u m b e r of
units to b e p a c k e d , the t y pe of c o n t a i n e r e m p l o y e d , a n d m e t h o d of s h i p m e n t .
W o r k r e q u i r e s the
p l ac in g of i t e m s in s h ip pi ng c o n t a i n e r s a n d m a y involve o n e o r m o r e of the f o l l o w i n g : K n o w l ­
e d g e of v a r i o u s i t e m s of s t o c k in o r d e r to ve ri fy content; se le ct io n of a p p r o p r i a t e t y p e a n d size
of co ntainer; inserting e n c l o s u r e s in co nt ai ne r; u s i n g e x c e l s i o r o r ot h e r m a t e r i a l to p r e v e n t
b r e a k a g e o r d a m a g e ; clos in g a n d seal in g co nt ai ne r; a n d a p p l y i n g label? o r e n t e r i n g identifying
d a ta o n co ntainer. P a c k e r s w h o a l so m a k e w o o d e n b o x e s or c r at es a r e ex cl ud ed .




wage

TRUCKDRIVER

( L o a d e r a n d u n l o a d e r ; h a n d l e r a n d s t ac ke r; shel ve r; t r u c k e r ; s t o c k m a n o r st o c k help er ; w a r e ­
h o u s e m a n o r w a r e h o u s e helper)

O R D E R

CLERK

janitress)

C l e a n s a n d k e e p s in a n o r d e r l y co nd it io n f a c t o r y w o r k i n g a r e a s a n d w a s h r o o m s , or
p r e m i s e s of a n office, a p a r t m e n t h o u s e , o r c o m m e r c i a l o r o t h e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
D u t i e s involve
a c o m b i n a t i o n of the f o l l o w i n g ; S w e e p i n g , m o p p i n g o r s c r u b b i n g , a n d po lishing floors; r e m o v i n g
chips, tr as h, a n d o t h e r refuse; d u st in g e q u i p m e n t , furniture, o r fixtures; po li sh in g m e t a l fixtures
o r t r i m m i n g s ; p r o v i d i n g s u pp li es a n d m i n o r m a i n t e n a n c e se r v i c e s ; a n d c l e a n i n g lavatories, s h o w ­
ers, a n d r e s t r o o m s . W o r k e r s w h o specia li ze in w i n d o w w a s h i n g a r e e x c l u d e d .
LABORER,

RECEIVING

P r e p a r e s m e r c h a n d i s e for s h i p m e n t , or r e c e i v e s a n d is r e s p o n s i b l e for i n c o m i n g s h i p ­
m e n t s of m e r c h a n d i s e o r ot h e r m a t e r i a l s .
S h i p p i n g w o r k i n v o l v e s : A k n o w l e d g e of s h ip pi ng
p r o c e d u r e s , pr ac t i c e s , routes, av ai la bl e m e a n s of tr an sp o r t a t i o n , a n d rate; a n d p r e p a r i n g r e c ­
o r d s of the g o o d s sh ip p e d , m a k i n g u p bills of lading, p o st in g w e i g h t a n d s h i p p i n g c h a r g e s , a n d
k e e p i n g a file of s h ip pi ng r e c o r d s . M a y direct o r assist in p r e p a r i n g the m e r c h a n d i s e for s h i p ­
ment.
R e c e i v i n g w o r k i n v o l v e s : V e r i f y i n g o r di re ct in g o t h e r s in ve ri fy in g the c o r r e c t n e s s of
s h i p m e n t s ag a i n s t bills of lading, invoices, o r ot h e r r e c o r d s ; c h e c k i n g for s h o r t a g e s a n d rejecting
d a m a g e d g o o d s ; r o ut in g m e r c h a n d i s e or m a t e r i a l s to p r o p e r d e p a r t m e n t s ; a n d m a i n t a i n i n g n e c e s ­
s a r y r e c o r d s a n d files.

