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Area Wage Survey

The Denver, Colorado, Metropolitan Area
December 1969

B u lle tin

1 6 6 0 -4 1




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

R E01O N

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V

•R E G IO N
I

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nebr

C h ic a g o

KANS

K a n s a s C ity

OKLA
VIRGIN ISLANDS
A tla n ta

u

Puerto Rico
Region II
Region I
341 Ninth Ave.
1603-B Federal Building
New York, N. Y. 10001
Government Center
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region VI
Region V
337 Mayflower Building
219 South Dearborn St.
411 North Akard St.
Chicago, 111. 60604
Dallas, Tex. 75201
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St. , 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

* Regions VII and VIII will be serviced by Kansas City.
*
 * Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.


Area Wage Survey
The Denver, Colorado, Metropolitan Area




D ecem ber

1969

B u lle tin

1 6 6 0 -4 1
April 1970

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
George P. Shultz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 40 cents




P r e fa c e

C o n ten ts
P a ge

Th e B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s p r o g r a m of an n ual
o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s i s d e ­
s ig n e d to p r o v id e d a ta on o c c u p a tio n a l e a r n i n g s , and e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s a n d s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s . It
y ie ld s d e taile d d ata by se le c t e d in d u stry d iv isio n fo r each
of the a r e a s stu d ie d , f o r g e o g r a p h ic r e g i o n s , and f o r the
U n ited S t a t e s .
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in t h e p r o g r a m i s
t h e n e e d f o r g r e a t e r i n s i g h t in to (1) t h e m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s
b y o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e g o r y a n d s k i l l l e v e l , a n d (2) th e s t r u c ­
t u r e a n d l e v e l of w a g e s a m o n g a r e a s a n d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s .

Introduction____________ _____ ________________________________________________ 1
W age trends fo r s e le c te d occupational groups ____________________________
T a b les:
1. E stab lish m en ts and w o rk e rs w ithin scope o f s u rv e y and
number studied . __________________________________________ ________ 4
2. Indexes of standard w e e k ly s a la rie s and s tra ig h t-tim e
h ou rly earnings fo r s e le c te d occupational grou ps, and
p ercen ts of in c re a s e fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s _______________________

A t th e end of e a c h s u r v e y , a n in d iv id u al a r e a b u l ­
le tin p r e s e n t s s u r v e y r e s u l t s fo r e a c h a r e a stu d ied . A fte r
c o m p le t io n of a ll of the in d iv id u a l a r e a b u lle tin s f o r a ro un d
o f s u r v e y s , tw o s u m m a r y b u l l e t i n s a r e i s s u e d . T h e f i r s t
b r i n g s d a t a f o r e a c h o f t h e m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s s t u d i e d into
one b u lletin .
The se c o n d p r e s e n t s in fo r m a tio n w hich h a s
b e e n p r o j e c t e d f r o m i n d i v i d u a l m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a d a t a to
r e l a t e to g e o g r a p h ic r e g i o n s and the U n ited S t a t e s .

A.

N i n e t y a r e a s c u r r e n t l y a r e i n c l u d e d in t h e p r o ­
g r a m . In e a c h a r e a , i n f o r m a t i o n on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s
is c o l l e c t e d an n u a lly and on e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and
su p p le m e n ta r y w age p r o v is io n s b ien n ially .

B.

T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s r e s u l t s of t h e s u r v e y in
D e n v e r , C o l o . , in D e c e m b e r 1 9 6 9 .
The Stan d ard M e tr o ­
p o lit a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e fin e d b y the B u r e a u of the
B u d g e t th ro u g h J a n u a r y 1968, c o n s i s t s of A d a m s , A r a p a h o e ,
B o u l d e r , D e n v e r , and J e f f e r s o n C o u n tie s. T h is stu d y w a s
c o n d u c t e d b y t h e B u r e a u ' s r e g i o n a l o f f i c e in K a n s a s C i t y ,
M o . , u n d e r th e g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f E d w a r d C h a i k e n ,
A s s is ta n t R egion al D ire cto r for O p eration s.




5

O ccupational earn in gs:
A - l . O ffic e occupations— en and women____ ____ ________________ 7
m
A - 2 . P r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ical occupations—m en and
w o m e n—... . _ . .
___________________________________________
A -3 . O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and tech n ica l occupations—
m en and w om en com b in ed ------ ---------------- -------------------A -4 . M aintenance and pow erplan t occupations___________________
A -5 . Custodial and m a te r ia l m ovem en t occu p a tion s____________

10
11
13
14

E stablish m en t p ra c tic e s and su pplem entary w age p ro v is io n s :
B - l . M inim u m entrance s a la rie s fo r w om en o ffic e
B -2 .
B -3 .
B -4 .
B -5 .
B -6 .
B -7 .

Appendix.

17
Shift d iffe r e n t ia ls ________ ________________ __ _________________
Scheduled w e e k ly h o u rs ______________________________________
18
P a id h olid a ys_____________ _ ____ ____________________________
19
P a id v a c a tio n s _______ _ - —_____________________________________ 20
H ealth , insu rance, and pension plans---------------------------- 23
M ethod of w age d eterm in a tio n and freq u en cy of
p a y m e n t_ __ _____________________________________________________ 24
O ccupational d e s c r ip tio n s _______

areas.

NOTE:
S im ila r tab u latio n s a r e a v a ila b le
(See in sid e b a c k co v er.)

25
fo r other

A c u r r e n t r e p o r t on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s a n d s u p ­
p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s in t h e D e n v e r a r e a i s a l s o
a v a i l a b l e f o r th e m a c h i n e r y i n d u s t r i e s ( O c t o b e r 1 9 6 8 ).
U n i o n s c a l e s , i n d i c a t i v e of p r e v a i l i n g p a y l e v e l s , a r e
a v a ila b le fo r b uilding c o n str u c tio n ; p rin tin g ; l o c a l - t r a n s i t
o p e r a t in g e m p l o y e e s ; and m o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r s , h e l p e r s , and
a llie d occu pation s.

iii

6




f
A r e a

W

a g e

S u r v e y

T h e

D e n v e r ,

C o lo .,

M

e t r o p o lit a n

A r e a

Introduction
This a rea is 1 of 90 in which the U.S. D epartm ent of L a b o r 's
Bureau of L a b or S ta tistics conducts su rveys of occupational earnings
and re la te d ben efits on an a reaw id e b a s is .1 In this a re a , data w e re
obtained by p erson a l v is its of Bureau fie ld econom ists to r e p re s e n t­
a tive establishm ents within six broad industry d ivisio n s: Manu­
factu rin g; tran sp ortation , com m unication, and other public u tilitie s ;
w h o lesa le tra d e; r e ta il tra d e; fin an ce, insurance, and re a l estate; and
s e r v ic e s . M a jo r industry groups excluded fr o m these studies a re
governm ent operation s and the construction and e x tra c tiv e in du stries.
E stablish m en ts having fe w e r than a p re s c rib e d number of w o rk e rs are
om itted because th ey tend to furnish in su fficien t em ploym ent in the
occupations studied to w arran t inclusion. Separate tabulations are
p rovid ed fo r each of the broad industry d ivision s which m eet p u bli­
cation c r ite r ia .

O c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t and e a r n in g s d a ta a r e shown fo r
fu ll- tim e w o r k e r s , i .e ., th o se h ire d to w o rk a r e g u la r w ee k ly sch ed u le
in t h e g i v e n o c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
E a rn in g s d ata exclu d e p r e ­
m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , an d
late s h ifts.
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g
a llo w a n c e s and in cen tive e a r n in g s a r e in clu ded. W h ere w e e k ly h o u rs
a r e r e p o r t e d , a s f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e i s to th e
s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k ( r o u n d e d t o th e n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r) f o r w h i c h e m ­
p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e of p a y
fo r o v e r tim e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m iu m r a t e s ) . A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n ­
in g s fo r t h e s e o c c u p a tio n s h ave b e e n ro u n d ed to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o lla r .
The a v e r a g e s p re se n ted re fle ct com po site, areaw ide e s t i­
m ates.
I n d u s t r i e s a n d e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l a n d j o b
s t a f f i n g a n d , t h u s , c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to t h e e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h j o b .
T h e p a y r e l a t i o n s h i p o b t a i n a b l e f r o m t h e a v e r a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t
a c c u r a t e l y t h e w a g e s p r e a d o r d i f f e r e n t i a l m a i n t a i n e d a m o n g j o b s in
i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . S i m i l a r l y , d i f f e r e n c e s in a v e r a g e p a y l e v ­
e l s f o r m e n a n d w o m e n in a n y o f t h e s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s h o u l d
not b e a s s u m e d t o r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y t r e a t m e n t o f the s e x e s
w it h in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
O th er p o s s i b l e f a c t o r s w hich m a y
c o n t r i b u t e t o d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y f o r m e n a n d w o m e n i n c l u d e :
D iffer­
e n c e s i n p r o g r e s s i o n w it h in e s t a b l i s h e d r a t e r a n g e s , s i n c e o n l y t h e
a c t u a l r a t e s p a i d i n c u m b e n t s a r e c o l l e c t e d ; a n d d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c
d u ties p e r f o r m e d , although the w o r k e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d a p p r o p r ia t e ly
w it h in the s a m e s u r v e y j o b d e s c r i p t i o n .
J o b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d in
c l a s s i f y i n g e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d
t h a n t h o s e u s e d in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d a l l o w f o r m i n o r
d i f f e r e n c e s a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in th e s p e c i f i c d u t i e s p e r f o r m e d .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e c o n d u c t e d on a s a m p l e b a s i s b e c a u s e of
th e u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t i n v o l v e d in s u r v e y i n g a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
To
o b t a i n o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y a t m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n of
l a r g e t h a n of s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i s s t u d i e d . In c o m b i n i n g th e d a t a ,
h o w e v e r , a ll e s t a b li s h m e n t s a r e given t h e ir a p p r o p r ia te w eigh t.
E s­
t i m a t e s b a s e d on th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
a s r e l a t i n g t o a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the i n d u s t r y g r o u p i n g a n d a r e a ,
e x c e p t f o r t h o s e b elo w the m in im u m s i z e stu d ied .
O c c u p atio n s and E a r n in g s
The o c c u p a tio n s s e l e c t e d f o r stud y a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y
o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g a n d n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , a n d a r e o f th e
follow in g t y p e s :
(1) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l ;
(3) m a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t ; a n d (4) c u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m en t.
O c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n i s b a s e d on a u n i f o r m s e t o f j o b
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d t o t a k e a c c o u n t of i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in d u t i e s w it h in th e s a m e j o b .
The o c c u p a tio n s s e l e c t e d fo r study
a r e l i s t e d a n d d e s c r i b e d in t h e a p p e n d i x . T h e e a r n i n g s d a t a f o l l o w i n g
the jo b t it l e s a r e f o r a ll in d u s t r i e s c o m b in ed . E a r n i n g s d a ta fo r so m e
of t h e o c c u p a t i o n s l i s t e d a n d d e s c r i b e d , o r f o r s o m e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s
w i t h i n o c c u p a t i o n s , a r e not p r e s e n t e d in the A - s e r i e s t a b l e s , b e c a u s e
e i t h e r (1) e m p l o y m e n t in t h e o c c u p a t i o n i s t o o s m a l l to p r o v i d e e n o u g h
d a t a t o m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y of d i s c l o s u r e
of in d iv id u al e s ta b lis h m e n t d a ta .

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the t o t a l in
a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h in the s c o p e of the s t u d y a n d not th e n u m b e r
actu ally su rv ey ed.
B e c a u s e of d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , the e s t i m a t e s of o c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t o b ­
t a i n e d f r o m t h e s a m p l e of e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d s e r v e o n ly t o i n d i c a t e
th e r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e of t h e j o b s s t u d i e d .
T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in
o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e do not a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y t h e a c c u r a c y of th e
e ar n in g s data.
E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s and S u p p le m e n ta r y W age P r o v i s i o n s

1
Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under con tract with the New Yorik State
D epartm ent o f Labor. These areas are Bingham ton (New York portion only); R ochester (o ffice o cc u ­
pations only); Syracuse; and U tic a —R om e. In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ite d area studies
in 78 areas at the request of the Wage and Horn: and P ublic C ontracts D ivisions o f the U. S. D e­
partm ent o f Labor.




1

I n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d (in t h e B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) on s e l e c t e d
e s t a b lis h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v is io n s a s they
r e l a t e to plant and o ffic e w o r k e r s .
A d m i n i s t r a t i v e , e x e c u t i v e , an d
p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p l o y e e s , an d c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k e r s w ho a r e u t i l i z e d
a s a s e p a r a t e w ork fo r c e a r e exclu d ed .
" P l a n t w o r k e r s " i n c lu d e

2

w o r k i n g f o r e m e n a n d a l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s (i n c l u d i n g l e a d m e n a n d t r a i n e e s ) e n g a g e d in n o n o f f i c e f u n c t i o n s .
"O ffice w o r k e r s "
in clu d e w o rk in g s u p e r v i s o r s and n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g
c l e r i c a l or r e la te d fu n ction s.
C a f e t e r ia w o r k e r s and ro u te m e n a r e
e x c l u d e d in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , but i n c l u d e d in n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g
in d u stries.
M in im u m e n tr a n c e s a l a r i e s fo r w o m e n o ffic e w o r k e r s (table
B - l ) r e l a t e o n ly t o t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s v i s i t e d . B e c a u s e of th e o p t i m u m
s a m p l i n g t e c h n i q u e s u s e d , a n d th e p r o b a b i l i t y t h a t l a r g e e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s a r e m o r e lik e ly to h ave f o r m a l e n tr a n c e r a t e s fo r w o r k e r s
a b o v e the s u b c l e r i c a l l e v e l t h a n s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , the t a b l e i s
m o r e - r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of p o l i c i e s in m e d i u m a n d l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
S h i ft d i f f e r e n t i a l d a t a ( t a b l e B - 2 ) a r e l i m i t e d to p l a n t w o r k e r s
in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s .
T h i s i n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d b o th in
t e r m s of (1) e s t a b l i s h m e n t p o l i c y , 2 p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f t o t a l p l a n t
w o r k e r e m p l o y m e n t , a n d (2) e f f e c t i v e ' p r a c t i c e , p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s
of w o r k e r s a c t u a l l y e m p l o y e d on t h e s p e c i f i e d s h i f t a t t h e t i m e of the
survey.
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g v a r i e d d i f f e r e n t i a l s , the a m o u n t
a p p l y i n g to a m a j o r i t y w a s u s e d o r , if no a m o u n t a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y ,
th e c l a s s i f i c a t i o n " o t h e r " w a s u s e d . In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in w h i c h s o m e
la t e - sh ift h o u rs a r e paid at n o r m a l r a t e s , a d iffe r e n tia l w a s r e c o r d e d
o n ly i f it a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y o f th e s h i f t h o u r s .
T h e s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s ( t a b l e B - 3 ) of a m a j o r i t y of the
f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s in a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t a r e t a b u l a t e d a s a p p l y i n g to
a l l of th e p l a n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s of t h a t e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
Sch ed u led
w e e k ly h o u r s a r e t h o s e w h ich f u ll- t im e e m p lo y e e s w e r e e x p e c t e d to
w o rk , w h eth er th ey w e r e p a id fo r at s t r a i g h t - t i m e o r o v e r t im e r a t e s .
P a id h o lid a y s; p a id v a c a tio n s ; h ealth , in s u r a n c e , and p e n sio n
p la n s; and f r e q u e n c y o f w ag e p a y m en t (t a b le s B - 4 th ro u g h B - 7 )
a r e t r e a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l l y on th e b a s i s t h a t t h e s e a r e a p p l i c a b l e t o a l l
p l a n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s if a m a j o r i t y of s u c h w o r k e r s a r e e l i g i b l e o r
m a y e v e n tu a lly q u a lify fo r the p r a c t i c e s lis t e d .
S u m s of in dividual
i t e m s in t a b l e s B - 2 t h r o u g h B - 7 m a y not e q u a l t o t a l s b e c a u s e of
rounding.
D a t a on p a i d h o l i d a y s ( t a b l e B - 4 ) a r e l i m i t e d to d a t a on h o l i ­
d a y s g r a n t e d a n n u a l l y on a f o r m a l b a s i s ; i . e . , (1) a r e p r o v i d e d f o r
in w r i t t e n f o r m , o r (2) h a v e b e e n e s t a b l i s h e d b y c u s t o m .
H o lid ay s
o r d i n a r i l y g r a n t e d a r e i n c l u d e d e v e n t h o u g h t h e y m a y f a l l on a n o n ­
w o r k d a y a n d t h e w o r k e r i s not g r a n t e d a n o t h e r d a y o f f .
The f ir s t
2
An establishm ent was considered as having a po licy if it
ditions: (1) O perated late shifts at the tim e of the survey, or (2 ) had
late shifts. An establishm ent was considered as having form al provisions
shifts during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2) had provisions in
late shifts.




p a r t of th e p a i d h o l i d a y s t a b l e p r e s e n t s t h e n u m b e r of w h o l e a n d h a l f
h o lid a y s a c t u a l l y g r a n t e d . The s e c o n d p a r t c o m b in e s w hole and h alf
h o lid a y s to show to ta l h o lid a y t i m e .
Th e s u m m a r y of v a c a t io n p la n s (table B -5 ) i s lim ite d to a
s t a t i s t i c a l m e a s u r e of v a c a tio n p r o v i s io n s .
It i s n ot i n t e n d e d a s a
m e a s u r e of the p r o p o r t io n of w o r k e r s a c t u a lly r e c e iv in g s p e c i f i c b e n e ­
f i t s . P r o v i s i o n s of a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t f o r a l l l e n g t h s o f s e r v i c e w e r e
ta b u la te d a s a p p ly in g to a ll p lan t o r o ffic e w o r k e r s of the e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t, r e g a r d l e s s of len gth of s e r v i c e .
P r o v i s i o n s f o r p a y m e n t on
o th er than a t im e b a s i s w e r e c o n v e r t e d to a t im e b a s i s ; fo r e x a m p le ,
a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t o f a n n u a l e a r n i n g s w a s c o n s i d e r e d a s th e e q u i v ­
a l e n t o f 1 w e e k ' s p a y . E s t i m a t e s e x c l u d e v a c a t i o n - s a v i n g s p l a n s an d
t h o s e w hich o ffe r " e x t e n d e d " o r " s a b b a t i c a l " b e n e f its beyon d b a s i c
p l a n s t o w o r k e r s w it h q u a l i f y i n g l e n g t h s o f s e r v i c e . T y p i c a l o f s u c h
e x c l u s i o n s a r e p l a n s in t h e s t e e l , a l u m i n u m , a n d c a n i n d u s t r i e s .
D a t a on h e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , a n d p e n s i o n p l a n s ( t a b l e B - 6 ) i n ­
c l u d e t h o s e p l a n s f o r w h i c h th e e m p l o y e r p a y s a t l e a s t a p a r t o f the
c o s t . Su ch p la n s in clu d e t h o s e u n d e r w r it te n by a c o m m e r c i a l in s u r a n c e
c o m p a n y a n d t h o s e p r o v i d e d t h r o u g h a u n i o n fu n d o r p a i d d i r e c t l y b y
the e m p l o y e r out of c u r r e n t o p e r a t i n g f u n d s o r f r o m a fun d s e t a s i d e
for this p u r p o se .
A n e s t a b l i s h m e n t w a s c o n s i d e r e d to h a v e a p l a n
if th e m a j o r i t y o f e m p l o y e e s w a s e l i g i b l e t o b e c o v e r e d u n d e r th e
p l a n , e v e n if l e s s t h a n a m a j o r i t y e l e c t e d t o p a r t i c i p a t e b e c a u s e e m ­
p l o y e e s w e r e r e q u i r e d t o c o n t r i b u t e t o w a r d t h e c o s t of th e p l a n .
Le­
g a lly r e q u ir e d p la n s, su ch a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n sa tio n , s o c ia l s e ­
c u r it y , and r a i l r o a d r e t i r e m e n t w e r e e x c lu d e d .
S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e i s l i m i t e d t o t h a t t y p e of
i n s u r a n c e u n d e r w hich p r e d e t e r m i n e d c a s h p a y m e n t s a r e m a d e d i r e c t l y
to t h e i n s u r e d d u r i n g i l l n e s s o r a c c i d e n t d i s a b i l i t y .
In form ation is
p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l s u c h p l a n s to w h i c h t h e e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t e s .
How­
e v e r , in N e w Y o r k a n d N e w J e r s e y , w h i c h h a v e e n a c t e d t e m p o r a r y
d i s a b i l i t y i n s u r a n c e la w s w hich r e q u i r e e m p l o y e r c o n tr ib u tio n s , 3 p la n s
a r e i n c l u d e d o n ly if th e e m p l o y e r (1) c o n t r i b u t e s m o r e t h a n i s l e g a l l y
r e q u i r e d , o r (2) p r o v i d e s th e e m p l o y e e w it h b e n e f i t s w h i c h e x c e e d the
r e q u i r e m e n t s of th e l a w .
T a b u l a t i o n s of p a i d s i c k l e a v e p l a n s a r e
l i m i t e d to f o r m a l p l a n s 4 w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y o r a p r o p o r t i o n o f the
w o r k e r 's p a y d u rin g a b s e n c e f r o m w o rk b e c a u s e of i l l n e s s .
Separate
t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r e s e n t e d a c c o r d i n g t o (1) p l a n s w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y
a n d no w a i t i n g p e r i o d , a n d (2) p l a n s w h i c h p r o v i d e e i t h e r p a r t i a l p a y
o r a w a i t i n g p e r i o d . In a d d i t i o n t o t h e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f t h e p r o p o r t i o n s
o f w o r k e r s w ho a r e p r o v i d e d s i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e o r p a i d
s i c k l e a v e , a n u n d u p l i c a t e d t o t a l i s s h o w n of w o r k e r s w ho r e c e i v e
e i t h e r o r b o th t y p e s of b e n e f i t s .

m et either of the follow ing con­
The tem porary disability laws in C alifo rn ia and Rhode Island do not require em ployer
form al provisions covering
contributions.
if it (1 ) had op erated late
An establishm ent was considered as having a form al plan if it established at least the
w ritten form for operating
m inim um number o f days o f sick lea v e av ailab le to each em ploy ee.
Such a plan need not be
w ritten, but inform al sick lea v e allo w an ces, determ ined on an individual basis, were excluded.

