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AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e A tla n ta , G e o rg ia , M e t r o p o lit a n
A re a , M a y 1 9 7 0

B u lle tin
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R

1 6 6 0 -7 6

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




Government Center

N ew Y o rk , N .Y . 10001

1317 Filbert St.

1371 Peachtree St. NE.

Boston, Mass. 02203

Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Philadelphia, Pa. 19107

Atlanta, Ga. 30309

Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Phone. 223-6762 (Area Code 617)
Region V

Region VI

219 South Dearborn St.

337 M ayflow er Building

Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)

Regions V II and V III

Regions IX and X

411 North Akard St.

Federal O ffice Building
911 Walnut St., 10th Floor

450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017

Dallas, T ex. 75201
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Kansas C ity, M o. 64106

San Francisco, Calif. 94102

Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

* Regions V II and V III will be serviced by Kansas City.
** Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.

U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
J. D. Hodgson, S ecretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner




AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e A tla n ta , G e o rg ia , M e t r o p o lit a n
A rea, M ay 1 97 0

B u lle tin

1 6 6 0 -7 6
August 19 70

For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, U.S. Government Printing O ffice, Washington, D.C., 20402 — Price 50 cents




Preface

T h e B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s p r o g r a m o f annual o c c u p a ­
t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s is d e s i g n e d to p r o v i d e data
o n o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s , a nd e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s a n d s u p p l e m e n ­
tary wage p r o v is io n s .
It y i e l d s d e t a i l e d da ta b y s e l e c t e d i n d u s t r y
d i v i s i o n f o r e a c h o f th e a r e a s s t u d i e d , f o r g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n s , and f o r
th e U n it e d S t a t e s . A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in the p r o g r a m is the n e e d
f o r g r e a t e r i n s i g h t in to ( 1 ) th e m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s b y o c c u p a t i o n a l
c a t e g o r y a nd s k i l l l e v e l , and ( 2 ) th e s t r u c t u r e and l e v e l o f w a g e s
a m o n g a r e a s and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s .

A t th e en d o f e a c h s u r v e y , an i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l l e t i n p r e ­
sents s u r v e y r e s u lt s f o r e a ch a r e a stu died .
A f t e r c o m p l e t i o n o f a ll
o f th e i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l l e t i n s f o r a r o u n d o f s u r v e y s , tw o s u m ­
m a r y b u lletin s a r e is s u e d .
T h e f i r s t b r i n g s data f o r e a c h o f the

m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s s t u d i e d in to o n e b u l l e t i n .
The secon d presen ts
i n f o r m a t i o n w h i c h h as b e e n p r o j e c t e d f r o m i n d i v i d u a l m e t r o p o l i t a n
a r e a da ta to r e l a t e to g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n s a n d th e U n it e d S t a t e s .
N i n e t y a r e a s c u r r e n t l y a r e i n c l u d e d in th e p r o g r a m . In e a c h
a r e a , i n f o r m a t i o n on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s i s c o l l e c t e d a n n u a l l y a nd on
e s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s b ie n n ia lly .
T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s r e s u l t s o f th e s u r v e y in A t l a n t a , G a . ,
in M a y 1 9 7 0. T h e S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f i n e d
b y the B u r e a u o f th e B u d g e t t h r o u g h J a n u a r y 1 9 6 8 , c o n s i s t s o f C l a y t o n ,
C o b b , D e K a l b , F u l t o n , a n d G w in n e t t C o u n t i e s .
T h is study w as c o n ­
d u c t e d b y th e B u r e a u ' s r e g i o n a l o f f i c e in A t l a n t a , G a . , u n d e r th e g e n ­
e r a l d ir e c t io n o f D onald M . C r u s e , A s s is t a n t R e g io n a l D i r e c t o r f o r
O p era tion s.

Contents
Page

W a g e t r e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

5

T a b les:
1.
2.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s and w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y a n d n u m b e r s t u d i e d ________________________________________________________________________________
I n d e x e s o f s t a n d a r d w e e k l y s a l a r i e s and s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s , and
p e r c e n t s o f i n c r e a s e f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




NOTE:

S im i l a r tabulations

a r e a v a ila b le fo r oth er a r e a s .

(See in sid e b a ck c o v e r . )

C u r r e n t r e p o r t s o n o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s in th e A t la n t a a r e a
a r e a l s o a v a i l a b l e f o r h o s p i t a l s ( M a r c h 1969) and a u t o d e a l e r r e p a i r s h o p s ( A u g u s t 1 9 6 9).
U n io n s c a l e s ,
in d ica tiv e o f p r e v a ilin g p a y l e v e l s , a r e a v a ila b le f o r building c o n s t r u c tio n ; p rin tin g; l o c a l - t r a n s i t op eratin g
e m p l o y e e s ; and m o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r s , h e l p e r s , and a llie d o c c u p a t io n s .

4
6

Contents— Continued
Page
T a b l e s — C o n t in u e d
A.

B.

O ccu pa tion a l earn ings:
A -l.
O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — e n a n d w o m e n ____________________________________________________________________________
m
A -la .
O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s - m e n a n d w o m e n --------------------------------------------------------------------------l
A - 2.
P r o f e s s i o n a l a nd t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s — e n a n d w o m e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------------m
A - 2 a . P r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s - m e n a n d w o m e n _______________________
l
A -3.
O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s - m i e n and w o m e n c o m b i n e d -----------------------------------------A - 3 a . O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s —l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s — e n and w o m e n c o m b i n e d
m
A -4.
M a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------A - 4 a . M a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ----------------------------------------------------------------l
A - 5.
C u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s _______________________________________________________________
A - 5 a . C u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ___________________________________
l
E s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s :
B -l.
M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------B -2.
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l s __________________________________________________________________________________________________
B -3 .
S c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s ___________________________________________________________________________________________
B -4 .
P a i d h o l i d a y s ________________________________________________________________________________________________________
B -5 .
P a i d v a c a t i o n s _______________________________________________________________________________________________________
B -6 .
H e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , a n d p e n s i o n p l a n s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------B -7 .
M e t h o d o f w a g e d e t e r m i n a t i o n a nd f r e q u e n c y o f p a y m e n t __________________________________________________

A ppendix.

O c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s ____________________________________________________________________________________________




iv

7
11

13
15
16
18
19
20

21
23

25
26
27
28
29
32
33
34

Area W
age Survey—
The Atlanta, G M
a., etropolitan Area
Introduction
O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t and e a r n i n g s d a t a a r e s h o w n f o r
f u ll- t i m e w o r k e r s , i .e ., th ose h ire d to w o r k a re g u la r w e e k ly sch ed u le
in th e g i v e n o c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
E a r n i n g s da t a e x c l u d e p r e ­
m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
la te s h i f t s .
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g
a l l o w a n c e s and i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e i n c l u d e d . W h e r e w e e k l y h o u r s
a r e r e p o r t e d , a s f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e is to the
s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k ( r o u n d e d t o the n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r ) f o r w h i c h e m ­
p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th eir re g u la r s tr a ig h t-tim e s a la r ie s (e x c lu siv e of pay
f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) . A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n ­
in g s f o r t h e s e o c c u p a t i o n s h a v e b e e n r o u n d e d t o th e n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .

T h i s a r e a is 1 o f 90 in w h i c h th e U.S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s
B u rea u o f L a b o r S ta tistics con du cts s u rv e y s of o ccu pa tion a l earnings
and r e l a t e d b e n e f i t s o n an a r e a w i d e b a s i s . 1 In t h is a r e a , da t a w e r e
o b t a i n e d b y p e r s o n a l v i s i t s o f B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s to r e p r e s e n t ­
a t i v e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith in s i x b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s :
Manu­
f a c t u r i n g ; t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ;
w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and
serv ices.
M a jo r in d u stry g ro u p s e x clu d e d f r o m th ese stu dies a re
g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t i o n s and th e c o n s t r u c t i o n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e
o m i t t e d b e c a u s e t h e y te n d t o f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the
o c c u p a t i. o n s s t u d i e d t o w a r r a n t i n c l u s i o n .
S ep arate tabu lation s are
p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h o f th e b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w h i c h m e e t p u b l i ­
cation c r it e r ia .

The a v e ra g e s p resen ted r e fle c t co m p o s ite , a reaw ide e s t i­
m ates.
I n d u s t r i e s and e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l and j o b
s t a f f in g a n d , t h u s , c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to th e e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h j o b .
T h e p a y r e l a t i o n s h i p o b t a i n a b l e f r o m th e a v e r a g e s m a y f a i l t o r e f l e c t
a c c u r a t e l y the w a g e s p r e a d o r d i f f e r e n t i a l m a i n t a i n e d a m o n g j o b s in
i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . S i m i l a r l y , d i f f e r e n c e s in a v e r a g e p a y l e v ­
e l s f o r m e n and w o m e n in a n y o f th e s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s h o u ld
not b e a s s u m e d t o r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y t r e a t m e n t o f the s e x e s
w it h in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
O ther p o s s i b l e f a c t o r s w h ich m a y
c o n t r i b u t e t o d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y f o r m e n and w o m e n i n c l u d e :
D iffer­
e n c e s in p r o g r e s s i o n w it h in e s t a b l i s h e d r a t e r a n g e s , s i n c e o n l y th e
a c t u a l r a t e s p a i d i n c u m b e n t s a r e c o l l e c t e d ; and d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c
d u t ie s p e r f o r m e d , a lt h o u g h th e w o r k e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d a p p r o p r i a t e l y
w it h in the s a m e s u r v e y j o b d e s c r i p t i o n .
J o b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d in
c l a s s i f y i n g e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d
th an t h o s e u s e d in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and a l l o w f o r m i n o r
d i f f e r e n c e s a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the s p e c i f i c d u t ie s p e r f o r m e d .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e c o n d u cte d on a s a m p le b a s is b e c a u s e of
th e u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t i n v o l v e d in s u r v e y i n g a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
To
o b t a i n o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n o f
l a r g e th an o f s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s t u d ie d . In c o m b i n i n g th e d a t a ,
h o w e v e r , all es ta b lis h m e n ts a r e g iv en th e ir a p p ro p ria te w eigh t.
E s­
t i m a t e s b a s e d o n the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
a s r e l a t i n g t o a ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the i n d u s t r y g r o u p i n g and a r e a ,
e x c e p t f o r t h o s e b e l o w th e m i n i m u m s i z e s t u d ie d .
O c c u p a t i o n s and E a r n i n g s
T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r s tu d y a r e c o m m o n t o a v a r i e t y
o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g and n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , and a r e o f th e
follow in g ty pes:
(1) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l ;
(3) m a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t ; and (4) c u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m ent.
O c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n is b a s e d on a u n i f o r m s e t o f j o b
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d t o ta k e a c c o u n t o f in t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in d u t ie s w it h in the s a m e j o b .
T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r s tu d y
a r e l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d in th e a p p e n d i x . T h e e a r n i n g s da ta f o l l o w i n g
th e j o b t i t l e s a r e f o r a l l i n d u s t r i e s c o m b i n e d . E a r n i n g s da t a f o r s o m e
o f th e o c c u p a t i o n s l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d , o r f o r s o m e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s
w it h i n o c c u p a t i o n s , a r e not p r e s e n t e d in the A - s e r i e s t a b l e s , b e c a u s e
e i t h e r (1) e m p l o y m e n t in th e o c c u p a t i o n i s t o o s m a l l to p r o v i d e e n o u g h
da t a t o m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e is p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e
o f i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t da ta .

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the t o t a l in
a ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h in the s c o p e o f the s tu d y and not the n u m b e r
actu a lly s u rv e y e d .
B e c a u s e o f d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , th e e s t i m a t e s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b ­
t a i n e d f r o m th e s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d s e r v e o n l y t o in d i c a t e
th e r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e o f th e j o b s s t u d ie d .
T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in
o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e d o not a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y th e a c c u r a c y o f the
e a r n i n g s da ta.
E stablish m en t P r a c t ic e s

1
Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New York State
Department of Labor. These areas are Binghamton (New York portion only); Rochester (office occu­
pations only); Syracuse; and Utica— Rome. In addition, the Bureau conducts more limited area studies
in 78 areas at the request of the Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions of the U. S. De­
partment of Labor.




1

and S u p p l e m e n t a r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s

I n f o r m a t i o n is p r e s e n t e d ( in th e B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) o n s e l e c t e d
e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s as t h e y
r e l a t e t o p la n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s .
A d m i n i s t r a t i v e , e x e c u t i v e , and
p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p l o y e e s , and c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k e r s w h o a r e u t i l i z e d
as a se p a ra te w o r k f o r c e a re exclu d e d .
" P l a n t w o r k e r s " in c lu d e

2

w o r k i n g f o r e m e n a nd a ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s
(inclu din g le a d m e n and t r a i n e e s ) e n g a g e d in n o n o f f i c e f u n c t i o n s .
"O ffice w o rk e rs "
in c lu d e w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s and n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g
c l e r i c a l or rela ted fun ction s.
C a f e t e r i a w o r k e r s and r o u t e m e n a r e
e x c l u d e d ip m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , but i n c l u d e d in n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g
in d u stries.
M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s (ta b le
B - l ) r e l a t e o n l y t o the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s v i s i t e d . B e c a u s e o f the o p t i m u m
s a m p l i n g t e c h n i q u e s u s e d , and the p r o b a b i l i t y that l a r g e e s t a b l i s h ­
m ents are m o r e lik e ly to have fo r m a l en tran ce ra tes fo r w o r k e r s
a b o v e the s u b c l e r i c a l l e v e l th an s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , the t a b l e is
m o r e - r e p r e s e n t a t i v e o f p o l i c i e s in m e d i u m and l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .

Sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a l da ta ( t a b l e B - 2 ) a r e l i m i t e d t o plant w o r k e r s
in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s .
T h i s i n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d b o t h in
t e r m s o f (1) e s t a b l i s h m e n t p o l i c y , 2 p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f t o t a l pla n t
w o r k e r e m p l o y m e n t , and (2) e f f e c t i v e p r a c t i c e , p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s
o f w o r k e r s a c t u a l l y e m p l o y e d o n the s p e c i f i e d s h if t at th e t i m e o f the
survey.
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g v a r i e d d i f f e r e n t i a l s , the a m o u n t
a p p l y i n g to a m a j o r i t y w a s u s e d o r , if no a m o u n t a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y ,
the c l a s s i f i c a t i o n " o t h e r " w a s u s e d . In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in w h i c h s o m e
l a t e - s h i f t h o u r s a r e p a id at n o r m a l r a t e s , a d i f f e r e n t i a l w a s r e c o r d e d
o n l y if it a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y o f the s h ift h o u r s .

T h e s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s ( ta b le B - 3 ) o f a m a j o r i t y o f the
f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s in an e s t a b l i s h m e n t a r e t a b u la t e d a s a p p l y i n g to
a l l o f the p la n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s o f th at e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
S cheduled
w e e k l y h o u rs a re t h o s e w h ich f u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s w e r e e x p e c te d to
w o r k , w h e t h e r t h e y w e r e p a i d f o r at s t r a i g h t - t i m e o r o v e r t i m e r a t e s .

P a i d h o l i d a y s ; p a i d v a c a t i o n s ; h e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n
p la n s ;
and f r e q u e n c y o f w a g e p a y m e n t ( t a b l e s B - 4 t h r o u g h B - 7 )
a r e t r e a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l l y o n th e b a s i s th at t h e s e a r e a p p l i c a b l e t o a ll
pla n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s if a m a j o r i t y o f s u c h w o r k e r s a r e e l i g i b l e o r
m a y e v e n t u a l l y q u a l i f y f o r th e p r a c t i c e s l i s t e d .
S u m s o f i n d iv id u a l
i t e m s in t a b l e s B - 2 t h r o u g h B - 7 m a y not e q u a l t o t a l s b e c a u s e o f
rou nding.

D a ta o n p a i d h o l i d a y s ( t a b le B - 4 ) a r e l i m i t e d t o da ta o n h o l i ­
d a y s g r a n t e d a n n u a l l y o n a f o r m a l b a s i s ; i . e . , (1) a r e p r o v i d e d f o r
in w r i t t e n f o r m , o r (2) h a v e b e e n e s t a b l i s h e d b y c u s t o m .
H olidays
o r d i n a r i l y g r a n t e d a r e i n c l u d e d e v e n t h o u g h t h e y m a y f a l l on a n o n ­
w o r k d a y and th e w o r k e r is not g r a n t e d a n o t h e r d a y o f f .
The fir s t

p a r t o f th e p a i d h o l i d a y s t a b l e p r e s e n t s th e n u m b e r o f w h o l e and h a lf
h o l i d a y s a c t u a l l y g r a n t e d . T h e s e c o n d p a r t c o m b i n e s w h o l e and h a lf
h olid a y s to show total h o lid a y t i m e .
T h e s u m m a r y o f v a c a t i o n p l a n s ( ta b le B - 5 ) i s l i m i t e d t o a
statistical m e a s u re of v a ca tion p r o v is io n s .
It is n o t i n t e n d e d a s a
m e a s u r e o f th e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s a c t u a l l y r e c e i v i n g s p e c i f i c b e n e ­
f i t s . P r o v i s i o n s o f a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t f o r a ll l e n g t h s o f s e r v i c e w e r e
t a b u l a t e d a s a p p l y i n g t o a ll p la n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s o f th e e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t, r e g a r d l e s s o f length o f s e r v i c e .
P r o v i s i o n s f o r p a y m e n t on
o t h e r th a n a t i m e b a s i s w e r e c o n v e r t e d to a t i m e b a s i s ; f o r e x a m p l e ,
a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t o f a n n u a l e a r n i n g s w a s c o n s i d e r e d as the e q u i v ­
a le n t o f 1 w e e k ' s p a y . E s t i m a t e s e x c l u d e v a c a t i o n - s a v i n g s p la n s and
th ose w hich o ffe r "e x te n d e d " or " s a b b a tic a l" b enefits beyond b a s ic
p l a n s t o w o r k e r s w ith q u a l i f y i n g l e n g t h s o f s e r v i c e .
T y p ic a l of such
e x c l u s i o n s a r e p l a n s in th e s t e e l , a l u m i n u m , and c a n i n d u s t r i e s .

D a ta o n h e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n p la n s ( t a b le B - 6 ) i n ­
c l u d e t h o s e p l a n s f o r w h i c h th e e m p l o y e r p a y s at l e a s t a p a r t o f the
c o s t . S u ch p la n s i n c l u d e t h o s e u n d e r w r i t t e n b y a c o m m e r c i a l i n s u r a n c e
c o m p a n y and t h o s e p r o v i d e d t h r o u g h a u n io n fu n d o r p a i d d i r e c t l y b y
th e e m p l o y e r out o f c u r r e n t o p e r a t i n g f u n d s o r f r o m a fund s e t a s i d e
f o r t h is p u r p o s e .
A n e s t a b l i s h m e n t w a s c o n s i d e r e d to h a v e a p la n
i f th e m a j o r i t y o f e m p l o y e e s w a s e l i g i b l e t o b e c o v e r e d u n d e r the
p l a n , e v e n if l e s s th a n a m a j o r i t y e l e c t e d t o p a r t i c i p a t e b e c a u s e e m ­
p l o y e e s w e r e r e q u i r e d t o c o n t r i b u t e t o w a r d th e c o s t o f the p la n .
Le­
g a l l y r e q u i r e d p l a n s , s u c h as w o r k m e n ' s c o m p e n s a t i o n , s o c i a l s e ­
c u r i t y , and r a i l r o a d r e t i r e m e n t w e r e e x c l u d e d .

S i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e is l i m i t e d t o that t y p e o f
in su ra n ce under w hich p r e d e te r m in e d cash paym ents are m ade d ir e ctly
t o the i n s u r e d d u r i n g i l l n e s s o r a c c i d e n t d i s a b i l i t y .
I n f o r m a t i o n is
p r e s e n t e d f o r a ll s u c h p la n s t o w h i c h th e e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t e s .
H ow­
e v e r , in N e w Y o r k a nd N e w J e r s e y , w h i c h h a v e e n a c t e d t e m p o r a r y
d i s a b i l i t y i n s u r a n c e l a w s w h i c h r e q u i r e e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t i o n s , 3 p la n s
a r e i n c l u d e d o n l y if th e e m p l o y e r (1) c o n t r i b u t e s m o r e th an is l e g a l l y
r e q u i r e d , o r (2) p r o v i d e s the e m p l o y e e w it h b e n e f i t s w h i c h e x c e e d the
r e q u i r e m e n t s o f the l a w .
T a b u l a t i o n s o f p a i d s i c k l e a v e p la n s a r e
l i m i t e d t o f o r m a l p l a n s 4 w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y o r a p r o p o r t i o n o f the
w o r k e r 's pay du rin g a b s e n c e f r o m w o r k b e c a u s e of i lln e s s .
Separate
t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r e s e n t e d a c c o r d i n g t o (1) p l a n s w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y
and no w a i t i n g p e r i o d , and (2) p la n s w h i c h p r o v i d e e i t h e r p a r t i a l p a y
o r a w a i t i n g p e r i o d . In a d d i t i o n t o t h e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f th e p r o p o r t i o n s
o f w o r k e r s w h o a r e p r o v i d e d s i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e o r p a id
s i c k l e a v e , an u n d u p l i c a t e d t o t a l is s h o w n o f w o r k e r s w h o r e c e i v e
e ith e r o r both ty p e s o f b e n e fit s .

2
An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met either of the following con­
The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island do not require employer
ditions: (1) Operated late shifts at the time of the survey, or (2) had formal provisions covering
contributions.
late shifts. An establishment was considered as having formal provisions if it (1) had operated late
An establishment was considered as having a formal plan if it established at least the
shifts during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2) had provisions in written form for operating
minimum number of days of sick leave available to each employee. Such a plan need not be
late shifts.
written, but informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, were excluded.




3

M a j o r m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e i n c l u d e s t h o s e p la n s w h i c h a r e d e ­
s i g n e d to p r o t e c t e m p l o y e e s in c a s e o f s i c k n e s s and i n j u r y i n v o l v i n g
e x p e n s e s b e y o n d the c o v e r a g e o f b a s i c h o s p i t a l i z a t i o n , m e d i c a l , and
s u r g ic a l plan s.
M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e r e f e r s to p la n s p r o v i d i n g f o r c o m ­
p le t e o r p a r t i a l p a y m e n t o f d o c t o r s ' f e e s .
S u ch p la n s m a y b e u n d e r ­
w ritten by c o m m e r c i a l in su ra n ce co m p a n ie s o r n on profit o rg a n iza tion s
o r t h e y m a y b e p a id f o r b y the e m p l o y e r out o f a fun d s e t a s i d e f o r
th is p u r p o s e .
T a b u l a t i o n s o f r e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n p la n s a r e l i m i t e d to
t h o s e p la n s that p r o v i d e r e g u l a r p a y m e n t s f o r the r e m a i n d e r o f the
w o r k e r 1s l i f e .
M e t h o d o f w a g e d e t e r m i n a t i o n ( ta b le B - 7 ) r e l a t e s t o b a s i c
t y p e s o f r a t e s t r u c t u r e f o r w o r k e r s p a i d u n d e r v a r i o u s t i m e and i n ­
cen tive s y s te m s .
U n d e r a s i n g l e r a t e s t r u c t u r e th e s a m e r a t e is p a i d
t o a l l e x p e r i e n c e d w o r k e r s in th e s a m e j o b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . A n i n d i v i d ­
ual w o r k e r o c c a s i o n a l l y m a y b e pa id a b o v e o r b e l o w th e s i n g l e r a t e




f o r s p e c i a l r e a s o n s , but s u c h p a y m e n t s a r e e x c e p t i o n s . A r a n g e - o f r a t e s p l a n s p e c i f i e s th e m i n i m u m a n d / o r m a x i m u m r a t e p a i d e x p e r i ­
e n c e d w o r k e r s f o r the s a m e j o b . I n f o r m a t i o n a l s o i s p r o v i d e d o n the
m e t h o d o f p r o g r e s s i o n t h r o u g h th e r a n g e . In the a b s e n c e o f a f o r m a l
r a t e s t r u c t u r e , th e q u a l i f i c a t i o n s o f the i n d i v i d u a l w o r k e r d e t e r m i n e
the p a y r a t e . I n f o r m a t i o n on t y p e s o f i n c e n t i v e p la n s is p r o v i d e d o n l y
f o r p la n t w o r k e r s b e c a u s e o f the l o w i n c i d e n c e o f s u c h p la n s f o r o f f i c e
w orkers.
U n d e r a p i e c e w o r k s y s t e m , a p r e d e t e r m i n e d r a t e is p a id
f o r e a c h unit o f o utp ut. P r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e b a s e d o n p r o d u c t i o n
o v e r a q u o t a o r c o m p l e t i o n o f a j o b in l d s s than s t a n d a r d t i m e .
Com ­
p e n sa tio n on a c o m m i s s i o n b a s is r e p r e s e n t s p a y m en ts b a s e d on a
p e r c e n t a g e o f valu e of s a l e s , o r on a c o m b in a tio n o f a stated s a la r y
p lu s a p e r c e n t a g e .
D a ta
table B - 7 .

on

frequen cy

of

wage

paym ent

a lso

are

p rovid ed

in

4

Table 1.

Establishments and W orkers Within Scope of Survey and Number Studied in Atlanta, Ga. , 1 by M ajor Industry D iv isio n ,2 May 1970
Number of establishments
Minimum
employment
in establish­
ments in scope
o f study

Industry division

W orkers in establishments
Within scope of study

Within scope
of study2

Studied

T o ta l4

Studied

Plant
Number

Office

Percent

T otal4

A ll establishm ents
A ll divisions—

-

- -

— —— .. _
——
—

Manufacturing
- _
—
__
— _______
Nonmanufacturing_______________________________
Transportation, com m unication, and
other public utilities 5 _____________________
W holesale tra d e_____ _________ __________
Retail trade— _____________________________
Finance, insurance, and real esta te-----------S ervices 7 ------------------------------------------ _

_

1,224

257

304,974

100

180, 335

65, 214

177,086

50
-

369
855

76
181

113,392
191,582

37
63

79,353
100, 982

14,358
50, 856

70, 391
106, 695

50
50
50
50
50

98
226
233
128
170

33
37
41
31
39

50, 079
30, 251
57,468
26, 912
26, 872

16
10
19
9
9

27,417
13,864
43, 132
6 1,067
(8)

9,607
9,600
8, 488
18,068
(8)

39,353
8,961
32, 590
14,316
11,475

Large establishm ents
A ll di vi s ion s— — — ___ _________ ______
—
Manufacturing___________________________________
Nonmanufacturing
- ____
Transportation, com m unication, and
other public u tilitie s 5 - _
_ —
W holesale tra d e_________—
_ — ---Retail trade__
- __ Finance, insurance, and real esta te_______
S e r v ic e s 7
_ ---— — —
- — -

-

500
-

500
500
500
500
500

74

63

149, 131

100

89,220

31,554

139,953

24
50

19
44

62, 275
86,856

42
58

42, 805
46, 415

7,924
23,630

58,335
81,618

18
3
17
8
4

16
3
13
8
4

36,936
2, 934
31,703
9, 935
5, 348

25
2
21
7
3

19,862
604
22, 884
-

(8)

7,
1,
5,
7,

773
370
844
520
(8)

35, 666
2, 934
27,735
9,935
5, 348

1 The Atlanta Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea, as defined by the Bureau of the Budget through January 1968, con sists of Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett Counties.
The "w ork ers within scope of study" estim ates shown in this table provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and com position of the labor fo rce included in the survey. The estim ates
are not intended, how ever, to serve as a basis of com parison with other employment indexes fo r the area to m easure employm ent trends or levels since (l) planning of wage surveys requires
the use of establishm ent data com piled con siderably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) sm all establishm ents are excluded from the scope of the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual was used in classifying establishm ents by industry division.
3 Includes all establishm ents with total em ploym ent at or above the minimum limitation. A ll outlets (within the area) of com panies in such industries as trade, finance, auto repair serv ice ,
and m otion picture theaters are con sidered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes executive, p rofession a l, and other w orkers excluded from the separate plant and o ffice categories.
5 Taxicabs and serv ices incidental to water transportation w ere excluded.
6 Estimate relates to real estate establishm ents only. W orkers from the entire industry division are represented in the S eries A tables, but from the rea l estate portion only in "a ll
industry" estim ates in the S eries B tables.
7 Hotels and m otels; la u n d rirj and other personal s e rv ice s ; business s e rv ice s ; automobile repair, rental, and parking; m otion pictu res; nonprofit m em bership organizations (excluding religious
and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectural se rv ice s.
8 This industry division is represented in estim ates fo r "a ll industries" and "nonm anufacturing" in the S eries A tables, and for " a ll industries" in the S eries B tables. Separate presentation
of data for this division is not made for one or m ore of the following reasons: (1) Employment in the division is too sm all to provide enough data to m erit separate study, (2) the sample was not
designed initially to perm it separate presentation, (3) response was insufficient or inadequate to perm it separate presentation, and (4) there is p ossib ility of d isclo su re of individual establishm ent data.




About tw o-fifths of the w orkers within scope of the survey in the Atlanta area were
em ployed in manufacturing firm s. The following presents the m ajor industry groups and
s p ecific industries as a percent of all manufacturing:
S pecific industries
A ircra ft and p a rts 24
M otor veh icles and
equipment------------------------------- 12
-

Industry groups
Transportation equipment-------- 36
Food and kindred p ro d u cts— - 11
—
A pparel and other textile
p ro d u cts---------------------------------- 7
P aper and allied p rod u cts------— 6
Printing and publishing__________ 6
Textile m ill p ro d u cts___——-------- 6

This inform ation is based on estim ates of total employment derived from universe
m aterials com piled p rio r to actual survey. P roportions in various industry divisions may
differ from proportions based on the results of the survey as shown in table 1 above.

Wage Trends for Se
P r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 2 a r e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e
in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s ,
and i n a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .
The in dexes
a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g i v e n t i m e , e x p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t o f
w a g e s d u r i n g th e b a s e p e r i o d . S u b t r a c t i n g 100 f r o m th e i n d e x y i e l d s
the p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e in w a g e s f r o m th e b a s e p e r i o d t o the date o f the
i n d e x . T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e o r i n c r e a s e r e l a t e to w a g e c h a n g e s
b e t w e e n th e i n d i c a t e d d a t e s . T h e s e e s t i m a t e s a r e m e a s u r e s o f c h a n g e
i n a v e r a g e s f o r th e a r e a ; t h e y a r e not i n t e n d e d to m e a s u r e a v e r a g e
p a y c h a n g e s i n the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in th e a r e a .

