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nayton & Montgomery

Co.

public Library

NOV 5 WO
DOCUMENT co llec tio n

AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e M a n c h e s te r, N e w H a m p s h ire ,
M e tro p o lita n A re a , J u ly 1 9 7 0

B u lle tin
U.S. DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR

1 6 8 5 -2

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES

\o

REGION II

w5=

%

U.S.

PR.

VIRGIN ISLANDS

O PUERTO RICO
Region I
1603-B Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region II
Region III
341 Ninth Ave.
406 Penn Square Building
New York, N .Y . 10001
1317 Filbert St.
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region VI
337 Mayflower Building
411 North Akard St.
Dallas. Tex. 75201
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
* Regions V II and V III will be serviced by Kansas City.
• * Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.
Region V
219 South Dearborn St.
Chicago, 111.60604
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)




Regions V II and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 10th Floor
Kansas C ity, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)
Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

U.S. DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR




J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner

AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e M a n c h e s te r, N e w H a m p s h ire ,
M e tro p o lita n A re a , J u ly 1 9 7 0
B u lletin 1 6 8 5 - 2
October 1970
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 — Price 35 cents




C o n te n ts

P re fa c e

Page
The Bureau of Labor Statistics program of annual
occupational wage surveys in metropolitan areas is de­
signed to provide data on occupational earnings, and estab­
lishment practices and supplementary wage provisions. It
yields detailed data by selected industry division for each
of the areas studied, for geographic regions, and for the
United States. A major consideration in the program is
the need for greater insight into (1) the movement of wages
by occupational category and skill level, and (2) the struc­
ture and level of wages among areas and industry divisions.

Tables:
1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and
2. Indexes of standard weekly salaries and straight-time
hourly earnings for selected occupational groups, and
percents of increase for selected periods--------------------------- -------6
A. Occupational earnings:
A- 1. Office occupations—
men and women__________________
A-2. Professional and technical occupations—
men--------------------A-3. Office, professional, and technical occupations—
men and women combined_________________________
A-4. Maintenance and powerplant occupations---------------------------A -5. Custodial and material movement occupations_________

1

B. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
B -l. Minimum entrance salaries for women office workers_
_
B-2. Shift differentials________________________________
B-3. Scheduled weekly hours___________________________

11
12
13

B-5. Paid vacations------------------------------------------- —------------------------B -6. Health, insurance, and pension plans---------------------------------

15
17

Ninety areas currently are included in the pro­
gram. In each area, information on occupational earnings
is collected annually and on establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions biennially.
This bulletin presents results of the survey in
Manchester, N.H., in July 1970. The Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Area, as defined by the Bureau of the Budget
through January 1968, consists of the city of Manchester;
the towns of Bedford and Goffstown in Hillsborough County;
and Hooksett in Merrimack County. This study was con­
ducted by the Bureau's regional office in Boston, Mass.,
under the general direction of Paul V. Mulkern, Assistant
Regional Director for Operations.




5

Appendix. Occupational descriptions___________________________

NOTE: Similar tabulations are available for other
areas. (See inside back cover.)
Union scales, indicative of prevailing pay levels in
the Manchester area, are also available for seven selected
building trades.

iii

7
8
00 O ' O

At the end of each survey, an individual area bul­
letin presents the survey results. After completion of all
of the individual area bulletins for a round of surveys, two
summary bulletins are issued. The first brings data for
each of the metropolitan areas studied into one bulletin.
The second presents information which has been projected
from individual metropolitan area data to relate to geo­
graphic regions and the United States.

Wage trends for selected occupational groups_________________ ___

18




Introduction
This area is 1 of 90 in which the U.S. Department of Labor's
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings
and related benefits on an areawide basis.1 In this area, data were
obtained by personal visits of Bureau field economists to represent­
ative establishments within six broad industry divisions: Manu­
facturing; transportation, communication, and other public utilities;
wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and
services. Major industry groups excluded from these studies are
government operations and the construction and extractive industries.
Establishments having fewer than a prescribed number of workers are
omitted because they tend to furnish insufficient employment in the
occupations studied to warrant inclusion. Separate tabulations are
provided for each of the broad industry divisions which meet publi­
cation criteria.
These surveys are conducted on a sample basis because of
the unnecessary cost involved in surveying all establishments. To
obtain optimum accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of
large than of small establishments is studied. In combining the data,
however, all establishments are given their appropriate weight. E s­
timates based on the establishments studied are presented, therefore,
as relating to all establishments in the industry grouping and area,
except for those below the minimum size studied.

Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for
full-time workers, i.e., those hired to work a regular weekly schedule
in the given occupational classification. Earnings data exclude pre­
mium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-of-living
allowances and incentive earnings are included. Where weekly hours
are reported, as for office clerical occupations, reference is to the
standard workweek (rounded to the nearest half hour) for which em­
ployees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay
for overtime at regular and/or premium rates) Average weekly earn­
ings for these occupations have been rounded to the nearest half dollar.
These surveys measure the level of occupational earnings in
an area at a particular time. Comparisons of individual occupational
averages over time may not reflect expected wage changes. The
averages for individual jobs are affected by changes in wages and
employment patterns. For example, proportions of workers employed
by high- or low-wage firms may change or high-wage workers may
advance to better jobs and be replaced by new workers at lower rates.
Such shifts'in employment could decrease an occupational average
even though most establishments in an area increase wages during
the year. Trends in earnings of occupational groups, shown in table
2, are better indicators of wage trends than individual jobs within
the groups.

Occupations and Earnings
The occupations selected for study are common to a variety
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries, and are of the
following types; (1) Office clerical; (2) professional and technical;
(3) maintenance and powerplant; and (4) custodial and material move­
ment. Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job
descriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job. The occupations selected for study
are listed and described in the appendix. The earnings data following
the job titles are for all industries combined. Earnings data for some
of the occupations listed and described, or for some industry divisions
within occupations, are not presented in the A-series tables, because
either (l) employment in the occupation is too small to provide enough
data to merit presentation, or (2) there is possibility of disclosure
of individual establishment data. Earnings data not shown separately
for industry divisions are included in all industries combined data,
where shown. Likewise, data are included in the overall classification
when a subclassification of secretaries or truckdrivers is not shown
or information to subclassify is not available.

The averages presented reflect composite, areawide esti­
mates. Industries and establishments differ in pay level and job
staffing and, thus, contribute differently to the estimates for each job.
The pay relationship obtainable from the averages may fail to reflect
accurately the wage spread or differential maintained among jobs in
individual establishments. Similarly, differences in average pay levels
for men and women in any of the selected occupations should not be
assumed to reflect differences in pay treatment of the sexes within
individual establishments. Other possible factors which may con­
tribute to differences in pay for men and women include; Differences
in progression within established rate ranges, since only the actual
rates paid incumbents are collected; and differences in specific duties
performed, although the workers are classified appropriately within
the same survey job description. Job descriptions used in classifying
employees in these surveys are usually more generalized than those
used in individual establishments and allow for minor differences
among establishments in the specific duties performed.

1
Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New York State
Departm ent of Labor. These areas are Bingham ton (New York portion only); Rochester (o ffic e o c c u ­
pations only); Syracuse; and U tic a —Rom e. In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ite d area studies
in 77 areas at the request of the W age and Hour D ivision of the U. S. D epartm ent of Labor.




1

Occupational employment estimates represent the total in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not the number
actually surveyed. Because of differences in occupational structure

2

among establishments, the estimates of occupational employment ob­
tained from the sample of establishments studied serve only to indicate
the relative importance of the jobs studied. These differences in
occupational structure do not affect materially the accuracy of the
earnings data.
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Information is presented (in the B-series tables) on selected
establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions as they
relate to plant and office workers. Data for industry divisions not
presented separately are included in the estimates for "all industries."
Administrative, executive, and professional employees, and construc­
tion workers who are utilized as a separate work force are excluded.
"Plant workers" include working foremen and all nonsupervisory
workers (including leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice func­
tions. "Office workers" include working supervisors and nonsuper­
visory workers performing clerical or related functions. Cafeteria
workers and routemen are excluded in manufacturing industries, but
included in nonmanufacturing industries.
Minimum entrance salaries for women office workers (table
B -l) relate only to the establishments visited. Because of the optimum
sampling techniques used, and the probability that large establish­
ments are more likely to have formal entrance rates for workers
above the subclerical level than small establishments, the table is
more-representative of policies in medium and large establishments.
Shift differential data (table B-2) are limited to plant workers
in manufacturing industries. This information is presented both in
terms of (1) establishment policy, 2 presented in terms of total plant
worker employment, and (2) effective practice, presented in terms
of workers actually employed on the specified shift at the time of the
survey. In establishments having varied differentials, the amount
applying to a majority was used or, if no amount applied to a majority,
the classification "other" was used. In establishments in which some
late-shift hours are paid at normal rates, a differential was recorded
only if it applied to a majority of the shift hours.
The scheduled weekly hours (table B-3) of a majority of the
first-shift workers in an establishment are tabulated as applying to
all of the plant or office workers of that establishment. Scheduled
weekly hours are those which a majority of full-time employees were
expected to work, whether they were paid for at straight-time or
overtime rates.
Paid holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and
pension plans (tables B-4 through B-6) are treated statistically on
the basis that these are applicable to all plant or office workers if
2
An establishm ent was considered as having a policy if it
ditions: (1) O perated late shifts at the tim e of the survey, or (2) had
late shifts. An establishm ent was considered as having form al provisions
shifts during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2) had provisions in
late shifts.




m et either of the follow ing
form al provisions covering
if it (1) had operated late
written form for operating

a majority of such workers are eligible or may eventually qualify for
the practices listed. Sums of individual items in tables B-2 through
B-6 may not equal totals because of rounding.
Data on paid holidays (table B-4) are limited to data on holi­
days granted annually on a formal basis; i.e., (l) are provided for
in written form, or (2) have been established by custom. Holidays
ordinarily granted are included even though they may fall on a non­
workday and the worker is not granted another day off. The first
part of the paid holidays table presents the number of whole and half
holidays actually granted. The second part combines whole and half
holidays to show total holiday time.
The summary of vacation plans (table B-5) is limited to a
statistical measure of vacation provisions. It is not intended as a
measure of the proportion of workers actually receiving specific bene­
fits. Provisions of an establishment for all lengths of service were
tabulated as applying to all plant or office workers of the establish­
ment, regardless of length of service. Provisions for payment on
other than a time basis were converted to a time basis; for example,
a payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as the equiv­
alent of 1 week's pay. Only basic plans are included. Estimates
exclude vacation bonus and vacation-savings plans and those which
offer "extended" or "sabbatical" benefits beyond basic plans with
qualifying lengths of service. Such exclusions are typical in the steel,
aluminum, and can industries.
Data on health, insurance, and pension plans (table B-6) in­
clude those plans for which the employer pays at least a part of the
cost. Such plans include those underwritten by a commercial insurance
company and those provided through a union fund or paid directly by
the employer out of current operating funds or from a fund set aside
for this purpose. An establishment was considered to have a plan if
the majority of employees was eligible to be covered under the plan,
even if less than a majority elected to participate because employees
were required to contribute toward the cost of the plan. Legally
required plans, such as workmen's compensation, social security,
and railroad retirement were excluded.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of
insurance under which predetermined cash payments are made directly
to the insured during illness or accident disability. Information is
presented for all such plans to which the employer contributes. How­
ever, in New York and New Jersey, which have enacted temporary
disability insurance laws which require employer contributions, plans
are included only if the employer (l) contributes more than is legally
required, or (2) provides the employee with benefits which exceed the
con ­
requirements of the law. Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are
2 The temporary disability laws in C alifo rn ia and Rhode Island do not require em ployer
contributions.

3

limited to formal plans4 which provide full pay or a proportion of the
worker's pay during absence from work because of illness. Separate
tabulations are presented according to (1) plans which provide full pay
and no waiting period, and (2) plans which provide either partial pay
or a waiting period. In addition to the presentation of the proportions
of workers who are provided sickness and accident insurance or paid
sick leave, an unduplicated total is shown of workers who receive
either or both types of benefits.
An establishm ent was considered as having a form al plan if it established at least the
minim um number of days of sick lea ve av ailab le to each em ployee.
Such a plan need not be
written, but inform al sick lea ve allow an ces, determ ined on an individual basis, were excluded.




Major medical insurance includes those plans which are de­
signed to protect employees in case of sickness and injury involving
expenses beyond the coverage of basic hospitalization, medical, and
surgical plans. Medical insurance refers to plans providing for com­
plete or partial payment of doctors' fees. Dental insurance usually
covers fillings, extractions, and X-rays. Excluded are plans which
cover only oral surgery or accident damage. Plans may be under­
written by commercial insurance companies or nonprofit organizations
or they may be paid for by the employer out of a fund set aside for
this purpose. Tabulations of retirement pension plans are limited to
those plans that provide regular payments for the remainder of the
worker's life.

4

T a b le 1.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts an d w o rk e rs w ith in s c o p e o f s u rv e y an d n u m b e r s tu d ie d in M a n c h e s te r, N .H .'

b y m a jo r in d u s try d iv is io n ,2 J u ly 1 9 7 0

Number o f es tablishments
Industry division

Minimum
employment
in establish­
ments in scope
o f study

W orkers in establishments
Within scope of study

Within scope
o f study3

Studied

T o ta l4

Studied

Plant
Number

A ll d ivision s—
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Transportation, com m unication, and
other public u tilitie s 5 W holesale trade
Retail trade
Finance, insurance, and real estate ______
S ervices 8 _

_

O ffice

Percent

T otal4

132

64

23, 984

100

17,465

3, 272

15, 923

50
-

65
67

30
34

14, 978
9, 006

62
38

12, 502
4, 963

934
2, 338

9, 998
5, 925

50
50
50
50
50

9
11
24
10
13

7
5
10
5
7

2, 679
1,203
2, 820
1,310
994

11
5
12
5
5

1,097
( 6)
( 6)
C)

( 6)

788
( 6)
( 6)
( 6)
( 6)

2, 354
569
1,488
881
633

1 The M anchester Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea, as defined by the Bureau of the Budget through January 1968, con sists of the city o f M anchester and the towns of Bedford and
Goffstown in H illsborough County; and Hooksett in M errim ack County.
The "w orkers within scope of study" estim ates shown in this table provide a reasonably accurate d escription of the size
and com position of the labor fo r c e included in the survey. The estim ates are not intended, how ever, to serve as a basis of com p arison with other em ploym ent indexes fo r the area to m easure
em ploym ent trends or levels since (1) planning of wage surveys requires the use of establishm ent data com piled con siderably in advance o f the payroll period studied, and (2) sm all establishments
are excluded from the scope of the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial C la ssifica tion Manual was used in cla ssifyin g establishm ents by
industry division.
3 Includes all establishm ents with total em ploym ent at or above the minimum lim itation. A ll outlets (within the area) of com panies in such industries as trade, finance, auto repair se rv ice ,
and m otion picture theaters are con sid ered as 1 establishm ent.
4 Includes executive, p rofession a l, and other w orkers excluded fro m the separate plant and office ca tegories.
5 Taxicabs and se rv ice s incidental to water transportation were excluded.
Abbreviated to "P ublic utilities" in the A - and B -s e r ie s tables.
6 This industry division is represented in estim ates fo r "all in d u stries" and "nonm anufacturing" in the Series A tables, and for "all in d ustries" in the S eries B tables. Separate presentation
of data for this division is not made for one or m ore of the following reasons: (1) Employment in the division is too small to provide enough data to m erit separate study, (2) the sample was not
designed initially to perm it separate presentation, (3) response was insufficient or inadequate to perm it separate presentation, and (4) there is possib ility of d isclo su re o f individual establishm ent data.
7 W orkers from this entire industry division are represented in estim ates for "a ll in d u stries" and "nonmanufacturing" in the S eries A tables, but from the real estate portion only in estim ates
fo r "a ll in d u stries" in the S eries B tables.
Separate presentation of data fo r this division is not made fo r one or m ore of the reasons given in footnote 6 above.
8 Hotels and m otels; laundries and other personal se rv ice s ; business se rv ice s ; automobile repair, rental, and parking; m otion p ictures; nonprofit m em bership organizations (excluding religious
and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectural s e rv ice s .




T w o-thirds o f the w orkers within scope o f the survey in the Manchester area were
em ployed in manufacturing firm s.
The following presents the m ajor industry groups and
sp ecific industries as a percent of all manufacturing:
Industry groups

Specific industries

Leather and leather products____ 33
Textile m ill p ro d u cts___________ 23
E le ctrica l equipment and
supplies_______________________18

Footwear, except ru b b e r_______ 32
Knitting m il l s ---------------------------- 9
Comm unication equipment-------- 5
E le ctric test and distributing
equipm ent____________________ 5
E lectronic com ponents and
a c c e s s o r ie s _____________________ 5
Weaving m ills, synthetics_______ 5

This inform ation is based on estim ates of total employment derived from universe
m aterials com piled p rio r to actual survey.
P roportions in various industry divisions may
differ fro m proportions based on the results of the survey as shown in table 1 above.

Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
shows the percentage change. The index is the product of multiplying
the base year relative (100) by the relative for the next succeeding
year and continuing to multiply (compound) each year's relative by the
previous year's index.

Presented in table 2 are indexes and percentages of change
in average salaries of office clerical workers and industrial nurses,
and in average earnings of selected plant worker groups. The indexes
are a measure of wages at a given time, expressed as a percent of
wages during the base period. Subtracting 100 from the index yields
the percentage change in wages from the base period to the date of
the index. The percentages of change or increase relate to wage
changes between the indicated dates. Annual rates of increase, where
shown, reflect the amount of increase for 12 months when the time
period between surveys was other than 12 months. These computations
were based on the assumption that wages increased at a constant rate
between surveys. These estimates are measures of change in aver­
ages for the area; they are not intended to measure average pay
changes in the establishments in the area.