3
M a jo r m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e i n c lu d e s th o s e p la n s w hich a r e d e ­
s i g n e d to p r o t e c t e m p l o y e e s i n c a s e o f s i c k n e s s an d i n j u r y i n v o l v i n g
e x p e n s e s b e y o n d the c o v e r a g e o f b a s i c h o s p i t a l i z a t i o n , m e d i c a l , and
s u r g ic a l p lan s.
M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e r e f e r s to p l a n s p r o v i d i n g f o r c o m ­
plete o r p a r t ia l p ay m en t of d o c t o r s ' f e e s .
Such p lan s m a y be u n d e r ­
w ritte n by c o m m e r c i a l i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n i e s o r n on p ro fit o r g a n i z a t i o n s
o r t h e y m a y b e p a i d f o r b y the e m p l o y e r out o f a fu n d s e t a s i d e f o r
this p u r p o se .
T a b u l a t i o n s o f r e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n p l a n s a r e l i m i t e d to
t h o s e p l a n s t h a t p r o v i d e r e g u l a r p a y m e n t s f o r the r e m a i n d e r o f the
w o r k e r 's life.
M e t h o d of w a g e d e t e r m i n a t i o n ( t a b l e B - 7 ) r e l a t e s to b a s i c
ty p e s of r a te s tr u c tu r e fo r w o r k e r s p a id under v a r io u s tim e and in ­
c e n t i v e s y s t e m s . U n d e r a s i n g l e r a t e s t r u c t u r e th e s a m e r a t e i s p a i d
t o a l l e x p e r i e n c e d w o r k e r s in t h e s a m e j o b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . A n i n d i v i d ­
u a l w o r k e r o c c a s i o n a l l y m a y be p a i d a b o v e o r b e l o w t h e s i n g l e r a t e




f o r s p e c i a l r e a s o n s , but s u c h p a y m e n t s a r e e x c e p t i o n s . A r a n g e - o f r a t e s p l a n s p e c i f i e s th e m i n i m u m a n d / o r m a x i m u m r a t e p a i d e x p e r i ­
e n c e d w o r k e r s f o r th e s a m e j o b . I n f o r m a t i o n a l s o i s p r o v i d e d on the
m e t h o d of p r o g r e s s i o n t h r o u g h th e r a n g e . In th e a b s e n c e of a f o r m a l
r a t e s t r u c t u r e , th e q u a l i f i c a t i o n s o f th e i n d i v i d u a l w o r k e r d e t e r m i n e
the p a y r a t e . I n f o r m a t i o n on t y p e s of i n c e n t i v e p l a n s i s p r o v i d e d o n ly
f o r p l a n t w o r k e r s b e c a u s e of th e low i n c i d e n c e o f s u c h p l a n s f o r o f f i c e
w orkers.
U nder a p ie c e w o r k s y s t e m , a p r e d e te r m in e d r a te is paid
f o r e a c h unit of o u t p u t . P r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e b a s e d on p r o d u c t i o n
o v e r a q u o t a o r c o m p l e t i o n of a j o b in l e s s t h a n s t a n d a r d t i m e .
Com ­
p e n s a t i o n on a c o m m i s s i o n b a s i s r e p r e s e n t s p a y m e n t s b a s e d on a
p e r c e n t a g e of v a l u e o f s a l e s , o r on a c o m b i n a t i o n of a s t a t e d s a l a r y
plus a p e rc e n ta g e .
D ata
table B - 7 .

on

frequency

of w age

paym ent

also

are

p rovided

in

4

T a b le

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d W o r k e r s W ith in S c o p e o f S u r v e y a n d N u m b e r S tu d ie d in D e n v e r , C o l o . , 1 b y M a jo r I n d u s t r y D i v i s i o n , 2 D e c e m b e r 1969
N u m b e r o f e s ta b lish m e n ts
M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s in s c o p e
o f stu d y

I n d u s tr y d iv i s i o n

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
W ith in s c o p e o f s t u d y

W ith in s c o p e
of stu d y *

S tu d ie d

S tu d ie d

T o t a l4
P la n t
N um ber

A ll d iv isio n s

—

—

-

— -

M a n u fa c tu r in g
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , a n d
o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s 5
W h o le s a le t r a d e __ __
—
_
- _■
R e t a i l t r a d e _______________________ —____________
F i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e ________
S e r v i c e s 8 ----------------------------------------------------

P ercen t

T o ta l4

.

802

184

1 8 0 ,6 8 4

100

1 0 5 ,4 3 3

50
-

216
586

56
128

6 7 ,2 2 1
1 1 3 ,4 6 3

37
63

4 2 ,0 4 4
6 3 ,3 8 9

62

27
18
38
16
29

2 8 ,8 2 6
1 3 ,3 5 3
3 8 ,2 9 3
1 4 ,6 5 1
1 8 ,3 4 0

8
21
8
10

16

1 3 ,3 0 7
(6)
2 9 ,9 4 8
C)
(6)

50
50
50
50
50

111
192
95
126

O ffic e

3 2 ,8 0 4

1 0 9 ,4 7 6

8,

4 5 ,0 4 6
6 4 ,4 3 0

6, 185
( 6)
4 , 046
(6)
(6)

2 4 ,4 1 7
3, 299
2 3 ,1 9 1
5 ,8 0 4
7 , 719

137
2 4 ,6 6 7

1 T h e D e n v e r S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l it a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f in e d b y th e B u r e a u o f th e B u d g e t th r o u g h J a n u a r y 1 9 6 8 , c o n s i s t s of A d a m s , A r a p a h o e , B o u l d e r , D e n v e r , a n d J e f f e r s o n C o u n tie s .
T h e " w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s t u d y " e s t i m a t e s sh o w n in t h is t a b le p r o v id e a r e a s o n a b l y a c c u r a t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f th e s i z e a n d c o m p o s it io n o f th e la b o r f o r c e in c lu d e d in th e s u r v e y . T h e e s t i m a t e s
a r e no t in te n d e d , h o w e v e r , to s e r v e a s a b a s i s o f c o m p a r i s o n w ith o th e r e m p lo y m e n t in d e x e s f o r th e a r e a to m e a s u r e e m p lo y m e n t t r e n d s o r l e v e l s s i n c e (1) p la n n in g o f w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s
th e u s e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t d a t a c o m p ile d c o n s i d e r a b l y in a d v a n c e o f th e p a y r o l l p e r io d s t u d i e d , a n d (2) s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .
2 T h e 1967 e d itio n o f th e S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l w a s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s b y in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n .
3 I n c lu d e s a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t a t o r a b o v e th e m in im u m l i m it a t io n . A ll o u t le t s (w ith in th e a r e a ) o f c o m p a n ie s in s u c h i n d u s t r i e s a s t r a d e , fin a n c e , a u to r e p a i r s e r v i c e ,
a n d m o tio n p i c t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s i d e r e d a s 1 e s t a b li s h m e n t .
4 I n c lu d e s e x e c u t i v e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d o th e r w o r k e r s e x c lu d e d f r o m th e s e p a r a t e p la n t a n d o f f ic e c a t e g o r i e s .
5 T a x i c a b s a n d s e r v i c e s in c id e n ta l to w a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n w e r e e x c lu d e d .
6 T h is in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n i s r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " a n d " n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g " in th e S e r i e s A t a b l e s , a n d f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " in th e S e r i e s B t a b l e s . S e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n
o f d a t a f o r t h is d iv i s i o n i s n o t m a d e f o r o n e o r m o r e o f th e fo llo w in g r e a s o n s : (1) E m p lo y m e n t in th e d i v i s i o n i s to o s m a l l to p r o v id e e n o u g h d a t a to m e r i t s e p a r a t e s t u d y , (2) th e s a m p le w a s not
d e s ig n e d i n it i a l ly to p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , (3) r e s p o n s e w a s in s u f f ic ie n t o r in a d e q u a te to p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , a n d (4) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f in d iv id u a l e s t a b li s h m e n t d a t a .
7 W o r k e r s f r o m t h is e n t ir e in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n a r e r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " a n d " n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g " in th e S e r i e s A t a b l e s , b u t f r o m th e r e a l e s t a t e p o r t io n o n ly in e s t i m a t e s
f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " in th e S e r i e s B t a b l e s . S e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f d a t a f o r t h is d i v i s i o n i s n o t m a d e f o r o n e o r m o r e o f th e r e a s o n s g iv e n in fo o tn o te 6 a b o v e .
8 H o te ls a n d m o t e l s ; la u n d r i e s a n d o th e r p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u t o m o b ile r e p a i r , r e n t a l , a n d p a r k in g ; m o tio n p i c t u r e s ; n o n p r o fit m e m b e r s h i p o r g a n i z a t io n s (e x c lu d in g r e l i g i o u s
a n d c h a r it a b le o r g a n i z a t i o n s ) ; a n d e n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .




O v e r o n e - t h i r d o f th e w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y in th e D e n v e r a r e a w e r e
e m p lo y e d in m a n u f a c t u r i n g f i r m s .
T h e fo llo w in g p r e s e n t s th e m a jo r in d u s t r y g r o u p s an d
s p e c if ic in d u s tr ie s a s a p e rc e n t o f a ll m a n u fa c tu rin g :
In d u stry g ro u p s
F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ____17
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l — 14
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t _____14
R u b b er and p la s tic s p ro d u c ts— 9
P r in t in g a n d p u b lis h in g _—_ — 8
L e a th e r and le a th e r p r o d u c ts— 6
O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ------ 6
F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s ____ 5
S to n e , c la y , an d g l a s s
p r o d u c t s _______________________ 5

S p e c i f i c in d u s t r i e s
A i r c r a f t a n d p a r t s ____ __ ______
F a b r i c a t e d r u b b e r p r o d u c t s ___
O f f ic e a n d c o m p u tin g
m a c h in e s —__ __________________
N e w s p a p e r s _____________________
O r d n a n c e ___ ________________ ____

12
9
8
6
5
5

T h is in f o r m a t io n i s b a s e d on e s t i m a t e s o f t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t d e r iv e d f r o m u n iv e r s e
m a t e r i a l s c o m p ile d p r i o r to a c t u a l s u r v e y .
P r o p o r t i o n s in v a r i o u s in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s m a y
d i f f e r f r o m p r o p o r t io n s b a s e d on th e r e s u l t s o f th e s u r v e y a s sh o w n in t a b le 1 a b o v e .

Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
P r e s e n t e d in t a b l e Z a r e i n d e x e s a n d p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e
in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s a n d i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s ,
a n d in a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .
The in d ex es
a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s a t a g i v e n t i m e , e x p r e s s e d a s a p e r c e n t of
w a g e s d u r i n g th e b a s e p e r i o d ( d a t e o f the a r e a s u r v e y c o n d u c t e d
b e t w e e n J u l y I 9 6 0 a n d J u n e 1 9 6 1 ).
S u b t r a c t i n g 100 f r o m the i n d e x
y i e l d s th e p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e in w a g e s f r o m th e b a s e p e r i o d to the
d a t e o f the i n d e x .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s of c h a n g e o r i n c r e a s e r e l a t e to
w a g e c h a n g e s b e t w e e n th e i n d i c a t e d d a t e s .
These e stim a te s are
m e a s u r e s o f c h a n g e in a v e r a g e s f o r the a r e a ; t h e y a r e not i n t e n d e d
to m e a s u r e a v e r a g e p a y c h a n g e s in th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in th e a r e a .

F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s a n d i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , the w a g e
t r e n d s r e l a t e to r e g u l a r w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r the n o r m a l w o r k w e e k ,
e x c lu s iv e of e a r n in g s fo r o v e r t i m e .
F o r p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s , th e y
m e a s u r e c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u rly e a r n i n g s , ex c lu d in g
p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , an d
late sh ifts.
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s a r e b a s e d on d a t a f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u ­
p a t i o n s a n d i n c l u d e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t j o b s w ith in
each group.
L im it a t io n s of D ata

M ethod of C o m p u tin g
T h e i n d e x e s a n d p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e , a s m e a s u r e s of
c h a n g e in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e i n f l u e n c e d by:
(1) g e n e r a l s a l a r y an d
w a g e c h a n g e s , (Z) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s i n p a y r e c e i v e d b y i n d i ­
v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h i l e in the s a m e j o b , a n d (3) c h a n g e s i n a v e r a g e
w a g e s d u e to c h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e r e s u l t i n g f r o m l a b o r t u r n ­
o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , a n d c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r ­
t i o n s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith d i f f e r e n t p a y l e v e l s .
C h a n g e s in th e l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in the
o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s w ith o u t a c t u a l w a g e c h a n g e s .
It i s c o n c e i v a b l e
t h a t e v e n t h o u g h a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in a n a r e a g a v e w a g e i n c r e a s e s ,
a v e r a g e w a g e s m a y have d eclin ed b e c a u s e lo w e r-p a y in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts
e n t e r e d the a r e a o r e x p a n d e d t h e i r w o r k f o r c e s .
Sim ilarly , w ages
m a y have r e m a in e d r e la t iv e ly Constant, y et the a v e r a g e s f o r an a r e a
m a y have r is e n c o n s id e r a b ly b e c a u s e h ig h e r-p ay in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts
e n t e r e d the a r e a .

E a c h o f the s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t i o n s w ith in a n o c c u p a t i o n a l
g r o u p w a s a s s i g n e d a w e i g h t b a s e d on i t s p r o p o r t i o n a t e e m p l o y m e n t
in the o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p .
T h e se co n sta n t w eights r e fle c t b a s e y e a r
em ploy m en ts w h e rev er p o ssib le .
The a v e r a g e (m ean) e a r n in g s fo r
e a c h o c c u p a t i o n w e r e m u l t i p l i e d b y th e o c c u p a t i o n a l w e i g h t , a n d the
p r o d u c t s f o r a l l o c c u p a t i o n s in th e g r o u p w e r e t o t a l e d . T h e a g g r e g a t e s
f o r Z c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s w e r e r e l a t e d b y d i v i d i n g the a g g r e g a t e f o r
the l a t e r y e a r by the a g g r e g a t e f o r the e a r l i e r y e a r .
The re su lta n t
r e l a t i v e , l e s s 100 p e r c e n t , s h o w s th e p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e . . T h e i n d e x
i s the p r o d u c t o f m u l t i p l y i n g the b a s e y e a r r e l a t i v e (100) b y the r e l a t i v e
f o r the n e x t s u c c e e d i n g y e a r a n d c o n t i n u i n g to m u l t i p l y (c o m p o u n d )
e a c h y e a r ' s r e l a t i v e b y the p r e v i o u s y e a r ' s i n d e x .
A v e ra g e e arn in g s
f o r the f o l l o w i n g o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e u s e d in c o m p u t i n g the w a g e t r e n d s :
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m e n a n d w o m en ): O ffic e c l e r ic a l ( m e n a n d w o m e n )— S k i lle d m a in te n a n c e (m e n ):
C o n tin u e d
B o o k k e e p in g - m a c h in e
C a rp e n te rs
o p e ra to rs, c la s s B
S e c r e ta r ie s
E le c t r ic ia n s
C lerics, a c c o u n t in g , c la s s e s
S te n o g ra p h e rs, g e n e ra l
M a c h in ists
A an d B
S te n o g ra p h e rs, se n io r
M e c h a n ic s
C lerics, f i l e , c la s se s
S w itc h b o a rd o p e ra to rs, c la s se s
M e c h a n ic s (a u t o m o tiv e )
A an d B
A , B, an d C
P a in ters
C lerics, o rder
P ip e fitte rs
T a b u la t in g - m a c h in e o p e ra to rs,
c la s s B
C lerics, p a y ro ll
T o o l a n d d ie m a k e rs
T y p is ts, c la s s e s A a n d B
C o m p to m e te r o p e ra to rs
K e y p u n ch o p e ra to rs, c la s se s
U n sk ille d p la n t (m e n ):
A and B
In d u stria l nurses ( m e n an d w o m en ):
J a n ito r s , p o rte rs, an d c le a n e r s
N u rses, in d u stria l ( r e g is te r e d )
O ffic e b oys a n d g irls
L a b o re rs, m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g




T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s the e f f e c t
of c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h j o b i n ­
c l u d e d in the d a t a .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e r e f l e c t o n ly c h a n g e s
in a v e r a g e p a y f o r s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r s .
T h e y a r e not i n f l u e n c e d by
c h a n g e s in s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , a s s u c h , o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
for overtim e.
W h e r e n e c e s s a r y , d a t a w e r e a d j u s t e d to r e m o v e f r o m
the i n d e x e s a n d p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e a n y s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d
b y c h a n g e s in the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .

5

6

T a b le 2.

I n d e x e s o f S t a n d a r d W e e k l y S a l a r i e s a n d S t r a i g h t - T i m e H o u r l y E a r n i n g s f o r S e l e c t e d O c c u p a t i o n a l G r o u p s in
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969 a n d D e c e m b e r 1 9 6 8 , an d P e r c e n t s o f I n c r e a s e f o r S e l e c t e d P e r i o d s
A ll in d u strie s
O ffice
clerical
(m e n and
women)

P eriod

In d u strial
nurses
(m e n and
women)

M an u factu rin g

Sk ille d
m ain ten an ce
trades
(m e n )

U n sk ille d
plant
w orkers
(m e n )

O ffice
clerical
(m en and
women)

In d u strial
nurses
(m e n and
wom en)

S k ille d
m ain ten an ce
trades
(m e n )

U n sk illed
plant
w orkers
(m e n )

1 5 5 .8
144.8

1 3 9 .9
1 3 1 .7

15 3 .7
13 9 .2

7 .5
9 .5
8 .0
4 .2
1.4
3.4
1.0
5.7
4.9
4.0

6 .2
6.1
4.4
3.1
2 .6
1.9
2 .7
3 .3
3.9
4 .7

1 1 0 .4
6 .3
3 .8
3.2
4.9
2 .5
1.5
4 .6
7 .0
2.4

I n d e x e s ( D e c e m b e r 1960=100)
1 3 9 .9
1 3 2 .7

D e c e m b e r 1 9 6 9 ------------------------------------D e c e m b e r 1 9 6 8 -------------------------------------

1 6 0 .6
150.0

1 4 1 .9
1 3 4 .3

1 4 2 .0
1 3 3 .7

139.4
1 3 1 .0

P e r c e n t s of i n c r e a s e
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber

1

1968
1967
1966
1965
1964
19 6 3
1962
1961
I960
1959

T h is




to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to

D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber
D ecem ber

in crease

5.4
5 .2
3 .2
4.3
2.3
2 .7
3.5
4 .1
3 .5
4 .2

1 9 6 9 ------1 9 6 8 ------1 9 6 7 ------1 9 6 6 -------1 9 6 5 ------1 9 6 4 -------1 9 6 3 -------1 9 6 2 ------1 9 6 1 -------I 9 6 0 --------

re fle cts

sh ifts

in

em ploy m en t

7 .0
9.3
7 .4
5.0
1.9
3 .9
3 .0
5 .2
6 .1
5.9

betw een

5 .6
6 .1
4 .6
4.3
2.3
2 .7
2 .9
3.2
4 .2
5.3

h i g h - an d

6 .2
4.7
4.0
2 .1
2.3
3.9
3 .4
4.3
4.8
2.8

low -w age

6.4
5.4
3 .3
3 .9
2 .7
1.6
3 .6
3 .3
3 .8
3.2

estab lish m en ts

in

ad dition

to

general

w age

in cre ase s.




7
A.

O ccupational Earnings

Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e we e kl y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s st udi ed on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n , D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e we e kl y e a r n i n g s of—
*

t

»

F

standard)

Under
Mean2

Median 2

i

S

r

1

1

1

$

$

$

t

t

Middle range 2

$

53
69
26

$

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

160

150

160

1 -----170

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

160

150

J.6C

170

over

-

6
6

2
-

8
5
-

20

1
-

7
7
1
5

21
16
-

9

6

28

60

8

6

9

9

6

6

1

28
3

60
26

8
6

1
-

8
2

1

-

2
1

17
17

1
-

1
-

1
1

6

2

3

2
2

1
1

60

$
1 3 1.5 0
1 32.00

$
1 3 6.0 0
136.5 0

6 0 .0
6 0 .0

1 3 8.0 0
1 1 1.0 0

162.5 0
108.5 0

6 0 .0
6 0 .0

1 2 0.0 0

1 2 5.0 0
1 3 0 .0 0
160.5 0
113.5 0
1 1 2.5 0

1 0 5.5 0 -1 23 .0 0
1 0 6.5 0 -1 21 .0 0

1 1 8 .5 0 -1 63 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0 -1 6 3 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 3 7.5 0 -1 67 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

9 3 .5 0 -1 6 0 .5 0

_

-

_

_

_

9 3 .5 0 -1 6 1 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

1 0 7.0 0 -1 16 .0 0

360
321

6 0 .0
1 1 3.0 0
6 0 . 0 ■1 1 2 . 0 0

130
106
26

3 9 .5

8 7 .0 0

8 3 .5 0

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 9 .5 0
9 6 .5 0

8 6 .5 0
1 0 0.0 0

28

6 0 .0

1 30.00

1 3 3.0 0

83
81

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 7 .5 0
8 7 .5 0

8 6 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

7 6 .0 0 7 3 .5 0 -

9 7 .0 0
9 7 .5 0

29

3 9 .5

8 0 .5 0

7 9 .0 0

7 6 .0 0 -

8 7 .5 0

65
38

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

106.5 0
1 0 1.0 0

1 0 6.0 0
1 0 2.0 0

170
60
110
70

3 9 .5
6 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 8 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
8 8 .5 0

9 1 .0 0
8 8 .5 0
9 2 .0 0
9 2 .0 0

578
127
651
69
103

6 0 .0
6 0 .0
6 0 .0
6 0 .0
6 0 .0

1 1 6.5 0
1 21.50
1 1 5.0 0
1 3 8.0 0
1 0 3.0 0

1 1 6.0 0
1 2 2.0 0
1 1 3 .5 0
1 6 0.5 0
1 0 0.5 0

6 0 .0

9 2 .0 0
1 0 1.5 0

9 1 .5 0
1 0 0.5 0

9 0 .0 0
1 0 6.5 0
8 6 .5 0

8 7 .5 0
1 0 2.5 0
8 3 .0 0

7 6 .0 0 -

9 0 .5 0

8 3 .5 0 -

9 6 .5 0

9 3 .0 0

9 1 .5 0

8 3 .5 0 -

9 5 .0 0

7 9 .5 0

7 1 .5 0 7 1 .5 0 -

8 6 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

7 1 .5 0 -

7 8 .0 0

3 9 .5
6 0 .0

65
51

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

668
665
25

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

7 9 .0 0

7 6 .5 0
7 6 .0 0

6 0 .0

7 5 .0 0

7 6 .0 0

6 0 .0
3 9 .5

7 6 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 -

-

-

-

6
6
6

7 6 .0 0 -1 1 9 .5 0

-

-

-

“

9 7 .5 0
9 9 .0 0

-

“

3

36

3

19

11
6

2

1

1

20
17
5

1
1

*

8
8
8
8
1
1
1
1

3
1
6
9

.5 0 .0 0 .5 0 .0 0 -

9 6 .5 0
9 6 .0 0
9 5 .0 0
9 6 .5 0

0 3.0 0 -1 27 .0 0
1 3.0 0 -1 31 .0 0
0 1.5 0 -1 26 .0 0
3 3 .0 0 -1 66 .0 0
9 3 .0 0 -1 0 8 .0 0