Occupational Groups
F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s a n d i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , the w a g e
t r e n d s r e l a t e to r e g u l a r w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r the n o r m a l w o r k w e e k ,
e x clu s iv e of earn ings fo r o v e r t im e .
F o r pla n t w o r k e r g r o u p s , th e y
m e a s u r e c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c l u d i n g
p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
la te s h i f t s .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s a r e b a s e d o n data f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u ­
p a t i o n s a nd i n c l u d e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t j o b s w ith in
each group.

L im itations

o f Data

M ethod o f C om puting
E a c h o f the s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t i o n s w it h in an o c c u p a t i o n a l
g r o u p was a s sig n e d a con sta n t w eigh t b a s e d on its p r o p o r t io n a te e m ­
p l o y m e n t i n the o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p . T h e a v e r a g e ( m e a n ) e a r n i n g s f o r
e a c h o c c u p a t i o n w e r e m u l t i p l i e d b y th e o c c u p a t i o n a l w e i g h t , and the
p r o d u c t s f o r all o c c u p a t i o n s in th e g r o u p w e r e t o t a l e d . T h e a g g r e g a t e s
f o r 2 c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s w e r e r e l a t e d b y d i v i d i n g th e a g g r e g a t e f o r
the l a t e r y e a r b y th e a g g r e g a t e f o r the e a r l i e r y e a r .
The resultant
r e l a t i v e , l e s s 100 p e r c e n t , s h o w s the p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e .
The in dex
i s the p r o d u c t o f m u l t i p l y i n g the b a s e y e a r r e l a t i v e (100) b y the r e l a t i v e
f o r the n e x t s u c c e e d i n g y e a r and c o n t i n u i n g to m u l t i p l y ( c o m p o u n d )
e a c h y e a r ' s r e l a t i v e b y th e p r e v i o u s y e a r ' s i n d e x . A v e r a g e e a r n i n g s
f o r the f o l l o w i n g o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e u s e d in c o m p u t i n g the w a g e t r e n d s :
Office clerical (men and women): Office clerical (men and women)— Skilled maintenance (men):
Bookkeeping-machine
Continued
Carpenters
operators, class B
Secretaries
Electricians
Cleiks, accounting, classes
Stenographers, general
Machinists
A and B
Stenographers, senior
Mechanics
Cleiks, file, classes
Switchboard operators, classes
Mechanics (automotive)
A , B, and C
A and B
Painters
Cleiks, order
Tabulating-machine operators,
Pipefitters
Cleiks, payroll
class B
Tool and die makers
Comptometer operators
Typists, classes A and B
Keypunch operators, classes
Unskilled plant (men):
A and B
Industrial nurses (men and women):
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Office boys and girls
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Laborers, material handling




The in d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f ch a n g e , a s m e a s u r e s of
c h a n g e in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e i n f l u e n c e d b y :
(1) g e n e r a l s a l a r y and
w a g e c h a n g e s , (2) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y i n d i ­
v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h i l e in the s a m e j o b , a nd (3) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e
w a g e s due to c h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e r e s u l t i n g f r o m l a b o r t u r n ­
o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , a n d c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r ­
t i o n s o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith d i f f e r e n t p a y l e v e l s .
C h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in the
o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s w ith o u t a c t u a l w a g e c h a n g e s .
It i s c o n c e i v a b l e
that e v e n t h o u g h a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in a n a r e a g a v e w a g e i n c r e a s e s ,
a v e r a g e w a g e s m a y have d e c lin e d b e c a u s e lo w e r - p a y in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts
e n t e r e d the a r e a o r e x p a n d e d t h e i r w o r k f o r c e s .
S im ila rly, wages
m a y h a v e r e m a i n e d r e l a t i v e l y c o n s t a n t , y e t th e a v e r a g e s f o r a n a r e a
m a y have r i s e n c o n s i d e r a b l y b e c a u s e h ig h e r -p a y in g e s t a b lis h m e n t s
e n t e r e d th e a r e a .

T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s the e f f e c t
o f c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h j o b i n ­
c l u d e d in the d a t a .
The p e r c e n t a g e s o f ch a n ge r e f l e c t on ly ch a n g es
in a v e r a g e p a y f o r s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r s .
T h e y a r e not i n f l u e n c e d b y
c h a n g e s in s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , a s s u c h , o r b y p r e m i u m pay
for overtim e.
W h e r e n e c e s s a r y , data w e r e a d j u s t e d to r e m o v e f r o m
the i n d e x e s a n d p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e a n y s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d
b y c h a n g e s in the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .

6

T a b l e 2. I n d e x e s o f S t a n d a r d W e e k l y S a l a r i e s a nd S t r a i g h t - T i m e H o u r l y E a r n i n g s f o r S e l e c t e d O c c u p a t i o n a l G r o u p s in A t l a n t a , G a . , M a y 1970
a n d M a y 19 6 9, a n d P e r c e n t s o f I n c r e a s e f o r S e l e c t e d P e r i o d s
A ll in du stries
P eriod

O ffice
clerical
( m e n and
w om en)

In dustrial
nurses
( m e n and
w om en)

Skilled
m a in ten ance
trades
(men)

M anufacturing
U n skilled
p la n t
w orkers
(men)

O ffice
clerica l
( m e n and
w om en)

In du strial
nurses
( m e n and
women)

Skilled
m ain ten ance
trades
(men)

U n skilled
p la n t
w orkers
(men)

124.1
1 1 8 .6

1 1 9 .7
112.7

123.7
1 1 2 .6

1 5 7 .0
1 2 6 .5

149.3
1 2 4 .7

157.8
1 2 7 .6

4 .7
11.1
6.7
4 .5
3 .0
4.4
3 2
2.8
6 .0
1.5

6.2
5.5
6.8
5.2
3.2
4 .6
2.8
3.3
3.5
3.3

9.9
5.6
6.6
7.1
2.3
6.5
1.3
.3
7.6
4.1

I n d e x e s ( M a y 1967 = 100)
M a y 197Q________________
M a y 1 9 6 9 .....................................................................

118.1
1 1 0 .7

1 2 6 .0
1 1 6 .5

1 2 2 .4
1 1 3 .0

1 2 4 .5
1 1 5 .2

1 1 6 .4
110.1

I n d e x e s ( M a y 1961 = 100)
M a y 1 9 7 0 ......................... ............................................
M a y 1 9 6 7 ____ ___ ____ ______ _____________

149.9
126.9

1 6 0 .5
1 2 7 .4

154.1
125.9

1 5 8 .0
126.9

1 4 5 .6
125.1

P ercen ts of in crea se
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
May
M ay
M ay
M ay
June

1969
1968
1967
1966
1965
1964
1963
1962
1961
1960

to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to

M ay
May
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
M ay
May
M ay




1 9 7 0 ---------------------------------1 9 6 9 ______________________
1 9 6 8 ______________________
1 9 6 7 --------------------------------1 9 6 6 ______________________
1 9 6 5 ______________________
1 9 6 4 ______________________
1963 ................................ .....
1962 ____________________
19 61_--------------------------------

6.7
5.5
5.0
5.7
4.3
4 .3
2.9
4.2
3.1
3.7

8 .2
10.2
5.8
4 .3
3.1
4 .7
4.9
3.0
4 .7
1.1

8.3
5.3
7.3
4.6
3 .6
4 .6
3 .5
3.0
4.1
3.6

8.1
4 .9
9 .8
8.7
.9
4.7
1.5
2.3
6 .4
2.7

5.7
5.8
4.1
5.3
3 .4
4 .0
2.7
3.1
4 .4
2.9

N O T E : P r e v i o u s l y p u b l i s h e d i n d e x e s f o r the A t la n t a a r e a u s e d M a y 1961 as th e b a s e p e r i o d . T h e y
c a n b e . c o n v e r t e d t o th e n e w b a s e p e r i o d b y d iv i d i n g t h e m b y th e c o r r e s p o n d i n g i n d e x n u m b e r s f o r M a y
1967 o n th e M a y 1961 b a s e p e r i o d a s s h o w n in th e t a b l e .
( T h e r e s u l t s h o u l d b e m u l t i p l i e d b y 100.)

7
A.

Occupational Earnings

Table A -l.

Office Occupations—Men and Women

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1970)
Weekly earnings *
(
standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

T i
T

weekly
(standard)

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly ea rnings of—
$

Me“ 2

Median 2

Middle range 2

s
65 -

S

65
and
under

70

$

$
75

$
80

$

i

85

90

t
95

$
100

$

$
105

110

$
115

$

$

$
120

130

140

S
150

$
160

s

$

i

170

180

190

200
and

75

80

85

90

95

-

-

-

-

-

-

i
-

100

105

no

115

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

2

5
2
3

-

6

6

7
1
6

18
2
16

63
18
45

i
i

8

34

60
2
58
14
28

65
2
63
8
40

37
7
30
4
26

49
16
33
1
24

29
15
14
3
11

14
7
7
1
6

8
2
6
6

2

70

30
16
1
15

45
42
10
20

35
35
14
20

18
18
11
7

5
5

6
6

-

i

-

-

5

11
10
6
4

over

M
EN
CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC UTI LIT IE S3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------

371
74
297
44
181

40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0

$
145.50
153.00
144.00
159.50
145.50

$
143.00
161.00
141.50
149.50
144.00

$
$
129.00-163.50
128.00-173.00
129.00-157.50
137.50-191.50
130.00-159.00

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U TI LIT IE S3 --------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------

264
234
51
145

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.5

121.50
123.00
133.00
120.00

118.00
120.00
135.50
115.00

108.50-133.00
109.00-135.50
122.50-143.00
108.00-131.00

CLERKS, ORDER --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------

354
51
303
279

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

126.50
136.00
125.00
124.00

126.50
128.50
126.00
122.50

108.00-150.00
110.00-158.50
106.00-146.00
104.50-143.50

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

OFFICE BOYS ------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC UTI LIT IE S3 --------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE4----------------------------------------------

381
69
312
43
109
93

39.0
90.50 88.00
39.5
94.50 93.50
39.0 90.00
87.00
39.0 108.50 103.50
40.0
86. 50 84.00
37.5
85.50 87.00

82.00- 99.00
86.50- 99.50
81.50- 98.50
88.50-129.00
81.00- 97.50
80.00- 91.50

_

_

“

~

16
16
2
12

41
41
13
12

_

_

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

70
54

39.5 155.00 148.50 142.50-171.50
39.0 148.00 146.50 140.50-151.00

_

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

177
167

40.0 123.00 121.00 111.00-134.50
40.0 120.00 119.50 110.50-132.50

_

_

-

-

TYPISTS, CLASS B -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC UTI LIT IE S3---------------------------

81
80
80

35.5 124.50 130.50 107.50-140.00
35.5 124.50 130.50 107.50-140.50
35.5 124.50 130.50 107.50-140.50

_

_

-

-

BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MACHI NE )-------------------------------------------------- —
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

85
76

40.0 100.00
99.00
40.0

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) ----------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

85
53

39.5
39.5

-

-

2
2

-

i
-

-

-

_

_

-

2
2
2
56

98
15
83
3
53

9

9

47
11
4
32

.

_

2

-

-

-

-

-

7

7
6

i
-

46
42

4

38

33
33
4
22

30
30
30

5
5
5

40
4
36
36

21
9
12
12

34
34
34

18
3
15
15

53
12
41
41

39
~
39
27

24
4
20
20

43
8
35
23

19
2
17
17

24
7
17
17

i

i

-

i
-

i
“

-

47
15
32
3
10
18

38
15
23
3
3

41
2
39
3
27
5

14
5

8

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

8
8
-

7

-

6
6
5

7
6

8
8

1
1

-

-

-

—
-

-

-

“

i

~

1

~

~

_

_

_

_

_

_

“

“

~

8
8

5
5

27
27

6
6

3
2

14
2

~

i
i
-

17
10

-

~

~

_

-

14
14
4
9

-

-

1

i

~

~

”

"
1

3
3

3
1

1
1

i
1

5
5

9
9

i
i

7
7

17
17

16
16

29
29

31
31

32
32

11
11

8
5

2
1

6
i

i
“

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2
2
2

-

-

18
18
18

_

-

22
22
22

_

-

36
36
36

1

-

2
2

2
2

4
4

2

*

'

6
6

12
10

_

3

8
7

1
1

22
20

3
1

4

23
10
13
2

18
10
8
i

23

15

11
6

“

W EN
OM

97.00
96.50

87.00-104.00
85.00-104.00

97.00 101.00
95.50 100.50

83.00-109.00
81.00-113.00

_

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

120
110

39.5 107.00 102.00
39.5 106.00 101.50

97.50-120.50
97.50-116.00

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------

255
113
142
53

40.0 101.00 101.00
40.0 99.50 100.50
39.5 102.50 102.00
40.0 108.00 115.50

92.50-111.50
95.00-107.00
91.50-116.00
97.50-120.00

footnotes at end of table.




”

20
20

”
2
2

7
7

2
2

_

_

_

_

“

~

~

~

2
2

2
2
-

6

”

_
-

-

4
2

4
~

14
14

14
14

15
13

2
i

17
10

2
2

5
i

5
2

12
11

15

I
1

i
i

9
7

39
39

27
25

6
1

22

4

48
15

33
26

18

33

7

45
28
17

12

3

7

5

“

3

2

_

4

19
16

15
12

5

6
6

2

_

-

_

_

-

-

_

4

2
1

_

_

-

i

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

i
i
-

-

_

-

8
Table A -l.

Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1970)
Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly ea rnings of—
$

weekly
(standard)

Mean2

Median L

Middle range 2

s

65

S

$
70

$

s
75

80

85

S

S
90

95

100

$

105

$

$
110

S

$
120

130

s

$
140

150

$
160

$

170

$

180

190

and
under

65

$

200

and
130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

over

52
133
10
22
111
42
28
8
37
18
29
13
11

100
36
64
3
25
16
11

84
6
78
37
21
4
7

65
16
49
23
22
2

26
20
6
3
3
-

39
13
26
20
6
-

15
8
7
3

4
i
3
3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

240
33
207
77
95
10
22

95
13
82
29
31
10
7

164
27
137
26
90
3
2

130
1
129
51
45
32
“

52
11
41
25
16
~

16
3
13
4
9
-

4
3
i
i
-

i
i
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3
2
2

1
1
1

2
2
1

5
2
-

i
1
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2

1
1
-

17
17
-

_
-

2
~
2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

3
3

-

6
6

_

-

-

-

-

70
W
OMEN -

$
115

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

-

-

-

-

1
i

5
5

47
18
29

59
5
54

80
20
60

53
7
46

47
17
30

-

-

“

-

i

4
~

21
8

2
30
19

14
20
25

17
14
13

17
5

-

1
1

40
2
38

141
13
128
17
36
21
34

367
55
312
108
33
99
54

317
81
236
32
46
58
65

258
44
214
15
66
41
80

301
45
256
13
95
68
61

188
59
129
26
51
15
28

120

CONTINUED

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U TI LIT IE S3 --------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

810
199
611
121
162
179
112

39.5
39.5
39.5
38.5
40.0
40.5
37.5

$
126.50
131.50
124.50
146.50
129.50
111.00
112.50

$
123.50
130.50
122.50
144.50
128.00
110.00
106.50

$
$
106.00-143.00
110.00-154.00
105.50-141.50
124.50-157.50
115.50-145.50
98.00-123.50
100.00-124.50

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U TI LIT IE S3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

2, 340
397
1,943
424
614
384
376

39.0
39.5
39.0
38.5
40.0
40.0
37.5

102.50
102.00
102.50
108.50
109.50
95.50
95.00

100.50
100.00
100.50
110.00
108.00
94.00
96.00

90.00-112.50
91.50-109.50
90.00-113.00
89.00-120.50
98.00-121.00
87.50-103.00
88.50-102.00

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS A --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

151
144
54

38.5
38.5
38.0

96.00
95.00
95.50

94.50
94.00
94.00

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS B --------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S 3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

764
93
671
51
112
338

38.5
39.5
38.5
38.5
40.0
37.5

CLERKS, FIL E, CLASS C --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------FINANCE4 -----------------------------------------------

631
608
367

38.5
38.0
37.0

CLERKS, ORDER --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

-

1

3
7

-

-

-

“

25
6
19
14
i

89.00-100.00
88.00- 99.50
90.50- 99.50

_
-

*

7
7
-

7
7

16
16
6

10
10
6

42
42
19

32
31
11

12
11
5

7
7
3

6
5
-

85.50 83.50
97.50 91.50
83. 50 82.50
98.00 101.00
89.50
84.50
80.00
79.50

77.50- 91.50
87.00-104.00
76.50- 89.50
87.50-106.00
82.00- 89.50
72.50- 87.00

27
27
27

53
53
41

53
2
51
5
34

128
6
122
76

185
3
182
7
59
61

113
33
80
12
22
41

54
9
45
4
i
31

57
10
47
1
7
26

29
9
20
12
1
-

28
3
25
1
9
i

15
15

79.00
79.50
76.50

78.00
78.50
76.00

73.00- 84.00
73.00- 84.00
72.50- 80.00

-

29
29
15

206
192
152

134
128
108

137
137
59

73
71
9

11
10
9

8
8
7

6
6
6

18
18
2

398
133
265
130

39.5 102.00 103.50
39.5 103.00 100.50
39.5 102.00 104.50
39.5
92.50 93.00

89.00-110.00
87.50-115.00
93.50-109.00
80.50-104.00

9
2
7
7

21
2
19
19

14

-

9
4
5
5

14
14

53
43
10
10

18
1
17
17

37
12
25
12

55
15
40
19

CLERKS, PAYROLL ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC UT IL IT IE S 3--------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

468
189
279
55
88
53

39.5
40.0
39.5
38.5
39.5
39.5

-

-

6
6
-

4
4

16
6
10
-

2
2

2
2

47
18
29
2
24
2

52
38
14
2
10

82
44
38

-

24
6
18
11
3
3

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 3--------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

267
219
28
139

39.0 104.00 100.50
38.5 102.00 100.50
40.0 115.00 96.00
38.0 98.00
98.50

-

5
5
5

9
9
9

15
15
4

43
32
10
18

53
45
2
36

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

1,298
214
1,084
341
242
86
151

50
i
49
5
14
11
14

55
16
39
3
16
14
1

See footnotes at end of table.




39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
37.5

110.00
106.50
112.00
119.50
109.00
110.00

119.00
125.50
117.50
134.50
114.50
102.00
109.00

105.50
97.00-119.50
102.50
96.50-115.50
98.00-127.00
112.00
97.50-141.00
118.00
102.50
93.00-135.00
111.50 102.00-117.00

115.00
125.50
114.50
134.50
113.50
102.00
107.50

94.50-110.50
94.00-106.50
91.50-142.00
92.50-104.00
105.00-132.00
109.00-142.50
104.50-129.00
127.00-147.50
104.50-124.00
96.00-107.00
103.50-113.00

-

2
2
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

~

1
i
i

-

-

1
13
22

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
7
-

-

-

7

n
17
3
14
6
-

8

6

2
~
2

-

-

-

-

82
18

46
19
27
3

25
24
1
i

31
17
14
1
6
i

42
5
37
9
6
16

55
19
36
5
i
6

62
55
33

10
10

7
6

3

23
20
14

2 04
24
180
1
35
29
31

153
12
141
6
3i
8
59

161
29
132
3
38
11
15

-

7

12

82
-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

1
1
-

_

5
5

7
2
5
3

8
6
2

4
4

-

-

-

-

27
8
19
2
1
3

27
6
21
7
11
3

44
8
36
14
15
2

3
1
2
2

3
2
1

5
5
-

~
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

6
4
4
-

6
5
5
-

10
3
3
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

15
9
9

-

-

75
15
60
2
9
i
5

227
12
215
110
62
4
15

78
7
71
39
20

235
88
147
130
17
-

-

2
-

2
2

-

11

-

2
-

29

_

-

-

7
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29
29

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
Table A-l.

Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1970)
Weekly earnings 1

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
$
$
$
$
$

Average
weekly

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Middle range 2

(standard)

$

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

$

190

*
200

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

over

18

172
16
156
44
30
19
50

250
29
221
23
27
38
83

254
71
183
21
89
9
56

225
36
189
22
60
17
85

119
26
93
11
12
5
55

128
13
115
23
18
7
61

11
10
1
1

i
i
-

-

-

25
4
2
7
10

-

-

3
3

7
7
5

5
5
5

2
2

2
2

402
105
297
13
45
31
181

314
237
15
35
20
161

290
139
151
2
41
25
77

6

1

-

1

“

and
under

i

65

70

WOMEN -

$

70

6

Under

65

CONTINUED

$
KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC UT I L IT I E S 3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

1,411
262
l,14<i
165
313
14C
422

OFFICE GIRLS ----------------------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -------------------------------FINANCE4----------------------------------------------

$

$

$

39-5 101.50 99.00
39.5 108.50 101.00
99.50 98.50
39.0
38.5 99.50 98.00
40.0 102.00 99.50
39.5
96.50 93.50
39.0
99.50 100.50

92.00-108.00
96.00-114.50
91.50-107.00
89.50-110.00
95.00-109.50
87.50-104.00
92.50-107.50

211
174
82

39.0
38.5
38.5

82.00
82.50
79.00

82.50
82.50
75.50

76.00- 87.50
75.00- 88.00
71.00- 84.00

SECRETARIES5------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4----------------------------------------------

4,031
1, 376
2,655
369
614
32 8
1,127

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
38.5

126.00
128.00
125.00
149.50
130.50
122.50
114.00

123.50
125.50
123.00
147.00
132.00
122.00
111.50

109.00-140.50
112.50-149.00
107.00-138.00
129.50-163.50
116.00-142.50
110.00-136.00
102.00-126.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------------

231
101
130

39.0 142.00 136.50 127.00-151.00
39.5 137.00 132.50 126.00-147.00
39.0 146.00 137.00 130.00-163.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

762
206
556
98
120
52
239

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
38.0

136.50
139.00
135.50
157.00
142.00
124.00
126.00

133.00
136.50
131.50
158.00
136.00
130.00
126.00

122.00-147.00
124.50-147.50
120.50-147.00
137.00-176.50
125.00-160,00
104.50-138.00
117.50-136.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC UT I L IT I E S 3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4----------------------------------------------

1,519
571
948
103
242
134
400

39.5
39.5
39.5
38.5
39.5
40.5
39.0

129.50
136.50
125.00
147.00
132.00
129.50
113.00

128.50
145.00
124.00
147.50
136.00
126.00
113.50

115.00-150.00
122.00-152.50
109.50-139.00
136.00-160.00
114.50-144.00
117.50-144.00
102.50-124.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS D ------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC UT IL IT IE S 3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRAOE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

1,489
486
1,003
136
22 8
113
441

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.0
40.0
39.5
38.5

114.00
111.00
115.50
139.00
123.00
112.50
105.50

111.00
111.50
110.50
133.50
125.50
114.00
104.00

102.00-123.50
103.00-118.00
101.50-127.00
122.50-154.50
107.50-138.50
101.50-127.00
98.00-110.00

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 3--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------------------------

1,277
319
958
328
299

39.5
40.0
39.0
39.0
40.0
39.5
38.0

108.00
104.50
109.00
121.00
105.00
105.00
97.50

105.00
96.00-117.00
105.00 95.50-114.50
105.00 96.00-118.00
118.50 104.00-137.50
95.00-109.50
101.50
105.50 100.00-114.00
91.00-105.50
97.50

See footnotes at end of table.




lO i

145

-

1

3

-

-

1

3

-

-

1

1
2

2
2
6

59
7
52
4
17
22
7

15
15
15

31
30
26

21
18
5

67
46
21

42
35
5

13
11

19
6
13

3
-

8
3

95
18

3

5

47
6
41

-

-

-

2

3

l
-

-

3
-

I
-

_

9

-

-

-

-

“

9

4
9

_

-

-

9

17

*

77

-

-

2

4
34

6
60

_

-

-

7

183
60
123
1
20
12
86
_

_

_

-

_

_

_

1

-

-

~
-

-

-

-

3
2

28

-

1

l

28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
13
10

-

-

1

1

-

-

9

-

-

6
6

1

-

-

9

-

1

~

-

-

-

-

-

7
4

3

42
6
36

27
4
23

77

25
-

5

-

-

1

12
2
10
3
7

176

12
2
10

63
47
16

57
10
47

32
25
7

17
12

18
2
16

5

9

2

-

5

9

2

180
52
128

158
46
112
3
19
15
48

106
38
68
19
18
5
21

45
12
33
6

46
10
36
19
15

29
8
21
15
4

12
7
5
3
1

10
2
8
1
7

16
4
12

-

-

262
97
165
15

9

30
46
129

17
6
48

29
5
27

5
27
55

22
32
78

133

186
108
78

4
18
10
98

12
19
40

139
71
68
3
11
11
26

216
67
149
30
54
19
15

117
17
100
34
36
15
13

81
25
56
23
14

102
39
63
31
16
14

94
13
81
61
17
1
1

3

31

22

67

-

-

-

-

3

52

2

5

2
38

193
60

13

40

151
54
97

-

-

-

2

3

-

-

-

2

4
31

—

i
-

6

-

-

i
-

5

172
65
107
21

-

-

i

i
-

5

41
13
28
5
~

8
a

92
18
74
29
30

2
13

55

14

40

2
6
28

20
8
64

248
85
163
13
26
5
104

154
44
110
16
46
4
29

160
32
128
21
58
13
30

190
54
136
14
53
25
19

42
14
14

-

29
13
16
8
3
1
3

198
43
155
18
71
20
44

8

-

-

61
18
43
25
11
3
3

150
50
100

-

-

~

“

-

-

126
18
108
50
24
11
20

84
23
61

1

-

418
275
143
52
43
18
11

88
14
74

2

-

—

“
-

-

339
103
2 36
60
93
26
42

727
269
458
54
109

120
20
100
7

-

~

533
119
414
55
143
60
123

381
137
244

15

-

_

-

1
10

13

i

_

~

9

-

-

6
2
5

3

3

-

4
9

~

~

32
29
11

_

-

10
8
2

76
14
62
2
9
4
46

-

-

12

51
36
15

-

20
8
12
1

2
-

84
8
76
12
50
10
2

i

109
14
95
42
14
20
17

6
5

9

33
4
77

5

6
6

-

—

-

7

2

2

312
250
62
19
19
10
3

47
3
44
23

22
10
12
2
7
2

65

41
1
40
24
16

9

~

~

135
34
101
24
42
14
11

-

6

59
13
33
7
6

9

10

2
-

-

16
10

23
23

3
3

-

-

-

-

—

-

1
1
-

-

9

-

-

-

9
9
~

~

16

23

3
~

-

4
-

9

-

9

33
1
32
29
3

-

-

9
3
6

”
-

5

6

2

l

-

-

8

6

35
8
27
22
3
1

3

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

~
~

-

-

'

-

10
Table A -l.

Office Occupations—Men and W omen— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1970)
Weekly earnings *
( standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly ea rnings of—
Under

(standard)

$

$

Average

Mean^

Median^

65

70

WOMEN -

$

$
75

80

$
85

$
90

$
95

$

$
100

105

$

S
110

115

$
12 0

$
130

S

140

$

s

150

160

$
17 0

*
1 80

$
190

200

and
75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

130

140

150

128

162

76

323

160

170

180

190

200

over

C ONTINUED
$
$
1 0 5 .5 0 -1 4 1 .5 0

$
STENOG RAPfiCR S f

$
70

and
under

$

Middle range^

65

S EN I OR

$

J?*0
3 9 .5

129*50
1 1 9.0 0

137*00
1 2 0.50

38*0

108*00

106*00

70

8 9* 0 0
1 1 6.00
9 1 .5 0
9 6 .5 0

85*50
1 18.50
8 8 .0 0
9 7 .0 0

1 00.00
1 0 0.0 0

9 8 .0 0
100.00

1 ,110

3 9 .5

13^
20 2
1^7

RETAIL TRADE

----------------------------------------------

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

580
1 60

0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .5

51
197
81

39*0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 7 .5

172

'0 0
3 7.5

1 3 2.0 0
9 8 .5 0
9 0 .0 0

5

5

82
W

1 0 9 .0 0 -1 2 7 .5 0

1 0 4 .0 0 -1 2 3 .5 0
8 4 .0 0 -1 0 5 .5 0
8 9 .5 0 -1 0 3 .0 0
9 0 .0 0 9 2 .0 0 -

i

10 6.0 0 110.50

138.00
9 8 .0 0
9 1 .0 0

-

2

2

6

-

-

13

28

51

4

24

^1
12
1
11

19

23
2
14

65

19

1

35

16

2
15

91

99

74

TO

3
37
13

2
39
19

^4
45

61

42

3?

33

'it

34
i

3

2
2

i

14

73

6

s

8
1

11
8

2
2

■

77

3
2

34
11

41
1

1^ 9

4
21

62

6

2
14
32

2
12
5

9 3 .0 0 -1 1 0 .5 0

15

34

9 1 .5 0 -1 0 4 .5 0

10

h8

12
1

126

5
3

39

1 1 1 .5 0 -1 5 6 .0 0
9 1 .5 0 -1 0 4 .0 0
8 3 .0 0 - 9 8 .0 0

107*00
9 8 .0 0

*

*

??

2

^0

i

37
1 11
61

2

i

1

97
25

43

g

^9

5
2
18
8

-

8

7

7

7

3
8

12

w

-

-

-

-

18
1

6

-

-

-

-

14

6

i

2

*

3

,

*

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
t

2
n

FINANCE

l

58
1<.3

n* '

iS J *

105*50
9 8 .0 0
l

r1
A

* n n i n i nn
■xn* * 1 0 1 * 5 0
30*' *
3 9 .5
3 0 .0

1 0 2.50
9 9 .0 0
7 7 .^ 0

2

*nn

100*00
100.50
9 9 .0 0
9 7 .0 0

.

8 8 .5 0 9 4 .5 0 -

7

11 4.5 0
1 03.00

J

2

*0
23

2
34

??