For office clerical workers and industrial nurses, the wage
trends relate to regular weekly salaries for the normal workweek,
exclusive of earnings for overtime. For plant worker groups, they
measure changes in average straight-time hourly earnings, excluding
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts. The percentages are based on data for selected key occu­
pations and include most of the numerically important jobs within
each group.
Limitations of Data

Method of Computing

The indexes and percentages of change, as measures of
change in area averages, are influenced by: (1) general salary and
wage changes, (2) merit or other increases in pay received by indi­
vidual workers while in the same job, and (3) changes in average
wages due to changes in the labor force resulting from labor turn­
over, force expansions, force reductions, and changes in the propor­
tions of workers employed by establishments with different pay levels.
Changes in the labor force can cause increases or decreases in the
occupational averages without actual wage changes. It is conceivable
that even though all establishments in an area gave wage increases,
average wages may have declined because lower-paying establishments
entered the area or expanded their work forces. Similarly, wages
may have remained relatively constant, yet the averages for an area
may have risen considerably because higher-paying establishments
entered the area.

Each of the following key occupations within an occupational
group was assigned a constant weight based on its proportionate em­
ployment in the occupational group:
O ffice c le ric a l (m en and women):
Bookkeeping-m achine
operators, class B
C lerks, accoun tin g, classes
A and B
C lerks, file , classes
A , B, and C
C lerks, order
C lerks, payroll
C om ptom eter operators
Keypunch operators, classes
A and B
M essengers (o ffice boys or
girls)

O ffice c le ric a l (m en and w om en)— Skilled m ain ten ance (m en):
C arpenters
Continued
Electrician s
S ecretaries
M achinists
Stenographers, general
M echanics
Stenographers, senior
Switchboard operators, classes
M echanics (au tom otive)
Painters
A and B
T abu latin g-m ach in e operators,
Pipefitters
Tool and die makers
class B
Typists, classes A and B
Unskilled plant (m en):
Jan itors, porters, and
Industrial nurses (m en and
cleaners
women):
Laborers, m a teria l handling
Nurses, industrial (registered)

The use of constant employment weights eliminates the effect
of changes in the proportion of workers represented in each job in­
cluded in the data. The percentages of change reflect only changes
in average pay for straight-time hours. They are not influenced by
changes in standard work schedules, as such, or by premium pay
for overtime. Where necessary, data were adjusted to remove from
the indexes and percentages of change any significant effect caused
by changes in the scope of the survey.

The average (mean) earnings for each occupation were multi­
plied by the occupational weight, and the products for all occupations
in the group were totaled. The aggregates for 2 consecutive years
were related by dividing the aggregate for the later year by the aggre­
gate for the earlier year. The resultant relative, less 100 percent,




5

6




T a b le 2 .

In d e x e s o f s ta n d a rd w e e k ly s a la r ie s an d s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d

o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s in M a n c h e s te r , N .H ., J u ly 1 9 7 0
a n d p e rc e n ts o f in c re a s e fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s

Pe riod

O ffice
c le r ic a l
(m en and
women)

a n d J u ly 1 9 6 9 ,

Industrial
nurses
(m en and
women)

Skilled
m aintenance
trades
(men)

Unskilled
plant
w ork ers
(men)

Indexes (July 1967*100)
July 1970_________________________________ ____ —
July 1969___ ____________________________________

120. 7
114. 3

n
(*)

117. 9
111. 2

126. 7
120. 1

Indexes (August 1960=100)
July 1970------------------ ------------................. -.................
July 1967------------------------ -------- ----------------------------

157. 5
130. 6

(*)

n

160. 4
136. 1

168. 4
132. 9

P ercen ts o f in cre a se
5.6
7. 1
6. 7

July 1969 to July 1970............ ................................July 1968 to July 1969----------------------------------------July 1967 to July 1968----------------------- -------- -------August 1966 to July 1967:
11-month in c r e a s e ---------------------------------------Annual rate of in cr e a s e ---------------------------------

4. 1
4. 5

August
August
August
August
August
August

4.
3.
2.
4.
4.
4.

1965
1964
1963
1962
1961
I960

to
to
to
to
to
to

August
August
August
August
August
August

1966----- -------------------------1965-------------------------------1964-------------------------------1963--------------------------------1962-------------------------------1961---------------------------------

6
1
6
2
5
1

( >

(

(*)

n
(l )
(!)
(

)

( >
(*)
)
(*)

6. 0
5. 5
5 .4

5. 5
7 .9
11. 3

5. 4
5. 9

2. 6
2. 8

4. 6
3. 9
5. 7
4. 1
4. 4
3. 5

4. 8
3. 8
5. 7
3. 0
5 .9
3. 3

1 Data do not m eet publication cr ite ria .

NOTE: P re v io u sly published indexes fo r the M anchester area used August 1960 as
the base p eriod .
They can be converted to the new base p eriod by dividing them by the
corresp on din g index num bers fo r July 1967 on the August I960 base p eriod as shown in the
table.
(The resu lt should be m ultiplied by 100.)

7

A.

O ccupational Earnings

T a b le A -1 .

O f f ic e o c c u p a tio n s —m e n a n d w o m e n

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i me w e e k l y h o ur s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s st udi ed on an a r e a b a s i s b y i n d us t r y d i v i s i o n, Ma n c h e s t e r , N. H. , Jul y 1970)
Weekly earnings 1
( standard)
Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

S e x , o c c u p a t i o n , and i n dus t r y di v i s i o n

N u m b e r o f wo r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i me we e k l y e a r ni ng s of—

»

*
60

and
und e r

Middle range2

65

$

*

65

70

-

-

70

75

»
75

-

“ i
80
-

80

$
85

*

-

85

95

-

90

%

90

t

100

105

-

95

-

100

*

i

110

-

105

-

110

*

115

t
120

-

115

-

*

t
125

130

-

120

125

-

-

-

130

$
135

i

140

-

135

-

140

150

-

145

i

%
145

-

150

i
155

160

-

155

and

160 over

HEN
$

$

$

85.0 0

MESSENGERS (OF F IC E BOVS! -----------------------

90 .5 0

7 9 . 0 0 - 93.0 0

$

3

3

3

WOMEN
BILL ERS , MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) -----------------------------------------------------------

8 4 .0 0 - 1 1 1 . 0 0

3

10

-

-

-

1

0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
35
15

39 .0
38 .5

9 2.5 0
9 5.0 0

8 3 .5 0 9 1 .0 0 -

104.00
116.00

2
—

1

MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ---------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

78
64

39 .0 107.00 113.00
38.5 108.00 116.00

9 6 .0 0 9 4 .0 0 -

118.00
118.50

5
5

6
4

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ---------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

125
29
96

38.5
4 0 .0
38.0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

CLERKS, PAYROLL -------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

9 2.5 0
99.5 0

9 2.0 0
87.50
9 3.5 0

93.0 0
90 .0 0
95 .0 0

8 1 .0 0 106.50
8 1 . 0 0 - 96.5 0
8 1 .0 0 108.50

13
3

8 8 .0 0

87.0 0

12

86.50

86.00

8 0 . 5 0 - 96.5 0
8 0 . 5 0 - 92.5 0

10

12

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ---------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

53
24
29

SECRETARIES -----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

118
51
67

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ---------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------------------

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
38 .5

80.5 0
82.0 0
79.0 0

81.0 0
83.00
78 .0 0

15
15

5
3

4

7 6 . 0 0 - 84.50
8 1 . 0 0 - 86.00
7 4 . 0 0 - 83.50

6
4
2

39 .0 117.50 123.00 1 0 1 . 0 0 39 .0 115.50 115.00 9 8 . 5 0 -

131.50
133.50

33
18

39 .0 119.50 117.50 1 0 6 . 0 0 40 .0 113.50 114.00 1 0 6 . 0 0 -

33
15

39 .5
39.5
4 0 .0

96 .5 0 9 9.0 0
96 .5 0
97 .5 0
9 6.5 0 1 0 1 .0 0

9 1 .0 0 8 7 .0 0 9 3 .0 0 -

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

69
60

39 .0
38 .5

87.50
87.0 0

86.00

8 2 . 0 0 - 93.00
8 1 . 5 0 - 90.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B --------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

39 .0
39 .0

84.50
84.5 0

87.50
87.50

7 4 . 5 0 - 96.00
7 4 . 5 0 - 96.00

5
5

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

39 .5
39.5

8 7.5 0
89.50

88.5 0
90 .5 0

8 2 . 5 0 - 95.00
8 4 . 5 0 - 94.50

5
5

3 9 .0
39 .0

8 0.5 0
79.00

81.50
74.5 0

3

9 2 .0 0 -

SENIOR ------------------------------

See f o o t no t e s at end of tabl es,




5

119.00

7 9 . 0 0 - 89.00

T Y P IS T S , CLASS A -----------------------------------------T Y P IS T S . CLASS B -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

1
13

12
15

7
1

—

—

1

—
-

i
1

20
7
13

9
5
4
2
2

11
4
6
6
1
1

7
3

7
2
5

4
3
1

9
3
6

3

4
3

7

6
6

5

1
1

8
8
1

4
2

2

2

—

—

—
—

-

—

—

-

-

12
5
7

8
2
6

2

5

3
2

1
1

1
1

2

1
—
-

3
—

2

1

2
—

—
—
—
—

—
—

4

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

—
-

—
—

—
-

—
-

-

—

-

—

—

-

-

-

-

—
—

—

—
—

—
—

—

—

—

—

-

-

-

—

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—
—

-

—

-

—

-

1

-

-

-

-

2

—
—

-

—

1
1

—

-

—

1
1

—
—

—
-

-

1
1

-

-

-

1

2

—

—
—

2

-

-

—

—

—

-

4

—

-

-

—

-

1

-

2
2

—
—

2
2

—
-

2

1

5

-

2

1

4
3

-

-

—

—

-

10
5
5

8
3

—

—

—

9
7

-

—

-

-

-

—

-

4
2

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

2
2
2

-

-

-

—
—

—
1

2

3
2

1

4

—
—

-

-

-

1
2
1

2

1

—

—
-

1

—

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

—

—

4

-

9

-

-

-

-

-

—

4
-

-

4

2

-

2

2
1

-

1

2

-

_

4

4

1

—

6
5
1

5

4

4

—

-

3

1

-

-

1
1

2
2

1

_

3
2

4

-

-

-

3

1
1

-

-

_
-

3

7
2

2
2
2

6

7 2 . 5 0 - 86.50
7 1 . 0 0 - 86.00

—

2
—

3

3
3

2
2
—
23
23

-

-

8
1

-

5

7

-

-

2
28

1

2

-

104.00
105.50
104.00

7
18
18

1

10
2
8

4
4

19
1
18

1

1
2
1

136.00
121.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 ---------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

3

3

—

2
5

—

1
1

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

5

6

3
3

1
1

6

42
31

STENOGRAPHERS,

1
3

15
5
10

3
2
1

84.5 0

4
—

3
2

18
6
12

129.50
39 .0 113.50 111.50 1 0 0 . 0 0 39 .5 1 1 1 .0 0 113.50 1 0 0 .5 0 -1 2 7 .0 0
131.50
39.0 115.00 1 1 0 . 0 0 1 0 0 . 0 0 -

18

—

10
5
5

8 0 . 5 0 - 92.50

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ----------------

1
5

-

8
T a b le A -2 .

P r o f e s s io n a l a n d t e c h n ic a l o c c u p a t io n s — m e n

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Manchester, N.H., July 1970)
W eek ly earnings *
( standard)
Number
of
woikers

Sex and occupation

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e weekly earnings of—

s
A verage
w eek ly
h ours1
(standard)

t
110

M ean 2

M edian 2

M iddle ran g e2

AO

O
o

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ---------------------------------------

s

s

s

s

s

s

120

t

125

130

135

140

145

150

155

t
160

165

170

175

120

125

130

135

140

145

150

155

160

165

170

175

180

-

5

1

9

2

4

-

$

$

$

and
under
115

MEN

t

115

$
$
$
$
1 3 9 .0 0 1 3 4 .5 0 1 2 4 . 0 0 - 1 5 7 . 5 0

6

1

6

-

-

3

3

See footnotes at end of tables.

T a b le A - 3 .

O f f ic e , p r o fe s s io n a l, a n d t e c h n ic a l o c c u p a t io n s — m e n a n d w o m e n

c o m b in e d

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Manchester, N.H., July 1970)
Average

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
woiken

Weekly
Weekly
hours * earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

O F F I C E OCCUPATIONS

Average

Occupation and industry division

O F F I C E OCCUPATIONS -

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

CONTINUED

Average

Occupation and induatry diviaion

O F F I C E OCCUPATIONS

-

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

CONTINUED

$
MACHINE) --------------------------------------------------------------

33

38.5

9 4 .0 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ----------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------

35
15

39.0
38.5

92.50
99.50

CL ERK S,

87

39.0

1 0 8 .5 0

ACCOUNTING,

CLASS A -----------------

NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

69

39.0

136
31
105

38.5
40.0
38.5

92.00
9 0 .5 0
92.50

CLERK S, ORDER ---------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

61
43

39.0
40.0

9 8 .0 0
9 4 .5 0

CLERK S, PAYROLL ----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

64
53

40.0
40.0

8 8 .0 0
8 6 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -----------------

39

38.5

8 6 .0 0

8 2 .0 0
7 9 .0 0

20

37.0

SECRETARIES --------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------

118
51

39.0
39.5

1 1 3 .5 0

SE CR ET AR IE S , CLASS 8 ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

42
31

39.0
3 9 .0

1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0

SE CR ET AR IE S , CLASS C ----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------

33
18

3 9 .0
40.0

1 1 9 .5 0
1 1 3 .5 0

S E CR ET AR IE S , CLASS 0 ----------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

33
18
15

39.5
39.5
40.0

96.50
96.50
96.50

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ----------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------------

69
60

39.0
38.5

87.50
8 7 .0 0

$
106*00

8 5 .0 0

MANUFACTURING - - — ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B --------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

18
18

39.0
39.0

8 4 .5 0
8 4 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD O P E R A T O R - R E C E P TI O N IS T S MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------

36
25

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 7 .5 0
8 9 .5 0

T Y P I S T S , CLASS 8 -------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

50
34

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

8 0 .5 0
7 9 .0 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS 8 -----------------

MESSENGERS ( O F F I C E BOYS AND G IR L S )

23

40.0

1 1 2 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN. CLASS B ---------------------------------------

40

40.0

1 3 9 .0 0

1 1 1 .0 0

1 0 9 .0 0

CLERK S, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ----------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

24
29

39 0
40.0
38.5

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

See footnotes at end of tables.




PROFESSIONAL AN0 TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

9
T a b le A - 4 .

M a in te n a n c e an d p o w e r p la n t o c c u p a tio n s

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ied on an a r e a b a s is b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n , M a n c h e s t e r , N .H ., J u ly 1970)
Hourly earnings3

S e x , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u stry d iv is io n

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—

I

Number
of
Mean 2 Median2

Middle range 2

i------ 5---- S
------1------i------1------ i----- 1------ i------1-----i------ i------1------1
------S
------1------S
------S
------S
------i------$

U nder 2 .2 0 2 .3 0
*
and
2 .2 0 u n d er

2 .30

2 .4 0

-

2 .4 0 2 . 5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0 3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0 3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .00 3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0 3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 .0 0 4 .1 0

4 .2 0

4 .3 0
and

2 .50 2 .6 0 2 .7 0

2 .80

2 .9 0

3 .50

3 .60

3 .70

3 .8 0

6
6

3
3

“

4
4

3 .9 0 4 ,00 4 .1 0

4 .20

4 .30

over

HEN
m a i n t e n a n c e -------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------------------

23
23

$
3 .2 4
3 .2 4

$
3 .4 5
3 .4 5

$
$
2 . 8 3 - 3 .5 9
2 . 8 3 - 3 .5 9

~

~

~

4
4

~

1
1

3
3

~

FIREMEN, s t a t i o n a r y b o i l e r -----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

31
31

2 .5 8
2 .5 8

2 .4 8
2 .4 8

2 .4 2 2 .4 2 -

2 .9 1
2 .9 1

5
5

-

13
13

i
i

4
4

-

-

8
8

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES ----------------

33

2 .6 7

2 .7 5

2 .7 1 -

2 .7 8

-

3

-

3

-

22

3

-

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE ------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

35
34

3 .3 8
3 .4 0

3 .3 8
3 .3 8

3 .2 3 3 .2 6 -

3 .6 9
3 .7 1

-

_

-

-

1
“

2
2

-

“

2
2

-

~

“

~

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) ----------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------

33
24
24

3 .6 5
3 .5 7
3 .5 7

3 .7 9
3 .7 5
3 .7 5

3 .4 0 3 .0 8 3 .0 8 -

3 .8 9
3 .8 4
3 .8 4

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

45
44

3 .1 0
3 .0 9

3 .1 2
3 .1 1

2 .7 4 2 .7 4 -

3 .3 5
3 .3 4

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

35
35

4 .0 4
4 .0 4

4 .1 1
4 .1 1

3 .7 9 3 .7 9 -

4 .1 8
4 .1 8

ELECTRICIANS,

S ee fo o t n o t e s at end o f ta b le s




1
1

"

”

~

-

_

_

“

~

~

*

7
7

12
12

_
*

2
2

“

~

~

-

“

_

_

1
1

_

2
2

-

: : : :
1
3
3

3
3

9
9

6
6

_

_

_
“

-

-

1
1

6
6

4
4

5
5

5
5

”