22

-

_

“

_

-

-

*
-

“

“

-

-

7

9
9

-

-

7
7

1
1

_

6
6

3
3

9

3

1

-

23
21

29

8

8

3

_

_

20

2

6

3

-

-

28
28

23
23

62
62

70
70

39
39

36

11

8

16

2
-

8
8

_

-

_

_

_

-

16

1
1

1

7

9
9

6

11

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

”

~

8

6

1
1

“

“

“

1

-

2

8

6

2

1

-

“

~

“

-

_

21
21

5
5

13
13

2
2

12
10

12
12

6
6

~

10

6

5

3

2

1

1

-

__

_

_

_

_

11

9

17

7

9

“

“

“

~

11

2

17

~

6
-

27
8
19

21
12
9

61
15
66
62

23

2
~

6
6

6
6

1

i

23
10

“

8

16
16
-

36

1

2
1

“

_

-

5

22

-

_

~

_

5
5

-

7
7
7
_

-

-

6
6

19
-

15

-

19
-

15

-

7

66
66

_

_

_

_

_

_

i

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

60

95
36
59
~

39
9
30
6

29

35
10

51

3
-

3
1
2

1
-

7
-

21
1
20

90
20
70

72
15

7

61
2
59

27

6

27

4

”

57
6

36

10

27

5

6

91

158

79

126

57

16

18

3
155
7
86

15
66

30
96

27
109

7
67

37
20
5

8
8

5
16

97
60
57
6

136

1
90
13
69

17
1
-

~

15

56

21

-

_

_

3
3

20
15

7
1

21
21

4

2

6

1

-

71

87

69

71
3

80
7

60

50
66

13

-

136
136

8
7

17
17

12

_

6
-

-

2

11
1

3
3

6

6

-

11
39

“

6

4

6

-

“

8 1 .5 0 -1 0 2 .0 0
9 6 .5 0 -1 0 8 .0 0
8 0 .0 0 -1 0 0 .0 0
8 6 .0 0 -1 3 1 .0 0

-

7

_

-

9
9

1 1 1.0 0 -1 63 .5 0

9 8 .0 0 -1 1 3 .0 0
9 6 .5 0 -1 0 5 .0 0

20
-

20

9 3 .5 0

9 3 .0 0

936
185
769
83
367

*

and

1 3 5.5 0 -1 66 .5 0

1 2 0.5 0
1 6 0.5 0

$

$

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

6 0 .0

*

and
under

60

167
152
65
27

65

65

weekly

i

11
29
1
1

7

l

11
18
8
2

4

11
60
33
2

9
-

10
-

5
-

1
-

9
9

10

5
5

1

25
12

3

l
“

1

1
1

“
_

_

-

~
-

23
5
18
-

10
2
8

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

6

2

2

-

_

_

_

_

_

8

7

1

-

3

2

-

_
-

6

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

*

12

-

5

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

12

-

5

8

Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e wee kl y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s st udi ed on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s t r y di v i si o n , D en v e r, C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
Weekly earnings1
( standard)

Sex,

o c c u p a tio n ,

an d in d u s tr y d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

weekly
(standard)

Mean 3

Median 2

Under
S

Middle range 2

60

t

$
60

65

$

$
70

75

i
80

85

$

i

i
90

tra ig h t -tim e

receivin g

N u m b e r o f w o r ke rs
$

95

i
100

-

138
116

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

$
7 0 .0 0
6 9 .5 0

$
6 8 .5 0
6 9 .0 0

$
6 6 .0 0 6 6 .5 0 -

$
7 2 .5 0
7 2 .0 0

51

3 9 .5

6 8 .0 0

6 9 . OC

6 6 .0 0 -

C L E R K S , O RDER ---------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------R t T A I L T R A D E ------------------------

228
50
178

40
40
40
40

9 5 .0 0
9 1 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
8 3 . 50

9 4 .5 0
8 6 .0 0
9 7 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

7
7
8
7

1 1 .0 0
0 6 .5 0
1 2 .0 0
9 2 .5 0

1 0 8.00
1 0 9.50
1 0 7.5 0
1 3 2.5 0
9 7 .0 0

1 0 4.5 0
1 0 9.0 0
103.0 0

9 3 .5 0 -1 1 9 .5 0
1 0 0.0 0 -1 18 .5 0
9 2 .0 0 -1 2 4 .0 0

142.0 0
100.0 0

1 4 0 . 5 0 - 1 4 4 . CC
9 2 .0 0 -1 0 3 .5 0

8 9 .0 0
8 8 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

8 8 .5 0
8 6 .0 0
8 2 .0 0

C L E R K S , P A Y R O L L ----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 -------------

46
256
77
179

40
40
39
39

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.5

RtTAIL TRADE -----------

33
80

C OMP T O M E T E R O P E R A T O R S ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

283
214

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

82

4 0 .0

-----------------------

KEYPUNCH U P E R A T G R S , C L A S S A
M A N U E A C I U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

387
119
268
AA
32

3 9 .5

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

85

90

95

100

105

19
12

68
61

33
32
19

6

3
1

2
1

2
-

1
1

3

16
-

4A

16

18

10

16
16

10
6

20
-

3
3

1
9

1 ,2 8 3
308

-

-

-

9 5 .0 0 -1 1 9 .5 0

-

3 9 .5

M A N L F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

48
89

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

13 1.5 0
13 0.5 0
1 3 2 . CO

12 6.0 0
1 2 9.5 0

1 1 7 . 0 0 - 1 4 6 . OC
1 1 8 .0 0 -1 4 2 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0 -1 5 2 .5 0

3

7
~

13
4

1
12

14
8
6
-

26
7
19
~

3
13
-

i

12

i

14

13

56
17

25
19
16

34
24
19

35
25

42
17
5

_

-

1

18

-

3
15
~

3
2

1
1

1

“

13

67

79

13
-

67
27

97
3
94
10
19

3
3
-

-

“

1 2 8.0 0

3 9 .5

137

A

13 4.5 0
1 07.00

2
13

-

_

1 0 8 .5 0 -1 4 3 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0 -1 4 9 .5 0
1 0 4 . 5 0 - 1 4 0 . CO
1 1 5.5 0 -1 52 .0 0

8 6 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

2

-

“
-

1 2 6.0 0
13 1.0 0
1 2 3.5 0
1 4 0.0 0
1 0 5.5 0

7 0 .0 0 6 9 .5 0 -

-

56

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

120

$
130

i

1
135

12

64

12
-

1
63

1
-

125

130

135

140

_

3

-

3

-

140

150

3
150

$
160

170

160

170

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

”

1 C 9 . 0 0 - 1 5 0 . OC

_

-

1 21.50
1 2 2 .5 0
1 03.50

9 9 .0 0

4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 8.5 0
1 22.00
1 1 6.5 0
1 2 6.0 0

1 1 9.0 0
1 2 2.0 0
116.0 0
1 2 9.5 0

3 9 .0

1 0 3.5 0

104.0 0

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S D --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------U T I L I T I E S 3-----------T R A D E ----------------------

S ee f o o tn o te s a t end of table.

797
332
465
44
42

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 0 4 .5
1 0 9.5
1 0 2 .5
1 0 6 .5

0
0
0
0

-1
-1
-1
-1

3
3
2
4

0
6
8
1

.0
.5
.5
.5

0
0
0
0

9 5 .0 0 -1 1 2 .0 0

10

1

69

59

24

9

18
51
2
4

12
47
3
12

20
18
2

2
22
16

8
1
i

11

88
16
72
2
4

16
14

4
4

5
5

1
1

2
2

-

-

90

100
26
74
9

165
37
128
20
24

115
49
66

16

10

8

3

10
2
8

7

2
~

24

7

2

13
11

7
5
2

23
10
13

20
1
19

2
34

22
16

10
69
5

-

2
2

10
3
3

6
-

1
~

9
7

8
7

6

10
7

6

1

2

1
1

6
“

3
2

23

44
~

54

46
7
39
10

18
11
7
4

"

-

i
-

8
~

-

23
7

44
23

9
45
8

8
_

“

11

2

8

1

_

19
16
3

12
~

35
2
33

35
10
25
~

103
28

1
1

2
2

-

“

8
-

-

-

12

~

10
9

-

i
-

-

i
1

-

“

“
_

-

11
79
23
15

-

-

36
7

-

1 2 9.5 0
1 4 7.5 0
1 2 2.0 0
1 2 3.0 0

-----------------------

7
29

-

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 2 6 .5 0 -1 5 7 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 -1 4 0 .0 0
9 6 .0 0 -1 4 6 .0 0
8 7 .5 0 -1 2 4 .0 0

36

11
62
-

-

758

1 4 0 . 5C

73

23
46
8
10

-

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

269
489
126
54

69

17
24
4

12

_

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-------------

41

-

-

1 28.50

25
12
13
4
5

1
1

“

-

~

“

13
1C
3
2

-

8

-

27
2
25
19

-

-

-

8
8

-

-

-

3
3

1
1

-

-

-

35
4

14

-

-

2
-

“

-

4
_

8
-

1 1 8 . 5 0 - 1 5 3 . 5C
1 3 5 .0 0 -1 5 9 .5 0

5
1
-

-

3
-

1 1 9 .0 0 -1 5 4 .0 0
1 2 2 . 0 0 - 1 5 4 . 5C

i
5
-

3

1
-

1 3 7.5 0
1 4 7.5 0

3
5
-

49

36
~

1 3 9.0 0
1 4 4 . CC

12
~

25
23
6

25
16
9
-

1 3 7 .5 0

6

i
i

8
-

1 38.00
13 8.5 0

6

1
2

3
-

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

8

1
29

1

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

-

6
2
4
-

12

_

“

-

31

-

-

1

“

14

-

2
2
-

13
6
7

18
12

_

~

“

21
18

-

1

20
8

27
27

13

20

i

-

360
120




115

45
14

"

240
123

PUBLIC
R ETAIL

110

1

-

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3-------------

TRADE

*
125

16

-

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------

1 4 7 . CC

19
5
14

13
-

-

_

18
26

7
~

~
-

-

3

1
17
17

-

1 26.50
1 31.50
1 23.50

139

CLASS

9 8 .5 0
9 9 .0 0
8 8 .5 0

-

-

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

----------

RETAIL

120

of—

4
4

25

_

7 7 . CO
7 6 .5 0

2 ,0 5 2
769

SECRETAR IES,

80

_

7 9 . CC
7 9 .0 0

S E C R E T A R I E S 4 --------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U b L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 -----------R ETAIL
T RADE -----------------------

TRADE

75

“

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

109
97

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3------

615
95

7 7 .5 0 7 4 .5 0 7 6 .0 0 -

_

8 4 .0 0 -1 0 4 .0 0
9 3 . 5 0 - 1 0 8 . 5C
8 2 .5 0 -1 0 2 .5 0
8 5 .0 0 -1 3 6 .5 0
8 2 .0 0 - 9 9 .5 0

O F F I C E G I R L S -----------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

B

M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------RtTAIL

70

-

9 3 .0 0
I C O . 50
9 1 .0 0
125.5 0
8 7 .0 0

-----------------------

CLASS

-1
-1
-1
-

9 7 .0 0
1 0 2.5 0
9 6 .5 0
1 14.00
8 8 .0 0

520
147
57

OPERATORS,

0
0
0
0

1 2 2.5 0
1 0 0.5 0

1 11.50
1 1 0.5 0

107.5 0
1 0 6.5 0

.5
.5
.0
.5

1 0 0 .5 0 -1 2 3 .0 0
9 9 .0 0 -1 2 7 .5 0
1 0 1 .5 0 -1 2 1 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0 -1 3 2 .0 0
9 6 .5 0 -1 0 7 .0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .C
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

KEYPUNCH

U T I L I T I E S 3 ------------T RA D E -----------------------

1 11.00

9
8
0
2

-

1 0 8 . OC
1 2 7.0 0
1C 3 .0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .C
4 0 .0

PUBLIC
R tTA IL

115

$

and

7

7 2 .0 0

T RA DE

110

t

over

CONTINUED

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S C ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------R E T A I L T R A C E -----------------------

R ETAIL

105

w e e k ly earn in gs
s

and
under
65

WOMEN

i

11

2

75
10
10

29
17

12
3
9
1

72
7

11
10
_

27
5

1

179
62
117

144

10

36

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

38
16
22
2

9

1
-

-

2
7
6
“

_

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

“

22
20

12
12

28
28

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

10

21

23
16

-

-

-

113
38
75
15
A

282
121
161
69

215

76

55

63

147
68

23
53
27

18
37
22

11
-

1

1

-

4

13
8
5

12
2
10

11

11

8

2
9

3
5

55
18
37

59
31
28

25
9
16
16

25
13

1
3

19
5

32
6

14

26
8

5

5

2

31

49
11
38

53
16

44
19

A8

7
24

60
18
42

25
7

2

2
3

37
4

3

-

80
31
49
4

57
30
27
-

70
36
34
~

129

5

12

“

1
1

3
-

_

28
-

75
69

55
36
19

3
-

-

12
-

112
49

7
4

-

_

18
2
16
9

5

1
i

16
1
15
15

223
59
164

6

28
25

-

*

“

7
2
5
5

1
~

1

i

110
38

21

30
2

31
98
8
_

7

-

35

34
9

30

25

13

92
34

136
108

35
5

58
26

28
6

8

7
A

10

2

-

-

-

-

38
25
13

29
18

122
61
61
12

8
6
2
2

2
2
-

-

~

"

“

5

11
2

1

~

”

38
10
28

13
6

_

9
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e we e kl y h o u r s an d e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s st ud ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
by i n d u s t r y di v i si o n , D en v e r, C o l o. , D e c e m b e r 1969)
W eekly earning^"™
(standard )

S ex , o c cu p a ti o n , and in d u s t r y di v i si o n

N um ber
of
workers

A ve rage
w eek ly
hours 1
standard)

U nder
M ean 2

M edian 2

M iddle r an g e 2

S
60

S

%

$

60

65

i

70

75

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w ee kl y e a r n i n g s ol
s
$
$
I
S
$
t
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
t
95
105
85
90
100
150
160
80
110
115
120
125
135
130
140

an d
under

170
and

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

140

~

-

8
8

28
19
9
6

60
10
50
9

32
8
24
7

96
15
81
2

35
14
21
1

59
49
10
1

53
39
14
1

51
19
32
26

50
33
17
6

38
27
11
2

31
22
9
9

25
19
6
6

26
2
24
24

-

15
5
10

44
7
37

41
21
20

49
12
37

34
A
30

36
6
30

2

13

”

14

5

2

31
A
27
1
-

25
8
17
8
i

22
16
6
1
2

39
23
16
10
*

15
6
9
8
-

21
1
20

A
4

19
3
16

7
2
5

9
8
1

9
i
8

1
1
“

9
i
8

19
2
17

_

_

-

-

-

-

3
2

5
3

-

1
1

12
2

10

15
3
12
2
1

150

160

170

17
2
15
6

over

1

W EN - CONTINUED
OM
STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NCNMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5----------------------

60 0
28 4
316
107

40.0
40.0
4C.0
40.0

$
$
$
$
104.50 103.50
91.00-118.00
107.00 107.50
99.00-120.00
101.50
94.50
89.00-114.50
1 1 5 . 5 0 1 1 6 . 0 l 1 1 0 . 0 0 - 1 3 6 . 0C

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5 ---------------------RETAIL IRADE -----------------------------

413
126
287
60
39

4C.0
AO.O
40.0
40.0
40.0

116.00
117.50
115.00
138.00
101.50

113.50
123.00
111.50
140.50
102.00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

103
26
77

40.0
4 0.0
40.0

106.50
105.50
107.00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

21 3
199
59

40.0
40.0
40.0

82.50
7 8 . 50
82.50

SWITChBDARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5 ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

385
100
285
30
92

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0

TKANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTORING --------------------------

158
25
133

39.0
40.0
39.0

T Y P I S T S , CLASS A ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5 ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

42 5
132
293
45
A3

T Y P I S T S , CLASS fi ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

442
53
389
37

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

-

-

*

-

IO C.5 0 - 1 3 1 .5 0
9 9 . 5 0 - 1 3 2 . 5C
I C C . 5 0 - 1 3 0 . 5C
132.50-144.00
9 3 . 0 0 - 1 0 6 . 0C

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

~

104.50
1C 6. 0C
103.00

9 4 .00-123.50
94.50-111.00
9 0 .0 0 -1 2 5 .0 0

-

-

-

-

8 0 . 00
79.00
83.50

7 1 .0 0 - 89.00
7C.50- 86.50
7 8 .0 0 - 89.00

15
15

93.00
90.50
97.50
94.00
9 2 . 0C
87.50
113.50 1 1 1.00
81.00
81.00

82.00-101.00
8 8 . 0 0 - 1 0 1 . 5C
8 C .5 0 -100.50
9 8 .5 0 -1 2 9 .0 0
7 5 .0 0 - 84.50

_
-

91.50
9 8 . CO
90.50

91.00
95.00
90.00

8 A. 0 0 - 9 6 . 0C
9 0 .5 0 -1 0 7 .5 0
8 3 . 0 0 - 9 4 . 5C

97.00
40.0
40.0
93.50
AO.O
98.50
4 0 .0 112.00
40.0
99.00

94.00
91.50
95.50
129.00
97.50

8 6 .50-104.50
86.00-100.00
86.50-108.50
8 0 .00-134.50
9 4 .50-110.50

83.50
88.50
83.00
8 5 . 50

82.50
86.00
82.50
87.00

7 7 .5 0 - 88.50
78.00- 92.50
7 7 .0 0 - 87.50
81 .0 0 - 92.00

2
2

13
13

20
20
3

34
34
5

24
24
12

37
37
14

21
21
13

5
5
2

13
13
10

6
5

2
2

2
2

~

8
8
8

17
2
15
~
15

40
~
40

82
12
70
1
34

37
18
19

36
16
20
4
9

34
13
21

12
1
11
6

6
i
5
2

1

64
24
40
A
9

_

8
8

10

26

10

26

29
6
23

43
7
36

15
1
14

8
3
5

8
5
3

2
2
-

10
10
-

37
1
36
12
2

A3
27
16
4
1

62
28
34

78
31
A7

53
20
33

27
3
24

23
6
17

1

8

41
13
28
1
19

57
7
50
1

52
11
41
7

163
7
156
8

46
12
34
7

55
7
48
13

6

10
1
9

-

_
-

-

-

-

~
-

-

-

_

-

~

~

~

_

*

-

_

-

1
1

28
28

15

~

-

-

6
1

~

-

1

-

10
2
*
1
1
-

_

12
9
3
3

2

-

2
2

2
2

44
12
32
26
-

1

3
1
2
_
-

8
i
7
2

3

_
-

-

2

_

-

-

-

3

-

3

2

-

1
1

11

*

-

11
6

1A
2
12
12

5
5

A

_

_

-

-

-

-

8
7

~

16
i

16

2

-

8

-

-

9

_

-

-

9
9

11
3
3

10
3
7

-

A

2

-

2

_
-

1 S ta n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o rk w ee k f o r which e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e th e ir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e of pa y f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , and the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d
to th e s e we e kl y h o u rs .
2 Th e m e a n i s co m p ut e d f o r e a c h job by tota ling the e a r n i n g s of a ll w o r k e r s and div id ing by the nu m b er of w o r k e r s .
The m e d ia n d e s i g n a t e s p o s it io n— h alf of the e m p l o y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e
than the ra te shown; half r e c e i v e l e s s than the ra te shown.
The m i dd le r a n ge i s de fin ed by 2 r a t e s of pay; a fo ur th of the w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s than the lo w e r of th e s e r a t e s and a fourt h e a r n m o r e than the
h ig he r ra te .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , co m m u n i ca t io n , and o the r pu blic u ti l it i e s .
4 M a y inc lu de w o r k e r s o th e r than th o se p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e l y .




1 0

Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations—Men and Women
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e we e kl y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s s t ud ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
W eekly e a m i n g ^ ^ ^
( standard)
Num ber
of
w orkers

A v e rage
w eek ly
hours 1
(standard )

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w ee kl y e a r n i n g s of—
$

*

*

$

»

*

$

t

$

t

t

S

%

M e“

2

M e d ian 2

M iddle ran g e 2

70
and
u nde r

90

100

110

12 0

13 0

14 0

150

160

170

180

80

S e x , o ccu p ati o n, and in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n

80

90

10 0

11 0

120

13 0

14 0

150

160

170

180

-

-

“

-

14
14

14
14

3
1
2

12
3
9

16
4
12

10
8
2

1
1

-

1
1

11
11

20
1
19

39
9
30

17
9
8

27
15
12

9
6
3

7
6
1

_

5
5

15
11

15
9

-

13
5

6

t

t

t

t

*

»

$

$

5
5

190

2 00

210

220

230

24 0

250

26 0

270

19P _ 2 f l 0 ___n o .