Operates a
transport go od s a n d
establishment.

m a n u a l l y c o nt ro ll ed g a s o l i n e - or e l e c t r i c - p o w e r e d t r u c k o r t r ac to r to
m a t e r i a l s of all k i n d s d o o u t a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u f a c t u r i n g plant, or ot h e r

F o r w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s a r e classified b y t y pe of truck, a s follows:
Trucker,
Trucker,

power
power

(forklift)
(other t h a n forklift)

A v a ila b le O n R e q u e s t ----T h e fo llo w in g a r e a s a r e s u r v e y e d p e r i o d i c a l l y f o r u se in a d m in is t e r in g the S e r v ic e C o n tr a c t A c t o f 1965.
a v a ila b le at no c o s t w h ile s u p p lie s la s t f r o m any o f the B L S r e g io n a l o f f i c e s show n on the in s id e fr o n t c o v e r .

A b ile n e , T e x .
A la s k a
A lb a n y , G a.
A le x a n d r ia , L a .
A lp e n a , S ta n d ish , and T a w a s C ity , M ich .
A m a r illo , T e x .
Ann A r b o r , M ich .
A s h e v ille , N .C .
A tla n tic C ity , N .J .
A u g u s ta , G a.—S .C .
A u s tin , T e x .
B a k e r s f ie ld , C a lif.
B a ton R o u g e , L a .
B illin g s , M on t.
B ilo x i , G u lfp o r t, and P a s c a g o u la , M is s .
B r id g e p o r t , N o r w a lk , and S t a m fo r d , C onn.
C h a r le s t o n , S .C .
C h e y e n n e , W y o.
C la r k s v ille , T erm ., and H o p k in s v ille , K y.
C o lo r a d o S p r in g s , C o lo .
C o lu m b ia , S .C .
C o lu m b u s , G a.—A la .
C r a n e , Ind.
D e c a tu r , 111.
D oth a n , A la .
D uluth— u p e r io r , M in n .—W is.
S
D u r h a m , N .C .
E l P a so, T ex.
E u gene, O reg.
F a r g o — o o r h e a d , N. D ak.—M inn.
M
F a y e t t e v ille , N .C .
F it c h b u r g —L e o m i n s t e r , M a s s .
F o r t S m ith , A r k .— k la .
O
F r e d e r i c k — a g e r s to w n , M d.—P a .—W . Va.
H
G r e a t F a l l s , M on t.
G r e e n s b o r o — in s to n S a le m — igh P o in t, N .C .
W
H
H a r r is b u r g , P a .
H a r tfo r d , C onn.
H u n ts v ille , A la .

C o p ie s o f p u b lic r e le a s e s a re

K n o x v ille , Term .
L a red o, T ex.
L a s V e g a s , N ev.
L e x in g to n , K y.
L o w e r E a s te r n S h o r e , M d.—Va.
L y n c h b u r g , Va.
M a co n , G a.
M a d is o n , W is.
M a rq u e tte , E s c a n a b a , Sault Ste. M a r ie , M ich
M e r id ia n , M is s .
M id d le s e x , M on m o u th , O c e a n and S o m e r s e t
C o s ., N .J .
M o b ile , A la ., and P e n s a c o la , F la .
M o n tg o m e r y , A la .
N a s h v ille , T en n .
N ew L on d on — r o t o n — o r w ic h , Conn.
G
N
N o r t h e a s te r n M ain e
O g d en , Utah
O r la n d o , F la .
O x n a rd — e n tu ra , C a lif.
V
P a n a m a C ity , F la .
P in e B lu ff, A rk .
P o r ts m o u th , N .H .—M a in e — a s s .
M
P u e b lo , C o lo .
R e n o , N ev.
S a c r a m e n t o , C a lif.
S a lin a , K a n s.
S a lin a s—M o n te r e y , C a lif.
Santa B a r b a r a , C a lif.
S h r e v e p o r t , La.
S p r in g fie ld — h ic o p e e — o ly o k e , M a s s .—C onn.
C
H
S to ck to n , C a lif.
T a c o m a , W ash .
T o p e k a , K a n s.
T u cso n , A r iz .
V a ld o s t a , G a.
V a lle jo — apa, C a lif.
N
W ic h ita F a lls , T e x .
W ilm in g to n , D e l.—N .J .—M d.