-

-

-

-

10
10
10

2
2

2

i
i

i
-

1
1

-

i
i

7
7

1
1

1
1

_

-

i
i

-

8
8
8
-

1
1

_

2

8

-

3
-

_
-

-

“

_

_
-

3
3

4
4

4
4
4

_

_

-

-

2
2

1
1

12
12

2
2

_
4
4

10
T a b le A - 5 .

C u s to d ia l an d m a te ria l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly ea rn in g s f o r s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ied on an a r e a b a s is b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n , M a n c h e s t e r , N. H . , J u ly 1970)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s

Hourly earnings^

s

s

t

s

s

s

s

s

s

s

s

s

s

s

s

s

$

*

$

*

$

*

1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40

S e x , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u str y d iv is io n

and
under

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60

1.87- 2.17
1.88- 2.14

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN
MANUFACTURING WATCHMEN
MANUFACTURING -------------------

20

2 .0 1

2 .0 4

1 .8 8 -

2 .1 4

-

2

4

2

6

4

-

-

-

2

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS --MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

174
78
96

2 .1 7
2 .2 9
2 .07

2 .0 8
2 .2 0
1 .9 0

1 .8 7 - 2 .31
2 .0 7 - 2 .32
1 .8 3 - 2 .32

10
2
8

6
2
4

41
3
38

1
1

35
18
17

17
14
3

20
19
1

ii
6

5

2

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING ------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------

155
56
99

2 .6 2
2 .1 3
2 .90

2 .27
2 .1 6
2 .7 3

2 .1 2 - 2 .7 9
2 .1 1 - 2 .22
2 .2 3 - 4 .3 1

3
3

5

2
3

3
3

8
4
4

13
4
9

30
30
”

24
12
12

FILLERS ---------------------

83

2 .19

2 .0 9

1 .9 3 - 2 .4 4

-

3

15

12

14

PACKERS, SHIPPING -----------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

43
43

2 .3 2
2 .3 2

2 .2 6
2 .2 6

2 .1 5 2 .1 5 -

2 .5 3
2 .5 3

_
-

_

_

-

8
8

RECEIVING CLERKS -------------------

23

2 .44

2 .3 9

2 .2 6 -

2 .7 5

-

-

-

-

-

1

SHIPPING C L E R K S --------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

31
15

2 .3 8
2 .5 5

2 .27
2 .3 9

2 .0 3 2 .0 8 -

2 .7 5
3 .1 5

_

-

3

3

8

~

5

~

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ----MANUFACTURING -------------------

36
33

2 .59
2 .55

2 .4 7
2 .4 4

2 .2 9 2 .2 7 -

3 .02
2 .7 5

-

-

_
“

5
5

TRUCKDRIVERS ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------

233
59
174
95

3 .2 9
2 .6 8
3 .50
4 .29

2 .8 9
2 .7 4
4 .4 0
4 .4 5

2 .7 1 2 .3 9 2 .7 7 4 .4 2 -

4 .4 3
3 .0 3
4 .4 5
4 .4 7

_
-

3
3
"

-

7

12
~

~

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1-1/2 TONS) ---------------------

24

2 .14

2 .0 5

1 .9 4 -

2 .2 8

-

-

3

8

3

-

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM (1-1/2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) ---------MANUFACTURING -------------------

85

3 .2 0

2 .5 9 - 4 .4 3
2 .5 4 - 2 .7 9

_

_

9

_

2 .6 8

2 .7 8
2 .7 4

_

30

-

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) ------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------

38
19

3.51
2.96

3.24
2.79

2.80- 4.44
2.74- 3.23

28

2.85

2.69

2.43- 2.96

46
44

2.16
2.16

2.16
2.17

2.11- 2.33
2.12- 2.34

ORDER

TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT)

-

-

~

_
-

*

2
2

_
-

15
10
5

_
-

-

~
-

*

*

~
”

4

4

18

2

2

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

26

-

2

4

4

18

2

2

“

5

5

2

4

6

2

-

-

-

3

3
3

*

9
9

2
2

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

9

2

-

4

3
i

2
2

2
2

-

“

3
2

-

5

5

5

-

5

5

5

-

5
3

3
3

2
2
”

8
4
4
i

4
3
1

“

4
4
“

7
6

~

11
8
3
1

i
i

6

-

-

-

-

i
i

6
5

1

2

4
i

12
6
6

5
5

13
13

~

5

-

_
-

2

2
5

See fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le s.




-

5
5

-

i
1

1

28
28

~

2

1

-

-

5

1
-

26

8
8

6

3

2

WOMEN
PACKERS, SHIPPING
RANUFACTURING ■

i
i

-

-

4
4

4
3

23
23

2
2

5
5

6
6

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

“

-

_

_

-

-

1
1

-

i
i
i

-

1
1
-

-

4
i
i

-

-

“

~

88
88
88

-

-

i

-

-

-

-

3
3

3
3

_

_

_

_

30

-

-

3
3

4
4

6

-

3

2

”

26

1
1

4

38
. 22
16
2

4

4

_

2
“

2
2

3
3

17

2
2

-

2

7
7

4
i

6

6

_

_

14

4
-

-

6

-

-

~

5

-

_

_

-

“

1

-

-

15

1

-

-

-

4

11
B.

E s ta b lis h m e n t p ractices and s u p p le m e n ta ry w a g e p rovisions

T a b le B -1 .

M in im u m

e n tra n c e s a la rie s fo r w o m e n o ffic e w o rk e r s

(D is tr ib u tio n o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts stu d ied in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u str y d iv is io n s b y m in im u m e n tra n ce s a la r y fo r s e l e c t e d c a t e g o r i e s
o f in e x p e r ie n c e d w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s , M a n c h e s t e r , N .H ., July 1970)
O ther in expe r ie n c e d c l e r i c a l w o rk e r s 5

I n e x p e rie n ce d ty p ists

M in im u m w eek ly s t r a ig h t -t im e s a l a r y 4

B ase

A ll
in d u str ie s

A ll
sch e d u le s

E s ta b lis h m e n t s studied-------------------------------------------------------

64

E s ta b lis h m e n t s h a ving a s p e c i fie d m in im u m — ------- — -------

30

M a n u fa ctu rin g

N on m a n u factu rin g

M anufacturing

on sta n da rd w ee k ly h o u r s 6 o f—
A ll
sch e d u le s

40

XXX

34

A ll
sc h e d u le s

40

N on m anufactu rin g

B a se d on sta n da rd w eek ly h o u r s 6 o f—

A ll
in d u str ie s

XXX

64

30

40

A ll
sc h e d u le s

XXX

34

40

XXX

15

8

8

7

5

29

14

13

15

10

$ 65.0 0 -----------------------------------------------------$ 67.50
$ 7 0 .0 0 — —-----------------------------------------------$ 7 2 .5 0
_ ------—
_
$ 7 5 .0 0 __
. .
_
$ 77.5 0 ___
. . .
$ 8 0 .0 0
$ 8 2 .5 0 —
$ 8 5 .0 0

4
3
3
3
1
1

2

2
_
2
2
_
1
1

2
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

3
_
3
2
i
3
1
_
1

2
1
3
3
_
4
_
2

-

5
1
6
5
1
7
i
2
1

3
3
2
1
3
1

-

2
_
1
1
_
2
_
1

-

2
1
1
2
2
_
2
-

E s ta b lis h m e n ts having no s p e c ifie d m in im u m _____— ----------

7

5

XXX

2

XXX

20

10

XXX

10

XXX

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w h ich did not e m p lo y w o r k e r s
in th is c a t e g o r y -------------------------------------------------------------------------

42

17

XXX

25

XXX

15

6

XXX

9

$ 6 2 .5 0
$ 6 5 .0 0
$ 6 7 .5 0
$ 7 0 .0 0
$ 7 2 .5 0
$ 7 5 .0 0
$ 7 7.5 0
$ 80.0 0
$ 8 2 .5 0

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u nd er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

See fo o t n o t e s at end o f ta b le s .




-

2
2
_
1
1
-

-

-

12




Table B-2.

Shift differentials

( L a t e - s h i f t pay p r o v i s i o n s fo r m a n u f a c t u r in g plant w o r k e r s b y type and amo unt of p ay d i f f e r e n t i a l ,
M a n c h e s t e r , N. H. , J u l y 1970)
^ A l^ jj> la n t ^ o r k e r s ^ n jr ia n u fa c t u r in g ^ _ K ) O jD e r c e n t ) _ _ _ _ _ _ ^ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ^ ^ _ _ _ - _ _ j_ _ ^ ^ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

P e r c e n t o f m a n u f a c t u r in g p la n t w o r k e r s —
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s having p r o v i s i o n s 7
fo r la t e sh if t s

L a t e - s h i f t pay p r o v i s i o n

A c t u a l ly work ing on la t e sh if t s

S e c o n d sh ift

T o t a l ___ ____

S e c o n d sh ift

T h i r d o r othe r
shif t

59. 3

- —

T h i r d o r o th er
shift

47. 3

12. 8

2. 6

No pay d i f f e r e n t i a l fo r w o r k on la t e s h i f t _____

8. 6

3. 0

_

P a y d i f f e r e n t i a l fo r w o r k on la t e s h i f t ______ —

50. 7

47. 3

_

9. 8

2. 6

33. 7

32. 8

5. 4

2. 2

-

Ty pe and amo unt of d i ff e r e n t i a l:
U n if o r m c e n t s ( p e r hour)

_

_

-

_

4 c e n t s ____________
.
...
5 cents .
7 c e n t s _____________________ _________
7 V2 c e n t s _____________ __ ___ _______ __
8 c e n t s —__ _ _
----10 c e n t s _____ _----------------------------12 c e n t s _______________________________
15 c e n t s . . . .
.
.
.
-----------------------------25 c e n t " .. .
35 c e n t s

4. 3
9. 3
2. 1
3. 0
3. 1
2.6
2. 6
6. 7
-

13. 0
7. 5
5. 6
6. 7

1.2
.9
. 1
1.0
1. 2
.2
.5
.3
-

U n if o r m p e r c e n t a g e _____________________

13. 1

10. 7

3. 0

.4

3. 0
10. 1

.5
2. 6

_

10. 7

3.8

3. 8

1.4

5 percent 10 p e r c e n t
Oth er f o r m a l pay d i f f e r e n t i a l

-

_

-

2. 1
. 1
. 1
-

-

4

'

S e e foo tn ot es at end of t a b l e s .

13

T a b le B - 3 .

S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u rs

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f plant and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u str y d iv is io n s b y sc h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s o f f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s , M a n c h e s t e r , N . H . , J u ly 1970)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

W eek ly h ou rs
A ll in d u s tr ie s

3 7 V2 h o u r s --------------------------------------------------------------383 h o u r s .................... ......... .............. —........... ................
/4
40 h o u r s ----------------------------- ------ -----------------------------O v e r 40 and u n d e r 45 h o u r s ----------- --------- - .............
45 h o u r s ------------------------------------------------------------------48 h o u r s ------------------------------------------------------------------50 h o u r s ------------------------------------------------------------------55 h o u r s -------------------------------------------------------------------




P u b lic u t ilit ie s

100

100

100

6

A ll w o r k e r s ................................- -------------------------

M a n u fa ctu rin g

6
_

2
-

82
2
1

2
3
1

-

-

94
-

66
15

-

18

-

A ll in d u str ie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g

100

100

4
31
12
52
1
-

7
2
-

91

-

P u b lic u tilitie s

100

68
32
"
-

14

T a b le B -4 .

P a id h o lid a y s

( P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f plant and o f f ic e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u s tr y d iv is io n s b y n u m b er o f paid h o lid a y s p r o v id e d a n n u ally , M a n c h e s t e r , N .H ., J u ly 1970)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

Item
A ll in d u s tr ie s

A ll w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------------------

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
pa id h o l id a y s --------------------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
no paid h o l id a y s ----------------------------------------------------

M a n u fa ctu rin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s

A ll in d u str ie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g

P u b lic u tilitie s

100

100

100

100

100

100

95

100

100

99

100

100

5

"

1

“

"

2

(’ )
23
3
5
9
4
7
37
5
4
-

.
(’ >
13

N u m b er o f d a y s
L e s s than 6 h o l id a y s ----------------------------------------------6 h o l id a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------6 h o lid a y s plus 1 h a lf d a y -------------------------------------7 h o l id a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------7 h o lid a y s plu s 2 h a lf d a y s -----------------------------------8 h o l id a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------8 h o lid a y s plu s 1 h a lf d a y -------------------------------------8 h o lid a y s plus 2 h a lf d a y s -----------------------------------9 h o l id a y s ___________________________________________
9 h o lid a y s plus 2 h a lf d a y s -----------------------------------10 h o lid a y s ____________________________________ - _____
10 h o lid a y s plus 1 h a lf d a y -----------------------------------11 h o lid a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------

17
2
5
3
11
3
5
29
4

9
2
2

2

.
-

7
-

5
-

57
30
"

.

.

10

21

1

-

3

3

(’ )
11
2

1
15
7
14

5
13
1
36
17
(’ )

33
3

2
1

68
19

T o ta l h o lid a y t im e 1
0
11 d a y s ---------------------------------------- ------------------------IOV2 d a y s o r m o r e -------------------------------------- --------10 d a y s o r m o r e ------------------------------------- ------- —
9 d a y s o r m o r e -------------------------------------------------------8 V2 d a y s o r m o r e ---------------------------------------------------8 d a y s o r m o r e -------------------------------------------------------7 d a y s o r m o r e -------------------------------------------------------6 V2 d a y s o r m o r e ---------------------------------------------------6 d a y s o r m o r e -------------------------------------------------------5 d a y s o r m o r e -------------------------------------------------------1 d a y o r m o r e ----------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of tables,




2
3
17
51
54
68
74
76
94
94

95

2
2
12
56
60
74
77
77
99

100
100

30
88
93
93
100
100
100
100
100
100

(’ )
17
55
73
75
86
88
89
99
99
99

1
1

7
53
60
77
79
79
100
100
100

19
87
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100

15

T a b le B -5 .

P a id v a c a tio n s

( P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f pla n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u str y d iv is io n s b y v a c a tio n pay p r o v is i o n s , M a n c h e s te r , N. H . , J u ly 19*70)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

V a c a t io n p o l ic y
A ll in d u s tr ie s

A l l w o r k e r s ---------- ----------------------------- -..............

M a n u fa ctu rin g

P u b lic u tilitie s

A ll in d u str ie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g

P u b lic u tilitie s

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
63
37

100
48
52

100
100

100
99
(’ )

100
98
2

100
100

-

*

-

"

"

22
42
5
2

29
52
4

M eth od o f p a y m en t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id v a c a t io n s - -------------------------------------------------L e n g t h - o f-t i m e p a y m e n t ----------- ----- ------ --------P e r c e n t a g e pa y m en t----------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
no p a id v a c a t io n s ------- ----------------------------------------A m ou n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 11
A fte r 6 m on th s o f s e r v i c e
U n d er 1 w e e k ------------------------------------------ ------ --------1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ------------------ ------ ---------2 w e e k s ....... ......................................................... ..................

_

5
33
17
25

16
59
10

-

30
5
29

-

19
1
68

3
73
4
19

4
80
4
12

..
28
72

_
22
n
78

26
2
73

.
12
88

3
59
6
31
1

4
73
7
16
-

18
72
10

14
(’ )
86
"

.
26
2
73

_
11
89
"

3
33
21
41
2

4
37
29
30

_

-

-

-

-

12
3
85

-

72
28

7
i
92
-

3
29
18
48
2

4
34
26
36
-

72
28

-

-

6
1
93
-

12
3
85
~

100
-

5
1
78
3
12

6
2
80
2
10

_
72
28

(’ )
92
(’ )
7

1
82
2
15

100
-

A f te r 1 y e a r o f s e r v i c e
U n der 1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s -----------------------------------2 w e e k s .............. .................................. ............................. —
A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U n der 1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ............ —............................
2 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------- —
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------

_

A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e .
U n der 1 w eek---------- --------- ----------------------------- ------- 1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ...........................................
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------

100

A fte r 4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U n d er 1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------1 w eek ----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s -----------------------------------2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------

-

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ......................... —..............
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s —........................................
3 w e e k s ...................—---------- ------------------------- -------------

See footnotes at end of tables,




16

T a b le B -5 .

P a id v a c a tio n s -----C o n tin u e d

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f p la n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u s tr y d i v is io n s b y v a c a tio n pay p r o v is i o n s , M a n c h e s te r , N. H. , J u ly 1970)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

V a c a tio n p o l ic y
A ll in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g

P u b lic u tilitie s

A ll in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g

P u b lic u tilitie s

A m ou n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 11— C ontinued
A fte r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w eek____________ ________ ___________ _____ ________
O v e r 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 w eek s — ---- ------------------------------------------------------- O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------4 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------

_

-

-

_
_
12
88
_

1

-

-

1
41

11

-

-

57
-

89
-

-

(’ )
24
75
1

-

-

6
2
19
7
60
6
-

_
66

(’ )
18
77

1
30
61
8
*

11
87
1
-

5
1
20
5
36
31
2

6
2
19
7
45
21

_
-

5
1
20
5
29
6
29
2
3

6
2
19
7
35
8
24
•

5
1
32
5
52
2
3

6
2
34
7
51
(’ )

5
1
26
5
58
2
3

6
2
26
7
60
(’ )

5

72
28
-

(’ )
24
75

i
41
57

A fte r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 w eek s -- -------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u nd er 3 w e e k s - - ------------------------- —
3 w e e k s ----------- --------------------------------------------------- —
O v e r 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s --------------------- ----------4 w e e k s ________________________________ ____________

_
72
28

_
-

A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w eek---------------------------------------- ---------- -------------------O v e r 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s -----------------------------------2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------- —
O v e r 2 and und er 3 w eek s ------------------ ---------- -3 w eek s -- ----------- -- — ---------------------------------- ------4 w eek s — ------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 and und er 5 w e e k s ------------------------------------

1
20
5
56

11
2

5

5

28

-

_

A fte r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s ________ ____ - .................................. .....................
4 w e e k s ----------- -------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s -----------------------------------

-

-

72
28

(’ )

1

_

-

-

-

18

30

11

-

-

-

37
45

31
38
-

_
89
-

-

M a x im u m v a c a tio n a v a ila b le *
1 w eek----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 w eek s
---------- -- ------------------------- ------------------- O v e r 2 and und er 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s ------- -----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and und er 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------ ---------- -------------O v e r 4 and und er 5 w e e k s ----------------------------------5 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------

*

E s tim a te s fo r 25 and 30 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e a re id e n t ic a l.

See fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le s .




_
-

43
28
29

(’ )
18
35
29
-

17

1
30
27
42
-

_
_
11
_
.
_
21
_
68

17

T a b le B -6 .

H e a lth , in s u ra n c e , an d p e n s io n p la n s

(P e r c e n t o f pla n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u str y d iv is io n s e m p lo y e d in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
h ea lth , in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n b e n e fit s , M a n c h e s t e r , N .H ., J u ly 1970)
P la n t w o r k e r s
T y p e o f b e n e fit and
fin a n cin g 12

A ll in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g

O ffic e w o r k e r s
P u b lic u tilitie s

A ll in d u str ie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g

100

100

100

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g at
le a s t 1 o f the b e n e fit s show n b e lo w ------------------

100

100

100

P u b lic u tilitie s

98

100

100

100

100

100

L ife in s u r a n c e ---------------------------------------------------N o n c o n t r ib u to r y p l a n s --------------------------------A c c id e n t a l death and d is m e m b e r m e n t
in s u r a n c e ----------------------------------------------------------N o n c o n t r ib u to r y p la n s
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s ic k le a v e o r b oth 13----------------------------------------

97
73

100
90

100
66

99
80

100
88

100
82

88
69

90
84

90
56

98
81

98
85

100
82

90

94

100

86

94

100

S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e ---------------N o n c o n t r ib u to r y p la n s
S ic k le a v e (fu ll p a y and no
w a itin g p e r io d )-------------------------- --------- ------S ic k le a v e (p a r t ia l p a y o r
w a itin g p e r io d )

80
66

90
83

34
34

38
29

83
74

13
13

7

38

67

59

99

(’ )

29

1

-

-

H o s p ita liz a t io n in s u r a n c e --------------------------------N o n c o n t r ib u to r y p l a n s --------------------------------S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e --------------------------------------------N o n c o n t r ib u to r y p la n s
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e
N o n c o n t r ib u to r y p la n s
M a jo r m e d ic a l in s u r a n c e
N o n c o n t r ib u to r y p la n s -------------------------------D en ta l in s u r a n c e
N o n c o n t r ib u to r y p l a n s --------------------------------R e t ir e m e n t p e n sio n ----- ------ ------ ------- ----- --------- —
N o n c o n t r ib u to r y p l a n s ---------------------------------

88
61
93
66
88
61
77
47
2
2
73
65

100
93
100
93
100
93
100
93
28
28
93
93

96
78
97
80
96
78
92
73
3
3
82
74

88
70
93
75
88
70
76
57

100
99
100
99
100
99
100
99
11
11
88
88

S e e fo o t n o t e s at en d o f t a b le s .




12
5

89
70
96
77
89
70
74
52
-

79
70

-

78
59

18
F o o tn o te s

All of these standard footnotes may not apply to this bulletin.
1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at
regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all workers and dividing by the number of workers. The median designates
position—half of the employees surveyed receive more than the rate shown; half receive less than the rate shown. The middle range is defined by
2 rates of pay; a fourth of the workers earn less than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn more than the higher rate.
3 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
4 These salaries relate to formally established minimum starting (hiring) regular straight-time salaries that are paid for standard
workweeks.
5 Excludes workers in subclerical jobs such as messenger or office girl.
6 Data are presented for all standard workweeks combined, and for the most common standard workweeks reported.
7 Includes all plant workers in establishments currently operating late shifts, and establishments whose formal provisions cover late
shifts, even though the establishments were not currently operating late shifts.
8 Less than 0.05 percent.
9 Less than 0.5 percent.
10 All combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for example, the proportion of workers receiving a total
of 9 days includes those with 9 full days and no half days, 8 full days and 2 half days, 7 full days and 4 half days, and so on. Proportions then
were cumulated.
11 Includes payments other than "length of time," such as percentage of annual earnings or flat-sum payments, converted to an equivalent
time basis; for example, a payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 week's pay. Periods of service were chosen arbitrarily
and do not necessarily reflect the individual provisions for progression. For example, the changes in proportions indicated at 10 years' service
include changes in provisions occurring between 5 and 10 years. Estimates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for 3 weeks' pay or
more after 10 years includes those eligible for 3 weeks' pay or more after fewer years of service.
12 Estimates listed after type of benefit are for all plans for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer. "Noncontributory
plans" include only those plans financed entirely by the employer. Excluded are legally required plans, such as workmen's compensation, social
security, and railroad retirement.
13 Unduplicated total of workers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below. Sick leave plans are
limited to those which definitely establish at least the minimum number of days' pay that can be expected by each employee. Informal sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.




A p p e n d ix .

O c c u p a t i o n a l D e s c r ip t io n s

The p r im a r y p u rp o se of p re p a r in g job d e sc r ip tio n s fo r the B u r e a u 's w age su r v e y s is to a s s i s t it s fie ld st a ff in c la s s ify in g into ap p r o p r ia te
o cc u p a tio n s w o rk e rs who a r e em ploy ed un der a v a r ie t y of p a y r o ll title s and d iffe re n t w ork a r r a n g e m e n ts fro m e sta b lish m e n t to e sta b lish m e n t and
fro m a r e a to a r e a . T h is p e r m it s the gro u p in g of o cc u p a tio n al w age r a t e s re p r e se n tin g c o m p a r a b le job content. B e c a u s e of th is e m p h a sis on
in te re sta b lish m e n t and in t e r a r e a c o m p a r a b ility of o cc u p a tio n al content, the B u r e a u 's jo b d e sc r ip tio n s m a y d iffe r sig n ific a n tly fro m th o se in u se in
in d iv id u al e sta b lis h m e n ts o r th ose p r e p a r e d fo r oth er p u r p o se s. In applyin g th e se jo b d e s c r ip tio n s , the B u r e a u 's fie ld e c o n o m ists a r e in str u c te d
to ex clu d e w orkin g s u p e r v is o r s ; a p p r e n tic e s; l e a r n e r s ; b e g in n e r s; t r a in e e s ; and h a n dicapp ed, p a r t- tim e , te m p o r a r y , and p r o b a tio n a r y w o r k e r s.

O F F IC E
C L E R K , ACCOUNTING— Continued

B I L L E R , M ACHINE

P o sitio n s a r e c l a s s if i e d into le v e ls on the b a s i s of the follow in g d efin itio n s.

P r e p a r e s sta te m e n ts, b i l l s , and in v o ic e s on a m ach in e oth er than an o r d in a r y o r e le c t r o m a tic ty p e w rite r. M ay a ls o k eep r e c o r d s a s to b illin g s o r sh ippin g c h a r g e s o r p e r fo r m other
c l e r ic a l w ork in c id en tal to b illin g o p e ra tio n s. F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , b i l l e r s , m a ch in e, a r e
c la s s if i e d by type of m a ch in e, a s fo llo w s:

C la s s A . U nder g e n e r a l su p e r v isio n , p e r fo r m s acco u n tin g c l e r ic a l o p e r a tio n s which
r e q u ir e the a p p lic a tio n of e x p e rie n c e and ju d gm en t, fo r e x a m p le , c l e r ic a lly p r o c e s s in g c o m ­
p lic a te d o r n o n rep etitiv e accou n tin g t r a n s a c t io n s , se le c tin g am ong a su b sta n tia l v a r ie t y of
p r e s c r ib e d acco u n tin g co d e s and c l a s s if i c a t io n s , o r t r a c in g t r a n s a c t io n s th rou gh p re v io u s
accou n tin g a c tio n s to d ete rm in e so u r c e of d i s c r e p a n c ie s . M ay be a s s i s t e d by one o r m o re
c l a s s B accou n tin g c le r k s .

B il le r , m ach in e (b illin g m a c h in e ). U s e s a s p e c ia l b illin g m ach in e (M oon H opk in s, E llio tt
F is h e r , B u r r o u g h s, e t c ., w hich a r e com bin ation typing and adding m a ch in e s) to p r e p a r e b ills
and in v o ic e s fro m c u s t o m e r s ' p u rc h a se o r d e r s , in te rn a lly p r e p a r e d o r d e r s , sh ippin g m e m o ­
ra n d u m s, etc. U su a lly in v o lv es a p p lic a tio n of p re d e te rm in e d d isc o u n ts and sh ippin g c h a r g e s ,
and en try of n e c e s s a r y e x te n sio n s, w hich m ay o r m ay not b e com p uted on the b illin g m ach in e,
and t o ta ls which a r e a u to m a tic a lly ac cu m u late d by m ach in e. The o p eratio n u su a lly in v o lv es
a la r g e n u m ber of ca rb o n c o p ie s of the b ill bein g p r e p a r e d and is often done on a fan fold
m ach in e.
B il le r , m ach in e (bookkeepin g m a ch in e ). U s e s a bookkeepin g m ach in e (S u n d stran d , E llio tt
F is h e r , R em in gton R and, e t c ., w hich m ay o r m ay not have ty p e w rite r k eyb o ard) to p r e p a r e
c u s t o m e r s ' b il ls a s p a r t of the ac co u n ts re c e iv a b le o p eratio n . G e n e r a lly in v o lv es the s im u lt a ­
n eou s en try of fig u r e s on c u s t o m e r s ' le d g e r r e c o r d . The m ach in e a u to m a tic a lly a c c u m u la te s
fig u r e s on a n u m ber of v e r t ic a l co lu m n s and c o m p u te s, and u su a lly p r in ts a u to m a tic a lly the
debit o r c r e d it b a la n c e s . D oes not involve a know ledge of bookk eep in g. W orks fr o m u n ifo rm
and sta n d a rd ty p es of s a l e s and c re d it s lip s .

C l a s s B . U n der c lo s e s u p e r v isio n , follow in g d e ta ile d in str u c tio n s and sta n d a r d iz e d p r o ­
c e d u r e s, p e r fo r m s one o r m o re rou tin e acco u n tin g c l e r ic a l o p e r a tio n s, su ch a s p o stin g to
le d g e r s , c a r d s , o r w o r k sh e e ts w here id e n tificatio n of ite m s and lo c a tio n s of p o stin g s a r e
c l e a r ly in d icate d ; ch eckin g a c c u r a c y and c o m p le te n e ss of sta n d a r d iz e d and re p e titiv e r e c o r d s
o r acco u n tin g d o c u m en ts; and coding d o cu m en ts u sin g a few p r e s c r ib e d acco u n tin g co d es.
C L E R K , F IL E
C la s s A . In an e sta b lis h e d filin g s y st e m con tain in g a n u m b er of v a r ie d su b je c t m a tte r
f i l e s , c l a s s i f i e s and in d e x es file m a t e r ia l su ch a s c o r r e sp o n d e n c e , r e p o r ts , te c h n ic a l d o cu ­
m e n ts, etc. M ay a ls o file th is m a te r ia l. M ay k eep r e c o r d s of v a r io u s ty p e s in con ju n ction
w ith the f il e s . M ay le a d a sm a ll gro u p of lo w er le v e l file c le r k s .

BO O K K E E P IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R

C la s s B . S o r t s , c o d e s, and f il e s u n c la s s ifie d m a t e r ia l by sim p le (su b je c t m a tte r ) h e a d ­
in gs o r p a r tly c l a s s if i e d m a te r ia l by fin e r su b h e ad in g s. P r e p a r e s sim p le r e la te d index and
c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e a id s . A s r e q u e ste d , lo c a t e s c l e a r ly id e n tifie d m a te r ia l in f il e s and fo r w a r d s
m a te r ia l.
M ay p e r fo r m r e la te d c l e r ic a l t a s k s r e q u ir e d to m a in ta in and s e r v ic e file s .

O p e ra te s a bookkeepin g m ach in e (R em in gton R and, E llio tt F is h e r , S u n d stran d , B u rr o u g h s,
N atio n al C a sh R e g is t e r , with o r w ithout a ty p e w rite r k eybo ard) to k eep a r e c o r d of b u s in e s s
t r a n s a c t io n s .

C la s s C . P e r f o r m s rou tin e filin g of m a t e r ia l that h a s a lr e a d y b een c l a s s if i e d o r which
i s e a s ily c l a s s if i e d in a sim p le s e r i a l c l a s s if i c a t io n s y s t e m ( e .g ., a lp h a b e tic a l, c h ro n o lo g ic al,
o r n u m e r ic a l). A s re q u e ste d , lo c a t e s r e a d ily a v a ila b le m a t e r ia l in f il e s and fo r w a r d s m a ­
t e r i a l ; and m a y f ill out w ith d raw al c h a rg e . P e r f o r m s sim p le c l e r ic a l and m a n u a l t a s k s r e ­
q u ire d to m a in ta in and s e r v ic e file s .

C la s s A . K e e p s a s e t of r e c o r d s re q u irin g a know ledge o f and e x p e rie n c e in b a s ic
bookk eep in g p r in c ip le s , and fa m ilia r ity w ith the s tr u c tu r e o f the p a r tic u la r accou n tin g s y st e m
u se d . D e te rm in e s p r o p e r r e c o r d s and d istrib u tio n of debit and c r e d it ite m s to be u sed in each
p h a se of the w ork. M ay preparre c o n so lid a te d r e p o r ts , b a la n c e s h e e ts , and oth er r e c o r d s
by hand.
C l a s s B . K e e p s a r e c o r d of one o r m o re p h a s e s o r se c tio n s of a se t of r e c o r d s u su a lly
re q u irin g little know ledge of b a s ic bookkeepin g. P h a s e s o r se c tio n s in clu de ac co u n ts p a y a b le ,
p a y r o ll, c u s t o m e r s ' ac co u n ts (not in clu din g a sim p le type of b illin g d e s c r ib e d un der b il le r ,
m a ch in e), c o s t d istrib u tio n , e x p en se d istrib u tio n , in ven tory c o n tro l, etc. M ay ch eck o r a s s i s t
in p r e p a r a tio n of t r i a l b a la n c e s and p r e p a r e co n tro l sh e e ts fo r the accou n tin g d ep artm en t.
C L E R K , ACCO UNTING
P e r f o r m s one o r m o re accou n tin g c l e r ic a l t a s k s su ch a s p o stin g to r e g is t e r s and le d g e r s ;
r e c o n c ilin g bank a c c o u n ts; v e rify in g the in te rn a l c o n siste n c y , c o m p le te n e ss, and m a th e m a tic a l
a c c u r a c y of accou n tin g d o c u m en ts; a ssig n in g p r e s c r ib e d accou n tin g d istrib u tio n c o d e s; ex am in in g
and v e rify in g fo r c l e r ic a l a c c u r a c y v a r io u s ty p e s of r e p o r t s , l i s t s , c a lc u la tio n s, p o stin g , e tc .;
o r p re p a rin g sim p le o r a s s is t in g in p r e p a rin g m o re c o m p lic a te d jo u r n a l v o u c h e r s. M ay w ork
in eith e r a m an u al o r au to m ated accou n tin g sy ste m .
The w ork r e q u ir e s a know ledge of c l e r ic a l m eth ods and o ffic e p r a c t ic e s and p r o c e d u r e s
which r e la t e s to the c l e r ic a l p r o c e s s in g and re c o rd in g of tr a n s a c t io n s and acco u n tin g in fo rm atio n .
With e x p e rie n c e , the w o rk e r t y p ic a lly b e c o m e s fa m ili a r w ith the bookk eep in g and acco u n tin g t e r m s
and p r o c e d u r e s u se d in the a s s ig n e d w ork , but is not re q u ire d to have a know ledge o f the fo r m a l
p r in c ip le s of bookk eep in g and accou n tin g.




NO TE:

C L E R K , O R D ER
R e c e iv e s c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s fo r m a t e r ia l o r m e r c h a n d ise by m a il, phone, o r p e r so n a lly .
D u ties in volve any com b in atio n o f the fo llo w in g: Q uoting p r ic e s to c u s t o m e r s ; m akin g out an o r d e r
sh eet listin g the ite m s to m ak e up the o r d e r ; ch eckin g p r ic e s and q u an titie s of it e m s on o r d e r
sh e e t; and d istr ib u tin g o r d e r sh e e ts to r e s p e c t iv e d e p a rtm e n ts to b e fille d . M ay ch eck w ith c r e d it
d e p artm en t to d ete rm in e c r e d it ratin g of c u st o m e r , ackn o w ledge r e c e ip t of o r d e r s fr o m c u sto m e r s,
follow up o r d e r s to s e e th at they have b een fille d , k eep file of o r d e r s r e c e iv e d , and ch eck sh ippin g
in v o ic e s w ith o r ig in a l o r d e r s .
C LER K , PAYRO LL
C o m p u tes w a g e s of co m p an y e m p lo y e e s and e n te r s the n e c e s s a r y d a ta on the p a y r o ll
s h e e ts . D u ties in v o lv e: C a lc u la tin g w o r k e r s ' e a r n in g s b a se d on tim e o r p ro d u ctio n r e c o r d s ; and
p o stin g c a lc u la te d d a ta on p a y r o ll sh e e t, show ing in fo rm a tio n su ch a s w o r k e r 's n am e, w orkin g
d a y s, t im e , r a t e , d ed u ctio n s fo r in su r a n c e , and to ta l w a g e s due. M ay m ak e out p a y c h e c k s and
a s s i s t p a y m a s te r in m akin g up and d istr ib u tin g p ay e n v e lo p e s. M ay u se a c a lc u la tin g m ach in e.