220

23 0

2 40

250

2 60

2 70

o v er

~
-

-

~
“

-

10

17

MEN
COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS A
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------

85
30
55

39.5
40.0
39.0

$
$
150.00 150.00
174.00 169.50
137.00 130.00

$
$
126.50-166.00
159.00-196.00
120.00-156.00

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------

147
57
90

40.0
40 .0
39.5

136.00
148.00
128.00

131.50
144.00
124.00

121.00-147.50
133.00-166.00
116.00-139.50

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C
NONMANUFACTURING ------------

61
37

40.0
40.0

120.50
116.00

115.00
111.00

107.00-138.00
103.00-136.50

2
2

234.00

231.50

2 13.50-251.50

-

8
7
1

“

-

3

16

14

27

20

20

ii

16
11
5

151

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , CLASS B ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

21 6
52
164

39 .5
40.0
39.5

176.00
194.00
170.00

178.50
189.00
175.50

157.00-190.00
177.00-204.50
150.00-185.50

_

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , CLASS C ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

99
42
57

4 0.0
40.0
39.5

159.00 149.50
178.50 167.50
144.50 143.00

136.00-175.00
144.50-214.00
124.00-162.50

_

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S , CLASS A ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

98
38
60

39.5
4 0.0
39.5

250.50 235.00 2 1 5 .0 0 -2 7 0 .5 0
261.50 262.50 2 2 9 .0 0 -2 7 2 .0 0
243.00 232.50 2 1 2 .5 0 -2 6 4 .5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BU S I N E S S , CLASS B ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

103
51
52

39.5
40.0
39.5

206.50
219.50
194.00

199.00
220.00
185.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BU S I N E S S , CLASS C ------------

30

o
o
*

178.00

176.00

164.50-187.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

5

6

8

-

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING ---------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------

231
130
101

4 0.0
4 0.0
4 0.0

179.00
189.00
166.00

178.00
200.50
164.00

160.00-201.50
172.50-205.00
152.00-181.00

-

“

-

.
-

-

-

_
-

*

_
-

23
4
19

35
9
26

30
13
17

35
22
13

24
8
16

15
7
8

ORAFTSMEN, CLASS B MANUFACTURING --NONMANUFACTURING

291
20 9
82

40.0
4 0.0
40.0

153.50
157.50
143.50

155.00
161.00
134.50

135.50-172.00
144.00-173.50
129.00-156.00

-

_

_

“

“

20
14
6

29
11
18

35
9
26

37
27
10

44
41
3

36
31

-

_
“

56
48
8

25
22
3

9
6
3

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C •
MANUFACTURING ---

156
113

4 0.0
4 0.0

122.50
122.00

122.00
122.00

111.50-134.50
1 13.00-131.50

-

_

12

22
12

35

29

39
36

12

6

31
18

2
2

3
1

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
NONMANUFACTURING ------------

34
29

40.0
40.0

116.50
113.00

114.50
113.50

110.50-126.00
100.00-123.00

2
2

1
1

1
1

12
11

7
6

1

3
2

1
1

1
1

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BU S I N E S S , CLASS A --------------

25

40.0

212.00

212.50

197.50-224.00

4

2

6

o

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BU S I N E S S , CLASS A ----------------------------

*
O

~

~

1
1
-

13

-

6
5
1

182.50-224.50
184.50-247.50
181.00-210.00

-

_

_
”
_
“

_

-

_
-

_

_
”

15
15

4
4

22
22

17
3
14

18
7
11

40
5
35

47
13
34

14
4
10

22
10
12

9
4
5

2
1
1

_
-

1
1

4
4

_

1
1
”

_
-v
“

7
7

15
3
12

10
4
6

19
9
10

7
2
5

14
4
10

4
1
3

1
1

5
2
3

4
4
“

5
5
“

4
4

4
4

_
-

_
-

_

_

2
2

2

~

_
-

2

-

~

9
2
7

16
3
13

5
2
3

19
7
12

3
2
1

5
1
4

10
4
6

27
315
4 12

36
14
22

7
3
4

7
2
5

12
6
6

7
4
3

9
6
3

4
4
“

5
5

4
4

2
2

~

~

~

i

3

-

-

i

-

-

-

56
55
1

12
11
1

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

~

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

~

-

-

_

_

“

_
~

_
”

9

_
“

_
~

1
1

5

9
1
8

~

“

W EN
OM

S e e f o o tn o te s at end of table,




4
4

1

6

5

1

1

11

Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations—
Men and Women—Continued .
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w ee kl y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s st udi ed on an a r e a b a s i s
by i n d u s t r y d iv i s i o n , D e n v e r, C o l o. , D e c e m b e r 1969)
W eekly e a r n in g ^ ^ ^ ™
( standard)

S e x , o cc up a tio n, and i n d u s tr y d iv i s i

N um ber
of
workers

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w ee kl y e a r n i n g s of—
t

A ve rage
w eek ly

70
M ean 2

(standard)

M e d ian 2

M iddle r an g e 2

and
u nde r
80

WOMEN - CONT IN UE D
C O MP UT ER PROGRAMERSt
BUSINESS. CLASS B --------------

29

40.0

$
$
$
$
178.50 177.50 1 5 4 .0 0 -1 9 9 .0 0

~

“

1

4

3

3

4

4

2

1

-

-

-

1

12
9

4
2

2

1

5

C O MP UT ER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C --------------

26

40.0

151.00

142.50

136.50-156.00

-

1

9

7

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
MA NU FA CT UR IN G ----------------

59
40

40.0
40.0

144.50 141.50
142.50 1 4 0 .0 0

135.00-155.50
1 3 4 . 5 0 - 1 5 3 . 0C

-

6
5

20
16

13
8

3

1
to th e se
2
3
4

“

“

1

“

1

1

-

-

-

-

2

S ta n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o rk w ee k f o r which e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e th e ir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e of pa y f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) ,
we e kl y h o u r s .
F o r de fin it ion of t e r m s , s e e footnote 2, ta ble A - l .
W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r i b u t e d a s f o ll o w s :
3 at $ 2 . 7 0 to $ 2 . 8 0 ; 3 at $ 2 . 9 0 to $ 3; 3 at $ 3 to $ 3 . 1 0 ; 4 at $ 3 . 2 0 to $ 3 . 3 0 ; 1 at $ 3 . 3 0 to $ 3 . 4 0 ; and 1 at $ 3 . 4 0 to $ 3 . 5 0 .
W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r i b u t e d a s f o ll o w s :
1 at $ 2 . 7 0 to $ 2 . 8 0 ; 3 at $ 2 . 8 0 to $ 2 . 9 0 ; 1 at $ 3 to $ 3 . 1 0 ; 4 a t $ 3 . 1 0 to $ 3 . 2 0 ; 2 a t $ 3 . 2 0 to $3.30;- and 1 at $ 3 . 6 0 to $ 3 . 7 0 .

and the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d

Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—
Men and Women Combined
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e kl y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s s t ud ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s tr y d iv i si o n , D e n v e r, C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
Average

Average
O ccu pa ti on and in d u s tr y d iv i s i o n

Number
of

O ccu pa ti on and in d u s tr y di v i si o n

$
3 9.5 102.00
3 9 .5 102.00
4 0 .0 123.00

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

181
60
121
70

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

74 5
142
603
114
130

149
147
69

B I L L E R S , MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) -------------------------------------------

29

39.5

80.50

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

98
71

39.0
38.5

109.00
109.00




W
eekly
W
eekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
B I L L E R S , MACHINE ( BI L LI N G
MACHINE) -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2----------------------

S e e fo o tn o te s at end of ta b le .

Number
of

eekly
W
eekly W
hour, * earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

Average
Occu pat ion and in d u s tr y di v i si on

-

Number
of

W
eekly
W
eekly
hour, 1 earning, 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5

$
88.50
88.50
89.00
88.50

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS 8 -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

987
189
798
109
357

40.0
4 0.0
39.5
39.5
40.0

$
93.50
101.50
92.00
114.50
85.00

40.0
4 0.0
39.5
40.0
40.0

119.50
122.00
119.00
138.00
104.50

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS A ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

70
56

39.5
39.5

94.50
95.50

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS B ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

469
446
25

39.5
39.0
40.0

79.50
79.00
75.00

Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined — Continued
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s st u d i e d on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s t r y d iv i si o n , D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
Average

Occupation and in dustry division

O FFICE

OCCUPATIONS

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING
R E TA IL

TRADE

-

TRADE

----------------------------------

----------------------------------

C L E R K S , P A Y R O L L --------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 2------------------------R E TA IL
COMPTO METE R

TRADE

----------------------------------

OPERATORS

-------------------------

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------------------K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 2------------------------R E TA IL

TRAOE

W
eekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
[standard) (standard)

----------------------------------

Average

O ccupation and in dustry division

O FFICE

C O NTINUED

C ------------------------------------------------------

C L E R K S , O R D E R -------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------R E TA IL

Number
of

1A0
117
51

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

$
7 0 .5 0 ,
7 0 .0 0
6 8 .0 0

568
69

AO .O
A O .O

10 6.0 0
1 0 2.5 0

A99
79

A O .O
AO .O

10 6.0 0
9 0 .0 0

268
80
188

A O .O
A O .O
3 9 .5
AO .O

1 09.00
1 10.00

AO
80

3 9 .5

283
21A

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

82

AO .O

388

AO .O
AO .O

1 0 8.5 0
13A.50
9 7 .0 0
8 9 .0 0
8 8 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

AO .O

111.C O
1 11.50
1 1 0 .5 0

A5

AO .O

1 2 3 .0 0

32

AO .O

1 0 0.50

119
269

520
1A7
57

AO .O
AO .O
3 9 .5
AO .O
AO .O

9 7 .0 0
1 0 2.50
9 6 .5 0
1 1A .0C
8 8 .0 0

O F F I C E B O Y S A N D G I R L S -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 2 ------------

239
38
201
A6

3 9 .5
AO .O
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 3 .5 0
7 8 .0 0
8 A . 50
9 0 .5 0

S E C R E T A R I E S 3 ----------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------

2 ,0 7 5
777
1 ,29 8

3 9 .5
AO .O
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 2 7.0 0
1 3 2 . OC
1 2 3.5 0
1 3 5.5 0

P U B L IC

U T I L I T I E S 2 ------------

320

R E TA IL

TRADE

139

3 9 .5
AO .O
AO .O
3 9 .5

1 3 2.5 0
1 3 3.5 0

S T E N O G R A P H E R S , G E N E R A L --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------U T I L I T I E S 2 ------------------------------

SE C R ETA R IE S,

---------------------

CLASS

A

---------

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------

1 3 2.0 0

Average

Occupation and industry division

A 70
A9
A2
613
28A
329
112

3 9 .5
A O .O
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
AO .O
AO .O
AO .O
AO .O

5 . , . . .
12 2.0 0
1 16.50
12 7.5 0
10 3.5 0
1 0 A .5 0
1 07.00
10 2.0 0
11 6.0 0

U T I L I T I E S 2 -----------------------------T R A D E ---------------------------------------

289
62
39

AO .O
AO .O
AO .O
AO .O
AO .O

S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A -------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------

10A
26

AO .O
AO .O

10 7.0 0
10 5.5 0

----------------------------------

78

AO .O

1 07.50

S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B -------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------------------------

217

AO.O
AO .O
AO .O

7 9 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

P U B L IC
R E TA IL

NONMANUFACTURING

S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R - R E C E P T I O N I S T S M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 2 -----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E --------------------------------------T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E OPERATO RS,
C L A S S A ---------------------------------------------------

A 15
126

203
59
393
106
287
30
92

30

3 9 .5
AO .O
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
AO .O

11 6.0 0
11 7.5 0
1 15.50
13 8.5 0
1 01.50

8 3 .0 0

9 3 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
9 1 .5 0
11 3.5 0
8 1 .0 0

12 8.0 0

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E OPERATO RS,
C L A S S B --------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

3A
28

AO .O
AO .O

11 3.5 0
10 9.0 0

TAB U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E OPERATO RS,
C L A S S C ---------------------------------------------------

A1

A O .O

9 3 .5 0

TR A N S C R IB IN G -M A C H IN E OPERATORS,
G E N E R A L --------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------

158
25

3 9 .0
A O .O

9 1 .5 0
9 8 .0 0

133

3 9 .0

9 0 .5 0

NONMANUFACTURING

-------------------------

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 2 ----------------------S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 2 ----------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------------------

370
126
2AA
127
76A
269
A95
129
5A

AO .O
AO .O
AO .O
AO .O

1 3 8.5 0
13 9.5 0
13 8.0 0
1 A 7 .5 0

AO .O
AO .O
3 9 .5
AO .O

1 28.50
1A0.50

A O .O

1 2 2.0 0
1 23.50
1 0 3.5 0

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S A -------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------P U B L IC
R E TA IL

U T I L I T I E S 2--------------------T R A D E ------------------------------

T Y P I S T S , C L A S S B -------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------------------

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

COM PU TE R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

91
36

3 9 .5
AO . 0

1 5 1.0 0
1 72.50

55

3 9 .0

1 3 7.0 0

CO MPUTER O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

181
62
119

AO .O
AO .O
AO .O

1A 7.50
12A .00

73
25

AO .O
A O .O
AO .O

122.00

110

A O .O
A O .O

2 3 1.0 0
232.0 0

2A5
60
185

3 9 .5
AO .O
3 9 .5

1 7 6.0 0
1 9 3.5 0
1 7 0.5 0

125

AO .O
AO .O
3 9 .5

1 5 7.0 0
1 7 6.00
1A 3 .00

3 9 .5
AO .O
3 9 .5

2 5 0.5 0
2 6 2.0 0
2A 2 .50

3 9 .5
A O .O
3 9 .5

2 0 5.0 0
2 1 8.5 0
1 9 2.5 0

NONMANUFACTURING

----------------

CO MPUTER O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S C
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------

CO MPUTER PR O G R A M E R S ,
B U SIN E S S, CLASS A -

CO MPUTER P R O G R A M E R S ,
B U SIN E S S, CLASS B M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G
COM PU TE R PR O G R A M E R S ,
B U SIN E S S, CLASS C M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----NONMANUFACTURING

5A
71

CO MPUTER S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S ,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S A ------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------CO MPUTER S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S ,
B U S I N E S S , C L A S S B ------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------CO MPUTER SY S T E M S
B U SIN E S S, CLASS

ANALYSTS,
C ----------------

DRAFTSMEN,

A

CLASS

CLASS

B

M ANUFACTURING

A31
137
29A
A6
A3
AA2
53
389
37

AO .O
AO .O
A O .O
A O .O

9 7 .0 0
9 3 .0 0
9 8 .5 0
11 2.5 0

AO .O

101
AO
61

111
53
58

1 32.00

128.0 0
1 1 9.0 0

32

AO .O

1 7 6.5 0

25A

A O .O

152

•

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----NONMANUFACTURING
DRAFTSMEN,

A8

176

NONMANUFACTURING

AO .O
AO .O

17 8.5 0
18 6.5 0
1 66.00

102

—

■

301
89

A O .O
AO .O
AO .O

161
11A
A7

A O .O
AO .O
A O .O

122.00

60
A1

A O .O
AO .O

1 A A .5 0
1 A 2 .50

212

NONMANUFACTURING
S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

$
802
332

NONMANUFACTURING
S T E N O G R A P H E R S , S E N I O R ----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------

Number
of

P R O F E S S I O N A L ANO T E C H N IC A L
OCCUPATIONS

1 0 7.0 0

139
50
89

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 2 ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------------------------

P U B L IC

Weekly
eamings 1
(standard)

CONTINUED

S E C R E T A R I E S 3- C O N T IN U E D
S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S D ---------------------------

O

615
95

-

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

o
*

KEYPUNCH O P E R A TO R S , C L A S S B
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 2 -----------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------

OCCUPATIO NS

Number
of

1 53.00
1 5 7.5 0
1A 2.50

9 9 .0 0

3 9 .5
AO .O
3 9 .5
AO .O

8 3 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
8 3 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN, C LASS
M ANUFACTURING

C --------------

NONMANUFACTURING

~

N U R S E S , I N D U S T R I A L ( R E G I S T E R E D ) -----M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------

122.00
1 23.00

8 5 .5 0

1 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o rk w e e k f o r which e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e ir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e of p a y f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , and the e a r n in g s
c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k l y h o u r s .
2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , co m m u n i c at io n , an d oth er pu bli c u t il it i e s .
3 M a y in clude w o r k e r s oth er than th o se p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e l y .




13,

Table A-4. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o ur ly e a r n i n g s f o r m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s st ud ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
b y i n d u s t r y d iv i si o n , D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
Houiiy earnings 1
O c c u p a ti o n and in d u s tr y d iv i s i o n

Number
of
woikeis

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o ur ly e a r n i n g s of—
t
2.10

Mean 2

Median 2

Middle range 2

i
i
$
*
$
$
*
i
t
2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 . AO 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 8 0 2 . 9 0 3 . 0 0

$
3.10

i
i
i
T*
3 . 2 0 3 . 3 0 3 .AO 3 . 6 0

A . 12
A.O A
A . 31

A . 06
A . 01
A.AA

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NQNMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

285
171
1 1A
3A

A. 10
A . 22
3.91
3 .7 A

A . 13
A . 17
3.89
3.82

3.8A 3.953.6A 3.62-

A . 61
A . 71
A . 21
A.0A

:

STATIONARY BOILER -------------

33

3 .0 A

3.52

2 .1 7 - 3.61

12

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES -----------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

111
56

3.00
2.81

3.21
2.8A

2.822.63-

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM —
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

130
130

3.99
3.99

A . 00
A . 00

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE ------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

302
251

A . 02
A . 01

A.0A
A . 01

3.793.78-

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
I MAINTENANCE) ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3----------------------

63 0
130
500
381

A . 07
3.7A
A . 16
A . 23

A . 31
3.73
A . 33
A.3A

3.763 . A03.90A .30-

A . 36
3.97
A . 37
A . 37

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE -------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

51A
500

3.88
3.88

3.78
3.78

3 .7 1 - 3.91
3 .7 1 - 3.92

OILERS ------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

A9
49

3.29
3 .29

3.A2
3 .A 2

3.123.12-

3.A7
3 .A 7
3.97

3.79

3.39-

2A
18
6

53
39
1A

2
1
1

11
11
“

2

58
51
7

32
31
1

6A
5A
10

25
25
*

A3

9

9
A

26
17
9
9

5A
27
27
A

86
63
23
13

18
15
3

8

6
6

18
18

A0
A0

26
26

36
36

3
3

_

5
5

78
7A

36
36

125
78

A7
A7

5
5

5
5

10
10

12
12

2A
23
1
1

1A5
23
122
52

70
25
A5
30

9
7
2
~

327
12
315
283

_
-

7
7
“

8
8
8
”

“

-

-

-

29 5
29A

A.A9
4 .49

A . 39
A . 39

12
12

-

-

-

-

-

:




-

5

1

1

6

1

1
1

1
1

6

1
1

~

1
1
:

A

-

A
1

3
10
10

2
-

1
1

12
12

1
1

11
11

-

2
2

6
6

10
7

5
5

55
10

6
6

”

8

2

_

-

A3

23
17
6

2

"

_
*

73
A8
25
“

-

-

2

“

_
-

_
-

h o li d a y s ,

_

_
*

_

1
1

-

*

7
7

11
11

3
1

23
23

A3
A3

207
207

111
99

13
13

22
22

_

73
73

2
2

8

7
7

1
1

1
1

28
28

1
1

_

_
“

_
~

-

2

12

1A

35

1

11

-

5A
5A

27
27

98
98

16
16

10
10

50
50

89
88

~

-

8

2A

and la te s h i f ts .

”

-

*

7

8
8

_
-

-

2

_

_
-

8

"

1
1

A . 2 5 - A . 77
A . 2 5 - A . 77

1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m pa y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o rk on w ee ke nd s,
2 F o r de fin it ion of t e r m s , s e e footnote 2, t a b le A - l .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , and o th e r pu b li c u t il it i e s .

-

5

3 . 7 9 - A . 07
3 . 7 9 - A . 07

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS -------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

5 . 2 0 o v er

10

A . 16
A . 09

A . 02
A . 02

A . 20 A.A0 A . 60 A. 80 5 . 0 0

17
17

3 . 8 3 - A . 28
3 . 8 3 - A . 28

3.77

t

and

3 . 8 0 - A.A1
3 . 7 8 - A . 18
A . 0 9 - A.A8

A . 01
A . 01

$

5.00 5.20

o
o
*

25A
18A
70

103

t

1
1

ELECT RICIA NS, MAINTENANCE --------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NQNMANUFACTURING --------------------------

198
198

t

.6 0 3 . 8 0

3 . 2 0 3 . 3 0 3 . AC

$
$
3 .6 5 - 3.99
3 .8 0 - 3.99
3 . 5 0 - A . 18

P I P E F I T T E R S , MAINTENANCE ----------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

I

1
1

3.91
3.9A
3.69

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE ----------------------

S

7
6
1

135
69
66

$
3.96
3.96
3.96

$

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE ------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING --------------------------

3.26
3.18

I

and
un der
2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 . AO 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 8 0 2 . 9 0 3 . 0 0 3 . 1 0

FIREMEN,

t

3 . 8 0 A . 00 A . 20 A.AO A . 60 A . 80

“

*
_
“

“

7

_

7
7

“

“
~

-

-

2

2

-

-

_

-

3
3

_
-

27
27

A8
A8

23
23

17
17

23
23

Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u rl y e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s st ud ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
by i n d u s t r y d iv i si o n , D e n v e r , C o l o , , D e c e m b e r 1969)
Num ber

Hourly earnings 2

of w o rk e r s rec eiv in g

straight -tim e

$
1.7 0

$
1 .80

$
1 .9 0

$
2.00

$
2 .1 0

S
2 .2 0

S
2 .3 0

$
2 .4 0

S
2.50

$
2 .60

1 .70

O c c u p a t i o n 1 and in d u s tr y d iv i s i o n

$
1.60

1.8 0

1.90

2 .0 0

2.10

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2.50

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

4
-

212

91
-

39

12
-

60

25

4

212

91

12

60

1
24

Number
woikeis

Mean3

Median 3

Middle range3 $

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN ----------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------GUARCS:
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------JANIT OR S, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS —
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4------------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------------JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
(WOMEN) -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------------LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING --------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------

226

3 .4 3

3.46

3 .4 1 -

3 .6 1

-

-

-

2 ,950
58 1
2 ,369

2 .21
2 .8 0
2 .0 7
2 .9 2

2.09
2 .9 2
2 .0 4

1 .9 0 2 .5 7 1 .8 8 -

2 .4 3
3 .1 5
2 .1 6

129
-

36
-

525
-

2 .9 4
2 .0 8

2 .6 0 1 .9 2 -

2 .9 9
2 .5 9

129
-

36
-

62
33
29
-

“

19

25

120
356

589
568
30
2 , 189
458
1 ,731
603
535

2 .1 9

---------------------------------------

444
238
20 6

PACKERS, SHIPPING (WOMEN) -----------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------

254
108

RECEIVING CLERKS ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------

258

SHIPPING CLERKS -----------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------

1 51
67
84

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ----MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------

199

70

77
181
107

38

87
11 2
74

-

1 .85

2 .0 8
2 .01

3 .28
3 .20

2 .6 5 2 .6 8 -

3 .5 7
3 .3 0

-

3.43
3 .92
2 .4 7

2 .6 3 3 .8 2 2 .0 8 -

3 .8 4
3 .9 6
3.03

3 .1 4

PACKERS, SHIPPING -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------

2 .08

2 .0 2 1 .7 9 -

2.05
2 .05

3 .0 3
3 .1 7
3 .7 3
2 .6 0

_

2 .0 2 -

2 .0 5
2 .0 3
1.89

587
87 7
338




3.61
2 .1 9

3 .4 1
1.95

3 .0 0

S ee fo otn ote s at end of table,

3 .4 1 1 .6 7 -

$
2 .3 6

230
581

1 ,4 6 4

TRUCKDRIVERS5 --------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------