T h e e le v e n th annual r e p o r t on s a la r ie s f o r a c c o u n t a n t s , a u d it o r s , c h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts , a t t o r n e y s , jo b a n a ly s t s , d i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l,
b u y e r s , c h e m is t s , e n g in e e r s , e n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s , d r a ft s m e n , and c l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s . -O rd e r as B L S B u lle tin 1693, N a tion a l
S u rv e y o f P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d m in is t r a t iv e , T e c h n ic a l, and C l e r i c a l P a y , June 1 9 7 0 , $ 1 .0 0 a c o p y , f r o m th e S u p e rin te n d e n t o f D o cu m e n ts ,
U .S . G o v e r n m e n t P r in t in g O f f ic e , W a s h in g to n , D .C ., 2 0 4 0 2 , o r any o f its r e g io n a l s a le s o f f i c e s .




A r e a W a g e Su rv ey s
A l i s t o f the l a t e s t a v a i l a b l e b u l l e t i n s is p r e s e n t e d b e l o w . A d i r e c t o r y o f a r e a w a g e s t u d i e s i n c l u d i n g m o r e l i m i t e d s t u d i e s c o n d u c t e d at the
r e q u e s t o f th e W a g e an d H o u r D i v i s i o n o f th e D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r i s a v a i l a b l e o n r e q u e s t . B u l l e t i n s m a y b e p u r c h a s e d f r o m the S u p e r i n t e n d e n t o f
D o c u m e n t s , U .S . G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . , 2 0 4 0 2 , o r f r o m a n y o f th e B L S r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s s h o w n o n th e i n s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .

Area

Bulletin nu m b er
an d p r i c e

A k r o n , O h i o , J u l y 1 9 7 0 ______________________________________ 1 6 6 0 - 8 8 ,
A l b a n y - S c h e n e c t a d y - T r o y , N . Y . , M a r . 1971 1
_________ 1 6 8 5 - 5 4 ,
A l b u q u e r q u e , N. M e x . , M a r . 197 1________________________
1685-5 8,
A l l e n t o w n —B e t h l e h e m —E a s t o n , P a . —N . J . , M a y 197 0 1— 1 6 6 0 - 8 3 ,
A t l a n t a , G a . , M a y 1 9 7 1 ---------------------------------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 6 9 ,
1 6 8 5 - 18,
B a l t i m o r e , M d . , A u g . 1 9 70 1_______________________________
B e a u m o n t —P o r t A r t h u i —O r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1971 1 ----- 1 6 8 5 - 6 8 ,
B i n g h a m t o n , N . Y . , J u l y 19 70 ______________________________
16 85-6 ,
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , M a r . 1971 1___________________________
1685-63,
1685-2 1,
B o i s e C i t y , I d a h o , N o v . 1 9 7 0 * ____________________________
B o s t o n , M a s s . , A u g . 1 9 70 1 ________________________________
1 6 8 5 - 1 1,
B u f f a l o , N . Y . , O c t . 19 70 1
___________________________________ 1 6 8 5 - 4 3 ,
1685-5 9,
B u r l i n g t o n , V t . , M a r . 197 1 1----------------------------------------------C a n t o n , O h i o , M a y 1 9 71_____________________________________
1685-71,
C h a r l e s t o n , W . V a . , M a r . 197 1---------------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 5 7 ,
C h a r l o t t e , N . C . , J a n . 1 9 7 1 ------------------------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 4 8 ,