S in c e the la s t su r v e y in th is a r e a , the B u r e a u h a s d isco n tin u ed c o lle c tin g d ata fo r o ile r s and p lu m b e r s.

19

20
COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
P rim a ry duty is to operate a Com ptom eter to p erform m athem atical computations. This
job is not to be confused with that of statistical or other type of clerk , which may involve f r e ­
quent use of a Com ptom eter but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to perform ance of
other duties.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Operates a keypunch m achine to record or v e r ify alphabetic and/or num eric data on
tabulating cards or on tape.
Positions are cla ssified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A . W ork requires the application of experience and judgment in selecting p r o c e ­
dures to be followed and in searching for, interpreting, selecting, or coding item s to be
keypunched from a variety of source documents. On occasion may also p erform som e routine
keypunch work. May train inexperienced keypunch op erators.
Class B . Work iB routine and repetitive. Under close supervision or following specific
p rocedu res or instructions, works from various standardized source documents which have
been coded, and follow s specified procedu res which have been p rescrib ed in detail and require
little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. Refers to supervisor
problem s arising from erroneous item s or codes or m issing information.
MESSENGER (Office Boy or Girl)
P erform s various routine duties such as running errands, operating m inor o ffice m a­
chines such as sealers or m ailers, opening and distributing m ail, and other m inor cle rica l work.
Exclude positions that require operation of a m otor vehicle as a significant duty.
SECRETARY
Assigned as personal secreta ry, norm ally to one individual. Maintains a clo se and highly
responsive relationship to the d a y-to-d ay w ork activities of the supervisor. Works fa irly inde­
pendently receiving a minimum of detailed supervision and guidance. P erfo rm s varied c le rica l
and secreta rial duties, usually including m ost of the follow ing: (a) R eceives telephone ca lls,
personal ca lle rs, and incom ing m ail, answers routine inquiries, and routes the technical inquiries
to the proper p erson s; (b) establishes, maintains, and revises the su p ervisor's file s ; (c) maintains
the su p ervisor's calendar and makes appointments as instructed; (d) relays m essages from super­
v is o r to subordinates; (e) reviews corresp on den ce, m em orandum s, and reports prepared by others
for the su p ervisor's signature to assure p rocedural and typographic accu racy; and (f) perform s
stenographic and typing work.
May also p erform other cle rica l and secreta rial tasks of com parable nature and difficulty.
The work typically requires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
p rogra m s, and procedu res related to the work of the supervisor.
Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled "se c re ta ry " p ossess the above ch aracteristics. Examples
of positions which are excluded from the definition are as follow s: (a) P ositions which do not m eet
the "p erson al" secreta ry concept d escribed above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in secreta rial
type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a group of profession a l, technical,
or m anagerial p ersons; (d) secreta ry positions in which the duties are either substantially m ore
routine or substantially m ore com plex and responsible than those ch aracterized in the definition;
and (e) assistant type positions which involve m ore difficult or m ore responsible technical, admin­
istrative, supervisory, or specialized c le rica l duties which are not typical of secreta rial work.
NOTE; The term "corp ora te o ffic e r ," used in the level definitions following, re fe rs to
those officia ls who have a significant corporate-w id e policym aking role with regard to m ajor
company activities. The title " v ic e p resid en t," though norm ally indicative of this ro le , does not
in all cases identify such positions. V ice presidents whose prim ary responsibility is to act p e r ­
sonally on individual cases or transactions (e .g ., approve or deny individual loan or credit actions;
administer individual trust accounts; d irectly supervise a c le rica l staff) are not con sidered to be
"corp ora te office rs " for purposes of applying the following level definitions.
Class A
a. S ecretary to the chairm an of the board o r president of a company that em ploys, in
all, over 100 but few er than 5,000 p ers on s ; or
b. S ecretary to a corporate o ffice r (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 but few er than 25, 000 p e rso n s; or
c. Secretary to the head (im m ediately below the corporate o ffice r level) of a m ajor
segment or subsidiary of a company that em ploys, in all, over 25,000 p erson s.




SECRETARY— Continued
Class B
a. Secretary to the chairm an of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
all, few er than 100 p e rso n s; or
b. Secretary to a corporate o ffice r (other than the chairm an of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5, 000 p e rs o n s ; or
c. S ecretary to the head (im m ediately below
corporate-w id e functional activity (e .g ., m arketing,
tions, etc.) or~a m ajor geographic o r organizational
a m ajor division) of a com pany that em ploys, in
em p loyees; or

the o ffice r level) over either a m ajor
resea rch , operations, industrial re la segment (e .g ., a regional headquarters;
all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000

d. S ecretary to the head of an individual plant, fa ctory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in all, over 5,000 p e rso n s; or
e. Secretary to the head of a large and important organizational segment (e .g ., a middle
management supervisor of an organizational segment often involving as many as several
hundred persons) of a com pany that em ploys, in all, over 25, 000 p e rso n s.
Class C
a. Secretary to an executive or m anagerial person whose responsibility is not equivalent
to one of the sp ecific level situations in the definition fo r class B, but whose subordinate staff
norm ally numbers at least several dozen em ployees and is usually divided into organizational
segments which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In som e com panies, this level includes
a wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; mb. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, fa ctory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in all, few er than 5, 000 p e rso n s.
Class D
a. S ecretary to the supervisor or head of a sm all organizational unit (e .g ., fewer than
about 25 or 30 p erson s); £ r
b. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional em ployee, adm inistra­
tive o ffice r, or assistant, skilled technician or expert. (NOTE: Many com panies assign
stenographers, rather than se cre ta rie s as d escrib ed above, to this level of supervisory or
nonsupervisory w orker.)
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
P rim a ry duty is to take dictation involving a norm al routine vocabulary from one or m ore
persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar m achine; and transcribe dictation. May
also type from written copy. May maintain file s , keep sim ple re c o rd s, or p erform other relatively
routine c le rica l tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool. Does not include transcribin gmachine w ork. (See transcribing-m achine op erators.)
STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
P rim a ry duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary
such as in legal b riefs or reports on scientific resea rch fro m one or m ore persons either in short­
hand or by Stenotype or sim ilar m achine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from written
copy. May also set up and maintain file s , keep re c o rd s, etc.
OR
P erfo rm s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and resp on si­
bility than stenographers, general as evidenced by the follow ing: Work requires high degree of
stenographic speed and accu racy; and a thorough working knowledge of general business and office
procedu res and of the s p e cific business operations, organization, p o lic ie s, p roced u res, file s,
w orkflow , etc. Uses this knowledge in perform ing stenographic duties and responsible cle rica l
tasks such as, maintaining followup file s; assem bling m aterial fo r rep orts, m em orandum s, letters,
e tc.; com posing sim ple letters from general instructions; reading and routing incom ing m ail; and
answering routine questions, etc. Does not include transcribing-m achine w ork.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
C lass A . Operates
outgoing, intraplant or
com plex ca lls, such as
doing routine work as

a single- or
office calls.
con ference,
d escribed

m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incom ing,
P erfo rm s full telephone inform ation s ervice or handles
co lle ct, ov e rse a s, or sim ilar ca lls, either in addition to
for switchboard operator, cla ss B, or as a full-tim e

21
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR— Continued

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (E le ctric Accounting Machine Operator)— Continued

assignm ent. ("F u ll" telephone inform ation s ervice occu rs when the establishm ent has varied
functions that are not readily understandable fo r telephone inform ation purposes, e .g ., because
of overlapping or interrelated functions, and consequently present frequent problem s as to
which extensions are appropriate for calls.)
Class B . Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office ca lls. May handle routine long distance calls and record tolls.
May p erform lim ited telephone inform ation service. ("L im ited" telephone inform ation service
occu rs if the functions of the establishm ent serviced are readily understandable for telephone
inform ation p urposes, or if the requests are routine, e .g ., giving extension numbers when
sp ecific names are furnished, or if com plex calls are re fe rre d to another operator.)

Class B . P erfo rm s work according to established p rocedu res and under specific in­
structions. Assignm ents typically involve com plete but routine and recurring reports or parts
of la rger and m ore com plex reports. Operates m ore difficult tabulating o r e le ctrica l a c­
counting m achines such as the tabulator and calculator, in addition to the sim pler machines
used by cla ss C op erators. May be required to do som e wiring from diagram s. May train
new em ployees in b asic machine operations.
Class C . Under sp ecific instructions, operates sim ple tabulating or e le ctrica l accounting
m achines such as the so rte r, in terpreter, reproducing punch, colla tor, etc. Assignments
typically involve portions of a work unit, for exam ple, individual sorting or collating runs,
or repetitive operations. May p erform sim ple wiring from diagram s, and do some filing work.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL

In addition to p erform ing duties of operator on a sin gle-position or m onitor-type switch­
board, acts as receptionist and may also type or p erform routine c le r ic a l work as part of regular
duties. This typing or c le r ic a l work may take the m ajor part of this w o rk e r's time while at
switchboard.

P rim a ry duty is to transcribe dictation involving a norm al routine vocabulary from
transcribing-m achine re co rd s. May also type from written copy and do sim ple cle rica l work.
W orkers transcribing dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as
legal b riefs or reports on scientific resea rch are not included. A worker who takes dictation
in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine is cla ssifie d as a stenographer, general.

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (E lectric Accounting Machine Operator)
TYPIST
Operates one or a variety of m achines such as the tabulator, calculator, colla tor, inter­
p reter, sorter, reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from this definition are working supervisors.
A lso excluded are operators of electron ic digital com puters, even though they m ay also operate
EAM equipment.

Uses a typew riter to make copies of various m aterial o r to make out bills after ca lcu la ­
tions have been made by another person. May include typing of sten cils, m ats, or sim ilar m ate­
rials fo r use in duplicating p ro ce s s e s. May do cle rica l work involving little special training, such
as keeping sim ple re c o rd s, filing re co rd s and rep orts, or sorting and distributing incom ing mail.

P ositions are cla ss ified into levels on the basis of the following definitions.
Class A . P erform s com plete reporting and tabulating assignm ents including devising
difficult con trol panel wiring under general supervision. Assignm ents typically involve a
variety of long and com plex reports which often are irregu la r or nonrecurring, requiring
some planning of the nature and sequencing of operations, and the use of a variety of m achines.
Is typically involved in training new operators in machine operations or training low er level
operators in wiring from diagram s and in the operating sequences of long and com plex reports.
Does not include positions in which wiring responsibility is lim ited to selection and insertion
of prew ired board s.

Class A . P e rfo rm s one or m ore of the follow ing: Typing m aterial in final form when
it involves combining m aterial from several sources or responsibility fo r co r r e c t spelling,
syllabication, punctuation, e tc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language m ate­
rial; and planning layout and typing of com plicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity
and balance in spacing. May type routine form letters varying details to suit circum stances.
Class B . P e rfo rm s one or m ore of the follow ing: Copy typing from rough or clear
drafts; routine typing of form s, insurance p o lic ie s, etc.; and setting up sim ple standard
tabulations, or copying m ore com plex tables already setup and spaced p roperly.

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
COMPUTER OPERATOR— Continued

COMPUTER OPERATOR
Monitors and operates the con trol con sole of a digital com puter to p ro ce s s data according
to operating instructions, usually prepared by a p rogra m er. Work includes m ost of the follow ing:
Studies instructions to determ ine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
item s (tape reels, ca rd s, etc.); switches n ecessary auxiliary equipment into circu it, and starts
and operates com puter; makes adjustments to com puter to co r r e c t operating problem s and meet
special conditions; reviews e rr o rs made during operation and determ ines cause or re fe rs problem
to supervisor or p rog ra m er; and maintains operating record s. May test and a ssist in correctin g
program .
F or wage study purposes, com puter operators are cla ssifie d as follow s;
Class A . Operates independently, or under only general d irection, a com puter running
program s with m ost of the following ch a ra cteristics: New program s are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requirem ents are of critica l importance to m inim ize downtime; the
program s are of com plex design so that identification of e rr o r source often requires a working
knowledge of the total prog ra m , and alternate program s m ay not be available. May give
direction and guidance to low er level operators.
Class B . Operates independently, or under only general direction, a com puter running
program s with m ost of the following ch a ra cteristics: Most of the program s are established
production runs, typically run on a regularly recurring b asis; there is little or no testing
of new program s required; alternate program s are provided in case original program needs
m ajor change or cannot be co rre cte d within a reasonable tim e. In com m on e rr o r situations,
diagnoses cause and takes co r re ctiv e action. This usually involves applying previou sly p r o ­
gram ed correctiv e steps, or using standard co rre ctio n techniques.
OR
Operates under d irect supervision a com puter running program s o r segments of program s
with the ch aracteristics d escrib ed for cla ss A. May a ssist a higher level operator by inde­
pendently perform ing less difficult tasks assigned, and p erform ing difficult tasks following
detailed instructions and with frequent review of operations p erform ed.




Class C . Works on routine program s under clo se supervision. Is expected to develop
working knowledge of the com puter equipment used and ability to detect problem s involved in
running routine program s. Usually has received some form a l training in com puter operation.
May a ssist higher level operator on com plex p rogram s.
COMPUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS
Converts statements of business p roblem s, typically prepared by a system s analyst, into
a sequence of detailed instructions which are required to solve the problem s by automatic data
p rocessin g equipment. Working from charts or diagram s, the program er develops the p re cise
instructions which, when entered into the com puter system in coded language, cause the manipu­
lation of data to achieve desired results. W ork involves m ost of the follow ing: A pplies knowledge
of com puter capabilities, m athem atics, logic em ployed by com puters, and particular subject matter
involved to analyze charts and diagram s of the problem to be program ed. D evelops sequence
of p rogram steps, w rites detailed flow charts to show ord er in which data w ill be p ro ce sse d ;
converts these charts to coded instructions for machine to follow ; tests and co r re cts program s;
prepares instructions fo r operating personnel during production run; analyzes, review s, and alters
program s to increase operating e fficien cy or adapt to new requirem ents; maintains record s of
program development and revisions. (NOTE: W orkers p erform ing both system s analysis and p ro ­
graming should be cla ssifie d as system s analysts if this is the skill used to determ ine their pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim arily responsible for the management or supervision of
other electron ic data p rocessin g (EDP) em ployees, or p rogra m ers p rim arily concerned with
scientific a n d /or engineering problem s.
F or wage study purp oses, p rogra m ers are cla ssifie d as follow s:
Class A . W orks independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s which
require com petence in all phases of program ing concepts and p ra ctices. Working from dia­
gram s and charts which identify the nature of d esired results, m ajor p rocessin g steps to be
accom plished, and the relationships between various steps of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of program ing actions needed to efficiently utilize the com puter system
in achieving d esired end products.

22
C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M E R , B U S IN E S S — C o n t in u e d

C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T , B U S IN E S S ---- C o n t in u e d

A t t h is l e v e l , p r o g r a m i n g i s d i f f i c u l t b e c a u s e c o m p u t e r e q u ip m e n t m u s t b e o r g a n i z e d to
p r o d u c e s e v e r a l i n t e r r e l a t e d b u t d i v e r s e p r o d u c t s f r o m n u m e r o u s a n d d i v e r s e d a t a e le m e n t s .
A w id e v a r i e t y a n d e x t e n s i v e n u m b e r o f i n t e r n a l p r o c e s s i n g a c t i o n s m u s t o c c u r . T h is r e q u i r e s
s u c h a c t i o n s a s d e v e l o p m e n t o f c o m m o n o p e r a t i o n s w h ic h c a n b e r e u s e d , e s t a b l is h m e n t o f
lin k a g e p o in t s b e t w e e n o p e r a t i o n s , a d ju s t m e n t s t o d a ta w h e n p r o g r a m r e q u i r e m e n t s e x c e e d
c o m p u t e r s t o r a g e c a p a c i t y , a n d s u b s t a n t ia l m a n ip u la t io n a n d r e s e q u e n c i n g o f d a ta e le m e n t s
t o f o r m a h ig h ly in t e g r a t e d p r o g r a m .
M a y p r o v id e

fu n c t io n a l d i r e c t i o n t o l o w e r l e v e l p r o g r a m e r s w h o a r e

a s s ig n e d to a s s is t .

C la s s B .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n l y g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o n r e l a t i v e l y s i m p l e
p r o g r a m s , o r on s i m p l e s e g m e n t s o f c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .
P r o g r a m s ( o r s e g m e n t s ) u s u a l ly
p r o c e s s in f o r m a t i o n t o p r o d u c e d a ta in tw o o r t h r e e v a r i e d s e q u e n c e s o r f o r m a t s . R e p o r t s
a n d l i s t i n g s a r e p r o d u c e d b y r e f i n i n g , a d a p t in g , a r r a y i n g , o r m a k in g m i n o r a d d it io n s t o o r
d e l e t i o n s f r o m in p u t d a t a w h ic h a r e r e a d i l y a v a il a b l e .
W h ile n u m e r o u s r e c o r d s m a y b e
p r o c e s s e d , th e d a ta h a v e b e e n r e f i n e d in p r i o r a c t io n s s o th a t th e a c c u r a c y a n d s e q u e n c in g
o f d a ta c a n b e t e s t e d b y u s in g a fe w r o u t in e c h e c k s .
T y p i c a l l y , th e p r o g r a m d e a l s w ith
r o u t in e r e c o r d - k e e p i n g t y p e o p e r a t i o n s .
OR
W o r k s on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s (a s d e s c r i b e d f o r c l a s s A ) u n d e r c l o s e d i r e c t i o n o f a h i g h e r
le v e l p r o g r a m e r o r s u p e r v is o r .
M a y a s s i s t h i g h e r l e v e l p r o g r a m e r b y in d e p e n d e n t ly p e r ­
fo r m in g le s s d iffic u lt ta s k s a s s ig n e d , and p e r fo r m in g m o r e d iffic u lt ta s k s u n d e r f a ir ly c lo s e
d ir e c t io n .
M a y g u id e

o r in s tru c t lo w e r le v e l p r o g r a m e r s .

