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C IF
WAGES

IND.

National Si
of Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay,
March 1974




National Survey
of Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay,
March 1974
Bulletin 1837
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Peter J. Brennan, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1974

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Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results o f the Bureau’s annual salary survey o f selected professional, administrative,
technical, and clerical occupations in private industry. The nationwide salary information, relating to March 1974, is
representative o f establishments in a broad spectrum o f industries throughout the United States, except Alaska and
Hawaii.
The results o f this survey are used as the basis for setting Federal white-collar salaries under the provisions o f the
Federal Pay Comparability A ct o f 1970. The Director o f the Office o f Management and Budget and the Chairman o f
the U.S. Civil Service Commission, who jointly serve as the President’ s agent for the purpose o f setting pay for Federal
white-collar employees, are responsible for translating the survey findings into recommendations to the President as to
the appropriate adjustments needed in Federal pay rates to make them comparable with private enterprise pay rates
for the same levels o f work. The President’ s agent is also responsible for determining the industrial, geographic, size o f
establishment, and occupational coverages o f the survey. The role o f the BLS in the pay setting process is limited to
conducting the survey and advising on the feasibility o f proposed survey changes.
These survey results have also proven useful to other users as a guide for salary administration and in general
econom ic analysis. It should be emphasized that this survey, like any other salary survey, does not provide mechanical
answers to pay policy questions.
The occupations studied span a wide range o f duties and responsibilities. The occupations selected were those
judged to be (a) surveyable in industry within the framework o f a broad survey design, (b ) representative o f
occupational groups which are numerically important in industry as well as in the Federal service, and (c) consist o f
work that is essentially the same in both the Federal and private sectors.
Occupational definitions used in the collection o f the salary data (appendix C) reflect duties and responsibilities in
private industry; however, they are also designed to be translatable to specific General Schedule grades applying to
Federal employees. Thus the definitions o f some occupations and work levels were limited to specific elements that
could be classified uniformly among establishments. The Bureau o f Labor Statistics and the Civil Service Commission
collaborated in the preparation o f the definitions.
The scope o f the survey, in terms o f industrial, geographic, and minimum establishment-size coverage, remained the
same as in March 1973.
The survey could not have been conducted without the cooperation o f the many firms whose salary data provide
the basis for the statistical information presented in this bulletin. The Bureau, on its own behalf and on behalf o f the
other Federal agencies that collaborated in planning the survey, wishes to express appreciation for the cooperation it
has received.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office o f Wages and Industrial Relations by the Division o f Occupational
Wage Structures. The analysis in this bulletin was prepared by William M. Smith. Field work for the survey was
directed by the Bureau’s Assistant Regional Directors, Division o f Operations.

Although only nationwide salary data are presented in this bulletin, clerical and drafting
occupation salary data are available for each o f the 93 metropolitan areas in which the Bureau
conducts area wage surveys. These area reports also include information on such supplementary
benefits as paid vacations, holidays, and health, insurance, and pension plans relating to
nonsupervisory office workers. (See the areas listed on the order form at the back o f this bulletin.)




in




Contents
Page

Summary
......................................................................................................................................................
Characteristics o f the survey
....................................................................................................................

1
1

Changes in salary levels
.............................................................................................................................
Average salaries, March 1974

2
3

Salary levels in metropolitan a r e a s ...........................................................................................................

7

Salary levels in large establishments
.......................................................................................................
Salary d is t r ib u t io n s .....................................................................................................................................

7
7

Pay differences by in d u s t r y .............................................................................................................................10
Average standard weekly hours

.................................................................................................................... 12

Summary tables:
Average
1.
2.
3.

salaries:
United States
........................................................................................................................ 13
Metropolitan a r e a s ................................................................................................................15
Establishments employing 2,500 or more
..............................................................17

Employment distribution by salary:
4. Professional and administrative occupations
................................................................. 19
5. Engineering technicians and keypunch su p e r v iso r s ........................................................ 25
6 . Drafting and clerical o c c u p a t i o n s ...................................................................................... 27
7. Occupational employment distribution: By industry d i v i s i o n ........................................... 29
8 . Relative salary levels: Occupation by industry division
....................................................30
9. Average weekly hours: Occupation b y industry d i v i s i o n ....................................................31
Charts:
1. Increases in average salaries for selected occupational groups,1961 to 1974
2. Salaries in professional and technical occupations, March1974
3. Salaries in administrative and clerical occupations, March1974
4. Relative employment in selected occupational groups by
industry division, March 1974

4

. . . .

g
.......................................

9

-1 8

Appendixes:




A. Scope and method o f survey
B. Survey changes in 1974

.......................................................................................................32
35

C. Occupational d e f i n i t i o n s ............................................................................................................... 37
D. Comparison o f average annual salaries in private industry, March 1974,
with corresponding salary rates for Federal employees under
the General Schedule

....................................................................

.5 7




Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical Pay
classification, however, vary from occupation to occu ­

Summary

Average salaries o f workers in the occupations cov­
ered by this survey rose 6.4 percent from March 1973 to
March 1974, the largest percent increase recorded in 3
years.1 Increases for 9 o f 11 professional, administrative,
and technical support occupations ranged from 5.8 to
7.2 percent; the average increase was 6.3 percent. The
average o f the increases for clerical occupations was 6.4
percent; 6 o f the 7 advanced between 5.4 and 6.9
percent.
Average monthly salaries for the 84 occupational
levels varied from $426 for clerks engaged in routine
filing to $3,182 for the highest level in the attorney
series. For most o f the occupations, salary levels in
metropolitan areas and in large establishments were
higher than the average for all establishments within the
full scope o f the survey. Salary levels in finance and
retail trade industries generally were lower than in other
major industry divisions represented in the survey.
Reported

average standard weekly hours also were

generally lower in the finance industries.

Characteristics of the survey

This survey, the 15th in an annual series, provides
nationwide salary averages and distributions for 84 work
level categories covering 20 occupations. It relates to
establishments in all areas o f the United States, except
Alaska and Hawaii, in the following industries: Manu­
facturing; transportation, communication, electric, gas,
and sanitary services; wholesale trade; retail trade;
finance, insurance, and real estate; engineering and
architectural services; and research, development, and
testing laboratories operated on a commercial basis.2
The minimum sizes o f establishments surveyed are: 250
employees in manufacturing and retail trade; and 100
employees in all other industry divisions.

pation.
The number o f work level definitions for each
occupation ranges from one for messengers to eight each
for chemists and engineers. More than one level o f work
is defined for survey in most o f the occupations; some
are purposely defined, however, to cover specific bands
o f work levels, which are not intended to represent all
levels or all workers that may be found in those
occupations.
The survey is designed to permit separate presenta­
tion o f data for metropolitan areas. Coverage in m etro­
politan areas includes the 261 Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Areas in the United States, except Alaska and
Hawaii, as revised through April 1973 by the U.S. Office
o f Management and Budget. Establishments in m etro­
politan areas employed over four-fifths o f the total
workers and nine-tenths o f the professional, administra­
tive, clerical, and related employees within the scope o f
the survey. Ninety percent o f the employees in the
occupations chosen for study were employed in m etro­
politan areas.
The selected occupations included more than
1,615,000 employees, or one-fifth o f the estimated
employment in professional, administrative, clerical, and
related occupations in establishments within the scope
o f the survey. Employment in the selected occupations
varied widely, reflecting actual differences in em ploy­
ment in the various occupations, and also differences
arising from variations in the range o f duties and
responsibilities covered by the occupational definitions.
Among the professional and administrative occupations,
the eight levels o f engineers included a total o f 388,797
employees, whereas there were fewer than 5,000 em­
ployees in each o f four o f the occupational categories as
defined for the study (ch ief accountants, job analysts,
directors o f personnel, and keypunch supervisors). (See
table 1.) Accounting clerks and secretaries made up over

Definitions for the occupations included in this study
provide for classification o f employees according to
appropriate work levels. Within each occupation, the
work levels surveyed — designated by Roman numerals,
with level I as the lowest — are defined in terms o f duties
and responsibilities. Specific job




factors determining

R esu lts o f the March 1973 survey were presented in
National Survey o f Professional, Administrative, Technical, and
Clerical Pay, March 1973, Bulletin 1804 (Bureau o f Labor
Statistics, 1973).
2 For a full description o f the scope o f the 1974 survey, see
appendix A.

Occupation and group

Average
annual
1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 rate of
to
increase
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
1961
1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 19671 1968 1969 1970 1971 19721 1973 1974
to
1974

All survey occupations2 ................. 2.9

3.0

3.1

3.1

3.3

4.5

5.4

5.7

6.2

6.6

5.8

5.4

6.4

4.7

Professional, administrative, and
technical support2 ......................................
Accountants...........................................
A u d ito rs ..................................................
Chief accountants.................................
A tto rn e y s ...............................................
Buyers ....................................................
Job analysts ...........................................
Directors of personnel ........................
Chem ists..................................................
Engineers ...............................................
Engineering technicians .....................
Drafting ..................................................

3.0
2.8
2.9
2.6
3.2
(5)
1.4
3.7
3.9
2.6
(5 )
3.2

3.3
3.3
3.6
2.8
4.6
(5)
2.6
3.0
3.8
4.4
2.9
3.6

3.4
2.8
3.1
4.8
3.3
(5)
3.5
4.6
3.3
2.9
3.6
2.6

3.7
3.5
3.9
3.9
4.2
(5)
4.3
3.5
3.9
3.2
2.3
(3 )

3.6
3.8
3.8
3.3
4.0
(5)
5.4
3.6
4.8
3.7
2.8
1.5

4.2
4.6
4.8
5.1
3.2
4.2
3.4
3.8
4.4
4.3
3.7
3.5

5.5
5.7
5.5
5.5
5.3
4.9
7.0
5.4
5.1
5.4
5.1
5.3

5.8
7.0
7.2
5.8
(3)
6.6
2.1
5.4
6.5
6.2
5.8
5.8

6.2
6.7
7.0
7.1
7.1
6.1
4.1
7.4
5.9
5.5
6.3
4.9

6.7
6.7
7.0
9.1
5.0
7.0
7.7
8.0
5.5
5.7
6.5
5.6

5.5
5.6
5.5
3.9
6.1
6.3
6.8
3.9
5.1
5.2
5.1
7.2

5.4
4.9
5.2
5.8
6.3
5.0
5.2
7.5
3.7
5.1
4.7
6.2

6.3
6.1
5.2
7.2
5.8
6.0
6.1
7.2
7.1
5.4
6.0
6.7

4.8
4.9
5.0
5.1
(4 )
(5)
4.6
5.1
4.9
4.6
64.6
(4 )

Clerical and clerical supervisory2 ...................
Accounting c lerks.................................
File clerks................................................
Keypunch operators............................
Keypunch supervisors..........................
Messengers .............................................
Secretaries .............................................
Stenographers........................................
T y p is ts ....................................................

2.8
3.0
(5)
(5)
(5)
2.6
(5)
(3 )
2.5

2.6
2.5
2.6
2.5
(5)
2.8
(5)
2.5
2.6

2.7
2.8
3.1
2.7
(5)
2.3
(5)
2.4
2.6

2.4
2.2
2.2
2.3
(5)
3.0
(5)
2.3
2.5

3.0
3.0
2.9
3.7
(5)
2.8
(5)
2.9
2.6

4.8
3.3
5.1
5.2
(5)
5.4
(5)
4.6
5.4

5.3
4.7
6.8
4.9
(5)
6.2
4.6
4.9
5.8

5.5
4.7
5.5
5.3
(5)
6.7
5.3
5.9
5.7

6.2
6.2
5.5
6.4
(5)
6.3
6.4
5.8
6.0

6.5
6.0
6.1
7.0
6.1
6.7
6.6
7.5
6.1

6.1
6.0
5.5
6.8
6.1
6.3
6.1
6.4
5.7

5.4
4.6
5.9
5.4
8.2
5.1
5.1
5.2
4.0

6.4
6.9
5.4
7.3
6.2
5.6
(3)
6.5
6.7

4.6
4.3
6 4.7
64.9
(5)
4.7
(5)
6 4.7
4.5

1 S urvey da ta did n o t represent a 1 2 -m o n th p e rio d d u e to a
change in survey tim in g . D ata have been p ro ra ted to rep re s e n t a
1 2 -m o n th in te rv a l.
2 D ata fo r 1 a d m in is tra tiv e o c c u p a tio n (m anagers o f o ffic e
services, last surveyed in 1 9 6 8 ) , and 3 clerical o c c upatio ns
(b o o k k e e p in g m ac h in e o p era to rs, last surveyed in 1 9 6 4 , and
s w itc h b o a rd op era to rs and ta b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e ra to rs , last
surveyed in 1 9 7 0 ), n o t show n above, are in cluded in th e averages

fo r th e periods d u rin g w h ic h th e y w e re surveyed.
3 C o m p a ra b le data n o t ava ila b le fo r b o th years.
4 C om pariso n over this period was no t possible because o f
changes in th e d e fin itio n o f th e o c c u p a tio n .
5 N o t surveyed.
6 A verage annu al rate o f increase 1 9 6 2 to 1 9 7 4 .

one-half o f the 812,409 employees in the clerical
occupations studied. The selected drafting occupations
had aggregate employment o f 83,423 and the five
engineering technician levels together had 93,100 em­
ployees.
Although women were employed in approximately
one-half o f the total jobs in the occupations studied,
they worked largely in clerical positions. The clerical
occupations in which the proportion o f women

survey occupation .3 Also shown are average percent
changes for the two broad occupational groups covered
b y the survey (the professional, administrative, and
technical support group; and the clerical and clerical
supervisory group) and the average percent change for
the two groups combined.

amounted to more than 90 percent at each level were
file clerks, keypunch operators, secretaries, steno­
graphers, and typists. A percent distribution o f women
employees by occupation and level is shown in appen­
dix A.

Changes in salary levels

Text table 1 presents increases in average salaries that
occurred between annual surveys since 1961 for each




NO TE:

F o r m e t h o d o f c o m p u t a t i o n , see a p p e n d ix A .

The increase in white-collar salaries in the year ending
March 1974 was, at 6.4 percent, 1 percentage point
greater than the increase in the year ending March 1973.
This is the first year since 1970-71 that the rate o f
white-collar salary increase has shown a gain from the
previous year, and is the second largest percent increase
since the series began in 1961. Clerical and clerical
supervisory salaries were up 6.4 percent; salaries for the
professional, administrative, and technical support occu3Beginning in 1965, data are for establishments in metro­
politan areas and nonmetropolitan counties; before 1965, data
are for metropolitan areas only. Establishments employing fewer
than 250 workers were excluded before 1966.

Work level category

1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1961
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 19671 1968 1969 1970 1971 19721 1973 1974 1974

Group A (GS grades 1-4 in appendix D ) .............. 2.8
Group B (GS grades 5-10 in appendix D ) ............ 2.6
Group C (GS grades 11-15 in appendix D ) .......... 3.5

2.7
4.0
3.7

2.7
2.6
3.5

1 A c tu a l survey-to-survey increases have been p ro ra ted to a
1 2 -m o n th p e rio d .

2.2
3.3
4.2

2.9
3.7
4.2

4.5
4.8
4.1

NOTE:

5.1
5.8
4.7

5.5
6.5
5.9

6.2
6.3
6.4

6.2
6.3
6.2

6.3
5.2
5.6

5.5
4.4
5.7

6.2
5.7
6.2

77.6
81.6
86.6

F o r m e th o d o f c o m p u ta tio n , see a p p e n d ix A .

pations were up 6.3 percent. O f the 18 occupations for
which 1973-74 increases could be com puted, the small­
est increases were shown b y auditors at 5.2 percent and

Average salaries, March 1974

engineers and file clerks at 5.4 percent. Showing the

cluded in this report (table 1) ranged from $426 for file
clerks I to $3,182 for the top level o f attorneys

largest increases were keypunch operators at 7.3 percent
and chief accountants and directors o f personnel at 7.2
percent.
To examine the changes in salaries that have occurred
since

1961

for different levels o f work, all o f the

occupational classifications were grouped into the three
broad categories described in text table 2 .
Average salaries increased more for the higher occupa­
tional levels (group C) than for the two lower groups
from 1961 through 1966, with the exception o f the
1962-63 period. Between 1966 and 1969, however, the
middle occupational levels (group B) showed larger
annual increases than did the lower or higher levels.
Between 1969 and 1971, the increases for all three
groups were nearly identical. Increases for the middle
levels were smaller than for the others between 1971 and
1974.
Another method o f examining salary trends is to
combine the data into the four occupational groups
shown in chart 1. Increases in the 1973 to 1974 period
amounted to 6.3 percent for the experienced profes­
sional and administrative group; 6.3 percent for the
technical support group; 6.5 percent for clerical workers;
and 5.0 percent for the entry and developmental
professional and administrative group .4 Although show­
ing the lowest rate o f salary increase for the fourth
consecutive year, the rate for the entry and develop­
mental professional and administrative occupational
levels was above the year earlier level by a greater
amount than for any o f the other three groups. Changes
in salaries for the entry and developmental professional
and administrative group tend to reflect, in part, the
status o f the labor market for new and recent college
graduates.
Increases in salaries o f both clerical and technical
support groups averaged 4.5 percent over the 13-year
period - less than the increases (4.9 and 4.7 percent) for

Average monthly salaries for the occupations in­

surveyed. These extremes reflect the wide range o f
duties and responsibilities represented by the occupa­
tional work levels surveyed. Average salaries for the
occupational levels, and a brief indication o f the duties
and responsibilities they represent, are summarized in
the following paragraphs.6
Among the five levels o f accountants surveyed,
average monthly salaries ranged from $812 for accoun­
tants I to $1,630 for accountants V. Auditors in the four
levels defined for survey had average salaries ranging
from $863 a month for auditors I to $1,458 for auditors
IV. Level I in both the accounting and auditing series
included trainees who had bachelor’ s degrees in account­
ing or the equivalent in education and experience
combined. At each corresponding level, average salaries

4Work levels used for computing 1973-74 increases were:
Clerical — All clerical levels, except secretaries.
Technical support — All levels o f drafters and engineering
technicians.
Entry and developmental professional and administrative —
Accountants I and II; auditors I and II; attorneys I; job analysts I
and II; chemists I and II; and engineers I and II.
Experienced professional and administrative - Accountants
III, IV, V; auditors III and IV; chief accountants I, II, III, and
IV; attorneys II, III, IV, V , and VI; job analysts III and IV;
directors o f personnel I, II, III, and IV; chemists III, IV, V, VI,
VII, and VIII; and engineers III, IV, V , VI, VII, and VIII.
A few survey levels, not readily identifiable with any o f the 4
occupational categories, were not used. In addition, secretaries
and computer operators were not used because comparable data
were not available for 1973.
See appendix A for method o f computation.
5 Survey data for 1966-67 and 1971-72 did not represent a
12-month period due to changes in survey timing. Increases for
these years have been prorated to represent a 12-month period.

the experienced and entry professional and administra­

6 Classification o f employees in the occupations and work
levels surveyed is based on factors detailed in the definitions in

tive groups .5

appendix C.




Increases in Average Salaries for Selected Occupational Groups,
1961 to 1974

Percent increase

8

Experienced professional and administrative

Mean
increase
1961
to
1974

Mean
increase
1961
to
1966

1966
to
19671

Data were adjusted to a 12-month period.




1967
to
1968

1968
to
1969

1969
to
1970

1970
to
1971

1971
to
19721

1972
to
1973

were higher for auditors than for accountants. For level
III, the most heavily populated group in both series,
monthly salaries averaged $1,107 for accountants and
$1,198 for auditors. Whereas 68 percent o f the accoun­
tants were employed in manufacturing, this industry
division employed 42 percent o f the auditors. Other
industry divisions which had large numbers o f auditors
were finance, insurance, and real estate (29 percent); and
public utilities (15 percent).7

Chief accountants were surveyed separately from
accountants and include those who develop or adapt and
direct the accounting program for a company or an
establishment (plant) o f a company. Classification by
level is determined b y the extent o f delegated authority
and responsibility, the technical com plexity o f the
accounting system, and, to a lesser degree, the size o f the

o f job analysts and five levels o f directors of personnel
were studied .10 Job analysts I, defined to include
trainees under immediate supervision, averaged $815,
compared with $1,439 for job analysts IV, who analyze
and evaluate a variety o f the more difficult jobs under
general supervision, and who may participate in the
development and installation o f evaluation or compensa­
tion systems. Directors o f personnel are limited by
definition to those who have programs that include, at a
minimum, responsibility for administering a job evalua­
tion system, employment and placement functions, and
employee relations and services functions. Those with
significant responsibility for actual contract negotiation
with labor unions as the principal company representa­
tive are excluded. Provisions are made in the definition
for weighting various combinations o f duties and respon­

professional staff directed. Chief accountants at level I,

sibilities

who have authority to adapt the accounting system

directors with job functions as specified for the four

to

determine

the

level.

Among personnel

established at higher levels to meet the needs o f an
establishment o f a company with relatively few and

levels o f responsibility, average monthly salaries ranged
from $1,316 for level I to $2,345 for level IV.
Manufacturing industries employed 66 percent o f the

stable functions and work processes (directing one or
two accountants), averaged $1,467 a month. Chief
accountants IV ,8 who have authority to establish and

job analysts and 67 percent o f the directors o f personnel

maintain the accounting program, subject to general
policy guidelines, for a company with numerous and

estate industries ranked next, with 21 percent o f the job
analysts and 13 percent o f the directors o f personnel.

varied functions and work processes (directing as many
as 40 accountants), average $2,418 a month. Over
three-fifths o f the chief accountants who met the
requirements o f the definitions for these four levels were
employed in manufacturing industries.
Attorneys are classified into survey levels based upon
the difficulty o f their assignments and their responsibili­
ties. Attorneys I, which includes new law graduates with
bar membership and those performing work that is
relatively uncomplicated due to clearly applicable pre­
cedents and well-established facts, averaged $1,185 a
month. Attorneys in the top level surveyed, level VI,
earned an average o f $3,182 a month. These attorneys
deal with legal matters o f major importance to their
organizations, and are usually subordinate only to the
general counsel or his immediate deputy in very large
firms. Finance, insurance, and real estate industries
employed about four-tenths o f the attorneys; manu­
facturing industries employed about three-tenths; and

Chemists and engineers each are surveyed in eight
levels. Both series start with a professional trainee level,
typically requiring a B.S. degree. The highest level
surveyed involves either full responsibility over a very
broad and highly com plex and diversified engineering or
chemical program, with several subordinates each direct­

public utilities, about one-fifth .9

Buyers average $839 a month at level I, which
includes those who purchase “ off-th e-sh elf’ and readily
available items and services from local sources. Buyers
IV, who purchase large amounts o f highly complex and
technical items, materials, or services, were paid monthly
salaries averaging $1,452. Manufacturing industries em­
ployed 88 percent o f the buyers in the four levels.
In the personnel management field four work levels




included in the study; the finance, insurance, and real

ing large and important segments o f the program; or
individual research and consultation in difficult problem
areas where the engineer or chemist is a recognized
authority and where solutions would represent a major
scientific or technological advance.11 Average monthly
salaries ranged from $992 for engineers I to $2,622 for
engineers VIII, and from $888 for chemists I to $2,873
for chemists VIII. Although at level I the average salaries
o f engineers exceeded those o f chemists by 12 percent,
the salary advantage o f engineers over chemists de­
creased steadily with each level, until at level V the
7 Establishments primarily engaged in providing accounting
and auditing services are excluded from the survey.
8 Although chief accountants V and directors o f personnel V
were surveyed, as defined in appendix C, too few employees in
each occupational level met requirements for the level to warrant
presentation o f salary figures.
9 Establishments primarily engaged in offering legal advice or
legal services are excluded from the survey.
I °See footn ote 8.
II It is recognized in the definition that top positions o f some
companies with unusually extensive and com plex engineering or
chemical programs are above that level.

average salaries for both occupations were nearly equal,
and at level VIII the average salaries for chemists
exceeded those for engineers by 10 percent.
Level IV, the largest group in each series, includes
professional employees who are fully competent in all
technical aspects o f their assignments, work with con­
siderable independence, and, in some cases, supervise a
few professional and technical workers. Manufacturing

nator, plan the graphic presentation o f com plex items
having distinctive design features, and either prepare or
direct the preparation o f the drawings (level III). The
drafting employees were distributed b y industry in
about the same proportion as engineers, with 73 percent
in manufacturing, 11 percent in public utilities, and 14
percent in the selected engineering and scientific services
industries studied.
A new jo b , computer operator, is included this year.

industries accounted for three-fourths o f all engineers
and

over nine-tenths o f all chemists; the surveyed

Computer operators I (work

assignments consist o f

engineering and scientific services, 12 and 3 percent; and
public utilities 12 and 1 percent, respectively.

on-the-job training) were paid an average o f $573 a
month. Computer operators III, the largest group sur­

By definition, the five-level series for engineering
technicians is limited to employees providing semiprofes­

veyed, averaged $741. At the highest level, computer
operator VI, the average monthly salary was $1,034,

sional technical support to engineers engaged in such
areas as research, design, development, testing, or manu­
facturing process improvement, and whose work pertains
to electrical, electronic, or mechanical components or
equipment. Technicians engaged primarily in production
or maintenance work are excluded. Engineering techni­
cians I, who perform simple, routine tasks under close
supervision, or from detailed procedures, were paid
monthly salaries averaging $665. Engineering technicians
V , the highest level surveyed, averaged $1,138 a month.
That level includes fully experienced technicians per­
forming more complex assignments involving responsi­
bility for planning and conducting a complete project o f
relatively limited scope, or a portion o f a larger and
more diverse project in accordance with objectives,
requirements, and design approaches as outlined b y the
supervisor or a professional engineer. Averages for
intermediate levels III and IV, at which a majority o f the
technicians surveyed were classified, were $874 and
$998, respectively. As might be expected, most o f the
technicians as defined were employed in manufacturing

however, less than 2 percent o f the operators were at
this level. Computer operators are classified on the basis
o f responsibility for solving problems and equipment

(79 percent) and in the scientific services industries
studied (12 percent), with public utilities employing
nearly all the rest (8 percent). Although the ratio o f such
technicians to engineers studied was about 1 to 4 in all
manufacturing industries, ratios o f approximately 1 to 3

malfunctions, the degree o f variability o f their assign­
ments, and the relative level o f sophistication o f the
equipment they operate. Computer operators, keypunch
supervisors and keypunch operators were distributed by
industry in approximately similar proportions. Nearly
three-fourths were employed in manufacturing and the
finance, insurance, and real estate industries, with the
remainder distributed among the public utilities, w hole­
sale, and retail trade industries.

Keypunch supervisors are classified on the basis o f
combinations o f three elements — level o f supervisory
responsibility, difficulty o f keypunch work supervised,
and number o f employees supervised. Keypunch super­
visors I, who are responsible for the day-to-day super­
vision o f fewer than 20 operators performing routine
keypunching operations, average $737 a month. At level
V , the highest level defined for survey, keypunch
supervisors average $1,129. Individuals classified at this
level supervise more complex keypunching operations,
50 operators or more, and perform at a higher level o f
supervisory authority.
Among the 17 clerical jobs included in this study,
average monthly salaries for secretaries, the most heavily

were found in establishments manufacturing mechanical

populated clerical occupation studied, ranged from $633

and electrical equipment, 1 to 6 in public utilities, and 1

at level I to $866 at level V. Average salaries o f $579 and

to 2 in research, development, and testing laboratories.

$658 were reported for general and senior stenographers;

In the drafting field, the definitions used in the

$551 and $697 for accounting clerks I and II; and the

survey, cover four levels o f work — drafter-tracers, and

two levels o f typists averaged $484 and $563. Generally,

drafters I, II, and III. Monthly salaries averaged $587 for

average salaries for clerical workers were highest in

drafter-tracers and ranged from $709 to $1,089 among

public utilities and manufacturing industries and lowest

the three levels o f drafters. Drafter-tracers copy plans
and drawings prepared by others or prepare simple or
repetitive drawings o f easily visualized items. The three
drafter levels as defined range from employees preparing
detail drawings o f single units or parts (level I) to those
who, working in close support with the design origi­

in the finance, insurance, and real estate, and retail trade




divisions. Employment in manufacturing exceeded that
in any o f the nonmanufacturing divisions within the
scope o f the survey in 13 o f the 17 clerical work levels;
highest employment totals in the other four levels were
in

the

finance, insurance, and real estate division.

Women constituted 95 percent or more o f the em­
ployees in 13 o f the clerical work levels; men constituted
one-half or more in only one (messenger).
Median monthly salaries (the amount below and
above which 50 percent o f the employees are found) for
most o f the work levels were slightly lower than the
weighted averages (means) cited above (i.e., the salaries
in the upper halves o f the arrays had a greater effect on
the averages than did the salaries in the lower halves).
The relative difference between the median and the
mean was less than 3 percent for 63 o f the 84 work
levels and between 3 and 5 percent in the 21 other
levels.

clerical and clerical supervisory jobs, and from 16 to 72
percent for nonclerical jobs.
The salary levels in large establishments, expressed as
a percent o f levels in all establishments combined,
ranged from 100 to 120. Salary averages in large
establishments exceeded the all-establishment averages
by 5 percent or more in all but two clerical and clerical
supervisory occupational levels, but in only 31 o f 56
nonclerical levels, as shown by the following tabulation
(all-establishm ent average for each occupational
level =100 percent):
Professional,
administrative,
and technical

Clerical,
clerical
supervisory

Total number of levels . .

56

21

100-104 p e rc e n t.................................
105-109 p e rc e n t.................................
110 percent and over ......................

25
19
12

2
7
12

Salary levels in m etropolitan areas

In most o f the occupational levels, average salaries for
employees in metropolitan areas (table 2 ) were slightly
higher than average salaries for employees in all estab­
lishments within the full scope o f the survey (table 1).
Only in 5 o f the 84 work levels studied were average

Relative salary levels in large establishments tended to
be highest for work levels in which large establishments
accounted for small proportions o f the total em ploy­

salaries more than 1.5 percent higher in metropolitan

ment.

areas than in all areas combined. Employment in the
survey occupations in metropolitan areas was about
nine-tenths o f the total nationwide employment re­
ported in these occupations. The proportions varied,
however, among occupations and work levels. Nearly all
o f the attorneys, for example, but only four-fifths o f all
buyers and directors o f personnel, were employed in
metropolitan areas. In 75 o f the 84 work levels studied,
85 percent or more o f the employment was in metro­
politan areas. It is apparent, therefore, that for most
work levels, salaries in nonmetropolitan counties could
have little effect upon the averages for all establishments
combined.

Salary levels in large establishments

It was possible to present separate data for 77
occupational work levels for establishments with 2,500
employees or more (table 3). Comparisons between
employment and relative salary levels in these establish­
ments and the full survey are also presented. Establish­

Salary distributions

Percent distributions o f employees by monthly salary
are presented for the professional and administrative
occupations in table 4, and for technical support
occupations and keypunch supervisors in table 5; distri­
butions by weekly salary are shown for employees in
clerical occupations in table 6 . Within all o f the 84
occupational work levels, salary rates for the highest
paid employees were more than twice those o f the
lowest paid employees. The absolute spread between
highest and lowest paid workers within a given work
level tended to widen with each rise in work level for
most occupations. All occupations showed a substantial
degree o f overlapping o f individual salaries between
work levels. Ranges in salary rates o f employees in
established pay grades or work levels within salary
structures o f individual firms also often overlapped
substantially.
The middle 50 and 80 percent o f the salary range,

ments employing 2,500 or more employed one-third o f

and the median salary for each occupation work level,

the professional, administrative, supervisory, and clerical

have been charted (charts 2 and 3). The charts point up
occupational pay relationships as well as the typically
greater degree o f salary dispersion associated with the
higher work levels in each occupational series.
Expressing the salary range o f the middle 50 percent
o f employees in each work level as a percent o f the
median salary permits comparision o f salary ranges and
eliminates extremely low and high salaries from each

workers within the scope o f the survey, and almost
three-eights o f the workers in the selected occupations
studied. In the 77 occupational work levels shown in
table

3

large

establishments accounted

for varying

proportions o f employment, ranging from

8 to 72

percent (keypunch supervisors I and job analysts IV,
respectively). The range was from 8 to 41 percent for




Salaries in Professional and Technical Occupations, March 1974
Median Monthly Salaries and Ranges Within Which Fell 50 Percent and 80 Percent of Employees

OCCUPATION
AND LEVEL

Accountants |
II
III
IV
V
Auditors I
II
III
IV
Chief accountants I
II
III
IV
Attorneys |
II
III
IV
V
VI
Chemists I
II
III
IV
V
VI
V II
V III
Engineers I
II
III
IV
V
VI
V II
V III
Engineering technicians I
II
III
IV
V
Drafter-tracers
Drafters I
II
III
Computer operators I
II
III
IV
V
VI




0

$500

$1,000

$1,500

$2,000

$2,500

$3,000

$3,500

$4,000

Salaries in Administrative and Clerical Occupations, March 1974
Median Monthly Salaries and Ranges Within Which Fell 50 Percent and 80 Percent of Employees

OCCUPATION
A ND LEVEL

0

$500

$1,000

$1,500

MEDIAN
FIRST QUARTILE
Directors of personnel

I

FIRST DECILE.

II
III
IV
Job analysts

I

MM

II
III
IV
Buyers

I

II
III

IV
Keypunch supervisors

I

II

III
IV
V
I

m

II

O B "■

Secretaries

III
IV
V
C lerks, accounting

I
II

Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Keypunch operators

I
II

Clerks, f ile

I
II
III

Typists

|

II
Messengers




$2,000

$2,500

THIRD QUARTILE
NINTH DECILE

$3,000

$3,500

$4,000

T e x t table 3. Distribution of w o rk levels by degree of salary dispersion
Number of levels having degree of
dispersion1 of —

Occupation

Number
of
work
levels

All occupations..................................................................

84

A ccou ntants..........................................................................................
A u d ito r s .................................................................................................
Chief accountants.................................................................................
A tto rn e y s ...............................................................................................
Buyers......................................................................................................
Job analysts ..........................................................................................
Directors of personnel..........................................................................
Chem ists.................................................................................................
Engineers ...............................................................................................
Engineering technicians.......................................................................
Drafting .................................................................................................
Computer operators ............................................................................
Keypunch supervisors.........................................................................
Clerical ....................................................................................................

5
4
4
6
4
4
4
8
8
5
4
6
5
17

Under
15
percent

15
and
under
20
percent

20
and
under
25
percent

25
and
under
30
percent

30
percent
and
over

2

20

38

21

3

_

—
1
—
1
-

1
3
2
2
1
—
4
4
3
-

-

—

-

-

4
1
2
2
4
2
2
4
3
2
1
5
1
5

_

—
2
—
—
1
—
3
1
3
11

_
—

—
1
—
1
1

1 Degree o f dispersion equals th e salary range o f th e m id d le
5 0 p ercen t o f em p loyees in a w o rk level expressed as a p e rce n t

o f th e m edian salary fo r th a t level.

comparison. As shown in text table 3, the degree o f
dispersion was between 15 and 30 percent o f the median
salary in 79 o f the 84 work levels. The degree o f
dispersion tended to be greater in the clerical and
keypunch supervisory occupations than in the other
occupations studied.