2

3 8 .5

9 0 .5 0

8 8 .0 0

8 2 .5 0 -

9 6 .0 0

60

95

277

226

172

992

3 8 .0

9 0 .5 0

8 8 .0 0

8 2 .0 0 -

9 6 .5 0

44

91

251

185

143

119

4 0 .0

9 7 .0 0

9 4 .5 0

8 7 .0 0 -1 0 5 .5 0

26

r ^0

3 7 .5

8 5 .0 0

8 4 .5 0

33

8**

169

27
1-3
1 K AU L

11^

44

A
r?

n o

98

2

51

36

48

36
LA
t4

£

1-5

1
8

42
1
41
^7
i

91

18
13

/ .fl

1,135

KL 1A 1L

49

19
_

42

9

34
13

8

6
2

7
i

10

2

2

3
1
2

2

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond
to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all workers and dividing by the number of workers. The median designates position— half of the employees surveyed receive more
than the rate shown; half receive less than the rate shown. The middle range is defined by 2 rates of pay; a fourth of the workers earn less than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn more than
the higher rate.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
4 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
5 May include workers other than those presented separately.




11

Table A-la.

Office Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, G a., May 1970)
Weekly e a r n i n g ^ ^ ^
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
t

Average
weekly
[standard)

Under
Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

$
70

$
70

$
75

$
80

$

1
85

90

95

$
100

i
105

$
11 0

$

$
115

120

12 5

13 0

135

*
140

150

$
160

*

$
170

180

and
under
75

19 0

and
80

85

90

95

10 0

105

110

115

120

1 25

13 0

135

1 AO

150

160

170

1 80

190

over

-

-

-

-

2
2

i
-

1
1

3
1
2
1

i
1

4
2
2

17
-

1

17
7

18
2
16
7

2A
2
22
8

25
7
18
4

2A
16
8
i

22
15
7
3

10
7
3
1

3
2
i
-

3
3

3
2

1
1

_
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

8
5

2
i

6
i

1
“

-

HE N
C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S A -------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3--------------------------------------

15 8
56
102
32

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

$
1 5 2.0 0
163.00
1A5.50
1A5.50

$
151.50
16A.50
1 A A .0 0
1A2.50

$
$
1 3 7 .0 0 -1 6 8 .0 0
1 5 5 .5 0 -1 7 6 .0 0
1 3 A .5 0 -1 5 6 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0 -1 5 3 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
2
1
-

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B -------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3--------------------------------------

133
123
35

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 23.00
12 3.5 0
1 3 0.00

121.50
122.00
13A.00

1 0 9 .5 0 -1 3 6 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0 -1 3 7 .5 0
1 2 1.5 0 — 1A2.00

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2

1
-

1
1

3
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8
4

21
19
1

12
12
1

13
11
1

18
17
6

6
4
i

12
12
5

11
11
5

18
18
11

O F F I C E B O Y S -------------------------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3--------------------------------------

103
81
37

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

9A.50
9 6 .5 0
1 1 1.00

8 8 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
112.00

8 2 .5 0 -1 0 3 .0 0
8 1 .5 0 -1 1 2 .0 0
8 9 .0 0 -1 3 2 .5 0

_
-

11
11
-

21
15
3

23
14
8

8
5

5
3
3

-

i
i
-

6
6
6

_
-

-

6
6
5

_
-

-

7
6
3

l
-

-

5
5
-

-

8
8
8

1
1
1

TA B U L A TIN G -M A C H IN E OPERATORS,
C L A S S B -------- — — — — — — — -------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------------

91
81

A O .O
AO. 0

12 8.0 0
12 3.0 0

127.00
12A.00

1 1 2 .5 0 -IA 3 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0 -1 3 9 .0 0

-

-

“

~

1
1

i
i

5
5

i
i

i
i

5
5

5
5

8
8

11
11

4
4

9
9

5
5

7
7

11
11

55

3 9 .0

9 8 .0 0

9 5 .0 0

8 8 .5 0 -1 0 8 .0 0

-

~

2

6

9

ii

6

3

9

3

3

-

-

i

i

1

~

-

-

-

-

All

132.00
1 5 3.0 0
1 2 7.0 0
1A5.00
1 0 9.00

13 1.0 0
1 60.50
12A.00
1 A A .0 0
1 08.00

1 1 2 .0 0 -1 5 1 .5 0
1A 5 .5 0 -1 7 3 .0 0
1 0 8 . 0 0 — 1A A . 00
1 2 4 .5 0 -1 5 4 .5 0
9 7 .0 0 -1 2 0 .0 0

_
-

_
-

_
-

i
-

4
-

21
-

2 1
3
18
1
14

20
2
18
3
12

5A
4
50
28
1A

IA
4
10
2

9
9
4

19
1
18
3
6

67
3
64
37
4

44
16
28
19
2

23
20
3
3
-

i
i
-

“

21
18

21
1
20
1A

8
8
-

*

A
4

11
2
9
7

36
13
23
20

-

i
i

37
2
35
27

_

3
-

28
2
26
-

178
5
1 73
1 08
56
5

92
10
82
32
39

63
9
54
13
29
9

55
10
45
22
15
6

102
7
95
77
4
4

44
7
37
21
10
2

15
1
14
2
i
i

20
20
20
-

32
1
31
27

38
10
28
25

6
3
3
2
-

4
3
i
i
~

1
i
-

4

66
7
59
11
35
7

31

13
12

52
1
51
17
21
7

7
7

7
7

9
9

5

28
28

16
15

5
4

5
5

6
5

-

1
1

-

5

1
1

30

71

76

44

9

5

14

16

1
1

_

_

i

3

-

-

13
1

-

-

"

2
i

i
i

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15
14
1A

6
6
6

10
10
10

18
18
18

3
3
3

i
i
i

1
1
1

i
i

_

_

2

-

-

_

-

i

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17
2
15

25
16
9
2

11
7
4

5
3
2
1

17
3
1A
7

8
2
6
3

7
2
5

i

7
1
6
i

8
2
6
6

13
2
11
8

3
i
2

i
-

5
5

i

-

-

—
-

-

-

WOMEN

BOOKKEEPIN G-M ACH INE OPERATORS,
C L A S S B ---------------------------------------------------------------------------C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S A -------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-------------------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E -------------------------------------------------

80
3 31
11A
129

3 9 .5
A O .O
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B -------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-------------------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------------------------------F I N A N C E 4----------------------------------------------------------------

830
77
753
402
22 7
59

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

1 0 3.5 0
1 1 2.50
1 0 2.50
1 0 8.00
9 3 .5 0
9 A .5 0

9 9 .5 0
1 07.50
9 8 .5 0
1 09.50
9 3 .0 0
9 5 .5 0

8 8 .5 0 -1 1 A .0 0
9 6 .0 0 -1 2 2 .5 0
8 8 . 0 0 — 11 A . 0 0
8 9 .0 0 -1 2 0 .5 0
8 7 .0 0 -1 0 1 .0 0
8 1 .5 0 -1 0 5 .0 0

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S A -------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------- -----------------------------------

98
91

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

9 6 .5 0
9 5 .0 0

9 4 .0 0
9 3 .0 0

8 7 .0 0 -1 0 2 .0 0
8 5 .0 0 - 9 9 .5 0

-----------------------

296

3 9 .5

8 6 .5 0

8 2 .5 0

7 7 .5 0 -

CLERKS,

F IL E ,

CLASS

B

8 9 .0 0

-

_

12

3
2
1

92

3 9 .5

8 0 .0 0

7 9 .5 0

7 5 .0 0 -

8 A.50

“

2A

26

23

12
15

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S C ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------------

15A
150

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

7 6 .0 0
7 5 .5 0

7A.OO
7A.00

7 1 .5 0 7 1 .5 0 -

8 0 .0 0
8 0 .0 0

17
17

77
76

21
21

25
25

8
6

C L E R K S , O R D E R ------------------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E -------------------------------------------------

113
106
106

A O .O
A O .O
A O .O

9 2 .0 0
9 0 .5 0
9 0 .5 0

9 0 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
9 0 .5 0

7 9 .0 0 -1 0 5 .0 0
7 9 .0 0 -1 0 A .0 0
7 9 .0 0 -1 0 A .0 0

5
5
5

7
7
7

21
19
19

11
11
11

10
10

C L E R K S , P A Y R O L L ------------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3--------------------------------------

159
52
107
A5

3 9 .0
A O .O
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1 1 0.00
1 1 1.5 0
1 0 9.0 0
1 1 6.5 0

10 3.0 0
10 2.0 0
10 7.5 0
11 5.0 0

9 2 .5 0 — 12A.50
9 6 .5 0 -1 2 2 .0 0
9 0 .5 0 -1 3 0 .0 0
9 1 .0 0 -1 3 9 .5 0

_

_

4

-

-

-

8
4
4

-

F I N A N C E 4 ---------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table.




4

n

19
2
17
11

2

i

-

31
2A
2
1

2

“

_

-

“

-

“

1
1

5
2

1
i

-

-

-

-

17

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

_

3
3

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

i

2

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

12
Table A-la.

Office Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1970)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of
workers

$

Average
weekly

$

$

$

WOMEN -

(standard)

T J
T
Under

$

M ean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

$

70

70
and
under

75

75

Sex, occupation, and industry division

80

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
$
*
$
85
90
95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130 135 140

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

190

150

160

170

-

5
5

6
6

11
n

19
16

32
32

22
19

4
4

18
17

4
3

8
7

3
2

3
1

3
3

6
5

2
-

7
7
-

17
19
8

19
18
11

29
22
19

71
67
29

56
50
8

64
63
11

25
29
1

30
26
3

108
108
1

-

13
12
-

215
127
-

29
29
~

83
7
76
44
19
13

105
4
101
17
17
25

81
12
69
10
9
I5

99
8
91
16
19
9

29
5
29
7
2
12

46
7
39
23
7
6

10

20
2
18
8
8
2

12
6
6
4
2

2
1
1

36
35
1

8
8

10
4
i
5

-

_

_

_

_

159
132

$
$
33.5 106.50 101.00
38.5 102.00 99.50

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A --------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------

729
601
86

39.5 125.50 127.00 108.50-193.00
39.5 123.00 125.50 107.00-191.50
40.0 102.00 102.00 96.0 0-1 0 7.0 0

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S S --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 ----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------F I N A N C E 4 ------------------------------

530
108
922
138
101
96

3 9.0 102.50 97.50 9 0.5 0-1 1 1.5 0
39.5 122.50 135.00 1 01.50-139.00
39.0 97.50 95.00 8 9.5 0-1 0 9.5 0
38.5 100.00 97.00 8 8 .5 0-1 1 1.5 0
40.0 96.50 93.50 86.5 0-1 0 9.0 0
39.5 97.00 95.50 9 0 .5 0-1 0 5.5 0

—

$
$
99.0 0-1 1 9.5 0
9 3.0 0-1 1 1.5 0

i
i
-

-

-

-

-

-

“
i

i

-

-

i

i

7
i
6

-

-

-

i
“

i
-

2
4

28
1
27
4
16
5

8
7

6
6

29
29

17
13

5
5

1
1

“

9
4

3
3

5
-

29
4
25

36
4
32

-

~

-

-

4

2
1

2

3

4
21

6
26

128
34
94
i
13
79

128
50
78

-

91
32
59
1
12
46

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

1
1

3

-

2
1

1
1

5
5

“

63
58

38.5
3 8.5

83.50
83.50

84.00
83.50

8 0 .5 0 - 88.00
8 0 .5 0 - 88.00

-

S E C R E T A R I E S 5 ---------------------------- —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------F I N A N C E 4 ------------------------------

1, 795
657
1,138
233
267
531

39.5
39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5

131.00
136.00
128.00
152.50
123.50
1 15.50

129.00
199.00
125.00
150.50
122.50
115.50

111.50-151.50
1 16.50-153.00
109.00-195.50
138.50-166.50
1 10.50-138.00
102.50-126.50

_

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S 8 ---------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-----------------F I N A N C E 4 ------------------------------

299
60
189
67
73

39.0
38.5
39.5
39.0
39.5

150.00
158.50
197.00
159.50
139.50

147.50
161.50
199.50
164.00
136.00

131.00-168.00
1 39.00-179.00
1 29.50-169.00
1 96.50-177.00
1 26.00-199.00

_
-

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C ---------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------F I N A N C E 4 -------------------------------

922
540
79
112
287

39. 5
39.5
38.5
4 0.0
39.5

135.00
127.50
149.50
131.50
116.00

139.00
125.00
149.00
129.00
116.50

1 19.00-152.50
1 12.50-199.00
1 90.50-162.00
118.50-197.50
105.50-129.50

-

-

i
i

_
-

7
3

7
7

22
18

-

*

1

-

3

7

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S D ---------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------F I N A N C E 4-------------------------------

562
359
60

112.50
113.50
139.50
112.00
103.00

111.00 101.00-122.00
111.50 9 9.0 0-1 2 7.0 0
138.00 131.00-153.50
113.50 101.00-125.50
101.50 9 5.5 0-1 0 9.0 0

22
22

28
29

-

-

158

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
90.0

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , G E N E R A L ---------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N Q N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-----------------F I N A N C E 4 ------------------------------

519
56
963
277
87

3 9.0
3 9.5
39.0
38.5
39.0

112.50
108.50
113.00
119.00
100.00

111.00 9 7 .5 0-1 2 6.5 0
108.00 9 3.5 0-1 2 9.0 0
111.00 9 8.5 0-1 2 7.5 0
117.00 109.00-136.50
101.00 9 2 .0 0-1 1 0.5 0

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , S E N I O R -----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-----------------

629
239
95

39.5 130.50 140.50 115.50-193.00
39.5 129.00 123.00 1 11.50-139.50
38.5 129.50 139.00 103.00-151.50

_

_

-

-

39.0 113.00 111.00

9 9.0 0-1 3 2.0 0

-

-

-

99.00 99.00 8 3.5 0-1 1 5.5 0
39.5
99.00 93.50 83.0 0-1 1 7.5 0
4 0 . 0 122.50 122.00 1 16.00-129.50

i
i

i
i

5

O F F I C E G I R L S -----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

no

A ----

56

S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B ---N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-----------------

122
115

OPERATORS,

CLASS

See footnotes at end of table.




170

180

180

$

-

190

and

190 over

CONTINUED

C O M P T O M E T E R O P E R A T O R S ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------

SWITCHBOARD

$

7

150

26

39.5

-

5

87
29
63
2
25
29

178
61
117

2

2
2
1
-

50
48

52
44

30
27

1
17

7
91

6
38

64
38

70
28

1

-

~

2
2

-

34
34

-

i
_

-

-

1

-

11
10
1
1
-

_

-

_

125
31
94
13
24
49

109
29
75
8
25
35

85
19
66
17
16
27

103
25
78
19
23
30

11
2
9
5

18

18
3
15
12

16

22

13
1
6

19
2
19

68
59

5
21

82
71
4
14
55

13
36

55
42
5
13
21

93
30
3
6
18

10
17

55
34
i
19
8

81
33
3
11
18

37
29
3
10
4

31
18
3
9
2

-

20
57

3
33

78

3

15
6
8

79
15
69
93

52
18
39
23
3
1

15
16

29
6
23
6
7

27
10
17
19
2

27
8
19
15

12
7
5
3

58
39
7
11
15

96
73
24
19
10

286
38
13
10
3

91
38
23
10
1

15
5

8
2

2

-

24
22
13
4
2

22
19
10
8
1

21
18
8
7
i

17
16
15

2
2
2

40
5
35
33
1

30
1
29
29

10
10
10

-

-

303
19
13

38
35
31

2
1
1
2

3

3

4
4

2
2

5
5

-

-

-

4

2

-

-

-

3
2

4
18

6
18

8
29

77
95
1
5
38

_

1
-

-

i

19
1
18
5

38
5
33
26
5

46

-

1
1

35
16
12

46
4
92
15
13

46
4
92
10
12

97
4
43
18
10

75
2
73
92
17

39
7
32
20
5

28
5
23
12

12
1
11
7

35
5
30
28

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

43
15
19

28
9
5

30
17
8

29
9

29
29

37
30
5

29
21
2

22
17
2

16
16
4

32
20
10

-

-

-

i

n

1
1

5

n

1

-

165
33

132
51
23
31
40
7
33

-

3

11

4

5

3

3

6

1

4

2

4

6

-

12
11

11
9

8
6

6
6
i

6

8

19

i
i

2

6
3

i
i

2

6

4
4
3

1
1
1

19

*

2
2

2
2

5

1

5
5

1
1

-

2

12

11

-

34
39

2

1
1

338
255
83
37
18
11

-

-

7

29 26
13
10
16 16
8
7
1
1
3
17
6
11
9
1
-

13
A-la.

Office Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, G a., May 1970)
Weekly earnings 1
( standard)

$

Average

70

Under

Sex, occupation, and industry division
(standard)

Mean2

Middle range 2

70

$
75

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of
I
$
I
»
I
*
*
$
*
$
1

1
80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

140

i

I
150

s
160

i
170

s
18 0

and
under

190

and

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

23

22

22
2

18

27
25

19
18

125

13 0

13 5

140

over

23
23

6

120

2

15 0

160

170

180

190

WOMEN - CONTINUED
TRANSCRIBING— MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL -----------------------

8 8 .0 0 -

TYPISTS, CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING ----PUBLIC UTILITIES3-

187
164
62

38.5
38.5
38.5

104.50
101.50
102.50

TYPISTS, CLASS B NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES3RETAIL T R A D E ---FINANCE4----------

328
280
99
83
90

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.0
39.0

93.00
93.00
106.00
84.50
85.50

1
to these
2
3
4
5

102.00
101.00
100.50
88.50

88.00
107.00
83.50
85.00

109.00

9 2.0 09 1 .0 0 8 8 .5 0 -

113.00
111.00
114.50

34
23
29
25

8 2 .5 0 100.00
8 2 .0 0 101.00
8 8 .5 0 117.50
8 0 .5 0 - 89.00
7 8 .5 0 - 92.50

21
21

31
26
3

18

6
13

Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond
weekly hours.
For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A -l.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
May include workers other than those presented separately.

Table A-2.

Professional and Technical Occupations—Men and Women

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1970)
Weekly earnings
(standard)

I

Average
weekly

Sex, occupation, and industry divisi

I
90

(standard)

90

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES3-----WHOLESALE TRADE ------FINANCE4---------------COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING ------

See footnotes at end of table.




$

$
226
188
53

40.0

155.00
155.00
148.00

140 .00 1 40 .50 1 29 .00 -

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
4 0.0
39.0

146.00
161.00
142.00
155.50
145.00
135.50

148.00
170.50
147.00
156.00
150.00
132.00

127 .50 1 29 .50 1 26 .50 1 48 .00 128 .00 1 20 .50 -

39.5
40.0

117.00

115.00

1 02 .00 1 02 .50 -

136.00
136.50

I

$

140

150

160

1 70

180

19 0

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

110

120

130

140

1 50

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

15
15

1
1

27
19

161.50
174.00
158.00
164.50
157.50
158.50

123

I

130

172.50
168.50
188.00

338
69
269
57
75
98

I

120

$

155.50
155.00
154.50

112

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
i
i
i
i
I
*
i
$
1
i
I
$

$
110

under
10 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING -------WHOLESALE TRA0E -------

I
100

43
5

25
23

11
59
2
57
16
2

12
16
13

56
5
51
19
4

1

20

27
27
—
—
1

-

3
2
1
—
-

1

-

3
2
1
—
1

-

2
1
1
—
-

1

1
1
—
—
-

4
4
—
—
-

-

-

280

14
Table A-2.

Professional

and Technical Occupations—Men and Women— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1970)
Weekly earnings *
( standard)

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—

MEN -

i

*

s

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Under 90
S
and
90
under

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

_______ 100

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

s

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

24p

250

260

270

280 over

-

i
i

11
11

9

-

8

19
18

1

4

24
23
1

14
11
3

24
18
1

8
1

24

25
23
6

20
18
4

7

12
8
5

4

i

26
25
12
8

~

~

6
5

_

_

-

-

Average

(standard)

M ean2

Median2

Middle range2

$

t

s

$

s

t

$

280
and

C ON TI NU ED

COMPUTER PROG RAMERS,
BU SIN ESS, CLASS A —
N C N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------

171
150
27

$
$
$
$
39.5 218.00 212.00 190.50-234.50
4 0.0 217.50 211.00 186.00-234.50
40.0 263.50 237.50 202.50-296.50

C O M PU TE R P R 0 G R A M E R S ,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B --------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-------------------------F I N A N C E 4 ---------------------------------------------------

269
244
72
63

39.5
39.5
40.0
38.0

C O M P UT E R P R 0 G R A M E R S ,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S C --------------------N Q N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

181.50
182.00
216.50
165.00

173.50
173.50
209.50
160.50

-

1 56.50-204.00
1 56.00-204.00
187.00-244.50
140.00-184.50

-

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

2

1

“

1
1

_

56
53

39.5 156.50 157.50 141.50-173.00
39.5 156.00 157.50 142.50-172.50

81
78
67
60
42
300
112
188

40.0 1 79.00 184.50 162.50-196.50
40.0 181.50 186.50 170.50-194.50
4 0.0 177.50 182.00 154.00-199.00

D R A F T S M E N , C L A S S B --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 -------------

439
230
209
29

4 0.0
40.0
4 0 .0
3 9.5

133.00-163.00
128.00-150.00
138.00-167.00
137.00-169.00

“

DRAFTSMEN,

471
263

39.5 119.00 119.00 112.00-125.50
3 9.0 119.50 120.50 111.00-127.50

14
14

33
21

28
26

186
59

39.5 100.50 103.50
39.0 95.50 95.00

14

52
38

13

29
1

36
31
3

A

9

ii

28

19

7
2

7
7

39.0 228.00 220.00 199.00-252.50
38.5 227.50 219.00 198.00-254.00
38.5 236.00 224.00 202 .00 -2 71 .00

D R A F T S M E N , C L A S S A --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

-

22
20

4

30
30

39.5 241.50 232.00 2 05.00-261.00
39.5 241.00 231.00 204.50-260.50

U T I L I T I E S 3-------------

2

2
2

9

9

8

1

6
5
1

4

23
20
4

4

8

7

9

7

3
2

1

9
9
59

6
6
6

4

4

4

4

3
3
3

~

~

~

_

_

_

_

-

ii
ii

-

-

-

-

3
3
3
~

120
20

COMPUTER S YS T E M S
BUSINESS, CLASS

ANALYSTS,
A ---------------------

NONMANUFACTURING

------------------

C O M P UT E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S ,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PUBLIC

CLASS

C ---------------------

NONMANUFACTURING

------------------

D R A F T S M E N - T R A C E R S -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

147.00
142.00
152.00
151.00

145.00
140.00
153.50
155.00

9 3.5 0-1 0 7.0 0
9 2.5 0-1 0 1.5 0

10

l

8

1

8
8

14
14

5
5

6
6

i
i

2
2

-

i

15
15

1
-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

2
-

20
-

2

6

9

2

4

2

2

2

2

1

9

21
7
14

42
19
23

23
13
10

56
35
21

74
37
37

28

2

_

5

6

1

_

_

_

28

2

-

5

6

1

-

-

-

61
17
44
9

37
16
21
1

25
12
13
4

3

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

3

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

1
1

10
8

10
10

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

“

-

-

-

-

“
_

_

-

—
-

1

-

2

20

20
1
19

12
12
-

13
6
7
5

69
52
17

83
45
38
4

84
60
24
4

51
10
41

177
67

144
86

43

7
6

20

21

i

l

17

WOMEN
COMPUTER

OPERATORS,

COMPUTER

CLASS

B

52

39.0 127.00 119.50 115.50-144.50

1

i

10

17

3

6

6

3

39.5 174.00 172.50 1 47.50-199.00
39.5 174.00 171.00 147.00-199.00

_

_

_

_

1
1

15
15

8
8

8
3

8
8

PROGRAM ERS,

B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

83
81

~

5

COMPUTER PROG RAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S C -------

56

39.0 149.00 147.00 139.00-162.00

-

i

2

2

-

12

19

6

2

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (R E G IST E R E D )
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------

98
56

39.5 151.50 146.50 1 37.00-171.00
39.5 157.00 168.00 137.00-173.50

_

_

_

_

8

"

“

6

19
5

7

“

30
13

6
4

2

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive thei
s tra ig h t-tim e sa laries (ex clu siv e of pay for
to these weekly hours.
2 For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A -l.
3 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities
4 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $310 to $320
a t $ 3 4 0 t o $ 3 5 0 ; 1 a t $ 360 t o $ 3 7 0 ; a n d 3
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 7 at $280 to $290 2 at $340 to $ 350; and 3 at $ 360 and over.
7 Workers were distributed as follows: 3 at $ 280 to $290 1 at $290 to $ 300; 4 at $310 to $ 320; and 1 at $ 320 to $ 330.




5
5

1 1

21
?0

overtim e

at

$370

at

and

5
5

11
11

“

i
3
3

regula r

over.

4
3

and/ or

“

p rem iu m

rates ),

and

the

< arn in gs
e

c o rre s pond

15

Table A-2a.

Professional and Technical Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, G a., May 1970)
Weekly ea rn in g ^ ^ ^
( standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

S

Average
weekly
(standard)

„

M ean2

M edian2

Middle range 2

,

t

S

100 110

Under
t
and
100
under
__________ 1 1 0

_

130

140

_

~

120

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
t
t
(
(
(
(
{
S
t
t
>
(

S
120

130

150

_

140

_

150

160

_

160

170

_

170

180

190

200

_
180

210

_
190

200

220

_

210

_

220

230

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A -----NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------

90
68

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

$
1 5 7 .5 0
1 5 1 .5 0

$
1 6 0 .5 0
1 5 3 .0 0

$
$
1 4 0 .0 0 -1 8 0 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0 -1 6 6 .0 0

5
5

4
4

12
10

11
10

11
11

13
13

8
6

2

4

1

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 3-------------------

178
128
57

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 5 0 .5 0
1 4 2 .0 0
1 5 5 .5 0

1 5 1 .0 0
1 4 6 .5 0
1 5 6 .0 0

1 3 1 .5 0 -1 6 9 .0 0
1 2 7 .5 0 -1 5 7 .5 0
1 4 8 .0 0 -1 6 4 .5 0

8
8
1

25
22
~

26
22
2

22
22
19

23
23
16

28
23
19

27

3

3

1

1

1

-

71
59
27

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

2 2 7 .5 0
2 2 7 .0 0
2 6 3 .5 0

2 1 5 .0 0
2 1 1 .0 0
2 3 7 .5 0

1 8 9 .0 0 -2 4 0 .0 0
1 8 6 .5 0 -2 3 7 .5 0
2 0 2 .5 0 -2 9 6 .5 0

_

_

_

2
2

-

COMPUTER PR0GRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------PUBLIC UT ILITIES3 -------------------

149
128
72

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 9 4 .5 0
1 9 7 .0 0
2 1 6 .5 0

1 8 6 .0 0
1 8 9 .0 0
2 0 9 .5 0

1 6 8 .0 0 -2 1 4 .0 0
1 7 0 .5 0 -2 1 8 .0 0
1 8 7 .0 0 -2 4 4 .5 0

1
1

-

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING:
PUBLIC UTILITIES3 -------------------

56

3 9 .0

2 3 2 .5 0

2 2 4 .0 0

3 8 .5

2 3 6 .0 0

2 2 4 .0 0

68

3 9 .5

1 5 8 .0 0

1 6 5 .5 0

1 4 3 .0 0 -1 7 2 .5 0

7

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C -----NONMANUFACTURING —

145
1 41

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0

1 1 8 .5 0
1 1 8 .5 0

1 1 2 .0 0 -1 2 6 .5 0
1 1 1 .5 0 -1 2 5 .5 0

52
52

85

3 9 .5

1 5 5 .0 0

1 4 9 .5 0

1 3 8 .0 0 -1 7 2 .0 0

2

_
250

260

270

t

270

_
280

t

280

290

_

,
anQ

290

over

2 0 2 .0 0 -2 7 1 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ------

240

$

260

2 0 1 .0 0 -2 6 1 .0 0

42

_

s

4
4

-

250

-

COMPUTER PR0GRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 3-------------------

240

1

-

230

1
1

1

9

4

1

-

-

4
4

13
11
4

6
5
1

15
10
3

2

7

6

5

17

38
38

11
11

7
6

5
2

1
1

26

16

7

6

23

21

W EN
OM
NURSES,

INDUSTRIAL

(REGISTERED)

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond
to these weekly hours.
2 For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A -l.
3 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
4 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $310 to $320; 2 at $320 to $330; 2 at $340 to $350; 1 at $360 to $370; and 3 at $370 and over.




16
Table A-3.

Office, Professional, ond Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1970)
Average
O cc up a tio n and in dus tr y d i v is i o n

Number
of

Weekly Weekly
hours * earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MA CHI NE )----------------------------------------------------NQNMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

96
87

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

$
1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 3 .0 0

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE)-----------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

86
54

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

9 7 .0 0
9 5 .5 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------

120
110

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------------

2 60
113
147
53

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 0 1 .0 0
9 9 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0
1 0 8 .0 0

3
----------------------------------------------------------------

1 ,1 8 1
273
9 08
165
3 43
192
139

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .5
3 8 .0

1 3 2 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0
1 3 1 .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0
1 1 5 .5 0

—
CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ----------■
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE 3-----------------------------------------------

2 ,6 0 4
4 27
2 ,1 7 7
4 75
7 59
3 86
3 96

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 7 .5

1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0
1 0 5 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0
1 1 1 .5 0
9 5 .5 0
9 7 .0 0

CLERKS, FIL E, CLASS A ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------FINANCE 3-----------------------------------------------

175
168
54

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0

9 7 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
9 5 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE

Average
O cc u pa t io n and in dus tr y di v is i o n

-

Number
of

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

CONTINUED

CLERKS, PAYROLL ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

504
193
311
79
50
88
53

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

$
1 1 2 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 1 8 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

267
219
28
139

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

1 0 4 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0
9 8 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

1 ,3 0 9
221
1 ,0 8 8
3 43
2 42
86
153

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 7 .5

1 1 9 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 3 4 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0
1 0 9 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

1 ,4 2 3
266
1 ,1 5 7
173
313
140
422

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 0 1 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0
9 9 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0
9 6 .5 0
9 9 .5 0

OFFICE BOYS AND GIRLS-----------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

592
106
486
66
131
175

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

8 7 .5 0
8 9 .5 0
8 7 .0 0
9 9 .5 0
8 7 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

4 , 038
1 ,3 7 8
2 ,6 6 0
372
615
3 29
1 ,1 2 7

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 2 6 .0 0
1 2 8 .0 0
1 2 5 .0 0
1 4 9 .5 0
1 3 0 .5 0
1 2 2 .5 0
1 1 4 .0 0

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------------

CLERKS, FIL E, CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------PUBLIC UT I L IT I E S 2------WHOLESALE TRADE --------FINANCE 3--------------------------

7 87
94
693
58
119
341

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 7 .5

8 6 .0 0
9 8 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0
9 0 .0 0
8 0 .0 0

SECRETARIES4------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

CLERKS, FIL E, CLASS C ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

652
629
367

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 7 .0

7 9 .5 0
8 0 .0 0
7 6 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------------

231
101
130

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 4 2 .0 0
1 3 7 .0 0
1 4 6 .0 0

CLERKS, ORDER -------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------RETAIL TRADE -----------------

1 84
5 68
4 14
1 54

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 3 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0
1 1 4 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

763
2 06
5 57
99
120
52
2 39

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

1 3 6 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 3 5 .5 0
1 5 7 .0 0
1 4 2 .0 0
1 2 4 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0

See footnotes at end of table.