C la s s C .
M a k e s p r a c t i c a l a p p l ic a t i o n s o f p r o g r a m i n g p r a c t i c e s a n d c o n c e p t s u s u a l ly
l e a r n e d in f o r m a l t r a in in g c o u r s e s . A s s i g n m e n t s a r e d e s ig n e d t o d e v e l o p c o m p e t e n c e in th e
a p p l ic a t i o n o f s t a n d a r d p r o c e d u r e s t o r o u t in e p r o b l e m s . R e c e i v e s c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n o n n ew
a s p e c t s o f a s s i g n m e n t s ; a n d w o r k i s r e v i e w e d t o , v e r i f y it s a c c u r a c y a n d c o n f o r m a n c e w ith
re q u ire d p r o c e d u r e s .

C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T , B U S IN E S S
A n a ly z e s b u s i n e s s p r o b l e m s t o f o r m u l a t e p r o c e d u r e s f o r s o l v i n g t h e m b y u s e o f e l e c t r o n i c
d a ta p r o c e s s i n g e q u ip m e n t . D e v e l o p s a c o m p l e t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f a l l s p e c i f i c a t i o n s n e e d e d to e n a b le
p r o g r a m e r s t o p r e p a r e r e q u i r e d d i g it a l c o m p u t e r p r o g r a m s . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
A n a l y z e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r o p e r a t i o n s t o b e a u t o m a t e d a n d id e n t i f i e s c o n d it i o n s a n d c r i t e r i a r e q u i r e d
to a c h ie v e s a t is fa c t o r y r e s u lt s ; s p e c i f ie s n u m b e r and ty p e s o f r e c o r d s , f i l e s , and d o c u m e n ts to
b e u s e d ; o u t li n e s a c t io n s t o b e p e r f o r m e d b y p e r s o n n e l a n d c o m p u t e r s in s u f f i c i e n t d e t a il f o r
p r e s e n t a t i o n t o m a n a g e m e n t a n d f o r p r o g r a m i n g ( t y p i c a l l y t h is i n v o l v e s p r e p a r a t i o n o f w o r k and
d a ta f l o w c h a r t s ) ; c o o r d i n a t e s th e d e v e l o p m e n t o f t e s t p r o b l e m s a n d p a r t i c i p a t e s in t r i a l r u n s o f
n e w a n d r e v i s e d s y s t e m s ; a n d r e c o m m e n d s e q u ip m e n t c h a n g e s t o o b t a in m o r e e f f e c t i v e o v e r a l l
o p e r a t i o n s . (N O T E ; W o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g b o th s y s t e m s a n a l y s is a n d p r o g r a m i n g s h o u ld b e c l a s ­
s i f i e d a s s y s t e m s a n a ly s t s i f t h is is th e s k i l l u s e d t o d e t e r m in e t h e i r p a y .)

m a in t a in in g a c c o u n t s r e c e i v a b l e in a r e t a i l e s t a b l i s h m e n t , o r m a in t a in in g in v e n t o r y a c c o u n t s
in a m a n u fa c t u r i n g o r w h o l e s a l e e s t a b l i s h m e n t .) C o n f e r s w it h p e r s o n s c o n c e r n e d t o d e t e r m in e
th e d a ta p r o c e s s i n g p r o b l e m s a n d a d v i s e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l o n th e i m p l i c a t i o n s o f the
d a ta p r o c e s s i n g s y s t e m s t o b e a p p l ie d .
OR
W o r k s on a s e g m e n t o f a c o m p l e x d a ta p r o c e s s i n g s c h e m e o r s y s t e m , a s d e s c r i b e d f o r
c l a s s A . W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o n r o u t i n e a s s i g n m e n t s a n d r e c e i v e s i n s t r u c t io n a n d g u id a n c e
o n c o m p l e x a s s i g n m e n t s . W o r k i s r e v i e w e d f o r a c c u r a c y o f ju d g m e n t , c o m p l i a n c e w ith i n ­
s t r u c t i o n s , a n d t o in s u r e p r o p e r a li n e m e n t w it h th e o v e r a l l s y s t e m .
C l a s s C . W o r k s u n d e r im m e d ia t e s u p e r v i s i o n , c a r r y i n g ou t a n a l y s e s a s a s s i g n e d , u s u a l ly
o f a s in g le a c tiv ity .
A s s ig n m e n t s a r e d e s ig n e d t o d e v e l o p a n d e x p a n d p r a c t i c a l e x p e r i e n c e
in th e a p p l ic a t i o n o f p r o c e d u r e s a n d s k i l l s r e q u i r e d f o r s y s t e m s a n a l y s is w o r k . F o r e x a m p le ,
m a y a s s i s t a h i g h e r l e v e l s y s t e m s a n a l y s t b y p r e p a r i n g th e d e t a il e d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s r e q u i r e d
b y p r o g r a m e r s f r o m i n f o r m a t i o n d e v e l o p e d b y th e h i g h e r l e v e l a n a ly s t .
DRAFTSM AN
C la s s A .
P la n s th e g r a p h i c p r e s e n t a t i o n o f c o m p l e x it e m s h a v in g d i s t i n c t i v e d e s i g n
f e a t u r e s th a t d i f f e r s i g n i f i c a n t l y f r o m e s t a b l i s h e d d r a f t in g p r e c e d e n t s . W o r k s in c l o s e s u p ­
p o r t w it h th e d e s ig n o r i g i n a t o r , a n d m a y r e c o m m e n d m i n o r d e s ig n c h a n g e s .
A n a ly z e s th e
e f f e c t o f e a c h c h a n g e o n t h e d e t a i l s o f f o r m , fu n c t io n , a n d p o s i t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s o f c o m ­
p on en ts and p a r ts .
W o r k s w it h a m in i m u m o f s u p e r v i s o r y a s s i s t a n c e .
C o m p le t e d w o r k is
r e v i e w e d b y d e s ig n o r i g i n a t o r f o r c o n s i s t e n c y w it h p r i o r e n g in e e r in g d e t e r m in a t io n s .
M ay
e it h e r p r e p a r e d r a w i n g s , o r d i r e c t t h e i r p r e p a r a t i o n b y l o w e r l e v e l d r a f t s m e n .
C la s s B .
P e r f o r m s n o n r o u t in e a n d c o m p l e x d r a f t in g a s s i g n m e n t s th a t r e q u i r e th e a p p l i ­
c a t io n o f m o s t o f th e s t a n d a r d iz e d d r a w in g t e c h n i q u e s r e g u l a r l y u s e d .
D u t ie s t y p i c a l l y in ­
v o lv e su ch w o rk a s :
P r e p a r e s w o r k i n g d r a w i n g s o f s u b a s s e m b l i e s w ith i r r e g u l a r s h a p e s ,
m u lt i p l e f u n c t io n s , a n d p r e c i s e p o s i t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s b e t w e e n c o m p o n e n t s ; p r e p a r e s a r c h i ­
t e c t u r a l d r a w i n g s f o r c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a b u il d i n g in c lu d in g d e t a il d r a w i n g s o f fo u n d a t i o n s , w a l l
s e c t i o n s , f l o o r p l a n s , a n d r o o f . U s e s a c c e p t e d f o r m u l a s a n d m a n u a ls in m a k in g n e c e s s a r y
c o m p u t a t i o n s t o d e t e r m i n e q u a n t it ie s o f m a t e r i a l s t o b e u s e d , lo a d c a p a c i t i e s , s t r e n g t h s ,
s t r e s s e s , etc.
R e c e i v e s in it ia l i n s t r u c t i o n s , r e q u i r e m e n t s , a n d a d v ic e f r o m s u p e r v i s o r .
C o m p le t e d w o r k i s c h e c k e d f o r t e c h n i c a l a d e q u a c y .
C la s s C .
P r e p a r e s d e t a il d r a w i n g s o f s i n g le u n its o r p a r t s f o r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s t r u c t i o n ,
m a n u fa c t u r i n g , o r r e p a i r p u r p o s e s . T y p e s o f d r a w i n g s p r e p a r e d in c lu d e i s o m e t r i c p r o j e c t i o n s
(d e p i c t in g t h r e e d i m e n s i o n s in a c c u r a t e s c a l e ) a n d s e c t i o n a l v ie w s t o c l a r i f y p o s it i o n in g o f
c o m p o n e n t s a n d c o n v e y n e e d e d in f o r m a t io n . C o n s o l i d a t e s d e t a i l s f r o m a n u m b e r o f s o u r c e s
a n d a d ju s t s o r t r a n s p o s e s s c a l e a s r e q u i r e d .
S u g g e s t e d m e t h o d s o f a p p r o a c h , a p p l ic a b l e
p r e c e d e n t s , a n d a d v ic e o n s o u r c e m a t e r i a l s a r e g iv e n w ith in it ia l a s s i g n m e n t s . I n s t r u c t io n s
a r e le s s c o m p le t e w h en a s s ig n m e n ts r e c u r .
W o r k m a y b e s p o t - c h e c k e d d u r in g p r o g r e s s .
D R A F T S M A N -T R A C E R
C o p ie s p la n s a n d d r a w i n g s p r e p a r e d b y o t h e r s b y p l a c in g t r a c i n g c l o t h o r p a p e r o v e r
d r a w i n g s a n d t r a c i n g w ith p e n o r p e n c i l .
(D o e s n o t in c lu d e t r a c i n g li m i t e d to p la n s p r i m a r i l y
c o n s i s t i n g o f s t r a i g h t li n e s a n d a l a r g e s c a l e n o t r e q u i r in g c l o s e d e l in e a t i o n .)
A N D /O R

D o e s n o t in c lu d e e m p l o y e e s p r i m a r i l y r e s p o n s i b l e f o r th e m a n a g e m e n t o r s u p e r v i s i o n o f
o t h e r e l e c t r o n i c d a t a p r o c e s s i n g (E D P ) e m p l o y e e s , o r s y s t e m s a n a ly s t s p r i m a r i l y c o n c e r n e d w ith
s c i e n t i f i c o r e n g in e e r in g p r o b l e m s .
F or w age

s tu d y p u r p o s e s ,

sy stem s

a n a ly s t s

a re

c la s s ifie d

E L E C T R O N IC

as fo llo w s ;

C la s s A .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o n c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s
in v o l v i n g a l l p h a s e s o f s y s t e m s a n a l y s i s . P r o b l e m s a r e c o m p l e x b e c a u s e o f d i v e r s e s o u r c e s
o f in p u t d a ta a n d m u l t i p l e - u s e r e q u i r e m e n t s o f o u tp u t d a ta . ( F o r e x a m p l e , d e v e l o p s an in t e ­
g r a t e d p r o d u c t io n s c h e d u l in g , i n v e n t o r y c o n t r o l , c o s t a n a l y s i s , a n d s a l e s a n a l y s i s r e c o r d in
w h ic h e v e r y it e m o f e a c h t y p e is a u t o m a t i c a ll y p r o c e s s e d t h r o u g h th e fu l l s y s t e m o f r e c o r d s
a n d a p p r o p r ia t e f o l lo w u p a c t i o n s a r e in it ia t e d b y th e c o m p u t e r . ) C o n f e r s w ith p e r s o n s c o n ­
c e r n e d t o d e t e r m in e th e d a ta p r o c e s s i n g p r o b l e m s a n d a d v i s e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l on
th e i m p l i c a t i o n s o f n e w o r r e v i s e d s y s t e m s o f d a ta p r o c e s s i n g o p e r a t i o n s .
M akes r e c o m ­
m e n d a t io n s , i f n e e d e d , f o r a p p r o v a l o f m a j o r s y s t e m s in s t a l la t io n s o r c h a n g e s a n d f o r
o b t a in in g e q u ip m e n t .
M a y p r o v i d e fu n c t io n a l
a s s is t.

d ir e c t io n

to lo w e r le v e l s y s te m s

a n a ly s t s w h o a r e

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to

C la s s B .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o n p r o b l e m s th a t a r e
r e l a t i v e l y u n c o m p l i c a t e d t o a n a l y z e , p la n , p r o g r a m , a n d o p e r a t e . P r o b l e m s a r e o f l i m it e d
c o m p l e x i t y b e c a u s e s o u r c e s o f in p u t d a ta a r e h o m o g e n e o u s a n d th e o u tp u t d a ta a r e c l o s e l y
re la te d .
( F o r e x a m p le , d e v e l o p s s y s t e m s f o r m a in t a in in g d e p o s i t o r a c c o u n t s in a b a n k ,




P r e p a r e s sim p le
d u r in g p r o g r e s s .

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ite m s .

W o rk is

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T E C H N IC IA N

W o r k s o n v a r i o u s t y p e s o f e l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t o r s y s t e m s b y p e r f o r m i n g o n e o r m o r e
o f th e f o l lo w i n g o p e r a t i o n s ; M o d if y i n g , in s t a l li n g , r e p a i r i n g , a n d o v e r h a u li n g . T h e s e o p e r a t i o n s
r e q u i r e th e p e r f o r m a n c e o f m o s t o r a l l o f th e f o l lo w i n g t a s k s :
A s s e m b l i n g , t e s t i n g , a d ju s t in g ,
c a l i b r a t i n g , t u n in g , a n d a lin in g .
W o r k i s n o n r e p e t it i v e a n d r e q u i r e s a k n o w l e d g e o f th e t h e o r y a n d p r a c t i c e o f e l e c t r o n i c s
p e r t a i n in g t o th e u s e o f g e n e r a l a n d s p e c i a l i z e d e l e c t r o n i c t e s t e q u ip m e n t ; t r o u b le a n a l y s i s : and
th e o p e r a t i o n , r e l a t i o n s h i p , a n d a lin e m e n t o f e l e c t r o n i c s y s t e m s , s u b s y s t e m s , a n d c i r c u i t s h a v in g
a v a r ie t y o f co m p o n e n t p a rts .
E l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t o r s y s t e m s w o r k e d on t y p i c a l l y in c lu d e o n e o r m o r e o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
G r o u n d , v e h i c l e , o r a i r b o r n e r a d i o c o m m u n i c a t io n s s y s t e m s , r e l a y s y s t e m s , n a v i g a t i o n a id s ;
a i r b o r n e o r g r o u n d r a d a r s y s t e m s ; r a d i o and t e l e v i s i o n t r a n s m i t t in g o r r e c o r d i n g s y s t e m s ; e l e c ­
t r o n i c c o m p u t e r s ; m i s s i l e a n d s p a c e c r a f t g u id a n c e a n d c o n t r o l s y s t e m s ; in d u s t r ia l a n d m e d i c a l
m e a s u r i n g , in d ic a t i n g , a n d c o n t r o l l i n g d e v i c e s ; e t c .
( E x c lu d e p r o d u c t io n a s s e m b l e r s a n d t e s t e r s , c r a f t s m e n , d r a f t s m e n , d e s i g n e r s , e n g i n e e r s ,
a n d r e p a i r m e n o f s u c h s t a n d a r d e l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t a s o f f i c e m a c h i n e s , r a d i o a n d t e l e v i s i o n
r e c e iv in g s e t s .)

23
N U R SE , IN D U S T R IA L (R e g is t e r e d )

N U R S E , I N D U S T R I A L ( R e g i s t e r e d ) — C o n t in u e d

A r e g i s t e r e d n u r s e w h o g i v e s n u r s in g s e r v i c e u n d e r g e n e r a l m e d i c a l d i r e c t i o n t o i l l o r
i n ju r e d e m p l o y e e s o r o t h e r p e r s o n s w h o b e c o m e i l l o r s u f f e r a n a c c i d e n t o n th e p r e m i s e s o f a
f a c t o r y o r o t h e r e s t a b l is h m e n t . D u t ie s in v o l v e a c o m b in a t i o n o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
G iv in g f i r s t a id
t o th e i l l o r i n ju r e d ; a t te n d in g t o s u b s e q u e n t d r e s s i n g o f e m p l o y e e s ' i n j u r i e s ; k e e p in g r e c o r d s

o f p a t ie n t s t r e a t e d ; p r e p a r i n g a c c i d e n t r e p o r t s f o r c o m p e n s a t i o n o r o t h e r p u r p o s e s ; a s s i s t i n g in
p h y s i c a l e x a m i n a t i o n s a n d h e a lt h e v a l u a t i o n s o f a p p l ic a n t s a n d e m p l o y e e s ; a n d p la n n in g a n d c a r r y ­
in g o u t p r o g r a m s in v o l v i n g h e a lt h e d u c a t i o n , a c c i d e n t p r e v e n t i o n , e v a lu a t io n o f p la n t e n v ir o n m e n t ,
o r o t h e r a c t i v i t i e s a f f e c t in g th e h e a lt h , w e l f a r e , a n d s a f e t y o f a l l p e r s o n n e l .

M A IN T E N A N C E A N D P O W E R P L A N T
C A R P E N T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E

M A C H I N I S T , M A IN T E N A N C E

P e r f o r m s th e c a r p e n t r y d u t ie s n e c e s s a r y t o c o n s t r u c t a n d m a in t a in in g o o d r e p a i r b u ild in g
w o o d w o r k a n d e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s b i n s , c r i b s , c o u n t e r s , b e n c h e s , p a r t i t i o n s , d o o r s , f l o o r s , s t a i r s ,
c a s i n g s , a n d t r i m m a d e o f w o o d in a n e s t a b l is h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f t h e f o l l o w i n g ; P la n n in g
a n d la y in g o u t o f w o r k f r o m b l u e p r i n t s , d r a w i n g s , m o d e l s , o r v e r b a l in s t r u c t i o n s u s in g a v a r i e t y
o f c a r p e n t e r 's h a n d t o o l s , p o r t a b l e p o w e r t o o l s , and s t a n d a r d m e a s u r i n g in s t r u m e n t s ; m a k in g
sta n d a rd sh o p c o m p u ta tio n s r e la tin g to d im e n s io n s o f w o r k ; and s e le c t in g m a te r ia ls n e c e s s a r y
f o r th e w o r k . In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e c a r p e n t e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d
e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g and e x p e r i e n c e .