Relative salary levels for the 12 professional, admin­
istrative, and technical support occupations tended to be
closest to the average for all industry divisions in

Differences in the range o f salaries paid individuals

in the public utilities industry division were generally the
highest.
For most o f the occupations studied, relative salary
levels were lower in retail trade and in finance, insur­
ance, and real estate than in other industry divisions. In
those occupations in which retail trade and the finance
industries contributed a substantial proportion o f the
total employment, the average salary in the occupation
for all industries combined was lowered, and the relative

within work levels surveyed reflect a variety o f factors
other than differences in the range o f duties and
responsibilities encompassed by the various work level
definitions. Two o f these factors are: Salary structures
within establishments which provide for a range o f rates
for each grade level; and regional variations, particularly
in the clerical levels (clerical employees are usually
recruited locally, while the job field tends to be broader
regionally, often national in scope, for the professional

manufacturing, which contributed more to total em ploy­
ment than any other industry division for all but one
(attorneys) o f the 12 occupations. Relative salary levels

and administrative occupations ).12 A third factor is

levels in industries such as manufacturing and public
utilities tended to be well above 100 percent o f the

industry variation. Table

all-industry level. For example, relative pay levels for file

7 and chart 4 show how

employment in surveyed occupations varies by industry.

clerks (107 percent o f the all-industry level in manu­

Pay differences by industry

facturing and 131 percent in public utilities) reflected
the influence o f lower salaries for the high proportion
(63 percent) o f all-industry employment included in the
finance industries. The finance industries, however, also

The survey is planned to permit publication o f
national salary estimates by level o f work. By combining
the data for all levels o f work studied in each occupa­
tion, it is possible to present comparisions between
relative salary levels in major industry divisions and all
industries combined (table 8).




12
For an analysis o f interarea pay differentials in clerical
salaries, see Area Wage Surveys: Metropolitan Areas, United
States and Regional Summaries, 1971-72, Bulletin 1725-96
(Bureau o f Labor Statistics, 1974).

Relative Employment in Selected Occupational Groups
by Industry Division, March 1974
Percent

OCCUPATIONAL
GROUP

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Accountants and
chief accountants

Auditors

Attorneys

Buyers

Directors of personnel
and job analysts

Chemists

Engineers

Engineering technicians
and drafters

Computer operators and
keypunch supervisors

C lerical employees




M anufacturing

Public u tilitie s

Finan ce, In suran ce,
and real e s ta te

Trade and
s e le c te d se rv ic e s

reported lower average standard weekly hours than the
other industries surveyed, as shown in table 9.

Average standard w eekly hours

The length o f the standard workweek, on which the
regular straight-time salary is based, is obtained for
individual employees in the occupations studied. When
individual weekly hours are not available, particularly
for some higher level professional and administrative
positions, the predominant workweek o f the office work
force is used as the standard workweek. The distribution




o f average weekly hours (rounded to the nearest
half-hour) is presented in table 9 for all work levels o f
each occupation combined in major industry divisions
surveyed. Average weekly hours were lower in finance,
insurance, and real estate (38 hours for a majority o f the
occupations) than in the other industry divisions (39 or
39.5 hours). Average weekly hours have been stable over
the past decade .13
13
For information on scheduled weekly hours o f office
workers employed in metropolitan areas, see Area Wage Surveys:
Selected Metropolitan Areas, 1972-73, Bulletin 1775-97 (Bureau
o f Labor Statistics, 1974).

Annual s a l a r i e s 4

Mon th ly s a l a r i e s 4
O c c u p a t io n and l e v e l 2

of
em ployees

M id d le rang e 5
Mean

M e d ia n

First
q u ar t il e

T h ir d
q u ar t il e

M i dd le rang e 5
Me a n

M ed ia n

Firs t
q u ar t il e

T h ir d
q u ar t il e

A c c o u n t a n t s and a u d i t o rs

A u d it o r s
Auditors
A u d it o r s
Auditors
Ch ie f
Chief
Chi ef
Ch ie f

7,
13,
28,
19,
7,

ac co u n ta n t s
a cc ou n ta n t s
ac co u n ta n t s
ac co u n ta n t s

I *
II
III
IV

$ 804
940
1, 086
1, 325
1, 600

$745
850
990
1, 200
1 ,4 5 6

$875
1, 065
1, 208
1, 465
1, 777

$9,
1 1,
13,
16,
19,

739
549
285
051
560

$9,
1 1.
13,
15,
1 9,

648
280
032
900
200

$ 8,
10,
11,
14,
17,

940
200
880
400
472

$10,
12,
14,
1 7,
21,

500
780
496
580
324

208
682
025
923

863
1, 002
1, 198
1, 458

850
967
1, 173
1,42 5

752
879
1, 065
1 ,3 1 2

920
1, 086
1, 295
1, 583

10,
12,
14,
17,

352
024
341
491

10,
1 1,
14,
17,

200
604
076
100

9,
10,
12,
1 5,

024
548
780
744

1 I,
13,
15,
1 8,

040
032
540
996

1 ,4 6 7
1, 673
1, 984
2, 418

1, 433
1 ,6 6 6
1, 940
2, 365

1, 343
1, 524
1 ,7 1 3
2, 124

1,
1,
2,
2,

624
816
166
666

1 7,
20,
23,
2 9,

601
072
805
021

17,
19,
23,
2 8,

196
992
280
3 80

16,
1 8,
20,
25,

116
288
556
488

19,
21,
25,
31,

488
792
992
992

580
1, 504
2, 443
1, 968
995
614

I
II
III
IV

$812
962
1. 107
1, 338
1, 630

619
1, 222
768
325

I
II
III
IV
V

376
735
869
206
259

1,
2,
5,
2,

A c co u n t a n t s
Accountants
Accountants
A c co u n t a n t s
A c co u n t a n t s

1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
3,

1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
3,

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
3,

265
470
958
374
940
565

14,223
1 6, 357
21, 082
25, 956
31, 999
3 8, 180

13,
16,
20,
25,
31,
37,

800
008
568
236
692
200

12,
14,
18,
23,
27,
33,

516
496
096
028
984
492

15,
1 7,
23,
28,
35,
42,

180
640
496
488
280
780

9,
11,
14,
16,

900
940
400
860

8,
10,
12,
15,

808 *
500
840
180

11,
13,
16,
19,

040
440
200
296

Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys

I
II
III
IV
V
VI

185
363
757
163
667
182

1 50
334
714
103
641
100

043
208
508
919
332
791

Buyers
Buyers
Buyers
Buyers
Buyers

021
910
965
200

839
1, 012
1, 222
1, 452

82 5
995
1, 200
1, 405

734
875
1, 070
1, 265

920
1, 120
1, 350
1, 608

10,
12,
14,
17,

55
297
676
494

4,
11,
13,
5,

I ---II “
III —
IV

073
141
659
421

815
957
1, 160
1, 439

816
940
1, 162
1, 445

756
864
1, 023
1, 276

865
1, 041
1, 294
1, 605

9, 783
11, 488
13, 921
1 7, 263

9, 792
1 1, 280
13, 944
17,340

9,
10,
12,
15,

072
368
276
312

10,
12,
1 5,
1 9,

380
492
528
260

1,
1,
2,
2,

316
568
007
345

1,
1,
2,
2,

300
499
012
275

1,
1,
1,
1,

166
333
725
958

1,
1,
2,
2,

490
700
282
666

15,
1 8,
24,
2 8,

790
815
078
140

15,
17,
24,
27,

600
988
144
300

13,
15,
20,
23,

992
996
700
496

1 7,
20,
2 7,
31,

880
400
3 84
992

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
3,

980
135
324
590
880
185
575
085

10,
12,
14,
17,
20,
24,
28,
34,

660
408
298
283
702
079
203
475

10,
12,
14,
17,
20,
23,
27,
34,

692
240
160
196
496
880
504
236

9,
11,
12,
15,
1 8,
21,
24,
30,

696
160
660
468
528
768
492
504

11,
13,
1 5,
19,
22,
26,
30,
37,

760
620
888
080
560
220
900
020

92 5
000
151
351
566
777
994
325

1, 050
1,178
1, 371
1, 625
1, 865
2, 173
2, 475
2, 875

11,
13,
15,
17,
20,
23,
26,
31,

901
171
160
92 9
654
827
960
469

11,
12,
15,
1 7,
20,
23,
26,
30,

760
960
000
784
436
592
364
300

11, 100
12,000
13, 812
1 6, 212
18, 792
21, 324
23, 928
27, 900

12,
14,
16,
19,
22,
26,
29,
34,

600
136
452
500
380
076
700
500

5 82
680
780
908
1, 027

741
826
956
1, 085
1, 243

7, 975
9, 122
10, 491
11, 974
13,654

7,
9,
10,
11,
13,

824
012
392
856
560

6,
8,
9,
10,
12,

8,
9,
11,
13,
14,

892
912
472
020
916

P ersonnel m anagem ent
Job
Job
Job
Job

a na ly st s
a n al y st s
a na ly st s
a n al y st s

I ------------------------------------II -----------------------------------III ---------------------------------IV ---------------------------------personnel
personnel
personnel
personnel

I
II -----------------III ---------------IV ----------------

1, 114
1, 924
1, 089
413

D irectors
D irectors
D irectors
D irectors

of
of
of
of

Chemists
Chem ists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists

I
II —
III "
IV —
V —
VI VII VIII

1,
4,
9,
12,
8,
4,
1,

719
085
540
161
72 5
191
564
412

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
2,

888
034
191
440
725
007
350
873

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

891
020
1 80
433
708
990
292
853

808
930
1, 055
1 ,2 8 9
1, 544
1, 814
2, 041
2, 542

Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers

I ---II —
III —
IV —
V —
VI —
VII VIII

15,
30,
83,
113,
81,
44,
16,
3,

358
532
255
436
652
2 83
593
688

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

992
098
263
494
721
986
247
622

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

980
080
250
482
703
966
197
525

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,

4,
12,
26,
31,
1 8,

039
810
151
853
247

665
760
874
998
1, 138

C h e m i s t s and e n g i n e e r s

Technical support
En ginee
En ginee
Engi nee
Enginee
Enginee

ring
ring
ring
ring
ring

t e ch n i ci a n s
te ch n i ci a n ;
t e ch n i ci a n s
t e ch n i ci a n s
t e ch n i ci a n s

I —
II —
III IV v




-

652
751
866
988
1, 130

984
160
360
896
324

Mon th ly :s a l a r i e s 4
O cc up a t io n and l e v e l 1
2

Number
of
em ployee s 3

Annual : a l a r i e s 4
s

M id d le rang e 5
M ea n

M e d ia n

F irst
q ua r t ile

Third
q u a r t il e

M i d d l e rang e 5
Mea n

M e d ia n

F irst
q u ar t il e

T h ir d
qua rtile

T e c h n i c a l su p p or t — Conti nue d
D rafter-tracers
--------------------------------------D r a f t e r s I -------------------------------------------------D r a f t e r s II -----------------------------------------------D r a f t e r s III -----------------------------------------------

5,
1 8,
28,
31.

425
350
581
067

$587
709
870
1, 089

$587
695
855
1, 041

$50 4
615
765
921

$653
790
961
1, 191

$7,
8,
10,
13,

048
507
443
070

$7,
8,
10,
12,

039
342
256
498

$6,
7,
9,
11,

048
3 83
178
056

$ 7,
9,
11,
14,

Com puter
Computer
Com puter
Computer
Com puter
Computer

operators
operators
operators
operators
operators
operators

4,
10,
19,
11,
2,

488
467
717
498
901
768

573
63 6
741
857
925
1, 034

554
626
730
847
915
1, 022

500
550
650
743
800
921

641
705
82 6
951
1, 024
1, 134

6,
7,
8,
10,
11,
12,

879
632
887
279
098
403

6,
7,
8,
10,
10,
12,

648
512
760
164
980
264

6,
6,
7,
8,
9,
11,

000
600
800
916
600
052

7, 692
8, 460
9, 912
1 1 ,4 12
12,288
1 3, 608

K e yp un ch
K e ypu nch
Ke yp un ch
K e ypu nch
Ke yp un ch

sup ervisors
sup ervisors
sup ervisors
sup ervisors
sup ervisors

1, 277
2, 081
1, 143
385
64

737
796
917
1, 067
1, 129

739
754
900
1, 029
1, 066

634
671
800
930
975

832
900
1, 000
1, 208
1, 265

8,
9,
11,
12,
13,

842
547
005
809
552

8,
9,
10,
12,
12,

868
048
800
348
792

7,
8,
9,
11,
11,

608
052
600
160
700

9,
1 0,
12,
14,
15,

984
800
000
496
180

551
697
426
471
577
537
624
470
633
685
729
797
866
579
658
4 84
563

530
669
413
449
555
515
60 6
450
619
673
720
7 84
854
559
643
569
542

460
5 80
375
400
498
452
539
396
547
594
633
687
740
4 85
560
417
484

613
7 94
461
513
62 6
591
690
521
704
769
819
900
975
652
741
527
617

6,
3,
5,
5,
6,
6,
7,
5,
7,
8,
8,
9,
10,
6,
7,
5,
6,

607
3 67
109
647
928
440
492
643
601
221
742
568
396
954
900
810
751

6,
8,
4,
5,
6,
6,
7,
5,
7,
8,
8,
9,
10,
6,
7,
5,
6,

358
030
955
383
663
179
274
402
425
082
638
410
246
703
717
627
507

5,
6,
4,
4,
5,
5,
6,
4,
6,
7,
7,
8,
8,
5,
6,
5,
5,

519
95 9
499
799
976
423
465
751
5 70
126
594
238
878
819
719
005
806

7,
9,
5,
6,
7,
7,
8,
6,
8,
9,
9,
10,
1 1,
7,
8,
6,
7,

352
526
531
153
508
091
278
257
447
229
823
798
698
821
890
324
404

I ----------------------------II -------------------------III ------------------------IV -------------------------V ---------------------------V I ----------------------------

842
478
533
291

C lerical sup ervisory
I -------------------------II ------------------------III ----------------------IV ----------------------V -----------------------

Cle r i c a l
C l e r k s , a cc o u n ti n g I --------------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n ti n g II -------------------------------------------C l e r k s , fi le I
------------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , file II ------------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , fi le III ------------------------------------------------------Ke yp un ch o p e r a t o r s I -------------------------------------------Ke yp un ch o p e r a t o r s II -----------------------------------------M essengers
----------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I ---------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s II -------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s III ------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s IV ------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s V ---------------------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l --------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ----------------------------------------T y p i s t s I -----------------------------------------------------------------T y p i s t s II -----------------------------------------------------------------

92,
69,
26,
22,
8,
63,
45,
25,
58,
76,
69,
44,
14,
43,
50,
63,
39,

282
323
099
814
357
909
157
435
370
386
133
389
180
612
486
176
301

!
|

1 F o r s c o p e of study, se e table in a p pe n di x A.
2 O c c u p a t io n a l de f in i t io n s a p p e a r in ap pe n di x C.
3 O c c u p a t io n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s re l a t e to the total in all e s t a b l i s h m e n t s within s c o p e of the s u r v e y and not to the n u m b e r a ct u a ll y s u r ­
v e ye d .
F o r fu r t h e r ex pl ana tio n, s e e ap pe n di x A, p. 34.
4 S a l a r i e s r e p o r t e d re l a t e to the sta nd a rd s a l a r i e s that w e r e pa id f o r st a nd a rd w o r k s c h e d u l e s ; i. e. , the s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d i n g
to the e m p l o y e e ' s n o r m a l w o r k sc h e d u l e e x cl u d i n g o v e r t i m e h o u r s .
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a re e x cl u d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g p a y m e n t s and in c e n t iv e
e a r n i n g s a r e in clu ded .
5 T he m id d l e range ( i n t e r q u a r t il e ) us ed h e r e is the c e n t r a l p a r t of the a r r a y e x cl u d i n g the u p pe r and l o w e r fo u r t h s of the e m p l o y e e di st r ib u t io n .




Monthl y s a l a r i e s 4
O cc u p a t io n and L e v e l 2

Number
em ployees

A c co u n t a n t s
A c co u n t a n t s
A c co u n t a n t s
A c co u n t a n t s
A c co u n t a n t s
A c co u n t a n t s

Ann ua l s a l a r i e s 4

Mi dd le r a n g e 5
Me a n

Me d ia n

F irst
q ua r t ile

M id d le r a n g e 5

Third
q u ar t ile

F irst
q ua r t ile

Third
q u ar t il e

and a u d i t or s

I ----------------------------------------------------------I I ---------------------------------------------------------I I I --------------------------------------------------------I V --------------------------------------------------------V ----------------------------------------------------------

6,
12,
25,
16,
6,

504
402
227
801
443

$812
970
1, 115
1, 342
1, 638

$ 80 4
945
1, 097
1, 330
1 ,6 1 2

$746
85 4
1 ,0 0 0
1, 200
1 ,4 6 0

$875
1, 078
1, 216
1 ,4 7 4
1, 792

$ 9 , 747
11, 642
13, 379
16, 102
19,655

I -----------------------------------------------------------------II ---------------------------------------------------------------I I I --------------------------------------------------------------I V ---------------------------- ----------------------------------

1,
2,
4,
2,

120
500
785
778

867
1, 006
1, 199
1 ,46 1

864
967
1, 175
1, 433

752
880
1, 064
1 ,3 1 2

920
1, 088
1, 29 5
1 , 58 3

10,406
12, 076
14, 384
17, 535

10,
11,
14,
17,

368
604
100
196

9,
10,
12,
15,

024
560
768
744

11, 040
13, 056
15, 540
18,996

539
1, 016
676
306

1 ,4 5 5
1, 688
1, 980
2, 424

1 ,4 3 3
1 ,6 6 6
1, 916
2, 376

1,
1,
1,
2,

333
533
700
166

1, 58 3
1 ,8 3 3
2, 166
2, 666

17,
20,
23,
29,

17,
19,
22,
28,

196
992
992
512

15, 996
18,396
20,400
25, 992

18,996
21, 996
25, 992
31, 992

568
1 ,42 1
2, 338
1 ,8 6 0
984
611

1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
3,

184
365
759
172
669
184

1, 149
1,34 1
1, 724
2, 107
2, 642
3, 100

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

042
200
500
934
332
791

1, 265
1 ,4 8 3
1,964
2, 400
2, 950
3, 567

14, 202
16, 385
21, 107
26,069
32, 027
38, 208

13, 778
16, 092
20,688
25, 284
31, 704
37,200

12, 504
14, 400
18,000
23, 208
27, 984
33, 492

15, 180
17, 796
23, 568
28,800
35, 400
42, 804

3, 214
9, 472
11,919
4, 778

851
1, 026
1, 228
1 ,4 6 0

840
1 ,0 0 0
1, 200
1 ,4 1 2

750
890
1,074
1, 270

954
1,134
1 ,3 6 0
1 ,6 1 7

1 0, 2 1 7
12, 315
14, 736
17,524

10,080
12, 000
14, 400
16, 944

9,
10,
12,
15,

11, 448
13, 608
16,320
19, 404

51
290
626
469

822
960
1, 168
1, 442

816
940
1, 175
1 ,4 5 0

7 56
8 67
1, 036
1, 282

8 67
1, 041
1 ,3 0 0
1, 610

9 , 8 58
11, 517
14,015
17, 299

9, 792
11,280
14, 100
17,400

9,072
10,404
12, 432
15, 384

10,
12,
15,
19,

1,
1,
2,
2,

330
571
022
351

1, 308
1,4 9 9
2 ,0 1 6
2, 306

1,
1,
1,
1,

1,
1,
2,
2,

500
702
291
692

15, 965
1 8 , 8 47
24,267
28,215

15,696
17,988
24, 192
27, 672

14,
15,
20,
23,

076
996
856
580

18,000
20, 424
27, 492
32, 304

891
1, 039
1, 200
1 ,4 4 5
1, 729
2, 019
2, 369
2, 915

895
1 ,0 2 3
1, 186
1 ,4 4 3
1, 709
2, 000
2, 315
2, 874

804
933
1 ,0 5 8
1, 291
1, 545
1 ,8 1 9
2, 060
2, 567

982
1, 145
1, 338
1, 592
1 ,8 8 4
2, 205
2, 582
3, 085

10, 686
12, 472
14, 395
17,336
20, 752
24, 229
28, 426
34, 978

10, 740
12, 276
14, 232
17,316
20, 508
24, 000
27,780
34, 488

9, 648
11, 196
12, 696
15, 492
18, 540
21,828
24, 720
30, 804

1 1, 784
13, 740
16, 056
19, 104
22,608
26, 460
30, 98 4
37,020

053
370
100
739
348
280
815
41 3

995
1, 102
1, 274
1, 504
1, 729
1 ,99 1
2, 249
2, 628

982
1, 083
1, 262
1, 492
1, 710
1 ,9 7 2
2, 200
2, 529

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,

926
000
164
366
575
781
995
330

1, 052
1, 183
1, 38 2
1, 637
1 ,8 7 2
2, 177
2, 478
2, 886

11,943
13,225
15, 293
18,046
20, 744
23, 897
26,986
31,537

11 , 784
12, 996
15, 144
17,904
20,520
23, 664
26,400
30, 348

11, 112
12, 000
13, 968
16, 392
18,900
21,372
23,940
27, 960

12, 624
14, 196
16, 584
19, 644
22, 464
26, 124
29,736
34, 632

I ------------------------------------I I -----------------------------------I I I ----------------------------------I V ----------------------------------V ------------------------------------

3, 706
11,513
23, 007
28, 438
17, 405

664
762
880
1 ,0 0 6
1, 140

652
752
870
995
1, 132

579
680
786
916
1, 028

744
826
962
1, 095
1, 249

7 ,9 7 3
9, 150
10,559
12, 075
13, 682

7,
9,
10,
11,
13,

824
024
440
940
584

6,
8,
9,
10,
12,

948
160
432
992
336

8,
9,
11,
13,
14,

928
912
544
140
988

D r a f t e r - t r a c e r s ------------------------------------------------------D r a f t e r s I -----------------------------------------------------------------D r a f t e r s I I ---------------------------------------------------------------D r a f t e r s I I I ---------------------------------------------------------------

4, 959
15, 227
23, 996
27,747

589
721
886
1, 107

589
704
870
1, 057

504
630
78 0
932

659
806
980
1, 212

7, 064
8, 647
10,633
13, 278

7, 072
8, 447
10,435
12, 683

6,
7,
9,
11,

048
560
358
181

7,
9,
11,
14,

907
677
763
547

A u d it o r s
A u d it o r s
A u d it o r s
Auditors
C hi e f
C hi e f
C h i ef
C h i ef

ac co u n ta n t s
a cc ou n ta n t s
a cc ou n ta nt s
a cc ou n ta nt s

I -----------------------------------------------II ---------------------------------------------I I I ---------------------------------------------IV ---------------------------------------------

457
261
763
086

$9,648
11,340
13, 164
15, 960
19, 344

$ 8 , 952
10, 248
12, 000
14, 400
17,520

$ 10,
12,
14,
17,
21,

500
936
592
688
504

Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys

I ---------------------------------------------------------------I I -------------------------------------------------------------I I I ------------------------------------------------------------I V ------------------------------------------------------------V -------------------------------------------------------------V I ------------------------------------------------------------Buyers

Buyers
Buyers
Buyers
Buyers

I --------------------------------------------------------------------I I ------------------------------------------------------------------III ----------------------------------------------------------------IV ------------------------------------------------------------------

000
680
888
240

P ersonn el management
Job
Jo b
Jo b
Jo b

a na ly st s
a n al y st s
a na ly st s
a na ly st s

I ----------------------------------------------------------I I ---------------------------------------------------------III ------------------------------------------------------I V --------------------------------------------------------

D irectors
D irectors
D irectors
D irectors

of
of
of
of

personnel
personnel
personnel
personnel

I --------------------------------------I I -------------------------------------I I I ------------------------------------I V -------------------------------------

Chemists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists

I ---------------------------------------------------------------I I --------------------------------------------------------------III ------------------------------------------------------------I V -------------------------------------------------------------V --------------------------------------------------------------V I -------------------------------------------------------•----V I I ------------------------------------------------------------V I I I -----------------------------------------------------------

Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers

I --------------------------------------------------------------.11 ------------------------------------------------------------III ----------------------------------------------------------I V -----------------------------------------------------------V -------------------------------------------------------------V I -----------------------------------------------------------V I I ----------------------------------------------------------V I I I ---------------------------------------------------------

781
1, 617
974
366

173
333
738
965

404
492
600
320

C h e m i s t s and e n g i n e e r s
1 ,4 9 9
3, 668
8, 196
10,612
7, 680
3, 720
1, 411
357
14,
28,
74,
102,
75,
41,
15,
3,

T e c h n i c a l su p po rt
E n g i n e e r in g
E n g i n e e r in g
E n g i n e e r in g
E n g i n e e r in g
En g i n e e ri n g

technicians
technicians
technician s
technicians
technicians




Annu al s a l a r i e s 4

Mont hly s a l a r i e s 4
O c c u p a t i o n and L e v e l 2

of
em ployees

M i dd le r a n g e 5
Mean

M e d ia n

F irst
q ua r t ile

Third
q u a r t il e

M id d le r a n g e 5
Mean

M e d ia n

F irst
q u ar t ile

T hird
q u a r t il e

T e c h n i c a l s u p p o r t ---- Con tinued
Computer
Computer
Computer
Computer
Com puter
Computer

operators
operators
operators
operators
operators
operators

I -------------------------------------------I I ------------------------------------------I I I -----------------------------------------I V -----------------------------------------V -------------------------------------------V I ------------------------------------------

Keypunch
K e y p u n ch
K e y p u n ch
Keypunch
Keypunch

supervisors
su p ervisors
sup ervisors
su p ervisors
supervisors

080
142
832
477
608
601

$ 57 7
642
744
860
924
1, 025

$ 55 6
633
730
8 50
918
1,02 1

$5 04
556
652
747
806
945

$64 3
710
830
955
1 , 020
1,115

1, 147
1, 783
1, 076
373
62

7 47
808
925
1, 069
1, 130

739
781
900
1 ,0 3 3
1 ,0 6 6

634
675
805
930
978

8 34
915
1, 008
1, 220
1, 264

80, 938
61, 154
21,613
21, 408
8, 064
56, 004
40,455
24, O il
52, 923
69, 784
62, 1 18
41,306
13, 025
38,045
45,561
55, 914
36, 139

556
704
425
468
577
546
631
470
638
689
735
804
875
586
663
488
564

534
675
412
444
555
523
608
450
625
675
726
791
869
565
650
474
543

465
587
370
400
498
461
543
399
550
600
640
695
750
49 2
565
425
48 5

623
800
459
508
626
600
699
521
713
773
826
905
980
660
750
534
617

4,
9,
17,
10,
2,

$ 6 , 928
7, 699
8, 927
10,315
1 1 ,0 9 3
12, 301

$ 6, 672
7, 596
8, 760
10,200
11,016
12, 252

$ 6 , 048
6,672
7, 824
8, 964
9, 672
11, 340

$7,716
8, 520
9, 960
11,460
12,240
13, 38 0

C lerical sup ervisory
I ---------------------------------------I I ---------------------------------------I I I -------------------------------------IV -------------------------------------V ----------------------------------------

8,
9,
11,
12,
13,

968
701
096
823
558

8,868
9, 372
10,800
12, 396
12,792

7,
8,
9,
11,
11,

608
100
660
160
736

1 0 ,0 08
10, 980
12, 096
14, 640
15, 168

5,
7,
4,
4,
5,
5,
6,
4,
6,
7,
7,
8,
8,
5,
6,
5,
5,

579
039
439
799
970
527
518 ;
789
599 !
195
678
342
998
902
778
099
819

7, 4 74
9, 598
5, 506
6, 100
7, 508
7, 198
8,3 8 6
6, 251
8, 551
9, 281
9, 907
10, 862
1 1, 758
7, 925
8, 998
6, 407
7, 408

Clerical
C l e r k s , a c c o u n ti n g I ----------------------------------------------C l e r k s , a cc o u n ti n g II -------------------------------------------C l e r k s , f i le I -----------------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , fi le I I ---------------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , fi le I I I --------------------------------------------------------K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s I --------------------------------------------K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s I I -------------------------------------------M e s s e n g e r s --------------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I -----------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I ----------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I I --------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I V ---------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s V ----------------------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ----------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ------------------------------------------T y p i s t s I ------------------------------------------------------------------T y p i s t s II ------------------------------------------------------------------

6 ,6 6 8
8, 454
5, 097
5, 611
6, 920
6, 550
7, 569
5, 645
7, 658
8, 272
8, 824
9, 649
10, 506
7, 037
7, 959
5, 859
6, 768

6,
8,
4,
5,
6,
6,
7,
5,
7,
8,
8,
9,
10,
6,
7,
5,
6,

413
098
945
324
659
279
300
406
498
098
709
48 9
428
778
799
683
518

1 F o r s c o p e of study, s e e tabl e in a pp en di x A.
2 O c c u p a t io n a l de f in i t io n s a p p e a r in ap pe n di x C.
3 O c c u p a t io n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e l a t e to the to ta l in all e s t a b l i s h m e n t s withi n s c o p e o f the s u r v e y and not to the n u m b e r a ct u a ll y s u r ­
veyed.
F o r f u r t h e r ex pl an a tio n, se e a pp en di x A. p. 34.
4 S a l a r i e s r e p o r t e d r e l a t e to the st a nd a rd s a l a r i e s that w e r e paid f o r sta nd a rd w o r k s c h e d u l e s ; i . e . , the s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d i n g
to the e m p l o y e e ' s n o r m a l w o r k s c h e d u l e e x cl u d i n g o v e r t i m e h o u r s .
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a re e x c l u d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g p a y m e n t s and in ce n t iv e
e a r n i n g s a re in cl u de d.
5 The m i d d l e ra n g e (i n t e r q u a r t il e ) u s e d h e r e is the c e n t r a l pa rt of the a r r a y ex cl u d i n g the up per and l o w e r f o u r t h s o f the e m p l o y e e d i s t r ib u t io n .




Mo nt hl y s a l a r i e s 5
O cc u p a t io n and le v e l 3

Number
of
em ployees

Mi ddle: ra ng e 6
M ea n

M ed ia n

$
1,
1,
1,
1,

$
1,
1,
1,
1,

F irst
q ua r t ile

T hi rd
q ua r t ile

E e v e l s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s
e m p l o y in g 2, 500 w o r k e r s
o r m o r e e x p r e s s e d as
p e r c e n t o f t h o s e in all
establishments combined
Mea n
Em ploym ent
s a la r i e s

A c c o u n t a n t s and a u d i t o rs
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants

I --------------------------------------------I I -------------------------------------------III-----------------------------------------I V -----------------------------------------V -------------------------------------------

1,
5,
7,
5,
2,

985
747
937
609
439

890
064
194
391
664

875
065
178
375
660

$ 805
950
1, 060
1, 241
1, 483

$955
1, 182
1, 334
1, 533
1, 828

27
42
27
29
34

1 10
111
108
104
102

I -------------------------------------------------I I ------------------------------------------------I I I -----------------------------------------------IV-------------------------------------------------

409
991
1, 690
1, 251

956
1, 072
1, 238
1, 477

910
1, 017
1, 196
1, 445

831
916
1, 061
1, 316

1,
1,
1,
1,

103
230
375
607

34
37
34
43

111
107
103
101

C h i e f a cc o u n ta n t s I I I ------------------------------C h i e f a cc o u n ta n t s IV --------------------------------

216
113

2, 216
2, 537

2, 133
2, 458

1, 927
2, 216

2, 643
2, 782

28
35

112
105

180
397
731
767
412
356

1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
3,

1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
3,

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

137
350
583
949
383
773

1,
1,
2,
2,
2,
3,

416
685
041
499
918
624

31
26
30
39
41
58

107
112
104
104
100
10.1

Aud itors
Aud itors
Aud itors
A uditors

Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys

I -------I I ------I II -----I V -----V ------V I ------

270
529
835
258
674
209

250
500
775
206
642
127

Buyers
809
3, 221
5, 085
3, 009

943
1, 105
1, 259
1, 466

925
1, 083
1, 234
1, 401

834
950
1, 091
1, 260

1,
1,
1,
1,

050
225
403
643

20
27
36
58

112
109
103
101

Job a n a l y s t s I I ----------------------------------------Jo b a n a l y s t s I I I ---------------------------------------Job a n a l y s t s IV-----------------------------------------

177
432
354

983
1, 183
1, 441

970
1, 185
1, 451

891 •
1, 030
1, 292

1, 080
1, 310
1, 594

60
64
72

103
102
100

D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I I I -------------------D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l IV----------------------

171
144

2, 283
2, 592

2, 266
2, 575

1, 948
2, 268

2, 724
2, 850

16
35

114
111

1,
4,
5,
3,
1,

533
722
060
477
654
859
644

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

973
083
274
531
820
099
500

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

980
072
282
539
810
065
444

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,

908
975
141
391
640
900
249

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

039
190
400
680
970
242
707

31
42
43
45
42
44
41

110
105
107
106
106
105
106

7,
16,
46,
68,
48,
24,
10,
2,

938
426
406
345
239
813
239
085

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
2,

020
125
299
543
767
043
284
733

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
2,

000
104
290
533
750
025
245
650

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

947
018
189
408
621
836
000
377

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
3,

080
210
408
675
907
225
533
003

52
54
56
60
59
56
62
57

103
102
103
103
103
103
102
104

I -----------------------I I ---------------------III ------------------I V --------------------V ----------------------

2,
5,
11,
16,
12,

153
946
437
773
483

703
802
900
1, 020
1, 156

687
791
891
1 ,0 1 0
1, 144

613
710
800
926
1, 043

786
875
992
1, 105
1, 269

53
46
44
53
68

106
106
103
102
102

D r a f t e r - t r a c e r s ---------------------------------------D r a f t e r s I ---------------------------------------------------D r a f t e r s I I -------------------------------------------------D r a f t e r s I I I -------------------------------------------------

2,
5,
9,
14,

010
790
326
7 84

642
763
919
1, 194

631
735
904
1, 122

574
661
800
982

680
847
1, 014
1, 400

37
32
33
48

109
108
106
110

Buyers
Buyers
Buyers
Buyers

I —
II —
III IV—
P erson n el management

C h e m i s t s and e n g i n e e r s
Chemists
Chem ists
Chemists
Chemists
Chemists
Chem ists
Chem ists

I -------------------------------------------------I I ------------------------------------------------I I I ----------------------------------------------IV------------------------------------------------V ------------------------------------------------V I ----------------------------------------------V I I ----------------------------------------------

E n g i n e e r s I -----------------------------------------------E n g i n e e r s I I ----------------------------------------------E n g i n e e r s I I I ---------------------------------------------E n g in e e r s I V ------------------------------------------------------

Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers

V ----------------------------------------------V I ---------------------------------------------V I I -------------------------------------------V I I I ------------------------------------------T e c h n i c a l su p po r t

Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering

technicians
technicians
technicians
technicians
technicians

See fo o t n o t e s at end o f tabl e.