Average
O cc up a tio n and industry di v is i on

SECRETARIES4 -

Number
of

Weekly
Weekly
hours * earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

CONTINUED

CONTINUED

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

1 ,5 2 3
573
9 50
104
243
134
400

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .5
3 9 .0

$
1 2 9 .5 0
1 3 6 .5 0
1 2 5 .0 0
1 4 7 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 -------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

1 ,4 9 0
4 86
1 ,0 0 4
136
22 8
114
441

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 1 4 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0
1 1 5 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------F I N A N C E -----------------------------------------------------------------

1 ,2 7 8
3 19
9 59
32 8
299
108
145

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 8* 0

1 0 8 .0 0
1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0
1 2 1 .0 0
1 0 5 .0 0
1 0 5 .0 0
9 7 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 2---------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE 3-----------------------------------------------

1 ,1 1 6
6 58
134
203
63
127

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

1 2 3 .0 0
1 1 8 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0
1 1 9 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0

3

CLASS A --------

73

3 9 .5

1 1 2 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS 8 -------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

442
42 9
37
111
61

4 1 .0
4 1 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

8 9 .0 0
8 9 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0
9 1 .5 0
9 6 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------------------------------------------------------------FINANCE 3

580
160
4 20
51
197
81

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 7 .5

1 0 0 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0
9 8 .5 0
9 0 .0 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A -------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

78
61

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 5 2 .5 0
1 4 5 .5 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2----------------------------

197
187
51

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 2 1 .0 0
1 1 8 .5 0
1 2 7 .0 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS,

17
Table A-3.

Office, Professional, ond Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, G a., May 1970)
Average

Average
Number

O cc u pa t io n and in du str y di v is i o n

of
workers

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

Number
of

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

382
365
156
172

39.0
38.5
4 0.0
3 7.5

$
101.50
101.50
105.50
98.00

TYPISTS, CLASS A -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

482
B7
395
62
58
123

39.0
4 0.0
38.5
38.5
39.5
38.0

101.50
100.50
101.50
102.50
99.00
97.50

TYPISTS, CLASS B -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

1,216
144
1 ,0 7 2
181
119
83
550

38.0
39.5
38.0
37.5
40.0
39.0
37.5

92.50
89.00
93.00
115.00
97.00
84.50
85.00

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS
242
194

53

4 0.0
4 0.0
4 0.0

155.50
154.50
154.50

Average

O cc up a t io n and indu stry di v is i on

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours 1
[standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

PROFESSIONAL ANO TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

PROFESSIONAL AN0 TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

CONTINUED

TRANSCRIB ING—MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------FINANCE3-----------------------------------------------

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A --------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------------

O cc u pa t io n and ind ust ry di v is i o n

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 2--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------FINANCE 3------------------------------------------------------------

390
83
307
69
85
98

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
3 9.0

$
143.50
156.50
139.50
150.50
143.50
135.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C -----------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 2-----------------------------------

156
141
30

3 9.5
39.5
38.0

116.50
116.50
117.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 2-----------------------------------

194
173
28

3 9.5
3 9.5
40.0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 2--------------------------FINANCE3----------------------------------------------COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ---------------------------------NONMANUF ACTURING--------------------------------

84
81

39.0
39.0

$
2 41.00
240.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

74
66

38.5
38.5

226.00
225.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

313
120
193

4 0 .0
4 0.0
40.0

179.00
182.50
177.00

214.00
213.00
261.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2-----------------------------------

455
231
224
33

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0

147.00
142.00
152.50
150.00

352
325
103
67

39.5 180.00
3 9 .5 180.00
3 9 .5 2 05.00
3 8 .0 164.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

491
283

3 9.0
38.5

119.00
1 19.50

DRAFTSMEN-TRACERS ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------

266
139

3 9 .0
38.0

98.00
93.50

112
107

39.5
39.5

152.50
152.50

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------------

99
56

39.5
39.5

152.50
157.00

Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings
correspond to these weekly hours.
2 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
3 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
4 May include workers other than those presented separately.




18
Table A-3a.

Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Large

Establishments—Men and Women

Combined

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1970)
Av rage

Average

O cc up a tio n and in dus tr y d i v is i o n

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard) (standard)
Weekly

of

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

O cc up a tio n and in dus tr y di v is i o n

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

-

Number
of

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

CONTINUED

UFFICE BOYS AND GIRLS --------------------------------------

166

3 9.0

90.50

PUBLIC UT I L IT I E S 2-----------------------------------

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

A ven ge

O cc up a tio n and industry di v is i on

56

38.0

Number
of

Weekly
hours 1
[standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

CONTINUED

101.50

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
98 C

98 0

I3C
433

^0*0
39.5

157*00
131.00

136

0 .0

110.00

963

39.0

106.50

39*0

131.00
136.00

16^
*62

3 0* ^
38.5

104.50
101.50
102.50

123 50
115.50

n 87
106

39*0
3 9.0

9 ' 00
108.00

0

39. 0

n ' . --n
0 5* 50

69

39.5

150.50

82
73
26

3 9.0
3 9.0
3 8.0

117.00
116.50
115.00

78
66
28

39.5
39.5
40.0

224.00
223.00

165

39.5
39.5

192.00

63

39* 5

63

39.0

165

38.0

120.00

86

39.5

155.50

10"*"0

1, 802

aQ n
n

'
‘If

^68
531

FINANCE

*

39*;:
39.5

250
RETAIL TRADE

22 9
64

39.5
38.5

93.50
9 4 . .,0

1 1J

30.5

?n
6.5 0

309

39.5

87.50

46
92

38.5
39.5

101.00
80.00

68
73

r
-

122
RET A IL T R ADE

39 0
39.0

-71.

1j O
1 rn

40.0

106

116.00

3 9.0

112.50

in
158

39.5
4 0.0

111.50
103.00

56
464
277
78

n
39.5
39.0
38.5
39.5

635
235
95

39.5
39.5
38.5

90*50

40.0

*"6

30*^

13-?

30* ■ 1 0 2 * 0 0
"

733
603

39.5
39.5

115.50

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------------

| _______

542
112

3 9.0
39.5
38.5
4 0.0

100.50
96.50

130.50
124.00
1 29.50

COMPUTER PR0GRAMERS,

COMPUTER PR0GRAMERS,
BUS 1N£SSi CLASS C

56

39.0

113.00

122
11 5
26

39.5
39.5
40.0

99.00
99.00
122.50

DRAFTbMENf CL Aj S 8
NONMANUFACTURING:

99

CLASS B --------

103.00
123.00

146
101

108.50
113.00
119.00
107.00
100.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,

125.50
123.00
SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS,

PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 2---------------------------

39.5

COMPUTER PR0GRAMERS,

56

CLASS B ---------------

135.00
127.50
149.50

nn

MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS,

39.5
39.5
38.5

287

97.50

159.50
134.50

563
r. A
~

39.0
39.5

926
542
80

TO

• r-n is *
>

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

39.5

127.00

DRAFTSMEN * CLASS C

51

40.0

1 27.00

NURSES,

2 30.00

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------------

INDUSTRIAL

(REGISTERED) ------

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings
correspond to these weekly hours.
2 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
3 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
4 May include workers other than those presented separately.




19

(A verage

Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations

stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly

earnings fo r m e n

in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s

stu d ied on an a r e a b a s is

by in du stry d iv ision ,

Hourly earnings 1

O c c u p a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

Median 2

Middle range ^

Under
i
1.90

1.90

T R A DE

--------------------------

$
4.25
3.97

100
59

4.4 3
4.57

E L E C T R I C I A N S , MAINTENANC E - M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 4 ---------------

449

4.43

348
101
51

4.43
4.43

ENGINEERS,

---------------

144

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

71

4 . 18
4 . 16

73

4.2 0

S T A T IO N A R Y

4.55

S
4.34
4 . 15
4.59

2 .4 0

2.50

2.6 0

2.70

2 .8 0

,.20 4.40 4-60

and

4 .3 2 -

5.11

4 .0 0 4 .0 2 3 .5 5 -

4.6 6
4.4 9
4.68

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

6
6

_
_

4.4 2
4.61

i
i

24
24

-

5
4

_

_

_

"
_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

326
147

2 . 85
2.88

2.73
3.03

2 .5 7 2 .4 9 -

3.08
3.08

_

-----------------------------

M A C H I N I S T S , M A I N T E N A N C E ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------

299
254

4.03
3.85

4.01
3.77

3 .6 2 3 .6 0 -

4.40
4.33

AUTO MOTIVE
4.08
3.23
4 . 12

3 .5 4 2 .8 8 3 .7 2 -

4.2 9
4.05
4 .2 9

4.20
3.40

3 .9 1 -

4.41

3.55

3 .3 1 -

_

“

_

3.10

_

2
2

_

_

_

_
_

_

_

3.9
3.4
4.0
4.1

3
1
1
1

M E C H A N I C S , M A I N T E N A N C E ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------- ------------N Q N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

626
473
153

3.62
3.52
3.96

3.54
3.4 1
4 . 15

3 .1 6 3 .0 8 3 .5 7 -

4 .2 2
4.0 4
4.36

O I L E R S -------------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------

82
80

3.11
3.13

3.32
3.35

2 .2 6 2 .2 6 -

3.77
3.77

P A I N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------

102
61

4.09
4.20

4.26
4.28

3 .0 8 4 .1 5 -

4.69
4.66

P I P E F I T T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E ------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------

129
129

4.55
4.55

4 . 74
4.74

4 .4 4 4 .4 4 -

T OO L AND D I E MA KE RS --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------

214
214

4.55
4.55

4.90

4 .1 5 4 .1 5 -

4.90

.20

over

4
3

4
4
61
1

5
4

1

2
1

i

_

8
“

5
4

85
85

7
7

9
9

17

“

6
6

6
2
4
4

15
12
3

12
2
10

20
8
12

3

-

l

14
6
8
3

60
34
26
23
3

-

48
48

2
2

23
18
5

58
39
19

-

"

4
3

-

6
6

2
2

7
6

22
22

58

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

6
6

6
6

-

-

-

12
12

-

-

-

-

25
24
1

-

12
12

-

-

-

_

_

-

“

15
14

-

-

-

-

-

-

”

2

4

-

“

i

n
5
6
5

12
2
10
9

18
2
16
3

17
17
3 10

53
37
16
-

41
13
28
27

14
3
11
3

12
8
4
3

138
133
5
-

63
43
20
13

12
8
4
-

3
3

34
29
5

35
6
29

7
5
2

3
3

6
2
4

5
5

57
7

4
4

12
3
9
8

1
1

4
3

l

32
4

27
13
14
14

20
14
6

10
6
4

3.76

U T I L I T I E S 4 --------------T R A D E --------------------------

1,221
162
1,05 9
889
54




2.30

4.44

2.6 5

1 E xclu des p rem
2 F o r defin ition
3 A ll w ork ers w
4 Transportation

2.2 0

1
1

2 .1 4 -

PUBLIC
RETAIL

2 .1 0

under

48
47

2 .1 3 -

( M A I N T E N A N C E ) ----------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

e.OO 4.20 4 .4 0 4.60 4.80 5..00 5.20

4 .8 8
4.88
4.89

2.19

MECHANICS,

2 .7 0

3 .9 8 3 .9 1 4 .0 8 -

2.1 8

TRADE S

2.60

4.62
4.81
4.38
4.38

4.58

2.71

MAINTENANCE

2.5 0

19
16
3
3

2.63

MANU FACTUR ING

2.40

5.14
4.89

61

HELPERS,

2.3 0

3 .9 3 4 .2 7 -

51

BOILER

of—

2.2 0

$
4.85
4.37

-

STATIONARY

MANU FACTUR ING

stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs

2.1 0

$
3 .7 1 3 .4 5 -

-----------------------------

FIREMEN,

receivin g

2.0 0

o
co

RETAIL

165
65

1970)

and

2.00

C A R P E N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

Ga. , M ay

Num ber of workers

Number
of
M ean 2

A tlanta,

o
o
V
J
1

Table A-4.

-

1
1

-

11
ii

5

1
1

:

33
33

143
130

29

21

46
46

6
6

17
17

8
8

42

182
7
175
162
3

227
11
216
215
1

186
186
186
-

19
17
2
i
i

9
8
i
i

38
38
38
“

_
-

66
60
6

64
6
58

18
12
6

70
64
6

i
1

2
2

2
2

2
2

~

1
1

3
3

20
20

20
20

6
6

13
-

4

-

4.92
4.92

1
1

1
1

29
29

38
38

40
40

-

4.96
4.96

26
26

13
13

6
6

18
18

89
89

22
22

-

iu m p a y fo r o v e r t im e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
o f t e r m s , s e e footn ote 2, table A - l .
e r e a t $ 5. 6 0 t o $ 5. 8 0 .
, c o m m u n ica tio n , and o th er p u blic u tilities.

h olida ys,

~

-

and

la te

shifts.

-

8
7

14

20

Table A-4a.

Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations—Large Establishments

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for men in selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1970)
N um be r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—

Hourly earnings 1

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

-

2
2

-

2
-

$
4 .9 3
5 .1 6
4 .9 0

6 .6 2

6 .8 3
4 .8 4

4 .1 5 6 .0 7 -

4 .8 9
6 .8 9

6 .5 6

4 .4 3
4 .3 6

6 .3 3 6 .3 2 -

5 .0 9
5 .1 2

4 .3 0
4 .3 4

4 .4 3
4 .4 4

4 .0 6 4 .0 7 -

4 .5 9
4 .4 9

228

2 .8 1

2 .6 9

2 .6 0 -

3 .0 5

2

58

181
136

6 .3 3
4 .1 0

6 .3 5
4 .0 9

4 .0 0 -

4 .9 6

_

-

2

3 .7 8 -

6 .3 9

~

“

2

349
276

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY -----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------

91
59

MAINTENANCE TRADES -----------

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE -------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

73
65

6 .6 2
4 .6 1

337

3 .9 8
4 .1 9
3 .9 4

3 .9 6
6 .3 1
3 .9 3

292

3 .9 8

3 .9 7

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE ---------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------

365
237
128

4 .0 2
3 .9 7
6 .1 2

4 .0 6
4 .0 4

MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

58
58

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

602
65

3 .5 7 3 .7 5 -

6 .2 6
6 .7 6

-

-

$
3 .2 0

%
3 .3 0

$
3 .4 0

$
3 .5 0

S
3 .6 0

$
3 .7 0

$
3 .8 0

3 . 10

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 . 90

i
1

6
-

-

-

2
2
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

4
4

3
-

4

-

_

3

_

61

1

_

*

-

8

2

3

-

1
1

-

i
-

3
-

_

3
3
73
7
7

3 .3 2
3 .3 2

3 .7 3
3 .7 3

3 .0 6 3 .0 6 -

3 .7 8
3 .7 8

51 2
12

78
55

4 .4 9
4 .3 4

4 .6 2
4 .3 0

4 .2 2 4 .2 3 -

4 .9 1
4 .6 7

-

PIPEFITTERS, MAINTENANCE ----------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

129
129

6 .5 5
4 .5 5

4 .7 4
4 .7 4

4 .4 4 4 .4 4 -

4 .9 2
4 .9 2

-

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ---------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

149
149

4 . 84
4 .8 4

4 .9 4
4 .9 4

4 .8 0 4 .8 0 -

-

-

3
3
-

5
4
i
i

$
3 .9 0

$
4 . 00

$
4 . 20

$
4 .4 0

$
4 . 60

$
4 .8 0

$
5

00

%
5 .2 0

4 . 20

4 . 40

4 .6 0

4 . 80

5 .0 0

5. 20

over

6
3
3

27
16
16

9
9
8

11
6
5

12
10
9

18
16

_

_

-

I
1

29

11
3
8

8
7

138
133
5

63
63

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

8
6

7
5

38
37

o
o

-

-

11
4
4

-

1
28
27

_

_

_

19

3

-

16

-

34
29
-

1

1

1

10

1

-

-

-

-

-

i

2
?

_

5

2

17

_

2

17

33
33

31

2

4
4

_
-

73
6
67

8
1
7

62
3
39

5
5

63
4
39

-

66

-

26

2

39

78
7
71
68

32
11
21
20

6
6

17
2
1

11
9

1
-

2

26
23
3

7
7

31
n
20

7
4
3

66
60
6

64
6
58

18
12
6

_

_

_

28
28

7
7

-

_

-

2

7
7

-

2

_

-

2
1

1
i

1
i

i
1

-

15

15
-

8

2
2

-

15

-

2
2

_

1

-

2

29

2

6
6
-

1
1
1

-

10
8
2

1
1

7
2
2

-

14
12
2

5
4

_

-

19
4

2
-

_

-

2
1

10
9

2
-

-

-

_

1

-

-

-

_

19
-

-

-

*

2
l

16
6

3

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A -l.
All workers were at $5.60 to $5.80.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
All workers were at $1.90 to $2.

-

1

3

-

2
2
-

l
-

1

4 .9 8
4 .9 8

-

-

2
2

i
-

-

-

-

2

4 .4 0
4 .6 0
4 .3 7

-

6 .3 1

3 .5 7 3 .4 8 3 .8 4 -

3

-

4
-

-

2
1
1

i
i
-

2
-

-

*

6 .1 6
6 .1 8




2
2

-

3 .5 6 3 .5 7 -

1
2
3
4
5

$
3 .1 0

i

$
4 .1 8 6 .3 1 4 .3 0 -

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE --------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------PUBLIC UT ILITIES4 ------------------------

$
3 .0 0

and

$
6 .5 3
6 .7 7
4 .5 9

118
78
56

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) --------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------PUBLIC UTI LIT IE S4------------------------

2 .7 0

$

and
under

Middle range L $
2 .5 0

$
4 .4 4
4 .6 4
4 .6 6

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------

HELPERS,

$
2 . 80

o
o

M ""2

Median ^

$
2 .7 0

rsj

Number

$
2 .6 0

2 .6 0

Occupation and industry division

s
2 .5 0

i
1

1
1
_

2 7
2
_

1

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

1

_

_

2

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

2
2

-

1
1

_

13
13

_

_

-

-

-

-

6
6

31

6
6

6
-

-

3

20
13

11
11
31 0
12
8
4
-

3

4

-

-

-

-

17
17

8
8

42

-

19

9
8

38
-

i
i

38

-

38

-

66
60
6

1
-

2
-

1

2

2

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

6
6

13

4

-

_

“

_

2
-

2
2

-

-

3
3

20
20

_
-

20
20

1
1

1
1

29
29

38
38

40
40

_
-

-

-

18
18

89

22
22

_

14
14

_

89

21

Table A-5.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1970)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
S
$
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2.10 2 .20 2.30 2 .4 0 2 .50 2.60 2.70 2 .80 2.90 3 .0 0 3.20
Unde
and
60 under

Occupation1 and industry division

1 .7 0

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN
MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING
GUARDS:
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------WATCHMEN:
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS -----MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC UTI LIT IE S4 --------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------JANITORS,

PORTERS,

1 ,6 6 8
270
1 ,3 9 8

178

$
2 .0 1
3 .0 9

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

21
13
8

74
29
45

-

-

$
1 .6 6 2 .0 6 -

$
2 .0 2
3 .9 1

39

1 .6 5 -

1 .7 8

~

665
6
659

511

-

1 .8 0

$
1 .7 3
3 .7 3
1 .7 1

18
493

12
27

3 .6 6

3 .7 8

3 .7 3 -

3 .9 5

-

-

-

8

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

26

16

10
16

2
14

11
5
6

12
1
11

17
-

28
7

17

21

3

-

-

-

-

5

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

over

9

13
1
12

9

39
5
34

10

3
-

12
12

-

i
-

10

3

88
84
4

64

9

1

-

3

-

-

84

62

-

3
6

-

2 .0 0

2 .0 2

1 .8 0 -

2 .1 0

-

6

18

4

13

29

7

2

5

1

-

2

3

1 .7
2 .4
1 .6
2 .8

2 .2 4
3 .4 2
1 .9 6
2 .9 4
2 .5 4
2 .3 8

190
77
113
1
-

196
69

291
89
202
13
-

129
46
83
-

135
110
25
13

133
68
65

37
33
4

16
35

10
17

i
-

6

21
35

72
12
60
50
-

6

127
1
11
97

184
72
112
29

70
37

17
-

622
59
563
-

2 .1 2

-

1907
14
1893
-

400

6
5
5
2
0
3

17
-

2 .2 1
2 .0 5

1 .6
2 .0
1 .6
2 .7
2 .0
1 .9

5

24

38

3

10

1 .6 8
1 .8 3
1 .6 7
2 .0 7

1
1
1
1

4
4
4
7

-

1 .7 6
2 .0 4
1 .7 4
2 .2 5

9
-

968
15

342
49

14
-

2
-

9

12
-

9

953

293
8

14
8

?

1 .9 8 2 .0 3 1 .9 4 -

2 .9 4
2 .6 9
3 .0 3

20

56

1,5 8 5
145
1 ,4 4 0
78

1 .7 6
2 .0 0
1 .7 3
2 . 10

.6
.7
.6
.8

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U TI LIT IE S4--------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

3 , 878
1 ,4 2 3
2 ,4 5 5
576

2 .4 8
2 .4 1
2 .5 2
3 .5 0

2
2
2
3

961
900

2 .0 7
2 .3 9

1 .9 9
2 .3 8

3 .5 2 1 .8 6 1 .9 6 -

3 .8 2
2 .2 1
2 .7 9

OROER FILLERS -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------WHOLESALE TRAOE ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

1, 738
653
1 ,0 8 5
470
615

2 .7 3
2 .8 1
2 .6 8
2 .5 6
2 .7 7

2
2
2
2
2

8
9
7
7
6

2
2
2
2
2

.3
.2
.3
.4
.2

3
9
7
1
8

-

3 .1 4
3 .6 7
3 .1 1
2 .7 1
3 .1 7

PACKERS, SHIPPING -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

1 ,0 0 0

2 .5 7

715
285
222
63

2 .5 0
2 .7 4
2 . 82
2 .4 6

2 .4 7
2 .4 7
2 .4 5
2 .4 7
2 .4 4

2
2
2
2

.2
.2
.0
.0

0
6
9
7

-

2
2
3
3

2 -2 3 -

PACKERS, SHIPPING (WOMEN) ------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

470
334
136

2 .1 5
2 .0 6
2 .3 9

129

2 .4 0

2 .0 0
1 .9 8
2 .4 5
2 .4 9

1
1
1
1

.9
.9
.9
.9

3
2
9
9

-

RECEIVING CLERKS -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

416
148
268

2 .9 7

2 .8 5
2 .9 9

.5
.6
.4
.1

2
9
5
4

-

3 .5 0
3 .8 3
3 .4 2
2 .6 5

SHIPPING CLERKS ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------------

179
93
86

See footnotes at end of table,

.3 0
.3 0
.3 1
.5 9

.5
.5
.5
.4
.9

89
146

3
240
84

23
18
5
-

26
14
12
-

40
12
28
-

5

12

28

31
30

12
12
-

19
18

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6
-

3

_

_

-

-

~

7
0
5
5

3 .0 4

3 .0 2

2 .5 2 -

3 .5 0

2 .9 0
2 .9 4
2 .8 4
2 .9 0

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3

62

176
26

_

.2
.2
.7
.7

87

-

12

2 .6 6

180

9
3
8
8

343
108
235
-

2
2
2
2

2 .6 5
2 .5 5

.5
.6
.5
.5

258
38
220
-

-

3 . 19
2 .8 5
2 .4 6

1
6
5
5

14
2
12
-

-

2
2
2
2

.9
.9
.7
.8

_

_

6
7
2
4

.0
.1
.0
.1

9
8
7
0

13
8
5
4

-

_

.6
.5
.7
.7

49
29
20
17

133
14
1 19
98
2
14

-

2

69

18
6

1
68
64
2

12
7
-

2

5

-

1
~

434
107
327

1
-

150
41
109

136
9
127

18
55

28
18

53
64

4
4?

99

148
71
77
60
17

220
23
197
174
23

143
75
68
50
18

52
27
25
15
10

90
3
87
77
10

69
37

28
17

230
217

11
5
6

13
5
8

23
18
5
-

15
-

32
22
10

162
149
13
5
8

78
69
9
9

8
-

7

8
-

8

7
7

8
8

4
4

39
39

14
3
11
~

20
15
5

32
7
25
12

12
12
-

48
37
11
~

5
-

1
-

13
-

-

127
81
46
-

139
58
81
81

18
15
3

-

188
71
117
-

94

11

-

145
99
46
-

126
32
94
-

-

_

115
73
-

87
62
25
12
13

41
32
9
7

_

2

83
28
55
36
19

46

1

-

3

68

178
149
29
29

-

2

153
44

-

-

-

41
4

210
96
114
-

10
6
4
4

-

25

501
299
202
5

1

-

25
~

9

14
2
12
11

45
42
3

-

9
-

12

8
4
4

41

2
7
4

55
21
34
15

3

172
58
114
11
66
37

“
188

3

10
-

_
-

73
44
29

4

2

~

—

15
15
-

-

23
4

190
40
150
74

90
71
19

284
67
217

1

109
52
57
~

8

1
125

8
49

60
16

1
10

194
6
17

16

129
54
75
-

124
6
118

75

204
42
162
6
156

12
12
~

16
4
12

-

-

~

“

~

_
-

_

149
69
80
80
—

190
190
190
-

3
2
i
-

89
3
86
86

2

2

i

4
4
4

10
10
-

32

5

5

3

4
-

39
-

4
4
4

1
1
1

9
5
4
4

20
15
5

21
8
13
-

12

12

-

4

1

2

21

11

5

22

13

12

1

*

13

-

-

18
18

6

19

21
9

20
8

1
1

17

-

1
1

-

6

19
19

12
12

12

~

38
18
20
17

23
11
12
12

_
-

~

90
88
2
~

15
10

14
3

_
-

22
12
10
8

7
4
3
-

4
-

-

~

1

-

-

-

4

5

-

-

1
1

118

-

-

-

4
-

13

-

-

139
136

1
-

-

-

84
50
34
34

13
3
10
4
6

-

12

-

-

-

~
-

-

-

-

-

~

32
25
7
7

-

1

2

“

62
9
53
31

2
2

_

62

”

23
2
21
-

-

338
318
20
16

-

16
2
14

5

4 .00

3 .2 0

2 .0 2
2 .6 1
1 .8 4
2 .7 8
2 .3 0

33
4
-

S
1
3 .8 0

3 .0 0

92

12
42

(
3 .6 0

2 .9 0

4 ,6 1 5
1 ,0 7 0
3 , 545
330
89

6
0
9
4

t

2 .8 0

AND CLEANERS

MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------




1 .8 0

{
S
3.40

“

-

-

“

~

~

-

3
2
1

—

1
1

-

-

-

~

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

~

-

~
8
-

3

53
5
~

10
-

32
-

21
6
15
-

10
-

8
~

3

31

15

5

10

8

3

1
1

-

4

-

2
2

6
6

—

58

2
2
2

-

-

4 .2

22

Table A-5.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations— Continued

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations on an area basis by industry division, Atlanta, Ga., May 1970)
Hourly earnings 2

Occupation1 and industry division

Number
of
workers

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ----------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------------

287
156

TRUCKDRIVERS5 ------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4-----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------------TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1-1/2 TONS) ----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------------TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING A TONS) ----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4-----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------------TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4-----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------------TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) ---------------TRUCKERS, POWER (F O R K L IF T ) -----------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING — ------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4-----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------------

1
2
3
4
5

M ean ’

$
3
3
3
2

.2
.4
.0
.9

6
2
7
6

5,547
811
4, 736
2,95 0
895
716

3.2
2 .6
3.3
3.8
2.4
2.8

8
8
9
4
6
6

1,04 3
184
859
377
308

2
2
2
2
2

2,4 5 4
242
2,212
1,62 9
299

3.45
2.85
3.5 1
3.79
2.25
3.19

131
104

221

1,657
1,622
1 ,25 9
180
183

3
3
3
3
3

. 36
.5 6
.32
.26
.2 9

.79
.8 1
.94
.25
.41

Median 3

$
3.24
3.68

Middle range3

$
3
3
2
2

.0
.0
.9
.7

2
3
8
5

-

$
3
3
3
3

.7
.7
.3
.1

2
7
8
9

3.63
4.2 1
2.42

2
2
2
3
2

.5
.4
.5
.5
.0

0
5
1
1
2

-

4
2
4
4
2

.2
.7
.2
.2
.7

2
1
3
5
0

2.71

2 .1 3 -

2.3
2.5
2.2
2.2
2.0

2 .0 7 -

2.56

2 .4 6 2 .0 4 2 .0 6 -

2 .6 0
2.54
2.52

2 .0 3 -

2.56

2
2
3
3
1
2

4
3
4
4
2
4

3 . 14
3.08
3.39
2.59

3
5
0
0
9

3.63
2.6 7
3 . 73
3.95
2.22
3.49

4
4
4
3
3

.2
.2
.2
.3
.3

0
0
3
4
0

.6
.4
.1
.3
.9
.2

8
0
3
7
4
6

-

3 .4 8 3 .4 9 -

3.66

.2
.4
.2
.2
.5
.0

2
7
3
5
9
9

4.25
4.25

3 .9 3 2 .7 9 -

4.2 6
3 .5 9

3 .2 4 -

3.66

255

2.6 6

2.61

2 .5 5 -

3.06

3.04

2 .5 5 -

3.72

1,068
606
182
249
175

2.99
3.20
4 .1 4
2.64
3.01

2
3
4
2
3

2
2
4
2
2

3.71
3.86
4.27
3.12
3.26

12

12
~
12
12
“

24
24
24
“

110
2
108
108

_

_

-

-

-

-

4
—

_

—

”

~

-

-

~

.7
.1
.2
.5
.0

8
4
4
9
9

.5
.5
.2
.1
.8

4
8
1
6
9

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

10

10

Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A -l.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
Includes all drivers, as defined regardless of size and type of truck operated.