P r o d u c e s r e p l a c e m e n t p a r t s a n d n e w p a r t s in m a k in g r e p a i r s o f m e t a l p a r t s o f m e c h a h i c a l
e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t e d in a n e s t a b l is h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : I n t e r p r e t in g w r i t t e n
i n s t r u c t i o n s a n d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; p la n n in g a n d la y in g o u t o f w o r k ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f m a c h i n i s t 's
h a n d t o o ls a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; s e t t in g up a n d o p e r a t i n g s t a n d a r d m a c h in e t o o l s ;
s h a p in g o f m e t a l p a r t s t o c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ; m a k in g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o d i m e n ­
s i o n s o f w o r k , t o o l i n g , f e e d s , a n d s p e e d s o f m a c h in in g ; k n o w le d g e o f th e w o r k i n g p r o p e r t i e s o f
th e c o m m o n m e t a l s ; s e l e c t i n g s t a n d a r d m a t e r i a l s , p a r t s , a n d e q u ip m e n t r e q u i r e d f o r h is w o r k ;
a n d fit t in g a n d a s s e m b l i n g p a r t s in to m e c h a n i c a l e q u ip m e n t .
In g e n e r a l , th e m a c h i n i s t 's w o r k
n o r m a l l y r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d t r a in in g in m a c h i n e - s h o p p r a c t i c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .

E L E C T R I C I A N , M A IN T E N A N C E
P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c a l t r a d e fu n c t io n s s u c h a s th e i n s t a l la t io n , m a in t e n a n c e ,
o r r e p a i r o f e q u ip m e n t f o r th e g e n e r a t i o n , d i s t r ib u t io n , o r u t il iz a t i o n o f e l e c t r i c e n e r g y in an
e s t a b l is h m e n t .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g ;
I n s t a llin g o r r e p a i r i n g a n y o f a v a r i e t y
o f e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , s w i t c h b o a r d s , c o n t r o l l e r s , c i r c u i t
b r e a k e r s , m o t o r s , h e a t in g u n i t s , c o n d u it s y s t e m s , o r o t h e r t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k in g
f r o m b l u e p r i n t s , d r a w i n g s , la y o u t s , o r o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; l o c a t i n g a n d d i a g n o s in g t r o u b le in
th e e l e c t r i c a l s y s t e m o r e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k i n g s t a n d a r d c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o lo a d r e q u i r e m e n t s
o f w i r i n g o r e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t ; a n d u s i n g a v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c i a n 's h a n d t o o ls a n d m e a s u r i n g
and t e s t i n g i n s t r u m e n t s .
In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e e l e c t r i c i a n r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d
t r a in in g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g
and e x p e r ie n c e .
E N G IN E E R . S T A T IO N A R Y
O p e r a t e s a n d m a in t a in s a n d m a y a l s o s u p e r v i s e th e o p e r a t i o n o f s t a t io n a r y e n g in e s a n d
e q u ip m e n t ( m e c h a n i c a l o r e l e c t r i c a l ) t o s u p p ly th e e s t a b l is h m e n t in w h ic h e m p l o y e d w it h p o w e r ,
h ea t, r e f r ig e r a t io n , o r a ir - c o n d it io n in g .
W o rk in v o lv e s :
O p e r a t i n g and m a in t a in in g e q u ip m e n t
s u c h a s s t e a m e n g in e s , a i r c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o t o r s , t u r b in e s , v e n t ila t in g a n d r e f r i g ­
e r a t in g e q u ip m e n t , s t e a m b o i l e r s a n d b o i l e r - f e d w a t e r p u m p s ; m a k in g e q u ip m e n t r e p a i r s ; a n d
k e e p in g a r e c o r d o f o p e r a t i o n o f m a c h i n e r y , t e m p e r a t u r e , a n d fu e l c o n s u m p t i o n . M a y a l s o s u ­
p e r v is e th e se o p e r a tio n s .
H e a d o r c h i e f e n g i n e e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s e m p l o y in g m o r e th a n on e
e n g in e e r a r e e x c l u d e d .
F IR E M A N , S T A T IO N A R Y B O IL E R
F i r e s s t a t io n a r y b o i l e r s t o f u r n is h th e e s t a b l is h m e n t in w h ic h e m p l o y e d w ith h e a t , p o w e r ,
o r ste a m . F e e d s fu e ls to fi r e b y hand o r o p e r a t e s a m e c h a n ic a l s to k e r , o r g a s o r o il b u r n e r ;
and c h e c k s w a t e r a n d s a f e t y v a l v e s . M a y c l e a n , o i l , o r a s s i s t in r e p a i r i n g b o i l e r r o o m e q u ip m e n t .
H E L P E R , M A IN T E N A N C E T R A D E S
A s s i s t s o n e o r m o r e w o r k e r s in th e s k i l l e d m a in t e n a n c e t r a d e s , b y p e r f o r m i n g s p e c i f i c
o r g e n e r a l d u tie s o f l e s s e r s k i l l , s u c h a s k e e p in g a w o r k e r s u p p lie d w it h m a t e r i a l s a n d t o o l s ;
c l e a n in g w o r k i n g a r e a , m a c h in e , a n d e q u ip m e n t ; a s s i s t i n g j o u r n e y m a n b y h o ld in g m a t e r i a l s o r
t o o l s ; a n d p e r f o r m i n g o t h e r u n s k il le d t a s k s a s d i r e c t e d b y jo u r n e y m a n .
T h e k in d o f w o r k th e
h e lp e r is p e r m itte d to p e r fo r m v a r ie s fr o m tra d e to tr a d e :
In s o m e t r a d e s th e h e l p e r i s c o n ­
fi n e d to s u p p ly in g , li f t i n g , a n d h o ld in g m a t e r i a l s a n d t o o l s a n d c l e a n in g w o r k i n g a r e a s ; a n d in
o t h e r s h e is p e r m i t t e d t o p e r f o r m s p e c i a l i z e d m a c h in e o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t s o f a t r a d e th a t a r e
a l s o p e r f o r m e d b y w o r k e r s on a f u l l - t i m e b a s i s .
M A C H I N E -T O O L O P E R A T O R , T O O L R O O M
S p e c i a l i z e s in th e o p e r a t i o n o f o n e o r m o r e t y p e s o f m a c h in e t o o l s , s u c h a s j i g b o r e r s ,
c y l i n d r i c a l o r s u r f a c e g r i n d e r s , e n g in e la t h e s , o r m il li n g m a c h i n e s , in th e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f
m a c h i n e - s h o p t o o l s , g a g e s , j i g s , f i x t u r e s , o r d i e s . W o r k in v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : P la n n in g
a n d p e r f o r m i n g d i f f i c u l t m a c h in in g o p e r a t i o n s ; p r o c e s s i n g it e m s r e q u i r in g c o m p l i c a t e d s e t u p s o r
a h ig h d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; s e l e c t i n g f e e d s ,
s p e e d s , t o o li n g , a n d o p e r a t i o n s e q u e n c e ; a n d m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s d u r in g o p e r a t i o n
to a c h ie v e r e q u is ite t o le r a n c e s o r d im e n s io n s .
M a y b e r e q u ir e d to r e c o g n iz e w h en t o o ls n e e d
d r e s s i n g , t o d r e s s t o o l s , a n d t o s e l e c t p r o p e r c o o l a n t s a n d c u t t in g a n d l u b r ic a t in g o i l s .
F or
c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s , m a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s , t o o l r o o m , in t o o l a n d d ie j o b b in g
s h o p s a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .




M E C H A N I C , A U T O M O T I V E (M a in t e n a n c e )
R e p a i r s a u t o m o b i l e s , b u s e s , m o t o r t r u c k s , a n d t r a c t o r s o f an e s t a b l is h m e n t . W o r k in ­
v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : E x a m in in g a u t o m o t i v e e q u ip m e n t t o d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b l e ; d i s ­
a s s e m b l i n g e q u ip m e n t a n d p e r f o r m i n g r e p a i r s th a t i n v o l v e th e u s e o f s u c h h a n d t o o l s a s w r e n c h e s ,
g a g e s , d r i l l s , o r s p e c i a l i z e d e q u ip m e n t in d i s a s s e m b l i n g o r fit t in g p a r t s ; r e p l a c i n g b r o k e n o r
d e f e c t i v e p a r t s f r o m s t o c k ; g r in d in g a n d a d ju s t in g v a l v e s ; r e a s s e m b l i n g a n d in s t a l li n g the v a r i o u s
a s s e m b l i e s in th e v e h i c l e a n d m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d j u s t m e n t s ; a n d a lin in g w h e e l s , a d ju s t in g b r a k e s
a n d l i g h t s , o r t ig h t e n in g b o d y b o l t s . In g e n e r a l , t h e w o r k o f th e a u t o m o t i v e m e c h a n i c r e q u i r e s
r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t
t r a in in g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
M E C H A N I C , M A IN T E N A N C E
R e p a i r s m a c h i n e r y o r m e c h a n i c a l e q u ip m e n t o f an e s t a b l is h m e n t .
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t
o f th e f o l l o w i n g : E x a m i n i n g m a c h in e s a n d m e c h a n i c a l e q u ip m e n t t o d i a g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b l e ;
d i s m a n t li n g o r p a r t l y d i s m a n t li n g m a c h in e s and p e r f o r m i n g r e p a i r s th a t m a in l y in v o l v e th e u s e
o f h a n d t o o ls in s c r a p i n g a n d fit t in g p a r t s ; r e p l a c i n g b r o k e n o r d e f e c t i v e p a r t s w ith i t e m s o b t a in e d
f r o m s t o c k ; o r d e r i n g th e p r o d u c t i o n o f a r e p l a c e m e n t p a r t b y a m a c h in e s h o p o r s e n d in g o f th e
m a c h in e t o a m a c h in e s h o p f o r m a j o r r e p a i r s ; p r e p a r i n g w r i t t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s f o r m a j o r r e p a i r s
o r f o r th e p r o d u c t i o n o f p a r t s o r d e r e d f r o m m a c h in e s h o p ; r e a s s e m b l i n g m a c h i n e s ; a n d m a k in g
a l l n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s f o r o p e r a t i o n . In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f a m a in t e n a n c e m e c h a n i c r e q u i r e s
r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t
t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
E x c l u d e d f r o m t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n a r e w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y d u tie s
i n v o l v e s e t t in g up o r a d ju s t in g m a c h in e s .
M IL L W R IG H T
I n s t a ll s n e w m a c h in e s o r h e a v y e q u ip m e n t , a n d d i s m a n t l e s a n d i n s t a l l s m a c h in e s o r h e a v y
e q u ip m e n t w h e n c h a n g e s in th e p la n t la y o u t a r e r e q u i r e d . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
P la n n in g a n d la y in g o u t o f th e w o r k ; in t e r p r e t in g b l u e p r in t s o r o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; u s in g a v a r i e t y
o f h a n d t o o ls a n d r i g g i n g ; m a k in g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o s t r e s s e s , s t r e n g t h o f
m a t e r i a l s , a n d c e n t e r s o f g r a v i t y ; a lin in g and b a l a n c in g o f e q u ip m e n t ; s e l e c t i n g s t a n d a r d t o o l s ,
e q u ip m e n t , a n d p a r t s t o b e u s e d ; a n d in s t a l li n g a n d m a in t a in in g in g o o d o r d e r p o w e r t r a n s m i s s i o n
e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s d r i v e s a n d s p e e d r e d u c e r s . In g e n e r a l , th e m i l l w r i g h t 's w o r k n o r m a l l y r e q u i r e s
a r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e in th e t r a d e a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r
e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
P A I N T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
P a i n t s a n d r e d e c o r a t e s w a l l s , w o o d w o r k , a n d f i x t u r e s o f a n e s t a b l is h m e n t . W o r k in v o l v e s
th e f o l l o w i n g : K n o w le d g e o f s u r f a c e p e c u l i a r i t i e s a n d t y p e s o f p a in t r e q u i r e d f o r d i f f e r e n t a p p l i c a ­
t i o n s ; p r e p a r i n g s u r f a c e f o r p a in t in g b y r e m o v i n g o ld f i n is h o r b y p l a c in g p u tty o r f i l l e r in n a il
h o l e s a n d i n t e r s t i c e s ; a n d a p p ly in g p a in t w it h s p r a y g u n o r b r u s h . M a y m i x c o l o r s , o i l s , w h it e
le a d , a n d o t h e r p a in t i n g r e d i e n t s t o o b t a in p r o p e r c o l o r o r c o n s i s t e n c y . In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e
m a in t e n a n c e p a i n t e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t ic e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
P I P E F I T T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
I n s t a ll s o r r e p a i r s w a t e r , s t e a m , g a s , o r o t h e r t y p e s o f p ip e a n d p i p e f it t in g s in an
e s t a b l is h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : L a y in g ou t o f w o r k a n d m e a s u r i n g t o l o c a t e
p o s i t i o n o f p i p e f r o m d r a w i n g s o r o t h e r w r i t t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; c u t t in g v a r i o u s s i z e s o f p i p e t o
c o r r e c t le n g t h s w it h c h i s e l a n d h a m m e r o r o x y a c e t y l e n e t o r c h o r p i p e - c u t t i n g m a c h i n e ; t h r e a d in g
p i p e w it h s t o c k s a n d d i e s ; b e n d in g p i p e b y h a n d - d r i v e n o r p o w e r - d r i v e n m a c h i n e s ; a s s e m b l i n g

24
T O O L A N D D IE M A K E R

P I P E F I T T E R , M A I N T E N A N C E — C o n t in u e d
p ip e w it h c o u p li n g s a n d fa s t e n i n g p i p e t o h a n g e r s ; m a k in g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o
p r e s s u r e s , f l o w , a n d s i z e o f p ip e r e q u i r e d ; a n d m a k in g s t a n d a r d t e s t s t o d e t e r m i n e w h e t h e r f i n ­
is h e d p i p e s m e e t s p e c i f i c a t i o n s .
In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e p i p e f i t t e r r e q u i r e s
r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t
t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e . W o r k e r s p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in in s t a l li n g a n d r e p a i r i n g b u ild in g s a n it a t io n
o r h e a t in g s y s t e m s a r e e x c l u d e d .
S H E E T - M E T A L W O R K E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
F a b r i c a t e s , i n s t a l l s , a n d m a in t a in s in g o o d r e p a i r th e s h e e t - m e t a l e q u ip m e n t a n d f i x t u r e s
( s u c h a s m a c h in e g u a r d s , g r e a s e p a n s , s h e l v e s , l o c k e r s , t a n k s , v e n t i l a t o r s , c h u t e s , d u c t s , m e t a l
r o o f in g ) o f a n e s t a b l is h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : P la n n in g a n d la y in g ou t a l l
t y p e s o f s h e e t - m e t a l m a in t e n a n c e w o r k f r o m b l u e p r i n t s , m o d e l s , o r o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; s e t t in g
up a n d o p e r a t i n g a l l a v a il a b l e t y p e s o f s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k i n g m a c h i n e s ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f h a n d t o o ls
in c u t t i n g , b e n d in g , f o r m i n g , s h a p in g , f i t t in g , a n d a s s e m b l i n g ; a n d in s t a l li n g s h e e t - m e t a l a r t i c l e s
as re q u ir e d .
In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d
t r a in in g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g
and e x p e r ie n c e .