1 .78

$
2.08
3.46

3.01
2 .9 9
3 .1 7

2 .97
3 .11
2 .9 3
3 .50

2 .6 5 2 .6 5 2 .6 3 -

3.41
3 .2 6
3 .5 0

2 .9 3 -

2.52
3.16
2 .4 5

2 .2 6 2 .2 2 2 .3 2 -

3 .30
3 .3 7
2 .6 6

2 .3 6
2 .4 0
2 .4 2

2.08
2 .6 6
2.68

2 .0 2 1 .8 7 1 .8 7 -

2 .7 4
2 .7 7
2 .8 3

3 .1 3
3 .2 3
3 .0 8
2 .9 3

3 .2 3
3 .28
3 .09
3.04

2
2
2
2

.9
.9
.7
.4

0
9
9
9

-

3 .1 7

3.25
3.38
3 .18
3 .23

3
3
2
3

.0
.1
.8
.0

6
7
7
5

3 .3 5
3 .0 3
3 .1 6
2 .9 5
2 .8 7
3 .0 1
3 .0 3

-

*
3 .2 0

$
3 .4 0

$
3 .6 0

$
3 .80

*
4 .0C

$
4 .2 0

$
4 .4 0

2 . 80

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .2C

3.40

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

over

48
48

-

-

1

23
-

1

3
-

8

50

23

1

3

1

-

-

-

-

54 9
12

116
33

36
36
-

11

i
6

20
25

72
66
6
-

64

83
3
15

67
17
50

2

537
4

40
31
9

525

473
17
456

33

1
53

-

9

7

130
6
124

225
208
17

3
74

31

11

“

33
2
31

22
7
15

40
2
38

30
1
29

-

-

8
8
8

33
33

8
-

10
14
4

50
34
16
4

1
15
3

37
29
8

58
13
45

-

12

-

12

33

-

5

13
-

34

-

77

16

41

9
-

25
11
2

150

32

1

17
4

74

11
78

2

~

-

89

12

33

_

12 9
52

24

34

1
-

9
-

6
-

9

6
6

13
7

8
3

9
7
2

16
7
9

14
7
7

29
14
15

25
25
25

1
1
1

121
1
1

1
1
1

1

11

14

132

30
16

8
6

120
12

30

8

120

48

14

-

101

15
-

7

3
-

-

15
15

7

3

ii

77

8
8
-

7
5

-

-

10
10

-

-

1

3 .5 7
3 .5 6
3 .6 0
3 .36

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .4 6
3 .5 3
3 .3 4
3.35

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

3 .09

2 .4 9 -

3 .4 7

-

_

_

3 .12
2 .9 6

2 .3 9 -

3.31

-

3 .22

3 .5 3
3 .5 4

-

-

2 .6 0 2 .6 3 -

-

3 .4 4
3 .4 7

3 .6 3
3.66

3 .0 5 3 .1 1 -

3 .9 4
3 .7 6

_

2 ,1 8 7
1 ,330
329

3 .4 3
3 .7 7
3 .0 8

3.62
3.94

3 .0 4 3 .9 0 2 .6 6 -

3 .9 5
3 .9 7
3 .5 3

-

-

_

-

11
10

9

-

9

7
7
-

5
5

“

“

7
7

_
-

21
-

21
-

21

21

“

-

10

3

10

i
i

3
~

153
81

“

4

6

_

-

-

309

467
17
450
27
118

7

55

17

3

58
19
39
14

46
32

2 94
211

14
8

83
65

315
1
314
170

84
84

23
23

122
12
-

5
-

15
15

~

5
-

16

1
1
1

18
16
16

5

9

14

1
8

217
92
61

-

“

33
7

_

_

1

1

1
1

1
1

~

21
11

22

2

44

36
32
4

_

6

4

-

6

4

38
21
17

4

13
23
17
6
4

27
19
8

368
66

139
82
57

“

8
-

8

5

9

12

8

2
6

1

2

10

2

“

1
4
4

57
16
41

37
6
31

48
10

38

55
12
43

75
2
73

57
9
48

42
10
32

22

24

15

24

8

1

17
10

11
10

14

10

1

7

1

10

1

2

56
-

20
-

56

20

29
10
19

2

2

2

5

2
9

30 2
172
73

_

~

_

~

14
30
18

8

25
26

“

_
-

_

_

468
468

-

-

-

-

19
19
-

38
38
-

-

_

-

-

4
4

3
3

-

468
-

_

4
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

57
23
34

6

12

10
-

_

~

“

14
8

“

20

-

2

26
21

3

-

-

23
17
6
6

i
i

2

“

“

13
3

72
7

14
14

~

"

6

3
3

12
12

“

*
-

12

“

-

1

“

2 ,7 2 2
535

1

“

95
6

I
73
6

127
5

-

-

15 6
149

4

-

13
11
2

12

46

"

54
29

5

41
-

-

8
8

3

2

32
-

13
5
~

1
73

2

17
-

18

95

105
49
56
54
2

*

1
218
8

“

33

52
36
16

_

219

3

34
-

5
12 2
27

1

13

13

4

2

15

_

4
-

1
1

36
19

7
6

2

1
1

7

-

2

41
-

13
13

19

2
2
2

6
6

32
-

9
9

-

50

24

527
527
2

1
-

_

276
8
268

-

3.15

$
3 .0 0

24
-

1
1
1

16
9
9

-

2
37

3 .5 5

2 .6 2
2 .8 0
2 .4 2

$
2 .9 0

under

811

ORDER FI LL ER S -------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NCNMANUFACTURING ----------------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------------M A N U F A C T U R IN G

$
3 .2 9

2 . 70

and

1 .6 0

$
1 .6 9 -

h o u r l y e a r n i n g s of—

S
2.80

s

10

59
14
45
15
6
6

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

i
36

5

4

2

5

4

305

3C1

23
28 2
79

22 3
78

122

27

1025
1025
1 025

-

6
-

~

34
30

6

34
34
-

5
5
~

20
20
-

Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations— Continued
( A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u rly e a r n in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s tr y d iv is io n , D e n v e r, C o lo ., D e c e m b e r 1969)
Hourly earnings 2

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t i m e h o u rly e a r n in g s of—

woikers

M ean3

Median 3

Middle range3

$
1 .7 0

S
$
$
$
*
1 .8 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0

1 .7 0

O c c u p a tio n 1 and in d u s try d iv isio n

t

Number
of

1 .8 0

1 .9 0 2 .0 0

7
7

“

U n d e r 1 * 60
*
and
1 . 6 0 u n d er

*
$
$
2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0

$
2 .6 0

$
2 .7 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0 2 .9 0

2 .5 0 2 .6 0

t
2 .8 0

S
*
2 .9 0 3 .0 0

t
3 .2 0

S
3 .4 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 ,4 0

? t 60 ? . 8 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

12
“
12

23

13
6
7

23
23

12
“
12

32

23

32

1
1
~

10
6
4

43
3
40

7
7
~

-

17
10
7

34
16
18

24
24

25
10
15

43
12
31

24
24

53
8
45

22

~

2

18

24

15

24

“

”

290
44
246
172
62

8

_

8

-

33
18
15

8

~

*
3 .6 0

*
$
*
*
3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0

4 . CO 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0

over

T R U C K D R I V E R S 5 - C O NT IN UE D
TR UC KD RI VE RS , LIGHT IUN0ER
1-1/2 TONS) -----------------------M A NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

400
60
340

$
2.96
3.21
2.92

$
2.94
3.50
2.76

$
2.332.922.29-

$
3.79
3.76
3.91

TR UC KD RI VE RS , ME 0I UM <1-1/2 TO
AND IN CLUDING 4 TONS) ----------M A NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4--------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------

1,327
172
1,155
761
157

3.36
3.15
3.39
3.68
2.78

3.49
3.07
3.54
3.92
2.68

3.022.663.033.512.48-

3.94
3.47
3.94
3.96
3.09

TR UC KD RI VE RS , HE AV Y (OVER 4 TONS,
TR AI LE R TYPE) --------------------M A NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4--------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------

584
43
541
397
139

3.79
4.04
3.77
3.90
3.44

3.93
3.79
3.93
3.95
3.53

3.563.143.563.923.37-

21
“
21

21

12

20

21

12

20

44
44

_

3.97
4.69
3.96
3.97
3.56

TRUCKD RI VE RS , HE AV Y (OVER 4 TONS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) -------M A N U FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

331
201

3.72
3.74

3.75
3.74

833
442
391
63
92

3.37
3.26
3.50
3.88
3.23

3.39
3.29
3.59
3.95
3.52

3.182.873.523.922.85-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

~

“

“

•

3.69- 3.79
3.71- 3.77

TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT) --------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4--------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------

_

3.62
3.37
3.67
3.97
3.57

9
-

_
-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

4
-

3
3

9
9

4

-

-

4

1 D a ta lim it e d to m e n w o r k e r s e x c e p t w h ere o th e r w ise in d ic a te d .
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r t im e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h if t s .
3 F o r d e fin itio n of t e r m s , s e e fo o tn o te 2, ta b le A - l .
4
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th er p u b lic u t il it i e s .
5 In c lu d e s a ll d r i v e r s , a s d e fin e d , r e g a r d l e s s of s i z e and type of tr u c k o p e r a te d .
6 W o rk e rs w e re d is tr ib u te d a s f o llo w s : 5 a t $ 4 .4 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; 5 a t $ 4 .6 0 to $ 4 .8 0 ; 5 a t $ 4 .8 0 to $ 5 ; and 5 a t $ 5 .6 0 to $ 5 .8 0 .




4
2
2

49
9
40

60
59
1

2

16

1

3
39
39

22
2

_
“
1
9
9

10

4
4

43
28
15

94
_
94

-

24
18
6
1
2

175
18
157
70
10

22
22
22
~

494
494
494

34
34
-

49
1
48
24
24

102
102
5
97

6
3
3
3
~

365

-

-

365
365
“

13
10

4
*

228
190

72
-

33
22
11

228
226
2
2

156
10
146
3
51

133
6
127

58
58
58

-

7

2
2

_

2
2
-

_
-

-

~

1
1

11

_

_
-

1
1
-

20
620

“

_

_

_

“
_
-

48
48

-

-

-

-

-

16

B. Establishm ent P ractices and Supplem entary Wage Provisions
Table B-l. Minimum Entrance Salaries for Women Office Workers
( D is t r ib u t io n o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d ie d in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y m in im u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r y f o r s e l e c t e d c a t e g o r i e s
o f i n e x p e r ie n c e d w o m e n o f f ic e w o r k e r s , D e n v e r , C o l o ., D e c e m b e r 1969)
In e x p e rie n c e d ty p is ts

M in im u m w e e k ly s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y 1

O th e r in e x p e r ie n c e d c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s 2
M a n u fa c tu r in g

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g

M a n u f a c tu r in g

B a s e d o n s t a n d a r d w e e k ly h o u r s 3 of—

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

A ll
sc h e d u le s

40

A ll
sc h e d u le s

37 Vz

Adi
in d u s tr ie s
A ll
sc h e d u le s

40

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g

B a s e d o n s t a n d a r d w e e k ly h o u r s 3 of—
40

A ll
sc h e d u le s

37 Vz

40

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d -----------------------------------------------

184

56

XXX

128

XXX

XXX

184

56

XXX

128

XXX

XXX

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g a s p e c i f i e d m i n i m u m ----------------------

65

23

22

42

7

34

91

26

25

65

10

54

$ 6 0 .0 0 a n d u n d e r $ 6 2 . 5 0 ----------------------------------------------$ 6 2 . 5 0 an d u n d e r $ 6 5 . 0 0 ----------------------------------------------$ 6 5 .0 0 a n d u n d e r $ 6 7 .5 0 ___________________________________
$ 6 7 .5 0 a n d u n d e r $ 7 0 .0 0 ----------------------------------------------$ 7 0 .0 0 an d u n d e r $ 7 2 .5 0 ----------------------------------------------$ 7 2 .5 0 an d u n d e r $ 7 5 .0 0 ___________________________________
$ 7 5 .0 0 an d u n d e r $ 7 7 .5 0 ----------------------------------------------$ 7 7 . 5 0 an d u n d e r $ 8 0 . 0 0 -----------------------------------------------$ 8 0 .0 0 an d u n d e r $ 8 2 .5 0 ___________________________________
$ 8 2 .5 0 a n d u n d e r $ 8 5 .0 0 ___________________________________
$ 8 5 .0 0 an d u n d e r $ 8 7 .5 0 -----------------------------------------------$ 8 7 . 5 0 an d u n d e r $ 9 0 . 0 0 ----------------------------------------------$ 9 0 . 0 0 an d u n d e r $ 9 2 .5 0 ----------------------------------------------$ 9 2 .5 0 an d u n d e r $ 9 5 .0 0 -----------------------------------------------$ 9 5 .0 0 an d u n d e r $ 9 7 .5 0 ----------------------------------------------$ 9 7 .5 0 an d u n d e r $ 1 0 0 .0 0 ---------------------------------------------$ 1 0 0 .0 0 an d u n d e r $ 1 0 2 ,5 0 -------------------------------------------$ 1 0 2 .5 0 an d o v e r -----------------------------------------------------------

2
6
2
3
9
8
9
5
7
5
2
1
1
1
4

_
1
2
2
3
4
4
3
2
1
1

1
2
2
3
4
3
3
2
-

2
5
2
3
7
6
6
1
3
2
-

2
1
1
1

_
4
2
3
6
4
6
1
2
2
-

1
4
2
3
6
2
3
2
1
1

1
1
3

1

1
1

1
~
3

5
11
4
8
12
12
4
7
8
6
2
1
3
2
1
~
5

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g no s p e c i f i e d m i n im u m --------------------

19

7

XXX

12

XXX

XXX

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w h ich d id no t e m p lo y w o r k e r s
in t h is c a t e g o r y ----------------------------------------------------------------

100

26

XXX

74

XXX

XXX

1
-

5
10
4
8
8
10
1
1
6
3
1
2
1
1

1

1
4
2
2
6
2
3
2
1
1
~
1

34

15

XXX

19

XXX

XXX

59

15

XXX

44

XXX

XXX

T h e s e s a l a r i e s r e l a t e to f o r m a l l y e s t a b l i s h e d m in im u m s t a r t i n g ( h ir in g ) r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s th a t a r e p a id f o r s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k s .
E x c l u d e s w o r k e r s in s u b c l e r i c a l jo b s su c h a s m e s s e n g e r o r o f f ic e g i r l .
D a t a a r e p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k s c o m b in e d , a n d f o r th e m o s t c o m m o n s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k s r e p o r t e d .




4
1
1
2
1
-

1
9

4
7
7
8
1
1
5
3
1
2
1

1
4

4




Table B-2. Shift Differentials
( L a t e - s h i f t p a y p r o v i s i o n s f o r m a n u f a c t u r i n g p la n t w o r k e r s b y ty p e a n d a m o u n t o f p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l ,
D e n v e r , C o lo . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
( A l l p l a n t w o r k e r s ;n m a n u ’ a c l u r i i i ^ *

100)

P e r c e n t o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g p la n t w o r k e r s —
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g p r o v i s i o n s 1
fo r la te sh ifts

L a t e - s h ift p a y p r o v is io n

A c t u a l l y w o r k in g o n l a t e s h i f t s

S e c o n d sh ift

T h ir d o r o th e r
sh ift

S e c o n d sh ift

T h ir d o r o t h e r
sh ift

9 3 .5

8 6 .9

1 9 .2

6.1

_

_

N o p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l f o r w o r k o n l a t e s h i f t _______

0.2

P a y d i f f e r e n t i a l f o r w o r k o n l a t e s h i f t __________

9 3 .3

8 6 .9

19-1

6.1

8 2 .9

6 8 .7

17 .1

5 .2

(2 )

T y p e and am o u n t o f d iffe r e n tia l:
U n i f o r m c e n t s ( p e r h o u r ) __________________
5 c e n t s ___
__________ ________
6 c e n t s ________________ ___________ ___ ___
8 c e n t s __________ ________________________
1 0 c e n t s _________________________ _________
1 2 c e n t s . ___________________________________
I 2 V2 c e n t s ____ ___________ _______ ____
13 V3 c e n t s _______________________ _________
14 c e n t s . . _______ __ . _____ ___ __
15 c e n t s _________ __ ___________ ___ ________
1 6 , 1 7 , o r 18 c e n t s ______________________
2 0 c e n t s ___________ ___ _________ ____
21 c e n t s ______ _________________ .
2 5 c e n t s _____________________________
2 6 z/3 c e n t s __________________________ __
27 c e n t s _________________________ _________
3 0 c e n t s a n d o v e r ________________________
U n ifo r m p e r c e n ta g e

______ ______

-

1 0 p e r c e n t __________ __ ___________________
1 2 l/2 p e r c e n t -----------------------------------------

11.0

_

2.6

_

1 6 .6
.7
1 9 .4
3 .3
-

8.8

4 .1
(2 )
3 .3
.5
.4

1 .3
_

1.2

3 .2
1 7 .8
2 .4
4 .9

_
14 .1
5 .0
1.8

1 5 .2

.1

3 .3

.8

.3
.3
.7

1.6

.8

.2

1 1 .4
3 .9

1 .4

.7

2.1
1.2

(2 )

2.2

-

-

3 .7

.5
-

4 .5

4 .5

.9

.2

4 .5
-

-

•9
-

-

4 .5

-

.2
_

-

.2
.1

(2 )
.5

.2

3 .9

-

1.2

-

F u l l d a y 's p a y f o r r e d u c e d h o u r s —________

-

1 .7

-

-

F u l l d a y 's p a y f o r r e d u c e d h o u r s
p l u s c e n t s d i f f e r e n t i a l ____________________

2.0

8.0

-

.6

F la t - s u m p a y m e n t p e r sh ift

F u l l d a y 's p a y f o r r e d u c e d h o u r s
p lu s
1 p e r day

3 .9

.1

1 I n c l u d e s a l l p la n t w o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s c u r r e n t l y o p e r a t i n g , o r h a v in g f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s c o v e r i n g l a t e s h i f t s , e v e n
th o u g h th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w e r e n o t c u r r e n t l y o p e r a t i n g l a t e s h i f t s .
2 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .

18

Table B-3. Scheduled Weekly Hours
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t an d o f f ic e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y s c h e d u l e d w e e k ly h o u r s 1
o f f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s , D e n v e r , C o l o ., D e c e m b e i 1969)
O f f ic e w o r k e r s

P la n t w o r k e r s
W e e k ly h o u r s

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2

M a n u f a c tu r i ng

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

R e ta il tra d e

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 4

M a n u fa c tu r in g

A U w o r k e r s __________________________________

100

100

100

100

100

100

U n d e r 3 7 Vi h o u r s --------------------------------------------37 V2 h o u r s _________________________________________
O v e r 3 7 V2 a n d u n d e r 40 h o u r s ------------------------40 h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 40 an d u n d e r 4 8 h o u r s ---------------------------48 h o u r s and o v e r --------------------------------------------

2
4
2
87
3
3

2
6
89
3

100
-

3
5
6
81
4

9
6
84
1

100
-

1
2
3
4

-

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

R e ta il tra d e

100

100

3
97

16
84

-

-

-

S c h e d u le d h o u r s a r e th e w e e k ly h o u r s w h ich a m a j o r i t y o f th e f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s w e r e e x p e c t e d to w o r k , w h e th e r th e y w e r e p a id f o r a t s t r a i g h t - t i m e o r o v e r t im e r a t e s .
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a le t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n to t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a le t r a d e ; f in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n to t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .




Table B-4. Paid Holidays
( P e r c e n t d is t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y n u m b e r o f p a i d h o lid a y s
p r o v i d e d a n n u a l ly , D e n v e r , C o lo . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
P la n t w o r k e r s
I te m

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 1

M a n u f a c tu r in g

O ffic e w o r k e r s

P u b l ic
u tilitie s 2

R e ta il tra d e

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 3

M a n u fa c tu r in g

P u b l ic
u tilitie s 2

R e ta il tra d e

100
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id h o l i d a y s ____________________________________
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g
no p a id h o l i d a y s --------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

92

99

100

88

99

100

100

99

1

*

12

(4 )

-

-

_

3
47
33
4
-

(4 )
11
6
9
(4 )
4
20
3
19
26
-

26
60
9
3
-

(4 )
63
30
6
-

-

-

-

(4 )
21
2
14
4
2
39
1
8
7
1
1

1
(4 )

_

_
6
18
44
32
-

-

-

-

10
44
67
69
90
99
99
99
99

_

4
4
38
84
84
86
88

1
2
9
17
59
63
79
98
98
99
99

_
26
48
72
73
88
99
100
100
100

_

32
76
76
94
100
100
100
100

3
12
73
73
98
99
100
100
100

_
6
6
36
98
98
99
99

8

1

N um ber of davs
L e s s th a n 6 h o lid a y s
__ ____ - __
6 h o l i d a y s ___________, ______ _ __ __ _ . .
6 h o lid a y s p l u s 2 h a lf d a y s ______________________
7 h o l i d a y s ___ _ __ _________________________ ___
7 h o lid a y s p l u s 1 h a lf d a y
____
7 h o lid a y s p l u s 2 h a lf d a y s ______________________
8 h o l i d a y s ________________________________________ _
8 h o lid a y s p l u s 2 h a lf d a y s ______________________
9 h o l i d a y s ___________ _ _____ __ ______
______
10 h o l i d a y s . . . ________ _________________ ___ ____
11 h o l i d a y s ___________-___________ _________________
12 h o lid a y s ------------------------------------------------------

1
27
2
20
1
2
17
1
17
4
(4 )

9
4

18
2
4
19
3
31
10

T o t a l h o lid a y t i m e 5
12 d a y s —
11 d a y s o r m o r e __________________________________
10 d a y s o r m o r e __________________________________
9 d a y s o r m o r e __________ ___ __ _________________
8 d a y s o r m o r e _____—_________ ____ __ ___ __ ____
7 7 2 d a y s o r m o r e _______________ ______ _______ __
7 d a y s o r m o r e ___________________________________
____ __ ___
6 days or m o re —
_________ __
5 d a y s o r m o r e ______ __ __ ________________ __ ___
4 d a y s o r m o r e ___________________________________

(4 )
4
23
40
42
64
90
90
91
92

1 I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a le t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n to t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
3 I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a le t r a d e ; f in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; an d s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n to t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
* L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .
5
A ll c o m b in a t io n s o f f u ll a n d h a l f d a y s th a t a d d to th e s a m e a m o u n t a r e c o m b in e d ; f o r e x a m p l e , th e p r o p o r t io n o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g a t o t a l
w ith 9 fu l l d a y s a n d n o h a lf d a y s , 8 f u l l d a y s a n d 2 h a lf d a y s , 7 f u l l d a y s a n d 4 h a lf d a y s , a n d s o o n .
P r o p o r t i o n s th e n w e r e c u m u la te d .




of 9

days

in c lu d e s

th o s e

Table B-5. Paid Vacations
( P e r c e n t d is t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t io n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
P la n t w o r k e r s
V a c a t io n p o l ic y

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2

M a n u f a c tu r in g

O ffic e w o r k e r s

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

R e ta il
tra d e

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 4

M a n u fa c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

R e ta il
tra d e

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
82
17
1

100
72
28
-

100
87
13
-

98
85
10
3

100
98
2
-

100
96
4
-

100
100
_

100
100
_

1

_

2

"

7
14
2

15
9
-

_
51
-

2
12
7

1
35
3

2
24
(6 )

2
63
-

1
17
13

70
3
25
1

72
5
23
-

50
8
42
-

76
22
*

28
(6 )
69
3

20
75
6

56
_
44
-

59
_
41
-

30
4
63
3
(?)
(6 )

39
3
53
5
-

19
13
69
-

32
66
-

9
85
6
-

(6 )
1
98
-

9
91
-

-

-

-

5
(6 )
89
5
1
(‘ )

-

-

-

3
4
88
3
2
(6 )

_
3
86
5
6
-

_
13
87
-

8
90
-

_

1
99
-

-

_
92
6
2
-

100
_

-

(6 )
93
5
1
(6)

-

-

2
4
88
3
3
(6 )

.