-

70
40
30
30

_

~

~

12

•

23

~

80
12
68
62
5

317
4
313
297
5
6

121
8
113
103
6
3

284 132
57
227 132
170 12 B
—
4
17

35
35
35

809
809
757
52

-

95
95
-

125
104
62
41
1

136
136
40
15
81

168
168
140
27
1

6
4

852
852
852

-

~

6

21
21
-

51
44
7

44
44
44

48
48
48

79
32
47
35
12

28
13
15
15

-

7

110

9

283
230
53

126
102
24

58
32
26

50
3

_

-

11
9
2
2
-

~

30
30
30

_

-

24

24
2

8
8
—

8

ii

~

-

~

119
27
27
-

23
23

“

~

6

10

6
6
-

6
6
-

-

_

~
~
-

_

-

-

-

_

~
-

12
12

129
121
121

6
6
-

12

2
1
1

_

_

~

3
3
-

30
10
20
20
~

_

15

104
104
72
~

42
22
20

105
67
38
38
“

120
5
115
25
90

12
12

-

38
1
37
31
~

5
5
-

_

_
-

330
7
323
268
27
28

51
12
39
25
14

2
2
“

23
23

12
12
12

15

64 1677
25
39 1677
- 1621
39
56

432
69
363
210
15
98

168
48
120
110
-

46
22
24
24
~

1 76
8
168
36
132

246
29
217
165
47
4

33

68
3
65
29
30

274
62
2 12
180

434
4
430
297
26
102

62
62

121
6
115
82
25

36
36
24
12

93
16
77
63
13
~

24
13
11
11
“

168
6
162
36
126

24
12
12
12
~

14
12
2
2
“

206
87
119
99
20

148
27
121
49
14

27
4
23
-

72
22
50
20
30

97
15
82
24
~

343
78
265
231
24
*

12
12
~
12

4
4
-

19
19
*

149
19
130
29
68
33

188
8
180
54
120

12
12

4
4
4

59
59
-

283
190
93
44
49

156
17
139
106
25

-

32
6
26

369
202
167
135
26

2
2

“

29
9
20
19

-

10
10

~
~

74
27
47
47

9
4
5
5

2

-

-

18
13
5
5

13
13
-

10
-

~

2 .6 7

1,67 4

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
s
s
$
s
$
s
$
$
$
$
t
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
t
*
1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2. 10 2 .2 0 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2 .70 2 .80 2 .90 3.00 3.20 3.40 3 .60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4 .40
T ^ l - 60
T
Under
and
1.60 under
1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2. 10 2.20 2 .30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2 .8 0 2.90 3.00 3 .20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 over

84

-

-

3

10

-

19
14
5

2 02
80
122
4

67

257
235
22

8

68

-

99
84
15

-

28
24
4
3
-

-

10
8

5

i

50

67

7

4

67

-

2
2
-

-

-

12
12

_

~

-

_

_
-

4

-

-

91
78
13
12
~
1

12
12
-

4

-

146
146
145
-

_

1

-

23

Table A-5a.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations—Large Establishments

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1970)

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN ------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

370
219
151

$
3 .1 0
3 .3 8
2 .7 1

$
3 .1 8
3 .7 6
2 .7 9

$
2 .4 4 2 .7 9 2 .2 8 -

$
3 .7 8
3 .9 3
3 .1 4

-

GUARDS:
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

175

3 .6 8

3 . 78

3 .7 3 -

3 .9 5

-

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS -----MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

2 ,2 7 7
526
2 76

2 .1 6
3 .0 2
2 .2 2

1 .8 2
3 .4 2
2 .1 7

1 . 6 6 - 2 .7 8
2 . 2 8 - 3 .4 8
2 .0 0 - 2 .4 8

JANITORS,

PORTERS,

5
-

4
4

23
12
11

17
13
4

12
5
7

13
7
6

10
2
8

11
5
6

7
i
6

11
n

14
7
7

o

CD

2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70

N
;

Occupation1 and industry division

workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
S
$
$
s
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2 30 2.40 2.50 2 .60 2 .70 2.80 2 .90 3.00 3.20 3.40 3 .60 3.80 4 .00 4.20 4.40

9
3
6

2.90 3 .00 3.20 3 .40 3 .6 0 3 .80

13
1
12

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

1

909
-

203
9
12

111
41
8

96
39
51

119
26
44

62
9
35

57
10
35

31
9
5

27
6
21

44
5
29

10
6
3

42
10

114
2
14

9
2
7
4

_
-

6
4
2
2

9
9
3

AND CLEANERS

9
9

39
5
34

10
10

o
o

Number of
s
t
$
$
*
$
$
$
1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 i .90 2.00 2. 10 2.20
Mean3 Median 3 Middle range 3
and
under
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2. 20 2 .30
Hourly e imings 2

Number
of
woikeis

3
3

88
84
4

64
62
2

12
12
~

-

3

-

-

84

62

12

67
1
2

12
5

49
44
2

318
318

_
-

1
1
“

-

25
25
2

41
~
41
4

_
-

15
15
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

381
70
311
51

2 .1 1
2 .2 2
2 .0 9
2 . 17

1 .8 0
1 .8 6
1 .7 9
2 .0 9

1 .7 5 1 .7 7 1 .7 4 1 .9 9 -

2 .6 3
2 .6 6
2 .4 9
2 .4 8

9
9

2
2
-

185
25
160
8

23
17
6
3

5
2
3
2

35
3
32
15

ii
2
9
8

6
6

_
-

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 4--------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

1, 708
550
1 , 158
565
591

2 .9 3
2 .6 5
3 .0 7
3 . 53
2 .6 3

2 .9 3
2 .4 6
3 .0 1
3 .5 9
2 .7 2

2 .4 4 2 .1 4 2 .7 1 3 .5 2 2 .3 8 -

3 .5 6
3 .2 4
3 .5 9
3 .8 3
2 .3 6

_
-

12
10
2
2

46
38
8
8

66
39
27
3
24

80
43
37
5
32

48
16
32
32

56
31
25
25

76
45
31
31

105
87
18
18

61
61
61

42
42
42

109
109
10
99

127
127
1
125

89
40
49
49

127
37
90
74
16

90
71
19
8
10

233
22
211
194
17

149
69
80
80
-

190
190
190

ORDER FILLERS -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

720
531
531

3 .0 4
2 .8 4
2 .8 4

3 . 14
3 .0 4
3 .0 4

2 .7 4 - 3 .3 7
2 . 4 7 - 3 .1 9
2 . 4 7 - 3 .1 9

_
“

2
2
_
-

5
5
5

14
12
12

28
28
28

29
19
19

15
13
13

24
22
22

21
17
17

24
23
23

6
6
6

10
10
10

10
10
10

12
12
12

75
75
75

156
156
156

118
118
118

4
4
4

32
“

137
1
1

PACKERS, SHIPPING -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

130
85

2 .5 6
2 .5 7

2 .5 2
2 .5 3

2 .2 2 2 .1 8 -

2 .7 3
2 .6 0

-

-

i
-

-

1
-

8
8

21
16

8
7

8
2

10
2

35
30

5
“

5

7
4

-

2
-

12
10

3
2

3
3

PACKERS, SHIPPING (WOMEN) ------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

208
126
126

2 .4 2
2 .4 1
2 .4 1

2 .2 8
2 .5 2
2 .5 2

2 .2 1 - 2 .7 4
1 . 9 9 - 2 .7 5
1 . 9 9 - 2 .7 5

-

3

4
4
4

31
29
29

4
4
4

3
3
3

74
9
9

3
3
3

7
7
7

8
8
8

4
4
4

39
39
39

4
4
4

i
i
i

9
4
4

4
4
4

10
-

RECEIVING CLERKS -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

2 14
14 8
147

3 .3 2
3 .1 7
3 .1 6

3 .4 8
3 .3 5
3 .2 9

2 . 7 2 - 3 .8 5
2 . 5 6 - 3 .6 3
2 .5 6 - 3 .6 4

_
_
-

1
1
1

1
i
i

4
2
2

11
9
9

11
11
u

6
5
5

15
13
13

2
1
1

12
12
12

2
1
1

_
-

13
13
13

7

6
6

TRUCKDRIVERS5 -------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 4--------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

1 ,3 0 9
2 03
1 ,1 0 6
6 68
416

3 .5 0
3 .3 0
3 .5 4
3 .6 8
3 .3 2

3 .6 2
3 .5 7
3 .6 5
3 .9 0
3 .6 2

3 . 2 3 - 3 .9 5
2 . 8 5 - 3 .6 8
3 . 2 5 - 3 .9 6
3 . 3 0 - 3 .9 7
3 .2 0 - 3 .8 8

2
2

86

2

5
5
-

13
13
-

14
14

3
i
2

10
10
-

36
7
29
29

42

84

1
1

22

8
6

84

14

2

-

20
20
~

2

i

53
10
43
43
~

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 T O N S ) -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

186
160

2 .5 6
2 .5 3

2 .7 1
2 .1 0

2 . 0 6 - 2 .8 5
2 . 0 5 - 2 .8 2

84
84

i
i

29
29

42
20

_
~

2

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM I 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) --------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 4--------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------------

625
507
375
131

3 .5 6
3 .6 5
3 .5 8
3 .8 4

3 .5 9
3 .5 9
3 .5 5
4 .0 6

3 .2 6 3 .2 9 3 .2 7 3 .7 6 -

2

_

7
-

-

2

See footnotes at end of table.




3 .9 5
3 .9 8
3 .9 3
4 .2 4

-

3
3

_
-

_
*

_
-

_

-

_
-

-

-

-

*
_

_

_

_

_
“

_
~

_

_

_

2

3

2

_

13

_

14
14
14

2
2

1
-

_

10
-

2

8

2

-

-

-

4 .20 4.40 4.60

-

-

~

-

i
i

-

-

—

-

_

_
-

~
~
~

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
“

1
1

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

32
32
31

18
15
15

58
5
5

10
10
10

8
8
8

3
3

182
1
181
91
90

166
29
137
129
4

176
63
113
98

306
7
299
268
28

64
25
39
39

142
142
86
56

-

_
~

_

_

23
23

_

_
~

_

1
51
42
42
-

98
97
91
6

113
105
101

74
17

132
132
128
4

35
35
35

63
63
11
52

3

-

17

3

_
-

24

Table A-5a.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations—Large Establishments— Continued

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more by industry division, Atlanta, Ga. , May 1970)

1
2
3
4
5

Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A -l.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
Includes all drivers, as defined, regardless of size and type of truck operated.




25
B.

Establishm ent

Table

B-l.

Practices

Minimum

and

Entrance

Supplem entary
Salaries

for

W age

W om en

Provisions

O ffice

W orkers

(Distribution of establishm ents studied in all industries and in industry divisions by minimum entrance salary for selected categories
of inexperienced women office w orkers, Atlanta, Ga., May 1970)
O th er in e x p e r ie n c e d c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s 2

I n e x p e r ie n c e d ty p is ts
M a n u fa c t u r in g
M in im u m w e e k l y s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y 1

B a s e d o n sta n d a r d w e e k l y h o u r s 3 o f—

A ll
in d u s t r ie s

A ll
s c h e d u le s

40

A ll
s c h e d u le s

37 Vz

N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u fa c t u r in g

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g

B a se d on sta n d a rd w e e k ly h o u r s 3 o f -

A ll
in d u s t r i e s
A ll
s c h e d u le s

40

40

A ll
s c h e d u le s

37 V2

40

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d ie d ------------------------------------------------------------

257

76

XXX

181

XXX

XXX

257

76

XXX

181

XXX

XXX

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g a s p e c i f i e d m in im u m ___________________

90

21

21

69

12

44

113

27

26

86

13

58

_

_

.

1
1
1
2
2
3
7
1
1
4

1
1
1
2
2
3
7
1
1
3

2
4
3
7
12
11
10
2
17
6
1
1

1
1
2
~
2
3
2
2
-

-

3
1
4
3
1
4
1
11
6
2
1

2
5
4
8
14
13
10
5
24
7
2
5

_

2
1
1
1
2
5
1
2
1
1
1
3

1
2
1
1
3
4
-

_

2
1
1
1
2
5
1
2
1
1
1
3

1
4
3
5
5
3
11
2
16
9
2
1

9 2 .5 0 and u n d e r $ 9 5 .0 0 -----------------------------------------------------------9 5 .0 0 and u n d e r $ 9 7 .5 0 -----------------------------------------------------------9 7 .5 0 and u n d e r $ 1 0 0 . 0 0 ______________________________________
1 0 0 .0 0 a n d u n d e r $ 1 0 2 .5 0 _____________________________________
1 0 2 .5 0 and u n d e r $ 1 0 5 .0 0 -------------------------------------------------------1 0 5 .0 0 and o v e r _________________________________________________

1
6
4
5
6
4
11
4
21
1
11
2
2
i
i
i
3
1
5

-

1
1
2
1
2

i
2
3
2
6

1
3

1
3

1
2
2
2
3

-

1
2
2
2
3

E s t a b li s h m e n t s h a v in g n o s p e c i f i e d m i n i m u m -------------------------

32

13

XXX

19

XXX

XXX

45

20

XXX

25

XXX

XXX

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w h ic h d id n o t e m p l o y w o r k e r s
in t h is c a t e g o r y ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

135

42

XXX

93

XXX

XXX

99

29

XXX

70

XXX

XXX

$ 6 0 .0 0
$ 6 2 .5 0
$ 6 5 .0 0
$ 6 7 .5 0
$ 7 0 .0 0
$ 7 2 .5 0
$ 7 5 .0 0
$ 7 7 .5 0
$ 8 0 .0 0
$ 8 2 .5 0
$ 8 5 .0 0
$ 8 7 .5 0
$
$
$
$
$
$

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
un d e r
under

$ 6 2 .5 0 -----------------------------------------------------------$ 6 5 .0 0 -----------------------------------------------------------$ 6 7 .5 0 ----- ------------------------------------------------------$ 7 0 . 0 0 -----------------------------------------------------------$ 7 2 .5 0 -----------------------------------------------------------$ 7 5 .0 0 -----------------------------------------------------------$ 7 7 .5 0 -----------------------------------------------------------$ 8 0 .0 0 ________________________________________
$ 8 2 .5 0 -----------------------------------------------------------$ 8 5 .0 0 -----------------------------------------------------------$ 8 7 .5 0 -----------------------------------------------------------$ 9 0 .0 0 ------------------------------------------------------------

1
1
2
i
2

-

-

1 These salaries relate to form ally established minimum starting (hiring) regular straight-tim e salaries that are paid fo r standard workweeks.
2 Excludes workers in su b clerica l jobs such as m essenger or office girl.
3 Data are presented for all standard workweeks com bined, and for the m ost com m on standard workweeks reported.




3
1
5
7
7
6
1
12
4
1
1

-

26




Table

B-2.

Shift

D ifferen tials

(L a te-sh ift pay p rov ision s fo r m anufacturing plant w orkers by type and amount of pay d ifferential,
Atlanta, Ga., May 1970)
(A U ^ la n t ^ o r k e r s in jia a n u fa c t u r in j| _ = ^ 0 0 j3 e r c e n t ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ _ ^ ^ _ ^ _ ^ ^ ^ _ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ _ ^ ^ ^ ^
P ercen t of m anufacturing plant w ork ers—
L a te-sh ift pay p rovision

In establishm ents having p rovision s 1
fo r late shifts

A ctually working on late shifts

Second shift

Third or other
shift

Second shift

T hird o r other
shift

Total--------------------------------------------------------------

8 0 .3

7 0 .4

2 0 .5

5 .7

No pay differen tial for w ork on late sh ift---------

7 .9

1 .5

2 .1

0 .5

Pay d ifferential fo r w ork on late sh ift_________

7 2 .4

6 8 .8

1 8 .4

5 .2

U niform cents (p er h o u r)--------------------------

5 8 .5

3 3 .7

1 3 .2

3 .8

3 c e n ts --------------------------------------------------4 c e n ts _________________________________
5 c e n ts --------------------------------------------------6 c e n ts --------------------------------------------------7 c e n ts --------------------------------------------------8 c e n ts --------------------------------------------------10 cen ts------------------------------------------11 cen ts_________________ _______
___
12 cen ts____________________________ ____
I 3 V cen ts---------------------------------------------3
14 cen ts________________________________
15 cen ts------------------------------------------------16 cen ts------------- --------------------------------18 cen ts ______________________________________
20 cen ts ______________________________________
2 4 cen ts -----------------------------------------------------------

1 .7
1 .9
7 .3
1 .7

.9

.1
.2
1 .8
.1

(2)

-

-

Type and amount of differen tial:

-

4 .9
1 0 .3
2 .2
5 .3
1 .2
1 .0
2 .0
1 9 .2
-

-

U niform p ercen ta g e -----------------------------------------

1 3 .9

5 p e rce n t -------------------------------------------------------10 percen t ____________________________________

1 3 .9

Full d ay's pay for reduced hours ---------------Full d ay's pay fo r reduced hours
plus cents d iffe re n tia l ---------------------------------

-

6 .0
.8
1 .6
2 .0
-

.8
4 .0

-

1.1
2 .4
.5
1 .4
.4
-

.1
-

.7

.2

(2)
.2
-

3 .7
3 .1
2 .9
.9
2 .0
4 .9

.5
4 .8
-

-

.9
.3
.4
.1
.3
.5

1 3 .9

5 .1

.1

5 .1

_

_

-

1 3 .9

-

.1

-

2 .0

-

.1

1 9 .2

1 Includes all plant w orkers in establishm ents cu rren tly operating, or having fo rm a l p rovision s
even though the establishm ents w ere not cu rren tly operating late shifts.
2 L ess than 0.05 percen t.

1 .2

cov erin g late shifts,

2 7

T a b le

B -3.

S ch ed u led

W eek ly

Hours

(P e rc e n t d istrib u tion of plant and o ffic e w o r k e rs in a ll in d u strie s and in industry d iv isio n s b y sched uled w eek ly h o u r s 1
o f fir s t -s h ift w o r k e rs , Atlanta, G a ., M ay 1970)
P lant w o rk e rs
W eekly hours

A ll
in d u s trie s 2

A ll w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------------------

100

35 h ou rs - -------------------------------------------------------------36V4 h o u r s ------------- — --------------- -----------------------3 7 V4 h o u r s -------------------------------------------------------------3 7 V h o u r s ----------------------------- -------------------------------2
373 h o u r s ________________________________________
/4
383 h o u r s ___________ ___________________________
/4
40 h o u r s __________________________________________
O ver 40 and under 42x hours -------------------------/2
4 2 V2 h o u r s ------------------------------------------------------------O ver 4 2 V2 and under 48 h ou rs----------------------------48 h o u r s ----------------------------- --------------------------------50 hou rs and o v e r --------------------------------------------------

1
4

1
83
2
1
3
3
1

Manu­
facturing

100

(6 )
6
92
-

1
1

P ublic
u tilities 3

O ffice w o rk e rs

W holesale
trade

100

100

-

8
84
4
4
-

R etail
trade

100

4

-

94
3
1
2

-

5
71
5
5
5
5

A ll
Manu­
in d u stries4 facturing

100
2
6
(6 )
16
1
2
71
(‘ )
(6 )
1
1

1 Scheduled h ou rs a re the w eekly h ou rs which a m a jo rity o f the fu ll-t im e w o r k e rs w ere exp ected
o v e r tim e ra tes.
2 Inclu des data fo r re a l estate and s e r v ic e s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly.
3 T ra n sp ortation , com m u n ica tion , and other pu blic u tilitie s.
4 Includes data fo r s e r v ic e s in addition to those ind u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
5 F inance, in su ra n ce, and re a l esta te.
6 L e s s than 0. 5 p ercen t.




10 0

(6)
-

9

91

(6)
-

to w ork,

P ublic
u tilitie s 3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

F in a n ce 5

100

100

100

100
8
.
27
61
(6)
(6)
4

w hether they w ere

_
4

12
81
2
(6)
-

paid fo r

1
_
10
.
86
1
2
(6)

3
20
_
23
3
1
49
_
-

at str a ig h t-tim e

or

2 8

T a b le

B -4 .

Paid

H olid a y s

(P e rc e n t d istrib u tion o f plant and o ffic e w o r k e rs in a ll in d u stries and in industry d iv isio n s b y nu m ber o f paid holid a ys
p rov id ed annually, A tlanta, G a., M ay 1970)
Plant w o rk e rs
Item

A ll
in d u stries

A ll w o r k e r s _________________________________
W ork ers in esta b lish m en ts p rov id in g
paid h o lid a y s ___________________________________
W ork ers in esta b lish m en ts p rov id in g
no paid h o lid a y s -------------------------------------------------

Manu­
facturing

P ublic
u tilities

2

O ffice w o rk e rs
W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

A ll
M anu­
in d u strie s 3 facturing

P ublic
u tilitie s

2

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

Finance

10 0

10 0

100

10 0

100

100

10 0

10 0

100

10 0

10 0

93

98

10 0

99

90

99

99

100

100

99

10 0

7

2

-

1

10

(5)

(5)

-

-

(5)

-

3

1

_

2

1

7
15

5
-

(5)
5
-

( 5)

1

-

_
13
3
5
( 5)

(5)
4
17
-

1
12

12

6

12

3
3
29
27
17

1
1

14
(5)
17

24
3
19
5

(5)

2

4

N um ber o f days
L e s s than 4 h o lid a y s ____________________________
4 h olid a ys
- —
—
____ _
- —
5 h o lid a y s ________________________________________
5 h olid ays plus 1 o r 2 ha lf d a y s _______________
__
___
_____
6 h olid ays
6 h olid a ys plus 1 o r 2 half d a ys_______________—
7 h o lid a y s ________________________________________
7 h olid ays plus 1 half day ________
_ —
7 h olid ays plus 3 ha lf days __ ___
—
— — — —
8 h olid ays — ------- ---------8 h olid ays plus 1 o r 2 half d a y s ________________
9 h o lid a y s __ _____________________________________
9 h olid ays plus 1 ha lf day_______________________
1 0 h olid a ys______ __ __ ________ _______ __ ___ ___
1 0 holidays plus 3 half days_____________________
1 1 h olid a ys - _
- __
_
—
. . . —
1 1 h olid a ys plus 1 ha lf d a y _____________________
T otal h olid a v tim e
I1
11
10

(5)

20

16
-

10

10

-

23
-

10

4
-

10

-

49
30
-

(5)
26
7
3
-

30
30
79
79
85
85
94
94
99
100
100
100
100

3
3

2

9
-

11
1
21
1
11

5
(*)
22
2
10
2
10
1
1
1

6

8
2
12

12

5
16
-

3
59
-

10

21

34
-

-

6

-

_
12

11

(5)
17

40
9

5
29
31
3
-

1

11

34
5
-

21

3
3
_
8
8

4
3

6

V2 d ays--------------------------------------------------------------days o r m o r e — - — — ____ .
days o r m o r e _________________________________
9*/z days o r m o r e ________________________________
9 days o r m o r e __________________________________
8 V2 days or m o r e — __________
- __ - - ___
8 days o r m o r e ______________ ______________ ____
7 V2 days o r m o r e ____
. . .
_____
- —
— — __ .
7 days or m o r e ________
6 V2 days o r m o re
____
. . . .
----- 6 days o r m o r e - ----------- --5 V2 days o r m o re
- - _____ - ----- - __
5 days o r m o re —— —..........
- ,
-----—
4 days o r m o re ________ ___________ ______ .
3 days or m o r e _____ __ - ______________ ___ ___ ___
2 days or m o r e ________________
___ - 1 day o r m o re

1
2
3
4
5

(5)
-

8

1

4
15
15
25
25
44
45
56
57
74
74
88
91
92
92
93

10

33
33
44
44
60
60
72
73
88
88

95
97
98
98
98

10
10

36
36
49
54
75
75
99
99
99
99
99

9
11

28
28
55
55
84
87
88
88
90

2

3
13
16
26
27
49
54
65
65
87
87
98
98
98
99
99

_
6

40
40
50
50
66

71
83
85
93
93
98
98
99
99
99

_
21
21

80
80
83
83
95
95
99
99
99
100
100

_
3
3
33
33
63
68

79
79
87
87
100
100
100
100
100

_
5
39
40
58
58
78
78
96
98
99
99
99

8
8

15
23
26
26
29
39
48
48
88
88

99
100
100
100
100

Includes data fo r re a l esta te and s e r v ic e s in addition to th ose in d u stry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra tely.
T ra n sp orta tion , co m m u n ica tion , and other p u b lic u tilitie s.
Includes data fo r s e r v ic e s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra tely.
F in a n ce, in s u ra n ce , and r e a l esta te.
L e s s than 0.5 p e rce n t.
6
A ll com b in a tion s o f fu ll surd h alf days that add to the sam e amount a re com b in ed ; fo r exa m p le, the p r o p o rtio n o f w o r k e rs r e c e iv in g a total o f 9 days includes
those with 9 fu ll days and no ha lf days, 8 fu ll days and 2 half da ys, 7 fu ll days and 4 h alf da ys, and so on. P ro p o rtio n s then w e r e cum ulated.




29

T a b le

B -5.

Paid

V a c a t io n s 1

(P e rc e n t d istrib u tion o f plant and o ffic e w ork ers in all in d u stries and in in d u stry d iv isio n s by va ca tion pay p ro v is io n s , Atlanta, G a ., M ay 1970)
Plant w o rk e rs
V acation p o lic y

A ll w o r k e rs __________________________________

Manu­
A ll
in d u s trie s 2 facturing

100

P ublic
u tilities 3

O ffice w o rk e rs
W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

P ublic
utilities 3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

Finance 5

100

100

100

100

100

100
99
(6)
-

100
100

100
100

99
99

100
100
-

A ll
Manu­
in d u stries4 facturing

100

100

100

100

100
86
14
-

100
98
2
-

99
99

97
95

-

-

-

2

99
99
( 6)
-

“

1

3

( 6)

11
17

100

Method o f paym ent
W ork ers in esta b lish m en ts providing
paid v a ca tion s-----------------------------------------------------L e n g th -o f-tim e p a ym en t_____________________
P ercen ta g e paym ent__________________________
O th e r__________________________________________
W ork ers in esta b lish m en ts providing
no paid v a ca tion s________________
____________

98
91
6
(6)
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

"

"

( 6)

“

2
38
7
(6)

_
55

-

3
47
5
3

-

4
36
3
10

4
23
1
-

3
67
11
5

_
7
93
-

_
72
1
28
-

Am ount o f va ca tion pay 7
A fter 6 m onths o f s e r v ic e
Under 1 week______________________________________
1 week_____________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w e e k s ___________________________________________

7
21
1
(6)

8
14
1
1

_
53
-

12
32
8
1

(6)
64
4
28
1

1
63
2
31
2

_
46
17
37
-

_
43
56
-

_
81
16
-

_
25
1
73
( 6)
(6)

_
14
(6)
85
(6)

_
56
5
37
2
-

( 6)
36
6
52
2
1

1
46
7
42
2
2

_
19
16
64
1

_
17
5
77

_
31
1
60
4

_
4
1
93
2
( 6)

_
4
3
93
( 6)
( 6)

_
12
3
81
4
-

(6 )
99

( 6)
15
10
66
5
2

1
16
21
56
3
2

_
1

_

_

-

-

-

(6)
96
4
"

(6)
14
10
64
5
4

1
16
21
51
3
8

-

-

-

A fter 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
Under 1 week______________________________________
1 week------------------- -------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w e e k s _________ _______________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------------------------3 w e e k s ___________________________________________

_
( 6)
99
-

A fte r 2 y e a rs of s e r v ic e
Under 1 week______________________________________
1 week---------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w eeks - --------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------

-

_
-

-

_
6
1
90
3
-

_
( 6)
99
-

-

A fter 3 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Under 1 week_____________________________________
1 week_____________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------------------------3 w e e k s ___________________________________________

-

82
17
"

_
8
5
84
2
~

_
13
1
77
4
2

_
1
1
93
5
1

_
2
2
88
6
2

_
8
5
84
2

_
13
1
77
4
2

_
1
1
91
6
2

_
2
2
84
6
7

93
7

_
3
1
92
3
1

_
( 6)
96
3
"

A fter 4 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Under 1 w eek---------------------------------------------------------1 week_____________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s -----------------------------------2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end o f table.




1
-

82
17

_

_

-

-

-

( 6)
96
4

93
7

_
3
1
92
3
1

( 6)
92
8

3 0

T a b le

B -5 .

Paid

V a c a tio n s 1— C ontinued

(P e rc e n t d istrib u tion o f plant and o ffic e w o r k e rs in all in d u stries and in in d u stry d iv isio n s b y va ca tion pay p ro v is io n s , Atlanta, G a ., M ay 1970)
O ffice w o rk e rs

Plant w o r k e rs
V acation p o lic y

A ll
Manu­
in d u strie s4 facturing

P ublic
u tilitie s 3

A ll
in d u s trie s 2

Manu­
facturing

P ublic
u tilitie s 3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

7
1
73
4
13

5
2
76
4
14

82
17
1

5
82
11

7
70
19

(?)
( 6)
77
5
18

(6)
2
82
( 6)
16

_
89
7
4

_
60
40

79
21

_
75
10
15

7
22
10
55
4
1

5
22
15
53
3
1

_
10
3
72
15
(6)

5
44
5
39
2
4

7
22
9
58
-

(6)
18
2
71
3
6

(6)
24
1
66
6
3

_
17
74
7
2

_
23
47
4
26

( 6)
15
8
76
( 6)

_
9
2
86
3

7
20
9
57
5
1

5
19
14
55
5
1

7
2
76
15
(6)

5
39
5
44
2
4

7
22
9
58
-

(6 )
16
2
73
3
6

( 6)
22
1
67
7
3

_
12
78
7
2

20
3
47
4
26

(6)
15
8
76
( 6)

9
88
3

7
16
(6)
60
2
11
2
( 6)

5
15
67
5
8
(6)

_
2
2
47
1
33
15
-

5
28
53
13
-

7
20
66
3
-

(6)
13
69
( 6)
18
-

( 6)
14
80
6
-

( 6)

_
3
66
24
7
-

_
13
25
62
-

-

( 6)
10
70
( 6)
19
1
( 6)

-

-

9
87
4
-

7
15
(5)
30
2
38
2
5

5
13
39
3
39
1

_
2
2
13
1
40
15
28

5
28
32
31
4

7
19
23
47
-

(6)
9
25
( 6)
57
1
7

(6)
8
27
(6)
64
1

_
3
15
53
7
22

_
13
16
45
26

(6)
13
16
70
( 6)

_
9
26
65
-

7
15
( 6)
25
1
38
3
9

5
13
33
2
42
2
3
1

_
2
2
10
1
26
15
44

5
25
24
35
11

7
19
18
53
“

(6)
8
18
( 6)
55
1
18
( 6)

( 6)
8
23
(6)
65
4
(6)

_
3
10
32
7
47
"

_
9
14
28
49

(6)
13
8
78
( 6)

_
9
13
74
4
“

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

F in a n ce5

Amount of va ca tion pay 7— Continued
A fte r 5 y e a rs of s e r v ic e
1 week_____________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w e e k s _______ __________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------

(6)

A fter 10 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
1 week_____________________________________________
2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------------------------3 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------4 w e e k s ___________________________________________
A fter 12 y e a rs of s e r v ic e
1 week_____________________________________________
2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------------------------3 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------A fter 15 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
1 week_____________________________________________
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------------------------3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------4 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s _______________________
5 w e e k s ____________________________________________

_

A fter 20 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
1 week______________________________________________
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------4 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s -----------------------------------5 w e e k s ____________________________________________
A fte r 25 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
1 week---------------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------4 w eeks _____ ___________________________________
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s _______________________
5 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------6 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------

1




See footnotes at end o f table.