M o nt hl y s a l a r i e s 5
O cc u p a t io n and L e v e l 1
3
2

Number
of
em ployees4

M i dd le ra ng e 6
M ea n

M e d ia n

F irst
q ua r t ile

T h ir d
q ua r t ile

L e v e l s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
e m p l o y i n g 2, 500 w o r k e r s
o r m o r e e x p r e s s e d as
p e r c e n t o f t h o s e in all
establishments com bined
Me a n
Em ploym ent
sala ries

T e c h n i c a l su p po rt — Con tinued
Computer
Com puter
Computer
Com puter
Com puter
Com puter

operators
operators
operators
operators
operators
operators

I -----------------------I I ----------------------III --------------------I V ----------------------V -----------------------VI ---------------------

K e yp u n ch
Keypunch
K e yp u n ch
K e yp u n ch

sup ervisors
sup ervisors
sup ervisors
sup ervisors

336
265
455
210
308
404

$ 631
698
793
917
976
1, 056

$ 617
689
7 64
908
948
1, 05 8

$541
617
695
805
855
969

99
410
337
159

1,
2,
5,
4,
1,

887
923
991
1, 075

850
902
962
1, 064

738
770
843
910

705
603
508
194
520
267
053
039
165
383
074
958
2 49
860
344
869
348

629
795
484
538
618
625
6 84
516
673
738
7 85
878
963
624
711
532
605

617
760
460
504
596
599
665
491
660
734
779
869
945
610
707
504
575

526
648
417
442
503
512
585
435
595
643
695
776
852
530
600
455
508

$704
750
890
1, 026
948
1, 130

30
22
28
37
45
53

no

1,
1,
1,
1,

045
065
108
198

8
20
29
41

120
116
108
101

704
949
524
600
702
710
775
573
739
834

18
24
13
18
30
22
31
24
26
31
32
29
30
34
34
20
34

114
114
114
114
107
116
110

1 10
107
107
106
102

C lerica l supervisory
I ---------------------I I -------------------I I I ------------------I V -------------------

Clerical
C l e r k s , a cc o u n ti n g I --------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n ti n g I I -------------------------C l e r k s , fi le I ---------------------------------------C l e r k s , fi le I I ---------------------------------------C l e r k s , fi le III-------------------------------------K ey p un ch o p e r a t o r s I -------------------------K e yp un ch o p e r a t o r s I I -----------------------M e s s e n g e r s -------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I ----------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I --------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I I -------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I V -------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s V ----------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l --------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r -----------------------T yp is ts I ------------------------------------------------T y p i s t s I I ------------------------------------------------

16,
16,
3,
4,
2,
14,
14,
6,
15,
23,
22,
12,
4,
14,
17,
12,
13,

881
978
1, 065
700
814
591
671

no
106
101
108

no
111
108
108
1 10
107

1 F o r s c o p e of study, s e e t abl e in ap pe n di x A.
2 I nc lu de s data f r o m 6 l a r g e c o m p a n i e s , that p r o v i d e d c o m p a n y w id e data un id en ti fie d by s i z e of e s t a b l is h m e n t .
Th is a p p l ie s onl y to data f o r
o c c u p a t io n s ot he r than dr af tin g and c l e r i c a l .
3 O c c u p a t io n a l d e fi ni t io ns a p p e a r in ap pe n di x C.
4 O c c u p a t io n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s re l a t e to the total in all e s t a b l i s h m e n t s within s c o p e of the s u r v e y and to the n u m b e r a ct u a ll y s u r v e y e d .
F o r fu r t h e r ex pl an a tio n, se e ap pe n di x A, p. 34.
5 S a l a r i e s r e p o r t e d r e l a t e to the sta nd a rd s a l a r i e s that w e r e pa id f o r sta nd a rd w o r k s c h e d u l e s ; i. e. , the s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d i n g
to the e m p l o y e e ' s n o r m a l w o r k sc h e d u l e ex cl u d i n g o v e r t i m e h o u r s .
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x cl ud e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g p a y m e n t s and in ce n t iv e
e a r n i n g s a re in cl u de d.
6 The m id d l e ra ng e (i n t e rq u a r t il e ) u s e d h e r e is the c e n t r a l pa rt o f the a r r a y ex cl u d i n g the u p p e r and l o w e r fo u r t h s of the e m p l o y e e d i s t r ib u t io n .




( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s b y m o n t h ly s a l a r y ,
M a r c h 1974)

United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and Ha w ai i, 1

A u d it o r s

Accountants

C h i e f a c c o u n ta n t s

Mo nt hl y s a l a r y
I

II

III

V

IY

I

III

II

IV

I

II

IV

III

Unde r $ 6 0 0 -----------------------------------------------

1.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 60 0
$62 5
$ 65 0
$67 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
und er
under

$ 6 2 5 -----------------------------$ 6 5 0 -----------------------------$ 6 7 5 -----------------------------$ 7 0 0 ------------------------------

2. 9
1 .8
4. 4
3. 0

(1. 8)

_
-

-

1 .4
.2
3. 1
3. 6

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

$ 70 0
$ 72 5
$ 75 0
$77 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
und er
under

$ 7 2 5 -----------------------------$ 7 5 0 -----------------------------^775 ----------------------------$ 8 0 0 ------------------------------

5 .3
6. 8
11. 1
7. 2

1.
2.
2.
4.

6
6
8
0

_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 80 0
$82 5
$ 85 0
$ 87 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
unde r

$ 8 2 5 -----------------------------$ 8 5 0 -----------------------------$ 8 7 5 -----------------------------$ 9 0 0 ------------------ ------------

12.
8.
8.
7.

5.
6.
7.
6.

6
1
1
7

(2.
1.
2.
2.

5)
0
0
7

_
-

-

-

-

-

$ 90 0
$ 92 5
$ 95 0
$ 975

and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
under

$ 9 2 5 -----------------------------$ 9 5 0 -----------------------------$ 9 7 5 -----------------------------$ 1 , 0 0 0 -------------------------

4. 7
3. 8
3 .7
1. 7

7. 9
5. 7
6. 6
4.9

4.
3.
5.
4.

9
1
5
5

_
(1.3)
1. 0

_
-

9. 6
6. 1
6. 0
4.9
7. 5

13.
12.
11.
9.
8.

4
1
0
8
4

3.2
4. 4
6. 6
8. 1
9 -2

(1.7)
2 .2

1.2
1. 1
(.4)

5.
3.
3.
2.
2.

6
8
3
4
5

10. 9
1 1.3
8 .9
6 .9
7. 6

9
0
5
8

4.
5.
12.
10.

-

0
2
8
5

6. 0
2.3
7. 5
7. 2

-

und er
und er
und er
und er
und er

$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

5 5 0 ---------------------6 00 ---------------------6 5 0 ---------------------7 00 --------------------7 5 0 ---------------------

_
-

_
-

(1. 5)
-

5.9
4. 5
3 .2
2. 8
1 .2

7. 6
9.3
8. 0
8. 3
6. 1

..
-

$ 1, 7 50
$ 1, 800
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$1,950

and
and
and
and
and

und er
unde r
und er
unde r
und er

$ 1 , 8 0 0 ---------------------$ 1 ,8 5 0 --------------------$ 1, 900 --------------------$ 1 , 9 5 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 0 0 0 ----------------------

-

-

-

1. 1

6.
5.
4.
3.
2.

"

$ 2 , 000
$ 2 , 050
$ 2 , 100
$2 , 150
$2,200

and
and
and
and
and

und er
unde r
und er
und er
unde r

$ 2 , 0 5 0 --------------------$2 , 1 0 0 --------------------$2 , 1 5 0 -------------------$ 2 , 2 0 0 -------------------$ 2 , 2 5 0 --------------------

_
-

_
-

-

$2,250
$ 2 , 300
$2,350
$2 , 400
$ 2, 450

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
und er
unde r
und er
un d er

$2,300
$2 , 350
$2,400
$2,450
$ 2, 500

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

"

"

-

$2,
$ 2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

500
600
700
800
900

apd
and
and
and
and

und er
under
und er
unde r
und er

$ 2,
$2 ,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$3,

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

-

-

_
-

"

-

-

-

$3 , 000
$ 3 , 100
$3,200
$ 3, 300
$ 3 , 400

and
and
and
and
and

under $ 3, 1 0 0 ---------------------und er $ 3 , 2 00 --------------------und er $ 3, 300 --------------------und er $ 3 , 4 0 0 --------------------o v e r --------------------------------------

-

“

-

-

-

“

"

600
7 00
800
900
000

-

"
_
-

-

-

"

-

-

(.3 )

-

-

6
9
7
4
2

2. 1
6 .9
10. 0
16. 2
9. 4

3. 1
4. 9
2 .9
5. 4
3. 0

_
(0.5)
6. 9
.4

-

_
-

-

-

_

(.3)
"

8.
7.
4.
4.
2.

7
8
7
8
1

7.9
5. 7
7. 6
3. 7
. 6

14. 0
7„ 7
5. 1
9 .4
7. 0

2. 0
1.2
3. 3
9. 0
5. 6

_
(1 . 5 )
4. 0

-

2.
2.
1.
1.
(3.

0
2
2
0
5)

3° 9
4. 8
1. 0
o6
. 5

8.
9.
3.
3.
1.

2
6
4
6
5

3.
5.
5.
7.
6.

3
1
9
3
6

1 .8
1. 5
. 6
4. 6

_
-

_

. 6
1. 8
(.7)

3.
8.
2.
7.
4.

8
9
1
7
6

4.
3.
3.
2.
4.

-

_
-

"

-

-

2. 4
1. 7
1 .2
1. 1

-

"

-

r
-

-

(3. 0)
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

“

-

-

-

and
and
and
and
and

-

-

1.2
.8

2. 3
1. 5
1. 5
(3.2)
-

-

1, 500
1,550
1, 600
1, 650
1 ,7 0 0

_

6. 8
9. 2
-

6«
10.
8.
12.
8.

$
$
$
$
$

2. 7
1 .8
1. 0
(2. 1)

-

11. 5
5. 9
5. 4
3.2
1. 7

_
-

_

-

2. 5
2. 0
1 .2
1. 6
2. 8

$ 1 ,3 00 --------------------$ 1 , 3 5 0 --------------------$ 1, 400 --------------------$ 1, 450 --------------------$ 1 , 5 0 0 ----------------------

-

-

(1.1)
1 .9
2. 3
4. 2
5. 9

und er
unde r
und er
und er
und er

_

~
-

7. 6
11. 9
1 1. 2
9. 9
9. 6

and
and
and
and
and

-

-

6
7
9
5
5

1 ,2 50
1 ,3 0 0
1 ,3 5 0
1, 400
1,450

1
6
4
3

_
-

10.
8.
5.
4.
2.

$
$
$
$
$

-

-

2 .2
1. 5
4 .9
2. 6
3. 6

2. 1
1.3
(1. 9)
-

(1. 7)

_
(2. 0)
1.3
2.
2.
3.
2.

$ 1 ,0 5 0 --------------------$ 1, 1 0 0 --------------------$ 1 , 1 5 0 --------------------$1, 2 0 0 ---------------------$ 1, 250 ---------------------

3
0
3
2
9

5. 0
5. 1
4. 4
6 .3
1
8
7
9

under
unde r
unde r
un d er
unde r

2
9
5
3
6

(1. 1)
4. 0
2. 0

8.
5.
10.
4.

and
and
and
and
and

3.
3.
4.
8.
7.

_

8
5
9
0

12.
3.
2.
2.

$ 1, 000
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1, 100
$ 1, 150
$1,200

"

-

-

-

-

~

_
-

-

“

“

“

-

-

'

-

_

-

0
7
7
5
9

2. 0
•9
. 5
1. 7
1.3

5. 2
3. 4
1 0. 2
1. 5
7. 1

-

1.2
1. 6
1 .2
5. 2
(.7 )

99.
92.
.

-

-

2
2
2
8
6

2. 2
3. 1
1.2
2. 2

100. 0

T o t a l -----------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r of e m p l o y e e s ------- ■
--------------------

7,376

1 3, 7 3 5

28, 869

1 9 , 206

7 ,2 5 9

1,2 08

2, 682

5, 025

2, 923

619

1,2 2 2

768

325

A v e r a g e m on t h ly s a l a r y ------------------------

$812

$ 1, 107

$ 1 , 338

$1,63 0

$863

$ 1, 002

$ 1, 198

$1.458

$1 , 467

$1,673

$1 , 984

$2,418




$962

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t io n s by m o n t h ly s a l a r y , United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and H a w ai i, 1
Iviarch 197 4)
Attorneys
M on t hl y s a l a r y
II

I

_
-

9. 1
1. 0
2. 1
.9

_
(0.7)

_
-

_
-

$900
$92 5
$950
$ 97 5

$ 9 2 5 ----------------------------------------------$95 0 ---------------------------------------------$97 5 ---------------------------------------------$ 1 , 0 0 0 ------------------------------------------

V

-

0. 3
5. 2

und er
und er
und er
und er

IV

.

$ 8 5 0 and und er $87 5 —
- —
---------------------$87 5 and un d er $90 0 ---------------------------------------------and
and
and
and

III

_

VI
.
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

$ 1, 000
$ 1 , 050
$ 1, 100
$ 1, 150
$1,200

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
unde r
und er
und er

$ 1, 050 -------------------------------------$ 1 , 1 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 1 , 1 5 0 -------------------------------------$ 1 , 2 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 1, 250 --------------------------------------

6. 6
9.3
15. 3
2. 4
5. 0

8. 6
2. 6
3. 5
6. 4
9 .3

_
(1.6)

_
-

_
-

$ 1 , 2 50
$ 1,300
$ 1 , 3 50
$1,400
$ 1 , 450

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
un d er
un de r

$ 1, 3 00 -------------------------------------$ 1 , 350 -------------------------------------$ 1, 400 -------------------------------------$ 1 , 450 -------------------------------------$ 1 , 5 0 0 -------------------------------------

20. 0
3. 4
2 .2
4. 3
3. 6

1 2.2
8. 6
8 .2
12. 8
4 .9

4. 9
1 .9
3. 6
6. 1
5. 0

_
-

_
-

-

"

$ 1, 500
$1,550
$ 1, 600
$ 1, 65 0
$ 1 ,7 00

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
un de r
unde r
unde r

$1,550
$1,600
$ 1, 65 0
$1,700
$1,750

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3. 6
1. 6
1. 6
1. 0
(1.4)

4.9
2. 4
2. 7
2. 9
2. 0

5. 0
7. 2
5. 4
7. 0
7.8

(1.8)
2. 4
. 6
3 .8
5. 3

_
-

$1,750
$ 1, 800
$ 1, 850
$ 1, 900
$ 1, 950

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
und er

$ 1, 800
$1,850
$1, 900
$ 1, 950
$ 2, 000

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

1 .9
1. 1
.7
1. 1
.3

7. 3
4.9
2.9
2. 5
6.6

2. 2
3 .9
3. 3
4. 2
7. 1

(0.7)
1.2
1. 6
.4
2. 0

$ 2 , 000
$ 2,050
$ 2 , 100
$ 2 , 150
$2,200

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
und er
und er
und er
und er

$ 2, 050 -------------------------------------$2, 1 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 2 , 1 5 0 -------------------------------------$ 2 , 2 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 2 , 2 5 0 --------------------------------------

_
-

1.3
(1.0)
-

-

-

2. 1
2. 7
4. 1
1. 1
1 .9

5. 3
10. 0
3 .9
6. 3
4. 0

.
3.
1.
4.
2.

7
5
6
1
6

_
(2.3)

$ 2,
$2,
$2 ,
$2,
$2,

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
und er
und er
und er
und er

$ 2, 300
$ 2, 350
$2,400
$2 , 450
$2 , 500

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

“

-

. 5
.9
1. 0
. 7
1. 1

5. 1
4. 5
2.2
4. 3
3. 6

3.
5.
3.
3.
4.

0
0
6
0
4

2. 6
1 .0
2 .9
2. 3
3 .3

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

500
600
700
800
900

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
und er

$2,
$2 ,
$ 2,
$2 ,
$ 3,

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

1 .6
1. 6
(. 8)

5. 1
2.3
2. 4
1 .9
2. 1

9. 8
6° 9
9. 8
6. 4
8 .4

2. 0
3 .3
8. 1
4. 2
9- 8

$ 3,
$3 ,
$ 3,
$3,
$3,

0 0 0 and und er $ 3 , 1 0 0 --------------------------------------

(2.5)

3. 7
5. 1
2. 9
1 .9
2. 1

6.
7.
4.
8.
4.

1.3
1. 8
1. 1
(• 9)

3. 9
2. 9
4. 2
2 .3
3 .4

600
700
800
900
000

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-

"

-

_
"

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

_

100
2 00
300
400

and
and
and
and

un d er
und er
und er
und er

$ 3, 200
$ 3 , 3 00
$ 3, 400
$3 , 500

$3,500
$ 3, 600
$3,700
$ 3, 800
$ 3 , 900

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
und er

$ 3 , 6 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 3, 700 -------------------------------------$ 3, 800 -------------------------------------$ 3, 900 -------------------------------------$ 4, 000 --------------------------------------

$ 4,
$ 4,
$4,
$4,
$4,

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
und er

$4 , 1 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 4 , 2 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 4, 300 -------------------------------------$ 4, 400 -------------------------------------$ 4 , 500 --------------------------------------

_
-

$ 4 , 500 and o v e r ------------------------------------------------------

-

000
100
200
300
400

"

-

-

"

_
-

-

_

"

-

8
0
1
6
9

_
-

-

1

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 9
1 .8
. 7
1. 5
1.3

-

-

-

-

2. 0

-

T o t a l ----------------------------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r of e m p l o y e e s --------------------------------------------

580

1, 504

2, 443

1 ,9 6 8

995

614

A v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r y -----------------------------------------

$ 1, 185

$1,363

$1 , 757

$2 , 163

$2,667

$ 3 , 182




100. 0

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p l o y e e s
M a r c h 197 4)

in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e

o c c u p a t io n s b y m o n t h ly s a l a r y ,

United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and Ha w aii , 1

Buyers
M on t h l y s a l a r y
I

II

III

IV

_

_

_

Unde r $ 550 --------------------------------------------------------------$ 5 5 0 and und er $57 5 ---------------------------------------------$57 5 and under $ 60 0 ------------------------------------ ---------

1.3
1. 5
1.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 60 0
$62 5
$ 65 0
$67 5

and
and
and
and

unde r
und er
und er
und er

$62 5
$ 65 0
$675
$70 0

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 .2
1. 6
6. 5
3. 4

(1.3)

$700
$ 72 5
$ 75 0
$ 775

and
and
and
and

und er
unde r
und er
unde r

$ 725
$ 75 0
$77 5
$ 80 0

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.
5.
7.
6.

8
6
5
6

1 .8
1 .8
3. 6
2. 6

$ 800
$ 825
$850
$87 5

and
and
and
and

under
unde r
unde r
und er

$ 825
$ 85 0
$ 875
$ 90 0

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

8.
6.
7.
5.

0
4
7
7

2. 6
4. 4
5. 7
4 .9

(3.1)

$90 0
$ 92 5
$950
$ 975

and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er

$92 5 ---------------------------------------------$ 9 5 0 ---------------------------------------------$97 5 ---------------------------------------------$ 1 , 0 0 0 ------------------------------------------

6.
2.
2.
4.

3
1
8
0

5.9
4. 6
6. 3
5. 6

2 .4
2 .2
3. 0
2. 6

_
(0 .5)

7.9
8. 8
9 .8
9. 7
9. 6

2. 0
2. 3
3. 8
5.9
7. 8

$ 1, 000
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1, 100
$ 1, 150
$1,200

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
und er

$ 1, 050 -------------------------------------$ 1, 1 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 1, 1 5 0 -------------------------------------$ 1 , 2 0 0 ------------------------------------$ 1, 250 --------------------------------------

$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un de r
und er
und er
und er

$1,300
$1,350
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$1,450
$ 1, 500

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$
$
$
$
$

500
550
600
65 0
700

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
unde r
unde r

$ 1, 55 0
$ 1, 600
$ 1, 650
$ 1,700
$1,750

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 , 800
$ 1 , 850
$ 1, 900
$ 1, 950

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
unde r

$1,800
$ 1 , 850
$ 1,900
$ 1,950
$ 2 , 000

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,

$ 2 , 0 0 0 and un d er $ 2 , 1 0 0 ------------------------------------$ 2 , 100 and un d er $ 2 , 2 0 0 ------------------------------------$ 2 , 2 00 and o v e r ------------------------------------------------------

6 .3
4. 2
1. 8
1. 0
1 .2
(1.2)
-

_

11.
8.
7.
5.
4.

4
8
8
8
0

"

3. 1
2. 5
1 .2
1. 5
1.2

_

(1.5)

-

-

_
-

9.
6.
5.
5.
3.

1
8
6
7
3

-

-

"

-

2. 5
2. 1
1 .9
1.5
1. 1

-

_

_

ll-6 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

"

"

-

7. 5
9. 6
8. 4
10. 2
7,2
5.
3.
4.
4.
2.

5
8
5
6
8

2.
2.
2.
1.
.

6
5
0
7
8

2. 0
1. 0
.9

T o t a l ---------------------------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r of e m p l o y e e s --------------------------------------------

4, 021

11,910

13,965

5 ,2 0 0

A v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r y -----------------------------------------

$83 9

$1 , 012

$1,222

$ 1 ,4 5 2

See foo t no t e at end of ta b l e .




( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s by mon th ly s a la r y ,
M a r c h 1 97 4)

United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and Ha w ai i,

J o b an al y st s

D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l

Mo nt hl y s a la r y
I

II

III

IV

$ 550 and und er $ 57 5 --------------------------------------------$ 57 5 and und er $ 60 0 --------------------------------------------

1 .8

.
-

-

-

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

und er
und er
un de r
un d er

$ 62 5
$65 0
$ 67 5
$ 70 0

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
3. 6
1.8

_
1. 3

-

_
-

$700
$ 725
$ 750
$ 775

and
and
and
and

un de r
un d er
un d er
und er

$ 72 5
$ 75 0
$775
$ 80 0

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5.
3.
14.
14.

5
6
5
5

2.
1.
3.
3.

4
3
7
7

-

-

$800
$825
$ 85 0
$875

and
and
and
and

und er
und er
un de r
und er

$ 82 5
$85 0
$875
$90 0

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

12. 7
12. 7
10. 9
1 .8

4.
5.
4.
6.

4
7
7
1

(2 .4)
2. 2
.9
2. 1

_

$ 90 0
$925
$ 95 0
$ 97 5

and
and
and
and

unde r
und er
un de r
un d er

$ 92 5 -------------------------------------------$ 95 0 -------------------------------------------$ 9 7 5 -------------------------------------------$ 1, 000 ----------------------------------------

7. 3
1 .8
5. 5

II

III

IV

.

-

I

-

_
-

3.
2.
4.
5.

0
7
4
2

_
_
(1 .2)

9.
7.
7.
8.
9.

5
0
1
6
2

2 .8
1 .0
3. 8
7. 5

5
6
1
7
2

1, 000
1 ,0 5 0
1, 100
1, 150
1, 200

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
un de r
und er
und er
und er

$
$
$
$
$

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,

0 50
100
150
200
250

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
1 .8
-

13. 1
7. 1
4. 4
5. 1
1 .0

$
$
$
$
$

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
und er
un de r
und er
un de r

$
$
$
$
$

1, 300
1, 350
1 ,4 0 0
1, 450
1, 500

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

5. 1
(1 .0)
-

-

"

11.
4.
10.
4.
2.

$
$
$
$
$

1, 500
1, 550
1, 600
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un de r
un de r
un de r
und er

$ 1, 550
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1, 700
$ 1, 750

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

1. 5
(1 .3)
-

-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1, 7 50
1 ,8 0 0
1 ,8 5 0
1 ,9 0 0
1, 950

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un de r
und er
und er
un de r

$
$
$
$
$

-----------------------------------— -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

_
-

$ 2 ,0 0 0
$ 2, 050
$ 2 , 100
$2,150
$ 2, 200

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
un de r
un de r
und er

$ 2,
$2 ,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,

0 50
100
150
200
250

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

_
_
_

-

-

-

$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un de r
un d er
und er
und er

$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,

300
350
400
450
500

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
unde r
un d er

$ 2, 600
$ 2, 700
$ 2, 800
$2,900
$ 3 ,0 0 0

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

-

-

-

-

and
and
and
and

und er
un d er
und er
over

$ 3, 100 -----------------------------------$ 3, 200 -----------------------------------$ 3, 300 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$3,
$3,
$ 3,
$ 3,

000
100
200
300

T o t a l ---------------------------------------------------------------

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
_
-

!

_
-

_

.

_
_

_
_

--

1 .9
_
2. 0
3. 5

.

-

_
_

„
_
_

-

-

2.2

1 .6
1. 5
2. 5
1 .6
5. 2

_
_
_
_
1 .7

9. 3
7.9
7. 5
7.9
8.7

8.
13.
6.
6.
4.

3
6
3
2
6

7.
7.
5.
9.
8.

7
2
1
4
5

1.
.
1.
3.
3.

4. 8
3. 8
6. 6
. 5
-

5.
3.
3.
1 2.
5.

4
8
1
2
4

2. 7
2. 5
3. 6
1 .6
8. 0

5.1
7.9
11.7
5. 5

2. 8
1 .6
2. 4
(3 .0)

3. 2
1. 3
(.8)

-

-

-

_

_
_
_

-

3. 5
4 .9
5. 4
14. 4
4. 4

-

2, 50 0
2, 600
2, 700
2, 800
2,900

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,8 0 0
1 ,8 5 0
1, 900
1 ,9 5 0
2 ,0 0 0

-

_

-

9.8
1 1. 8
6. 4
2. 0

$
$
$
$
$

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

_
_
_
_

_
_

.

-

-

.

.

_
_

_
_
_
-

5
5
3
7
9

(0. 2 )
5. 1
1 .5
1 .9

.9
3. 7
3. 1
1. 7
1 .7

4.
3.
5.
2.
3.

4
1
0
0
5

.
5.
6.
3.
4.

1. 1
. 1
.4
.9
. 1

5.
8.
3.
5.
2.

1
3
9
1
2

5. 1
2 .9
1 .0
4. 6
6. 1

1. 1
1. 3
1 .0
1. 1
(1 .6)

3.
1.
2.
1.
6.

8
3
1
3
2

2.
3.
1.
.
4.

_

_

.

_
_

_
_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

.

_

_

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

4. 5
.6
5. 2
(1 .7)

5
3
3
6
4

2
9
5
7
1

7. 7
7. 0
5 .8
4. 8
4. 6
3. 4
1. 5
1 .0
3. 4

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

—

55

297

676

494

1,114

1 ,9 2 4

1 ,0 8 9

413

A v e r a g e m on t hl y s a l a r y ----------------------------------------

$ 815

$95 7

$ 1, 160

$ 1,439

$1,316

$ 1 ,5 6 8

$ 2, 007

$ 2 , 345

Number of em ployees

-




— — —

—

100. 0

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s b y m o n t h ly s a l a r y ,
M a r c h 1974)

United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and Ha w ai i, 1

Chemists
M on th ly s a l a r y
I

_

-

-

(0. 5)
1. 1
2. 8

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

6. 2
5. 6
1 1. 2
6. 3

2. 0
3.4
3. 6
4. 7

(1.3)
l. i
1 -5

-

-

_
-

-

-

"

-

7.
7.
7.
7.

1
1
7
4

5.9
5. 6
7. 3
6. 2

2. 0
2. 1
2 .5
3. 0

_
(i-o)

-

_
-

_
-

1 1. 2
6. 1
1.3
(• 8)

13. 7
1 1. 7
8 .2
7. 1
7. 3

1. 8
1 .4
3 .7
4. 7
6. 6

_
(1 .9 )

_
-

5. 0
2. 3
(1.7)
-

1 .9
5.9
5. 7
2 .9

$800
$ 82 5
$ 85 0
$87 5

and
and
and
and

unde r
und er
unde r
und er

$ 82 5
$85 0
$ 875
$ 90 0

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 90 0
$92 5
$ 95 0
$97 5

and
and
and
and

under
und er
und er
und er

$92 5 ---------------------------------------------$ 95 0 ---------------------------------------------$ 975 ---------------------------------------------$ 1 , 0 0 0 -----------------------------------------

000
050
100
150
200

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
un d er
und er
und er

$ 1 , 050 -------------------------------------$ 1 , 1 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 1, 1 5 0 ------------------------------------$ 1 , 2 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 1, 250 --------------------------------------

1 ,2 5 0
1, 300
1, 350
1 ,4 0 0
1, 450

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
un de r
und er
und er

$1,300
$ 1 , 350
$1 , 400
$1,450
$ 1, 500

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-

$ 1, 500
$ 1, 550
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1, 65 0
$1 , 700

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un d er
un de r
und er
und er

$ 1, 5 50 -------------------------------------$ 1, 600 -------------------------------------$ 1, 650 -------------------------------------$ 1 ,7 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 1, 7 5 0 --------------------------------------

-

$ 1, 750
$1,800
$1 , 850
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
un de r
und er
un d er
under

$1 ,
$1,
$1 ,
$ 1,
$ 2,

$ 2, 000
$ 2 , 050
$2 , 100
$ 2, 15 0
$2,200

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
und er
und er
und er
under

$ 2 , 050 ------------------------------------$2, 1 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 2, 1 5 0 ------------------------------------$ 2, 2 00 -------------------------------------$ 2 , 2 5 0 -------------------------------------

$2,250
$ 2 , 300
$ 2, 350
$2, 400
$ 2, 450

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
un de r
und er

$ 2,
$ 2,
$2,
$2,
$ 2,

3 00
350
400
450
500

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 2, 500
$ 2, 600
$ 2, 700
$ 2, 800
$2,900

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
un de r
und er

$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$2 ,
$3 ,

600
700
800
900
000

--------------------------------------------------------------------------— ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 1
--------------------------------------

$ 3,
$3 ,
$ 3,
$ 3,
$3 ,

000
100
2 00
300
400

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
und er

$3 , 1 0 0 ------------------------------------$ 3, 2 00 -------------------------------------$ 3 , 3 00 -------------------------------------$ 3, 400 -------------------------------------$ 3, 500 --------------------------------------

$ 3,
$ 3,
$3,
$ 3,
$3,

500
600
700
800
900

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
und er
und er
und er
und er

$3,
$ 3,
$3,
$ 3,
$ 4,

-------------------------------------- !
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 4, 000 and und er $ 4 , 1 0 0 -------------------------------------$ 4, 100 and o v e r ---------------------------------------------------

T ota 1 ----------------------------------------------------------------

.

-

_
-

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

600
700
800
900
000

-

"

$ 72 5
$ 75 0
$77 5
$80 0

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VIII

_
-

-

und er
und er
unde r
unde r

800
850
900
95 0
000

VII
_
-

_
-

and
and
and
and

$
$
$
$
$

VI

"

$70 0
$ 725
$ 75 0
$77 5

_

4
6
1
7

_
-

-

_
-

0.
1.
1.
2.

-

V

IV

_
-

Un der $ 62 5 --------------------------------------------------------------$62 5 and und er $ 6 5 0 --------------------------------------------- $ 65 0 and und er $ 6 7 5 ----------------------------------------------$ 67 5 and und er $ 70 0 ----------------------------------------------

$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

III

II

!
1

!

i

10. 3
8. 9
1 1.2
9- 8
9 .3

-

9.4
6. 6
7. 4
5. 4
3. 4

-

|

|

2.2
1. 1
(1.5)

_

1

1
1

!
-

-

-

0
4
8
7
1

1. 1
2. 0
2. 8
6. 0
5 .2

_
(0.7)
1 .0
.7
1.3

-

6.
7.
5.
5.
4.

9
7
5
5
8

6. 8
8- 9
7.9
7. 3
8. 0

1 .4
2. 6
2. 6
3. 6
4. 8

_

8.
6.
5.
4.
5.

3
9
7
7
7

4.
7.
6.
8.
6.

2
1
4
5
8

3. 1
2. 2
1. 7
1 .2
1.3

6.
7.
7.
3.
4.

4
7
0
1
8

-

2 .5
1. 9
1. 0
(2.1)

-

"

-

“

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

"

-

"

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1. 0
(2 .4)

-

-

-

-

_
"

_
-

_
-

”
"
|
"

_

_
-

8.
8.
9.
6.
10.

-

-

_
-

-

-

1

4. 2
4.2
2. 5
2o 0
1. 2

-

_

(1.0)
1. 0
1 .7
. 5
1.
3.
2.
4.
5.

j

j

1. 6
(3.6)
-

-

1

-

"

1
8
8
3
9

1.9
. 7
1 .2
1.7
2. 9

8.
3.
5.
4.
3.

2. 9
3. 2
2. 2
4. 9

3
5
9
2
0

9. 7
5. 4
4.9
2. 8
1. 0

8.
5.
10.
7.
10.

0
3
9
3
7

13.
5.
4o
1.
.

1
1
1
7
2

_

_

_

"

-

-

1 .9
1 .2
.5
1 .3
.4

-

-

_

_
-

2. 2
(. 7)
-

-

"

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

~

_

_
-

j

"
-

100. 0

100. 0

1
j

-

100. 0

100. 0

“

100. 0

100. 0

(0.7)

3 .3
5. 1
2. 4
5 .9
4. 4

-

-

_

100. 0

2. 4
1.2
1 .5
. 5
1. 0
1. 5
2. 4

100. 0

N u m b e r of e m p l o y e e s --------------------------------------------

1 ,7 1 9

4, 085

9, 540

12, 161

8, 725

4, 191

1, 564

412

A v e r a g e m on t h ly s a l a r y - ---------------------------------------

$88 8

$ 1, 034

$ 1, 191

$1 , 440

$ 1 , 725

$2,007

$ 2, 350

$ 2 , 873

See foo tn ot e at end o f ta b l e .




( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s by m on th ly s a la r y ,
M a r c h 1 97 4)

United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and Ha w ai i, 1

Engineers
Month ly s a l a r y
I
Unde r $ 6 2 5 -------------------------------------------------------------$ 6 2 5 and un d er $ 65 0 ---------------------------------------------$ 65 0 and unde r $ 67 5 ----------------------------------- ---------$ 6 7 5 and und er $ 70 0 ---------------------------------------------$ 700
$ 725
$ 750
$775

and
and
and
and

und er
und er
un d er
und er

$ 7 25
$ 750
$ 775
$ 80 0

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 800
$825
$ 85 0
$875

and
and
and
and

un d er
un d er
un d er
un de r

$ 82 5 --------------------------------------------$ 85 0 -------------------------------------------$ 8 7 5 -------------------------------------------$ 90 0 --------------------------------------------

$900
$925
$950
$ 97 5

and
and
and
and

und er
un d er
un d er
und er

$ 92 5 -------------------------------------------$ 95 0 -------------------------------------------$ 97 5 -------------------------------------------$ 1 ,0 0 0 ---------------------------------------

III

II

IV

V

VI

VII

VIII

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(1. 6)
1. 1

_
-

-

-

.
-

-

"

-

1. 7
1.8
4. 5
4. 2

(2. 5)
1. 1

-

-

-

-

(1 .7)
1 .0
1. 2

-

-

-

-

-

*

9.
9.
12.
12.

4
7
1
1

-

3.
3.
5.
6.