13
87
-

5
93
-

_
100
_

99

_

_

M e th o d o f p a y m e n t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d in g
p a id v a c a t i o n s ___________________________________
L ,e n g t h - o f- t im e p a y m e n t _____________________
P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t __________________________
O t h e r __________ __________ _____
___ ___
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g
no p a id v a c a t i o n s ________________________________
A m o u n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 5
A fte r 6 m o n th s o f s e r v ic e
U n d e r 1 w e e k ______________________________________
1 w e e k _____________________________ _____________
O v e r 1 an d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _______________________
A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ____ _______ ______ ___ _____________________
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _ ____________________
2 w e e k s ___________________________ _______________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _____________________

_

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
w ee k ____________________________________________
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w e e k s _______________ ___ _____ ___ _____ ________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ------------------------------3 w e e k s ________________ __________________________
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s _______________________
1

A ft e r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ______ ___
O v er 1 an d u n d er 2
2 w eeks
O v er 2 and u n d er 3
3 w eeks ..... .. .
.
O v er 3 an d u n d er 4

______ ______ __ _ — _
w e e k s _______________________
__
w e e k s _______________________
_
_ .
„__ _ _
...
w e e k s _____________________ —

A fte r 4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w ee k _____ __
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ____ ___ __________
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _________ __________
3 w eeks
_
, ._
O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s

S e e fo o tn o te s a t en d o f t a b le .




3
84
5
7

(6 )
93
5
1
( 6)

_
92
6
2

_

1
_

Table B-5. Paid Vacations1 Continued
--( P e r c e n t d is t r i b u t i o n o f p l a n t a n d o f f ic e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t io n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
O ffic e w o r k e r s

P la n t w o r k e r s
V a c a t io n p o l ic y

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2

M a n u f a c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

R e ta il
tra d e

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 4

M a n u fa c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

R e ta il
tra d e

A m o u n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 5— C o n tin u e d
A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1
. . _r
________________ ___ ______
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _________ ____________
3 w e e k s __ ______________ ______
____
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w e e k s _ _____________ ________ __ _______

i
2
81
3
12
(6 )
(6 )

_
77
6
17
-

_
13
72
_
16
_

3
_
86
_
10
_

-

-

-

_
_
76
3
19
2
1

_

.
2
13
86
-

3
29
_
67
-

.
11
(6 )
84
1
3

-

-

(b)

_
_
56
1
38
6
-

_
_
93
_
7

_
_
83

-

-

_
3

.
18

75
6
5
-

97
-

82
-

-

-

_
10

_
1

79
6
5
-

99
-

17

A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ______ _
__ ___
____ ____ _____ __
2 w e e k s ___ _______________________________________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w eeks
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w e e k s ____________________________________ ______
O v er 4 and u n der 5 w e e k s . _____ ___

1
30
2
64
2
(6 )

29
_
67
4
-

1
21
2
73
2
2
(6 )

11
2
83
4
-

14

_

_

_

A f t e r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k _______________ _______ ....... _
_______
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ------------------------------- --------- ------- ---O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w eeks
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s _______________________

_

_

_

87
13
_

3
24
1
71
_

-

-

9
1
86
1
3
(6)

_
1
54
13
33
-

3
20
_
66
9
-

4
(6 )
71
(‘ )
24
(‘ )

1

3
19

1

_

13
1
86
-

_

_

-

-

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w eek ____________________________________
2 w e e k s ___________ ____________________ ________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s __ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ________ _________
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w e e k s _ ______________ _________________________
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s _______________________

1
15
(6 )
62
2
20
(6 )

_
3
66
2
29
-

_

_
2
_
55
_
43
-

_

_

1
_
79
_
20
-

11
84
_
5
-

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k __________ ______ ______ . „ ____
2 w e e k s ____________________________________ _____
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s - _________________________________________
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w e e k s __ _________________________________________
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s _______________________

S e e f o o tn o te s a t en d o f t a b le .




1
13
(6 )
30
2
50
1
3

.
3
32

-

-

6
13
65

-

48

-

-

-

3

16

-

62

29

4
(6)
28

2

1

10

-

_

-

20

5

40

-

-

_

-

62
3
3

69
6
3

89

50

-

_

6

Table B-5. Paid Vacations1 Continued
--( P e r c e n t d is t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t an d o f f ic e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t io n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c e m b e r 1969)
O ffic e w o r k e r s

P la n t w o r k e r s
V a c a t io n p o l ic y

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2

M a n u f a c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

R e ta il
tra d e

_
i
6
13
43
25
13

3
19
26
50
-

_
4
(6 )
24
53
2
16
1

4
(6 )
24
53
1
13
1
4

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 4

M a n u fa c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

R e ta il
tra d e

.
i
_
5
53
_
36
5

_
10
_
38
51
-

A m o u n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 5— C o n tin u e d
A f t e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ________________________________ — _______
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w ^ fik s
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ___ __________________
4 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s _______________________
5 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------6 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------

i
13
(6)
23
4
43
2
13
2

_
3
16
5
52
2
22

1
13
(6 )
22
4
43
2
13
2

_
3
15
5
53
2
22
-

_
1
6
13
43
25
13

3
19
26
50
-

1
13
(6 )
22
4
43
2
13
2

_
3
15
5
53
2
22
-

1
6
13
43
25
13

3
19
26
50

_
2
12
55
31
-

A f t e r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w eek
2 w e e k s _________________________ ______________ _
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s -------------------------- —
3 w e e k s --- -------------------------------- — -------------O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s __ ___________________
4 w e e k s _ _________________________________________
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s _______________________
5 w e e k s ---------------------- ---- ------------------------O v e r 5 a n d u n d e r 6 w e e k s ---------------------- -----6 w e e k s _____________________ __ _______________

-

_

_

2
_
12
55
14
6
10

1
5
53
36
5

_
2
_
12
55
14
6
10

_
1
_
5
_
53
36
5

_
10
_
38
51

_
_

_
-

M a x im u m v a c a t io n a v a i l a b l e
1 w e e k _________ _________________ ________ __ _
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ____________________________ _____________
___________
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ________
4 w e e k s ________ _________________________________
O v e r 4 an d u n d e r 5 w e e k s _______________________
5 w e e k s _______________________ ___________________
O v e r 5 a n d u n d e r 6 w e e k s __ ___________________
6 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O v e r 6 w e e k s ___________________ ________________

-

-

4
(6)
24
52
1
13
1
4
(6 )

_
_

10

38
_
51
_

_

-

1 I n c lu d e s b a s i c p l a n s o n ly . E x c l u d e s p l a n s s u c h a s v a c a t io n b o n u s , v a c a t i o n - s a v i n g s , a n d t h o s e p l a n s w h ic h o f f e r " e x t e n d e d ” o r " s a b b a t i c a l " b e n e f it s b e y o n d b a s i c p la n s
to w o r k e r s w ith q u a lif y in g le n g t h s o f s e r v i c e .
T y p i c a l o f s u c h e x c l u s i o n s a r e p l a n s in th e s t e e l , a lu m in u m , a n d c a n i n d u s t r i e s .
2 I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a le t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n to t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
4 I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a le t r a d e ; f in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; an d s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n to t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
5 I n c lu d e s p a y m e n t s o t h e r th a n " le n g t h o f t i m e , " su c h a s p e r c e n t a g e o f a n n u a l e a r n in g s o r f l a t - s u m p a y m e n t s , c o n v e r t e d to a n e q u iv a le n t t i m e b a s i s ; fo r e x a m p le , a p a y m e n t
o f 2 p e r c e n t o f a n n u a l e a r n in g s w a s c o n s i d e r e d a s 1 w e e k 's p a y .
P e r i o d s o f s e r v i c e w e r e c h o s e n a r b i t r a r i l y a n d do n o t n e c e s s a r i l y r e f l e c t th e in d iv id u a l p r o v i s i o n s fo r
p r o g re ssio n .
F o r e x a m p l e , th e c h a n g e s in p r o p o r t io n s in d ic a te d a t 10 y e a r s * s e r v i c e in c lu d e c h a n g e s in p r o v i s i o n s o c c u r r i n g b e tw e e n 5 a n d 10 y e a r s .
E s t i m a t e s a r e c u m u la t iv e .
T h u s , th e p r o p o r t io n e l i g i b l e f o r 3 w e e k s ' p a y o r m o r e a f t e r 10 y e a r s in c lu d e s t h o s e e l i g i b l e f o r 3 w e e k s ' p a y o r m o r e a f t e r f e w e r y e a r s o f s e r v i c e .
6 L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .




Table B-6. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
(Percent of plant and qffice w o r k e r s in all industries and in industry divisions e m p l o y e d in establishments providing
health, insurance, or pension benefits, Denver, Colo., D e c e m b e r 1969)
Plant w o r k e r s
T y p e of benefit and
financing 1

All w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in establishments providing at
least 1 of the benefits s h o w n b e l o w _____ _--- Life insurance
_ __
Noncontributory plans
Accidental death and d i s m e m b e r m e n t
insurance
Noncontributory plans----- --------- — ___
Sickness and accident insurance or

All
industries 2

Manufacturing

Office w o r k e r s

Public
utilities 3

100

100

100

99

100

100

93
62

97
76

100
74

72
46

72
56

94
49

Retail
trade

100

All
industries 4

Manufacturing

Public
utilities 3

100

100

100

100

99

99

99

100

99

90
45

95
58

98
79

97
64

95
41

63
35

74
38

76
62

96
27

63
26

84
Noncontributory pl an s ________________
Sick leave (full pa y and no
waiting period)
Sick leave (partial pa y or
waiting period)
Hospitalization insurance
Nonrnntrihutnry plans
Surgical insurance .
.
. . . . .
Noncontributory plans
Me di ca l insurance
_
___ _ _
Noncontributory plans
M a j o r medical insurance___________________
Noncontributory plans
Re ti re me nt pension_
Noncontributory plans

Retail
trade

95

88

82

94

89

99

59
40

84
65

49
34

34
10

52
28

61
44

24
ii

45
9

23

15

63

19

69

54

98

38

22

18

2

45

10

5

1

37

96
50
96
50
93
49
71
37
70
53

99
66
99
66
99
66
72
41
80
68

100
44
100
44
100
44
100
63
87
60

92
31
92
31
84
31
60
20
66
45

97
37
97
37
93
35
85
41
81
64

99
65
99
65
99
65
73
44
88
80

100
19
100
19
100
19
100
54
85
69

80
5
80
5
68
5
80
17
64
27

1 Estimates listed after type of benefit are for all plans for wh i c h at least a part of the cost is borne b y the employer. "Noncontributory plans" include only those plans
financed entirely b y the employer. E x cl ud ed are legally required plans, such as w o r k m e n ' s compensation, social security, and railroad retirement.
2 Includes data for wholesale trade, real estate, and services, in addition to those industry divisions s h o w n separately.
3 Transportation, communication, an d other public utilities.
4 Includes data for wholesale trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services, in addition to those industry divisions s h o w n separately.
5 Unduplicated total of w o r k e r s receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance s h o w n separately below. Sick leave plans are limited to those w h i c h definitely
establish at least the m i n i m u m n u m b e r of days' pa y that can be expected b y each employee. Informal sick leave allowances d e t e rm in ed on a n individual basis are excluded.




Table B-7.

Method of Wage Determination and Frequency of Payment

(Percent distribution of plant and office w o r k e r s in all industries and in industry divisions b y m e t h o d of w a g e d e te rmination1
and frequency of w a g e payment, Denver, Colo., D e c e m b e r 1969)
Office w o r k e r s

Plant w o r k e r s
Item

All w o r k e r s -------------------------------

AU
industries 2

Manufacturing

Public
utilities -

Retail
trade

All
industries 4

Manufacturing

Public
utilities 3

Retail
trade

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

90
81
30
51

92
89
44
45

99
99
37
63

80
65
10
56

100
78
1
77

100
79
79

100
96
7
89

100
76
76

22

17

59

21

14

11

48

8

10

14

3

5

34

46

2

20

19
9
10
4
3
1
1
1
(5)
6

14
3
8
8
6
2
(5)
M
-

1

30
15
20
1
1

29
22
-

22
21
-

39
4
-

48
24
-

61
25
13
1

78
19
3
-

M e t h o d of w a g e determination 1
Paid time r a t e s ________________________________
F o r m a l rate policy-------------------------Single rate------------------------------Ra n g e of rates--------------------------Pr og re ss io n ba se d on automatic
a d v a n c e m e n t according to
length of se rv ic e-------------------Pr ogression ba se d on merit
r e v i e w ------------------------------Pr og re ss io n ba s e d on a
combination of length of
service and me ri t r e v i e w ----------N o fo rm al rate po li cy----------------------Paid by incentive m e t h o d s _____________________
Piece r a t e ----------------------------------Individual________________________________
G r o u p -----------------------------------Individual-------------------------------G r o u p -----------------------------------C o m m i s s i o n _________________________________

(!)

(5)
-

(5)

17
51
32
“

69
16
15
-

M e t h o d of determining incentive pay of
office w o r k e r s not presented

2
2
17

(*)
(!)

F r e q u e n c y of w a g e p a y m e n t
W e e k l y __________________________________________
B i w e e k l y --------------------------------------S e m i m o n t h l y ----------------------------------M o n t h l y ----------------------------------------Other freq ue nc y --------------------------------

1
2
3
4
5

27
36
35
2

47
29
24
1

F o r a description of the m e t h o d s of w a g e determination, see Introduction.
Includes data for wholesale trade, real estate, and services, in addition to those industry divisions s h o w n separately.
Transportation, co mm un ic at io n, and other public utilities.
Includes data for wholesale trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services, in addition to those industry divisions s h o w n separately.
Le s s than 0.5 percent.




9
64
27
-

54
23
22
-

Appendix.

Occupational Descriptions

T h e p r i m a r y purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's w a g e surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations w o r k e r s w h o are e m p l o y e d under a variety of payroll titles an d different w o r k a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m establishment to establishment and
f r o m area to area.
This permits the grouping of occupational w a g e rates representing c o m p a r a b l e job content.
B e c a u s e of this em ph a s i s on
interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions m a y differ significantly f r o m those in use in
individual establishments or those pr epared for other purposes.
In applying the*e job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed
to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-time, temporary, an d probationary workers.

OFFICE
BILLER,

CLERK,

MACHINE

P r e p a r e s statements, bills, and invoices on a m a c h i n e other than an ordinary or electromatic typewriter. M a y also ke ep records as to billings or shipping charges or p e r f o r m other
clerical w o r k incidental to billing operations. F o r w a g e study purposes, billers, machine, are
classified b y type of machine, as follows:
Biller, m a c h i n e (billing m a c h i n e ) . U s e s a special billing m a c h i n e ( M o o n Hopkins, Elliott
Fisher, Burroughs, etc., which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills
and invoices f r o m customers' purchase orders, internally pr epared orders, shipping m e m o ­
r a n d u m s , etc. Usually involves application of pr ed etermined discounts and shipping charges,
and entry of n e ce ss ar y extensions, which m a y or m a y not be c o m p u t e d on the billing machine,
and totals which are automatically ac cu mu la te d by machine. T h e operation usually involves
a large n u m b e r of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold
machine.
Biller, m a c h i n e (bookkeeping m a c h i n e ) . U s e s a bookkeeping m a c h i n e (Sundstrand, Elliott
Fisher, R e m i n g t o n Rand, etc., which m a y or m a y not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare
customers' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves t;he simulta­
neous entry of figures on customers' ledger record. T h e m a c h i n e automatically accumulates
figures on a n u m b e r of vertical c o l u m n s and computes, and usually prints automatically the
debit or credit balances. D o e s not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. W o r k s f r o m uniform
and standard types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE

Class B. Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple (subject matter) h e a d ­
ing s "or- partly classified material b y finer subheadings. Pr ep a r e s simple related index and
cross-reference aids. A s requested, locates clearly identified material in files and forwards
material.
M a y p e r f o r m related clerical tasks required to maintain and service files.
Class C . P e r f o r m s routine filing of material that has already be en classified or which
is easiLy classified in a simple serial classification s y s t e m (e.g., alphabetical, chronological,
or numerical). A s requested, locates readily available material in files and forwards m a ­
terial; and m a y fill out withdrawal charge. P e r f o r m s simple clerical and m a n u a l tasks re­
quired to maintain and service files.
CLERK,

OPERATOR

Class A. K e e p s a set of records requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic
bookkeeping principles, and familiarity with the structure of the particular accounting s y s t e m
used. De t e r m i n e s p roper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each
phase of the work.
M a y prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records
b y hand.
Class B. K e e p s a record of one or m o r e phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Ph a s e s or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, customers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described under biller,
machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. M a y check or assist
in preparation of trial balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.
ACCOUNTING

Class A. U n d e r general direction of a bo okkeeper or accountant, has responsibility for
keeping one or m o r e sections of a complete set of books or records relating to one phase
of a n establishment's business transactions. W o r k involves posting and balancing subsidiary
ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable; examining and coding
invoices or vouchers with proper accounting distribution; and requires j u dg me nt and experi­
ence in m a k i n g proper assignations and allocations. M a y assist in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal entries; and m a y direct class B accounting clerks.

CLERK,

PAYROLL

C o m p u t e s w a g e s of c o m p a n y e m p l o y e e s and enters the nece ss ar y data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers' earnings ba se d on time or production records; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such as wo rker's n a m e , working
days, time, rate, deductions for insurance, and total w a g e s due. M a y m a k e out paychecks and
assist p a y m a s t e r in m a k i n g up and distributing pay envelopes.
M a y use a calculating machine.
COMPTOMETER

OPERATOR

P r i m a r y duty is to operate a C o m p t o m e t e r to p e r f o r m ma th em at ic al computations. This
job is not to be confused with that of statistical or other type of clerk, wh ic h m a y involve fre­
quent use of a C o m p t o m e t e r but, in which, use of this m a c h i n e is incidental to p e rf or ma nc e of
other duties.

Class B. U n d e r supervision, p e r f o r m s one or m o r e routine accounting operations such
as posting simple journal vouchers or accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in
voucher registers; reconciling ba nk accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by
general ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data. This job does not require a k n o w l ­
edge of accounting and bookkeeping principles but is found in offices in wh ic h the m o r e routine
accounting w o r k is subdivided on a functional basis a m o n g several workers.




ORDER

Receives customers' orders for material or m e r c h a n d i s e b y mail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve an y combination of the following: Quoting prices to customers; m a k i n g out an order
sheet listing the items to m a k e up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective de partments to be filled. M a y ch ec k with credit
d e pa rt me nt to determine credit rating of customer, acknowledge receipt of orders f r o m customers,
follow up orders to see that they have be en filled, ke ep file of orders received, and check shipping
invoices with original orders.

Operates a bookkeeping m a c h i n e ( R em in gt on Rand, Elliott Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs,
National C a s h Register, with or without a typewriter keyboard) to ke ep a record of business
transactions.

CLERK,

FILE

Class A . In an established filing s y s t e m containing a n u m b e r of varied subject matter
files, classifies and indexes file material such as correspondence, reports, technical d o c u ­
ments, etc. M a y also file this material. M a y ke ep records of various types in conjunction
with the files. M a y lead a small group of lower level file clerks.

25

KEYPUNCH

OPERATOR

Class A . Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combination ke yp u n c h m a c h i n e to
transcribe data f r o m various source d o c u m e n t s to ke ypunch tabulating cards. P e r f o r m s s a m e
tasks as lower level keyp un ch operator but, in addition, w o r k requires application of coding
skills and the m a k i n g of s o m e determinations, for example, locates on the source d o c u m e n t
the items to be punched; extracts information f r o m several documents; and searches for and
interprets information on the d o c u m e n t to de termine information to be punched.
M a y train
inexperienced operators.

2 6

KEYPUNCH

O P E R A T O R -- Continued

Class B. U n d e r close supervision or following specific procedures or instructions,
transcribes data f r o m source d o c u m e n t s to punched cards. Operates a nume ri ca l and/or
alphabetical or combination k e yp un ch m a c h i n e to keyp un ch tabulating cards. M a y verify cards.
W o rk in g f r o m various standardized source do cu me nt s, follows specified sequences wh ic h have
be e n coded or prescribed in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting
of data to be punched. P r o b l e m s arising f r o m erroneous items or codes, missing information,
etc., are referred to supervisor.

S E C R E T A R Y -- Continued
d. Secretary to the he a d of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that employs, in all, over 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
e. Secretary to the he ad of a large and important organizational s e g m e n t (e.g., a middle
m a n a g e m e n t supervisor of an organizational s e g m e n t often involving as m a n y as several
hu nd re d persons) of a c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 25, 000 p e r s o n s .
Class C

OFFICE

BOY

O R GIRL

P e r f o r m s various routine duties such as running errands, operating m i n o r office m a ­
chines such as sealers or mailers, opening and distributing mail, and other m i n o r clerical work.