C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n . - G a . , S e p t . 1 9 70 1 ____________________ 1 6 8 5 - 1 0 ,
C h i c a g o , 111., J u n e 1 9 7 0 -------------------------------------------------------- 1 6 6 0 - 9 0 ,
C i n c i n n a t i , O h i o — y . —I n d . , F e b . 197 1 1
K
___________________ 1 6 8 5 - 5 3 ,
C l e v e l a n d , O h i o , S e p t . 19 70 1
______________________________
1685-2 8,
C o l u m b u s , O h i o , O c t . 1970 1_______________________________
1685-33,
D a l l a s , T e x . , O c t . 19 70 1 ----------------------------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 2 2 ,
D a v e n p o r t —R o c k I s l a n d —M o l i n e , I o w a —111.,
F e b . 197 1--------------------------------------------------------------- -------------- 1 6 8 5 - 5 1,
D a y t o n , O h i o , D e c . 1 9 7 0 * ___________________________________
1685-4 5,
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1970 ----------------------------------------------------1685-4 1,
D e s M o i n e s , I o w a , M a y 1 9 7 1 ______________________________
1685-7 0,
D e t r o i t , M i c h . , F e b . 1 9 7 0 __________________________________ 1 6 6 0 - 5 8 ,
F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , O c t . 1 9 70 1 --------------------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 2 5 ,
G r e e n B a y , W i s . , J u l y 1 9 7 0 1---------------------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 4 ,
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M a y 1 9 7 0 ________________________________
1660-7 9,
H o u s t o n , T e x . , A p r . 1971 1-------------------------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 6 7 ,
I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d ., O c t . 1 9 7 0 * _____________________________
1685-3 1,
J a c k s o n , M i s s . , J a n . 1971 1
________________________________
1 6 85-3 9,
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , D e c . 19 70 1
------------------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 3 7 ,
K a n s a s C i t y , M o . - K a n s . , S e p t . 1 9 70 1____________________ 1 6 8 5 - 1 6 ,
L a w r e n c e —H a v e r h i l l , M a s s . —N . H . , J u n e 1 9 7 0 1-----------1 6 60-8 2,
16 85-1 ,
L i t t l e R o c k H N o r t h L i t t l e R o c k , A r k . , J u l y 1 9 7 0 1_____
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h a n d A n a h e i m —S a n t a A na rG a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , M a r . 1971 1______________________ 1 6 8 5 - 6 6 ,
L o u i s v i l l e , K y . —I n d . , N o v . 1 9 7 0 ___________________________
1 6 85-2 7,
L u b b o c k , T e x . , M a r . 197 1---------------------------------- ----------------- 1 6 8 5 - 6 0 ,
M a n c h e s t e r , N . H . , J u l y 19 70 1 ____________________________
16 85-2 ,
M e m p h i s , T e n n . - A r k . , N o v . 1 9 7 0 --------------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 3 0 ,
M i a m i , F l a . , N o v . 1 9 7 0 * ____________________________________
1685-2 9,
M i d l a n d a n d O d e s s a , T e x . , J a n . 197 1-------------------------------- 1 6 8 5 - 4 0 ,
M i l w a u k e e , W i s . , M a y 1970 1______________________________
1660-7 4,
M i n n e a p o l i s —St. P a u l , M i n n . , J a n . 1 9 7 1 __________________ 1 6 8 5 - 4 4 ,