9
6
6
3

1

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,0 0 0
1, 050
1, 100
1, 150
1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
un de r
un de r
unde r
und er

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,0 5 0
1, 100
1, 150
1, 200
1 ,2 5 0

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

15. 7
9.9
7. 2
3. 8
2. 6

17. 0
15. 2
13. 2
10. 1
7.9

4. 0
6. 7
9. 3
1 1.8
1 2.8

(1 .5)
1.7
2. 5
4. 0

(1 .1)

$
$
$
$
$

1, 250
1 ,3 0 0
1, 350
1 ,4 0 0
1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un de r
unddr
un d er
un d er

$
$
$
$
$

1, 300
1, 350
1 ,4 0 0
1 ,4 5 0
1 ,5 0 0

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. 5
(1 .1)
-

4. 9
3. 6
2. 1
1 .8
(1 .4)

12. 0
10. 5
8. 3
6 .8
5. 3

6. 0
8 .4
9 .4
10. 0
10. 0

1. 1
1 .9
2. 7
3. 7
4. 6

(1 .4)
1. 1

$
$
$
$
$

1, 500
1, 550
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1, 700

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
un d er
unde r
un de r
un de r

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1, 650
1 ,7 0 0
1, 750

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

4. 3
2. 1
1. 1
(i.o )

"

-

9 .4
8. 2
6. 6
6. 2
5. 0

7. 1
8. 1
8. 7
10. 0
8.8

1 .9
2. 5
3. 5
4. 1
6. 9

_
(1 .7)
1. 3
1.4

$
$
$
$
$

1, 750
1, 800
1 ,8 5 0
1 ,9 0 0
1 ,9 50

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un d er
un de r
und er
un d er

$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0
$ 2,000

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

.
-

.
-

_
-

4. 1
2. 8
1. 7
(2 .6)

8.
7.
5.
5.
4.

6. 7
6.7
6. 5
6. 2
7. 0

1 .9
3. 6
4. 9
5. 4
5. 7

_
-

-

3. 2
2. 5
1 .8
1 .4
(2 .7)

6.
6.
5.
4.
4.

5
3
4
7
9

7.
5.
5.
5.
5.

3
7
8
5
1

-

_
-

4. 0
3. 0
2. 7
1.9
1.9

5.
4.
4.
3.
3.

2
8
2
6
6

-

-

2 .3

6.9
5. 4
3. 8
2. 6
2. 0

9. 6
7. 4
6 .8
4. 8
5. 7

(2 .7)
-

3 .9
3. 2
2. 7
2. 0
1. 7

-

-

$2,
$ 2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

000
050
100
150
200

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
und er
und er
un de r
un de r

$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$2,

050
100
150
200
250

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

$2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un de r
un d er
un d er
und er

$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,
$ 2,

300
350
400
450
500

------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_
-

$
$
$
$
$

2,
2,
2,
2,
2,

500
600
7 00
8 00
900

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
un d er
un de r
un de r
und er

$
$
$
$
$

2,
2,
2,
2,
3,

600
700
8 00
900
000

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$3,
$3,
$ 3,
$ 3,
$ 3,

000
100
200
300
400

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
un de r
un de r
un de r

$ 3,
$3,
$ 3,
$ 3,
$ 3,

100
200
300
400
500

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 3, 500
$ 3, 600
$ 3, 700
$3,800
$ 3, 900

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
un de r
un de r
und er
und er

$ 3 , 600
$ 3, 700
$ 3, 800
$3,900
$ 4, 000

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

1
i

1
-

!

3
1
8
2
2

!

-

1* 1
(i.o )
-

_
-

j

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

.

.
-

-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

_

.

_

_

_

"

$ 4, 000 and und er $ 4, 100 ------------------------------------$ 4 , 100 and o v e r -----------------------------------------------------

_

'

■

■

"

-

_
(1 .1)
1. 1
1 .6
2. 0
|

1.8
1 .6
1.8
2. 3
4. 4
4.
7.
3.
5.
8.

9
4
9
2
1

-

_
-

!
i

1.8
(3 .4)
-

_

T o t a l ---------------------------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r of e m p l o y e e s --------------------------------------------

15, 358

30,532

83, 255

113, 436

81,652

44, 283

16, 593

3, 688

A v e r a g e m on t h ly s a l a r y ----------------------------------------

$ 99 2

$ 1 ,0 9 8

$ 1 ,2 6 3

$ 1, 494

$ 1 , 721

$ 1, 986

$ 2 , 247

$ 2, 622

1

For

scope

of study,

s e e t abl e in ap pe n di x A.

NOTE:
T o a vo i d sho w in g s m a l l p r o p o r t i o n s o f e m p l o y e e s s c a t t e r e d at o r ne a r the e x t r e m e s of the d i s t r ib u t io n f o r s o m e o c c u p a t i o n s , the
p e r c e n t a g e s o f e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e in t e r v a l s have b e en a c c u m u l a t e d and a r e show n in the i n t e r v a l a bo v e o r be lo w the e x t r e m e in te r v a l co nt ain ing
at le a st 1 p e r c e n t .
T he p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e s e e m p l o y e e s a r e show n in p a r e n t h e s e s .
B e c a u s e o f rou nd in g, su m s o f ind ivi du a l i t e m s ma y
not eq ual 100.




( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d t e c h n i c a l su p po r t o c c u p a t io n s and key pu n ch s u p e r v i s o r s b y m o n t h ly s a la r y ,
and H a w ai i,1 M a r c h , 1974)
E n g i n e e r in g t e ch n i ci a n s

D raftertracers

M on t hl y s a l a r y
I
U nd er $40 0

III

-

--------------

II
-

IV

V

-

-

-

$40 0
$42 5
$45 0
$475

and
and
and
and

un d er
un d er
un d er
un d er

$42 5
$450
$475
$50 0

$500
$525
$55 0
$575

and
and
and
and

un d er
un d er
un d er
un d er

$525
$55 0
$575
$600

8.
3.
6.
5.

3
6
7
3

$600
$625
$65 0
$67 5

and
and
and
and

un d er
un d er
under
un d er

$625
$65 0
$67 5
$70 0

9.
10.
8.
7.

5
4
8
1

4.
4.
6.
6.

8
3
5
8

(0.
1.
2.
3.

5)
0
8
8

$70 0
$72 5
$75 0
$77 5

and
and
and
and

un d er
un de r
un d er
un d er

$72 5
$75 0
$77 5
$80 0

7.
4.
5.
6.

0
4
3
9

10.
8.
8.
9.

5
6
6
3

4.
5.
5.
6.

3
6
8
4

(0.
1.
2.
2.

9)
1
2
4

$80 0
$82 5
$ 85 0
$87 5

and
and
and
and

un d er
un d er
under
un d er

$82 5
$85 0
$87 5
$900

1.
1.
2.
2.

6
3
2
2

6.
6.
4.
3.

8
5
2
2

6.
8.
7.
7.

9
4
7
1

3.
3.
4.
5.

0
5
5
2

(o.
1.
1.
1.

9)
5
8
6

$90 0
$92 5
$95 0
$97 5

and
and
and
and

un de r
un d er
un d er
un d er

$92 5 $95 0 $97 5 $1, 000

2.
2.
1.
.

1
2
5
7

6.
6.
5.
4.

7
5
2
7

6.
6.
8.
10.

5
5
4
5

2.
2.
4.
4.

9
0
1
5

6. 9
4. 8
2. 3
1. 4
(1 . 4 )

13.
10.
8.
5.
3.

2
1
4
2
9

10.
11.
14.
10.
9.

9
7
2
7
2

1,
$1,
$ 1,
$1,
$ 1,

000
050
100
150
200

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
und er
un de r
un de r
und er

$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,

050
100
150
200
250

$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
un de r
und er
un de r
un de r

$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,

300
350
400
450
500

$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,

500
550
600
650
700

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
un de r
un d er
un d er
un d er

$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,
$1,

8)
4
8
0

-

_

550
600
650
700
750

$

-

_
_
-

D rafters
I

II

-

-

2. 5

(0.
1.
.
2.

1. 9
1. 4
(1. 0)

United States e x c e p t Al a s k a

III
-

3.
2.
6.
7.
10.
4.
8.
7.

3. 0
1. 9
(.8)
-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

-

-

-

'

_

.

-

-

2. 9
(1.6)
_

_

8
7
6
8

9
2
5
2

7.
6.
11.
8.

8
1
0
3

1.
1.
2.
3.

7
8
7
0

7.
6.
5.
5.

5
9
0
3

3.
5.
6.
7.

7
2
7
7

4.
4.
3.
2.

9
8
5
6

6.
6.
6.
6.

6
7
6
2

2.
3.
4.
3.

7
0
4
4

3. 0
. 8
1. 0
(3.3)

5.
5.
5.
3.

9
4
1
8

5.
5.
5.
5.

4
1
3
6

6. 7
5. 2
2. 3
1 .4
1. 0

10.
9.
3.
6.
3.

2
7
1
8
9

1. 1
(1.2)
-

2.
2.
2.
1.
1.

9
0
6
3
8

2.
1.
1.
1.
1.

0
8
3
8
2

.

4)
0
1
7

_
-

-

6. 7
7. 4
4. 4
4. 1
(1 . 5 )

_
-

2.
2.
4.
3.

2. 3
1. 5
1. 1
(5.4)

-

6
6
6
7

8.
10.
10.
6.

_
(2. 1)
2. 7
2. 9

6
7
2
4

(0.
1.
1.
1.

_
_
(2.3)

-

_

-

1. 1

$ 1, 750 and o v e r
T otal
N u m b e r of e m p l o y e e s
A v e r a g e m on t h ly s a l a r y ----

See f oo t n ot e at end o f t a bl e .




_
(2.5)
2. 0
2. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

4, 039

12, 810

26, 151

$6 65

$760

$87 4

31, 853

1 8, 247

5, 425

18, 350

28, 581

31, 067

$998

$ 1, 13 8

$ 587

$ 709

$870

$1, 089

100. 0

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d t e c h n i c a l su p po r t o c c u p a t i o n s and key pu n ch s u p e r v i s o r s b y m o n t h ly s a la r y ,
H a w a i i, 1 M a r c h 1974)
Computer Operators

United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and

Ke yp un ch s u p e r v i s o r s

M on t h l y s a l a r y
I
Un de r $375
$3 75 and unde r
$400 and unde r
$425 and und er
$450 and un de r
$475 and unde r

$ 400
$425
$450
$47 5
$50 0

-

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

unde r
und er
un de r
und er

$52 5
$550
$5 75
$600

-

11.
12.
12.
4.

$600
$62 5
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
un d er
unde r
unde r

$62 5
$65 0
$675
$700

-

$700
$72 5
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

unde r
und er
un de r
un de r

$725
$75 0
$77 5
$80 0

-

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

un de r
unde r
un de r
un de r

$82 5
$85 0
$87 5
$90 0

-

$900
$92 5
$95 0
$975

and
and
and
and

und er
un de r
unde r
unde r

II

$92 5 $95 0 $97 5 $1, 000

$1,
$ 1,
$1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

1.2
2. 7
1. 0
4. 0
4. 5
8. 4

-

III

V

VI
-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
1. 3
3. 4

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

7
7
8
6

7.
6.
7.
3.

4
0
3
2

8.
7.
8.
8.

5
3
7
4

5.
5.
8.
6.

7
3
9
6

1.
2.
5.
4.

8
8
4
6

3.
3.
2.
1.

0
2
3
2

5.
5.
3.
3.

5
6
9
1

8.
7.
7.
5.

3
7
7
4

4.
5.
4.
5.

1
7
6
0

4.
4.
4.
5.

1.
2.
1.
1.

5
2
1
3

5.
5.
4.
3.

2
0
0
4

6.
7.
6.
6.

4
6
1
3

6. 3
5. 4
5 .:
5. 4

4.
7.
1.
4.

(2. 5)
-

3.
2.
1.
1.

4
4
9
6

7.
4.
4.
4.

3
8
2
2

4.
8.
5.
4.

8
2
4
9

2. 0
1. 0
(1.2)
-

5.
4.
2.
1.
1.

7
1
9
6
1

9.
6.
3.
2.
1.

-

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un d er
un d er
und er
un d er

$1,
$1,
$1,
$ 1,
$1,

-

300
350
400
450
500

$ 1, 500 and un d er $1, 550
$ 1, 5 50 and un d er $1, 600
$1, 600 and un d er $1, 650

-

_
(2. 3)

(1.4)
-

_
_

(1.5)
2. 1
2. 2
3. 2

.
4.
2.
1.

9
6
7
9

8.
5.
10.
6.

7
2
2
9

3.
5.
7.
7.

8
1
4
3

(0.5)
1. 0
4. 9
4. 5

2.
5.
4.
6.

1
1
6
0

8.
7.
4.
6.

8
8
0
0

3. 1
1 .2
4. 7
4. 0

0
7
7
3

5.
13.
3.
1.

6
4
3
8

3.
3.
4.
2.

8
5
8
9

7. 3
10. 3
3. 0
4 .1

1.
6.
5.
5.

6
0
5
2

1. 6
1. 6

3.
6.
5.
6.

9
9
1
5

1.
1.
5.
.

3
1
5
2

4.
3.
2.
2.

1
3
5
7

11.
5.
5.
5.

2
0
0
1

1.
4.
8.
4.

0
4
8
9

9.
7.
3.
6.

7
3
6
2
6

10.
13.
8.
6.
8.

3
4
9
0
7

. 9
1. 4
1. 1
(• 8)
-

4.
1.
2.
1.
2.

3
7
3
4
2

4.
6.
2.
3.
2.

8
7
7
0
3

10.
9.
4.
7.
3.

9
1
9
5
4

17, 2
7. 8
14. 1
1. 6
-

2. 9
1. 0
(2. 2)
-

2.
.
.
3.
'

9
7
8
9

-

_
(2. 4)
1. 6
2. 1
5
8
2
2

_
(0. 8)
2. 0
1. 7

■-

_
-

(1.4)
-

.

-

_

_

_
-

1. 0
1. 6
(3. 1)
_
-

4. 2
3. 6
1 0. 1
2. 9
(1.3)

1. 6

_

4.
1.
3.
4.
4.

4
8
1
3

7
6
1
7
7

-

3. 1

"

"

4. 7

_

_

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

_

_
(1. 8)
2. 9

-

-

-

-

-

1.
2.
2.
3.

$ 1, 250
$1, 300
$ 1, 350
$ 1, 400
$ 1 ,4 5 0

V

_

6
2
2
5

$1, 050
$1, 100
$1, 150
$1,200
$1, 250

IV

-

6.
7.
8.
8.

un d er
un d er
unde r
un d er
un de r

III

_

9
6
7
3

and
and
and
and
and

II

2)
6
1
0

(2. 8)
-

I

(0.5)
1. 1
1. 0

(1.
2.
2.
4.

000
050
100
150
200

100. 0

T otal

N u m b e r of e m p l o y e e s

IV

—

A v e r a g e m on th ly s a l a r y

F o r s c o p e of study,

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

4, 488

10, 467

19, 717

11, 498

2, 901

768

1, 277

2, 081

1, 143

385

64

$573

$63 6

$741

$ 857

$92 5

$1, 034

$73 7

$79 6

$91 7

$1, 067

$1, 129

100. 0

100. 0

se e table in a pp en di x A,

N O T E : T o a v o i d sh ow in g s m a ll p r o p o r t i o n s of e m p l o y e e s s c a t t e r e d at o r ne a r the e x t r e m e s of the d i s t r ib u t io n s f o r s o m e o c c u p a t i o n s , the p e r ­
c e n t a g e s of e m p l o y e e s in th e se in t e r v a l s ha ve b e e n a c c u m u l a t e d and ar e show n in the in te r v a l a b o v e o r b e l o w the e x t r e m e in te r v a l con ta in in g at
le a s t 1 p e r c e n t .
The p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n t i n g t hes e e m p l o y e e s a r e sh ow n in p a r e n t h e s e s . B e c a u s e of roun din g, su m s of in div id ua l it e m s m a y not
equ al 100.




( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s ,

W eekly salary

I
U nd er $ 70 -----------------------------------------$ 70 and und er $ 7 5 ---------------------------$ 75
$8 0
$85
$9 0
$9 5

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
und er

$ 80 --------------------------$ 85 --------------------------$ 90 --------------------------$ 9 5 --------------------------$ 1 0 0 -------------------------

_
(0.
Z.
2.
4.
5.

9)
7
2
9
4
7
2
4
4
0

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
und er

$ 105
$11 0
$115
$ 1Z0
$125

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.
6.
8.
7.
9.

$ 1Z5
$130
$135
$140
$145

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
und er
und er
unde r
un d er

$ 13 0
$135
$ 14 0
$145
$150

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6 .9
6. 7
5. 3
4. 4
3 .9

$ 15 0
$ 16 0
$ 17 0
$ 18 0
$ 19 0

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
und er
un d er

$ 16 0
$170
$180
$ 19 0
$Z00

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5.
2.
2.
2.
2.

$ Z00
$ Z1 0
$ 2Z 0
$ Z30
$ Z4 0

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un de r
und er
und er
unde r

$Z10
$Z20
$ Z30
$Z40
$ 25 0

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------

United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and H a w a i i , 1 M a r c h 1 97 4)
K e yp u n ch
operators

C lerks,
file

II

$ 100
$1 0 5
$110
$ 115
$ 1 Z0

$ Z50 and o v e r

by w e e k l y s a l a r y ,

--------------------- C l e r k s , ------------------a cc ou n ti n g
I

II

III

I

.

1. 1
3. 5

.

.

.

(1.8)
_

(0.9)
1 .9
3. 5
5. 4
5. 7

-

(1.6)
1.
2.
2.
3.
4.

2
2
4
7
8

4. 7
6.0
6. 2
6. 5
5. 5

5
1
0
0
2

1.
7.
8.
12.
12.

3
1
3
0
7

(2.6)
2. 2
4. 4

13.
9.
6.
3.
2.

0
1
5
6
7

10. 0
8.8
7. 3
7.9
5. 1

4. 1
4. 3
8 .0
9. 9
7. 1

1. 6
1. 1
(3.0)

3 .8
2. 5
2. 4
1. 3
1. 2

-

-

11.4
10. 3
6.9
6. 0
4. 0

(2.7)

-

4. 3
3. 6
3. 5
1 .7
1 .9

-

_

1 .6

_

-

2. 6
1.4
1 .0
(1.6)
_

(2*2)

-

5.
10.
13.
14.
12.

6
9
6
2
0

-

Messengers
II

-

_
-

(1.0)
1. 5

9.
7.
9.
8.
8.

3
4
0
6
5

2.
3.
4.
6.
7.

6.
6.
4.
4.
2.

9
7
6
2
4

7. 4
8. 7
7. 7
8.9
6.8

6. 8
4. 4
2. 3
1.9
1. 3

5. 1
2. 6
2. 0
1. 1
1 .4

9. 7
7 .4
4. 5
4. 5
3. 0

1. 7
1. 5
1. 2
(1.7)

2. 1
1.0
(1.2)

1. 5
1. 1
(-3)

1 .9
1. 7
(1.3)

_

10.
8.
8.
5.
3.

5
2
5
5
6

4
2
4
7
6

2. 5
8. 2
8 .8
10. 6
9. 2
10. 8
8 .4
6. 9
7. 2
6. 2
3.
3.
2.
1.
1.

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

_

6
8
3
6
6

-

_

T o t a l ----------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s ---------------------

92, 282

69,323

26,099

22, 814

8, 357

63, 909

45, 157

25, 435

A v e r a g e w ee k l y s a l a r y -------------------

$ 127

$ 161

$ 98

$10 8

$ 133

$ 124

$ 144

$ 108

See fo ot n ot e at end of ta b l e.




( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s ,

by w e e k l y s a l a r y ,

United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and Hawaii* 1 M a r c h 1 97 4)

Secretaries

Stenog­
raphers,
general

W e e k l y s a la r y
I
U n d er $ 8 0 ---------------------------------------$ 8 0 and un d er $ 8 5 ------------------------$ 8 5 and un d er $ 9 0 ------------------------$ 90 and un d er $ 9 5 ------------------------$ 9 5 and un d er $ 1 0 0 -----------------------

III

II

_

_

(1.9)

-

_
-

IV
_

-

V

.
-

.

(l.D

-

-

and
and
a nd
and
and

un d er
un d er
u n d er
un d er
un d er

$105
$ 110
$ 11 5
$ 1 20
$125

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2.
2.
3.
5.
7.

2
7
3
8
0

1 .0
.9
1.6
2. 9
4. 5

_
(2 .1)
1. 1
2. 0
2. 0

_
(2 .3)
1 .0

_
_
-

$125
$130
$135
$140
$ 1 45

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
un de r
un de r
un de r
un de r

$ 13 0
$ 13 5
$ 14 0
$145
$ 1 50

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

7. 2
7. 6
7. 6
7.9
6.8

4. 6
6 .4
6. 0
7. 1
7. 2

2.9
3. 7
4. 5
5. 7
5. 4

1 .8
2. 5
2.8
3. 3
3. 7

(2 .7)
1 .5
1 .4
1 .7
2. 3

6. 3
7.7
5. 9
5. 0
4. 6

$ 1 50
$ 160
$ 170
$180
$190

and
and
and
and
and

un de r
un de r
un d er
un d er
und er

$ 16 0
$ 17 0
$ 180
$ 19 0
$ 20 0

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

12.
10.
6.
4.
3.

13. 2
11.8
8 .9
7.9
5. 6

12. 3
13. 0
11.4
9. 9
7. 6

8 .6
1 1. 8
11.0
11. 1
9. 1

6.
8.
8.
10.
9.

7.
5.
4.
2.
2.

$200
$210
$220
$230
$ 240

and
and
and
and
and

und er
un d er
und er
un de r
under

$ 21 0
$220
$ 23 0
$ 24 0
$250

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 .8
(1 .9)
-

4. 3
2. 6
1 .3

6.8
4. 6
2. 3
1 .4
.6

7 .9
7. 2
5. 2
3. 8
3. 0

$ 250
$ 260
$270
$280
$ 290

and
and
and
and
and

und er $ 26 0 -------------------un d er $ 27 0 -------------------und er $ 28 0 -------------------un d er $ 29 0 -------------------o v e r ---------------------------------

(l.D

.
-

_
-

-

-

(.7 )
-

1 .5
1.2
(1 .4)
-

-

6.
6.
6.
8.
8.

-

2
5
5
1
4

9. 5
10. 0
7. 0
5. 7
3 .8
3 .9
2. 8
1 .5
1 .6
2. 0

3
9
1
5
3

6
4
3
8
1

2. 0
.9
(.4 )

.

T y p is t s
I

II

1 .3
3. 6
6. 5
10. 3
9. 9

(0 .3)
1 .6
2. 5
3. 6

3
2
7
0
7

12. 0
10. 5
9. 3
8 .6
7. 3

7 .0
7. 5
8 .0
10. 2
9. 6

6. 1
6.9
6.9
6. 7
6. 4

4. 7
3. 8
2. 6
1 .9
1. 7

8.
7.
6.
5.
4.

2. 6
1. 5
1. 1

6. 2
3. 6
2. 6
1. 3
1 .5

_
(1 .7)

(0 .9)
1. 5
2. 5
4. 3

$100
$ 105
$110
$ 11 5
$120

0
1
7
3
2

Ste nog raphers,
senior

1.
2.
2.
5.
6.

12.
9.
7.
6.
4.

4
5
1
6
5

3. 5
2. 3
1 .3
(-4)

(i.o)
.

_
_
_
-

_
-

_

_
_
_

-

-

-

1.4
(1 .2)
_
-

_

.
-

5
6
5
2
0

_
-

T o t a l --------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

------------------

58,370

76, 386

69, 133

44, 389

14, 180

43, 612

50,486

63, 176

39, 301

$ 158

$ 168

$ 184

$200

$ 134

$ 152

$ 11 2

$ 130

Number of em ployees

A v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r y -----------------

1

For

s c o p e o f study,

$ 146

s e e ta b l e in a pp en d ix A.

NOTE:
T o a v o i d sh ow in g s m a l l p r o p o r t i o n s o f e m p l o y e e s s c a t t e r e d at o r n e a r the e x t r e m e s o f the d i s t r ib u t io n f o r s o m e o c c u p a t i o n s , the
p e r c e n t a g e o f e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e in t e r v a l s ha ve be e n a c c u m u l a t e d and a re sh ow n in the i n t e r v a l a b o v e o r b e lo w the e x t r e m e i n t e r v a l co nt ain ing
at le a st 1 p e r c e n t .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e s e e m p l o y e e s a r e shown in p a r e n t h e s e s . B e c a u s e o f ro un din g, s u m s o f ind iv id ua l i t e m s m a y
not eq ua l 100.




( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l ,
e x c e p t A l a s k a and Ha wai i, M a r c h 1974)

Manufa ct u r in g

administrative,

te ch n i ca l,

Public
u til iti es 3

and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , 1 b y in d u s t r y di v is i o n , 2 United States

W hol e sale
trade

Ret ail
tra de

F inan ce ,
in s u r a n c e ,
and
r e a l es t a t e

S e le c t e d
services 4

P r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e
A c co u n t a n t s
-----------— ------- _
A u d it o r s
--------- ------------------------ ------- ------------C hi e f a cc ou n ta nt s
~ —
-----—
-------- ---------Attorneys
-------------------------------- ------------- --------Buyers
----- ----~ ------------------ -------------Job a na ly st s
- -------- ------ ~ ------ -------------------D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l ----------------------- ------------Chem ists
--------- — ---------------------------- ----------------------------------------- --------- -----------Engineers

68
42
64
31
88
66
67
95
75

12
15
9
21
5
8
5
( 5)
12

6
6
9
( 5)
( 5)
( 5)
9
n
( 5)

4
7
7
4
(5)
( 5)
5

8
29
7
41
( 5)
21
13

(?)
(5)

(?)
H

( 5)
(5)
7

( 5)
(5)
7

( 5)
31

12
14
( 5)

17
63
24
36
24
21
44

( 5)
(5)
( 5)
( 5)
n
(5)
(5)

( 5)
( 5)
( 5)
( 5)
( 5)
(5)
(5)
( 5)
12

T e c h n i c a l su p po rt
En g i n ee ri n g t e c h n i c i a n s - ------ - ---------------------D r a f t e r s ------------------- ------------- ~
C o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r s — ---------------- -------------------

8

79
73
43

11
10

44
20
43
36
51
53
37

15
6
11
12
10
16
9

(?)

C lerical su p ervisory
K ey p un ch s u p e r v i s o r s

------------

------------------ --------

Clerical
C l e r k s , a cc o u n ti n g - - ----- ------------- ---------- ~
C l e r k s , fi le
------------- --------------------------------K ey p un ch o p e r a t o r s --------- -------------------------M essengers
------------- ------ — ------------------------------- ----------------------- -------------------Secretaries
Stenographers
— ---------- -- -----------------------------T ypists
--------- --------- -------------------

t ri c,

10
5
11
7
6
7
5

13
4
10
5
5
( 5)
( 5)

1 Each o c c u p a t i o n in c lu d e s the w o r k l e v e l s sh ow n in table 1.
2 F o r s c o p e o f study, s e e table in ap p en d ix A.
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (l im i t e d to r a i l r o a d , l o c a l and su bu rb an p a s s e n g e r , d e e p se a w at er , and a ir t r a n s p o r t a t io n i n d u s t r ie s ) , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , e l e c ­
gas, and s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s .
* E n g i n e e ri n g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c i a l l y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t , and t e st in g l a b o r a t o r i e s only.
5 L e s s than 4 p e r c e n t .




(R e la t iv e s a l a r y l e v e l s f o r s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l ,
and Ha waii, M a r c h 1974)

administrative,

t e ch n i ca l,

and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s 1 b y in d u st r y di v is i o n , 2 United States e x c e p t A l a s k a

( A v e r a g e s a l a r y f o r ea ch o c c u p a t io n in all in d u s t r ie s = 100)
Manufa c t u r in g

O cc u p a t io n

P u b l ic
u til iti es 3

W hol e sale
tra de

101
104
103
105
100
103
99
100
100

102
106
' 101
101
106
1 06
103
( 5)
103

96
100
88
109
99

99
100
102

108
103
1 11

104
88
102

103

120

102
107
102
104
101
102
105

118
131
121
122
1 14
111
1 14

R e t a il
tra de

F inanc e,
in s u r a n c e ,
and
r e a l esta te

Selected
services 4

P r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e
Accountants
— ---------------------- ----A u d it o r s
------------- ------------- -------- ----------------------C hi e f ac co u n ta n t s ------------------------------ ------------------- ---------Attorneys —
-* - -------------- -------Buyers
—
----- —
----------------------------------Job a n al y st s
------------ --------------------------- --------------D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l ---------------- --------- -----Chemists
-------------------------------------E n g i n e e r s ------ ------- ------------------- -----

( 5)

107
( 5)
( 5)

95
96
96
100
103
( 5)

94
( 5)
( 5)

96
92
101
95
104
87
104
( 5)
( 5)

100
115
( 5)
( 5)

96
( 5)
101
101
98

T e c h n i c a l su p p or t
E n g i n e e r in g t e c h n i c i a n s ------ ------------------D rafters
- ------------------------------ — -------------------C o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r s --------------------- "

94
97

94

103
99
97

93

92

C)

90
96
94
94
94
96
101

89
94
91
90
93
87
92

101
109
104
96
105
98
108

( 5)

( 5)
( 5)

C lerical sup ervisory
K ey p un ch s u p e r v i s o r s

--------

“

------ --------

( 5)

Clerical
C l e r k s , a cc o u n ti n g
-------------- ~ * ------ ---------C l e r k s , fi le
---------—
—
- - — ----K ey p un ch o p e r a t o r s --------------------------------------------------- - -------------------M e s s e n g e r s ---------------S ecretaries
-------------------------------------- ------Stenographers
---------- -- ---------- ----------------------T y p is t s
------------- ------ ------------------------------

96
101
98
97
99
96
103

1 Each o c c u p a t io n in c lu d e s the w o r k l e v e l s show n in table 1. In co m p u t in g r e l a t i v e s a l a r y l e v e l s f o r e a ch o c c u p a t i o n b v in d u st r y d i v is i o n , the
total e m p l o y m e n t in e a c h w o r k l e v e l in all i n d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d w a s u s e d as a co ns t an t e m p l o y m e n t w e ig ht to e lm i n a t e the e f f e c t of d i f f e r e n c e s in
the p r o p o r t i o n o f e m p l o y m e n t in v a r i o u s w o r k l e v e l s withi n e a c h o c c u p a t i o n .
2 F o r s c o p e of study, se e table in ap pe n di x A.
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( l im i t e d to r a i l r o a d , l o c a l and su b ur b a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p se a w a t e r , and a i r t r a n s p o r t a t io n i n d u s t r ie s ) , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , e l e c ­
t ri c, gas and sa n it a ry s e r v i c e s .
4 E n g i n e e ri n g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c i a l l y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t , and te sti ng l a b o r a t o r i e s only.
5 I ns uf fi c ie nt e m p l o y m e n t in 1 w o r k le v e l o r m o r e to w a r r a n t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n of data.




( A v e r a g e sta nda rd w e e k l y h o u r s 1 f o r e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s 23by in du st r y d i v is i o n ,
United States e x c e p t A l a s k a and Haw aii , M a r c h 1 974)

M a nu f a ct u r in g

O cc u p a t io n

P u b l ic
ut ili ti es 4*

W h o l e s a le
tra de

Re ta il
tra de

F in a n c e ,
in su ran ce,
and
r e a l es t a t e

S e le c t e d
service s

P r o f e s s ion al and a d m i n i s t r a t iv e
A c co u n t a n t s
---------------------------------------------A u d it o r s ----------------------------------------------------C hi ef a cc ou n ta nt s -------------------------------------Attorneys
-------------------------------------------------B u y e r s -------------------------------------------------------Job a na ly st s
--------------------------------------------D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l ---------------------------Chemists
-------------------------------------------------E n g i n e e r s ---------------------------------------------------

39. 9
( 6)
39. 0

3 9. 5
39. 5
40. 0
3 9. 0
39. 5
( 6)
40. 0
( 6)
( 6)

39. 5
39. 5
39. 0

39. 5
40. 0
3 9. 0

( 6)
3 8. 5
39. 5

3 8. 5

3 9. 5

—

3 9. 5
3 8. 5
40. 5
3 8. 5
39. 5
( 6)
3 9. 0
( 6)
( 6)

40. 0
40. 0
39. 5

-

39. 0

( 6)

39. 5

3 8. 5

39.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.

39.
39.
39.
38.
39.
39.
39.

39.
39.
3 9.
39.
39.
3 9.
39.

3 8.
3 8.
3 8.
3 8.
38.
3 8.
3 7.

3 9.
3 9.
39.
3 8.
39.
3 9.
39.
39.
40.

5
0
5
5
9
5
5
5
0

39.
39.
39.
39.

5
5
0
5

39. 3
39. 9

3 8. 0
3 8. 0
3 8. 5
3 7. 5
3 8. 0
3 7. 5
38. 5
( 6)
(6)

39. 5
39. 5
( 6)
( 6)
40. 0
( 6)
40. 0
39. 5
39. 5

0

3 9. 5
40. 0
39. 5

T e c h nical sup port
En g i n e er in g t e ch n i ci a n s ----------------Drafters
------------------------------------------C o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r s ------------------------

( 6)

C l e r i c a_l s u p e r v i s o r y
Ke yp un ch s u p e r v i s o r s

---------------------

Clerical
C l e r k s , a cc ou n ti n g
C l e r k s , fi le ------------K e yp un ch o p e r a t o r s
M essengers
---------S ecretaries
---------Stenographers
------T y p i s t s ---------------------

—

5
0
5
0
0
5
5

0
0
5
5
0
5
0

39.
3 9.
3 9.
3 8.
3 8.
3 9.
3 9.

5
0
0
5
5
0
0

5
0
0
0
0
5
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
5

39.
3 9.
39.
39.
4o.
39.
3 9.

9
0
5
0
0
5
5

1 B a s e d on the st a nd a rd w o r k w e e k f o r w hi c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e th eir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a la r y .
If st a nd a rd h o u r s w e r e not a va il a b l e , the
st an dar d h o u r s a p p l ic a b l e f o r a m a j o r i t y of the o f f i c e w o r k f o r c e in the e s t a b l i s h m e n t w e r e us ed .
Th e a v e r a g e f o r e a ch job c a t e g o r y w as rou nd ed
to the n e a r e s t half h o ur .
2 Ea ch o c c u p a t i o n in c lu d e s the w o r k l e v e l s show n in table 1.
3 F o r s c o p e of study, se e table in a pp en di x A.
4 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (l i m i t e d to r a i l r o a d , l o c a l and sub ur b a n p a s s e n g e r , de e p sea w a t e r , and a i r t r a n s p o r t a t io n i n d u s t r ie s ) , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , e l e c ­
t r i c , gas , and sa n it a r y s e r v i c e s .
’ E n g i n e e r in g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c i a l l y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t , and testi ng l a b o r a t o r i e s only.
6 I ns uf fi c ie nt e m p l o y m e n t in 1 w o r k l e v e l o r m o r e to w a r r a n t se p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n of data.




Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope of survey

visited a nationwide sample o f representative establish­
ments within the scope o f the survey between January

The survey relates to establishments in the United
States, except Alaska and Hawaii, in the following
industries: Manufacturing; transportation, communica­
tion, electric, gas, and sanitary services; wholesale trade;
retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; engineer­
ing and architectural services; and commercially oper­
ated research, development, and testing laboratories.
Excluded are establishments employing fewer than the
minimum number o f workers, as indicated in the

and May. Employees were classified according to occu ­
pation and level, with the assistance o f company
officials, on the basis o f the BLS jo b definitions which
appear in appendix C. In comparing actual duties and
responsibilities o f employees with those in the survey
definitions, extensive use was made o f company occu ­
pational descriptions, organization charts, and other
personnel records.

accompanying table for each industry division, at the
time o f reference o f the universe data (generally, first
quarter o f 1971). The variable minimum employment
size, which was adopted in the 1966 survey, more nearly
equalizes the white-collar employment o f establishments
among the various industry divisions.
The estimated number o f establishments and the total
employment within scope o f this survey, and within the
samples actually studied, are shown for each major
industry division in table A -l. These estimates also are
shown separately for establishments employing 2,500
workers or more and those located in Standard Metro­
politan Statistical Areas.1

Tinning of survey and method of collection

Survey data collection was planned so that the data
would reflect an average reference period o f March
1974.2
Data were obtained b y Bureau field economists who

1The metropolitan area data in the 1974 survey relate to all
261 SMSA’s (within the 48 States surveyed) as revised through
April 1973 b y the U.S. O ffice o f Management and Budget.
Earlier surveys represented SMSA’s ranging in numbers from 188
in 1962 and earlier surveys to 229 in the surveys from 1970 to
1972.
2 The March payroll period has been used since the 1972
survey. The 1967 through 1971 surveys had a June reference
period for all occupations. Prior to the 1967 study, the average
reference period was February for clerical and drafting jobs, and
March for all other occupations. Until 1963, reports listed
“ Winter” as the reference period. From 1963 through 1966, the
more specific designation, “ February-March,” was used.




Sampling and estimating procedures

The

sampling procedures called for the

detailed

stratification o f all establishments within the scope o f
the survey b y location, industry, and size o f em ploy­
ment. From this universe, a nationwide sample o f about
3,200 establishments (not companies) was selected
systematically .3 Each industry was sampled separately,
the sampling rates depending on the employment size o f
the industry. Within each industry, a greater proportion
o f large than o f small establishments was included. In
combining the data, each establishment was weighted
according to its probability o f selection, so that unbiased
estimates were generated. To illustrate the process,
where one establishment out o f four was selected, it was
given a weight o f 4, thus representing itself plus three
others. In instances where data were not available for the
original sample member, an alternate o f the same
original probability o f selection was chosen in the same
industry-size classification. Where there was no suitable
substitution for the original sample member, the missing
unit was accounted for by assigning additional weight to
the sample member that most closely resembled the
missing unit.

3
A few o f the largest employers, together employing approxi­
mately 1,150,000 workers, gave data on a companywide basis.
These companies were eliminated from the universe to which the
preceding procedure applies. The sample count includes the
establishments o f these companies within the scope o f the
survey.

Table A -1. Number of establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied,
by industry division, March 1974
W ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y 1

S tu d ie d

W o rk e rs in

W o rk e rs in

e sta b lish m e n ts

M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t

e sta b lish m e n ts

in e sta b ­

N um ber

P ro fe ssio n a l,

N um ber

P ro fe ssio n a l,

lish m e n ts

o f e sta b ­

a d m in s-

o f esta b ­

ad m in s-

in s c o p e o f

lish m e n ts

tra tiv e ,

lish m e n ts

In d u stry d iv isio n

T o ta l

su rv e y

T o ta l

s u p e r­

tra tiv e ,
s u p e r­

v iso ry and
c le r ic a l2

United States— all
industries1 ..........................
Manufacturing...................................
Non manufacturing:
Transportation,3 communica­
tion, electric, gas, and
sanitary services........................
Wholesale tr a d e ........... ...............
Retail trade .................................
Finance, insurance and
real estate...................................
Services:
Engineering and architec­
tural services; and com­
mercially operated re­
search, development,
and testing laboratories
only .....................................
Metropolitan areas— all
industries4 ..........................
Manufacturing...................................
Nonmanufacturing:
Transportation,3 communica­
tion, electric, gas, and
sanitary services........................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail trade .................................
Finance, insurance and
real estate .................................
Services:
Engineering and architec­
tural services; and com­
mercially operated re­
search, development,
and testing laboratories
only .....................................

c le ric a l2

29,205

20,227,540

7,762,596

3,199

6,876,946

2,904,829

250

14,486

12,374,290

3,717,175

1,953

4,349,857

1,517,340

100
100
250

2,858
3,923
2,769

2,311,155
847,813
2,587,816

1,119,413
412,983
537,559

354
165
272

1,138,979
67,238
651,546

574,283
38,119
147,791

100

4,693

1,880,651

1,811,399

365

542,543

538,117

100

476

225,815

164,067

90

126,783

89,179

23,124

16,673,767

6,983,227

2,705

6,273,690

2,748,431

250

9,828

9,258,095

3,132,509

1,533

3,792,344

1,384,297

100
100
250

2,197
3,673
2,579

2,135,531
801,561
2,472,860

1,052,740
393,870
522,181

319
157
261

1,118,033
65,788
642,467

563,564
37,544
146,408

100

4,379

1,790,458

1,724,669

350

537,151

532,977

100

468

215,262

157,258

85

117,907

83,641

1,191

6,673,800

2,694,296

776

5,122,211

2,158,357

736

4,182,378

1,492,352

495

3,307,318

1,187,499

-

Establishments employing
2,500 workers or more— all
industries..........................................
Manufacturing...................................

v iso ry and

-

The study relates to establishments in industries listed, w ith total em p loym ent at or above the m inim um lim itation indicated
in the first colum n, in the U nited States except Alaska and Hawaii.
2

Includes executive, adm inistrative, professional, supervisory, and clerical employees, but excludes technicians, drafters, and

safes personnel.
3

Lim ited to railroad, local and suburban passenger, deep sea water (foreign and domestic), and air transportation industries as

defined in the 1 967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification M anual.
4

Standard M etropolitan Statistical Areas in the U nited States, except Alaska and Hawaii, as revised through A p ril 1973 by the

U.S. Office of Management and Budget.




Nature of data collected and presented

The reported salaries relate to standard salaries paid
for standard work schedules, i.e., the straight-time salary
corresponding to the em ployee’s normal work schedule
excluding overtime hours. Nonproduction bonuses are
excluded,

but cost-of-living payments and incentive

earnings are included. The average salaries presented
relate to full-time employees for whom salary data are
available.

fication. It was thus possible to estimate the proportion
o f employees in each category for whom salary data
were not available. In all but 4 o f the 84 occupational
levels surveyed, the number o f employees for whom
salary data were not available was less than 5 percent .5
Comparisions between establishments that provided
salary data for each specific occupation level and those
not doing so indicated that the two classes o f establish­
ments did not differ materially in industries represented,
employment, or salary levels for other jobs in this series

Data presented on year-to-year changes in average
salaries are subject to limitations which reflect the

for which data were available.

nature o f the data collected. Changes in average salaries

total in all establishments within the scope o f the survey

Occupational employment estimates relate to the

reflect not only general salary increases and merit or

and not the number actually surveyed. Employees for

other increases given to individuals while in the same

whom salary data were not available were not taken into

work level category, but they also may reflect other

account in the estimates.6 These estimates were derived

factors such as employee turnover, expansions or reduc­

by weighting full-time employees in the occupations

tions in the work force, and changes in staffing patterns

studied in each sample establishment in proportion to

within establishments with different salary levels. For
example, an expansion in force may increase the
proportion o f employees at the minimum o f the salary
range established for a work level, which would tend to
lower the average, whereas a reduction or a low turnover
in the work force may have the opposite effect.
Similarly, year-to-year promotions o f employees to
higher work levels o f professional and administrative
occupations may affect the average o f each level. The
established salary ranges for such occupations are rela­
tively wide, and promoted employees, who may have
been paid the maximum o f the salary scale for the lower
level, are likely to be replaced by less experienced
employees who may be paid the minimum. Occupations
most likely to reflect such changes in the salary averages
are the higher levels o f professional and administrative
occupations and single incumbent positions such as chief
accountant and director o f personnel.4
A bout 3 percent o f the establishments which were
asked to supply data would not do so. These corre­
sponded to an estimated total in the universe studied o f
approximately 875,000 workers, about 4 percent o f

the number o f establishments it represented within the

20,227,540. The non cooperating units were replaced by
others in the same industry-size-location classes. If all
similar units were already in the sample, the weights o f
the included establishments were increased to account
for the missing units.
Some companies had an established policy o f not
disclosing salary data for some o f their employees. Often
this policy related to higher level positions, because
these employees were considered part o f the manage­
ment group or were classified in categories which
included only one employee. In nearly all instances,
however, information was provided on the number o f
such employees and the appropriate occupational classi­




scope o f the survey. For example, if the sample
establishment was selected from a group o f four estab­
lishments with similar employment in the same industry
and region, each full-time employee found in an occu­
pation studied was counted as four employees in
compiling the employment estimates for the occupa­
tions. In addition, the survey occupations were limited
to employees meeting the specific criteria in each survey
definition and were not intended to include all em­
ployees in each field o f w ork .7 For these reasons, and
because o f differences in occupational structure among
establishments, the estimates o f occupational em ploy­
ment obtained from the sample o f establishments
studied serve only to indicate the relative importance o f
the occupations and levels as defined for the survey.
These qualifications o f the employment estimates do not
4
These types o f occupations also may be subject to greater
sampling error, as explained in the paragraph headed Estimates
o f sampling error.
5Those with 5 percent and over were: Directors o f personnel
IV - 16 percent; job analysts I and directors o f personnel III 11 percent; directors o f personnel II — 5 percent.
6 Also not taken into account were a few instances in which
salary data were available for employees in an occupation, but
where there was no satisfactory basis for classifying the
employees by work level.
7 Engineers, for example, are defined to permit classification
o f employees engaged in engineering work within a band o f eight
levels, starting with inexperienced engineering graduates and
excluding only those within certain fields o f specialization or in
positions above those covered b y level VIII. In contrast, such
occupations as chief accountants and directors o f personnel are
defined to include only those with responsibility for a specified
program and with duties and responsibilities as indicated for
each o f the more limited number o f work levels selected for
studv.

materially affect the accuracy o f the earnings data.
Wherever possible, data were collected for men and
women separately. I f identification by sex was not
possible, all workers were reported as the predominant
sex. In the professional, administrative, and technical
support occupations, men were sufficiently predominant
to preclude presentation o f separate data by sex. For
those clerical occupations in which both men and

salaries for all other occupations in tables 1 and 2,

women are com m only em ployed, separate data by sex
are available from the area wage survey reports compiled

multiplied b y 12 and rounded to the nearest dollar.

All salaries presented in the tables were rounded to the
nearest dollar. Average monthly salaries presented in
tables 1, 2, and 3 and annual salaries presented in tables
1 and 2 for the clerical and drafting occupations are
derived from average weekly salaries (to the nearest
penny) by use o f the factors 4.345 and 52.14, respec­
tively, and rounding the results. To obtain annual
average monthly salaries (to the nearest penny) are

by metropolitan area. The occupations and work levels
included in this study, and in which women accounted
for 5 percent or more o f the employment, were
distributed according
employees, as follow s:

to the proportion

Women (percent)

o f women

Occupation and level

95 or m o re ............

File clerks I, all levels of keypunch opera­
tors, secretaries, stenographers, and typists
90-94 ...................... Accounting clerks I, file clerks II and III,
and keypunch supervisors I and II
80-84 ..................... Keypunch supervisors III
75-79 ..................... Accounting clerks 1
1
65-69 ..................... Keypunch supervisors IV
45-49 ..................... Messengers, keypunch supervisors V , and
job analysts I
30-34 ...................... Drafter-tracers and job analysts II
25-29 ..................... Engineering technicians I, buyers I, and
computer operators 1
1
20-24 ..................... Accountants I and chemists I
1 5 -1 9 ..................... Accountants II, job analysts III, chemists II,
computer operators I and III
1 0 -1 4 ..................... Auditors I and II, attorneys I, chemists III,
and engineering technicians II
5 - 9 .......................... Accountants III, job analysts IV , directors
of personnel II and III, attorneys III,
engineers I, engineering technicians III,
buyers II, computer operators IV and V,
and drafters I and 1
1

Method o f determ ining median and quartile values

Median and quartile values presented in this report
were derived from distributions o f employees by salary
using $1 class intervals. Weekly salary class intervals were
used for drafters and clerical occupations and monthly
salary class intervals were used for all other occupations.
The weekly values were multiplied by 4.345 to obtain
monthly values and by 52.14 to obtain annual values.
The annual values for other than drafters and clerical
occupations were obtained by multiplying monthly
values by 12.

Estimates of sampling error

The survey procedure yields estimates with widely
varying sampling errors, depending on the frequency
with which the jo b occurs and the dispersion o f salaries.
Thus, for the 84 surveyed occupational work levels, the
relative sampling errors o f the average salaries were
distributed as follow s: 51 were under 2 percent; 24 were
2 and under 4 percent; 3 were 4 and under 6 percent;
and 6 were 6 percent and over.8 These sampling errors

Conversion o f salary rates

Salary data for the selected occupations were col­
lected in the form in which they were most readily
available from company records, i.e., on a weekly,
biweekly, semimonthly, m onthly, or annual basis. For
the initial tabulations, the salary data were first con­
verted to a weekly basis for the clerical and drafting

measure the validity o f the band within which the true
average is likely to fall. Thus, for an occupation with a
sample average monthly salary o f $ 1,000 and sampling
error o f 4 percent, the chances are 19 out o f 20 that the
true average lies within the band from $960 to $ 1,040.

Methods o f com putation of annual
percent increases

occupations and to a monthly basis for all others. The
factors used to convert these data were as follows:
Conversion factors
Payroll basis

W e e k ly .............................
B iw e e k ly ..................................
S em im o nthly................
M o n th ly .....................................
A n n u a l.......................................




To w eekly
basis

1.0000
.5000
.4602
.2301
.0192

The percent increases for each occupation in text
table 1 were obtained by adding the aggregate salaries

To m o nthly
basis

4.3450
2.1725
2.0000
1.0000
.0833

8The 6 percent and over group included: Attorneys III - 7.8
percent; directors o f personnel IV — 6.6 percent; draftertracers - 6.6 percent; computer operators VI - 7.5 percent;
keypunch supervisors I - 6.7 percent; keypunch supervisors
III - 7.1 percent.

for each level in each o f two successive years (em ploy­
ment in the most recent year, to eliminate the effects o f
year-to-year employment shifts, multiplied by the aver­
age salaries in both years) and dividing the later sum by
the earlier sum. The resultant relative, less 100, is the
percent o f increase. Changes in the scope o f the survey
and in occupational definitions were incorporated into
the series on a continuing basis as soon as tw o
comparable periods were available. The increases for
each o f the tw o broad occupational groups were
obtained by averaging the increases o f the occupations
within the group. The increases for all survey occupa­
tions were determined b y averaging the increases for the
two broad occupational groups. The annual increases

were then linked together to obtain the changes that
have occurred since this series was begun and to
compute average annual rates o f increase for each
occupation and group and for all occupations com bined.
The year-to-year percent increases for each group in
text table 2 were determined by adding average salaries
for all occupations in the group for 2 consecutive years,
and dividing the later sum by the earlier sum. The
resultant relative, less 100, shows the percent o f in­
crease. Changes in the scope o f the survey or in the
occupational definitions were incorporated into the
series as soon as comparable data for 2 consecutive
periods were available. The 13-year trends were obtained
by linking changes for the individual periods.

Appendix B. Survey Changes in 1974
Changes in occupational coverage

A six level computer operator jo b as defined in
appendix C was added to the survey.

Interagency Committee on Occupation Classification
designed to identify and m odify occupational titles
which denote or connote sex sterotypes. Since the title
changes did not affect the content o f the jobs, compari­
sons with previously published data are not affected.
The secretary definition, revised to take account o f

Changes in occupational definitions

the extent o f the secretary’ s participation in the admin­
istrative work o f the supervisor, is now defined in five

The jobs formerly titled draftsman-tracer and drafts­

rather than four levels. Because o f changes in the

man were retitled drafter-tracer and drafter. The m odifi­

definition at each level, data are not comparable to
secretary data previously published.

cation is in accordance with recommendations o f the




Appendix C. Occupational Definitions
The primary purpose o f preparing job definitions for the Bureau’ s wage surveys is to
assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations, or levels within
occupations, workers who are employed under a variety o f payroll titles and different
work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This
permits the grouping o f occupational wage rates representing comparable jo b content. To
secure comparability o f job content, some occupations and work levels are defined to
include only those workers meeting specific criteria as to training, jo b functions, and
responsibilities. Because o f this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea compara­
bility o f occupational content, the Bureau’ s occupational definitions may differ
significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other
purposes. Also see note referring to the definitions for the drafting and clerical
occupations at the end o f this appendix.

Accountants and Auditors
ACCOUNTANT

Performs professional accounting work requiring
knowledge o f the theory and practice o f recording,
classifying, examining, and analyzing the data and
records o f financial transactions. The work generally
requires a bachelor’ s degree in accounting or, in rare
instances, equivalent experience and education com ­
bined. Positions covered by this definition are charac­
terized by the inclusion o f work that is analytical,
creative, evaluative, and advisory in nature. The work
draws upon and requires a thorough knowledge o f the
fundamental doctrines, theories, principles, and termi­
nology o f accountancy, and often entails some under­
standing o f such related fields as business law, statistics,
and general management. (See also chief accountant.)
Professional responsibilities in accountant positions
above the entry and developmental levels include several
such duties as:
Analyzing the effects o f transactions upon account
relationships;
Evaluating alternative means o f treating transactions;
Planning the manner in which account structures should
be developed or m odified;
Assuring the adequacy o f the accounting system as the
basis for reporting to management;
Considering the need for new or changed controls;




Projecting accounting data to show the effects o f pro­
posed plans on capital investments, income, cash position,
and overall financial condition;
Interpreting the meaning o f accounting records, reports,
and statements;
Advising operating officials on accounting matters; and
Recommending improvements, adaptations, or revisions
in the accounting system and procedures.

(Entry and developmental level positions provide oppor­
tunity to develop ability to perform professional duties
such as those enumerated above.)
In addition to such professional work, most accoun­
tants are also responsible for assuring the proper
recording and documentation o f transactions in the

accounts. They, therefore,
professional personnel in

frequently direct non­
the actual day-to-day

maintenance o f books o f accounts, the accumulation o f
cost o f other comparable data, the preparation o f
standard reports and statements, and similar work.
(Positions involving such supervisory work but not
including professional duties as described above are not
included in this description.)
E xcluded are accountants whose principal or sole
duties consist o f designing or improving accounting

systems or other nonoperating staff work, e.g., financial
analysis, financial forecasting, tax advising, etc. (The

criteria that follow for distinguishing among the several
levels o f work are inappropriate for such job s.) Note,
however, that professional accountant positions with
responsibility for recording or reporting accounting data
relative to taxes are included, as are operating or cost
accountants whose work includes, but is not limited to,
improvement o f the accounting system.

exhibits to be used in reports. In addition to such work,
may also perform some nonprofessional tasks for
training purposes.
Responsibility f o r direction o f others. Usually none.

Some accountants use electronic data processing
equipment to process, record, and report accounting

Accountant II

data. In some such cases the machine unit is a
subordinate segment o f the accounting system; in others
it is a separate entity or is attached to some other
organization. In either instance, providing the primary
responsibility o f the position is professional accounting
work o f the type otherwise included, the use o f data
processing equipment o f any type does not o f itself
exclude a position from the accountant description nor
does it change its level.

General characteristics. A t this continuing develop­
mental level the professional accountant makes practical
applications o f technical accounting practices and con­
cepts beyond the mere application o f detailed rules and
instructions. Assignments are designed to expand his
practical experience and to develop his professional
judgment in the application o f basic accounting tech­
niques to simple professional problems. He is expected
to be competent in the application o f standard pro­
cedures and requirements to routine transactions, to

raise questions about unusual or questionable items, and
to suggest solutions. (Terminal positions are excluded.)

Accountant I
General characteristics. At this beginning professional
level, the accountant learns to apply the principles,
theories, and concepts o f accounting to a specific
system. The position is distinguishable from non­
professional positions by the variety o f assignments; rate
and scope o f development expected o f the incumbent;

and the existence, implicit or explicit, o f a planned
training program designed to give the entering
accountant practical experience. (Terminal positions are
excluded.)
Direction received. Works under close supervision o f an

experienced accountant whose guidance is directed
primarily to the development o f the trainee’ s profes­
sional ability and to the evaluation o f his potential for
advancement. Limits o f assignments are clearly defined,
methods o f procedure are specified, and kinds o f items
to be noted and referred to supervisor are identified.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety o f

accounting

tasks

such

as:

Examining

a variety o f

financial statements for completeness, internal accuracy,
and conformance with uniform accounting classifica­
tions or other specific accounting requirements; recon­
ciling reports and financial data with financial state­
ments

already

on

file,

and

Direction received. Work is reviewed closely to verify its

general accuracy and coverage o f unusual problems, to
insure conformance with required procedures and special
instructions, and to assure his professional growth. His
progress is evaluated in terms o f his ability to apply his
professional knowledge to basic accounting problems in
the day-to-day operations o f an established accounting
system.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety o f
accounting tasks, e.g., prepares routine working papers,
schedules, exhibits, and summaries indicating the extent
o f his examination, and presenting and supporting his
findings and recommendations. Examines a variety o f
accounting documents to verify accuracy o f computa­
tions and to ascertain that all transactions are properly
supported, are in accordance with pertinent policies and
procedures, and are classified and recorded according to
acceptable accounting standards.
Responsibility fo r the direction o f others. Usually none,

although he may supervise a few clerks.

Accountant III

pointing out apparent
General characteristics. Performs professional operating

inconsistencies or errors; carrying out assigned steps in
an accounting analysis, such as computing standard
ratios; assembling and summarizing accounting literature
on a given subject; preparing relatively simple financial

or cost accounting work requiring the standardized
application o f well-established accounting principles,

statements

or

instructions concerning the overall accounting system

presentation; and preparing charts, tables, and other

and its objectives, the policies and procedures under

not

involving




problems

of

analysis

theories,

concepts,

and

practices.

Receives detailed

which it is operated, and the nature o f changes in the
system
or its operation. Characteristically, the
accounting system or assigned segment is stable and well
established (i.e., the basic chart o f accounts, classifica­
tions, the nature o f the cost accounting system, the
report requirements, and the procedures are changed
infrequently).
Depending upon the workload involved, the accoun­
tant may have such assignments as supervision o f the
day-to-day operation o f: (a) The entire system o f a
subordinate establishment, or (b ) a major segment (e.g.,
general accounting; cost accounting; or financial state­
ments and reports) o f a somewhat larger system, or (c)
in a very large and com plex system, may be assigned to a
relatively narrow and specialized segment dealing with
some problem, function, or portion o f work which is
itself o f the level o f difficulty characteristic o f this level.

Direction received. A higher level professional accoun­

Accountant IV
General characteristics. Performs professional operating

or cost accounting work which requires the application
o f well-established accounting principles, theories, con­
cepts, and practices to a wide variety o f difficult
problems. Receives instructions concerning the objec­
tives and operation o f the overall accounting system. At
this level, compared with level III, the accounting system
or assigned segment is more com plex, i.e., (a) is
relatively unstable, (b ) must adjust to new or changing
company operations, (c ) serves organizations o f
unusually large size, or (d ) is complicated by the need to
provide

and

coordinate

separate

or

specialized

accounting
treatment
and reporting (e.g.,
cost
accounting using standard cost, process cost, and job
order techniques) for different operations or divisions o f
the company.
Depending upon the workload and degree o f
coordination involved, the accountant IV may have such

tant normally is available to furnish advice and assistance
as needed. Work is reviewed for technical accuracy,
adequacy o f professional judgment, and compliance with
instructions through spot checks, appraisal o f results,
subsequent processing, analysis o f reports and state­
ments, and other appropriate means.

assignments as the supervision o f the day-to-day opera­
tion o f: (a) The entire accounting system o f a sub­
ordinate establishment, or (b ) a major segment (e.g.,
general accounting; cost accounting; or financial state­
ments and reports) o f an accounting system serving a

Typical duties and responsibilities. The primary respon­
sibility o f most positions at this level is to assure that the

larger and more com plex establishment, or (c ) the entire
accounting system o f a large (e.g., employing several
thousand persons) subordinate establishment which in
other respects has an accounting system o f the com­
plexity that characterizes level III.

assigned day-to-day operations are carried out in
accordance with established accounting principles,
policies, and objectives. The accountant performs such
professional work as: Developing nonstandard reports
and statements (e.g., those containing cash forecasts
reflecting the
interrelations o f accounting, cost
budgeting, or comparable inform ation); interpreting and
pointing out trends or deviations from standards; pro­
jecting data into the future; predicting the effects o f
changes in operating programs; or identifying manage­
ment informational needs, and refining account struc­
tures or reports accordingly.
Within the limits o f his delegated responsibility,
makes day-to-day decisions concerning the accounting
treatment o f financial transactions. Is expected to
recommend solutions to com plex problems and propose
changes in the accounting system for approval at higher
levels. Such recommendations are derived from his own
knowledge

of

the

application

of

well-established

principles and practices.

Direction received. A higher level accountant normally is

available to furnish advice and assistance as needed.
Work is reviewed by spot checks and appraisal o f results
for adequacy o f professional judgment, compliance with
instructions, and overall accuracy and quality.

Typical duties and responsibilities.
As at level III, a
primary characteristic o f most positions at this level is
the responsibility o f operating an accounting system or
major segment o f a system in the intended manner.
The accountant IV exercises professional judgment in
making frequent appropriate recommendations for: New

accounts; revisions in the account structure; new types
o f ledgers; revisions in reporting system or subsidiary
records; changes in instructions regarding the use o f
accounts; new or refined account classifications or
definitions; etc. He also makes day-to-day decisions
concerning

In most
instances he directs the work o f a subordinate nonpro­

R esponsibility fo r

fessional staff.




the

direction

o f others.

the

accounting

treatment

of

financial

transactions and is expected to recommend solutions to
complex
problems
responsibility.

beyond

the

scope

of

his

R esponsibility fo r direction o f others. Accounting staff

he supervises, if any, may include professional accoun­
tants.

staff
supervised
accountants.

generally

includes

professional

A U D IT O R
Accountant V
General characteristics. Performs professional operating

or cost accounting work which is o f greater than average
professional difficulty and responsibility because o f the
presence o f unusual and novel problems or the unusual
magnitude or impact o f the accounting program.
Typically this level o f difficulty arises from (a) the large
size o f the accounting and operating organization, (b )
the atypical nature o f the accounting problems
encountered, or (c) the unusually great involvement in
accounting systems design and development.
Examples o f assignments characteristic o f this level
are the supervision o f the day-to-day operation o f: (a)
The entire accounting system o f a subordinate establish­
ment having an unusually novel and com plex accounting
system, or (b ) the entire accounting system o f a large
(e.g., employing several thousand persons) subordinate
establishment which in other respects has an accounting
system o f the complexity that characterizes level IV, or
(c) the entire accounting system o f a company or
corporation that has a relatively stable and conventional
accounting system and employs several thousand persons
and has a few subordinate establishments which include
accounting units, or (d) a major segment o f an
accounting system that substantially exceeds the
characteristics described in any one o f the preceding
examples.
received. An accountant o f higher level
normally is available to furnish advice and assistance as
needed. Work is reviewed for adequacy o f professional
judgment, compliance with instructions, and overall
quality.
Direction

Typical duties and responsibilities. The work is charac­

terized

by

its unusual

difficulty

or

responsibility.

Accountants V typically are directly concerned on a
relatively continuous basis with what the nature o f the

Performs professional auditing work requiring a
bachelor’ s degree in accounting or, in rare instances,
equivalent experience and education combined. Audits
the financial records and practices o f a company, or o f
divisions or components o f the company, to appraise
systematically and verify the accounting accuracy o f
records and reports and to assure the consistent applica­
tion o f accepted accounting principles. Evaluates the
adequacy o f the accounting system and internal financial
controls. Makes appropriate recommendations for
improvement as necessary. To the extent determined
necessary, examines the transactions entering into the
balance sheet and the transactions entering into income,
expense, and cost accounts. Determines:

The existence o f recorded assets (including the observa­
tion o f the taking o f physical inventories) and the allinclusiveness o f recorded liabilities;
The accuracy o f financial statements or reports and the
fairness o f presentation o f facts therein;
The propriety or legality o f transactions;
The degree o f compliance with established policies and
procedures concerning financial transactions.

Exclu ded are positions which do

not require full

professional accounting training because the work is
confined on a relatively permanent basis to repetitive
examinations o f a limited area o f company operations
and accounting processes, e.g., only accounts payable
and receivable; demurrage records and related functions,
or station operations only o f a railroad com pany; branch
offices which do not engage in the full range o f banking
and accounting activities o f the main bank; warehouse
operations only o f a mail order com pany; checking
transactions to determine whether or not they conform
to prescribed routines or procedures. (Examinations o f
such repetitive or limited nature normally do not require
or permit professional audit work to be performed.)

accounting system should be, with the devising or
revising o f the operating accounting policies and pro­

A u d ito r I

cedures that are necessary, and with the managerial as
well as the accounting meaning o f the reports and

General

characteristics. As a trainee auditor at the
entering professional level, performs a variety o f routine

statements for which they are responsible. Accountants
V are necessarily deeply involved in fundamental and
com plex accounting matters and in the managerial

assignments. Typically, he is rotated through a variety o f

problems that are affected.

provide practical experience in applying the principles,

tasks under a planned training program designed to
theories, and concepts o f accounting and auditing to

R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. A ccounting




specific situations. (Terminal positions are excluded.)

Direction received. Works under close supervision o f an

experienced auditor whose guidance is directed primarily
to the development o f the trainee’s professional ability
and to the evaluation o f his* potential for advancement.
Limits o f assignments are clearly defined, methods o f
procedure are specified, and kinds o f items to be noted
and referred to supervisor are identified.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Assists in making
audits by performing such tasks as: Verification o f the
accuracy o f the balances in various records; examination

o f a variety o f types o f documents and vouchers for
accuracy o f computations; checking transactions to
assure they are properly documented and have been
recorded in accordance with correct accounting classifi­
cations; verifying the count o f inventories; preparing
detailed statements, schedules, and standard audit
working papers; counting cash and other assets; pre­
paring simple reconciliations; and similar functions.

A u d ito r II

At this continuing develop­
mental level the professional auditor serves as a junior
member o f an audit team, independently performing
selected portions o f the audit which are limited in scope
and com plexity. Auditors at this level typically have
acquired knowledge o f company operations, policies,
and procedures. (Terminal positions are excluded.)
General

characteristics.

Direction received. Detailed instructions are furnished

and the work is reviewed to the extent necessary to
verify its general accuracy and coverage o f unusual
problems, to insure conformance with required pro­
cedures and special instructions, and to assure the
auditor’s professional growth. Any technical problems
not covered by instructions are brought to the attention
o f a superior. His progress is evaluated in terms o f his
ability to apply his professional knowledge to basic
auditing situations.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Applies knowledge o f
accounting theory and audit practices to a variety o f

relatively simple professional problems in his audit
assignments, including such tasks as: The verification o f
reports against source accounts and records to determine
their reliability; reconciliation o f bank and other
accounts and verifying the detail o f recorded trans­
actions; detailed examinations o f cash receipts and
disbursement vouchers, payroll records, requisitions,
work orders, receiving reports, and other accounting
documents to ascertain that transactions are properly




supported and are recorded correctly
accounting or regulatory standpoint; or
working papers, schedules, and summaries.

from an
preparing

A u d ito r I II
General characteristics. Work at this level consists o f the
audit o f operations and accounting processes that are
relatively stable, well-established, and typical o f the
industry. The audits primarily involve the collection and
analysis o f readily available findings; there is previous
audit experience that is directly applicable; the audit
reports are normally prepared in a prescribed format
using a standard method o f presentation; and few if any
major problems are anticipated. The work performed
requires the application o f substantial knowledges o f
accounting principles and practices, e.g., bases for
distinguishing among capital maintenance and operating
expenses; accruing reserves for taxes; and other
accounting considerations o f an equivalent nature.
Direction received. Work is normally within an estab­

lished audit program and supervision is provided by a
higher level auditor who outlines and discusses assign­
ments. Work is spot-checked in progress. Completed
assignments are reviewed for adequacy o f coverage,
soundness o f judgment, compliance with professional
standards, and adherence to policies.

Typical duties and responsibilities. The auditor examines
transactions and verifies accounts; observes and evaluates
accounting procedures and internal controls; prepares
audit working papers and submits an audit report in the
required pattern containing recommendations for

needed changes or improvements. He is usually
responsible for selecting the detailed audit methods to
follow , choosing the audit sample and its size, deter­
mining the extent to which discrepancies need to be
investigated, and deciding the depth o f the analyses
required to support reported findings and conclusions.
Examples o f assignments involving work o f this level:
As a team leader or working alone, independently
conducts audits o f the complete accounts and related
operations o f smaller or less com plex companies (e.g.,
involving a centralized accounting system with few or no
subordinate, subsidiary, or branch accounting records) or o f
comparable segments o f larger companies.
As a member o f an audit team independently
accomplishes varied audit assignments o f the above described
characteristics, typically major segments o f complete audits,
or assignments otherwise limited in scope o f larger and more
com plex companies (e.g., com plex in that the accounting
system entails cost, inventory, and comparable specialized
systems integrated with the general accounting system).

Illustrative o f such assignments are the audit and initial
review o f the accounting treatment and validity o f
reporting o f overhead expenses in a large manufacturing
or maintenance organization (e.g., major repair yard o f a
railroad); or, the checking, verification, and balancing o f
all accounts receivable and accounts payable; or, the
analysis and verification o f assets and reserves; or, the
inspection and evaluation o f accounting controls and
procedures.

A u d ito r IV
General characteristics. Auditors at this level are
exp erien ced
professionals
who
apply
thorough
knowledge o f accounting principles and theory in
connection with a variety o f audits. Work at this level is
characterized by the audit o f organizations and

accounting processes which are complex and difficult
because o f such factors as: Presence o f new or changed
programs and accounting systems; existence o f major
specialized accounting functions (e.g., cost accounting,
inventory accounting, sales accounting), in addition to
general accounting; need to consider extensive and
complicated regulatory requirements; lack o f or
difficulty in obtaining information; and other similar
factors. Typically, a variety o f different assignments are
encountered over a period o f time, e.g., 1 year. The
audit reports prepared are comprehensive, explain
irregularities,
cite rules or regulations violated,
recommend remedial actions, and contain analyses o f
items o f special importance or interest to company
management.
Direction received. Within an established audit program,

has responsibility for independently planning and
executing audits. Unusually difficult problems are dis­
cussed with the supervisor who also reviews completed
assignments for adherence to principles and standards
and the soundness o f conclusions.

Typical duties and responsibilities. Auditors at this level

have full responsibility for planning the audit, including
determination o f the aspects to emphasize, methods to
be used, development o f nonstandard or specialized
audit aids such as questionnaires, etc., where previous
audit experience and plans are o f limited applicability.

