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National Survey of
Professional,
Administrative
Technical,
and Clerical Pay1

,

March 1972

n
u

Bureau of Labor Statistics

H R

■

Bulletin 1764




National Survey of
Professional,
Administrative,
Technical,
and Clerical Pay

,

March 1972

Bulletin 1764
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1973

For sale by the S >erintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 — Price $1.25
Microfiche edition available from National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Va. 22151, at 95 cents a set.
Make checks payable to NTIS.







i

P r e fa c e
This bulletin summarizes the results o f the Bureau’s annual salary survey o f selected professional,
administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in private industry. The nationwide salary
information, relating to March 1972, is representative o f establishments in a broad spectrum o f
industries throughout the United States, except Alaska and Hawaii.
The survey was designed by the Bureau o f Labor Statistics in cooperation with the U.S. Office o f
Management and Budget and the U.S. Civil Service Commission. It provides a fund o f broadly based
information

on salary levels and

distributions in private employment. The survey provides

information on pay in private industry in a form suitable for use in appraising the compensation o f
salaried employees in the Federal civil service (appendix D). In addition, survey results are useful as
a guide for salary administration and in general econom ic analysis. It should be emphasized that this
survey, like any other salary survey, does not provide mechanical answers to pay policy questions.
The occupations studied span a wide range o f duties and responsibilities. The occupations
selected were judged to be (a) surveyable in industry within the framework o f a broad survey design
and (b ) representative o f occupational groups which are numerically important in industry as well as
in the Federal service.
Occupational definitions used in the collection o f the salary data (appendix C) reflect duties and
responsibilities in private industry; however, they are also designed to be translatable to specific pay
grades in the General Schedule applying to Federal Classification Act employees. Thus the
definitions o f some occupations and work levels were limited to specific elements that could be
classified uniformly among establishments. The Bureau o f Labor Statistics and the Civil Service
Commission collaborated in the preparation o f the definitions.
A number o f changes affecting the scope, reference period, sampling procedures, and some o f the
occupational definitions were introduced in the 1972 survey. The reference period was changed
from June to March in 1972 at the request o f the President’s agent to adjust the timing o f the
survey to fit the time schedule for Federal pay adjustments set by the Federal Pay Comparability
Act o f 1970. The changes are described in detail in appendix B.
The survey could not have been accomplished without the cooperation o f the many firms whose
salary data provide the basis for the statistical information presented in this bulletin. The Bureau, on
its own behalf and on behalf o f the other Federal agencies that collaborated in planning the survey,
wishes to express sincere appreciation for the cooperation it has received.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office o f Wages and Industrial Relations by the
Division o f Occupational Wage Structures. William M. Smith prepared the analysis in this bulletin.
Field work for the survey was directed by the Bureau’s Assistant Regional Directors, Division o f
Operations.
Although only nationwide salary data are presented in this bulletin, clerical ai.d drafting
occupation salary data are available for each o f the 89 metropolitan areas in which the Bureau
conducts area wage surveys. These area reports also include information on such
supplementary benefits as paid vacations, holidays, and health, insurance, and pension plans
relating to nonsupervisory office workers. (See the areas listed on the order form at the back
o f this bulletin.)




iii




Contents
Page

S u m m a ry ......................................................................................................................
Characteristics of the survey ................ ........................................................................................
Changes in salary le v e ls ...................................................................................................................
Average salaries, March 1972 .........................................................................................................
Salary levels in metropolitan areas ................................................................................................
Salary levels in large establishments ............................................................................................
Salary d istributions..........................................................................................................................
Pay differences by in d u s try .............................................................................................................
Average standard weekly h o u r s ......................................................................................................

1
1
2
2
8
8
8
12
12

Summary tables:
Average
1.
2.
3.

salaries:
United S t a t e s ........................................................................................................
Metropolitan areas ................................................................................................
Establishments employing 2,500 or m o r e ...................................................... .

14
16
18

Employment distribution by salary:
4. Professional and administrative occupations .....................................................
5. Engineering technicians and keypunch su p erv iso rs...........................................
6. Drafting and clerical o cc u p atio n s.........................................................................

20
25
26

7. Occupational employment distribution: By industry division....................................
8. Relative salary levels: Occupation by industry division . . ; ....................................
9. Average standard weekly hours: Occupation by industry division ..........................