'

31

T a b le

B -5.

Paid

V a c a tio n s 1 C ontinued
—

(P e rc e n t d istrib u tion o f plant and o ffic e w o r k e rs in all in d u stries and in in d u stry d iv isio n s by va ca tion pay p ro v is io n s , Atlanta, G a „ M ay 1970)
O ffice w o rk e rs

Plant w o rk e rs
V acation p o lic y

A ll
in d u strie s2

M anu­
facturing

P ublic
u tilities 3

7
15
(6)
25
1
38
3
9
1
( 6)

5
13
33
2
42
2
1
2
1

_
2
2
10
1
25
15
46
-

7
15
(6)
25
1
37
3
9
l
( 6)

5
13
33
2
42
2
1
2
1

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

A ll
M anu­
in d u stries4 facturing

P ublic
u tilities 3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

Finance*

Am ount of va ca tion pay 7— Continued
A fter 30 y e a rs of s e r v ic e
1 week_____________________________________________
2 w eeks __________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w e e k s _________ ________________________________
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s -----------------------------------5 w e e k s ___________________________________________
6 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O ver 6 w eek s_____________________________________

-

5
25
24
31
13
1
-

7
19
18
53
-

5
25
24
31

7
19
18
53

-

-

13
1

-

-

( 6)
8
18
(6)
52
1
19
1
( 6)

(6)
8
23
( 6)
65
3
2
(6)

( 6)
8
18
(6)
52
1
19
1
( 6)

( 6)
8
23
( 6)
65

_
3
10
32
7
48
-

_
9
14
20
52
6
-

( 6)
13
8
78
( 6)
-

_
9
13
69
10
-

M axim um va ca tion a va ilable
1 week_____________________________________________
2 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ____ _________________
4 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s -----------------------------------5 w e e k s ___________________________________________
6 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 6 w eek s----------------------------------------------------------

_
2
2
10
1
22
15
49
-

-

-

3
2
( 6)

_

_

3
10
31
7
48

9
14
20

-

( 6)
13
8
78

_
9
13
69

-

-

-

52
6

( 6)

10
-

1 Inclu des b a s ic plans only. E xclu d es plans such as va ca tion bonus, v a c a tio n -sa v in g s , and those plans which o ffe r "e x te n d e d " or 1 sa b b a tica l" b enefits beyond b a s ic
1
plans to w ork ers with qualifying lengths o f s e r v ic e .
T y p ica l of such e x c lu sio n s a re plans in the s te e l, alum inum , and can in d u strie s.
2 Inclu des data fo r rea l estate and s e r v ic e s in addition to those in d u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly.
3 T ra n sp orta tion , com m u n ica tion , and other public u tilitie s.
4 Inclu des data fo r s e r v ic e s in addition to those in d u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
5 F in a n ce , in su ra n ce, and rea l esta te.
6 L e s s than 0.5 p ercen t.
7 Inclu des paym ents other than "len gth of t im e ," such as p ercen ta g e of annual earnings o r fla t -s u m paym ents, co n v e rte d to an equivalent tim e b a s is; fo r exa m p le,
a paym ent of 2 p ercen t o f annual earnings was c o n sid e re d as 1 w e e k 's pay. P e rio d s o f s e r v ic e w ere ch o se n a r b itr a r ily and do not n e c e s s a r ily r e fle c t the individual
p ro v is io n s fo r p r o g r e s s io n . F o r exa m p le, the changes in p ro p o rtio n s in d ica ted at 10 y e a r s ' s e r v ic e include changes in p ro v is io n s o c c u r r in g betw een 5 and 10 y e a r s .
E stim a tes a re cu m u la tive. Thus, the p rop ortion e lig ib le fo r 3 w e e k s' pay o r m o re a fter 10 y e a rs in clu d es those e lig ib le fo r 3 w e e k s ' pay o r m o re after fe w e r y e a rs
of s e r v ic e .




T able

B -6.

H ealth,

In su ra n ce,

and

P ension

Plans

(P e rc e n t of plant and o ffic e w o r k e rs in a ll in d u stries and in ind u stry d iv isio n s e m p loy ed in e sta b lish m en ts prov id in g
health, in su ra n ce, o r p en sion b e n e fits , A tlanta, G a ., M ay 1970)
P lant w o r k e rs
Type o f b en efit and
financing 1

Manu­
AH
in d u s tr ie s 2 facturing

O ffice w o r k e rs

P ublic
u tilitie s 3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

A ll
M anu­
ind ustries4 facturing

P ublic
u tilities 3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

Finance 5

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

96

100

98

96

96

99

100

99

100

98

99

L ife in s u ra n c e ________________________________
N on con trib u tory plans - _______ — ____
A ccid en ta l death and d ism em b erm en t
in su ra n ce-------------------------------------------------------N on con trib u tory plans - _ _
- S ick n ess and a ccid en t in su ra n ce o r
s ic k lea ve o r b o t h 6- ---- ------- ---------- —

96
63

100
70

98
78

96
53

93
45

99
57

99
73

99
72

100
57

95
35

99
47

73
46

83
60

77
51

83
32

53
21

80
39

86
62

84
46

87
51

42
13

86
21

75

82

86

67

74

84

89

96

82

88

77

S ick n ess and a ccid en t in su ra n ce______ N on con trib u tory p la n s _______ _______
S ick leave (fu ll pay and no
waiting p e r io d )_________ __ ___ ____ ___ ___
Sick lea ve (p a rtia l pay or
_—
waiting p eriod )
-

54
39

76
56

59
48

40
25

29
15

46
26

69
55

41
30

36
18

24
14

43
11

25

28

18

27

23

55

71

55

62

24

59

A ll w o r k e r s _________________________________
W ork ers in esta b lish m en ts p rov id in g at
lea st 1 of the b en efits shown b e lo w -

H osp ita liza tion in su ra n ce------------------------------N on con trib u tory p la n s ------------------------------S u rg ica l in su ra n ce- — ----- —
N on con trib u tory plans
— —- —
M ed ica l in s u r a n c e ____________________________
N on con trib u tory p la n s ____________________
M a jor m e d ic a l in s u r a n c e ____________________
N on con trib u tory p la n s ____________________
R etirem en t pension___________________________
N on con trib u tory plans —
—

18

5

51

11

31

18

7

37

14

56

1

92
50
92
50
82
44
75
37
65
57

99
63
99
63
86
55
70
36
68
65

98
71
98
71
86
59
84
70
84
76

91
32
91
32
86
32
86
32
72
58

87
24
87
24
80
23
85
24
60
47

97
38
97
38
92
37
95
40
81
61

98
61
98
61
96
60
96
53
74
71

99
56
99
56
95
54
94
75
77
72

96
29
96
29
95
29
94
25
89
52

88
14
88
14
67
14
87
14
76
34

99
25
99
25
99
25
99
25
92
69

1 E stim a tes lis te d a fter type o f b en efit a re fo r all plans fo r w h ich at le a st a p a rt o f the c o s t is b o rn e b y the e m p lo y e r. "N o n co n trib u to ry plan s" include only
those plans fin a n ced e n tire ly b y the e m p lo y e r. E xclu d ed a re le g a lly re q u ire d p lan s, such as w o r k m e n 's com p en sation , s o c ia l s e cu rity , and ra ilro a d re tire m e n t.
2 Includes data fo r r e a l estate and s e r v ic e s in addition to those ind u stry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra tely.
3 T ra n sp orta tion , co m m u n ica tion , and other p u b lic u tilitie s.
4 Includes data fo r s e r v ic e s in addition to th ose in d u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly.
5 F in a n ce, in s u ra n c e , and re a l estate.
6 U nduplicated total of w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k lea ve o r s ick n e ss and a ccid e n t in su ra n ce shown se p a ra te ly below . S ick lea ve plans a re lim ite d to those w hich
d efin itely esta b lish at le a s t the m in im u m num ber of d a ys' pay that can be e xp e cte d b y each em p lo y e e . In form a l sick le a ve a llow an ces d eterm in ed on an individual b a sis
a re excluded.




3 3

T a b le

B -7.

M ethod

of

W age

D eterm in a tion

and

F requ en cy

of

P aym ent

(P e r c e n t d istrib u tion of plant and o ffic e w o r k e rs in a ll in d u strie s and in industry d iv isio n s b y m ethod o f wage d e te rm in a tio n 1
and fre q u e n cy o f wage paym ent, A tlanta, G a ., May 1970)
O ffice w o rk e rs

Plant w o rk e rs
Item

A ll w o r k e r s ---------------

A li
in d u s trie s 2

--------------------------------

Manu­
facturing

P ublic
u tilities 3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

A ll
Manu­
in d u strie s4 facturing

P ublic
utilities 3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

Finance 5

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

91
63
33
30

89
74
42
31

99
77
36
41

99
55
21
34

84
49
21
27

99
57
5
53

100
61
1
60

100
61
26
35

100
49
49

99
60
5
55

100
60

18

24

27

5

11

11

32

20

-

10

-

3

3

4

11

-

18

18

4

31

3

26

9
28
9
4
3
1
2
2
3

4
16
11
9
6
3
2
2
-

9
22
(6 )
-

19
45
1

17
36
16
-

23
42
(6 )

10
39
-

11
39
-

19
51
-

43
39
(6 )

34
40
-

82
10
6
1

96
2
2
-

56
14
27
3

M ethod of wage d e te rm in a tio n 1
P aid tim e ra te s -----------------------------------------------------F o rm a l rate p o l ic y -----------------------------------------Single r a t e --------------------------------------------------Range of r a t e s --------------------------------------------P r o g r e s s io n b ased on autom atic
a dvancem ent a cco r d in g to
length o f s e r v i c e ----------------------------—
P r o g r e s s io n b ased on m e rit
re v ie w --------------------------------------------------P r o g r e s s io n based on a
com b in a tion o f length of
s e r v ic e and m e r it re v ie w ------------------No fo rm a l rate p o lic y -------------------------------------Paid by in cen tive m eth od s-----------------------------------P ie ce ra te---------------------------------------------------------In d iv id u a l---------------------------------------------------G roup-----------------------------------------------------------In d iv id u a l---------------------------------------------------G roup-----------------------------------------------------------C o m m is s io n ------------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

(6)

1

2
2
13

58
27
7
9

82
17
1
-

-

-

60

M ethod o f d eterm in in g in cen tiv e pay of
o ffic e w o r k e rs not p re se n te d

F req u en cy o f wage paym ent
W eek ly ____________________________________________
B iw eek ly----------------------------------------------------------------Sem im onthly----------------------------------------------------------M on th ly___________________________________________
Other fr e q u e n c y ----------------------------------------------------

1
2
3.
4
5
6

41
25
26
9

F o r a d e s c rip tio n of the m ethods o f wage d eterm in ation , see Introduction.
Includes data fo r re a l estate and s e r v ic e s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly.
T ra n sp orta tion , com m u n ica tion , and other pu blic u tilitie s.
Includes data fo r s e r v ic e s in addition to those ind u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
F inance, in su ra n ce, and r e a l esta te.
L e s s than 0 .5 p e rce n t.




70
11
13
6

44
14
36
5

25
36
22
16

53
45
2

16
26
48
11

Appendix.

Occupational Descriptions

The prim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to a ssist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations workers who are em ployed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and
from area to area.
This perm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representing com parable job content.
Because of this emphasis on
interestablishm ent and interarea com parability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in
individual establishm ents or those prepared for other purposes.
In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field econom ists are instructed
to exclude working sup ervisors; apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, p art-tim e, tem porary, and probationary w orkers.

OFFICE
CLERK,

BILLER, MACHINE
P repares statements, b ills, and invoices on a machine other than an ordinary or e le ctro matic typew riter. May also keep record s as to billings or shipping charges or perform other
cle rica l work incidental to billing operations. For wage study purposes, b ille rs , m achine, are
cla ssified by type of machine, as follow s:
B iller, machine (billing m achine). Uses a special billing machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
F ish e r, Burroughs, e tc., which are com bination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills
and invoices from cu stom ers' purchase ord e rs , internally prepared o rd ers, shipping m em o­
randums, etc. Usually involves application of predeterm ined discounts and shipping charges,
and entry of n ecessary extensions, which m ay or m ay not be computed on the billing machine,
and totals which are autom atically accumulated by machine. The operation usually involves
a large number of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold
m achine.
B iller, machine (bookkeeping m achine). Uses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand, Elliott
F ish er, Remington Rand, e tc., which may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare
cu stom ers' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the sim ulta­
neous entry of figures on cu stom ers' ledger record . The machine autom atically accumulates
figures on a number of vertical columns and com putes, and usually prints autom atically the
debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform
and standard types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott F ish er, Sundstrand, Burroughs,
National Cash R egister, with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business
transactions.
Class A. Keeps a set of record s requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic
bookkeeping principles, and fam ilia rity with the structure of the particular accounting system
used. Determ ines proper record s and distribution of debit and credit item s to be used in each
phase of the work. May prepare consolidated rep orts, balance sheets, and other record s
by hand.
Class B. Keeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections of a set of record s usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, cu stom ers' accounts (not including a sim ple type of billing d escribed under b ille r,
m achine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory con trol, etc. May check or a ssist
in preparation of trial balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A. Under general d irection of a bookkeeper or accountant, has responsibility for
keeping one or m ore sections of a com plete set of books or record s relating to one phase
of an establishm ent's business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing subsidiary
ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable; examining and coding
invoices or vouchers with proper accounting distribution; and requires judgment and e xp eri­
ence in making proper assignations and allocations. May assist in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal entries; and m ay d irect cla ss B accounting clerk s.
Class B. Under supervision, perform s one or m ore routine accounting operations such
as posting simple journal vouchers or accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in
voucher reg isters; reconcilin g bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by
general ledgers, or posting sim ple cost accounting data. This job does not require a knowl­
edge of accounting and bookkeeping principles but is found in offices in which the m ore routine
accounting work is subdivided on a functional basis among several w orkers.




34

FILE

Class A . In an established filing system containing a number of varied subject matter
file s , cla ss ifie s and indexes file m aterial such as corresp on den ce, rep orts, technical docu­
m ents, etc. May also file this m aterial. May keep record s of various types in conjunction
with the file s. May lead a sm all group of low er level file clerks.
Class B. Sorts, cod es, and file s unclassified m aterial by simple (subject matter) head­
ings or partly cla ssified m aterial by finer subheadings. P repares simple related index and
cr o s s -r e fe r e n c e aids. As requested, locates cle a rly identified m aterial in files and forw ards
m aterial.
May p erform related c le rica l tasks required to maintain and service file s.
Class C . P erform s routine filing of m aterial that has already been cla ssified or which
is ea sily cla ssified in a sim ple serial cla ssification system (e .g ., alphabetical, ch ronological,
or num erical). As requested, locates readily available m aterial in files and forw ards m a­
terial; and m ay fill out withdrawal charge. P erform s sim ple c le rica l and manual tasks r e ­
quired to maintain and service file s.
CLERK, ORDER
R eceives cu stom ers' ord ers for m aterial or m erchandise by m ail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any com bination of the follow in g: Quoting p rices to cu stom ers; making out an order
sheet listing the item s to make up the ord er; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be filled . May check with credit
department to determ ine credit rating of cu stom er, acknowledge receipt of ord ers from cu stom ers,
follow up ord ers to see that they have been filled , keep file of ord ers received , and check shipping
invoices with original ord ers.
CLERK, PAYROLL
Computes wages of company em ployees and enters the necessary data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve: Calculating w orkers' earnings based on time or production re co rd s; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing inform ation such as w o rk e r's name, working
days, tim e, rate, deductions fo r insurance, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and
a ssist paym aster in making up and distributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.
COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
P rim ary duty is to operate a Com ptom eter to p erform mathematical computations. This
job is not to be confused with that of statistical or other type of clerk , which may involve f r e ­
quent use of a Com ptom eter but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to perform ance of
other duties.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Class A . Operates a num erical a n d /or alphabetical or com bination keypunch machine to
transcribe data from various source documents to keypunch tabulating ca rd s. P erform s same
tasks as lower level keypunch operator but, in addition, work requires application of coding
skills and the making of some determ inations, fo r exam ple, locates on the source document
the item s to be punched; extracts inform ation from several docum ents; and searches for and
interprets inform ation on the document to determ ine inform ation to be punched. May train
inexperienced op erators.

35
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR-

SECRETARY— Continued

lontinued

Class B. Under close supervision or following specific procedures or instructions,
transcribes data from source documents to punched ca rd s. Operates a num erical and/or
alphabetical or combination keypunch machine to keypunch tabulating cards. May verify cards.
Working from various standardized source docum ents, follow s specified sequences which have
been coded or prescribed in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting
of data to be punched. Problem s arising from erroneous items or cod es, m issing information,
etc., are referred to supervisor.

d. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, fa ctory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 p e rso n s; or
e. Secretary to the head of a large and important organizational segment (e .g ., a middle
management supervisor of an organizational segment often involving as many as several
hundred persons) of a company that em ploys, in all, over 25, 000 p e rso n s.
Class C

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
P erform s various routine duties such as running errands, operating m inor office m a­
chines such as sealers or m ailers, opening and distributing m ail, and other m inor cle rica l work.
SECRETARY
A ssigned as personal secreta ry, norm ally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the d a y-to-d ay work activities of the supervisor. Works fa irly inde­
pendently receiving a minimum of detailed supervision and guidance. P erform s varied cle rica l
and secreta rial duties, usually including m ost of the follow ing: (a) R eceives telephone ca lls,
personal ca lle rs, and incoming m ail, answers routine inquiries, and routes the technical inquiries
to the proper persons; (b) establishes, maintains, and revises the su p ervisor's file s; (c) maintains
the su p ervisor's calendar and makes appointments as instructed; (d) relays m essages from super­
visor to subordinates; (e) reviews correspon den ce, memoranda, and reports prepared by others
for the s u p ervisor's signature to assure procedural and typographic accu racy; and (f) perform s
stenographic and typing work.
May also perform other cle rica l and secretarial tasks of com parable nature and difficulty.
The work typically requires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
p rogram s, and procedures related to the work of the supervisor.
Exclusions
.Not all positions that are titled "s e c re ta ry " possess the above ch a ra cteristics. Examples
of positions which are excluded from the definition are as follow s: (a) Positions which do not meet
the "p erson al" secreta ry concept d escribed above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in secretarial
type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a group of professional, technical,
or m anagerial persons; (d) secreta ry positions in which the duties are either substantially m ore
routine or substantially m ore com plex and responsible than those ch aracterized in the definition;
and (e) assistant type positions which involve m ore difficult or m ore responsible technical, admin­
istrative, supervisory, or specialized cle rica l duties which are not typical of secreta rial work.
NOTE: The term "corp ora te o ffic e r ," used in the level definitions following, refers to
those officia ls who have a significant corporate-w ide policymaking role with regard to m ajor
company activities. The title "v ice p residen t," though norm ally indicative of this role, does not
in all cases identify such positions. Vice presidents whose prim ary responsibility is to act per­
sonally on individual cases or transactions (e.g ., approve or deny individual loan or credit actions;
adm inister individual trust accounts; d irectly supervise a cle rica l staff) are not considered to be
"corp ora te o ffice rs " for purposes of applying the following level definitions.
Class A
a. Secretary to the chairm an of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
all, over 100 but few er than 5,000 p erson s; or
b. Secretary to a corporate o ffice r (other than the chairm an of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000 p e rs o n s ; or
c. S ecretary to the head (im m ediately below the corporate o ffice r level) of a m ajor
segment or subsidiary of a com pany that em ploys, in all, over 25, 000 p e rso n s.
Class B
a. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a company that em ploys, in
all, fewer than 100 p erson s; or
b. S ecreta ry to a corporate o ffice r (other than the chairman of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 p e rso n s; or
c. S ecretary to the head (im m ediately below
corporate-w id e functional activity (e.g ., marketing,
tions, etc.) o_r a m ajor geographic or organizational
a m ajor division) of a company that em ploys, in
em p loy ees; or




the o ffice r level) over either a m ajor
resea rch , operations, industrial re la ­
segment (e .g ., a regional headquarters;
all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000

a. S ecretary to an executive or m anagerial person whose responsibility is not equivalent
to one of the s p e cific level situations in the definition fo r class B, but whose subordinate staff
norm ally numbers at least several dozen em ployees and is usually divided into organizational
segments which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In some com panies, this level includes
a wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; c>r
b. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, fa ctory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in all, few er than 5, 000 p e rs o n s .
Class D
a. S ecretary to the supervisor or head of a sm all organizational unit (e .g ., few er than
about 25 or 30 p erson s); o£
b. S ecretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, profession a l em ployee, adm inistra­
tive o ffice r, or assistant, skilled technician or expert. (NOTE: Many com panies assign
stenographers, rather than secreta ries as d escribed above, to this level of sup ervisory or
nonsupervisory w orker.)
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
P rim ary duty is to take dictation involving a normal routine vocabulary from one or m ore
persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar m achine; and transcribe dictation. May
also type from written copy. May maintain file s , keep sim ple re co rd s, or perform other relatively
routine cle rica l tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool. Does not include transcribin gmachine work. (See transcribing-m achine op era tor.)
STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
P rim ary duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary
such as in legal b riefs or reports on scientific research from one or m ore persons either in short­
hand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from written
copy. May also set up and maintain file s, keep re co rd s, etc.
OR
P erform s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and resp on si­
bility than stenographers, general as evidenced by the following: Work requires high degree of
stenographic speed and accu racy; and a thorough working knowledge of general business and office
procedures and of the specific business operations, organization, p o licies, p roced u res, file s,
workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in perform ing stenographic duties and responsible cle rica l
tasks such as, maintaining followup file s; assem bling m aterial for reports, m emorandum s, letters,
etc.; com posing simple letters from general instructions; reading and routing incom ing m ail; and
answering routine questions, etc. Does not include transcribing-m achine work.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Class A . Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incom ing,
outgoing, intraplant or office ca lls. P e rfo rm s full telephone inform ation se rv ice or handles
com plex ca lls, such as con ference, co lle ct, oversea s, or sim ilar ca lls, either in addition to
doing routine work as d escribed fo r switchboard operator, cla ss B, or as a full-tim e
assignment. ("F u ll" telephone inform ation s ervice occu rs when the establishm ent has varied
functions that are not readily understandable for telephone inform ation purposes, e .g ., because
of overlapping or interrelated functions, and consequently present frequent problem s as to
which extensions are appropriate for calls.)
Class B. Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incom ing,
outgoing, intraplant or o ffice ca lls. May handle routine long distance calls and re co rd tolls.
May p erform lim ited telephone inform ation se rvice . ("L im ited " telephone inform ation service
o ccu rs if the functions of the establishm ent serviced are readily understandable fo r telephone
inform ation purposes, or if the requests are routine, e .g ., giving extension numbers when
sp ecific names are furnished, or if com plex calls are referred to another operator.)

36
SW ITCHBOARD O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T

TABU EA TIN G -M A C H IN E

In a d d i t i o n to p e r f o r m i n g d u t i e s o f o p e r a t o r on a s i n g l e - p o s i t i o n o r m o n i t o r - t y p e s w i t c h ­
b o a r d , a c t s a s r e c e p t i o n i s t and m a y a l s o t y pe o r p e r f o r m r o u t i n e c l e r i c a l w o r k a s p a r t o f r e g u l a r
duties.
T h is ty p i n g o r c l e r i c a l w o r k m a y ta ke the m a j o r p a r t o f this w o r k e r ' s t i m e w h i l e at
sw itchboard.

O P E R A T O R ---- C o n t i n u e d

Class C .
O p e r a t e s s i m p l e t a b u l a t i n g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e s su c h a s the
s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c i n g p u nc h, c o l l a t o r , e t c . , w ith s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s .
M ay include sim p le
w i r i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s and s o m e f i li n g w o r k .
The w o rk ty pica lly in volves portion s of a w o rk
uni t, f o r e x a m p l e , i n d iv i d u a l s o r t i n g o r c o l l a t i n g ru n s o r r e p e t i t i v e o p e r a t i o n s .
T R A N S CRIBIN G -M ACH IN E

T A BU LA TIN G -M ACH IN E

OPERATOR,

GENERAL

OPERATOR

Class A .
O p e r a t e s a v a r ie t y of tabulating o r e l e c t r i c a l acco u n tin g m a c h in e s , ty p ica lly
i n c lu d in g s u c h m a c h i n e s a s the t a b u l a t o r ,
calculator,
i n t e r p r e t e r , c o l l a t o r , and o t h e r s .
P e r f o r m s c o m p l e t e r e p o r t i n g a s s i g n m e n t s w it h o u t c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n , and p e r f o r m s d i f f i c u l t
w ir in g as r e q u ire d .
T h e c o m p l e t e r e p o r t i n g and t a b u l a t i n g a s s i g n m e n t s t y p i c a l l y in v o l v e a
v a r i e t y o f lo n g and c o m p l e x r e p o r t s w h i c h o f t e n a r e o f i r r e g u l a r o r n o n r e c u r r i n g t y p e r e ­
q u i r i n g s o m e pl a n n in g and s e q u e n c i n g o f s t e p s to b e ta k e n . A s a m o r e e x p e r i e n c e d o p e r a t o r ,
is t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e d in t r a i n i n g ne w o p e r a t o r s in m a c h i n e o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t i a l l y t r a i n e d
o p e r a t o r s in w i r i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s and o p e r a t i n g s e q u e n c e s o f lo n g and c o m p l e x r e p o r t s .
D o e s not i n c l u d e w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s p e r f o r m i n g t a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t i o n s and d a y - t o d a y s u p e r v i s i o n o f the w o r k and p r o d u c t i o n o f a g r o u p o f t a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s .

C l a s s B . O p e r a t e s m o r e d i f f i c u l t t a b u l a t i n g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e s s u c h a s the
t a b u l a t o r and c a l c u l a t o r , in a d d i t i o n to the s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c e r , and c o l l a t o r .
T h i s w o r k is
p e r f o r m e d u n d e r s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s and m a y i n c l u d e t he p e r f o r m a n c e o f s o m e w i r i n g f r o m
d ia g r a m s . The w o rk ty pica lly in v o lv e s ,
for e x a m p le , tabulations
involving a repetitive
a c c o u n t i n g e x e r c i s e , a c o m p l e t e but s m a l l t a b u l a t i n g s t u d y , o r p a r t s o f a l o n g e r and m o r e
com p lex report.
S u ch r e p o r t s and s t u d i e s a r e u s u a l l y o f a r e c u r r i n g n a t u re w h e r e the p r o ­
c e d u re s are w ell establish ed.
M a y a l s o i n c l u d e the t r a i n i n g o f ne w e m p l o y e e s in the b a s i c
o p e r a t i o n o f the m a c h i n e .

PROFESSIONAL

P r i m a r y duty is t o t r a n s c r i b e d i c t a t i o n i n v o l v i n g a n o r m a l r o u t i n e v o c a b u l a r y f r o m
tra n scribin g-m ach in e rec ord s.
M a y a l s o t y p e f r o m w r i t t e n c o p y and d o s i m p l e c l e r i c a l w o r k .
W o r k e r s t r a n s c r i b i n g d i c t a t i o n i n v o l v i n g a v a r i e d t e c h n i c a l o r s p e c i a l i z e d v o c a b u l a r y s u c h a s le g a l
b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s o n s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h a r e not i n c l u d e d .
A w o r k e r w h o t a k e s d i c t a t i o n in s h o r t ­
hand o r b y S t e n o t y p e o r s i m i l a r m a c h i n e is c l a s s i f i e d a s a s t e n o g r a p h e r , g e n e r a l .
TYPIST
U s e s a t y p e w r i t e r to m a k e c o p i e s o f v a r i o u s m a t e r i a l o r t o m a k e out b i l l s a f t e r c a l c u l a ­
t i o n s h a ve b e e n m a d e b y a n o t h e r p e r s o n .
M ay include typing of s t e n c ils , m a ts , or s im ila r m a te ­
r i a l s f o r u s e in d u p l i c a t i n g p r o c e s s e s .
M a y d o c l e r i c a l w o r k i n v o l v i n g li t t le s p e c i a l t r a i n i n g , s u c h
as k e e p i n g s i m p l e r e c o r d s , f i l i n g r e c o r d s and r e p o r t s , o r s o r t i n g and d i s t r i b u t i n g i n c o m i n g m a i l .
Class A .
P e r f o r m s o n e o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g : T y p i n g m a t e r i a l in fi na l f o r m w h e n it
in v o lv e s c om b in in g m a te r ia l f r o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s o r r e s p o n s i b il ity for c o r r e c t sp elling,
s y l l a b i c a t i o n , p u n c t u a t io n , e t c . , o f t e c h n i c a l o r u n u s u a l w o r d s o r f o r e i g n la n g u a g e m a t e r i a l ;
and p l a n n in g la y o u t and t y p i n g o f c o m p l i c a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l t a b l e s t o m a i n t a i n u n i f o r m i t y and
b a l a n c e in s p a c i n g .
M a y t y pe r o u t i n e f o r m l e t t e r s v a r y i n g d e t a i l s to sui t c i r c u m s t a n c e s .
C l a s s B . P e r f o r m s o n e o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g ; C o p y t y p i n g f r o m r o u g h o r c l e a r d r a f t s ;
r o u t i n e t y p i n g o f f o r m s , i n s u r a n c e p o l i c i e s , e t c . ; and se t t i n g up s i m p l e s t a n d a r d t a b u l a t i o n s ,
o r c o p y i n g m o r e c o m p l e x t a b l e s a l r e a d y s e t u p and s p a c e d p r o p e r l y .