Included in the scope o f work that characterizes this
level are such functions as: Evaluation o f methods used
for determining depreciation rates o f equipment; evalua­
tion o f assets where original costs are unknown; evalua­
tion o f the reliability o f accounting and reporting




systems; analysis o f cost accounting systems and cost
reports to evaluate the basis for cost and price setting;
evaluation o f accounting procurement and supply
management records, controls, and procedures; and
many others.
Examples o f assignments involving work at this level:
As a team leader or working alone, independently plans
and conducts audits o f the complete accounts and related
operations o f relatively large and com plex companies (e.g.,
com plex in that the accounting system entails cost,
inventory, and comparable specialized accounting systems
integrated with the general accounting system) or o f
company branch, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations which
are individually o f comparable size and com plexity.
As a member o f an audit team independently plans and
accomplishes audit assignments that constitute major
segments o f audits ofery large and com plex organizations, for
example, those with financial responsibilities so great as to
involve specialized subordinate, subsidiary, or affiliate
accounting systems that are complete in themselves.
N O T E : Excluded from level IV are auditors who, as
team leaders or working alone, conduct com plete audits
o f very large and com plex organizations, for example,

those with financial responsibilities so great as to involve
sp ecialized
subordinate,
subsidiary,
or
affiliate
accounting systems that are complete in themselves; or
are team members assigned to major segments o f audits
o f even larger or more com plex organizations.

C H IE F A C C O U N T A N T

As the top technical expert in accounting, is respon­
sible for directing the accounting program for a com ­
pany or for an establishment o f a company. The
minimum accounting program includes: (1 ) General
accounting (assets, liabilities, income, expense, and
capital accounts, including responsibility for profit and
loss and balance sheet statements); and (2 ) at least one
other
major
accounting
activity,
typically
tax
accounting, cost accounting, property accounting, or
sales accounting. It may also include such other activities
as payroll and timekeeping, and mechanical or electronic
data processing operations which are an adjunct o f the
accounting system. (Responsibility for an internal audit
program is typically n ot included.)
The responsibilities o f the chief accountant include
all o f the following:
1. On own responsibility, developing or adapting or
revising an accounting system to meet the needs o f the
organization;
2. Supervising, either directly or through subordinate
supervisors, the operation o f the system with full manage­
ment responsibility for the quality and quantity o f work
performed, training and development o f subordinates, work

scheduling and review, coordination with other parts o f the
A R -2 . The basic accounting system is prescribed in
organization served, etc.;
broad outline rather than in specific detail. While certain
3.
Providing, directly or through an official such as a
major financial reports, overall accounts, and general
comptroller, advisory services to the top management
policies are required by the basic system, the chief
officials o f the organization served as to:
accountant has broad latitude and authority to decide
a. The status o f financial resources and the financial
trends or results o f operations as revealed by accounting
the specific methods, procedures, accounts, reports, etc.,
data, and selecting a manner o f presentation that is
to be used within the organizational segment served. He
meaningful to management;
must secure prior approval from higher levels for only
b. Methods for improving operations as suggested by
those changes which would basically affect the broad
his expert knowledge o f accounting, e.g., proposals for
requirements prescribed by such higher levels. Typical
improving cost control, property management, credit and
collection, tax reduction, or similar programs.
responsibilities include:
Excluded are positions with responsibility for the
accounting program i f they also include (as a major part
o f the jo b ) responsibility for budgeting; work measure­
ment; organization, methods, and procedures studies; or
similar nonaccounting functions. (Positions o f such
breadth are sometimes titled comptroller, budget and
accounting manager, financial manager, etc.)
Some positions responsible for supervising general
accounting and one or more other major accounting

activities but which do n ot fully meet all o f the
responsibilities o f a chief accountant specified above
may be covered by the descriptions for accountant.
Chief accountant jobs which meet the characteristics
described are classified by level o f w ork 1 according to
(a) authority and responsibility and (b ) technical com ­
plexity, using the table accompanying the definitions
which follow .

A u th o rity and Responsibility
A R -1 . The accounting system (i.e., accounts, procedures,

and reports to be used) has been prescribed in consider­
able detail by higher levels in the company or organiza­
tion. The chief accountant has final, unreviewed
authority within the prescribed system, to expand it to
fit the particular needs o f the organization served, e.g.,
in the following or comparable ways:
Provides greater detail in accounts and reports or financial
statements;
Establishes additional accounting controls, accounts,
subaccounts, and subsidiary records; and
Provides special or interim reports and statements needed
by the manager responsible for the day-to-day operations o f
the organization served.

This degree o f authority is typically found at a plant
or similar subordinate establishment.

Evaluating and taking final action on recommendations
proposed by subordinate establishments for changes in
aspects o f the accounting system or activities not prescribed
by higher authority;
Extending cost accounting operations to areas not pre­
viously covered;
Changing from one cost accounting method to another;
Expanding the utilization o f computers within the
accounting process; and
Preparing accounting reports and statements reflecting the
events and progress o f the entire organization for which he is
responsible;
often
consolidating data submitted by
subordinate segments.

This degree o f authority is most typically found at
intermediate organizational levels such as regional
offices, or division or subsidiary headquarters. It is also
found in some company level situations where the
authority o f the chief accountant is less extensive than is
described in A R -3 . More rarely it is found in plant level
chief accountants who have been delegated more
authority than usual for such positions as described in
A R -1 .
A R -3 . Has complete responsibility for establishing and

maintaining the framework for the basic accounting
system used in the company, subject only to general
policy guidance and control from a higher level company
official responsible for general financial management.
Typical responsibilities include:
Determining the basic characteristics o f the com pany’ s
accounting system and the specific accounts to be used;
Devising and preparing accounting reports and statements
required to meet management’s needs for data;
Establishing basic accounting policies, interpretations, and
procedures;
Reviewing and taking action on proposed revisions to the
com pany’ s accounting system suggested by subordinate units;
and
Taking final action on all technical accounting matters.

Characteristically, participates extensively in broad
com p a n y
management
processes
by
providing
accounting advice, interpretations, or recommendations

^ Insufficient data were obtained for level V to w arrant
presentation of average salaries.




based on data accumulated in the accounting system and
on his professional judgment and experience.

Authority
and
1
responsibility

Level

Technical
complexity1

Subordinate staff of professional accountants
in the system for which he is responsible.

I

AR-1

TC-1

Only one or two professional accountants, who do
not exceed the accountant III job definition.

II

AR-1

TC-2

About 5 to 10 professional accountants, with at least
one or two matching the accountant IV job
definition.

AR-2

TC-1

About 5 to 10 professional accountants. Most of
these match the accountant III job definition, but
one or two may match the accountant IV job
definition.

AR-3

TC-1

Only one or two professional accountants, who do
not exceed the accountant IV job definition.

AR-1

TC-3

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. A t least
one or two match the accountant V job definition.

AR-2

TC-2

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. Many of
these match the accountant IV job definition, but
some may match the accountant V job definition.

AR-3

TC-1

About 5 to 10 professional accountants. Most of
these match the accountant III job definition, but
one or two may match as high as accountant V.

AR-2

TC-3

About 25 to 40 professional accountants. Many of
these match the accountant V job definition, but
several may exceed that level.

AR-3

TC-2

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. Most of
these match the accountant IV job definition, but
several may match the accountant V and one or two
may exceed that level.

AR-3

TC-3

About 25 to 40 professional accountants. Many of
these match the accountant V job definition, but
several may exceed that level.

or

or

III

or

or

IV

or

V

1 A R - 1 , -2 , and -3 and T C -1 , -2 , and -3 are e x p la in e d in th e a cc o m p an yin g te x t .




Technical Com plexity
TC-1. The organization which the accounting program
serves has relatively few functions, products, work
processes, etc., and these tend to be stable and
unchanging. The accounting system operates in accord­
ance with well-established principles and practices or
those o f equivalent difficulty which are typical o f that
industry.
TC-2. The organization which the accounting program
serves has a relatively large number o f functions,
products, work processes, etc., which require substantial
and frequent adaptations o f the basic system to meet
management needs (e.g., adoption o f new accounts,
subaccounts, and subsidiary records; revision o f
instructions for the use o f accounts; improvement or

basic system to meet management needs. Such demands
arise because the functions, products, work processes,
etc., o f the organization are very numerous, diverse,
unique, or specialized, or there are other comparable
complexities. Consequently, the accounting system, to a
considerable
degree,
is developed
well beyond
established principles and accounting practices in order
to:
Provide for the solution o f problems for which no clear
precedents exist; or
Provide for the development or extension o f accounting
theories and practices to deal with problems to which these
theories and practices have not previously been applied.

Subordinate S taff

expansion o f methods for accumulating and reporting
cost data in connection with new or changed work
processes).

In table C-l the number o f professional accountants
supervised is recognized to be a relatively crude criterion
for distinguishing between various levels. It is to be
considered less important in the matching process than
the other criteria. In addition to the staff o f professional

TC-3. The organization which the accounting program
serves puts a heavy demand on the accounting organiza­
tion fo r specialized and extensive adaptations o f the

accountants in the system for which the chief
accountant is responsible, there are clerical, machine
operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel.

Attorneys
ATTORNEY

Performs consultation and advisory work and carries
out the legal processes necessary to effect the rights,
privileges, and obligations o f the company. The work
performed requires com pletion o f law school with an
LL.B. degree (or the equivalent) and admission to the
bar. Responsibilities or functions include one or m ore o f
the follow ing or comparable duties:
Preparing and reviewing various legal instruments and
documents, such as contracts, leases, licenses, purchases,
sales, real estate, etc.;
Acting as agent o f the company in its transactions;
Examining material (e.g., advertisements, publications,
etc.) for legal implications; advising officials o f proposed
legislation which might affect the company;
Applying for patents, copyrights, or registration of
com pany’s products, processes, devices, and trademarks;
Advising whether to initiate or defend lawsuits;
Conducting pre-trial preparations; defending the company
in lawsuits; and
Advising officials on tax matters, government regulations,
and/or corporate rights.
Excluded from this definition are:
Patent work which requires professional training in
addition to legal training (typically a degree in engineering or
in a science);




Claims examining, claims investigating, or similar work for
which professional legal training and bar membership is not
essential;
Attorneys, frequently titled “ general counsel” (and their
immediate full associates or deputies), who serve as company
officers or the equivalent and are responsible for participating
in the overall management and formulation o f policy for the
company in addition to directing its legal work. (The duties
and responsibilities o f such positions exceed level VI as
described below .)

Attorney job s which meet the above definition are to
be classified and coded in accordance with table C-2 and
the definitions which follow .
D -l. Legal questions are characterized by: Facts that are

well established; clearly applicable legal precedents; and
matters not o f substantial importance to the organiza­
tion. (Usually relatively limited sums o f money, e.g., a
few thousand dollars, are involved.)
Exam ples o f D -l w ork:
Legal investigation, negotiation, and research preparatory
to defending the organization in potential or actual lawsuits
involving alleged negligence where the facts can be firmly
established and there are precedent cases directly applicable
to the situation.

Difficulty
of legal work^

Level

1

Responsibility
of job^

This is the entry level. The duties and
responsibilities after initial orientation and
training are those described in D-1 and R-1.

D-1

R-2

D-2

R-1

D-2

R-2

D-3

R-3

D-3

R-2

V

D-3

VI

D-3

II

Sufficient professional experience (at least 1
year, usually more) at the "D -1" level to
assure competence as an attorney.

or

III

A t least 1 year, usually more, of professional
experience at the "D -2” level.

or

IV

Extensive professional
"D -2" or a higher level.

experience

at

the

R-3

Extensive professional
"D -3" level.

experience

at

the

R-4

Extensive professional
"D -3" and "R -3" levels.

experience

at

the

or

1D -1 ,

Completion of law school with an LL.B. or
J.D. degree plus admission to the bar.

R-1

D-2

Experience required

D -2 , D -3 and R -1 , R -2 , R -3, and R -4 are e x p la in e d in th e acc o m p an yin g te x t.

Searching case reports, legal documents, periodicals,
textbooks, and other legal references, and preparing draft
opinions on employee compensation or benefit questions
when there is a substantial amount o f clearly applicable
statutory, regulatory, and case material.
Drawing up contracts and other legal documents in
connection with real property transactions requiring the
development o f detailed information but not involving
serious questions regarding titles to property or other major
factual or legal issues.
D -2. Legal work is regularly difficult by reason o f one or

more o f the following: The absence o f clear and directly
applicable

legal

precedents;

the

different

Exam ples o f D -2 w ork:
Advising on the legal implications o f advertising
representations when the facts supporting the representations
and the applicable precedent cases are subject to different
interpretations.
Reviewing and advising on the implications o f new or
revised laws affecting the organization.
Presenting the organization’s defense in court in a
negligence lawsuit which is strongly pressed by counsel for an
organized group.
Providing legal counsel on tax questions complicated by
the absence o f precedent decisions that are directly
applicable to the organization’s situation.

possible
Legal work is typically complex and difficult

interpretations that can be placed on the facts, the laws,

D -3.

or the precedents involved; the substantial importance o f
the legal matters to the organization (e.g., sums as large

because o f one or more o f the following: The questions

as $100,000 are generally directly or indirectly
involved); the matter is being strongly pressed or
contested in formal proceedings or in negotiations by
the individuals, corporations, or government agencies
involved.




are unique and require a high order o f original and
creative legal endeavor for their solution; the questions
require extensive research and analysis and the obtaining
and evaluation o f expert testimony regarding con­
troversial

issues in a scientific, financial, corporate

organization, engineering, or other highly technical area;

the legal matter is o f critical importance to the
organization and is being vigorously pressed or contested
(e.g., sums such as $1 million or more are generally
directly or indirectly involved).

Exam ples o f D -3 w ork :
Advising on the legal aspects and implications o f Federal
antitrust laws to projected greatly expanded marketing
operations involving joint ventures with several other
organizations.
Planning legal strategy and representing a utility company
in rate or government franchise cases involving a geographic
area including parts or all o f several States.
Preparing and presenting a case before an appellate court
where the case is highly important to the future operation o f
the organization and is vigorously contested by very
distinguished (e.g., having a broad regional or national
reputation) legal talent.
Serving as the principal counsel to the officers and staff o f
an insurance company on the legal problems in the sale,
underwriting, and administration o f group contracts involving
nationwide or multistate coverages and laws.
Performing the principal legal work in a nonroutine major
revision o f the com pany’s charter or in effectuating new
major financing steps.

R -L Responsibility for final action is usually limited to

matters covered by legal precedents and in which little
deviation from standard practice is involved. Any
decisions or actions having a significant bearing on the
organization’s business are reviewed. (Is given guidance
in the initial stages o f his assignment. Assignments are
then carried out with moderate independence although
guidance is generally available and is sought from time to
time on problem points.)

Usually works independently in investigating the
facts, searching legal precedents, defining the legal and
factual issues, drafting the necessary legal documents,
and developing conclusions and recommendations.
Decisions having an important bearing on the organiza­
tion’s business are reviewed. (Receives information from
supervisor regarding unusual circumstances or important
policy considerations pertaining to a legal problem. If

assignments to one or more lower level attorneys, aids,
or clerks.)
R -3. Carries out assignments independently and makes

final legal determinations in matters o f substantial
importance to his organization. Such determinations are
subject to review only for consistency with company
policy, possible precedent effect, and overall effective­
ness. To carry out his assignments, he deals regularly
with company officers and top level management
officials and confers or negotiates regularly with senior
attorneys and officials in other companies or in govern­
ment agencies on various aspects o f his assigned work.
(Receives little or no preliminary instruction on legal
problems and a minimum o f technical legal supervision.
May assign and review work o f a few attorneys, but this
is not a primary responsibility.)

R -4. Carries out assignments which entail independently

planning

investigations

and

negotiations

on

legal

problems o f the highest importance to his organization
and developing completed briefs, opinions, contracts, or
other legal products. T o carry out his assignments he
represents his organization at conferences, hearings, or
trials, and personally confers and negotiates with top
attorneys and top-ranking officials in private companies
or in government agencies. On various aspects o f his
assigned work may give advice directly and personally to
corporation officers and top level managers, or may
work through the general counsel o f the company in
advising officers. (Generally receives no preliminary
instruction on legal problems. On matters requiring the
concentrated efforts o f several attorneys or other
specialists, is responsible for directing, coordinating, and
reviewing the work o f the attorneys involved.)

R -2.

trials

are

involved,

may

supervisor

regarding

presentation, line o f approach,

receive

guidance

from

a

OR

As a primary responsibility, directs the work o f a
staff o f attorneys, one, but usually more, o f whom
regularly perform D-3 legal work. With respect to the
work directed, gives advice directly to corporation
officers and top managerial officers, or may give such
advice through the general counsel. (Receives guidance
as to organization policy but no technical supervision or

possible line o f opposition to be encountered, etc. In the

assistance except when he might request advice from, or

case

product is reviewed carefully, but primarily for overall

be briefed by, the general counsel on the overall
approach to the most difficult, novel, or important legal

soundness o f legal reasoning and consistency with
organization policy. Some (but not all) attorneys make

questions. Usually reports to the general counsel or his
deputy.)

of

nonroutine




written

presentations

the final

B y r
u es
BUYER

Purchases materials, supplies, equipment, and services
(e.g., utilities, maintenance, and repair). In some
instances items are o f types that must be specially
designed, produced, or m odified by the vendor in
accordance with drawings or engineering specifications.
or

Solicits bids, analyzes quotations received, and selects
recommends supplier. May interview prospective

vendors. Purchases items and services at the most
favorable price consistent with quality, quantity, specifi­
cation requirements, and other factors. Prepares or
supervises preparation o f purchase orders from requisi­
tions. May expedite delivery and visit vendors’ offices
and plants.
Normally, purchases are unreviewed when they are
consistent with past experience, and are in conformance
with established rules and policies. Proposed purchase
transactions that deviate from the usual or from past
experience in terms o f prices, quality o f items,
quantities, etc., or that may set precedents for future
purchases, are reviewed by higher authority prior to final
action.
In addition to the work described above, some (but
not all) buyers direct the work o f one or a few clerks
who perform routine aspects o f the work. As a
secondary and subsidiary duty, some buyers may also
sell or dispose o f surplus, salvage, or used materials,
equipment, or supplies.
N O T E : Some buyers are responsible for the pur­
chasing o f a variety o f items and materials. When the
variety includes items and work described at more than
one o f the following levels, the position should be
considered to equal the highest level that characterizes at
least a substantial portion o f the buyer’ s time.
E xcluded are:
a. Buyers o f items for direct sale, either wholesale or
retail;
b. Brokers and dealers buying for clients or for invest­
ment purposes;
c. Positions that specifically require professional educa­
tion and qualifications in a physical science or in engineering
(e.g., chemist, mechanical engineer);
d. Buyers who specialize in purchasing a single or a few
related items o f highly variable quality such as raw cotton or
w ool, tobacco, cattle, or leather for shoe uppers, etc. Expert
personal knowledge o f the item is required to judge the
relative value o f the goods offered and to decide the
quantity, quality, and price o f each purchase in terms o f its
probable effect on the organization’s profit and competitive
status;
e. Buyers whose principal responsibility is the super­




vision o f other buyers or the management, direction, or
supervision o f a purchasing program;
f. Persons predominantly concerned with contract or
subcontract administration;
g. Persons whose major duties consist o f ordering,
reordering, or requisitioning items under existing contracts;
and
h. Positions restricted to clerical functions or to purchase
expediting work.

Buyer I

Purchases “ off-the-shelf” types o f readily available,
com m only used materials, supplies, tools, furniture,
services, etc.
Transactions usually involve local retailers, whole­
salers, jobbers, and manufacturers’ sales representatives.
Quantities purchased are generally small amounts,
e.g., those available from local sources.
Exam ples o f items purchased include: Common
stationery and office supplies; standard types o f office
furniture and fixtures; standard nuts, bolts, screws;
janitorial and com m on building maintenance supplies;
and com m on building maintenance or com m on utility
services.

Buyer II

Purchases “ off-the-shelf” types o f standard, generally
available technical items, materials, and services.
Transactions usually involve dealing directly with
manufacturers, distributors, jobbers, etc.
Quantities o f items and materials purchased may be
relatively large, particularly in the case o f contracts for
continuing supply over a period o f time.
May be responsible for locating or promoting possible
new sources o f supply. Usually is expected to keep
abreast o f market trends, changes in business practices in
the assigned markets, new or altered types o f materials
entering the market, etc.
Exam ples o f items purchased include: Industrial
types o f handtools; electronic tube and com ponent test
instruments; standard electronic parts and com ponents;

electric motors; gasoline service station equipment; PBX
or other specialized telephone services; and routine
purchases o f com m on raw materials such as standard
grades and sizes o f steel bars, rods, and angles.
Also included at this level are buyers o f materials o f
the types described for buyer I when the quantities
purchased are large so that local sources o f supply are
generally inadequate and the buyer must deal directly
with manufacturers on a broader than local scale.

Buyer I II

Purchases items, materials, or services o f a technical
and specialized nature. The items, while o f a com m on
general type, are usually made, altered, or customized to
meet the user’s specific needs and specifications.
Transactions usually require dealing with manufac­
turers. The number o f potential vendors is likely to be
small and price differentials often reflect important
factors (quality, delivery dates and places, etc.) that are
difficult to evaluate.
The quantities purchased o f any item or service may
be large.
Many o f the purchases involve one or more o f such
complications as: Specifications that detail, in technical
terms, the required physical, chemical, electrical, or
other comparable properties; special testing prior to
acceptance; grouping o f items for lot bidding and
awards; specialized processing, packing, or packaging
requirements; export packs; overseas port differentials;
etc.
Is expected to keep abreast o f market and product
developments. May be required to locate new sources o f
supply.
Some positions may involve assisting in the training
or supervising o f lower level buyers or clerks.
Exam ples o f items purchased include: Castings;
special extruded shapes o f normal size and material;
special formula paints; electric motors o f special shape
or speed; special packaging o f items; and raw materials in
substantial quantities.

according to com plex and rigid specifications.
Quantities o f items and materials purchased are often
large in order to satisfy the requirements for an entire
large organization for an extended period o f time.
Complex schedules o f delivery are often involved. Buyer
determines appropriate quantities to be contracted for at
any given period o f time.
Transactions are often complicated by the presence
o f one or more such matters as inclusion o f: Require­
ments for spare parts, preproduction samples and
testing, or technical literature; or patent and royalty
provisions.
Keeps abreast o f market and product developments.
Develops new sources o f supply.
In addition to the work described above, a few
positions may also require supervision over a few lower
level buyers or clerks. (N o position is included in this
level solely because supervisory duties are performed.)
Exam ples o f items purchased include: Special pur­
pose high cost machine tools and production facilities;
raw materials o f critically important characteristics or
quality; parts, subassemblies, components, etc., specially
designed and made to order (e.g., communications
equipment for installation in aircraft being manufac­
tured; component assemblies for missiles and rockets;
and m otor vehicle frames).
N O T E : Excluded are buying positions above level IV.
Some buyers above level IV make purchases in such
unusually large quantities that they can affect the
market price o f a com m odity or produce other signi­

ficant effects on the industry or trade concerned. Others
may purchase items o f either (1 ) extraordinary technical
com plexity, e.g., involving the outermost limits o f
science or engineering, or (2 ) unusually high individual

Buyer IV

Purchases highly com plex and technical items,
materials, or services, usually those specially designed
and manufactured exclusively for the purchaser.
Transactions require dealing with manufacturers and
often involve persuading potential vendors to under­
take the manufacturing o f custom-designed items

or unit value. Such buyers often persuade suppliers to
expand their plants or convert facilities to the produc­
tion o f new items or services. These types o f buying
functions are often performed by program managers or
company officials who have primary responsibilities
other than buying.

Personnel Management
JOB A N A L Y S T

responsibilities and o f the physical and mental require­

Performs work involved in collecting, analyzing, and
developing occupational data relative to jobs, job

mining appropriate wage or salary levels in accordance

qualifications, and worker characteristics as a basis for
compensating employees in a fair, equitable, and
uniform manner. Performs such duties as studying and

conducting or participating with representatives o f other

analyzing jobs and preparing descriptions o f duties and

merit rating programs; reviewing changes in wages and

ments needed by workers; evaluating jobs and deter­




with their difficulty and responsibility; independently
companies in conducting compensation surveys within a
locality or labor market area; assisting in administering

salaries indicated by surveys and recommending changes
in pay scales; and auditing individual jobs to check the
propriety o f evaluations and to apply current job
classifications.

plan survey methods and conduct or direct wage surveys
within a broad compensation area.

Job Analyst I

Directs a personnel management program for a
company or a segment o f a company. Serves top

As a trainee, performs work in designated areas and
o f limited occupational scope. Receives immediate
supervision in assignments designed to provide training
in the application o f established methods and techniques
o f job analysis. Studies the least difficult jobs and
prepares reports for review by a jo b analyst o f higher
level.

management officials o f the organization as the source
o f advice and assistance on personnel management

Studies, describes, and evaluates jobs in accordance
with established procedures. Is usually assigned to the
simpler kinds o f both wage and salaried jobs in the
establishment. Works independently on such assignments
but is limited by instructions o f his superior and by
defined area o f assignment.

Job Analyst III

Analyzes and evaluates a variety o f wage and salaried
jobs in accordance with established evaluation systems
and procedures. May conduct wage surveys within the
locality or participate in conducting surveys o f broad
compensation areas. May assist in developing survey
methods and plans. Receives general supervision but
responsibility for final action is limited.

Job Analyst IV

Analyzes and evaluates a variety o f jobs in accordance
with established evaluation systems and procedures, and
is given assignments which regularly include responsi­
bility for the more difficult kinds o f jobs. ( “ More
means

jobs

which

consist

of

hard-to-

understand work processes; e.g., professional, scientific,
administrative, or technical; or jobs in new or emerging
occupational fields; or jobs which are being established
as part o f the creation o f new organizations; or where
other special considerations o f these types apply.)
Receives general supervision, but responsibility for final
action is limited. May participate in the development
and installation o f evaluation or compensation systems,
which may include those for merit rating programs. May




matters and problems generally; is typically consulted on
the

personnel

implications

management policy

of

planned

changes

in

or program, the effects on the

organization o f econom ic or market trends, product or
production method changes, etc.; represents manage­
ment in contacts with other companies, trade associa­
tions, government agencies, etc., dealing primarily with
personnel management matters.

Job Analyst II

difficult”

D IR E C T O R O F P E R S O N N E L

Typically the director o f personnel for a company
reports to a company officer in charge o f industrial
relations and personnel management activities or an
officer o f similar level. Below the company level the
director o f personnel typically reports to a company
officer or a high management official who has responsi­
bility for the operation o f a plant, establishment, or
other segment o f the company.
For a job to be covered by this definition, the
personnel management program m ust include responsi­
bility for all three o f the following functions:
1. Administering a job evaluation system:i.e., a system in
which there are established procedures by which jobs are
analyzed and evaluated on the basis o f their duties, responsi­
bilities, and qualification requirements in order to provide a
foundation for equitable compensation. Typically, such a
system includes the use o f one or more sets o f jo b evaluation
factors and the preparation o f formal job descriptions. It may
also include such related functions as wage and salary surveys
or merit rating system administration. The job evaluation
system(s) does not necessarily cover all jobs in the organiza­
tion, but does cover a substantial portion o f the organization.
2. Employment and placement function: i.e., recruiting
actively for at least some kinds o f workers through a variety
o f sources (e.g., schools or colleges, employment agencies,
professional societies, etc.); evaluating applicants against
demands o f particular jobs by use o f such techniques as jo b
analysis to determine requirements, interviews, written tests
o f aptitude, knowledge, or skill, reference checks, experience
evaluations, etc.; recommending selections and job place­
ments to management, etc.
3. Employee relations and services function: i.e.,
functions designed to maintain employees’ morale and
productivity at a high level (for example, administering a
formal or informal grievance procedure; identifying and
recommending solutions for personnel problems such as
ab sen teeism , high turnover, low productivity, etc.;
administration o f beneficial suggestions system, retirement,
pension, or insurance plans, merit rating system, etc.;

tions, work rules, hiring or la yoff procedures, etc., within the
broad terms o f a general agreement reached at higher levels,
or to supply advice and information on technical points to
the com pany’s principal representative.

overseeing cafeteria operations, recreational programs, indus­
trial health and safety programs, etc.).

In addition, positions covered by this definition may,
but do not necessarily, include responsibilities in the
following areas:
Employee training and development;
Labor relations activities which are confined mainly to
the administration, interpretation, and application o f those
aspects o f labor union contracts that are essentially o f the
type described under (3) above. May also participate in
bargaining o f a subordinate nature, e.g., to negotiate detailed
settlement o f such matters as specific rates, job classifica­

E xcluded are positions in which responsibility for
actual contract negotiation with labor unions as the
principal company representative is a significant aspect
o f the jo b , i.e., a responsibility which serves as a primary
basis for qualification requirements and compensation.

Director o f personnel jobs which meet the above
definition are classified by level o f work2 in accordance
with the criteria shown in table C-3.

Table C-3. Criteria fo r matching directors o f personnel by level
"Operations level"
personnel program 1
Number of employees in
work force serviced

"Development level"
personnel program 2

"Type A "
organization
serviced 3

"Type B"
organization
serviced 4

1
II
III
IV

II
III
IV
V

250-750 ...............................
1,000-5,000 ........................
6,000-12,000 .....................
15,000-25,000 ...................

Number of employees in
work force serviced

"Type A "
organization
serviced 3
II
III
IV
V

250-750 ...............................
1,000-5,000 ........................
6,000-12,000 .....................
15,000-25,000 ...................

"Type B"
organization
serviced 4

III
IV
V
-

1 "Operations lev el" personnel program —d ire c to r o f personnel servicing an o rg a n iz a tio n a l segm ent (e.g., a p la n t) o f a c o m p a n y ,
w h e re th e basic personnel prog ram policies, plans, ob jectives, e tc ., are established at c o m p a n y headqu arters or at som e o th e r higher
level b e tw e e n th e p la n t and th e c o m p a n y headqu arters level. T h e personnel d ire c to r's re s p o n s ib ility is to p u t these in to o p e ra tio n at
th e local level, in such a m an n e r as to m ost e ffe c tiv e ly serve th e local m an ag e m e n t needs.
2

"D evelopm ent level"personnel program —e ith e r :
(a) D ire c to r o f personnel servicing an e n tire c o m p a n y (w ith o r w ith o u t s u b o rd in a te establishm ents) w h e re th e personnel d ire c to r
plays an im p o rta n t role in e sta b lis h m e n t o f basic personnel policies, plans, ob jectives, e tc ., fo r th e c o m p a n y subject to p o lic y
d ire c tio n and c o n tro l fr o m c o m p a n y o ffice rs, o r (b ) d ire c to r o f personnel servicing an in te rm e d ia te o rg a n iz a tio n b e lo w th e
c o m p a n y level, e.g., a division o r a subsid iary, to w h ic h a rela tiv e ly c o m p le te d e le g a tio n o f personnel program p lan nin g and
d e v e lo p m e n t re s p o n s ib ility is m ade. In this s itu a tio n o n ly basic p o lic y d ire c tio n is given by th e p a ren t c o m p a n y and local office rs.
T h e d ire c to r o f personnel has essentially th e sam e degree o f la titu d e and re s p o n s ib ility fo r e s ta b lis h m e n t o f basic personnel policies,
plans, ob jectives, e tc., as described above in (a ).

2 "T yp e A " organization serviced—m ost jobs serviced do n o t present p a rtic u la rly d if f ic u lt o r unusual re c ru itm e n t, jo b
e va lu a tio n , o r tra in in g pro b le m s because th e jobs consist o f re la tiv e ly e asy-to-un derstand w o rk processes, and an a d equate la b o r supply
is available. These c o n d itio n s are m ost lik e ly to be fo u n d in org a n izatio n s in w h ic h th e w o rk fo rc e and o rg a n iza tio n a l s tru c tu re are
rela tiv e ly stable.
4 "T y p e B " organization serviced—a substantial n u m b er o f jobs present d iffic u lt re c ru itm e n t, jo b e v a lu a tio n , o r tra in in g
p rob lem s because o f th e jobs: C onsist o f h a rd -to -u n d e rsta n d w o rk processes (e.g., professional, s c ie n tific , a d m in is tra tiv e , or te c h n ic a l);
have h a rd -to -m a tc h skill req u ire m en ts; are in new or em erging occupatio ns; o r are e x tre m e ly hard to f ill. These c o n d itio n s are m ost
lik e ly to be fo u n d in o rg a n izatio n s in w h ic h th e w o rk fo rc e , o rg a n iza tio n a l s tru c tu re , w o rk processes o r fu n c tio n s , e tc ., are c o m p lic a te d
o r u nstable.
N O T E : T h e re are gaps b e tw e e n d iffe r e n t degrees o f all th re e elem ents used to d e te rm in e jo b level m atches. These gaps have been
pro v id ed pu rp osely to a llo w ro o m fo r ju d g m e n t in gettin g th e best overall jo b level m atch fo r each jo b . T h u s , a jo b w h ic h services a
w o rk fo rc e o f 8 5 0 e m p loyees should be m atched w ith level II if it is a personnel prog ram o p era tio n s level jo b w h ere th e n a tu re o f th e
o rg a n iza tio n serviced seems to fa ll slig h tly b e lo w th e d e fin itio n fo r ty p e B. H o w e v e r, th e same jo b should be m atc h e d w ith level I if th e
n ature o f th e o rg a n iza tio n serviced c le a rly falls w e ll w ith in th e d e fin itio n fo r ty p e A .

Chem ists and Engineers
processes; and to investigate the transformations which

C H E M IS T

substances undergo. Work typically
Performs professional work in research, development,

requires a B.S.

degree in chemistry or the equivalent in appropriate and

the

substantial

com position, molecular structure, and properties o f

experience.

in te r p r e t a tio n ,

and

analysis

to

determine

substances; to develop or investigate new materials and
2 Insufficient data were obtained
presentation o f average salaries.




for level V to w arrant

college

level

study

of

chemistry

plus

Chemist I
General characteristics. This is the entry level o f profes­

sional work requiring a bachelor’s degree in chemistry

and no experience, or the equivalent (to a degree) in
appropriate education and experience. Performs assign­
ments designed to develop professional capabilities and
to provide experience in the application o f training in
chemistry as it relates to the com pany’s programs. May
also receive formal classroom or seminar type training.

cedures, e.g., extending or curtailing the analysis or using
alternate procedures, based on his knowledge o f the
problem and pertinent available literature. Conducts
specified phases o f research projects as an assistant to an
experienced chemist.

(Terminal positions are excluded.)

Responsibility

fo r

the

direction

o f others.

May be

a broad

range o f

assisted by a few aids or technicians.
Direction

received.

Works

under

close

supervision.

Receives specific and detailed instructions as to required
tasks and results expected. Work is checked during
progress, and is reviewed for accuracy upon completion.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety o f
routine tasks that are planned to provide experience and
familiarization with the chemistry staff, methods,
practices, and programs o f the company. The work
includes a variety o f routine qualitative and quantitative
analyses; physical tests to determine properties such as
viscosity, tensile strength, and melting point; and
assisting more experienced chemists to gain additional
knowledge through personal observation and discussion.
R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. Usually none.

Chemist III
General

characteristics.

Performs

chemical tests and procedures utilized in the laboratory,
using judgment in the independent evaluation, selection,
and adaptation o f standard methods and techniques.
May carry through a complete series o f tests on a
product in its different process stages. Some assignments
require a specialized knowledge o f one or tw o com m on
categories o f related substances. Performance at this
level requires developmental experience in a professional
position, or equivalent graduate level education.
Direction received. On routine work, supervision is very

Chemist II

general. Assistance is furnished on unusual problems and
work is reviewed for application o f sound professional
judgment.