SECRETARY
As signed as personal secretary, n o rm al ly to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the day-to-day w o r k activities of the supervisor. W o r k s fairly inde­
pendently receiving a m i n i m u m of detailed supervision and guidance.
P e r f o r m s varied clerical
and secretarial duties, usually including m o s t of the following: (a) Receives telephone calls,
personal callers, and incoming mail, a n s w e r s routine inquiries, and routes the technical inquiries
to the proper persons; (b) establishes, maintains, and revises the supervisor's files; (c) maintains
the supervisor's calendar and m a k e s appointments as instructed; (d) relays m e s s a g e s f r o m s uper­
visor to subordinates; (e) reviews correspondence, m e m o r a n d a , and reports prepared b y others
for the supervisor's signature to assure procedural and typographic accuracy; and (f) pe rf o r m s
stenographic and typing work.
M a y also p e r f o r m other clerical and secretarial tasks of co mp a r a b l e nature and difficulty.
Th e w o r k typically requires knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
p r o g r a m s , and procedures related to the w o r k of the supervisor.
E x c lusions
Not all positions that are titled "secretary" possess the above characteristics. E x a m p l e s
of positions which are excluded f r o m the definition are as follows: (a) Positions wh ic h do not m e e t
the "personal" secretary concept described above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in secretarial
type duties: (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a group of professional, technical,
or managerial persons; (d) secretary positions in wh ic h the duties are either substantially m o r e
routine or substantially m o r e c o m p l e x and responsible than those characterized in the definition;
and (e) assistant type positions wh ic h involve m o r e difficult or m o r e responsible technical, a d m i n ­
istrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical duties wh ic h are not typical of secretarial work.
N O T E : T h e t e r m "corporate officer," used in the level definitions following, refers to
those officials w h o have a significant corporate-wide policymaking role with regard to m a j o r
c o m p a n y activities. Th e title "vice president," though n o rm al ly indicative of this role, does not
in all cases identify such positions. Vice presidents w h o s e p r i m a r y responsibility is to act pe r ­
sonally on individual cases or transactions (e.g., approve or de n y individual loan or credit actions;
administer individual trust accounts; directly supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be
"corporate officers" for purposes of applying the following level definitions.
Class A
a. Secretary to the c h a i r m a n of the bo a r d or president of a c o m p a n y that employs, in
all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 p e r s o n s ; or
b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the c h a i r m a n of the b o a r d or president)
of a c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 5, 000 but fewer than 25, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
c. Secretary to the he ad (immediately be lo w the corporate officer level) of a m a j o r
s e g m e n t or subsidiary of a c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 25, 000 p e r s o n s .
Class B
a. Secretary to the c h a i r m a n of the bo a r d or president of a c o m p a n y that employs, in
all, fewer than 100 p e r s o n s ; or
b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the c h a i r m a n of the bo a r d or president)
of a c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 p e r s o n s ; or
c. Secretary to the he a d (immediately be lo w the officer level) over either a m a j o r
corporate-wide functional activity (e.g., marketing, research, operations, industrial relations, etc.) or a m a j o r geographic or organizational s e g m e n t (e.g., a regional headquarters;
a m a j o r division) of a c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
e m p l o y e e s ; or




a. Secretary to an executive or m a na ge ri al p e r s o n w h o s e responsibility is not equivalent
to one of the specific level situations in the definition for class B, but w h o s e subordinate staff
no rmally n u m b e r s at least several dozen em p l o y e e s an d is usually divided into organizational
se gm e n t s wh i c h are often, in turn, further subdivided. In s o m e companies, this level includes
a wi de range of organizational echelons; in others, only on e or two; or
b. Secretary to the h e a d of a n individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that employs, in all, fewer than 5, 000 p e r s o n s .
Class D
a. Secretary to the supervisor or he a d of a small organizational unit (e.g., fewer than
about 25 or 30 persons); £ r
b. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional employee, administra­
tive officer, or assistant, skilled technician or expert.
(NOTE;
M a n y c o mp an ie s assign
stenographers, rather than secretaries as described above, to this level of supervisory or
nonsupervisory worker.)
STENOGRAPHER,

GENERAL

P r i m a r y duty is to take dictation involving a n o r m a l routine vocabulary f r o m one or m o r e
persons either in shorthand or b y Stenotype or similar machine; and transcribe dictation. M a y
also type f r o m written copy. M a y maintain files, ke e p simple records, or p e r f o r m other relatively
routine clerical tasks. M a y operate f r o m a stenographic pool. D o e s not include transcribingm a c h i n e work. (See transcribing-machine operator.)
STENOGRAPHER,

SENIOR

P r i m a r y duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary
such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific re search f r o m one or m o r e persons either in short­
hand or b y Stenotype or similar machine; and transcribe dictation. M a y also type f r o m written
copy. M a y also set up and maintain files, ke ep records, etc.
OR
P e r f o r m s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and responsi­
bility than stenographers, general as evidenced b y the following: W o r k requires high degree of
stenographic speed and accuracy; and a thorough working knowledge of general business and office
procedures and of the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures, files,
workflow, etc. U s e s this knowledge in performing stenographic duties and responsible clerical
tasks such as, maintaining followup files; assembling material for reports, m e m o r a n d u m s , letters,
etc.; c o m p o s i n g simple letters f r o m general instructions; reading and routing i ncoming mail; and
answering routine questions, etc. D o e s not include transcribing-machine work.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Class A . Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office calls. P e r f o r m s full telephone information service or handles
c o m p l e x calls, such as conference, collect, overseas, or similar calls, either in addition to
doing routine w o r k as described for switchboard operator, class B, or as a full-time
assignment. ("Full" telephone information service occurs w h e n the establishment has varied
functions that are not readily understandable for telephone information purposes, e.g., because
of overlapping or interrelated functions, and consequently present frequent p r o b l e m s as to
wh i c h extensions are appropriate for calls.)
Class B . Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office calls. M a y handle routine long distance calls and record tolls.
M a y p e r f o r m limited telephone information service. ("Limited" telephone information service
occurs if the functions of the establishment serviced are readily understandable for telephone
information purposes, or if the requests are routine, e.g., giving extension n u m b e r s w h e n
specific n a m e s are furnished, or if c o m p l e x calls are referred to another operator.)

27
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST

TABULATING-MACHINE

In addition to pe rf or mi ng duties of operator on a single-position or monitor-type switch­
board, acts as receptionist and m a y also type or p e r f o r m routine clerical w o r k as part of regular
duties.
This typing or clerical w o r k m a y take the m a j o r part of this worker's time while at
switchboard.

O P E R A T O R — Continued

Class C . Operates simple tabulating or electrical accounting m a c h i n e s such as the
sorter, reproducing punch, collator, etc., with specific instructions. M a y include simple
wiring f r o m d i a g r a m s and s o m e filing work. Th e w o r k typically involves portions of a w o r k
unit, for example, individual sorting or collating runs or repetitive operations.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR,

GENERAL

TABU LATINO-MACHINE OP ER AT OR
Class A . Operates a variety of tabulating or electrical accounting machines, typically
including such m a c h i n e s as the tabulator, calculator, interpreter, collator, and others.
P e r f o r m s complete reporting assignments without close supervision, and p e r f o r m s difficult
wiring as required.
Th e complete reporting and tabulating assignments typically involve a
variety of long and c o m p l e x reports wh i c h often are of irregular or nonrecurring type r e ­
quiring s o m e planning and sequencing of steps to be taken. A s a m o r e experienced operator,
is typically involved in training n e w operators in m a c h i n e operations, or partially trained
operators in wiring f r o m di ag r a m s and operating sequences of long and c o m p l e x reports.
D o e s not include w o rk in g supervisors performing tabulating-machine operations and day-today supervision of the w o r k and production of a group of tabulating-machine operators.
Class B . Operates m o r e difficult tabulating or electrical accounting m a c h i n e s such as the
tabulator and calculator, in addition to the sorter, reproducer, and collator. This w o r k is
p e r f o r m e d under specific instructions a nd m a y include the p e r f o r m a n c e of s o m e wiring f r o m
diagrams. T h e w o r k typically involves, for example, tabulations involving a repetitive
accounting exercise, a complete but small tabulating study, or parts of a longer and m o r e
c o m p l e x report. Such reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature w h e r e the p r o ­
cedures are well established. M a y also include the training of n e w e m p l o y e e s in the basic
operation of the machine.

P r i m a r y duty is to transcribe dictation involving a n o r m a l routine vocabulary f r o m
transcribing-machine records. M a y also type f r o m written copy and do simple clerical work.
W o r k e r s transcribing dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal
briefs or reports on scientific r esearch are not included. A w o r k e r w h o takes dictation in short­
hand or b y Stenotype or similar m a c h i n e is classified as a stenographer, general.
TYPIST
U s e s a typewriter to m a k e copies of various material or to m a k e out bills after calcula­
tions have been m a d e by another person. M a y include typing of stencils, mats, or similar m a t e ­
rials for use in duplicating processes. M a y do clerical w o r k involving little special training, such
as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and distributing incoming mail.
Class A . P e r f o r m s one or m o r e of the following: Typing material in final f o r m w h e n it
involves combining material f r o m several sources or responsibility for correct spelling,
syllabication, punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual w o r d s or foreign language material;
and planning layout and typing of complicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity and
balance in spacing. M a y type routine f o r m letters varying details to suit circumstances.
Class B . P e r f o r m s one or m o r e of the following: C o p y typing f r o m rough or clear drafts;
routine typing of forms, insurance policies, etc.; and setting up simple standard tabulations,
or copying m o r e c o m p l e x tables already setup and spaced properly.

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COMPUTER

COMPUTER PROGRAMER,

OPERATOR

Mo nitors and operates the control console of a digital c o m p u t e r to process data according
to operating instructions, usually p r ep ar ed b y a pr o g r a m e r . W o r k includes m o s t of the following:
Studies instructions to determine e q uipment setup and operations; loads eq uipment with required
items (tape reels, cards, etc.); switches n e ce ss ar y auxiliary equipment into circuit, and starts
and operates computer; m a k e s adjustments to c o m p u t e r to correct operating p r o b l e m s and m e e t
special conditions; reviews errors m a d e during operation an d determines cause or refers p r o b l e m
to supervisor or p r o g r a m e r ; and maintains operating records. M a y test and assist in correcting
program.
F o r w a g e study purposes,

c o m p u t e r operators are classified as follows;

Class A . Operates independently, or under only general direction, a c o m p u t e r running
p r o g r a m s with m o s t of the following characteristics: N e w p r o g r a m s are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requirements are of critical im portance to m i n i m i z e downtime; the
p r o g r a m s are of c o m p l e x design so that identification of error source often requires a working
knowledge of the total p r o g r a m , and alternate p r o g r a m s m a y not be available. M a y give
direction and guidance to lower level operators.
Class B . Op erates independently, or under only general direction, a c o m p u t e r running
p r o g r a m s with m o s t of the following characteristics; M o s t of the p r o g r a m s are established
production runs, typically run on a regularly recurring basis; there is little or no testing
of n e w p r o g r a m s required; alternate p r o g r a m s are provided in case original p r o g r a m needs
m a j o r change or cannot be corrected within a reasonable time. In c o m m o n error situations,
diagnoses cause an d takes corrective action. This usually involves applying previously p r o ­
g r a m e d corrective steps, or using standard correction techniques.

BUSINESS

Converts statements of business pr oblems, typically pr ep a r e d b y a s y st em s analyst, into
a sequence of detailed instructions wh ic h are required to solve the p r o b l e m s b y automatic data
processing equipment.
W o r k i n g f r o m charts or diagrams, the p r o g r a m e r develops the precise
instructions which, w h e n entered into the c o m p u t e r s y s t e m in coded language, cause the m a n i p u ­
lation of data to achieve desired results. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Applies knowledge
of co mputer capabilities, ma th em at ic s, logic e m p l o y e d b y computers, an d particular subject matter
involved to analyze charts and d i a g r a m s of the p r o b l e m to be p r o g r a m e d .
De velops sequence
of p r o g r a m steps, writes detailed flow charts to s h o w order in wh i c h data will be processed;
converts these charts to coded instructions for m a c h i n e to follow; tests and corrects p r o g r a m s ;
prepares instructions for operating personnel during production run; analyzes, reviews, and alters
p r o g r a m s to increase operating efficiency or adapt to n e w requirements; maintains records of
p r o g r a m de ve lo pm en t and revisions. ( N O T E : W o r k e r s pe rf or mi ng both s y st em s analysis a nd p r o ­
g r a m i n g should be classified as s y st em s analysts if this is the skill us ed to de termine their pay.)
D o e s not include e m p l o y e e s primarily responsible for the m a n a g e m e n t or supervision of
other electronic data processing ( E D P ) employees, or p r o g r a m e r s primarily concerned with
scientific an d/ or engineering problems.
F o r w a g e study purposes,

p r o g r a m e r s are classified as follows;

Class A . W o r k s independently or un de r only general direction on c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s wh ic h
require c o m p e t e n c e in all phases of p r o g r a m i n g concepts and practices. W o r k i n g f r o m dia­
g r a m s and charts wh ic h identify the nature of desired results, m a j o r processing steps to be
accomplished, an d the relationships b e tw ee n various steps of the p r o b l e m solving routine;
plans the full range of p r o g r a m i n g actions ne e d e d to efficiently utilize the c o m p u t e r s y s t e m
in achieving desired end products.

OR
Op erates under direct supervision a co mp u t e r running p r o g r a m s or s e gm e n t s of p r o g r a m s
with the characteristics described for class A. M a y assist a higher level operator b y inde­
pendently pe rf or mi ng less difficult tasks assigned, and pe rf or mi ng difficult tasks following
detailed instructions and with frequent review of operations performed.
Class C . W o r k s on routine p r o g r a m s under close supervision.
Is expected to develop
wo rk in g kn owledge of the c o m p u t e r e q uipment used and ability to detect p r o b l e m s involved in
running routine p r o g r a m s . Usually has received s o m e fo rm al training in c o m p u t e r operation.
M a y assist higher level operator on c o m p l e x pr o g r a m s .




At this level, p r o g r a m i n g is difficult be ca us e c o m p u t e r eq uipment m u s t be organized to
pr od uc e several interrelated but diverse products f r o m n u m e r o u s and diverse data elements.
A wi de variety and extensive n u m b e r of internal processing actions m u s t occur. This requires
such actions as de velopment of c o m m o n operations w h i c h can be reused, establishment of
linkage points b e t w e e n operations, adjustments to data w h e n p r o g r a m requirements exceed
c o m p u t e r storage capacity, an d substantial manipulation and resequencing of data elements
to f o r m a highly integrated p r o g r a m .
M a y provide functional direction to lower level p r o g r a m e r s w h o are assigned to assist.

2 8

“C n ^ t P U T E R P R O G R A M E R ,

COMPUTER

B U S I N E S S — Continued

Class B . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on relatively simple
p r o g r a m s , or on simple s e g m e n t s of c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .
P r o g r a m s (or segments) usually
process information to pr od uc e data in two or three varied sequences or formats. Reports
and listings are p r od uc ed b y refining, adapting, arraying, or m a k i n g m i n o r additions to or
deletions f r o m input data wh i c h are readily available.
While n u m e r o u s records m a y be
processed, the data have be en refined in prior actions so that the ac curacy and sequencing
of data can be tested b y using a few routine checks.
Typically, the p r o g r a m deals with
routine record-keeping type operations.
OR
W o r k s on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s (as described for class A) under close direction of a higher
level p r o g r a m e r or supervisor.
M a y assist higher level p r o g r a m e r b y independently p e r ­
forming less difficult tasks assigned, and pe rf or mi ng m o r e difficult tasks under fairly close
direction.
M a y guide or instruct lower level pr o g r a m e r s .

SYSTEMS ANALYST,

BUSINESS

Analyzes business p r o b l e m s to formulate pr oc ed ur es for solving t h e m b y use of electronic
data processing equipment. Develops a complete description of all specifications n e ed ed to enable
p r o g r a m e r s to prepare required digital c o m p u t e r p r o g r a m s . W o r k involves m o s t of the following:
Analyzes subject-matter operations to be auto ma te d and identifies conditions and criteria required
to achieve satisfactory results; specifies n u m b e r and types of records, files, and d o c u m e n t s to
be used; outlines actions to be p e r f o r m e d b y personnel and c o mp ut er s in sufficient detail for
presentation to m a n a g e m e n t an d for p r o g r a m i n g (typically this involves preparation of w o r k and
data flow charts); coordinates the d e v e lo pm en t of test p r o b l e m s and participates in trial runs of
n e w and revised systems; and r e c o m m e n d s equi pm en t changes to obtain m o r e effective overall
operations. ( N O T E : W o r k e r s p e r f or mi ng both s y st em s analysis and p r o g r a m i n g should be clas­
sified as s y st em s analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)
D o e s not include e m p l o y e e s primarily responsible for the m a n a g e m e n t or supervision of
other electronic data processing (E D P ) employees, or s y st em s analysts primarily conc er ne d with
scientific or engineering problems.
F o r w a g e study purposes,

B U S I N E S S — Continued

OR
W o r k s on a s e g m e n t of a c o m p l e x data processing s c h e m e or system, as described for
class A. W o r k s independently on routine assignments and receives instruction and guidance
on c o m p l e x assignments. W o r k is reviewed for accu ra cy of judgment, compliance with in­
structions, and to insure pr oper alinement with the overall system.
Class C . W o r k s under i m m e d i a t e supervision, carrying out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. A s s i g n m e n t s are designed to develop and expand practical experience
in the application of pr oc ed ur es and skills required for s y s t e m s analysis work. F o r example,
m a y assist a higher level sy st em s analyst b y preparing the detailed specifications required
b y p r o g r a m e r s f r o m information developed b y the higher level analyst.
DRAFTSMAN

Class C . M a k e s practical applications of p r o g r a m i n g practices an d concepts usually
learned in fo rm al training courses. A s s i g n m e n t s are designed to develop c o m p e t e n c e in the
application of standard pr oc ed ur es to routine problems. Receives close supervision on n e w
aspects of assignments; and w o r k is re viewed to verify its accu ra cy and c o n f o r m a n c e with
required procedures.
COMPUTER

SYSTEMS ANALYST,

maintaining accounts receivable in a retail establishment, or maintaining inventory accounts
in a manufacturing or wholesale establishment.) Confers with pe rs on s co nc er ne d to determine
the data processing p r o b l e m s and advises subject-matter personnel on the implications of the
data processing s y st em s to be applied.

s y st em s analysts are classified as follows:

Class A . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s
involving all phases of s y s t e m s analysis. P r o b l e m s are c o m p l e x be ca us e of diverse sources
of input data and multiple-use requirements of output data. (For e xample, develops an inte­
grated production scheduling, inventory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis record in
wh i c h every item of each type is automatically p r oc es se d through the full s y s t e m of records
and appropriate followup actions are initiated b y the computer.) Confers with persons c o n ­
cerned to determine the data processing p r o b l e m s and advises subject-matter personnel on
the implications of n e w or revised s y st em s of data processing operations. M a k e s r e c o m ­
mendations, if needed, for approval of m a j o r s y st em s installations or changes and for
obtaining equipment.
M a y provide functional direction to lower level s y st em s analysts w h o are assigned to
assist.
Class B . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on p r o b l e m s that are
relatively uncomplicated to analyze, plan, p r o g r a m , and operate. P r o b l e m s are of limited
complexity because sources of input data are h o m o g e n e o u s and the output data are closely
related. (For example, develops s y st em s for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank,

Class A . Plans the graphic presentation of c o m p l e x items having distinctive design
features that differ significantly f r o m established drafting precedents. W o r k s in close su p ­
port with the design originator, an d m a y r e c o m m e n d m i n o r design changes.
Analyzes the
effect of each change on the details of form, function, and positional relationships of c o m ­
ponents and parts.
W o r k s with a m i n i m u m of supervisory assistance. C o m p l e t e d w o r k is
reviewed b y design originator for consistency with prior engineering determinations.
May
either pr ep ar e drawings, or direct their preparation b y lower level draftsmen.
Class B . P e r f o r m s nonroutine and c o m p l e x drafting as signments that require the appli­
cation of m o s t of the standardized drawing techniques regularly used.
Duties typically in­
volve such w o r k as: P r e p a r e s wo rk in g drawings of subassemblies with irregular shapes,
multiple functions, and precise positional relationships be tw ee n components; prepares archi­
tectural drawings for construction of a building including detail drawings of foundations, wall
sections, floor plans, and roof. U s e s accepted form ul as and m a n u a l s in m a k i n g ne cessary
computations to de termine quantities of materials to be used, load capacities, strengths,
stresses, etc.
Receives initial instructions, requirements, and advice f r o m supervisor.
C o m p l e t e d w o r k is ch ec ke d for technical adequacy.
Class C . P r e p a r e s detail drawings of single units or parts for engineering, construction,
manufacturing, or repair purposes. T y p e s of drawings pr ep a r e d include isometric projections
(depicting three diminsions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning of
c o m p o n e n t s and co nv ey ne e d e d information. Consolidates details f r o m a n u m b e r of sources
and adjusts or transposes scale as required. Suggested m e t h o d s of approach, applicable
precedents, and advice on source materials are given with initial assignments. Instructions
are less co mplete w h e n as signments recur. W o r k m a y be spot-checked during progress.
DRAFTSMAN-TRACER
Copies plans and drawings pr ep a r e d b y others b y placing tracing cloth or paper over
drawings and tracing with p e n or pencil.
(Does not include tracing limited to plans primarily
consisting of straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
and/or
P r e p a r e s simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized items.
during progress.
NURSE,

W o r k is closely supervised

INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

A registered nurse w h o gives nursing service under general m e di ca l direction to ill or
injured e m p l o y e e s or other persons w h o b e c o m e ill or suffer a n accident on the p r e m i s e s of a
factory or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of employees' injuries; keeping records
of patients treated; preparing accident reports for co mp en s a t i o n or other purposes; assisting in
physical examinations a nd health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and ca rr y­
ing out p r o g r a m s involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment,
or other activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety of all personnel.

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
CARPENTER,

MAINTENANCE

P e r f o r m s the carpentry duties n e ce ss ar y to construct and maintain in good repair building
w o o d w o r k and equi pm en t such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs,
casings, and tr im m a d e of w o o d in an establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Planning
and laying out of w o r k f r o m blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal instructions using a variety




CARPENTER,

M A I N T E N A N C E — Continued

of carpenter's handtools, portable p o w e r tools, and standard m e a s u r i n g instruments; m a k i n g
standard shop computations relating to di me ns io ns of wo rk ; and selecting materials ne ce ss ar y
for the work. In general, the w o r k of the main te na nc e carpenter requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

29
ELECTRICIAN,

MAINTENANCE

MECHANIC.