TECHNICAL

COMPUTER OPERATOR

COMPUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS

M onitors and operates the control con sole of a digital com puter to p ro ce ss data according
to operating instructions, usually prepared by a p rogra m er. Work includes m ost of the follow ing:
Studies instructions to determ ine equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with required
item s (tape reels, ca rd s, etc.); switches necessary auxiliary equipment into circu it, and starts
and operates com puter; makes adjustments to com puter to co r re ct operating problem s and meet
special conditions; reviews e rr o rs made during operation and determ ines cause or re fe rs problem
to sup ervisor or p rog ra m er; and maintains operating record s. May test and assist in correctin g
program .

Converts statements of business prob lem s, typically prepared by a system s analyst, into
a sequence of detailed instructions which are required to solve the problem s by automatic data
p rocessin g equipment. Working from charts or diagram s, the program er develops the p recise
instructions which, when entered into the com puter system in coded language, cause the manipu­
lation of data to achieve d esired results. Work involves m ost of the follow ing; Applies knowledge
of computer capabilities, m athem atics, lo gic em ployed by com puters, and particular subject matter
involved to analyze charts and diagram s of the problem to be program ed. Develops sequence
of p rogram steps, w rites detailed flow charts to show ord er in which data will be p ro ce sse d ;
converts these charts to coded instructions for machine to follow ; tests and c o r re cts p rogram s;
prepares instructions fo r operating personnel during production run; analyzes, review s, and alters
program s to increase operating e fficien cy or adapt to new requirem ents; maintains record s of
p rogram developm ent and revision s. (NOTE; W orkers perform ing both system s analysis and p r o ­
graming should be cla ssifie d as system s analysts if this is the skill used to determ ine their pay.)

F or wage study purposes, com puter operators are cla ssifie d as follow s;
Class A . Operates independently, or under only general d irection, a com puter running
program s with m ost of the following ch a ra cteristics; New program s are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requirem ents are of critica l im portance to m inim ize downtime; the
program s are of com plex design so that identification of e rr o r source often requires a working
knowledge of the total p rogram , and alternate program s may not be available. May give
direction and guidance to low er level operators.
Class B. Operates independently, or under only general d irection, a com puter running
program s with m ost of the following ch a ra cteristics; Most of the program s are established
production runs, typically run on a regularly recurring b a sis; there is little or no testing
of new program s required; alternate program s are provided in case original program needs
m ajor change or cannot be corrected within a reasonable time. In com m on e rr o r situations,
diagnoses cause and takes c o r re ctiv e action. This usually involves applying p reviou sly p r o ­
gram ed co rre ctiv e steps, or using standard co rre ctio n techniques.

Does not include em ployees prim arily responsible fo r the management or supervision of
other electron ic data p rocessin g (EDP) em ployees, or p rogra m ers p rim arily concerned with
scien tific a n d /o r engineering problem s.
F or wage study purposes, p rogram ers are cla ssifie d as follow s;
Class A . Works independently or under only general d irection on com plex problem s which
require com petence in all phases of program ing concepts and p ra ctices. Working from dia­
gram s and charts which identify the nature of d esired results, m ajor p rocessin g steps to be
accom plished, and the relationships between various steps of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of program ing actions needed to efficiently utilize the com puter system
in achieving d esired end products.

OR
Operates under d irect supervision a com puter running program s or segments of program s
with the ch aracteristics d escrib ed for cla ss A. May a ssist a higher level operator by inde­
pendently perform ing less difficult tasks assigned, and perform ing difficult tasks following
detailed instructions and with frequent review of operations p erform ed.
Class C. W orks on routine program s under close supervision. Is expected to develop
working knowledge of the com puter equipment used and ability to detect problem s involved in
running routine program s. Usually has received som e form al training in com puter operation.
May a ssist higher level operator on com plex program s.




At this level, program ing is difficult because com puter equipment must be organized to
produce several interrelated but diverse products from numerous and diverse data elements.
A wide variety and extensive number of internal p rocessin g actions must occu r. This requires
such actions as development of com m on operations which can be reused, establishment of
linkage points between operations, adjustments to data when program requirem ents exceed
com puter storage capacity, and substantial manipulation and resequencing of data elements
to fo rm a highly integrated program .
May provide functional direction to low er level p rog ra m ers who are assigned to assist.

37
COM PU TER PROGRAM ER,

B U S IN E S S — C o n t in u e d

C O M P U TE R SYSTEM S A N A L Y S T ,

C la s s B .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n l y g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n on r e l a t i v e l y s i m p l e
p r o g r a m s , o r on s im p le s e g m e n ts o f c o m p le x p r o g r a m s .
P r o g r a m s ( o r s e g m e n t s ) u s u a l ly
p r o c e s s in f o r m a t i o n to p r o d u c e d a ta in tw o o r t h r e e v a r i e d s e q u e n c e s o r f o r m a t s . R e p o r t s
a n d l i s t i n g s a r e p r o d u c e d b y r e f i n i n g , a d a p t in g , a r r a y i n g , o r m a k in g m i n o r a d d i t io n s t o o r
d e l e t i o n s f r o m in p u t d a ta w h ic h a r e r e a d i l y a v a il a b l e .
W h ile n u m e r o u s r e c o r d s m a y b e
p r o c e s s e d , th e d a ta h a v e b e e n r e f i n e d in p r i o r a c t io n s s o th a t th e a c c u r a c y a n d s e q u e n c i n g
o f d a ta c a n b e t e s t e d b y u s in g a fe w r o u t in e c h e c k s .
T y p i c a l l y , th e p r o g r a m d e a l s w ith
r o u t in e r e c o r d - k e e p i n g t y p e o p e r a t i o n s .
OR
W o r k s on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s ( a s d e s c r i b e d f o r c l a s s A) u n d e r c l o s e d i r e c t i o n o f a h i g h e r
le v e l p r o g r a m e r o r s u p e r v is o r .
M a y a s s i s t h i g h e r l e v e l p r o g r a m e r b y in d e p e n d e n t ly p e r ­
fo r m in g le s s d iffic u lt ta s k s a s s ig n e d , and p e r fo r m in g m o r e d iffic u lt ta s k s u n d e r fa ir ly c lo s e
d ir e c t io n .
M a y g u id e o r i n s t r u c t l o w e r l e v e l p r o g r a m e r s .

B U S IN E S S

A n a ly z e s b u s i n e s s p r o b l e m s t o f o r m u l a t e p r o c e d u r e s f o r s o l v i n g t h e m b y u s e o f e l e c t r o n i c
da ta p r o c e s s i n g e q u ip m e n t . D e v e l o p s a c o m p l e t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f a l l s p e c i f i c a t i o n s n e e d e d t o e n a b le
p r o g r a m e r s t o p r e p a r e r e q u i r e d d i g it a l c o m p u t e r p r o g r a m s . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g ;
A n a ly z e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r o p e r a t i o n s t o b e a u t o m a t e d and i d e n t if ie s c o n d it i o n s a n d c r i t e r i a r e q u i r e d
to a c h i e v e s a t i s f a c t o r y r e s u l t s ; s p e c i f i e s n u m b e r a n d t y p e s o f r e c o r d s , f i l e s , a n d d o c u m e n t s to
b e u s e d ; o u t li n e s a c t io n s t o b e p e r f o r m e d b y p e r s o n n e l a n d c o m p u t e r s in s u f f i c i e n t d e t a il f o r
p r e s e n t a t i o n t o m a n a g e m e n t a n d f o r p r o g r a m i n g ( t y p i c a l l y t h is i n v o l v e s p r e p a r a t i o n o f w o r k and
d a ta f l o w c h a r t s ) ; c o o r d i n a t e s th e d e v e l o p m e n t o f t e s t p r o b l e m s a n d p a r t i c i p a t e s in t r i a l ru n s o f
n ew a n d r e v i s e d s y s t e m s ; a n d r e c o m m e n d s e q u ip m e n t c h a n g e s t o o b t a in m o r e e f f e c t i v e o v e r a l l
o p e r a t i o n s . (N O T E ; W o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g b o th s y s t e m s a n a l y s is and p r o g r a m i n g s h o u ld b e c l a s ­
s i f i e d a s s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s i f t h is is th e s k i l l u s e d t o d e t e r m in e t h e ir p a y .)
D o e s n o t in c lu d e e m p l o y e e s p r i m a r i l y r e s p o n s i b l e f o r th e m a n a g e m e n t o r s u p e r v i s i o n o f
o t h e r e l e c t r o n i c d a ta p r o c e s s i n g (E D P ) e m p l o y e e s , o r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s p r i m a r i l y c o n c e r n e d w ith
s c i e n t i f i c o r e n g in e e r in g p r o b l e m s .
F o r w age

s tu d y p u r p o s e s ,

sy stem s

a n a ly s ts

a re

c la s s ifie d

f u n c t io n a l

d ir e c t io n

to lo w e r le v e l s y s te m s

a n a ly s ts w h o a re

a s s ig n e d

to

C la s s B .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o n p r o b l e m s th a t a r e
r e l a t i v e l y u n c o m p l i c a t e d t o a n a l y z e , p la n , p r o g r a m , a n d o p e r a t e . P r o b l e m s a r e o f li m it e d
c o m p l e x i t y b e c a u s e s o u r c e s o f in p u t d a ta a r e h o m o g e n e o u s a n d th e ou tp u t d a ta a r e c l o s e l y
r e la te d .
( F o r e x a m p l e , d e v e l o p s s y s t e m s f o r m a in t a in in g d e p o s i t o r a c c o u n t s in a b a n k ,

MAINTENANCE
CARPENTER,

M A IN T E N A N C E

P e r f o r m s th e c a r p e n t r y d u t ie s n e c e s s a r y t o c o n s t r u c t a n d m a in t a in in g o o d r e p a i r b u ild in g
w o o d w o r k a n d e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s b i n s , c r i b s , c o u n t e r s , b e n c h e s , p a r t i t i o n s , d o o r s , f l o o r s , s t a i r s ,
c a s i n g s , a n d t r i m m a d e o f w o o d in a n e s t a b l is h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : P la n n in g
a n d la y in g o u t o f w o r k f r o m b l u e p r i n t s , d r a w i n g s , m o d e l s , o r v e r b a l in s t r u c t i o n s u s in g a v a r i e t y




C l a s s C . W o r k s u n d e r i m m e d ia t e s u p e r v i s i o n , c a r r y i n g o u t a n a l y s e s a s a s s i g n e d , u s u a l ly
o f a s i n g le a c t i v i t y .
A s s i g n m e n t s a r e d e s ig n e d t o d e v e l o p a n d e x p a n d p r a c t i c a l e x p e r i e n c e
in th e a p p l ic a t i o n o f p r o c e d u r e s a n d s k i l l s r e q u i r e d f o r s y s t e m s a n a l y s i s w o r k . F o r e x a m p le ,
m a y a s s i s t a h i g h e r l e v e l s y s t e m s a n a ly s t b y p r e p a r i n g th e d e t a il e d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s r e q u i r e d
b y p r o g r a m e r s f r o m i n f o r m a t io n d e v e l o p e d b y th e h i g h e r l e v e l a n a ly s t .

C la s s A .
P la n s th e g r a p h i c p r e s e n t a t i o n o f c o m p l e x i t e m s h a v in g d i s t i n c t i v e d e s ig n
f e a t u r e s th a t d i f f e r s i g n i f i c a n t l y f r o m e s t a b l i s h e d d r a f t in g p r e c e d e n t s . W o r k s in c l o s e s u p ­
p o r t w ith th e d e s ig n o r i g i n a t o r , a n d m a y r e c o m m e n d m i n o r d e s ig n c h a n g e s .
A n a ly z e s th e
e f f e c t o f e a c h c h a n g e on th e d e t a il s o f f o r m , fu n c t io n , a n d p o s i t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s o f c o m ­
p o n e n ts and p a r ts .
W o r k s w it h a m in i m u m o f s u p e r v i s o r y a s s i s t a n c e .
C o m p le t e d w o r k is
r e v i e w e d b y d e s ig n o r i g i n a t o r f o r c o n s i s t e n c y w it h p r i o r e n g in e e r in g d e t e r m i n a t i o n s .
M ay
e it h e r p r e p a r e d r a w i n g s , o r d i r e c t t h e i r p r e p a r a t i o n b y l o w e r l e v e l d r a f t s m e n .
C l a s s B . P e r f o r m s n o n r o u t in e a n d c o m p l e x d r a f t in g a s s i g n m e n t s th a t r e q u i r e th e a p p l i ­
c a t io n o f m o s t o f th e s t a n d a r d iz e d d r a w in g t e c h n i q u e s r e g u l a r l y u s e d .
D u t ie s t y p i c a l l y i n ­
v o lv e s u ch w o r k a s ;
P r e p a r e s w o r k i n g d r a w i n g s o f s u b a s s e m b l i e s w ith i r r e g u l a r s h a p e s ,
m u lt i p l e f u n c t io n s , a n d p r e c i s e p o s i t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s b e t w e e n c o m p o n e n t s ; p r e p a r e s a r c h i ­
t e c t u r a l d r a w i n g s f o r c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a b u ild in g in c lu d in g d e t a il d r a w i n g s o f f o u n d a t i o n s , w a l l
s e c t i o n s , f l o o r p l a n s , a n d r o o f . U s e s a c c e p t e d f o r m u l a s a n d m a n u a ls in m a k in g n e c e s s a r y
c o m p u t a t i o n s t o d e t e r m i n e q u a n t it ie s o f m a t e r i a l s t o b e u s e d , lo a d c a p a c i t i e s , s t r e n g t h s ,
s t r e s s e s , etc.
R e c e i v e s in it ia l i n s t r u c t i o n s , r e q u i r e m e n t s , a n d a d v ic e f r o m
s u p e r v is o r .
C o m p le t e d w o r k i s c h e c k e d f o r t e c h n i c a l a d e q u a c y .
C l a s s C . P r e p a r e s d e t a il d r a w i n g s o f s i n g le u n its o r p a r t s f o r e n g i n e e r i n g , c o n s t r u c t i o n ,
m a n u fa c t u r i n g , o r r e p a i r p u r p o s e s . T y p e s o f d r a w i n g s p r e p a r e d in c lu d e i s o m e t r i c p r o j e c t i o n s
( d e p i c t in g t h r e e d i m i n s i o n s in a c c u r a t e s c a l e ) a n d s e c t i o n a l v ie w s to c l a r i f y p o s it i o n in g o f
c o m p o n e n t s a n d c o n v e y n e e d e d in f o r m a t io n . C o n s o l i d a t e s d e t a i l s f r o m a n u m b e r o f s o u r c e s
a n d a d ju s t s o r t r a n s p o s e s s c a l e a s r e q u i r e d .
S u g g e s t e d m e t h o d s o f a p p r o a c h , a p p l ic a b l e
p r e c e d e n t s , a n d a d v ic e o n s o u r c e m a t e r i a l s a r e g iv e n w ith in it ia l a s s i g n m e n t s . I n s t r u c t io n s
a r e le s s c o m p le t e w h en a s s ig n m e n ts r e c u r .
W o r k m a y b e s p o t - c h e c k e d d u r in g p r o g r e s s .
D R A F T S M A N -T R A C E R

as fo llo w s :

C la s s A .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n on c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s
in v o l v i n g a ll p h a s e s o f s y s t e m s a n a l y s i s . P r o b l e m s a r e c o m p l e x b e c a u s e o f d i v e r s e s o u r c e s
o f in p u t d a ta a n d m u l t i p l e - u s e r e q u i r e m e n t s o f o u tp u t d a ta . ( F o r e x a m p le , d e v e l o p s an i n t e ­
g r a t e d p r o d u c t i o n s c h e d u l in g , in v e n t o r y c o n t r o l , c o s t a n a l y s i s , and s a l e s a n a l y s is r e c o r d in
w h ic h e v e r y it e m o f e a c h ty p e is a u t o m a t i c a ll y p r o c e s s e d t h r o u g h th e f u l l s y s t e m o f r e c o r d s
and a p p r o p r i a t e f o l lo w u p a c t io n s a r e in it ia t e d b y th e c o m p u t e r . ) C o n f e r s w it h p e r s o n s c o n ­
c e r n e d t o d e t e r m i n e th e d a ta p r o c e s s i n g p r o b l e m s and a d v i s e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l on
th e i m p l i c a t i o n s o f n e w o r r e v i s e d s y s t e m s o f d a ta p r o c e s s i n g o p e r a t i o n s .
M akes r e c o m ­
m e n d a t io n s , i f n e e d e d , f o r a p p r o v a l o f m a j o r s y s t e m s in s t a l la t io n s o r c h a n g e s a n d f o r
o b t a in in g e q u ip m e n t .
M a y p r o v id e
a s s is t.

OR
W o r k s o n a s e g m e n t o f a c o m p l e x d a ta p r o c e s s i n g s c h e m e o r s y s t e m , a s d e s c r i b e d f o r
c l a s s A . W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o n r o u t in e a s s i g n m e n t s a n d r e c e i v e s i n s t r u c t i o n a n d g u id a n c e
on c o m p l e x a s s i g n m e n t s . W o r k is r e v i e w e d f o r a c c u r a c y o f ju d g m e n t , c o m p l i a n c e w ith in ­
s t r u c t i o n s , a n d t o in s u r e p r o p e r a li n e m e n t w ith th e o v e r a l l s y s t e m .

D RAFTSM AN

C la s s C .
M a k e s p r a c t i c a l a p p l ic a t i o n s o f p r o g r a m i n g p r a c t i c e s a n d c o n c e p t s u s u a l ly
l e a r n e d in f o r m a l t r a in i n g c o u r s e s . A s s i g n m e n t s a r e d e s ig n e d t o d e v e l o p c o m p e t e n c e in th e
a p p l ic a t i o n o f s t a n d a r d p r o c e d u r e s t o r o u t in e p r o b l e m s . R e c e i v e s c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n on n ew
a s p e c t s o f a s s i g n m e n t s ; and w o r k i s r e v i e w e d t o v e r i f y it s a c c u r a c y a n d c o n f o r m a n c e w ith
re q u ire d p r o c e d u r e s .

C O M P U TE R SYSTEM S A N A L Y ST ,

B U S IN E S S — C o n t in u e d

m a in t a in in g a c c o u n t s r e c e i v a b l e in a r e t a i l e s t a b l is h m e n t , o r m a in t a in in g i n v e n t o r y a c c o u n t s
in a m a n u fa c t u r i n g o r w h o l e s a l e e s t a b l is h m e n t .) C o n f e r s w ith p e r s o n s c o n c e r n e d t o d e t e r m in e
th e d a ta p r o c e s s i n g p r o b l e m s and a d v i s e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l o n th e i m p l i c a t i o n s o f the
d a ta p r o c e s s i n g s y s t e m s t o b e a p p l ie d .

C o p i e s p la n s a n d d r a w i n g s p r e p a r e d b y o t h e r s b y p l a c in g t r a c i n g c l o t h o r p a p e r o v e r
d r a w i n g s a n d t r a c i n g w ith p e n o r p e n c i l .
(D o e s n o t in c lu d e t r a c i n g li m i t e d t o p la n s p r i m a r i l y
c o n s i s t i n g o f s t r a i g h t li n e s a n d a l a r g e s c a l e n o t r e q u i r in g c l o s e d e l in e a t i o n . )
a n d /o r
P r e p a r e s s im p le
d u r in g p r o g r e s s .
NU RSE,

or

r e p e titiv e

IN D U S T R IA L

d r a w in g s

o f e a s ily v is u a liz e d

it e m s .

W o r k is

c lo s e ly

s u p e r v is e d

(R E G IS T E R E D )

A r e g i s t e r e d n u r s e w h o g i v e s n u r s in g s e r v i c e u n d e r g e n e r a l m e d i c a l d i r e c t i o n t o i l l o r
in ju r e d e m p l o y e e s o r o t h e r p e r s o n s w h o b e c o m e i l l o r s u f f e r a n a c c i d e n t on th e p r e m i s e s o f a
f a c t o r y o r o t h e r e s t a b l is h m e n t . D u t ie s in v o l v e a c o m b in a t i o n o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
G iv in g f i r s t a id
t o th e i l l o r i n ju r e d ; a tte n d in g t o s u b s e q u e n t d r e s s i n g o f e m p l o y e e s ' i n j u r i e s ; k e e p in g r e c o r d s
o f p a t ie n t s t r e a t e d ; p r e p a r i n g a c c i d e n t r e p o r t s f o r c o m p e n s a t io n o r o t h e r p u r p o s e s ; a s s i s t i n g in
p h y s i c a l e x a m i n a t i o n s a n d h e a lt h e v a l u a t i o n s o f a p p l ic a n t s and e m p l o y e e s ; a n d p la n n in g a n d c a r r y ­
in g o u t p r o g r a m s in v o l v i n g h e a lt h e d u c a t i o n , a c c i d e n t p r e v e n t i o n , e v a l u a t i o n o f p la n t e n v ir o n m e n t ,
o r o t h e r a c t i v i t i e s a f f e c t in g th e h e a lt h , w e l f a r e , a n d s a f e t y o f a l l p e r s o n n e l .

D POWERPLANT
CARPENTER,

M A IN T E N A N C E — C o n t in u e d

o f c a r p e n t e r 's h a n d t o o l s , p o r t a b l e p o w e r t o o l s , a n d s t a n d a r d m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; m a k in g
sta n d a rd sh op c o m p u ta tio n s r e la tin g to d im e n s io n s o f w o r k ; and s e le c t in g m a t e r ia ls n e c e s s a r y
f o r th e w o r k . In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e c a r p e n t e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d
e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .

38
E L E C T R IC IA N ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

M E C H A N IC ,

P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c a l t r a d e fu n c t io n s s u c h a s th e in s t a l l a t i o n , m a in t e n a n c e ,
o r r e p a i r o f e q u ip m e n t f o r th e g e n e r a t i o n , d i s t r i b u t i o n , o r u t i l i z a t i o n o f e l e c t r i c e n e r g y in an
e s t a b l is h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
I n s t a ll in g o r r e p a i r i n g a n y o f a v a r i e t y o f
e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , s w i t c h b o a r d s , c o n t r o l l e r s , c i r c u i t b r e a k ­
e r s , m o t o r s , h e a t in g u n i t s , c o n d u it s y s t e m s , o r o t h e r t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k i n g f r o m
b l u e p r i n t s , d r a w i n g s , la y o u t s , o r o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; l o c a t i n g a n d d i a g n o s in g t r o u b l e in th e
e l e c t r i c a l s y s t e m o r e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k i n g s t a n d a r d c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o lo a d r e q u i r e m e n t s o f
w i r i n g o r e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t ; a n d u s in g a v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c i a n 's h a n d t o o ls a n d m e a s u r i n g a n d
t e s t i n g in s t r u m e n t s . In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e e l e c t r i c i a n r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a i n ­
in g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g and
e x p e r ie n c e .
E N G IN E E R ,

S T A T IO N A R Y

O p e r a t e s a n d m a in t a in s a n d m a y a l s o s u p e r v i s e th e o p e r a t i o n o f s t a t io n a r y e n g in e s a n d
e q u ip m e n t (m e c h a n i c a l o r e l e c t r i c a l ) t o s u p p ly th e e s t a b l is h m e n t in w h ic h e m p l o y e d w it h p o w e r ,
h e a t, r e f r ig e r a t io n , o r a ir -c o n d it io n in g .
W o rk in v o lv e s :
O p e r a t i n g a n d m a in t a in in g e q u ip m e n t
s u c h a s s t e a m e n g in e s , a i r c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o t o r s , t u r b i n e s , v e n t ila t in g a n d r e f r i g ­
e r a t in g e q u ip m e n t , s t e a m b o i l e r s a n d b o i l e r - f e d w a t e r p u m p s ; m a k in g e q u ip m e n t r e p a i r s ; and
k e e p in g a r e c o r d o f o p e r a t i o n o f m a c h i n e r y , t e m p e r a t u r e , a n d f u e l c o n s u m p t i o n .
M a y a ls o su ­
p e r v is e th e se o p e r a tio n s .
H e a d o r c h i e f e n g i n e e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s e m p l o y in g m o r e th a n on e
e n g in e e r a r e e x c l u d e d .
F IR E M A N ,

S T A T IO N A R Y

B O IL E R

F i r e s s t a t io n a r y b o i l e r s t o f u r n is h th e e s t a b l is h m e n t in w h ic h e m p l o y e d w it h h e a t , p o w e r ,
o r s t e a m . F e e d s fu e l s t o f i r e b y h a n d o r o p e r a t e s a m e c h a n i c a l s t o k e r , o r g a s o r o i l b u r n e r ;
a n d c h e c k s w a t e r a n d s a f e t y v a l v e s . M a y c l e a n , o i l , o r a s s i s t in r e p a i r i n g b o i l e r r o o m e q u ip m e n t .
HELPER,

M A IN T E N A N C E

TRADES

A s s i s t s o n e o r m o r e w o r k e r s in th e s k i l l e d m a in t e n a n c e t r a d e s , b y p e r f o r m i n g s p e c i f i c
o r g e n e r a l d u tie s o f l e s s e r s k i l l , s u c h a s k e e p in g a w o r k e r s u p p l ie d w it h m a t e r i a l s a n d t o o l s ;
c l e a n in g .w o r k i n g a r e a , m a c h in e , a n d e q u ip m e n t ; a s s i s t i n g j o u r n e y m a n b y h o ld in g m a t e r i a l s o r
t o o l s ; a n d p e r f o r m i n g o t h e r u n s k il le d t a s k s a s d i r e c t e d b y j o u r n e y m a n .
T h e k in d o f w o r k th e
h e l p e r is p e r m i t t e d t o p e r f o r m v a r i e s f r o m t r a d e t o t r a d e :
In s o m e t r a d e s th e h e l p e r is c o n ­
fi n e d t o s u p p ly in g , li f t i n g , a n d h o ld in g m a t e r i a l s a n d t o o l s a n d c l e a n in g w o r k i n g a r e a s ; a n d in
o t h e r s he is p e r m i t t e d t o p e r f o r m s p e c i a l i z e d m a c h in e o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t s o f a t r a d e th a t a r e
a ls o p e r fo r m e d b y w o r k e r s on a fu ll-t im e b a s is .
M A C H I N E -T O O L O P E R A T O R ,

TOOLROOM

S p e c i a l i z e s in th e o p e r a t i o n o f o n e o r m o r e t y p e s o f m a c h in e t o o l s , s u c h a s j i g b o r e r s ,
c y l i n d r i c a l o r s u r f a c e g r i n d e r s , e n g in e la t h e s , o r m i l l i n g m a c h i n e s , in t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f
m a c h i n e - s h o p t o o l s , g a g e s , j i g s , f i x t u r e s , o r d i e s . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
P la n ­
n in g a n d p e r f o r m i n g d i f f i c u l t m a c h in in g o p e r a t i o n s ; p r o c e s s i n g i t e m s r e q u i r i n g c o m p l i c a t e d s e t u p s
o r a h ig h d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ; u s i n g a v a r i e t y o f p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; s e l e c t i n g f e e d s ,
s p e e d s , t o o l i n g , a n d o p e r a t i o n s e q u e n c e ; a n d m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s d u r in g o p e r a t i o n t o
a ch ie v e r e q u is it e t o le r a n c e s o r d im e n s io n s . M a y be r e q u ir e d to r e c o g n iz e w h en t o o ls n e e d d r e s s ­
in g , t o d r e s s t o o l s , a n d t o s e l e c t p r o p e r c o o l a n t s a n d c u t t in g a n d l u b r i c a t i n g o i l s . F o r c r o s s ­
in d u s t r y w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , m a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s , t o o l r o o m , in t o o l a n d d ie j o b b i n g s h o p s
a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
M A C H IN IS T ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

P r o d u c e s r e p l a c e m e n t p a r t s a n d n ew p a r t s in m a k in g r e p a i r s o f m e t a l p a r t s o f m e c h a n ­
i c a l e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t e d in a n e s t a b l is h m e n t .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
I n t e r p r e t in g
w r i t t e n i n s t r u c t io n s a n d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; p la n n in g a n d la y in g ou t o f w o r k ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f m a ­
c h i n i s t 's h a n d t o o ls a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; s e t t in g up a n d o p e r a t i n g s t a n d a r d m a c h in e
t o o l s ; s h a p in g o f m e t a l p a r t s t o c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ; m a k in g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o
d i m e n s i o n s o f w o r k , t o o l i n g , f e e d s , a n d s p e e d s o f m a c h in in g ; k n o w le d g e o f th e w o r k i n g p r o p e r t i e s
o f th e c o m m o n m e t a l s ; s e l e c t i n g s t a n d a r d m a t e r i a l s , p a r t s , a n d e q u ip m e n t r e q u i r e d f o r h is w o r k ;
a n d fi t t in g a n d a s s e m b l i n g p a r t s in to m e c h a n i c a l e q u ip m e n t .
In g e n e r a l , th e m a c h i n i s t 's w o r k
n o r m a l l y r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d t r a in i n g in m a c h i n e - s h o p p r a c t i c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .

M E C H A N IC ,

A U T O M O T I V E (M A I N T E N A N C E )

R e p a i r s a u t o m o b i l e s , b u s e s , m o t o r t r u c k s , a n d t r a c t o r s o f a n e s t a b l is h m e n t . W o r k in ­
v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
E x a m i n i n g a u t o m o t i v e e q u ip m e n t t o d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b l e ;
d i s a s s e m b l i n g e q u ip m e n t a n d p e r f o r m i n g r e p a i r s t h a t in v o l v e t h e u s e o f s u c h h a n d t o o ls a s
w r e n c h e s , g a g e s , d r i l l s , o r s p e c i a l i z e d e q u ip m e n t in d i s a s s e m b l i n g o r fi t t in g p a r t s ; r e p l a c i n g
b r o k e n o r d e f e c t i v e p a r t s f r o m s t o c k ; g r i n d i n g a n d a d ju s t in g v a l v e s ; r e a s s e m b l i n g a n d in s t a l li n g




A U T O M O T IV E

(M A I N T E N A N C E )— C o n t in u e d

th e v a r i o u s a s s e m b l i e s in th e v e h i c l e a n d m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s ; a n d a lin in g w h e e l s ,
a d ju s t in g b r a k e s a n d li g h t s , o r t ig h t e n in g b o d y b o l t s .
In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e a u t o m o t iv e
m e c h a n i c r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n ­
t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
M E C H A N IC ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

R e p a i r s m a c h i n e r y o r m e c h a n i c a l e q u ip m e n t o f a n e s t a b l is h m e n t .
W ork in v o lv e s m o s t
o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
E x a m in in g m a c h in e s a n d m e c h a n i c a l e q u ip m e n t t o d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b l e ;
d i s m a n t li n g o r p a r t l y d i s m a n t li n g m a c h in e s a n d p e r f o r m i n g r e p a i r s th a t m a in l y in v o l v e th e u s e
o f h a n d t o o ls in s c r a p i n g a n d fi t t in g p a r t s ; r e p l a c i n g b r o k e n o r d e f e c t i v e p a r t s w ith it e m s o b t a in e d
f r o m s t o c k ; o r d e r i n g th e p r o d u c t i o n o f a r e p l a c e m e n t p a r t b y a m a c h in e s h o p o r s e n d in g o f th e
m a c h in e t o a m a c h in e s h o p f o r m a j o r r e p a i r s ; p r e p a r i n g w r i t t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s f o r m a jo r r e p a i r s
o r f o r t h e p r o d u c t i o n o f p a r t s o r d e r e d f r o m m a c h in e s h o p ; r e a s s e m b l i n g m a c h in e s ; and m a k in g
a l l n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s f o r o p e r a t i o n .
In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f a m a in t e n a n c e m e c h a n i c r e ­
q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h i p o r
e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e . E x c l u d e d f r o m t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n a r e w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y
d u t ie s i n v o l v e s e t t in g up o r a d ju s t in g m a c h in e s .
M IL L W R IG H T
I n s t a ll s n ew m a c h in e s o r h e a v y e q u ip m e n t , a n d d i s m a n t le s a n d i n s t a l ls m a c h in e s o r
h e a v y e q u ip m e n t w h e n c h a n g e s in th e p la n t la y o u t a r e r e q u i r e d . W o r k in v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l ­
lo w i n g :
P la n n in g a n d la y in g ou t o f th e w o r k ; in t e r p r e t in g b l u e p r in t s o r o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; u s in g
a v a r i e t y o f h a n d t o o ls a n d r i g g i n g ; m a k in g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o s t r e s s e s ,
s t r e n g t h o f m a t e r i a l s , a n d c e n t e r s o f g r a v i t y ; a lin in g a n d b a l a n c in g o f e q u ip m e n t ; s e l e c t i n g s t a n d ­
a r d t o o l s , e q u ip m e n t , a n d p a r t s t o b e u s e d ; a n d in s t a l li n g a n d m a in t a in in g in g o o d o r d e r p o w e r
t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s d r i v e s a n d s p e e d r e d u c e r s .
In g e n e r a l , th e m i l l w r i g h t 's w o r k
n o r m a l l y r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e in th e t r a d e a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l
a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
O IL E R
L u b r i c a t e s , w it h o i l o r
e q u ip m e n t o f an e s t a b l is h m e n t .
P A IN T E R ,

grea se,

th e

m o v in g p a r t s

o r w e a r in g

s u r fa c e s

o f m e ch a n ica l

M A IN T E N A N C E

P a in t s a n d r e d e c o r a t e s w a l l s , w o o d w o r k , a n d f i x t u r e s o f a n e s t a b l is h m e n t .
W o rk in ­
v o l v e s th e f o l l o w i n g :
K n o w le d g e o f s u r f a c e p e c u l i a r i t i e s a n d t y p e s o f p a in t r e q u i r e d f o r d i f f e r e n t
a p p l i c a t i o n s ; p r e p a r i n g s u r f a c e f o r p a in t in g b y r e m o v i n g o l d f i n is h o r b y p l a c in g p u tty o r f i l l e r
in n a il h o l e s a n d i n t e r s t i c e s ; a n d a p p ly in g p a in t w it h s p r a y g u n o r b r u s h . M a y m ix c o l o r s , o i l s ,
w h it e le a d , a n d o t h e r p a in t i n g r e d i e n t s t o o b t a in p r o p e r c o l o r o r c o n s i s t e n c y .
In g e n e r a l , th e
w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e p a in t e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h
a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
P IP E F IT T E R ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

I n s t a ll s o r r e p a i r s w a t e r , s t e a m , g a s , o r o t h e r t y p e s o f p ip e a n d p i p e f it t in g s in an
e s t a b l is h m e n t .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
L a y in g ou t o f w o r k a n d m e a s u r i n g t o l o ­
c a t e p o s i t i o n o f p ip e f r o m d r a w i n g s o r o t h e r w r i t t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; c u ttin g v a r i o u s s i z e s o f p ip e
t o c o r r e c t le n g t h s w it h c h i s e l a n d h a m m e r o r o x y a c e t y l e n e t o r c h o r p i p e - c u t t i n g m a c h in e ; t h r e a d ­
in g p ip e w it h s t o c k s a n d d i e s ; b e n d in g p ip e b y h a n d - d r i v e n o r p o w e r - d r i v e n m a c h i n e s ; a s s e m b l i n g
p i p e w it h c o u p li n g s a n d fa s t e n i n g p ip e t o h a n g e r s ; m a k in g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g
t o p r e s s u r e s , f l o w , a n d s i z e o f p ip e r e q u i r e d ; a n d m a k in g s t a n d a r d t e s t s t o d e t e r m in e w h e t h e r
f i n is h e d p i p e s m e e t s p e c i f i c a t i o n s .
In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e p i p e f i t t e r r e q u i r e s
r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t
t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
W o r k e r s p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in in s t a l li n g a n d r e p a i r i n g b u ild in g s a n it a ­
t io n o r h e a t in g s y s t e m s a r e e x c l u d e d .
PLU M BER,

M A IN T E N A N C E

K e e p s th e p lu m b in g s y s t e m o f a n e s t a b l is h m e n t in g o o d o r d e r . W o r k i n v o l v e s : K n o w le d g e
o f s a n it a r y c o d e s r e g a r d in g i n s t a l la t io n o f v e n t s a n d t r a p s in p lu m b in g s y s t e m ; in s t a l li n g o r r e ­
p a i r in g p ip e s a n d f i x t u r e s ; a n d o p e n in g c l o g g e d d r a i n s w it h a p lu n g e r o r p l u m b e r 's s n a k e . In
g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e p l u m b e r r e q u i r e s r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly
a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
S H E E T -M E T A L W O R K E R ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

F a b r i c a t e s , i n s t a l l s , a n d m a in t a in s in g o o d r e p a i r th e s h e e t - m e t a l e q u ip m e n t a n d f i x ­
t u r e s (s u c h a s m a c h in e g u a r d s , g r e a s e p a n s , s h e l v e s , l o c k e r s , t a n k s , v e n t i l a t o r s , c h u t e s , d u c t s ,
m e t a l r o o f i n g ) o f a n e s t a b l is h m e n t .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
P la n n in g a n d la y in g
ou t a ll t y p e s o f s h e e t - m e t a l m a in t e n a n c e w o r k f r o m b l u e p r i n t s , m o d e l s , oj* o t h e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ;
s e t t i n g up a n d o p e r a t i n g a ll a v a il a b l e t y p e s o f s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k i n g m a c h in e s ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f

39
S H E E T -M E T A L

WORKER,

M A IN T E N A N C E ---- C o n t in u e d

T O O L A N D D IE M A K E R — C o n t in u e d

h a n d t o o ls in c u t t in g , b e n d in g , f o r m i n g , s h a p in g , f i t t in g , a n d a s s e m b l i n g ; and in s t a l li n g s h e e t m e t a l a r t i c l e s a s r e q u i r e d . In g e n e r a l , th e w o r k o f th e m a in t e n a n c e s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r r e q u i r e s
ro u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t
t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
T O O L A N D D IE M A K E R
(D ie

m a k er; jig

m a k e r ; t o o l m a k e r ; fi x t u r e

m a k er;

gage

m a k er)

C o n s t r u c t s a n d r e p a i r s m a c h i n e - s h o p t o o l s , g a g e s , j i g s , fi x t u r e s o r d i e s f o r f o r g i n g s ,
p u n c h in g , and o t h e r m e t a l - f o r m i n g w o r k .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
P la n n in g and
la y in g ou t o f w o r k f r o m m o d e l s , b lu e p r in t s , d r a w i n g s , o r o t h e r o r a l a n d w r i t t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ;

u s in g a v a r i e t y o f t o o l a n d d ie m a k e r *s h a n d t o o ls a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t r u m e n t s ; u n d e r ­
s t a n d in g o f th e w o r k i n g p r o p e r t i e s o f c o m m o n m e t a l s a n d a l l o y s ; s e t t in g up a n d o p e r a t i n g o f
m a c h in e t o o l s a n d r e l a t e d e q u ip m e n t ; m a k in g n e c e s s a r y s h o p c o m p u t a t io n s r e l a t i n g to d i m e n s i o n s
o f w o r k , s p e e d s , f e e d s , and t o o li n g o f m a c h in e s ; h e a t - t r e a t in g o f m e t a l p a r t s d u r in g f a b r i c a t i o n
a s w e l l a s o f f i n is h e d t o o l s a n d d i e s t o a c h i e v e r e q u i r e d q u a l i t i e s ; w o r k in g t o c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ;
fit t in g a n d a s s e m b l i n g o f p a r t s t o p r e s c r i b e d t o l e r a n c e s a n d a l l o w a n c e s ; a n d s e l e c t i n g a p p r o p r ia t e
m a t e r ia ls , t o o ls , and p r o c e s s e s .
In g e n e r a l , th e t o o l and d ie m a k e r 's w o r k r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d
t r a in i n g in m a c h i n e - s h o p a n d t o o l r o o m p r a c t i c e u s u a l ly a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h i p
o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .

shop s

F o r c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s ,
a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .

t o o l and

d ie

m a k ers

in

t o o l a n d d ie j o b b in g

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT

S H IP P IN G A N D R E C E I V I N G

GUARD AND W ATCH M AN
G uard.
P e r f o r m s r o u t in e p o l i c e d u t i e s , e i t h e r at f i x e d p o s t o r on t o u r , m a in t a in in g
o r d e r , u s in g a r m s o r f o r c e w h e r e n e c e s s a r y .
I n c lu d e s g a t e m e n w h o a r e s t a t io n e d a t g a te
and c h e c k o n id e n t it y o f e m p l o y e e s a n d o t h e r p e r s o n s e n t e r i n g .
W a tch m a n .
M a k e s ro u n d s
t h e ft , a n d i l l e g a l e n t r y .
J A N IT O R ,

PORTER,

(S w e e p e r ;

OR

o f p r e m is e s

p e r i o d i c a l l y in p r o t e c t i n g

p r o p e r t y a g a in s t f i r e ,

CLEANER

ch a rw om a n ; ja n itre s s )
F o r w age

C l e a n s and k e e p s in a n o r d e r l y c o n d it i o n f a c t o r y w o r k i n g a r e a s a n d w a s h r o o m s , o r
p r e m i s e s o f an o f f i c e , a p a r t m e n t h o u s e , o r c o m m e r c i a l o r o t h e r e s t a b l is h m e n t . D u t ie s in v o lv e
a c o m b in a t i o n o f th e f o l l o w i n g : S w e e p in g , m o p p in g o r s c r u b b i n g , a n d p o l is h in g f l o o r s ; r e m o v i n g
c h i p s , t r a s h , a n d o t h e r r e f u s e ; d u s t in g e q u ip m e n t , fu r n it u r e , o r f i x t u r e s ; p o l is h in g m e t a l f i x t u r e s
o r t r i m m i n g s ; p r o v id i n g s u p p l ie s a n d m in o r m a in t e n a n c e s e r v i c e s ; and c l e a n in g l a v a t o r i e s , s h o w ­
e r s , a n d r e s t r o o m s . W o r k e r s w h o s p e c i a l i z e in w in d o w w a s h in g a r e e x c l u d e d .
LABORER,

M A T E R I A L H A N D L IN G

A w o r k e r e m p l o y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c t u r in g p la n t , s t o r e , o r o t h e r e s t a b l is h m e n t
w h o s e d u tie s in v o l v e o n e o r m o r e o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
L o a d in g a n d u n lo a d in g v a r i o u s m a t e r i a l s and
m e r c h a n d i s e o n o r f r o m fr e ig h t c a r s , t r u c k s , o r o t h e r t r a n s p o r t i n g d e v i c e s ; u n p a c k in g , s h e l v in g ,
o r p l a c in g m a t e r i a l s o r m e r c h a n d i s e in p r o p e r s t o r a g e lo c a t i o n ; a n d t r a n s p o r t i n g m a t e r i a l s o r
m e r c h a n d is e b y h a n d tru ck , c a r , o r w h e e lb a r r o w .
L o n g s h o r e m e n , w h o lo a d a n d u n lo a d s h ip s a r e
excluded.

R e c e iv in g c le r k
S h ip p in g c l e r k
S h ip p in g a n d r e c e i v i n g

w ork ers

a re

c la s s ifie d

as

fo llo w s :

c le r k

D r i v e s a t r u c k w it h in a c i t y o r in d u s t r ia l a r e a to t r a n s p o r t m a t e r i a l s , m e r c h a n d i s e ,
e q u ip m e n t , o r m e n b e t w e e n v a r i o u s t y p e s o f e s t a b l is h m e n t s s u c h a s : M a n u fa c t u r in g p la n t s , f r e ig h t
d e p o t s , w a r e h o u s e s , w h o l e s a l e a n d r e t a i l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , o r b e t w e e n r e t a i l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and
c u s t o m e r s * h o u s e s o r p l a c e s o f b u s i n e s s . M a y a l s o lo a d o r u n lo a d t r u c k w it h o r w ith o u t h e l p e r s ,
m a k e m in o r m e c h a n i c a l r e p a i r s , and k e e p t r u c k in g o o d w o r k i n g o r d e r .
D r i v e r - s a l e s m e n and
o v e r -t h e - r o a d d r iv e r s a re e x c lu d e d .
F o r w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s , t r u c k d r i v e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d b y s i z e a n d t y p e o f e q u ip m e n t ,
as fo llo w s :
( T r a c t o r - t r a i l e r s h o u ld b e r a t e d o n th e b a s i s o f t r a i l e r c a p a c i t y .)

F IL L E R

(O r d e r

p ick e r;

stock

s e le c to r ; w areh ou se

stock m a n )

F i l l s s h ip p in g o r t r a n s f e r o r d e r s f o r fi n is h e d g o o d s f r o m s t o r e d m e r c h a n d is e in a c c o r d ­
a n c e w ith s p e c i f i c a t i o n s on s a le s s l i p s , c u s t o m e r s * o r d e r s , o r o t h e r i n s t r u c t i o n s . M a y , in a d d i t i o n
to fi l l i n g o r d e r s and in d ic a t in g it e m s f i l l e d o r o m it t e d , k e e p r e c o r d s o f o u t g o in g o r d e r s , r e q u i ­
s i t io n a d d it io n a l s t o c k o r r e p o r t s h o r t s u p p l ie s t o s u p e r v i s o r , and p e r f o r m o t h e r r e l a t e d d u t i e s .

T r u c k d r iv e r (c o m b in a tio n o f s iz e s lis t e d s e p a r a te ly )
T r u c k d r i v e r , lig h t (u n d e r 1V2 t o n s )
T r u c k d r i v e r , m e d iu m ( 1 V2 t o and in c lu d in g 4 to n s )
T r u c k d r iv e r , h e a v y (o v e r 4 t o n s , t r a il e r ty p e)
T r u c k d r i v e r , h e a v y ( o v e r 4 t o n s , o t h e r th a n t r a i l e r ty p e )

TRUCKER,
PACKER.

s tu d y p u r p o s e s ,

T R U C K D R IV E R

( L o a d e r a n d u n l o a d e r ; h a n d le r a n d s t a c k e r ; s h e l v e r ; t r u c k e r ; s t o c k m a n o r s t o c k h e l p e r ; w a r e ­
h o u se m a n o r w a r e h o u s e h e lp e r)

ORDER

CLERK

P r e p a r e s m e r c h a n d i s e f o r s h i p m e n t , o r r e c e i v e s a n d is r e s p o n s i b l e f o r in c o m in g s h i p ­
m e n ts o f m e r c h a n d is e o r o th e r m a te r ia ls .
S h ip p in g w o r k i n v o l v e s : A k n o w le d g e o f s h ip p in g
p r o c e d u r e s , p r a c t i c e s , r o u t e s , a v a il a b l e m e a n s o f t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , a n d r a t e ; a n d p r e p a r i n g r e c ­
o r d s o f th e g o o d s s h i p p e d , m a k in g up b i l l s o f la d in g , p o s t in g w e ig h t a n d s h ip p in g c h a r g e s , and
k e e p in g a f i l e o f s h ip p in g r e c o r d s .
M a y d i r e c t o r a s s i s t in p r e p a r i n g th e m e r c h a n d i s e f o r s h i p ­
m en t.
R e c e i v i n g w o r k i n v o l v e s : V e r i f y i n g o r d i r e c t i n g o t h e r s in v e r i f y i n g th e c o r r e c t n e s s o f
s h ip m e n t s a g a in s t b i l l s o f la d in g , i n v o i c e s , o r o t h e r r e c o r d s ; c h e c k i n g f o r s h o r t a g e s a n d r e j e c t i n g
d a m a g e d g o o d s ; r o u t in g m e r c h a n d i s e o r m a t e r i a l s t o p r o p e r d e p a r t m e n t s ; a n d m a in t a in in g n e c e s ­
s a r y r e c o r d s and file s .

POW ER

S H IP P IN G

P r e p a r e s fi n is h e d p r o d u c t s f o r s h ip m e n t o r s t o r a g e b y p l a c in g t h e m in s h ip p in g c o n ­
t a i n e r s , th e s p e c i f i c o p e r a t i o n s p e r f o r m e d b e in g d e p e n d e n t u p o n th e t y p e , s i z e , a n d n u m b e r o f
u n its to b e p a c k e d , th e ty p e o f c o n t a in e r e m p l o y e d , a n d m e t h o d o f s h ip m e n t . W o r k r e q u i r e s the
p l a c in g o f it e m s in s h ip p in g c o n t a in e r s a n d m a y in v o l v e o n e o r m o r e o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
K n o w l­
e d g e o f v a r io u s it e m s o f s t o c k in o r d e r t o v e r i f y c o n t e n t ; s e l e c t i o n o f a p p r o p r ia t e t y p e a n d s i z e
o f c o n t a i n e r ; in s e r t i n g e n c l o s u r e s in c o n t a i n e r ; u s in g e x c e l s i o r o r o t h e r m a t e r i a l t o p r e v e n t
b r e a k a g e o r d a m a g e ; c l o s i n g a n d s e a li n g c o n t a i n e r ; a n d a p p ly in g la b e ls o r e n t e r i n g id e n t if y in g
d a ta o n c o n t a in e r . P a c k e r s w h o a l s o m a k e w o o d e n b o x e s o r c r a t e s a r e e x c l u d e d .




O p era tes a
t r a n s p o r t g o o d s and
e s t a b l is h m e n t .

m a n u a lly c o n t r o l l e d
g a s o l i n e - o r e l e c t r i c - p o w e r e d t r u c k o r t r a c t o r to
m a t e r i a l s o f a ll k in d s a b o u t a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c t u r in g p la n t , o r o t h e r

F o r w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d b y t y p e o f t r u c k , a s f o l l o w s :
T ru ck er,
T ru ck er,

pow er
pow er

( f o r k l if t )
(o t h e r th a n f o r k l i f t )




A v a ila b le O n R e q u e s t

The tenth annual r e p o r t on s a l a r i e s f o r a c c o u n t a n t s , a u d i t o r s , a t ­
torneys,
chem ists, engineers, engineering technicians, draftsm en,
t r a c e r s , j o b a n a l y s t s , d i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l , b u y e r s , and c l e r i c a l
em ployees.
O r d e r as BL S Bu l l e ti n 1654, N at io na l S u r v e y of P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d ­
m i n i s t r a t i v e , T e c h n i c a l , and C l e r i c a l P a y , June 19 6 9. S e v e n t y - f i v e
cent s a c o p y .

Area Wage Surveys
A lis t o f the l a t e s t a v a ila b le b u lle tin s is p r e s e n t e d b e l o w . A d i r e c t o r y o f a r e a w a g e stu d ie s in clu d in g m o r e l i m i t e d stu d ie s c o n d u c t e d at the
r e q u e s t o f the W a ge and H o u r and P u b l i c C o n t r a c t s D i v i s i o n s o f the D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r is a v a ila b le on r e q u e s t . B u lle tin s m a y b e p u r c h a s e d f r o m
the S u perin ten den t o f D o c u m e n t s , U.S. G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W a s h in g to n , D . C . , 20402, o r f r o m any o f the BLS r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s s h o w n on
the in s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .

Area
A k r o n , O h io , J u ly 1969 *----------------------------------------------------A lb a n y— c h e n e c t a d y - T r o y , N . Y . , F e b . 1970-----------------S
A lb u q u e r q u e , N. M e x . , M a r . 1 970 1___ ____ _______ __
Alle n to w n — e t h le h e m — a s to n , P a . —N .J ., M a y 1969-----B
E
Atla nta, G a . , M a y 1970 1 ---------------------------------------------------B a l t i m o r e , M d . , Aug. 1969-----------------------------------------------B e a u m o n t— o r t Arth u r—O r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1969 1_____
P
B in gh a m to n , N . Y . , J u ly 1969-------------------------------------------- B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , M a r . 1970------------------------------------------B o i s e C ity, Idaho, N o v . 1969-------------------------------------------B o s to n , M a s s . , A u g . 1969------------------------------------------------B u ffa lo , N . Y ., O ct. 1969----------------------------------------------------B u rlin g to n , V t . , M a r . 1970_______________________________
Cant on, O h io , M a y 1 9 6 9 ----------------------------------------------------C h a r le s t o n , W. V a . , A p r . 1970 1---------------------------------------C h a r lo tt e , N . C . , M a r . 1970 1 --------------------------- —--------------C h atta n ooga, T e n n . - G a . , Sept. 1969--------------------------------C h ic a g o , 111., A p r . 1969 1 --------------------------------------------------C in cin n a ti, O h io — y.—I n d . , F e b . 1970----------------------------K
C le v e la n d , O h io , Sept. 1969--------------------------------------------- C o lu m b u s , O h i o , O c t . 1969-----------------------------------------------D a lla s , T e x . , O ct . 1969----------------------------------------------------D a v e n p o rt— o c k I sla nd— o l i n e , Iowa—
R
M
111.,
O ct. 1969 1_______________________________________, __________
D ayton , O h io , D e c . 1969___________________________________
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1969 1---------- — ------ ------------------ —-----D e s M o i n e s , Iow a, M a r . 1969-------------------------------------------D e t r o it , M i c h . , F e b . 1970-------------------------------------------------F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , O ct. 1969--------------------------------------------G r e e n B a y, W i s . , J u ly 1 9 6 9 ----------------------------------------------G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M a y 1969 1--------------------------------------------H o u s to n , T e x . , A p r . 1970--------------------------------------------------In d ia n a p o lis , Ind., O ct . 1969--------------------------------------------J a c k s o n , M i s s . , Jan. 1970------------------------------------------------J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , D e c . 1969-----------------------------------------K a n s a s C ity, M o . - K a n s , , Sept. 1969-------------------------------L a w r e n c e — a v e r h il l, M a s s . — .H ., June 1 9 6 9 ---------------H
N
L it tle R o c k — o rt h L it tle R o c k , A r k . , J u ly 1969---------- N
L o s A n g e l e s —Lon g B e a c h and A n a h e im —
Santa A n a G a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , M a r . 1970---------------------------------L o u i s v i l l e , K y.—Ind., Nov. 1969 1-------------------------------------L u b b o c k , T e x . , M a r . 1 9 7 0 1 --------------------------------------------- M a n c h e s t e r , N .H ., J u ly 1969-------------------------------------------- M e m p h i s , Ten n.—A r k . , N o v. 1969 1_______________________
M i a m i , F l a . , N o v . 1969---------------------- -----------------------------M id la n d and O d e s s a , T e x . , Jan. 1 9 7 0 1__-----------------------M ilw a u k e e , W i s . , A p r . 1969_______________________________
M in n e a p o lis —St. P a u l, M in n ., Jan. 1970 1------------------------

B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r i c e
1625-89,
1660-51,
1660-55,
1625-86,
1660-76,
1 6 6 0 -1 1 ,
1625-75,
1660-5,
1660-57,
1660-34,
1660-16,
1 6 6 0 -2 9 ,
1660-53,
1625-73,
1660-68,
1660-61,
1660-9,
1625-82,
1660-49,
1660-22,
1660-27,
1660-23,

35
30
35
30
50
35
35
30
30
25
45
45
25
30
35
40
30
65
35
40
30
35

ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
cents
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts

1660-20,
1660-37,
1660-41,
1625-62,
1660-58,
1 6 6 0 -1 8 ,
1660-8,
1625-70,
1660-67,
1660-25,
1660-39,
1660-35,
1660-10,
1625-79,
1660-2,

35
30
40
30
35
30
30
35
35
30
30
30
35
30
30

ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts
cen ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
cen ts
ce n ts

1660-64,
1660-28,
1660-50,
1660-3,
1660-31,
1660-32,
1660-44,
1625-66,
1660-46,

45
40
35
30
40
30
35
35
50

ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
cen ts
cen ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts

l Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




A rea
M u s k e g o n — u s k e g o n H e i g h t s , M i c h . , M a y 1 9 6 9 ________
M
N e w a r k and J e r s e y C it y , N . J . , Jan. 1 9 7 0 1____________
New H av e n , C o n n ., Jan. 1970 1___________________________
New O r l e a n s , L a . , Jan. 1970___________________ __ _______
N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , A p r . 1969_____________________________ —
N o r f o l k — o r t s m o u t h and N e w p o r t New s—
P
H am pto n, V a . , Jan. 1970 1_________________ _____________
O k la h o m a C it y , O k l a . , J u ly 1969 1________________________
O m a h a , N e b r . —Iowa, Sept. 1969_________ ____ _________ _
P a t e r s o n — lif to n — a s s a i c , N .J ., M a y 1969_____________
C
P
P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . —N . J . , Nov. 1969 1______________________
P h o e n i x , A r i z . , M a r . 1970 1______________—_______________
P i t t s b u r g h , P a . , Jan. 1970 1_______________________________
P o r t l a n d , M a in e , Nov. 1969 1__________________________ __
P o r t l a n d , O r e g . —W a s h ., M a y 1969___ ____________________
P r o v i d e n c e — a w t u c k e t — a r w i c k , R.I.—M a s s .,
P
W
M a y 1970___________________________________________________
R a le ig h , N . C . , Aug. 1969_________________________________ R i c h m o n d , V a . , M a r . 1970 1 ______________________________
R o c h e s t e r , N .Y . ( o f f i c e o c c u p a t io n s on ly),
J u ly 1969___________________________________________________
R o c k f o r d , 111., M a y 1 9 6 9 __________________________________
St. L o u i s , M o .—111., M a r . 1970___________________________
Salt Lake C it y , Utah, Nov. 1969 *_______________________
San A n to n io , T e x . , M a y 197 0______________________________
San B e r n a r d i n o — iv e r s id e r - O n t a r i o , C a l i f . ,
R
D e c . 1 9 6 9 __________________________________________________
San D ie g o , C a l i f . , Nov. 1969 1____________________________
San F r a n c i s c o —
Oakla nd, C a l i f . , O ct . 1 9 6 9 1___________ _
San J o s e , C a l i f . , Sept. 1969 *___________________________ _
Savannah, G a . , M a y 1969____________________________ ______
S c r a n to n , P a . , J u ly 1969---------------------------------------------------Seattle—E v e r e t t , W a s h ., Jan. 1970_______________________
S io u x F a l l s , S. D a k., Sept. 1969____ _____________ ____ __
South B e n d, Ind., M a r . 1970 1_____________ ________________
Sp okane, W a s h ., June 1 9 6 9 ______—________________________
S y r a c u s e , N . Y . , J u ly 1969_______________ —________ __ ___
T a m p a—St. P e t e r s b u r g , F l a . , A u g. 1 9 6 9 * _________ __ __
T o l e d o , O h i o — i c h . , F e b . 1970_______ ________________ __
M
T ren t on, N . J . , Sept. 1969_________________________________
U t ica — o m e , N . Y ., J u ly 1969___ —- _______________________
R
W a s h in g t o n , D .C .—Md.—V a . , Sept. 1969 1________________
W a t e r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r . 1970 1________ __________________
W a t e r l o o , Iowa, Jan. 1970________________________ ________
W ic h it a , K a n s . , A p r . 1970 1 _______________________________
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , M ay 1970 1___________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1 9 7 0 1_____________________________________
Y o u n g s to w n — a r r e n , O h io , Nov. 1969 1_________________
W

B u lle t in n u m b e r
and p r i c e
1625-80,
1660-47,
1660-40,
1660-42,
1625-88,

30
50
35
30
60

ce n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts

1660-59,
1660-17,
1660-12,
1625-87,
1660-48,
1660-70,
1660-60,
1660-26,
1625-76,

35
35
30
35
60
35
50
35
30

c e n ts
c e n ts
cents
c e n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts

1660-72,
1660-6,
1660-65,

30 ce n ts
30 ce n ts
40 ce n ts

1660-4,
1625-72,
1660-66,
1660-30,
1660-71,

30
30
40
35
30

c e n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts

1660-43,
1660-36,
1660-33,
1660-24,
1625-68,
1 6 6 0 -1 5 ,
1660-52,
1660-14,
1660-62,
1625-81,
1 6 6 0 -1 3 ,
1 6 6 0 -7 ,
1660-56,
1 6 6 0 -2 1 ,
1660-1,
1660-19,
1660-54,
1660-45,
1660-69,
1660-78,
1660-63,
1660-38,

30
35
50
35
30
30
30
25
35
30
30
35
30
30
30
50
35
30
35
35
35
35

c e n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF L ABOR STA TI STI CS
WASHINGTON, D.C.

20212

O F F I C I A L BUSINESS




POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R

FIR ST CLASS M A IL


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102