General

characteristics. At this continuing develop­
mental level, performs routine chemical work requiring

Typical duties and responsibilities. In accordance with
instructions as to the nature o f the problem, selects

selection and application o f general and specialized
methods, techniques, and instruments com m only used in

standard methods, tests or procedures; when necessary,
develops or works out alternate or m odified methods

the laboratory and the ability to carry out instructions
when less com m on or proposed methods or procedures
are necessary. Requires work experience acquired in an
entry level position, or appropriate graduate level study.
For training and developmental purposes, assignments
may include some work that is typical o f a higher level.
(Terminal positions are excluded.)

with supervisor’ s concurrence. Assists in research by
analyzing samples or testing new procedures that require
specialized training because (a) standard methods are
inapplicable, (b ) analytical findings must be interpreted
in terms o f compliance or noncompliance with
standards, or (c) specialized and advanced equipment
and techniques must be adapted.

Direction received. Supervisor establishes the nature and

Responsibility fo r the direction o f others. May supervise

extent

or coordinate the work o f a few technicians or aids, and

of

analysis

required,

specifies methods and

criteria on new types o f assignments, and reviews work
for thoroughness o f
accuracy o f results.

application

of

methods

be assisted by lower level chemists.

and
Chemist IV

Carries out a wide

General characteristics. As a fully competent chemist in

variety o f standardized methods, tests, and procedures.
In accordance with specific instructions may carry out
proposed and less com m on ones. Is expected to detect

all conventional aspects o f the subject matter or the

Typical duties and responsibilities.

functional area o f the assignments, plans and conducts
work requiring (a) mastery o f specialized techniques or

problems in using standardized procedures because o f

ingenuity in selecting and evaluating approaches to

the

sample, difficulties with the

unforeseen or novel problems, and (b ) ability to apply a

equipment, etc. Recommends modifications o f pro­

research approach to the solution o f a wide variety o f

condition

of




the

problems and to assimilate the details and significance o f
chemical and physical analyses, procedures, and tests.
Requires sufficient professional experience to assure
competence as a fully trained worker; or, for positions
primarily o f a research nature, com pletion o f all require­
ments for a doctoral degree may be substituted for
experience.
Direction received. Independently performs most assign­

ments with instructions as to the general results
expected. Receives technical guidance on unusual or
com plex problems and supervisory approval on proposed

highly m odified scientific techniques and procedures,
extensive knowledge o f his specialty, and knowledge o f
related scientific fields.
Responsibility fo r the direction o f others. Supervises,

coordinates, and reviews the work o f a small staff o f
chemists and technicians engaged in varied research and
development projects, or a larger group performing
routine analytical work. Estimates manpower needs and
schedules and assigns work to meet com pletion date. Or,
as individual researcher or worker, may be assisted on
projects by other chemists or technicians.

plans for projects.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Conducts laboratory
assignments requiring the determination and evaluation
o f alternative procedures and the sequence o f
performing them. Performs com plex, exacting, unusual
analytical assignments requiring specialized knowledge
o f techniques or products. Interprets results, prepares
reports, and may provide technical advice in his

specialized area.
R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. May supervise

a small staff o f chemists and technicians.

Chemist V
General characteristics. Participates in planning labora­

tory programs on the basis o f specialized knowledge o f
pfpblems and methods and probable value o f results.
May serve as an expert in a narrow specialty (e.g., class
o f chemical compounds, or a class o f products), making
recommendations and conclusions which serve as the
basis for undertaking or rejecting important projects.
Development o f the knowledge and expertise required
for this level o f work usually reflects progressive
experience through chemist IV.

Chemist V I
General characteristics. Performs work requiring leader­

ship and expert knowledge in a specialized field,
product, or process. Formulates and conducts a systema­
tic attack on a problem area o f considerable scope and
com plexity which must be approached through a series
o f complete and conceptually related studies, or a
number o f projects o f lesser scope. The problems are
com plex because they are difficult to define and require
unconventional or novel approaches or have other
difficult features. Maintains liaison with individuals and
units within and outside his organization, with responsi­
bility for acting independently on technical matters
pertaining to his field. Work at this level usually requires
extensive progressive experience including work compar­
able to chemist V.
Supervision received is essentially
administrative, with assignments given in terms o f broad

Direction received.

general objectives and limits.

received. Supervision and guidance relates
largely to overall objectives, critical issues, new concepts,
and policy matters. Consults with supervisor concerning

Typical duties and responsibilities. One or both o f the
following: (1) In a supervisory capacity (a) plans,
develops, coordinates, and directs a number o f large and
important projects or a project o f major scope and
importance, or (b ) is responsible for the entire chemical
program o f a company, when the program is o f limited
complexity and scope. Activities under his leadership are

unusual problems and developments.

o f such a scope that they require a few (3 to 5)

Typical duties and responsibilities. One or both o f the

subordinate supervisors or team leaders with at least one
in a position comparable to level V. (2) As individual

following: (1 ) In a supervisory capacity, plans, organizes,

researcher or worker determines, conceives, plans, and

Direction

and directs assigned laboratory programs. Independently

conducts projects o f major importance to the company.

defines scope and critical elements o f the projects and
selects approaches to be taken. A substantial portion o f

Applies a high degree o f originality and ingenuity in
adapting, extending, and synthesizing existing theory,

the work supervised is comparable to that described for
chemist IV. (2 ) As individual researcher or worker,

principles, and techniques into original combinations
and configurations. May serve as a consultant to other

carries out projects requiring development o f new or

chemists in his specialty.




R esponsibility

fo r the direction o f others. Plans,
organizes, and supervises the work o f a staff o f chemists
and technicians. Evaluates progress o f the staff and
results obtained, and recommends major changes to
achieve overall objectives. Or, as individual worker or

complex aspects o f extremely broad and important
programs. Has responsibility for exploring, evaluating,
and justifying proposed and current programs and
projects and furnishing advice on unusually com plex and
novel problems in the specialty field. Typically will have

researcher, may be assisted on individual projects by
other chemists or technicians.

contributed innovations (e.g., techniques, products,
procedures) which are regarded as significant advances in
the field.

Chemist V II

Responsibility fo r the direction o f others. Directs several

General characteristics. Makes decisions and recommen­

are in positions comparable

dations that are recognized as authoritative and have an
important impact on extensive chemical activities.
Initiates and maintains extensive contacts with key
chemists and officials o f other organizations and com ­
panies, requiring skill in persuasion and negotiation o f

individual researcher and consultant, may be assisted on

subordinate supervisors or team leaders, some o f whom

critical issues. At this level individuals will have
demonstrated creativity, foresight, and mature judgment
in anticipating and solving unprecedented chemical
problems, determining program objectives and require­
ments, organizing programs and projects, and developing
standards and guides for diverse chemical activities.
D irection

received.

Receives

general

administrative

direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities. One or both o f the
following: (1 ) In a supervisory capacity is responsible for

(a) an important segment o f a chemical program o f a
company with extensive and diversified scientific
requirements, or (b ) the entire chemical program o f a
company where the program is more limited in scope.
The overall chemical program contains critical problems
the solution o f which requires major technological
advances and opens the way for extensive related
development. Makes authoritative technical recom­
mendations concerning the scientific objectives and
levels o f work which will be most profitable in light o f
company requirements and scientific and industrial
trends

and

personnel,

developments.
and

funds

Recommends

required.

(2 )

As

facilities,

to

chemist V I; or, as

individual projects by other chemists and technicians.

Chemist V I I I
characteristics. Makes decisions and recom­
mendations that are authoritative and have a far-reaching
impact on extensive chemical and related activities o f
the company. Negotiates critical and controversial issues
with top level chemists and officers o f other organiza­
tions and companies. Individuals at this level have
demonstrated a high degree o f creativity, foresight, and
mature judgment in planning, organizing, and guiding
e x te n s iv e
chem ical programs and activities o f
outstanding novelty and importance.

General

Direction

received.

Receives

general

administrative

direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities . One or both o f the

following: (1 ) In a supervisory capacity is responsible for
(a) the entire chemical program o f a company which is
o f moderate scope, or (b ) an important segment o f a
chemical program o f a company with very extensive and
highly diversified scientific requirements, where pro­
grams are o f such com plexity and scope that they are o f
critical importance to overall operations and include
problems o f extraordinary difficulty that have resisted

individual

solution. Decides the kind and extent o f chemical

researcher and consultant, selects problems for research
to further the com pany’ s objectives. Conceives and plans

programs needed to accomplish the objectives o f the

investigations in which the phenomena and principles are

planning and organizing facilities and programs, and for

not adequately understood, and where few or contra­

interpreting results. (2 ) As individual researcher and

dictory scientific precedents or results are available for
reference. Outstanding creativity and mature judgment
are required to devise hypotheses and techniques o f

consultant formulates and guides the attack on problems
o f exceptional difficulty and marked importance to the
company and/or industry. Problems are characterized by

experimentation and to interpret results. As a leader and

the lack o f scientific precedents and source materials, or
the lack o f success o f prior research and analysis so that

authority in his company, in a broad area o f specializa­
tion, or in a narrow but intensely specialized one, advises
the head o f a large laboratory or company officials on




company, for choosing the scientific approaches, for

their solution would represent an advance o f great
significance and importance. Performs advisory and

consulting work for the company as a recognized
authority for broad program areas o f considerable
novelty and importance. Has made contributions such as
new products or techniques, development o f processes,
etc., which are regarded as major advances in the field.
Responsibility f o r

the direction o f others.

Supervises

several subordinate supervisors or team leaders some o f
whose positions are comparable to chemist VII, or

and abilities. May also receive formal classroom or
seminar type training. (Terminal positions are excluded.)
received. Works under close supervision.
Receives specific and detailed instructions as to required
tasks and results expected. Work is checked during
progress and is reviewed for accuracy upon completion.

D irection

Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety o f
routine tasks that are planned to provide experience and

individual researchers some o f whose positions are
comparable to chemist VII and sometimes chemist VIII.

familiarization

As an individual researcher and consultant may be

practices, and programs o f the company.

with

the engineering staff, methods,

assisted on individual projects by other chemists or
technicians.
N O T E : Individuals in charge o f a com pany’ s chemical

program may match any o f several o f the survey job
levels, depending on the size and com plexity o f chemical
programs. Excluded from level VIII are chemists in
charge o f programs so extensive and com plex (e.g.,
consisting o f highly diversified or unusually novel
products and procedures) that one or more subordinate
supervisory chemists are performing at level VIII. Also
excluded from level VIII are individual researchers and
consultants who are recognized as national and/or
international authorities and scientific leaders in very
broad areas o f scientific interest and investigation.

Responsibility f o r the direction o f others. Usually none.

Engineer II
General

characteristics.

mental

level,

performs

At this continuing develop­
routine engineering work

requiring application o f standard techniques, procedures,
and criteria in carrying out a sequence o f related
engineering tasks. Limited exercise o f judgment is
required on details o f work and in making preliminary
selections and adaptations o f engineering alternatives.
Requires work experience acquired in an entry level
position, or appropriate graduate level study. For
training and developmental purposes, assignments may
include some work that is typical o f a higher level.
(Terminal positions are excluded.)

E N G IN E E R
Direction received.

Supervisor screens assignments for

Performs professional work in research, development,
design, testing, analysis, production, construction,
maintenance, operation, planning, survey, estimating,
application, or standardization o f engineering facilities,
systems, structures, processes, equipment devices, or
materials requiring knowledge o f the science and art by
which materials, natural resources, and power are made
useful. Work typically requires a B.S. degree in engineer­
ing or the equivalent in combined education and
experience. (E xclu ded are: Safety engineers, industrial
engineers, quality control engineers, sales engineers, and
engineers whose primary responsibility is to be in charge

unusual or difficult problems and selects techniques and
procedures to be applied on nonroutine work. Receives
close supervision on new aspects o f assignments.

o f nonprofessional maintenance work.)

Responsibility fo r

Typical duties and responsibilities. Using prescribed
methods, performs specific and limited portions o f a
broader assignment o f an experienced engineer. Applies
standard practices and techniques in specific situations,
adjusts and correlates data, recognizes discrepancies in
results, and follow s operations through a series o f related
detailed steps or processes.
the

direction

o f others.

May be

assisted by a few aids or technicians.
Engineer I
Engineer III
General characteristics. This is the entry level o f profes­

sional work requiring a bachelor’s degree in engineering

General characteristics. Independently evaluates, selects,

and no experience, or the equivalent (to a degree) in
appropriate education and experience. Performs assign­

and applies standard engineering techniques, procedures,

ments designed to develop professional work knowledges

tions and modifications. Assignments have clear and




and criteria, using judgment in making minor adapta­

specified objectives and require the investigation o f a
limited number o f variables. Performance at this level
requires developmental experience in a professional
position, or equivalent graduate level education.

requirements, unsuitability o f standard materials, and
difficult coordination requirements. Work requires a
broad knowledge o f precedents in the specialty area and
a good knowledge o f principles and practices o f related
specialties.

Receives instructions on specific
assignment objectives, com plex features, and possible

R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. May supervise

solutions. Assistance is furnished on unusual problems

a few engineers or technicians on assigned work.

D irection

received.

and work is reviewed for application o f sound profes­
sional judgment.

Engineer V

Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs work which
involves conventional types o f plans, investigations,
surveys, structures, or equipment with relatively few
com plex features for which there are precedents. Assign­
ments usually include one or more o f the following:
Equipment design and development, test o f materials,
preparation o f specifications, process study, research
investigations, report preparation, and other activities o f
limited scope requiring knowledge o f principles and
techniques com m only employed in the specific narrow
area o f assignments.
Responsibility f o r the direction o f others. May supervise

General characteristics. Applies intensive and diversified

knowledge o f engineering principles and practices in
broad areas o f assignments and related fields. Makes
decisions independently on engineering problems and
methods, and represents the organization in conferences
to resolve important questions and to plan and
coordinate work. Requires the use o f advanced techni­
ques and the m odification and extension o f theories,
precepts, and practices o f his field and related sciences
and disciplines. The knowledge and expertise required
for this level o f work usually result from progressive
experience, including work comparable to engineer IV.

or coordinate the work o f drafters, technicians, and
others who assist in specific assignments.

D irection

Engineer IV

unusual problems and developments.

General characteristics. As a fully competent engineer in

doctoral degree may be substituted for experience.

Typical duties and responsibilities. One or more o f the
following: (1 ) In a supervisory capacity plans, develops,
coordinates, and directs a large and important engineer­
ing project or a number o f small projects with many
com plex features. A substantial portion o f the work
supervised is comparable to that described for engineer
IV. (2 ) As individual researcher or worker carries out
com plex or novel assignments requiring the development
o f new or improved techniques and procedures. Work is
expected to result in the development o f new or refined
equipment, materials, processes, products, and/or

D irection received. Independently performs most assign­

scientific methods. (3 ) As staff specialist develops and
evaluates plans and criteria for a variety o f projects and

ments

activities to be

all conventional aspects o f the subject matter or the
functional area o f the assignments, plans and conducts
work requiring judgment in the independent evaluation,
selection, and substantial adaptation and m odification o f
standard techniques, procedures, and criteria. Devises
new approaches to problems encountered. Requires
sufficient professional experience to assure competence
as a fully trained worker; or, for positions primarily o f a
research nature, com pletion o f all requirements for a

with

instructions

as to

the

general

results

expected. Receives technical guidance on unusual or
com plex problems and supervisory approval on proposed
plans for projects.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Plans, schedules,
conducts, or coordinates detailed phases o f the engineer­

received.

Supervision

and guidance

relate

largely to overall objectives, critical issues, new concepts,
and policy matters. Consults with supervisor concerning

carried out by others. Assesses the

feasibility and soundness o f proposed engineering evalua­
tion tests, products, or equipment when necessary data
are insufficient or confirmation by testing is advisable.
Usually performs as a staff advisor and consultant as to a
technical specialty, a type o f facility or equipment, or a
program function.

ing work in a part o f a major project or in a total project
o f moderate scope. Performs work which involves
conventional engineering practice but may include a

R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. Supervises,

variety o f com plex features such as conflicting design

engineers and technicians; estimates manpower needs




coordinates, and reviews the work o f a small staff o f

and schedules and assigns work to meet completion date.
Or, as individual research or staff specialist may be
assisted on projects by other engineers or technicians.

scientific methods and developments affecting his
organization for the purpose o f recommending changes
in emphasis o f programs or new programs warranted by
such developments.

Engineer V I
fo r the direction o f others. Plans,
organizes, and supervises the work o f a staff o f engineers

Responsibility
General characteristics. Has full technical responsibility

for interpreting, organizing, executing, and coordinating
assignments. Plans and develops engineering projects
concerned with unique or controversial problems which
have an important effect on major company programs.
This involves exploration o f subject area, definition o f
scope and selection o f problems for investigation, and
development o f novel concepts and approaches.
Maintains liaison with individuals and units within or
outside his organization, with responsibility for acting
independently on technical matters pertaining to his
field. Work at this level usually requires extensive
progressive experience including work comparable to
engineer V.
Supervision received is essentially
administrative, with assignments given in terms o f broad
general objectives and limits.

D irection received.

Typical duties and responsibilities. One or more o f the

following:

(1) In a supervisory capacity (a) plans,

develops, coordinates, and directs a number o f large and
important projects or a project o f major scope and
importance, or (b ) is responsible for the entire
engineering program o f a company when the program is
o f limited com plexity and scope. The extent o f his
responsibilities generally requires a few (3 to 5)
subordinate supervisors or team leaders with at least one
in a position comparable to level V. (2 ) As individual
researcher or worker conceives, plans, and conducts
research in problem areas o f considerable scope and
complexity. The problems must be approached through
a series o f complete and conceptually related studies, are
difficult to define, require unconventional or novel
approaches, and require sophisticated research tech­
niques. Available guides and precedents contain critical
gaps, are only partially related to the problem, or may
be largely lacking due to the novel character o f the

and technicians. Evaluates progress o f the staff and
results obtained, and recommends major changes to
achieve overall objectives. Or, as individual researcher or
staff specialist may be assisted on individual projects by
other engineers or technicians.

Engineer V II
General characteristics. Makes decisions and recom­
mendations that are recognized as authoritative and have
an important impact on extensive engineering activities.
Initiates and maintains extensive contacts with key
engineers and officials o f other organizations and
companies, requiring skill in persuasion and negotiation
o f critical issues. At this level individuals will have
demonstrated creativity, foresight, and mature engineer­
ing judgment in anticipating and solving unprecedented
engineering problems, determining program objectives

and requirements, organizing programs and projects, and
developing standards and guides for diverse engineering
activities.
Direction

received.

Receives

general

administrative

direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities. One or both o f the
following: (1 ) In a supervisory capacity is responsible for
(a) an important segment o f the engineering program o f
a company with extensive and diversified engineering
requirements, or (b ) the entire engineering program o f a
company when it is more limited in scope. The overall
engineering program contains critical problems the solu­
tion o f which requires major technological advances and
opens the way for extensive related development. The
extent o f his responsibilities generally requires several
subordinate organizational segments or teams. R ecom ­

project. At this level, the individual researcher generally
will have contributed inventions, new designs, or tech­

mends facilities, personnel, and funds required to carry

niques which are o f material significance in the solution

directed toward fulfillment o f overall company objec­

o f important problems. (3) As a staff specialist serves as
the technical specialist for the organization (division or
company) in the application o f advanced theories,

tives. (2 ) As individual researcher and consultant is a

concepts, principles, and processes for an assigned area
o f responsibility (i.e., subject matter, function, type o f
facility or equipment, or product). Keeps abreast o f new




out

programs

which

are directly related with and

recognized leader and authority in his company in a
broad area o f specialization or in a narrow but intensely
specialized field. Selects research problems to further the
com pany’s objectives. Conceives and plans investigations
o f broad areas o f considerable novelty and importance

for which engineering precedents are lacking in areas
critical to the overall engineering program. Is consulted
extensively by associates and others, with a high degree
o f reliance placed on his scientific interpretations and
advice. Typically, will have contributed inventions, new
designs, or techniques which are regarded as major
advances in the field.
R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. Directs several

subordinate supervisors or team leaders, some o f whom
are in positions comparable to engineer V I; or, as
individual researcher and consultant, may be assisted on
individual projects by other engineers and technicians.

solution, and consist o f several segments requiring
subordinate supervisors. Is responsible for deciding the
kind and extent o f engineering and related programs
needed to accomplish the objectives o f the company, for
choosing the scientific approaches, for planning and
organizing facilities and programs, and for interpreting
results. (2 ) As individual researcher and consultant
formulates and guides the attack on problems o f
exceptional difficulty and marked importance to the
company or industry. Problems are characterized by
their lack o f scientific precedents and source material, or
lack o f success o f prior research and analysis so that
their solution would represent an advance o f great
significance and importance. Performs advisory and
consulting work for the company as a recognized
authority for broad program areas or in an intensely
specialized area o f considerable novelty and importance.

Engineer V I II
characteristics. Makes decisions and recom­
mendations that are recognized as authoritative and have
a far-reaching impact on extensive engineering and
related activities o f the company. Negotiates critical and
controversial issues with top level engineers and officers
o f other organizations and companies. Individuals at this
level demonstrate a high degree o f creativity, foresight,
and mature judgment in planning, organizing, and

General

guiding extensive engineering programs and activities o f

the direction o f others. Supervises
several subordinate supervisors or team leaders some o f
whose positions are comparable to engineer VII, or

Responsibility fo r

individual researchers some o f whose positions are
comparable to engineer VII and sometimes engineer
VIII. As an individual researcher and consultant may be
assisted on individual projects by other engineers or
technicians.

outstanding novelty and importance.
N O T E : Individuals in charge o f a com pany’s engineer­

administrative

ing program may match any o f several o f the survey job
levels depending on the size and com plexity o f engineer­
ing programs. Excluded from level VIII are engineers in

Typical duties and responsibilities. One or both o f the
following: ( 1) In a supervisory capacity is responsible for
(a) an important segment o f a very extensive and highly
diversified engineering program o f a company, or (b ) the
entire engineering program o f a company when the

charge o f programs so extensive and com plex (e.g.,
consisting o f research and development on a variety o f
com plex products or systems with numerous novel
components) that one or more subordinate supervisory
engineers are performing at level VIII. Also excluded
from level VIII are individual researchers and consultants
who are recognized as national and/or international
authorities and scientific leaders in very broad areas o f
scientific interest and investigation.

Direction

received.

Receives

general

direction.

program is o f moderate scope. The programs are o f such
complexity and scope that they are o f critical
importance to overall objectives, include problems o f
extraordinary difficulty that often have resisted

Technical Support
E N G IN E E R IN G T E C H N IC IA N

To be covered by these definitions, employees must

science

or

engineering.

(Excludes

production

maintenance workers, quality control testers,
workers, drafters, designers, and engineers.)

or
craft

meet all o f the following criteria: (a) Provides
semiprofessional technical support for engineers working
in such areas as research, design, development, testing, or
manufacturing process improvement. (2 ) Work pertains

Engineering Technician I

to electrical, electronic, or mechanical components or

Performs simple routine tasks under close supervision

equipment. (3 ) Required to have some knowledge o f

or from detailed procedures. Work is checked in process




or on completion. Performs, at this level, one or a
combination o f such typical duties as:
Assembles or installs equipment or parts requiring simple
wiring, soldering, or connecting.
Performs simple or routine tasks or tests such as tensile or
hardness tests; operates and adjusts simple test equipment;
records test data.
Gathers and maintains specified records o f engineering
data such as tests, drawings, etc.; performs computations by
substituting numbers in specified formulas; plots data and
draws simple curves and graphs.

Engineering Technician II

Performs standardized or prescribed assignments,
involving a sequence o f related operations. Follows

nical advice from supervisor or engineer; work is
reviewed for technical adequacy. May be assisted by
lower level technicians. Performs, at this level, one or a
combination o f such typical duties as:
Works on limited segment o f development project; con­
structs experimental or prototype models to meet
engineering requirements; conducts tests or experiments;
records and evaluates data and reports findings.
Conducts tests or experiments requiring selection and
adaptation or m odification o f test equipment and test
procedures; records data; analyzes data and prepares test
reports.
Compiles and computes a variety o f engineering data; may
analyze test and design data; develops or prepares schematics,
designs, specifications, parts lists, or makes recommendations
regarding these items. May review designs or specifications
for adequacy.

standard work methods or explicit instructions; tech­
nical adequacy o f routine work is reviewed on com ­
pletion; nonroutine work may also be reviewed in
process. Performs, at this level, one or a combination o f
such typical duties as:
Assembles or constructs simple or standard equipment or
parts. May service or repair simple instruments or equipment.
Conducts a variety o f standardized tests; may prepare test
specimens; sets up and operates standard test equipment;
records test data.
Extracts engineering data from various prescribed sources;
processes the data following well-defined methods; presents
the data in prescribed form.

Engineering Technician I II

Engineering Technician V

Performs nonroutine and com plex assignments in­
volving responsibility for planning and conducting a
complete project o f relatively limited scope or a portion
o f a larger and more diverse project. Selects and adapts
plans, techniques, designs, or layouts. May coordinate
portions o f overall assignment; reviews, analyzes, and
integrates the technical work o f others. Supervisor or
professional engineer outlines objectives, requirements,
and design approaches; completed work is reviewed for
technical adequacy and satisfaction o f requirements.
May be assisted by lower level technicians. Performs, at
this level, one or a combination o f such typical duties as:

Performs

assignments

that

are

not

completely

standardized or prescribed. Selects or adapts standard
procedures or equipment. Receives initial instructions,
equipment requirements, and advice from supervisor or
engineer; technical adequacy o f completed work is
checked. Performs, at this level, one or a combination o f
such typical duties as:
Constructs components, subunits, or simple models or
adapts standard equipment. May troubleshoot and correct
malfunctions.
Conducts various tests or experiments which may require
minor modifications in test setups or procedures; selects, sets
up, and operates standard test equipment and records test
data.
Extracts and compiles a variety o f engineering data;
processes or computes data using specified formulas and
procedures. Performs routine analysis to check applicability,
accuracy, and reasonableness o f data.

Engineering Technician IV

Designs, develops, and constructs major units, devices, or
equipment; conducts tests or experiments; analyzes results
and redesigns or modifies equipment to improve per­
formance; reports results.
Plans or assists in planning tests to evaluate equipment
performance. Determines test requirements, equipment
modification and test procedures; conducts tests, analyzes
and evaluates data, and prepares reports on findings and
recommendations.
Reviews and analyzes a variety o f engineering data to
determine requirements to meet engineering objectives; may
calculate design data; prepares layouts, detailed specifica­
tions, parts lists, estimates, procedures, etc. May check and
analyze drawings or equipment to determine adequacy o f
drawings and design.

DRAFTERS

D rafter-t racer

Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by
Performs nonroutine assignments o f substantial
variety and com plexity. Receives objectives and tech­




placing tracing cloth or paper over drawings and tracing
with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracing limited to

plans primarily consisting o f straight lines and a large
scale not requiring close delineation.)

drawings, or direct their preparation b y lower level
drafters.

and/or
Prepares simple or repetitive drawings o f easily visualized
items. Work is closely supervised during progress.

Prepares detail drawings o f single units or parts for
engineering, construction, manufacturing, or repair pur­
poses. Types o f drawings prepared include isometric
(depicting

three

scale) and sectional views to

dimensions in accurate
clarify positioning or

components and convey needed information. Consoli­
dates details from a number o f sources and adjusts o f
transposes

Monitors and operates the control console o f a digital
computer, in accordance with operating instructions, to
process data. Work is characterized by the following:

D rafter I

projections

COM PUTER O PER A TO R

scale as required. Suggested methods o f

approach, applicable precedents, and advice on source
materials are given with initial assignments. Instructions
are less complete when assignments recur. Work may be
spot checked during progress.
D rafter II

Performs nonroutine and com plex drafting assign­
ments that require the application o f most o f the
standardized drawing techniques regularly used. Duties
typically involve such work as: Prepares working
drawings o f subassemblies with irregular shapes, multiple
functions, and precise positional relationships between
components; prepares architectural drawings for con ­
struction o f a building including detail drawings o f
foundations, wall sections, floor plans, and roof. Uses
accepted formulas and manuals in making necessary
computations to determine quantities o f materials to be
used, load capacities, strengths, stresses, etc. Receives
initial instructions, requirements, and advice from super­
visor. Completed work is checked for technical
adequacy.

Studies operating instructions to determine equipment setup
needed;
Loads equipment with required items (tapes, cards, paper,
etc.);
Switches necessary auxiliary equipment into system;
Starts and operates computer;
Responds to operating instructions and computer output
instructions;
Reviews error messages and makes corrections during opera­
tion or refers problems;
Maintains operating record.

May test run new or modified programs and assist in
modifying systems or programs. Included within the
scope o f this definition are fully qualified computer
operators, trainees working to becom e fully qualified
operators, and lead operators providing technical
assistance to lower level operators.

Computer Operator I

Work assignments consist o f on-the-job training
(sometimes augmented by classroom training). Operator
is provided detailed written or oral guidance before and
during assignments
supervision.

and

is

under

close

personal

Com puter O perator II

Work assignments typically are established produc­
tion runs (i.e., programs which present few operating
problems) executed by serial processing (i.e., one
program is processed at a time). In response to computer
output instructions or error conditions, applies standard

D rafter III

operating

Plans the graphic presentation o f com plex items

or

corrective

procedure.

Refers problems

which do not respond to preplanned procedure.

having distinctive design features that differ significantly
from established drafting precedents. Works in close

Computer Operator III

support with the design originator, and may recommend
o f each

Work assignments are characterized by the frequent

change on the details o f form , function, and positional
relationships o f components and parts. Works with a
minimum o f supervisory assistance. Completed work is
reviewed by design originator for consistency with prior
e n g in e e r in g determinations. May either prepare

introduction
of
new
programs,
applications,
and procedures (i.e., situations which require the

minor

design changes. Analyzes the effect




operator to adapt to a variety o f problems) executed by
serial processing. In response to computer output
instructions

or

error

conditions,

applies

standard

operating or corrective procedure. Refers problems
which do not respond to preplanned procedure.
OR

Work assignments typically are established produc­
tion runs (i.e., programs which present few operating
problems) executed by serial processing. Selects from a
variety o f standard setup and operating procedures. In
response to computer output instructions or error
conditions, deviates from standard procedures if
standard procedures do not provide a solution. Then
refers problems or aborts program.
OR

adapt to a variety o f problems) executed by multi­
processing. In response to computer output instructions
or error conditions, applies standard operating or
corrective procedure. Refers problems which do not
respond to preplanned procedure.
OR

Work assignments are established production run (i.e.,
programs which present few operating problems)
executed by multiprocessing. Selects from a variety o f
standard setup and operating procedures. In response to
computer output instructions or error conditions,
deviates from standard procedures if standard pro­
cedures do not provide a solution. Then refers problems

Work assignments are established production runs
(i.e., programs which present few operating problems)
e x e cu te d
b y multiprocessing (i.e., simultaneous
processing o f two or more programs). In response to
computer output instructions or error conditions,
applies standard operating or corrective procedure.
Refers problems which do not respond to preplanned

or aborts program.

Com puter O perator V

Work assignments are characterized by the frequent
testing and introduction o f new programs, applications
and

procedures.

procedures

operator

to

(i.e.,

adapt

situations which

to

a variety

of

require

problems).

the
In

responding to computer output instructions and error
conditions or to avoid loss o f information or to conserve

Com puter O perator IV

computer time, operator deviates from standard pro­

Work assignments are characterized by the frequent
introduction o f new programs, applications, and
procedures (i.e., situations which require the operator to
adapt to a variety o f problems) executed by serial
processing. Selects from a variety o f standard setup and
operating procedures. In response to computer output
instructions or error conditions, deviates from standard
procedures if standard procedures do not provide a
solution. Then refers problems or aborts program.
OR

Work assignments are characterized by the frequent
introduction o f new programs, applications, and
procedures (i.e., situations which require the operator to

cedures or aborts program. Such actions may materially
alter the computer unit’s production plans. Advises
programmers and subject-matter experts on setup
techniques.

Computer Operator V I

In addition to level V characteristics, assignments at
this level require a knowledge o f program language,
computer features, and software systems to assist in: ( 1)
Maintaining, modifying, and developing operating
systems or programs; ( 2) developing operating instru­
ctions and techniques to cover problem situations; ( 3)
switching to ermgency backup procedures.

Clerical Supervisory
K E Y P U N C H S U P E R V IS O R

puters, tabulating machines, or other kinds o f office
machines;

Supervises three or more keypunch operators who
keypunch or verify cards or tape for computer or

(b )

positions

responsible

clerical work not directly

for

supervising

related to the keypunch

tabulating machine processing. May also, as an incidental

function; and (c ) working supervisors, group leaders, or
other overseers with more limited supervisory responsi­

responsibility, supervise the operation o f other types o f

bility than is described below.

punching machines such as reproducers or gang punches.

Keypunch supervisory positions are classified in five
levels (I through V ) on the basis o f combinations o f
three elements—
level and kind o f supervisory responsi-

E xclu ded

are:

(a)

Positions also responsible for

supervising the operation o f equipment such as com ­




Table C-4. Criteria fo r matching keypunch supervisors by level

Level and kind of supervisory responsibility
Lower

Upper

Is responsible for the day-to-day operations and flow of work
when the organization of the work, assignment of employees to
positions, the job types and levels, instructions and procedures,
etc., are prescribed by higher authority. Within this prescribed
framework, assigns work to individual employees; instructs
employees in specific tasks and procedures; insures work meets
established standards of quality; checks attendance; keeps
production records; provides information to higher levels for use
in budgeting, planning of personnel changes, adjusting to
variations in the workload, etc.; reports problems to a higher
level supervisor. (Exclude positions in which keypunching rather
than supervisory responsibility is the most significant function.)

In addition to being responsible for the functions of the lower
level of supervisory responsibility, plans and establishes the
organization and flow of work; plans changes to meet both
short- and long-term workload trends and changes; selects
employees and assigns them to positions; assigns and reviews
work of subordinates; initiates recommendations or formal
actions such as requests for staff, job evaluation actions,
promotions, etc.; approves absences and vacation schedules;
recommends disciplinary actions; in some positions, assists
programmers, project planners, or other technical specialists in
designing card layouts and detailed punching instructions.

Difficulty of keypunch work
supervised

Difficulty of keypunch work
supervised

Number of
employees
supervised

More difficult 2

Less difficult 1

Less difficult 1

Level of keypunch supervisor
3 - 1 5 ........................
20-40 .....................
50 or m o r e ............

1
II
III

||

More difficult 2

Level of keypunch supervisor

II
III
IV

III
IV
V

II
III
IV

^

Less d iffic u lt keypunch work - W o rk is ro u tin e and re p e titiv e . U n d e r close supervision or fo llo w in g specific procedures or
in stru c tio n s , w o rk s fro m various s tan d a rd ize d source d o cu m e n ts w h ic h have been coded, fo llo w s specified procedures w h ic h have been
prescribed in d e ta il and req u ire little or no selecting, coding, or in te rp re tin g o f data to be recorded . Refers to supervisor pro b le m s
arising fr o m erron eo us item s, codes, o r missing in fo rm a tio n . (Th is level is th e same as th e B LS Class B K ey p u n c h O p e ra to r.)