(D i e m a k e r ; j i g

m a k e r ; t o o l m a k e r ; fix tu re

m a k e r; g a ge m a k er)

C o n s tr u c ts and r e p a ir s m a c h in e -s h o p t o o ls , g a g e s , j ig s , fix tu r e s o r d ie s f o r fo r g in g s ,
p u n c h in g , a n d o t h e r m e t a l - f o r m i n g w o r k .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g ;
P la n n in g a n d
la y in g o u t o f w o r k f r o m m o d e l s , b l u e p r i n t s , d r a w i n g s , o r o t h e r o r a l a n d w r i t t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ;
u s in g a v a r i e t y o f t o o l a n d d ie m a k e r 's h a n d t o o l s a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; u n d e r ­
s t a n d in g o f t h e w o r k i n g p r o p e r t i e s o f c o m m o n m e t a l s a n d a l l o y s ; s e t t in g u p a n d o p e r a t i n g o f
m a c h in e t o o l s a n d r e l a t e d e q u ip m e n t ; m a k in g n e c e s s a r y s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o d i m e n s i o n s
o f w o r k , s p e e d s , f e e d s , a n d t o o li n g o f m a c h i n e s ; h e a t - t r e a t i n g o f m e t a l p a r t s d u r in g f a b r i c a t i o n
as w e ll as o f fin is h e d t o o ls and d ie s to a c h ie v e r e q u ir e d q u a lit ie s ; w o rk in g to c l o s e t o le r a n c e s ;
fi t t in g a n d a s s e m b l i n g o f p a r t s t o p r e s c r i b e d t o l e r a n c e s a n d a l l o w a n c e s ; a n d s e l e c t i n g a p p r o p r ia t e
m a t e r i a l s , t o o l s , a n d p r o c e s s e s . In g e n e r a l , th e t o o l a n d d ie m a k e r 's w o r k r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d
t r a in i n g in m a c h i n e - s h o p a n d t o o l r o o m p r a c t i c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h i p
o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .

sh op s

F o r c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s ,
a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .

to o l and

d ie m a k e r s

in t o o l a n d d ie j o b b in g

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
S H IP P IN G A N D R E C E I V I N G

GUARD AND W ATCH M AN
G uard.
P e r f o r m s r o u t in e p o l i c e d u t i e s , e i t h e r a t f i x e d p o s t o r o n t o u r , m a in t a in in g
o r d e r , u s in g a r m s o r f o r c e w h e r e n e c e s s a r y .
I n c lu d e s g a t e m e n w h o a r e s t a t io n e d a t g a te
a n d c h e c k on id e n t it y o f e m p l o y e e s a n d o t h e r p e r s o n s e n t e r i n g .
W a tch m a n .
M a k e s ro u n d s o f p r e m is e s
t h e ft , a n d i l l e g a l e n t r y .
JA N IT O R ,

PORTER,

(S w e e p e r ;

OR

p e r i o d i c a l l y in p r o t e c t i n g

p r o p e r t y a g a in s t f i r e ,

CLEANER

P r e p a r e s m e r c h a n d i s e f o r s h ip m e n t , o r r e c e i v e s a n d is r e s p o n s i b l e f o r in c o m in g s h i p ­
m e n ts o f m e r c h a n d is e o r o th e r m a t e r ia ls .
S h ip p in g w o r k i n v o l v e s : A k n o w le d g e o f sh ip p in g
p r o c e d u r e s , p r a c t i c e s , r o u t e s , a v a il a b l e m e a n s o f t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , a n d r a t e ; a n d p r e p a r i n g r e c ­
o r d s o f th e g o o d s s h ip p e d , m a k in g up b i l l s o f la d in g , p o s t in g w e ig h t a n d s h ip p in g c h a r g e s , and
k e e p in g a f i l e o f s h ip p in g r e c o r d s . M a y d i r e c t o r a s s i s t in p r e p a r i n g th e m e r c h a n d is e f o r s h i p ­
m en t.
R e c e i v i n g w o r k i n v o l v e s : V e r i f y i n g o r d i r e c t i n g o t h e r s in v e r i f y i n g th e c o r r e c t n e s s o f
s h ip m e n t s a g a in s t b i l l s o f la d in g , i n v o i c e s , o r o t h e r r e c o r d s ; c h e c k i n g f o r s h o r t a g e s a n d r e j e c t i n g
d a m a g e d g o o d s ; r o u t in g m e r c h a n d i s e o r m a t e r i a l s t o p r o p e r d e p a r t m e n t s ; and m a in t a in in g n e c e s ­
s a r y r e c o r d s and file s .

ch a rw o m a n ; ja n it r e s s )
F o r w age

C le a n s a n d k e e p s in a n o r d e r l y c o n d it i o n f a c t o r y w o r k i n g a r e a s a n d w a s h r o o m s , o r
p r e m i s e s o f a n o f f i c e , a p a r t m e n t h o u s e , o r c o m m e r c i a l o r o t h e r e s t a b l is h m e n t . D u t ie s in v o l v e
a c o m b in a t i o n o f th e f o l l o w i n g : S w e e p in g , m o p p in g o r s c r u b b i n g , a n d p o l is h in g f l o o r s ; r e m o v i n g
c h i p s , t r a s h , a n d o t h e r r e f u s e ; d u s t in g e q u ip m e n t , f u r n it u r e , o r f i x t u r e s ; p o l is h in g m e t a l f i x t u r e s
o r t r i m m i n g s ; p r o v id i n g s u p p l ie s a n d m in o r m a in t e n a n c e s e r v i c e s ; a n d c l e a n in g l a v a t o r i e s , s h o w ­
e r s , and r e s t r o o m s . W o r k e r s w h o s p e c i a l i z e in w in d o w w a s h in g a r e e x c l u d e d .
LABORER,

s tu d y p u r p o s e s ,

R e c e iv in g c le r k
S h ip p in g c l e r k
S h ip p in g a n d r e c e i v i n g

w ork ers

a re

c la s s ifie d

as fo llo w s ;

cle rk

T R U C K D R IV E R

M A T E R I A L H A N D L IN G

( L o a d e r a n d u n l o a d e r ; h a n d le r a n d s t a c k e r ; s h e l v e r ; t r u c k e r ; s t o c k m a n o r s t o c k h e l p e r ; w a r e ­
h o u s e m a n o r w a r e h o u s e h e lp e r ),
A w o r k e r e m p l o y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c t u r in g p la n t , s t o r e , o r o t h e r e s t a b l is h m e n t
w h o s e d u tie s in v o l v e o n e o r m o r e o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
L o a d in g a n d u n lo a d in g v a r io u s m a t e r i a l s and
m e r c h a n d i s e o n o r f r o m f r e ig h t c a r s , t r u c k s , o r o t h e r t r a n s p o r t i n g d e v i c e s ; u n p a c k in g , s h e l v in g ,
o r p l a c in g m a t e r i a l s o r m e r c h a n d i s e in p r o p e r s t o r a g e lo c a t i o n ; a n d t r a n s p o r t i n g m a t e r i a l s o r
m e r c h a n d is e b y h a n d tru ck , c a r , o r w h e e lb a r r o w .
L o n g s h o r e m e n , w h o lo a d and u n lo a d s h ip s a r e
e x c lu d e d .
ORDER

CLERK

D r i v e s a t r u c k w it h in a c i t y o r in d u s t r ia l a r e a t o t r a n s p o r t m a t e r i a l s , m e r c h a n d i s e ,
e q u ip m e n t , o r m e n b e t w e e n v a r i o u s t y p e s o f e s t a b l is h m e n t s s u c h a s ; M a n u fa c t u r in g p l a n t s , f r e i g h t
d e p o t s , w a r e h o u s e s , w h o l e s a l e a n d r e t a i l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , o r b e t w e e n r e t a i l e s t a b l is h m e n t s and
c u s t o m e r s ' h o u s e s o r p l a c e s o f b u s i n e s s . M a y a l s o lo a d o r u n lo a d t r u c k w it h o r w it h o u t h e l p e r s ,
m a k e m in o r m e c h a n i c a l r e p a i r s , a n d k e e p t r u c k in g o o d w o r k i n g o r d e r .
D r i v e r - s a le s m e n and
o v e r -t h e - r o a d d r iv e r s a re e x c lu d e d .
F o r w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s , t r u c k d r i v e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d b y s i z e a n d t y p e o f e q u ip m e n t ,
as fo llo w s :
( T r a c t o r - t r a i l e r s h o u ld b e r a t e d o n th e b a s i s o f t r a i l e r c a p a c i t y .)

F IL L E R

(O r d e r

p ick e r;

stock

s e le cto r; w areh ou se

stock m an )

F i l l s s h ip p in g o r t r a n s f e r o r d e r s f o r f i n is h e d g o o d s f r o m s t o r e d m e r c h a n d i s e in a c c o r d ­
a n c e w it h s p e c i f i c a t i o n s on s a l e s s l i p s , c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s , o r o t h e r in s t r u c t i o n s . M a y , in a d d i t i o n
t o f i l l i n g o r d e r s a n d in d ic a t in g it e m s f i l l e d o r o m it t e d , k e e p r e c o r d s o f o u t g o in g o r d e r s , r e q u i ­
s i t io n a d d it io n a l s t o c k o r r e p o r t s h o r t s u p p l ie s t o s u p e r v i s o r , and p e r f o r m o t h e r r e l a t e d d u t i e s .

T r u c k d r iv e r (c o m b in a tio n o f s iz e s lis t e d se p a r a te ly )
T r u c k d r i v e r , lig h t (u n d e r IV 2 to n s )
T r u c k d r i v e r , m e d i u m (IV2 t o a n d in c lu d in g 4 t o n s )
T r u c k d r iv e r , h e a v y (o v e r 4 t o n s , t r a il e r ty p e)
T r u c k d r i v e r , h e a v y ( o v e r 4 t o n s , o t h e r th a n t r a i l e r t y p e )

TRUCKER,
PACKER.

POW ER

S H IP P IN G

P r e p a r e s fi n is h e d p r o d u c t s f o r s h ip m e n t o r s t o r a g e b y p l a c in g t h e m in s h ip p in g c o n ­
t a i n e r s , th e s p e c i f i c o p e r a t i o n s p e r f o r m e d b e in g d e p e n d e n t u p o n th e t y p e , s i z e , a n d n u m b e r o f
u n its t o b e p a c k e d , th e t y p e o f c o n t a in e r e m p l o y e d , a n d m e t h o d o f s h ip m e n t . W o r k r e q u i r e s th e
p l a c in g o f it e m s in s h ip p in g c o n t a in e r s a n d m a y in v o l v e o n e o r m o r e o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : K n o w l­
e d g e o f v a r i o u s it e m s o f s t o c k in o r d e r t o v e r i f y c o n t e n t ; s e l e c t i o n o f a p p r o p r ia t e t y p e a n d s i z e
o f c o n t a i n e r ; in s e r t i n g e n c l o s u r e s in c o n t a i n e r ; u s in g e x c e l s i o r o r o t h e r m a t e r i a l t o p r e v e n t
b r e a k a g e o r d a m a g e ; c l o s i n g a n d s e a li n g c o n t a i n e r ; a n d a p p ly in g l a b e l s o r e n t e r i n g id e n t if y in g
d a ta o n c o n t a in e r . P a c k e r s w h o a l s o m a k e w o o d e n b o x e s o r c r a t e s a r e e x c l u d e d .




O p era tes a
tr a n s p o r t g o o d s and
e s t a b l is h m e n t .

m a n u a lly c o n t r o l l e d g a s o l i n e - o r e l e c t r i c - p o w e r e d t r u c k o r t r a c t o r to
m a t e r i a l s o f a l l k in d s a b o u t a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c t u r in g p l a n t , o r o t h e r

F o r w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s a r e c l a s s i f ie d b y ty p e o f tr u c k , a s fo llo w s :
T ru ck er,
T ru ck er,

pow er
pow er

(fo r k lift)
(o t h e r th a n f o r k l i f t )

A re a W a g e S urveys
A list of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A directory of area wage studies including more limited studies conducted at the
request of the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins may be purchased from the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C ., 20402, or from any of the BLS regional sales offices shown on the inside front cover.

Area

Akron, Ohio, July 1969 1_______________ -, ..... _
_
Albany—
Schenectady-Troy, N.Y., Feb. 1970—_____
Albuquerque, N. Mex., Mar. 1970 1---- —-------------------Allentowir-Bethlehem—
Easton, Pa.—
N.J., May 1970 1_
Atlanta, Ga., May 1970 1______________________
Baltimore, Md., Aug. 1969____________________
Beaumont—
Port Arthux—
Orange, Tex., May 1970------Binghamton, N.Y., July 1969___ —
__________ ___
Birmingham, Ala., Mar. 1970__________________
Boise City, Idaho, Nov. 1969__________________
Boston, Mass., Aug. 1969 ....._________________
Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 1969______________________
Burlington, Vt., Mar. 1970--------------- -------------------------Canton, Ohio, May 1970 1______________________
Charleston, W. Va., Apr. 1970 1________________
_
_
Charlotte, N.C., Mar. 1970 *_ _-_ __________
Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ca., Sept. 1969—
—--------------------Chicago, 111., Apr. 1969 1 —---------------------------------------Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky.—
Ind., Feb. 1970------------------------Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1969____________________
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1969____________________
Dallas, Tex., Oct. 1969_______________________
Davenport—
Rock Island—
Moline, Iowar-Ill.,
Oct. 1969 1________________________________
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1969______________________
Denver, Colo., Dec. 1969 1____________________
Des Moines, Iowa, May 1970 1 _________________
Detroit, Mich., Feb. 1970------------------------------------------Fort Worth, Tex., Oct. 1969--------------------------------------Green Bay, Wis., July 1969____________________
Greenville, S.C., May 1970____________________
Houston, Tex., Apr. 1970-------------------------------------------Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1969___________________
Jackson, Miss., Jam. 1970— ___________________
Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 1969------------------------------------Kansas City, Mo.-Kans., Sept. 1969_____________
Lawrence—
Haverhill, Mass.—
N.H., June 1970 1---------Little Rock-North Little Rock, Ark., July 1969____
Los Angeles—
Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa Ana—
Garden Grove, Calif., Mar. 1970______________
Louisville, Ky.—
Ind., Nov. 1969 1___ ___________
Lubbock, Tex,, Mar. 1970 1 — _________________
Manchester, N.H., July 1970 1__________________
Memphis, Tenn.—
Ark., Nov. 1969 1 ______________
Miami, Fla., Nov. 1969___ —---- ------—
---------------------Midland and Odessa, Tex., Jam. 1970 1 ---------------------Milwaukee, Wis., May 1970 1___________________
Minneapolis— Paul, Minn., Jan. 1970 1 _________
St.
l

Bulletin number
and price

1625-89,
1660-51,
1660-55,
1660-83,
1660-76,
1660-11,
1660-84,
1660-5,
1660-57,
1660-34,
1660-16,
1660-29,
1660-53,
1660-81,
1660-68,
1660-61,
1660-9,
1625-82,
1660-49,
1660-22,
1660-27,
1660-23,

35 cents
30 cents
35 cents
35 cents
50 cents
35 cents
30 cents
3U cents
30 cents
25 cents
45 cents
45 cents
25 cents
35 cents
45 cents
40 cents
30 cents
65 cents
35 cents
40 cents
30 cents
35 cents

1660-20,
1660-37,
1660-41,
1660-73,
1660-58,
1660-18,
1660-8,
1660-79,
1660-67
1660-25,
1660-39,
1660-35,
1660-10,
1660-82,
1660-2,

35 cents
30 cents
40 cents
35 cents
35 cents
30 cents
30 cents
30 cents
35 cents
30 cents
30 cents
30 cents
35 cents
35 cents
30 cents

1660-64,
1660-28,
1660-50,
1685-2.
1660-31,
1660-32,
1660-44,
1660-74,
1660-46,

45 cents
40 cents
35 cents
35 cents
40 cents
30 cents
35 cents
50 cents
50 cents

D a ta o n esta blish m en t p r a c t ic e s and su p plem en tary w a g e provision s are also presented .




Area

Bulletin number
and price

Muskegon—
Muskegon Heights, Mich., June 19701____ 1660-85,
Newark and Jersey City, N .J., Jan. 1970*____ - ■ __ 1660-47,
New Haven, Conn., Jam. 1970 1
_________ _______________ 1660-40,
New Orleans, La., Jan. 1970___________________________ 1660-42,
New York, N .Y ., Apr. 1969_____________________________ 1625-88,
Norfolk—
Portsmouth and Newport News—
Hampton, V a., Jan. 19701 ____________________________ 1660-59,
Oklahoma City, Okla., July 1969*_____________________ 1660-17,
Omaha, Nebr.—Iowa, Sept. 1969______________ ____ __ _ 1660-12,
Paterson-Clifton— assaic, N .J., May 1969___________ 1625-87,
P
Philadelphia, Pa.— .J., Nov. 1969 1_______ ______
N
1660-48,
Phoenix, A riz ., Mar. 1970 1---------------------- ------------ ------- 1660-70,
- 1660-60,
Pittsburgh, P a., Jan. 1970 1________________
Portlamd, Maine, Nov. 1969 1 ____________________ ____ 1660-26,
Portland, Oreg.—
Wash., May 1970 1___________________ 1660-77,
Providence—
Pawtucket—
Warwick, R.I.— a ss.,
M
May 1970_______________________________________________ 1660-72,
Raleigh, N .C ., Aug. 1969_______________________________ 1660-6,
Richmond. Va.. Mar. 19701____________________________ 1660-65,
Rochester, N.Y.' (office occupations only),
July 1969_______________________________________________ 1660-4,
Rockford, 111., May 1970 1 _____________________________ 1660-75,
St. Louis, Mo.—
111., Mar. 1970_________________________ 1660-66,
Salt Lake City, Utah, Nov. 1969 1______________________ 1660-30,
San Antonio, Tex., May 1970------------------------------------------ 1660-71,
San Bernardino-Riverside—
Ontario, Calif.,
Dec. 1969_______________________________________________ 1660-43,
San Diego, C alif., Nov. 19691 _________________________ 1660-36,
San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., Oct. 1969 1---------------- 1660-33,
San Jose, C alif., Sept. 1969 1 ------------------------------1660-24,
Savannah, G a., May 1970 1___________________________ _
1660-80,
Scranton, P a., July 1969_______________________________ 1660-15,
Seattle—Everett, Wash., Jan. 1970__________________ _
1660-52,
Sioux Falls, S. Dak., Sept. 1969--- --------------- ----------------- 1660-14,
South Bend, Ind., Mar. 19701____________________ ____ - 1660-62,
Spokane, W ash., June 19701 ___________ _______________ 1660-86,
Syracuse, N .Y ., July 1969--------------------------------------------- 1660-13,
Tampa-St. Petersburg, F la,, Aug. 1969 1 _____________ 1660-7,
Toledo, Ohio—
Mich., Feb. 1970----------------- ________------- 1660-56,
Trenton, N .J., Sept. 1969— _______________ — _______— 1660-21,
Utica-Rome, N .Y ., July 1969__________________________ 1660-1,
Washington, D.C.—
Md.— a ., Sept. 1969 1____________ — 1660-19,
V
Waterbury, Conn., Mar. 1970 1-------------------------------------- 1660-54,
Waterloo, Iowa, Jan. 1970_____________________________ 1660-45,
Wichita, Kans., Apr. 1970 1 ______________ — ________ 1660-69,
___
W orcester, M a ss., May 19701 __________
1660-78,
York, Pa., Feb. 19701__________________________________ 1660-63,
Youngstown—
Warren, Ohio, Nov. 1969 1_______________ 1660-38,

35
50
35
30
60

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

35
35
30
35
60
35
50
35
40

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cent8

30 cents
30 cents
40 cents
30
35
40
35
30

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

30
35
50
35
35
30
30
25
35
35
30
35
30
30
30
50
35
30
35
35
35
35

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W A SHING TO N, D .C .

20212

O FF IC IA L BUSINESS




POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

F IR S T C LASS M A IL


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102