28
29
30

Charts:
1. Cumulative rise in average (mean) salaries for selected occupational groups,
1961 to 1972 .............................................................................................................
2. Increases in average salaries for selected occupational groups, 1961 to 1972 . . . .
3. Salaries in professional and technical occupations, March 1972 .................................
4. Salaries in administrative and clerical occupations, March 1972 ..............................
5. Relative employment in selected occupational groups by
industry division, March 1972 ..................................................................................

4
6
9
10
18

Appendixes:
A.
B.
C.
D.

Scope and method of s u rv e y .................................... I .............................................
Survey changes in 1972 ............................................................................................
Occupational d efin itio n s........................................................... : .............................
Comparison of average annual salaries in private industry, March 1972,
with corresponding salary rates for Federal employees under
the General S chedule...............................................................................................




V

31
36
37

67




Professional, Administrative, Technical,
and Clerical Pay
for chemists and engineers. More than one level of work
was defined for survey in most of the occupations; some
were purposely defined, however, to cover specific bands
of work levels, which were not intended to represent all
levels or all workers that may be found in those
occupations.
The survey was designed to permit separate presenta­
tion of data for metropolitan areas. Coverage in metro­
politan areas includes the 229 Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Areas in the United States, except Alaska and
Hawaii, as revised through January 1968 by the U.S.
Office of Management and Budget. Establishments in
metropolitan areas accounted for four-fifths of the total
employment and almost nine-tenths of the professional,
administrative, clerical, and related employees within
scope of the survey. Almost nine-tenths of the
employees in the occupations chosen for study were
employed in metropolitan areas.
The selected occupations accounted for more than
1,445,000 employees, or about one-fifth of the
estimated employment in professional, administrative,
clerical, and related occupations in establishments within
scope of the survey. Employment in the selected
occupations varied widely, reflecting actual differences
in employment in the various occupations, and also
differences arising from variations in the range of duties
and responsibilities covered by the occupational defini­
tions. Among the professional and administrative
occupations, the eight levels of engineers accounted for a
total of 360,052 employees, whereas there were fewer
than 5,000 employees in each of four of the occupa-

Summary

Average salaries of workers in the occupations
covered by this survey rose 4.4 percent from June 1971
to March 1972. Comparisons with earlier surveys in this
series indicate that the annual rate of increase (5.9
percent) in white-collar salaries declined for the first
time since the study was initiated in 1961. Over the
9-month period, average salaries increased by 4.6 percent
for clerical jobs and 4.1 percent for professional,
administrative, and technical occupations.
Average monthly salaries for the 77 occupational
levels varied from $383 for clerks engaged in routine
filing to $2,902 for the highest level in the attorney
series. For most of the occupations, salary levels in
metropolitan areas and in large establishments were
higher than the average for all establishments within the
full scope of the survey. Salary levels in Finance and
retail trade industries generally were lower than in other
major industry divisions represented in the survey.
Reported average standard weekly hours were also
generally lower in the finance industries.
Characteristics of the survey

This survey, the 13th in an annual series, provides
nationwide salary averages and distributions for 77 work
level categories covering 19 occupations. 1 It relates to
establishments in all areas of the United States, except
Alaska and Hawaii, in the following industries: Manufac­
turing; transportation, communication, electric, gas, and
sanitary services; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,

1 Results of the earlier survey reports were presented under
the title: National Survey o f Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay, Winter 1959-60 (BLS Bulletin 1286,
1960); Winter 1960-61 (BLS Bulletin 1310, 1961); Winter
1961-62 (BLS Bulletin 1346, 1962)\February-March 1963 (BLS
Bulletin 1387, 19 63); February -March 1964( BLS Bulletin 1422,
1964); February-March 1965 (BLS Bulletin 1469, 1965);
February-March 1966 (BLS Bulletin 1535, 1966); June 1967
(BLS Bulletin 1585, 1968); June 1968 (BLS Bulletin 1617,
1969); June 1969 (BLS Bulletin 1654, 1970); June 1970 (BLS
Bulletin 1693, 1971); and June 1971 (BLS Bulletin 1742, 1972).

insurance, and real estate; engineering and architectural

services; and research, development, and testing labora­
tories operated on a commercial basis. 2 The minimum
sizes of establishments surveyed were: 250 employees in
manufacturing and retail trade and 100 employees in all
other industry divisions. 3
Definitions for the occupations included in this study
provide for classification of employees according to
appropriate work levels. Within each occupation, the
work levels surveyed - usually designated by roman
numerals, with class I as the lowest level —are defined in
terms of duties and responsibilities. Specific job factors
deterrhining classification, however, varied from occupa­
tion to occupation.
The number of work level definitions for each
occupation varies from one for messengers to eight each