2

More d iffic u lt keypunch work - W o rk requires th e a p p lic a tio n o f exp e rien ce and ju d g m e n t in selecting procedures to be
fo llo w e d and in searching fo r, in te rp re tin g , selecting, or coding item s to be k ey p u n c h e d fro m a v a rie ty o f d o cu m e n ts . O n occasion m ay
also p e rfo rm som e ro u tin e k e y p u n c h w o rk . M a y tra in in ex p e rie n c e d k e y p u n c h o p erators. (T h is level is th e same as th e B LS Class A
K ey p u n c h O p e ra to r.)
NOTE:
If th e k e y p u n c h a ctivities in clu d e b o th " m o r e d if f ic u lt " and "less d if f ic u lt " w o rk , classification should be on th e basis of
th e m ore d iffic u lt w o rk , p ro v id ed th a t a s ig n ific a n t p r o p o rtio n o f th e k e y p u n c h op erators w o rk at this level. T h e n u m b e r o f k e y p u n c h
o p erators p e rfo rm in g m ore d iffic u lt w o rk is considered s ig n ific a n t w h en at least 2 5 p e rce n t o f th e op erators w o rk at this level,
provided th e re are a t least t w o such o p erators in units w ith a to ta l o f 3 or 4 e m p loyees, 3 such op era to rs in units w ith a to ta l o f 5 to 12
e m p loyees, and 4 such op era to rs in units w ith a to ta l o f 1 3 or m ore op erators.

bility, difficulty o f keypunch work supervised, and
number o f employees supervised. In table C-4 tw o levels
o f supervision are described and each is follow ed by a

brief chart that shows the level o f keypunch supervisor
for each combination o f the other two elements.

Clerical
C L E R K , A C C O U N T IN G

various types o f reports, lists, calculations, postings, etc.;
or preparing simple (or

Performs one or more accounting clerical tasks such
as posting to registers and ledgers; reconciling bank
accounts;

verifying

the

internal

consistency,

assisting in preparing more

complicated) journal vouchers. May work in either a
manual or automated accounting system.

com ­

The work requires a knowledge o f clerical methods

o f accounting

and office practices and procedures which relates to the

documents; assigning prescribed accounting distribution

clerical processing and recording o f transactions and
accounting information. With experience, the worker

pleteness, and mathematical accuracy

codes; examining and verifying for clerical accuracy




typically becomes familiar with the bookkeeping and
accounting terms and procedures used in the assigned
work, but is not required to have a knowledge o f the
formal principles o f bookkeeping and accounting.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis o f the
following definitions.

Clerk, File II

Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material b y simple
(subject matter) headings or partly classified material by
finer subheadings. Prepares simple related index and
cross-reference aids. As requested, locates clearly
identified material in files and forwards material. May
perform related clerical tasks required to maintain and
service files.

Clerk, Accounting I

Under close supervision, following detailed instruc­
tions and standardized procedures, performs one or
more routine accounting clerical operations, such as
posting to ledgers, cards, or worksheets where identifica­

Classifies and indexes file material such as cor­
respondence, reports, technical documents, etc., in an

tion o f items and locations o f postings are clearly

established filing system containing a number o f varied

indicated; checking accuracy and completeness o f
standardized and repetitive records or accounting
documents; and coding documents using a few

records o f various types in conjunction with the files.
May lead a small group o f lower level file clerks.

Clerk, File III

subject matter files. May also file this material. May keep

prescribed accounting codes.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Clerk, Accounting II

Under

general

supervision,

performs

accounting

clerical operations which require the application o f
experience and judgment, for example, clerically pro­
cessing complicated or nonrepetitive accounting trans­
actions, selecting among a substantial variety o f
prescribed accounting codes and classifications, or
tracing transactions through previous accounting actions
to determine source o f discrepancies. May be assisted by
one or more accounting clerks I.

C L E R K , F IL E

Files, classifies, and
established filing system.
manual tasks required to
classified into levels on

retrieves material in an
May perform clerical and
maintain files. Positions are
the basis o f the following

definitions.

Operates a keypunch machine to record or verify
alphabetic and/or numeric data on tabulating cards or on
tape.
Positions are classified into levels on the basis o f the
following definitions.

Keypunch O perator I

Work is routine and repetitive. Under close super­
vision or following specific procedures or instructions,
works from various standardized source documents
which have been coded, and follow s specified procedures
which have been prescribed in detail and require little or
no selecting, coding, or interpreting o f data to be
recorded. Refers to supervisor problems arising from
erroneous items, codes, or missing information.

Keypunch O perator II

Work requires the application o f experience and
judgment-in selecting procedures to be follow ed and in
searching for, interpreting, selecting, or coding items to

Clerk, File I

Performs routine filing o f material that has already
been classified or which is easily classified in a simple

be keypunched from a variety o f source documents. On
occasion may also perform

some routine keypunch

work. May train inexperienced keypunch operators.

serial classification system (e.g., alphabetical, chrono­
logical, or numerical). As requested, locates readily

M ESSEN G ER

available material in files and forwards material; may fill
out withdrawal charge. May perform simple clerical and
manual tasks required to maintain and service files.




Performs various routine

duties such as running

errands, operating minor office machines such as sealers

or mailers, opening and distributing mail, and other
minor clerical work. E xclu de positions that require
operation o f a m otor vehicle as a significant duty.

dozen employees and is usually divided into organiza­
tional segments which are often, in turn, further
subdivided. In some companies, this level includes a
wide range o f organizational echelons; in others, only
one or tw o; or

SECRETARY

Assigned as a personal secretary, normally to one
individual. Maintains a close and highly responsive
relationship to the day-to-day activities o f the super­
visor. Works fairly independently receiving a minimum
o f detailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied

b.

LS-3

Exclusions. Not all positions that are titled “ secretary”

c. Secretary to the head o f an individual plant, factory,
etc., (or other equivalent level o f official) that
employs, in all, over 5,000 persons; or

possess the above characteristics. Examples o f positions
which are excluded from the definition are as follows:

d. Secretary to the head o f a large and important
organizational segment (e.g., a middle management
supervisor o f an organizational segment often
involving as many as several hundred persons) o f a
com pany that employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.
LS-4

c. Secretary to the head, immediately below the
corporate officer level, o f a major segment or
subsidiary o f a company that employs, in all, over
25,000 persons.

are matched at one o f the five levels according to (a) the
level o f the secretary’s supervisor within the com pany’ s
tary’s responsibility. Table C-5 indicates the level o f the
secretary for each combination o f the factors.
Level o f Secretary's Supervisor (LS)
LS-1

a. Secretary to the supervisor or head o f a small
organizational unit (e.g., fewer than about 25 or 30
persons); or
b.

LS-2

Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, profes­
sional employee, administrative officer or assistant,
skilled technician or expert. {NOTE: Many companies
assign stenographers, rather than secretaries as
described above, to this level o f supervisory or
nonsupervisory worker.)

a. Secretary to an executive or managerial person whose
responsibility is not equivalent to one o f the specific
level situations in the definition for LS-3, but whose
organizational unit normally numbers at least several




a. Secretary to the chairman o f the board or president o f
a company that employs, in all, over 100 but fewer
than 5,000 persons; or
b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the
chairman o f the board or president) o f a company that
employs, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
persons; or

Secretary jobs which meet the required characteristics

organizational structure and (b ) the level o f the secre­

a. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than chairman
o f the board or president) o f a company that employs,
in all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 persons; or
b. Secretary to the head (immediately below the officer
level) o f either a major corporatewide functional
activity (e.g., marketing, research, operations, indus­
trial relations, etc.) or a major geographic or organiza­
tional segment (e.g., a regional headquarters; a major
division) o f a company that employs, in all, over 5,000
but fewer than 25,000 employees; or

clerical and secretarial duties requiring a knowledge o f
office routine and understanding o f the organization,
programs, and procedures related to the work o f the
supervisor.

a. Positions which do not meet the “ personal” secretary
concept described above;
b. Stenographers not fully trained in secretarial-type duties;
c. Stenographers serving as office assistants to a group o f
professional, technical, or managerial persons;
d. Assistant-type positions which entail more difficult or
more responsible technical, administrative, or supervisory
duties which are not typical o f secretarial work, e.g.,
administrative assistant, or executive assistant;
e. Positions which do not fit any o f the situations listed in
the section below titled “ Level o f Secretary’s Supervisor,”
e.g., secretary to the president o f a company that
employs, in all, over 5,000 persons;
f. Trainees.

Secretary to the head o f an individual plant, factory,
etc., (or other equivalent level o f official) that
employs, in all, fewer than 5,000 persons.

N O T E : The term “ corporate officer” used in the
above L S definitions refers to those officials who have a

significant corporatewide policymaking role with regard
to major company activities. The title “ vice president,”
though normally indicative o f this role, does not in all
cases identify such positions. Vice presidents whose
primary responsibility is to act personally on individual
cases or transactions (e.g., approve or deny individual
loan

or

credit

actions;

accounts; directly

administer

individual

trust

supervise a clerical staff) are not

considered to be “ corporate officers” for purposes o f
applying the definition.

Level o f Secretary's Responsibility (L R )

This factor evaluates the nature o f the work relation­
ship between the secretary and the supervisor, and the

extent to which the secretary is expected to exercise
initiative and judgment. Secretaries should be matched
at L R -1 or L R -2 described below according to their level
o f responsibility.

Level o f Responsibility 1 (L R -1 )

Performs varied secretarial duties including or com ­
parable to most o f the following:
a. Answers telephone, greets personal callers, and opens
incoming mail.
b. Answers telephone requests which have standard answers.
May reply to requests by sending a form letter.
c. Reviews correspondence, memoranda, and reports
prepared by others for the supervisor’s signature to assure
procedural and typographic accuracy.
d. Maintains supervisor’s calendar and makes appointments
as instructed.

STENOGRAPHER

Primary duty is to take dictation using shorthand,
and to transcribe the dictation. May also type from
written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool.
May occasionally transcribe from voice recordings.
N O T E : This jo b is distinguished from that o f a secretary

in that a secretary normally works in a confidential
relationship with only one manager or executive and
performs more responsible and discretionary tasks as
described in the secretary job definition.
Stenographer, General

Dictation involves a normal routine vocabulary. May
maintain files, keep simple records, or perform other
relatively routine clerical tasks.
Stenographer, Senior

e. Types, takes and transcribes dictation, and files.

Dictation involves a varied technical or specialized
vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific
research. May also set up and maintain files, keep

Level o f Responsibility 2 (L R -2 )

Performs

duties

described

under

L R -1

and,

in

performs tasks requiring greater judgment,
initiative, and knowledge o f office functions including or
comparable to most o f the following:

records, etc.
OR

addition,

a. Screens telephone and personal callers, determining which
can be handled by the supervisor’s subordinates or other
offices.
b. Answers requests which require a detailed knowledge o f
office procedures or collection o f information from files
or other offices. May sign routine correspondence in own
or supervisor’s name.
c. Compiles or assists in compiling periodic reports on the
basis o f general instructions.
d. Schedules tentative appointments without prior clearance.
Assembles necessary background material for scheduled
m eetings. Makes arrangements for meetings and
conferences.
e. Explains supervisor’s requirements to other employees in
supervisor’s unit. (Also types, takes dictation, and files.)

Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly
greater independence and responsibility than steno­
grapher, general, as evidenced by the following: Work
requires a high degree o f stenographic speed and
accuracy; a thorough working knowledge o f general
business and office procedure and o f the specific
business operations, organization, policies, procedures,
files, workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in performing
stenographic duties and responsible clerical tasks such as
maintaining follow-up files; assembling material for
reports, memorandums, and letters; composing simple
letters from general instructions; reading and routing
incoming mail; answering routine questions, etc.
T Y P IS T

Uses a typewriter to make copies o f various materials
or to make out bills after calculations have been made
by another person. May include typing o f stencils, mats,

Table C-5. Criteria fo r matching secretaries by level
Level of secretary's
responsibility

Level of secretary's
supervisor

LR-1
LS-1
LS-2
LS-3
LS-4

......................................
......................................
......................................
......................................




LR-2

I
II
III
IV

II
III
IV
V

or similar materials for use in duplicating processes. May
do clerical work involving little special training, such as
keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or
sorting and distributing incoming mail.
Typist I

Performs on e or m ore o f the follow ing: Copy typing
from rough or clear drafts; or routine typing o f forms,

insurance policies, etc.; or setting up simple standard
tabulations; or copying more com plex tables already set
up and spaced properly.
Typist II

Performs on e or m ore o f the follow in g: Typing
material

in final form

material from several sources; or responsibility for
correct spelling, syllabication, punctuation, etc., o f
technical or unusual words or foreign language material;
or planning layout and typing o f complicated statistical
tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing.
May type routine form letters, varying details to suit
circumstances.

when it involves combining

NOTE: The occupational titles and definitions for drafter-tracers, messengers, and steno­
graphers are the same as those used in the Bureau’s program o f occupational wage surveys in
metropolitan areas. (See the list o f areas on the order form at the back o f this bulletin.) The
occupations listed below have the same definitions in both the national and area surveys; however,
the level designations differ as shown:

Occupation
D r a fte r ....................................................

National Survey of
Professional, Administrative, Technical, and
Clerical Pay

Occupational
Wage Surveys in
Metropolitan
Areas
C

II
III

Clerk, accounting.........

I

B
A

A

I

C

II
III

Keypunch operator

B

II

Clerk, f i l e .........

I

B
A

....

I
II

T y p is t.........................................................




B
A

I

B

II

A

Appendix D. Comparison of Average Annual Salaries in Private
Industry with Corresponding Salary Rates for Federal Employees
Under the General Schedule, March 1974
The survey was designed to provide a basis for
comparing salaries under the General Schedule classifica­
tion and pay system with salaries in private enterprise.
To assure collection o f pay data for work levels
equivalent to the General Schedule grade levels, the Civil
Service Commission, in cooperating with the Bureau o f

by the Commission according to standards established
for each grade level. Table D shows the surveyed jobs
grouped by work levels equivalent to General Schedule

Labor Statistics, prepared the occupational work level
definitions used in the survey. Definitions were graded

pay comparisons.)




grade levels. (N ote that the private enterprise rates for
secretaries and computer operators were not used by the
President’s agent in the 1974 Federal-private enterprise

O c c u p a tio n and le v e l
s u r v e y e d b y BLS 1

A vera ge
a nnual
s a la r i e s
in p r iv a t e
in d u s t r y 2

S a la r y r a t e s f o r F e d e r a l e m p l o y e e s u n d e r the G e n e r a l S ch e d u le 3
A n n u a l r a t e s and s t e p s 6
A v era g e

1

3

10

$5, 109
5, 643

$5, 113

$5, 017

$5, 184

$5, 351

$5, 518

C le r k s , f i l e II -------------------K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s I -----T y p is t s I -----------------------------

5, 647
, 440
5, 810

5, 859

5, 682

5, 871

6 , 060

C le r k s , a c c o u n tin g I
C l e r k s , f i le I I I ---------D r a f t e r - t r a c e r s ------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s I —
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s II ------K e y p u n ch s u p e r v i s o r s I ---S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ---T y p is t s II -------------------------------

,
6,
7,
7,
7,
,
,
,

6

607
928
048
975
492
842
954
751

6, 916

6, 408

6, 622

6, 836

8, 367
6, 879
8, 507

8, 108

7, 198

7, 438

C le rk s , file I ■
M essen gers —

C le r k s , a c c o u n tin g II --------C o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r s I 7 -----D r a ft e r s I ----------------------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s II K e y p u n ch s u p e r v is o r s II —
S e c r e t a r i e s i 7 ---------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r ------A c c o u n t a n t s I ------------------------A u d it o r s I ------------------------------B u y e r s I ---------------------------------C h e m is t s I ----------------------------C o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r s II 7 -----D r a ft e r s II ----------------------------E n g in e e r s I ---------------------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s III J ob a n a ly s t s I -----------------------K e y p u n ch s u p e r v is o r s III - —
S e c r e t a r i e s II 7 ---------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s I I I 7 ---K ey p u n ch s u p e r v is o r s IV ---S e c r e t a r i e s III 7 ---------------------

6

8
6
6

9,
9,
7,
7,

739
352
073
660
632
443
901
491
783
005
221

$5, 852

$6, 186

$6, 520

6, 249

7, 005

7, 383

7, 050

7, 906

8 , 120

9, 931

10 , 199

$6, 019

8, 334

8, 398

122
547
601
900

9,
10,
10,
,
7,
10,
11,
,
9,
11,
8,

$5, 685

10
10

9, 186

8, 887
12, 809
8, 742

8, 977

11, 549

A c c o u n t a n t s II A u d it o r s I I ------B u y e r s I I --------C h e m is t s II
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s IV 7 -----D r a ft e r s III ---------------------------E n g in e e r s II --------------------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s IV Job a n a ly s ts II ---------------------K ey p u n ch s u p e r v i s o r s V ---S e c r e t a r i e s IV 7 ---------------------

12,
12,
12,
10,

9, 276

9 ,5 7 5

9, 874

10, 633

10, 965

11, 297

11, 629

11, 765

12, 1 33

12, 501

12, 869

9, 969

11, 098
10, 396

9, 127

9, 663

11, 369

1 1 , 6 68

12, 293

1 2 ,6 2 5

13, o05

11, 961

1 3, 973

14, 341

|
15, 009!

15, 415

15, 821

1 8, 094

1 8 ,5 8 3

1 9 ,0 7 2

070
171
974
488
552
568

C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s V 1
S e c r e t a r i e s V 7 -------

8, 591

024
141
408
279

13,
13,
11,
1 1,
13,
9,

8, 323

A c c o u n t a n t s III --------------------A t t o r n e y s I ---------------------------A u d it o r s III -------------------------B u y e r s III ----------------------------C h e m is t s III ------------------------C om p u ter o p e r a to r s V I 7 —
E n g in e e r s III -----------------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s V J ob a n a ly s t s III -------------------

13, 285
14, 223
1 4 , 37 1
14, 659
14, 298
1 2 ,4 0 3
1 5 , 160
13, 654
1 3 , 921

A c c o u n t a n t s IV A t t o r n e y s II ----A u d it o r s I V ------B u y e r s I V ---------C h e m is t s I V ----C h ie f a c c o u n ta n t s I --------D ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I
E n g in e e r s IV --------------------J ob a n a ly s ts I V --------- --------

16,
17,
17,
17,
17,
15,
17,
17,

1 1, 029

S ee fo o t n o t e s at end o f t a b le .




16, 051

357
491
42 1
2 83
60 1
790
929
263

12, 167

G S -1 1

16, 586

1 1, 397!

12, 5 7 3 1 12, 979

13, 385

1 3, 791

14, 603

15, 1 60

16, 138

16, 627

17, 116 I 17, 605

15, 649

I
|

O c c u p a tio n and le v e l
su rveyed by BLS 1

A c c o u n t a n t s V -----------------------------------A t t o r n e y s I I I -------------------------------------C h e m is t s V ----------------------------------------C h ie f a c c o u n ta n t s II -----------------------D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l II --------------E n g in e e r s V ----------------------------------------

A vera ge
annual
s a la r i e s
in p r iv a t e
in d u s t r y 2
$ 1 9 ,5 6 0
21, 0 82
20, 702
20, 072
18, 815
20, 654

S a la r y r a t e s f o r F e d e r a l e m p l o y e e s u n d e r the G e n e r a l S ch e d u le 3
A n n u a l r a t e s and s t e p s 6

5
G ra d e 4 A v e r a g e
1

2

3

4

G S -1 2 $ 19, 709

$ 1 7 ,4 9 7

$18, 080

$18, 663

$19, 246

5

6

7

$19, 829 $20, 412

$20, 995

8

9

$ 2 1 , 578 $22, 161

10
$22, 744

A t t o r n e y s I V --------------------------------------C h e m is t s V I -------------------------------------C h ie f a c c o u n ta n t s III ----------------------D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I I I --------------E n g in e e r s V I -------------------------------------

25,
24,
23,
24,
23,

956
079
805
078
827

G S -1 3

23, 355

20, 677

21, 366

22, 055

22, 744

23, 433

24, 122

24, 811

25, 500

26, 189

26, 878

A t t o r n e y s V ---------------------------------------C h e m is t s VII ------------------------------------C h ie f a c c o u n ta n t s I V -----------------------D ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I V --------------E n g in e e r s V II ------------------------------------

31,
28,
29,
28,
26,

999
203
021
140
960

G S -1 4

27, 431

24, 247

25, 055

25, 863

26, 671

27, 479

28, 287

29, 095

29, 903

30, 711

31, 519

A t t o r n e y s V I -------------------------------------C h e m is t s V III -----------------------------------E n g in e e r s VIII ----------------------------------

38, 180
34, 475
31, 469

G S -1 5

32, 328

28, 263

29, 205

30, 147

31, 089

32, 031

32, 973

33, 915

34, 857

35, 799

36, 741 8

1 F o r d e f in it io n s , s e e a p p e n d ix C .
2 S u r v e y fin d in g s a s s u m m a r i z e d in ta b le 1 o f th is bu lletin ,, F o r s c o p e o f
3 S a la r y r a t e s in e f f e c t M a r c h 1974, r e f e r e n c e da te o f the B L S s u r v e y ,

s u r v e y , s e e a p p e n d ix A .
a s e s t a b lis h e d b y E x e c u t iv e O r d e r 1 1739 is s u e d u n d e r a u th o r ity o f S e c t io n
5305 o f t it l e 5, U .S . C o d e .
C o r r e s p o n d i n g g r a d e s in the G e n e r a l S c h e d u le w e r e su p p lie d b y the U .S . C iv il S e r v i c e C o m m i s s i o n .
M ea n s a la r y o f a ll G e n e r a l S c h e d u le e m p l o y e e s in e a c h g r a d e a s o f M a r c h 31, 1974.
N ot li m it e d to F e d e r a l e m p l o y e e s
in o c c u p a t io n s s u r v e y e d b y
BLS.
S e c t io n 5335 o f t it le 5 o f the U . S , C od e p r o v id e s f o r w it h in -g r a d e i n c r e a s e s on co n d it io n that the e m p l o y e e 's w o r k is o f an a c c e p t a b le le v e l o f c o m ­
p e t e n c e as d e fin e d b y the h ea d o f the a g e n c y . F o r e m p l o y e e s w ho m e e t th is c o n d it io n , the s e r v i c e r e q u i r e m e n t s a r e 52 c a le n d a r w e e k s e a c h f o r a d v a n c e m e n t
to s a la r y r a t e s 2, 3, and 4; 104 w e e k s e a c h f o r a d v a n c e m e n t to s a la r y r a t e s 5, 6, and 7; and 156 w e e k s e a c h f o r a d v a n c e m e n t to s a la r y r a t e s 8, 9, and 10.
S e c t io n 5336 p r o v id e s that an a d d it io n a l w it h i n -g r a d e i n c r e a s e m a y b e g ra n te d w ith in any p e r io d o f 52 w e e k s in r e c o g n it io n o f h igh q u a lity p e r f o r m a n c e a b o v e
that o r d in a r i ly fo u n d in the ty p e o f p o s it i o n c o n c e r n e d .
N ot u s e d in th e 1974 F e d e r a l - p r i v a t e p a y c o m p a r is o n s .
E m p lo y e e s at G S -1 5 , ste p 10, a r e a c t u a lly p a id $ 36, 000 r a t h e r than the t h e o r e t i c a l ra te o f $ 36, 741, s in c e as p e c i a l s t a t u t o r y
lim it a t io n on F e d e r a l
p a y p r e v e n t s p a y m e n t o f a s a la r y o f m o r e than $ 36, 000 to any G e n e r a l S ch e d u le e m p l o y e e .

4
5

6

7
8

U n d e r S e c t io n 5303 o f t it le 5 o f the U n ited S ta tes C o d e , h ig h e r m in im u m r a t e s (but n ot e x c e e d in g the
m a x im u m s a la r y r a t e p r e s c r i b e d in the G e n e r a l S ch e d u le f o r the g ra d e o r le v e l) and a c o r r e s p o n d i n g new
s a la r y ra n g e m a y b e e s t a b lis h e d f o r p o s it io n s o r o c c u p a t io n s u n d e r c e r t a in c o n d it io n s . T h e c o n d it io n s in ­
c lu d e a fin d in g that the G o v e r n m e n t 's r e c r u i t m e n t o r re t e n t io n o f w e l l - q u a l i f i e d p e r s o n s is s ig n ific a n t ly
h a n d ic a p p e d b e c a u s e the s a la r y r a t e s in p r iv a t e in d u s t r y a r e s u b s t a n t ia lly a b o v e the s a la r y r a t e s o f the
s ta t u t o r y p a y s c h e d u l e s . A s o f M a r c h 1974, s p e c i a l , h ig h e r s a la r y ra n g e s w e r e a u t h o r iz e d f o r p r o f e s s i o n a l
e n g in e e r s ,
a c c o u n ta n t s ,
and a u d it o r s at the e n try g r a d e s (G S -5 and G S -7 ). I n fo r m a t io n on s p e c i a l s a la r y
r a t e s , in c lu d in g the o c c u p a t io n s and the a r e a s to w h ic h th e y a p p ly , m a y be o b ta in e d f r o m the U .S . C iv il
S e r v i c e C o m m i s s i o n , W a sh in g to n , D„ C. 2 0 4 15 , o r its r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s .




A list of the latest available bulletins or bulletin supplements is presented below. A directory o f
area wage studies including more lim ited studies conducted at the request o f the Em ploym ent
Standards Adm inistration of the Departm ent o f Labor is available on request. Bulletins may be
purchased fro m

any

of the

BLS

regional

offices shown

on the back cover, or fro m

the

Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Governm ent Printing O ffic e, W ashington, D .C ., 2 0 4 0 2 . B ulletin
supplements listed below may be obtained, w ith o u t cost, only fro m BLS regional offices. (Prices o f
publications are subject to change w ith o u t notice.)

Area
Akron* 6H\b, t)e c .1 9 7 3 1 ...................
Albany—Schenectady—Troy,
N .Y ., Mar. 1974 ...............................
Albuquerque, N.Mex.,
Mar. 1974 ........................................
Allen to w n—Bethlehem—East o n ,
Pa.—N.J., May 1973 ........................
Atlanta, Ga., May 1974 ........................
Austin, Tex., Dec. 1973 .....................
Baltimore, Md., Aug. 1973 .................
Beaumont—Port Arthur—Orange, Tex.,
May 1974 ........................................
Binghamton, N .Y .-P a .,
July 19731 ......................................
Birmingham, Ala., Mar. 1974 ............
Boise City, Idaho, Nov. 1973 ............
Boston, Mass., Aug. 1973 ...................
Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 1973 .....................
Burlington, Vt., Dec. 1973 .................
Canton, Ohio, May 19741 ...................
Charleston, W. Va.,
Mar. 1974 ........................................
Charlotte, N.C., Jan. 1974 .................
Chattanooga, T en n .-G a .,
Sept. 1973 ........................................
Chicago, 111., May 1973 ........................
Cincinnati, O h io -K y .—Ind.,
F e b .1 9 7 4 1 ......................................
Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1973 ..............
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1973 ..............
Dallas, Tex., Oct. 1973 ........................
Davenport—Rock Island—Moline,
lo w a -Ill., Feb. 19741 ...................
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1973 ...................
Denver, Colo., Dec. 1973 ...................
Des Moines, Iowa,
May 1974 .........................................
Detroit, Mich., Mar. 1974 ...................
Durham, N.C., Dec. 1973* .................
Fort Lauderdale-H ollyw ood and West
Palm Beach, Fla., Apr. 1974 . . . .
Fort Worth, Tex., Oct. 1973 ..............
Green Bay, Wis., July 1973 .................
Greenville, S.C., May 1974 .................
Houston, Tex., Apr. 19741 .................
Huntsville, Ala., Feb. 19741 ..............
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1973 ............
Jackson, Miss., Jan. 19741 .................
Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 19731 ............
Kansas City, M o.—Kans.,
Sept. 1 9731 ......................................
Lawrence-Haverhill, M ass.-N.H.,
June 1974 ........................................




Bulletin number
and price
1795-10,

65 cents

Suppl.

Free

Suppl.

Free

1775-90,
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.

50 cents
Free
Free
Free

Suppl.

Free

1795-1,
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
1795-23,

55 cents
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
80 cents

Suppl.
Suppl.

Free
Free

Suppl.
1775-88,

Free
50 cents

1795-16,
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.

75 cents
Free
Free
Free

1795-14,
Suppl.
Suppl.

65 cents
Free
Free

Suppl.
Suppl.
1795-9,

Free
Free
65 cents

Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
1795-22,
1795-13,
Suppl.
1795-12,
1795-8,

Free
Free
Free
Free
85 cents
65 cents
Free
65 cents
65 cents

17954,

Free

Lexington, Ky., Nov. 1973 .................
Little R o ck —North Little R ock, Ark.,
July 1973 ........................................
Los Angeles—Long Beach and
Anaheim—Santa Ana—Garden
Grove, Calif., Oct. 1 9 7 3 .................
Louisville, K y.—Ind.,
Nov. 1973 ........................................
Lubbock, Tex., Mar. 1974 .................
Manchester, N.H., July 1973 ..............
M elbourne-Titusville-C ocoa, Fla.,
Aug 1Q7 ^1
Memphis, Tenn.—Ark.,
\fov 1Q7 V
Miami, Fla., Nov. 1973 ........................
Midland and Odessa, Tex.,
J a n .1974 ...........................................
Milwaukee, Wis., May 1 9 7 4 .................
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.,
J a n .1974 ...........................................
Muskegon—Muskegon Heights, Mich.,
June 1973 ........................................
Newark and Jersey City, N.J.,
Jan. 1974 ...........................................
New Haven, Conn.,
Jan. 1974 ...........................................
New Orleans, La., Jan. 19741 ............
New York, N.Y., Apr. 1974 ..............
Nor folk-V irginia Beach-Portsm outh
and Newport News—Hampton, Va.,
Jan. 1974 ...........................................
Oklahoma City, Okla., July 1973 . . .
Omaha, N ebr.-Iow a, Sept. 1973 . . .
Paterson-Clifton—Passaic, N.J.,
June 1973 ........................................
Philadelphia, Pa.-N .J.,
Nov. 19731 ......................................
Phoenix, Ariz., June 1973 ...................
Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 1974 ...................
Portland, Maine, Nov. 19731 ............
Portland, Oreg.-Wash.,
May 1973 ........................................
Po ughkeep sie - Kingston - Ne wb urgh,
N.Y., June 1973 .............................
Providence-W arw ick-Paw tucket,
R.I.-M ass., May 19741 .................
Raleigh, N.C., Dec. 1 9 7 3 '...................
Richmond, Va., Mar. 1973 .................
Riverside-San Bernardino—Ontario,
Calif., Dec. 1973 .............................

Bulletin number
and price

80 cents

Suppl.

Area

Suppl.

Free

Suppl.

Free

Suppl.

Free

Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.

Free
Free
Free

1795-2,

55 cents

1795-11,
Suppl.

65 cents
Free

Suppl.
Suppl.

Free
Free

Suppl.

Free

1775-91,

50 cents

Suppl.

Free

Suppl.
1795-15,
Suppl.

Free
70 cents
Free

Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.

Free
Free
Free

1775-92,

55 cents

1795-19,
1775-96,
Suppl.
1795-6,

85 cents
50 cents
Free
65 cents

1775-87,

35 cents

1775-85,

35 cents

1795-24,
1795-7,
1775-68,

80 cents
65 cents
40 cents

Suppl.

Free

1 D ata on esta b lis h m e n t practices and supplementary wage
provisions are also presen ted .

A rea
Rockford, m., June 1973 ................ .
St. Louis, Mo.— Mar. 1974 . . . .
111.,
Salt Lake City, Utah, Nov. 1973 . . .
San Antonio, Tex., May 19741 .. . . .
San Diego, Calif., Nov. 1973 ............
San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.,
Mar. 1974 ....................................
San Jose, Calif., Mar. 1974 ..............
Savannah, Ga., May 1974 ................
Scranton, Pa., July 19731 ................
Seattle—
Everett, Wash.,
Jan. I9741 .................................... .
Sioux Falls, S. Dak.,
Dec. 1973 ....................................
South Bend, Ind., Mar. 19741 ......... .
Spokane, Wash., June 1973 .............. .
Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fla.,
Aug. 1973 ....................................




Bulletin number
and price
1775-80,
Suppi.
Suppl.
1795-21,
Suppi.

35 cents
Free
Free
65 cents
Free

Suppl.
Suppi.
Suppl.
1795-3,

Free
Free
Free
55 cents

1795-17,

65 cents

Suppl.
1795-18,
1775-95,

Free

Toledo, Ohio—
Mich.,
Apr. 1974 ..................................
Trenton, N.J., Sept. 1973 ..............
Washington, D.C.-M d.-Va.,
Mar. 1973 .................................. . .
Waterbury, Conn., Mar. 1974 . . . .
Waterloo, Iowa, Nov. 19731 ......... . .
Wichita, Kans., Apr. 19741 ........... . .
Worcester, Mass., May 1974 .........
York, Pa., Feb. 1974 .......................
Youngstown-Warren, Ohio,
Nov. 1973 ..................................

Bulletin number
and price

Free
65 cents
50 cents

Suppl.

Area

Suppl.
Suppl.

Free
Free

1775-75,
Suppl.
1795-5,
1795-20,
Suppl.
Suppl.

50 cents
Free
60 cents
65 cents
Free
Free

Suppl.

Free

1 Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage
provisions are also presented.




TO:
Superintendent o f Documents
U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C., 20402

or

Bureau o f Labor Statistics—
1603 JFK Federal Building, Government
Center, Boston, Mass. 02203
1515 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10036
406 Penn Square Building,
1317 Filbert St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
1371 Peachtree St., NE., Atlanta, Ga. 30309
911 Walnut St., Kansas City, Mo. 64106
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive,
Chicago, 111. 60606
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex., 75202
450 Golden Gate Ave., Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102

Enclosed find $_______in □ check or □ m oney order. (Make checks or money orders payable to the
superintendent o f Documents. Twenty-five percent discount for bundle order o f 100 copies or more.)

Please send me copies o f bulletins as indicated.

Number
of
copies

1 9 7 0 -7 1 A R E A W A G E S U R V E Y S S U M M A R Y B U L L E T IN S

Bulletin 1 7 7 5 -9 7 Area Wage Surveys, S elected M etropolitan Areas, 1 9 7 2 -7 3 (1974).

Consolidates information from the individual area bulletins for surveys made during the period July
1970 to June 1971. Contains average weekly earnings for office occupations, average hourly earnings
for plant occupations, and establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions by industry
division and area. (In press.)
Bulletin 1 7 2 5 -9 6 Area

Wage Surveys, M etropolitan Areas, United States and Regional Summaries,

1 9 7 1 -7 2 . (1974).

Presents information on occupational earnings, establishment practices, and supplementary wage
provisions for all metropolitan areas combined and separately by industry division and region. Also
provides analyses o f wage differences and trends o f occupational earnings. Price $1.55.




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region I
1603-JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
P ho ne: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)
Region II
341 Ninth Ave., Rm. 1025
New York, N .Y . 10001
Phone: 971-5405(A re a C o d e 212)
Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796(A re a C o d e 215)
Region IV

Chicago, III. 60604
P ho ne: 353-1880 (Area C o d e 312)
Region VI
1100 Com merce S t., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
P hone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 W alnut S t., 10th Floor
Kansas C ity, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (A re a C o d e 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.

Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.

Box 36017

A tlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418(A re a C o d e 404)




Region V
230 S. Dearborn St.

San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678(A re a C o d e 415)

Regions VII and VIII will be serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102