 Data on establishment practices


and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.

30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
40 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
40 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
60 c e n t s
45 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
40 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
40 c e n ts
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
40 cen ts
35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
45 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
50
30
30
35.
30
40
30
50
40

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Area
M u s k e g o n —M u s k e g o n H e i g h t s , M i c h . , J u n e 1 9 7 0 1_______
N e w a r k an d J e r s e y C i t y , N . J . , J a n . 197 1-----------------------N e w H a v e n , C o n n . , J a n . 197 1_______________________________
N e w O r l e a n s , L a . , J a n . 197 1 1_____________________________
N e w Y o r k , N . Y . , A p r . 1 9 7 0 1_______________________________
N o r f o l k —P o r t s m o u t h a n d N e w p o r t N e w s —
H a m p t o n , V a . , J a n . 1971 1 ------------------------------------------------O k l a h o m a C i t y , O k l a . , J u l y 1 9 7 0 __________________________
O m a h a , N e b r . - I o w a , S e p t . 1 9 70 1 _________________________
P a t e r s o n —C lift o r r — a s s a i c , N . J . , J u n e 19 70 1___________
P
P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . —N . J . , N o v . 1 9 7 0 ________________________
P h o e n i x , A r i z . , M a r . 1 9 70 1________________________________
P i t t s b u r g h , P a . , J a n . 197 1 1------------------------------------------------P o r t l a n d , M a i n e , N o v . 1 9 7 0 -------------------------------------------------P o r t l a n d , O r e g . - W a s h . , M a y 1970 1______________________
P r o v i d e n c e —P a w t u c k e t — a r w i c k , R . I . —M a s s . ,
W
M a y 1 9 7 0 ______________________________________________________
R a l e i g h , N . C . , A u g . 19 70 1__________________________________
R i c h m o n d , V a . , M a r . 1 9 7 1 __________________________________
R o c h e s t e r , N .Y . ( o f fic e o c cu p a tio n s on ly),
A u g . 1 9 7 0 ______________________________________________________
R o c k f o r d , 111., M a y 1970 1 ---------------------------------------------------St. L o u i s , M o . —111., M a r . 1971 1----------------------------------------S a lt L a k e C i t y , U t a h , N o v . 1 9 70 1 _________________________
S a n A n t o n i o , T e x . , M a y 1 9 7 0 _______________________________
San B e r n a r d i n o — i v e r s i d e — n t a r i o , C a lif.,
R
O
D e c . 19 70 1-------------------------------------------------------------------------------S a n D i e g o , C a l i f . , N o v . 1 9 7 0 ------------------------------------------------S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k l a n d , C a l i f . , O c t . 1 9 7 0 _______________
O
S an J o s e , C a l i f . , A u g . 1 9 7 0 -------------------------------------------------S a v a n n a h , G a . , M a y 1 9 7 1 ____________________________________
S c r a n t o n , P a . , J u l y 1 9 70 1___________________________________
S e a t t l e —E v e r e t t , W a s h . , J a n . 197 1 1______________________
S i o u x F a l l s , S. D a k . , D e c . 1 9 70 1---------------------------------------S o u t h B e n d , I n d ., M a r . 1 9 7 1 ------------------------------------------------S p o k a n e , W a s h . , J u n e 19 70 1 _______________________________
S y r a c u s e , N . Y . , J u l y 1 9 7 0 __________________________________
T a m p a - S t . P e t e r s b u r g , F l a . , N o v . 1 9 7 0 __________________
T o l e d o , O h i o —M i c h . , F e b . 1 9 7 0 ------------------------------------------T r e n t o n , N . J . , S e p t . 1 9 70 1 _________________________________
U t ic a —R o m e , N . Y . , J u l y 1 9 7 0 ______________________________
W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . - M d . - V a . , A p r . 197 1---------------------------W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , M a r . 1 9 7 1 ______________________________
W a t e r l o o , I o w a , N o v . 19 70 1________________________________
W i c h i t a , K a n s . , A p r . 1 9 7 1 __________________________________
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , M a y 1 9 7 1 ______________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1 9 7 1 _________________________________________
Y o u n g s t o w n — a r r e n , O h i o , N o v . 1 9 7 0 ____________________
W

B ulletin n u m b e r
an d p r i c e
1660-85,
1 6 85-4 7,
1 6 85-3 5,
1 6 85-3 6,
1660-8 9,

35 c e n t s
40 c e n ts
30 c e n t s
40 c e n t s
75 c e n t s

1 6 85-4 6,
16 85-5 ,
1 6 8 5 - 14,
1660-87,
1685-3 4,
1660-70,
1 6 85-4 9,
1 6 8 5 - 19,
1660-77,

35
30
35
45
50

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
35 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
40 c e n t s

1660-72,
1 6 8 5 - 12,
1685-6 2,

30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s

16 85-7,
1660-75,
1 6 85-6 5,
1685-26,
1660-71,

30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s

1685-4 2,
1685-2 0,
1685-2 3,
1 6 8 5 - 1 3,
1685-7 2,
16 85-3 ,
1685-52,
1685-38,
1685-6 1,
1660-86,
16 85-8 ,
1 6 8 5 - 17,
1660-56,
1 6 8 5 - 15,
16 85-9 ,
1685-5 6,
1 6 85-5 5,
1 6 8 5 - 32 ,
1685-64,
1685-73,
1 6 85-5 0,
1685-2 4,

40c e n ts
30 c e n t s
40ce n ts
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
40 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W ASHING TO N, D.C.

20212

O F F IC IA L BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIV A TE USE, $300




POSTAGE A N D FEES PAID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
FIRST CLASS MAIL
I
________________________ I


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102