2 February-March 1964 and earlier surveys were limited to
establishments in metropolitan areas. For a full description of
the scope of the 1972 survey, see appendix A.
3 February-March 1965 and earlier surveys were limited to
establishments having 250 employees or more in all industry
divisions. In 1972, the minimum size for establishments in the
finance, insurance, and real estate industry was raised from 50 to
100 employees. See appendix B for further details.
1

Between 1969 and 1971, the increases for all three
groups were nearly identical. From June 1971 to March
1972 increases for the middle levels were smaller than
for the others.
Another method of examining salary trends is to
combine the data into the four occupational groups
shown in chart 2. 6 Increases in the June 1971-March
1972 period amounted to 4.6 percent for technical
support and for clerical workers; 4.2 percent for the
experienced professional and administrative group; and
2.6 percent for entry and developmental professional
and administrative workers. Adjusting these increases to
reflect a 12-month period for comparison purposes
results in increases of 6.2 percent, 5.6, and 3.5 percent,
respectively. (This adjustment assumes a constant rate of
increase over the 9-month period, projected to 12
months.) These increases were above their respective
11-year averages for all but the entry and developmental
professional and administrative group. The annual rate
of increase for that group was, at 3.5 percent, less than
half its peak rate of increase of 7.2 percent recorded
in 1968-69.
Increases in salaries of both clerical and technical
support groups averaged 4.3 percent over the 11-year
period —less than the increases (4.7 and 4.8 percent) for
the experienced and entry professional and administra­
tive groups.

tional categories as defined for the study (chief
accountants, job analysts, directors of personnel, and
keypunch supervisors). (See table 1.) Accounting clerks
and secretaries accounted for about one-half of the
761,078 employees in the clerical occupations studied.
The selected drafting occupations had aggregate employ­
ment of 80,857 and the five engineering technician levels
together accounted for about 83,404.
Although women accounted for approximately onehalf of the total employment in the occupations studied,
they were employed largely in clerical positions. The
clerical occupations in which the proportion of women
amounted to more than 90 percent at each level were
file clerks, keypunch operators, secretaries, steno­
graphers, and typists. A percentage distribution of
women employees by occupation and level is shown in
appendix A.
Changes in salary levels

Table A presents percent increases in average salaries
that occurred between annual surveys since 1961 for
each survey occupation. 4 Also shown are average
percent changes for the two broad occupational groups
covered by the survey (the professional, administrative,
and technical support group; and the clerical and clerical
supervisory group) and the average percent change for
the two groups ^combined. The cumulative 1961-72
percent increases for selected occupations are shown in
chart 1.
In the 1971-72 9-month period, increases in average
salaries for the 11 professional, administrative, and
technical support occupations ranged from 2.9 to 5.4
percent, while increases for the eight clerical and clerical
supervisory occupations were between 4.1 and 5.1
percent. 5 For all white-collar occupations combined,
the increase in average salaries amounted to 4.4 percent.
Conversion of this figure to an annual rate indicates that
white-collar salaries rose at the rate of 5.9 percent per
year during the 9-month period. This represents a
decline from the 6.6-percent rate of increase recorded in
the previous year and is the first decline in the rate of
increase in average salaries since the trend series was
begun a decade ago.
To examine the changes in salaries that have occurred
since 1961 for different levels of work, all of the
occupational classifications were grouped into the three
broad categories described in table B.
Average salaries increased more for the higher occupa­
tional levels (group C) than for the two lower groups
from 1961 through 1966, with the exception of the
1962-63 period. Between 1966 and 1969, however, the
middle occupational levels (group B) showed larger
annual increases than did the lower or higher levels.