P e r f o r m s a variety of electrical trade functions such as the installation, maintenance,
or repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric en er gy in an
establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Installing or repairing an y of a variety of
electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, controllers, circuit b r e a k ­
ers, mo to rs , heating units, conduit systems, or other transmission equipment; w o rk in g f r o m
blueprints, drawings, layouts, or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the
electrical s y s t e m or equipment; w o rk in g standard computations relating to load requirements of
wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of electrician's handtools and m e a s u r i n g and
testing instruments. In general, the w o r k of the ma intenance electrician requires rounded train­
ing and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.
ENGINEER,

STATIONARY

Operates and maintains and m a y also supervise the operation of stationary engines and
equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the establishment in w h i c h e m p l o y e d with power,
heat, refrigeration, or air-conditioning. W o r k involves: Operating and maintaining equipment
such as s t e a m engines, air co m p r e s s o r s , generators, motors, turbines, ventilating and refrig­
erating equipment, s t e a m boilers and boiler-fed water p u m p s ; m a k i n g equipment repairs; and
keeping a record of operation of ma ch in er y, temperature, an d fuel consumption. M a y also su­
pervise these operations. H e a d or chief engineers in establishments employing m o r e than one
engineer are excluded.
FIREMAN,

STATIONARY BOILER

Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in w h i c h e m p l o y e d with heat, power,
or steam. F e e d s fuels to fire b y hand or operates a me chanical stoker, or gas or oil burner;
an d checks water and safety valves. M a y clean, oil, or assist in repairing bo il er ro om equipment.
HELPER,

MAINTENANCE

TRADES

Assists one or m o r e w o r k e r s in the skilled maintenance trades, b y pe rf or mi ng specific
or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a w o r k e r supplied with materials and tools;
cleaning w o rk in g area, machine, and equipment; assisting j o u r n e y m a n b y holding materials or
tools; and pe rf or mi ng other unskilled tasks as directed b y jo urneyman.
T h e kind of w o r k the
helper is permitted to p e r f o r m varies f r o m trade to trade; In s o m e trades the helper is co n ­
fined to supplying, lifting, an d holding materials and tools and cleaning wo rk in g areas; an d in
others he is permitted to p e r f o r m specialized m a c h i n e operations, or parts of a trade that are
also p e r f o r m e d b y w o r k e r s on a full-time basis.
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR,

TOOLROOM

Specializes in the operation of one or m o r e types of m a c h i n e tools, such as jig borers,
cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes, or milling machines, in the construction of
m a c h i n e - s h o p tools, gages, jigs, fixtures, or dies. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: P l a n ­
ning and pe rf or mi ng difficult ma chining operations; processing items requiring complicated setups
or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of precision m e a s u r i n g instruments; selecting feeds,
speeds, tooling, and operation sequence; and m a k i n g nece ss ar y adjustments during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions. M a y be required to recognize w h e n tools need d r e s s ­
ing, to dress tools, and to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils. F o r cr o s s ­
industry w a g e study purposes, machine-tool operators, toolroom, in tool and die jobbing shops
are excluded f r o m this classification.
MACHINIST,

MAINTENANCE

P r o d u c e s re placement parts and n e w parts in m a k i n g repairs of metal parts of m e c h a n ­
ical equipment operated in an establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Interpreting
written instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m a ­
chinist's handtools an d precision m e a s u r i n g instruments; setting u p and operating standard m a c h i n e
tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; m a k i n g standard shop computations relating to
dimensions of wo r k , tooling, feeds, an d speeds of machining; kn owledge of the w o rk in g properties
of the c o m m o n metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and equipment required for his work;
and fitting an d assemb li ng parts into me ch an ic al equipment. In general, the machinist's w o r k
no rm a l l y requires a rounded training in m a c h i n e - s h o p practice usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
MECHANIC,

AUTOMOTIVE

(MAINTENANCE)

Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of a n establishment. W o r k in­
volves m o s t of the following: E x a m i n i n g automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
disassembling equipment and pe rf or mi ng repairs that involve the use of such handtools as
w r en ch es , gages, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts; replacing
br o k e n or defective parts f r o m stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassembling and installing




AUTOMOTIVE

( M A I N T E N A N C E ) — Continued

the various assemblies in the vehicle and m a k i n g ne cessary adjustments; and alining wheels,
adjusting brakes and lights, or tightening bo d y bolts. In general, the w o r k of the automotive
m e c h a n i c requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal a p p r e n ­
ticeship or equivalent training and experience.
MECHANIC,

MAINTENANCE

Repairs m a c h i n e r y or me ch an ic al equipment of an establishment. W o r k involves m o s t
of the following: E x a m i n i n g m a c h i n e s and me ch an ic al equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
dismantling or partly dismantling m a c h i n e s and pe rf or mi ng repairs that ma in ly involve the use
of handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing br o k e n or defective parts with items obtained
f r o m stock; ordering the production of a replacement part b y a m a c h i n e shop or sending of the
m a c h i n e to a m a c h i n e shop for m a j o r repairs; preparing written specifications for m a j o r repairs
or for the production of parts ordered f r o m m a c h i n e shop; reassembling machines; and m a k i n g
all n e ce ss ar y adjustments for operation. In general, the w o r k of a ma intenance me ch a n i c r e ­
quires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience. Excl ud ed f r o m this classification are w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y
duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs n e w m a c h i n e s or he av y equipment, and dismantles and installs m a ch in es or
he av y equipment w h e n changes in the plant layout are required. W o r k involves m o s t of the fol­
lowing: Planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using
a variety of handtools an d rigging; m a k i n g standard shop computations relating to stresses,
strength of materials, an d centers of gravity; alining and balancing of equipment; selecting stand­
ard tools, equipment, an d parts to be used; an d installing and maintaining in good order p o w e r
transmission equipment such as drives and speed reducers. In general, the millwright's w o r k
no rm a l l y requires a rounded training and experience in the trade acquired through a fo rm al
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
OILER
Lubricates, with oil or grease, the
equipment of an establishment.
PAINTER,

m o v i n g parts

or we ar in g surfaces

of mechanical

MAINTENANCE

Paints and redecorates walls, w o o d w o r k , and fixtures of an establishment. W o r k in­
volves the following: K n o w l e d g e of surface peculiarities and types of paint required for different
applications; preparing surface for painting b y r e m o v i n g old finish or b y placing putty or filler
in nail holes and interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush. M a y m i x colors, oils,
white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency. In general, the
w o r k of the ma intenance painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
PIPEFITTER,

MAINTENANCE

Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and pipefittings in an
establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Laying out of w o r k and m e a s u r i n g to lo­
cate position of pipe f r o m drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe
to correct lengths with chisel and h a m m e r or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machine; thread­
ing pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or po we r- dr iv en machines; assembling
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; m a k i n g standard shop computations relating
to pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; and m a k i n g standard tests to determine wh et he r
finished pipes m e e t specifications. In general, the w o r k of the maintenance pipefitter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. W o r k e r s primarily engaged in installing and repairing building sanita­
tion or heating s y st em s are excluded.
PLUMBER,

MAINTENANCE

K e e p s the plumbing s y s t e m of an establishment in good order. W o r k involves: K n o w l e d g e
of sanitary codes regarding installation of vents and traps in plumbing system; installing or r e ­
pairing pipes and fixtures; and opening clogged drains with a plunger or pl u m b e r ' s snake. In
general, the w o r k of the maintenance p l u m b e r requires rounded training an d experience usually
acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
SHEET-METAL WORKER,

MAINTENANCE

Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-metal equipment and fix­
tures (such as m a c h i n e guards, grease pans, shelves, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts,
metal roofing) of an establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Planning a.nd laying
out all types of sheet-metal maintenance w o r k f r o m blueprints, models, o j other specifications;
setting up and operating all available types of sheet-metal wo rk in g machines; using a variety of

30
SHEET-METAL

WORKER,

M A I N T E N A N C E -- Continued

TOOL AND

handtools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assembling; and installing sheetmetal articles as required. In general, the w o r k of the maintenance sheet-metal w o r k e r requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.
TOOL AND

DIE M A K E R

(Die m a k e r ; jig m a k e r ; tool m a k e r ; fixture m a k e r ; gage ma ke r)
Constructs and repairs m a c h i n e - s h o p tools, gages, jigs, fixtures or dies for forgings,
punching, and other me ta l-forming work.
W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Planning and
laying out of w o r k f r o m models, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifications;

D I E M A K E R -- Continued

using a variety of tool and die m a k e r ' s handtools and precision m e a s u r i n g instruments; un d e r ­
standing of the wo rk in g properties of c o m m o n metals and alloys; setting up and operating of
m a c h i n e tools and related equipment; m a k i n g nece ss ar y shop computations relating to dimensions
of work, speeds, feeds, and tooling of machines; heat-treating of metal parts during fabrication
as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities; w o rk in g to close tolerances;
fitting and assembling of parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances; and selecting appropriate
materials, tools, and processes. In general, the tool and die ma k e r ' s w o r k requires a rounded
training in m a c h i n e - s h o p and tool ro om practice usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship
or equivalent training and experience.
F o r cross-industry w a g e study purposes, tool and
shops are excluded f r o m this classification.

die m a k e r s in tool and die jobbing

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND

SHIPPING A N D RE CE IV IN G C L E R K

WATCHMAN

G u a r d . P e r f o r m s routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour, maintaining
order, using a r m s or force w h e r e necessary.
Includes g a t e m e n w h o are stationed at gate
and check on identity of e m p l o y e e s and other persons entering.
W a t c h m a n . M a k e s rounds of p r e m i s e s periodically in protecting property against fire,
theft, and illegal entry.
JANITOR,

PORTER,

OR

CLEANER

Pr ep a r e s me r c h a n d i s e for shipment, or receives and is responsible for incoming ship­
m e n t s of me r c h a n d i s e or other materials. Shipping w o r k involves: A knowledge of shipping
procedures, practices, routes, available m e a n s of transportation, and rate; and preparing re c ­
ords of the goods shipped, m a k i n g up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges, and
keeping a file of shipping records. M a y direct or assist in preparing the m e rc ha nd is e for ship­
ment.
Receiving w o r k involves: Verifying or directing others in verifying the correctness of
shipments against bills of lading, invoices, or other records; checking for shortages and rejecting
d a m a g e d goods; routing m e rc ha nd is e or materials to proper departments; and maintaining ne c e s ­
sary records and files.

(Sweeper; c h a r w o m a n ; janitress)
F o r w a g e study purposes, w o r k e r s are classified as follows:
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory wo rk in g areas and w a s h r o o m s , or
p r e m i s e s of an office, apartment house, or c o m m e r c i a l or other establishment. Duties involve
a combination of the following: Sweeping, m o p p i n g or scrubbing, and polishing floors; re mo v i n g
chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures
or trimmings; providing supplies and m i n o r maintenance services; and cleaning lavatories, s h o w ­
ers, and restrooms. W o r k e r s w h o specialize in w i n d o w washing are excluded.
LABORER,

MATERIAL HANDLING

(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; s t o c k m a n or stock helper; w a r e ­
h o u s e m a n or w a r e h o u s e helper)
A w o r k e r e m p l o y e d in a wa re ho us e, manufacturing plant, store, or other establishment
w h o s e duties involve one or m o r e of the following; Loading and unloading various materials and
me r c h a n d i s e on or f r o m freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing materials or m e r c h a n d i s e in proper storage location; and transporting materials or
me r c h a n d i s e by handtruck, car, or wheelbarrow. L o n g s h o r e m e n , w h o load and unload ships are
excluded.
ORDER

FILLER

(Order picker; stock selector; w a r e h o u s e stockman)
Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods f r o m stored m e rc ha nd is e in a c c o r d ­
ance with specifications on sales slips, customers* orders, or other instructions. M a y , inaddition
to filling orders and indicating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requi­
sition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and p e r f o r m other related duties.

Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCKDRIVER
Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport materials, merchandise,
equipment, or m e n be tw ee n various types of establishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight
depots, wa re ho us es , wholesale and retail establishments, or be tw ee n retail establishments and
customers* houses or places of business. M a y also load or unload truck with or without helpers,
m a k e m i n o r me chanical repairs, and keep truck in good working order. D r i v e r - s a l e s m e n and
over-the-road drivers are excluded.
F o r w a g e study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and type of equipment,
as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on the basis of trailer capacity.)
Truckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under IV2 tons)
Truckdriver, m e d i u m (IV2 to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, he av y (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, he av y (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)
TRUCKER,

PACKER,

POWER

SHIPPING

Prep ar es finished products for shipment-or storage b y placing t h e m in shipping con­
tainers, the specific operations p e r f o r m e d being dependent upon the type, size, and n u m b e r of
units to be packed, the type of container employed, and m e t h o d of shipment. W o r k requires the
placing of items in shipping containers and m a y involve one or m o r e of the following; K n o w l ­
edge of various items of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size
of container; inserting enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to prevent
breakage or d a ma ge ; closing and sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying
data on container. P a ck er s w h o also m a k e w o o d e n boxes or crates are excluded.




Operates a ma nually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered truck or tractor to
transport goods and materials of all kinds about a wa re ho us e, manufacturing plant, or other
establishment.
F o r w a g e study purposes, w o r k e r s aye classified b y type of truck, as follows:
Trucker, p o w e r (forklift)
Trucker, p o w e r (other than forklift)




A v a i l a b l e O n R e q u e s t -----

T h e

t e n t h

t o r n e y s ,
t r a c e r s ,
e m

j o b

i s t s ,

r e p o r t

o n

s a l a r i e s

e n g i n e e r s ,

a n a l y s t s ,

f o r

a c c o u n t a n t s ,

e n g i n e e r i n g

d i r e c t o r s

o f

a u d i t o r s ,

t e c h n i c i a n s ,

p e r s o n n e l ,

b u y e r s ,

d r a f t s m
a n d

a t ­
e n ,

c l e r i c a l

p l o y e e s .

O r d e r
m

a n n u a l
c h e m

a s

B L S

i n i s t r a t i v e ,

c e n t s

a

c o p y .

B u l l e t i n
T e c h n i c a l ,

1 6 5 4 ,
a n d

N a t i o n a l
C l e r i c a l

S u r v e y
P a y ,

o f

J u n e

P r o f e s s i o n a l ,
1 9 6 9 .

A

d ­

S e v e n t y - f i v e




Area Wage Surveys
A list of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A directory of area wage studies including more limited studies conducted at the
request of the Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions of the Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins may be purchased from
the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or from any of the BLS regional sales offices shown on
the inside front cover.
A rea
Akron, Ohio, July 1969 1
------------------ ----------------------Albany—
Schenectady—Troy, N .Y., Mar. 1969 1_________
Albuquerque, N. Mex. , Apr. 1969--------------------------Allentown—
Bethlehem—
Easton, Pa.—N.J., May 1969___
Atlanta, G a., May 1969__________________________________
Baltim ore, M d ., Aug. 1969______________________________
Beaumont— o r t Arthur—Orange, Tex., May 1969 1____
P
Binghamton, N .Y ., July 1969----------------------------------Birmingham, Ala., Apr. 1969 1-------------------------------Boise City, Idaho, Nov. 1969___________________________
Boston, Mass., Aug. 1969______________________________
Buffalo, N .Y ., Oct. 1969-----------------------------------------Burlington, Vt., Mar. 1969 1 ____________________________
Canton, Ohio, May 1969_________________________________
Charleston, W. Va., Apr. 1969 -------------------------------Charlotte, N.C., Mar. 1969_____________________________
Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga., Sept. 1969-------------------------Chicago, 111., Apr. 1969 1 _______________________________
Cincinnati, Ohio—
Ky.—Ind., Mar. 1969 1 ________________
Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1969-----------------------------------Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1969-------------------------------------Dallas, Tex., Oct. 1969_________________________________
Davenport—
Rock Island—
Moline, Iowa—
111.,
_______________________________________________
Oct. 1969 1
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1969----------------------------------------Denver, Colo., Dec. 1969 1______________________________
Des Moines, Iowa, Mar. 1969---------------------------------Detroit, Mich., Jan. 1969 1 _____________________________
Fort Worth, Tex., Oct. 1969____________________________
Green Bay, Wis., July 1969____________________________
Greenville, S.C., May 1969 1 --------- ---------------------Houston, Tex., May 1969 1--------------------------------------Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1969-----------------------------------Jackson, Miss., Jan. 1970„______________________________
Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 1969__________________________
Kansas City, Mo.-Kans., Sept. 1969------------------------Lawrence—
Haverhill, Mass.—
N.H., June 1969_________
Little Rock—
North Little Rock, Ark., July 1969--------Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa AnaGarden Grove, Calif., Mar. 1969 1 ___________________
Louisville, Ky.—
Ind., Nov. 1969 1
________-_______________
Lubbock, Tex., Mar. 1969______________________________
Manchester, N.H., July 1969____________________________
Memphis, Tenn.—
Ark., Nov. 1969 1
_____________________
Miami, Fla., Nov. 1969_________________________________
Midland and Odessa, Tex., Mar. 1969__________________
Milwaukee, Wis., Apr. 1969_____________________________
Minneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 1969________________

Bulletin number
and price
1625-89,
1625-56,
1625-67,
1625-86,
1625-77,
1660-1 1,
1625-75,
1660-5,
1625-65,
1660-34,
1660-16,
1660-29,
1625-54,
1625-73,
1625-71,
1625-61,
1660-9,
1625-82,
1625-63,
1660-22,
1660-27,
1660-23,

35cents
35cents
30cents
30cents
35cents
35cents
35cents
30cents
35cents
25cents
45cents
45cents
35cents
30cents
30cents
30cents
30cents
65cents
45cents
40cents
30cents
35cents

1660-20,
1660-37,
1660-41,
1625-62,
1625-58,
1660-18,
1660-8,
1625-70,
1625-83,
1660-25,
1660-39,
1660-35,
1660-10,
1625-79,
1660-2,

35cents
30cents
40cents
30cents
50cents
30cents
30cents
35cents
45cents
30cents
30cents
30cents
35cents
30cents
30cents

1625-78,
1660-28,
1625-53,
1660-3,
1660-31,
1660-32,
1625-49,
1625-66,
1625-47,

50cents
40 cents
30cents
30cents
40cents
30cents
25cents
35cents
35cents

D a t a on es t abl i s hment pr act i ces and s uppl e me nt a r y wa g e provi sions are al s o presented.




A rea
Muskegorr-Muskegon Heights, Mich., May 1969_______
Newark and J ersey City, N.J., Jan. 1969______________
New Haven, Conn., Jan. 1970 1 _________________________
New Orleans, La., Jan. 1970___________________________
New York, N .Y., Apr. 1969_____________________________
N orfolk—
Portsmouth and Newport News—
Hampton, Va., June 1968______________________________
______________________
Oklahoma City, Okla., July 1969 1
Omaha, Nebr.-Iowa, Sept. 196 9 ------------------------------Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic, N.J., May 1969____________
Philadelphia, Pa.—
N.J., Nov. 1968______________________
Phoenix, A r i z . , Mar. 1969______________________________
Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 1969______________________________
Portland, Maine, Nov. 1969 1___________________________
Portland, Oreg.—
Wash., May 1969______________________
Providence—
Pawtucket—
Warwick, R.I.— a s s .,
M
May 1969 1 ----------------------------------------------------------Raleigh, N.C., Aug. 1969________________________________
Richmond, Va., Mar. 1969______________________________
Rochester, N.Y. (office occupations only),
July 1969------------------------------------------------------------Rockford, 111., May 1969________________________________
St. Louis, M o.—111., Mar. 1969 1________________________
Salt Lake City, Utah, Nov. 1969 1______________________
San Antonio, Tex., June 1969 1 _________________________
San Bernardino— iv erside—
R
Ontario, Calif.,
Dec. 1969------------------------------------------------------------San Diego, Calif., Nov. 1969 1 __________________________
San Francisco—
Oakland, Calif., Oct. 1969 1 ___________
San Jose, Calif., Sept. 1969 1___________________________
Savannah, Ga., May 1969________________________________
Scranton, Pa., July 1969________________________________
Seattler-Everett, Wash., Nov. 1968 1 ___________________
Sioux Falls , S. Dak., Sept. 1969________________________
South Bend, Ind., Mar. 1969____________________________
Spokane, Wash., June 1969_____________________________
Syracuse, N .Y., July 1969_________ ____________________
Tampa—
St. Petersburg, Fla., Aug. 1969 *______________
Toledo, Ohio—
Mich., Feb. 1969 1________________________
Trenton, N.J., Sept. 1969---------------------------------------Utica^Rome, N.Y., July 1969---------------------------------Washington, D.C.—
Md.— a ., Sept. 1969 1_______________
V
Waterbury, Conn., Mar. 1969___________________________
Waterloo, Iowa, Nov. 19681_____________________________
Wichita, Kans., Dec. 1968______________________________
W orcester, Mass., May 1969___________________________
York, Pa., Feb. 1969_______ _____________________________
Youngstown—
Warren, Ohio, Nov. 1969 1 _______________

Bulletin number
and price
1625-80,
1625-46,
1660-40,
1660-42,
1625-88,

30cents
40cents
35cents
30cents
60cents

1575-85,
1660-17,
1660-12,
1625-87,
1625-48,
1625-60,
1625-59,
1660-26,
1625-76,

30cents
35cents
30cents
35cents
50cents
30cents
35cents
35cents
30cents

1625-74,
1660-6,
1625-69,

35cents
30cents
30cents

1660-4,
1625-72,
1625-64,
1660-30,
1625-85,

30cents
30cents
50cents
35cents
35cents

1660-43,
1660-36,
1660-33,
1660-24,
1625-68,
1660-15,
1625-43,
1660-14,
1625-55,
1625-81,
1660-13,
1660-7,
1625-57,
1660-21,
1660-1,
1660-19,
1625-50,
1625-31,
1625-41,
1625-84,
1625-52,
1660-38,

30 cents
35cents
50cents
35cents
30cents
30cents
35cents
25cents
30cents
30cents
30cents
35cents
35cents
30cents
30cents
50cents
30cents
35cents
30cents
30cents
30cents
35cents

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D.C.
O FFIC IA L




20212

BUSINESS

POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

I
-------------------------------- 1
| F I R S T C L A S S MAIL I
I------------------------------------------------------ 1


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102