Average salaries, March 1972

Average monthly salaries for the occupations
included in this report (table 1) ranged from $383 for
4 The increases since 1965 relate to establishments in
metropolitan areas and nonmetropolitan counties; all others
relate to metropolitan areas only. Establishments employing
fewer than 250 workers were excluded before 1966.
5 All measures of salary change for the 1971-72 period which
appear in this bulletin have been computed using data based on
the 1971 survey scope in both years, i.e., including establish­
ments with fewer than 100 employees in the finance, insurance,
and real estate industries.
6 Work levels used for computing 1971-72 increases were:
Clerical - All clerical levels.
Technical support — All levels of draftsmen and engineering
technicians.
Entry and developmental professional and administrative —
Accountants I and II; auditors I and II; job analysts I and II;
chemists I and II, and engineers I and II.
Experienced professional and administrative - Accountants
III, IV, and V; auditors III and IV; chief accountants I, II, III,
and IV; attorneys II, III, IV, V, and VI; job analysts III and IV;
directors of personnel I, II, III, and IV; chemists III, IV, V, VI,
VII, and VIII; and engineers III, IV, V, VI, VII, and VIII.
A few survey levels, not readily identifiable with any of the
four occupational categories, were not used.
The 1966-67 increases were prorated to a 12-month period
because a change in survey timing in 1967 resulted in a longer
period between surveys.
2

Table A .

Percent increases in average salaries, 1961—1972, by occupation and group

A v e ra g e
annual
1961

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

ra te o f

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

in c r e a s e ,

1962

O c c u p a t io n a n d g ro u p

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967 1

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972 2

1961 to
1972 2

q

.........................

2.9

3.0

3.1

3.1

3.3

4.5

5.4

5.7

6.2

6.6

4.4

4.5

P ro fe ssio n a l, a d m in is tra tiv e , and
te c h n ic a l s u p p o rt 3 .................................................
A c c o u n ta n ts .....................................................
A u d ito r s ............................................................
C h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts ............................................
A tto r n e y s ..........................................................
B u y e r s .................................................................
Jo b a n a ly s t s .......................................................
D ire c to rs o f p e r s o n n e l.....................................
C h em ists ............................................................
E n g in e e r s ............................................................
E ng ine ering t e c h n ic ia n s ..................................
D r a f t in g ..............................................................

3.0
2.8
2.9
2.6
3.2
(6)
1.4
3.7
3.9
2.6
(6)
3.2

3.3
3.3
3.6
2.8
4.6
(6)
2.6
3.0
3.8
4.4
2.9
3.6

3.4
2.8
3.1
4.8
3.3
(6)
3.5
4.6
3.3
2.9
3.6
2.6

3.7
3.5
3.9
3.9
4.2
(6)
4.3
3.5
3.9
3.2
2.3
(4)

3.6
3.8
3.8
3.3
4.0
(6)
5.4
3.6
4.8
3.7
2.8
1.5

4.2
4.6
4.8
5.1
3.2
4.2
3.4
3.8
4.4
4.3
3.7
3.5

5.5
5.7
5.5
5.5
5.3
4.9
7.0
5.4
5.1
5.4
5.1
5.3

5.8
7.0
7.2
5.8
(4)
6.6
2.1
5.4
6.5
6.2
5.8
5.8

6.2
6.7
7.0
7.1
7.1
6.1
4.1
7.4
5.9
5.5
6.3
4.9

6.7
6.7
7.0
9.1
5.0
7.0
7.7
8.0
5.5
5.7
6.5
5.6

4.1
4.2
4.1
2.9
4.6
4.7
5.1
2.9
3.8
3.9
3.8
5.4

4.6
4.7
4.9
4.9
(5)
(6)
4.3
4.8
4.7
4.4
7 4.4
(5)

2.8
3.0
(6)
(6)
(6)
2.6
(6)

2.6
2.5
2.6
2.5
(6)
2.8
(6)
2.5
2.6

2.7
2.8
3.1
2.7
(6)
2.3
(6)
2.4
2.6

2.4
2.2
2.2
2.3
(6)
3.0
(6)
2.3
2.5

3.0
3.0
2.9
3.7
(6)
2.8
(6)
2.9
2.6

4.8
3.3
5.1
5.2
(6)
5.4
(6)
4.6
5.4

5.3
4.7
6.8
4.9
(6)
6.2
4.6
4.9
5.8

5.5
4.7
5.5
5.3
(6)
6.7
5.3
5.9
5.7

6.2
6.2
5.5
6.4
(6)
6.3
6.4
5.8
6.0

6.5
6.0
6.1
7.0
6.1
6.7
6.6
7.5
6.1

4.6
4.5
4.1
5.1
4.6
4.7
4.6
4.8
4.3

4.3
4.0
7 4.5
7 4.6
(6)
4.6
(6)
7 4.5
4.3

A ll survey o c c u p a tio n s

o

C le ric a l and c le ric a l su p e rviso ry
..............................
A c c o u n tin g c le rk s ............................................
F ile c le rk s ..........................................................
K e y p u n c h o pe rato rs .......................................
K e y p u n c h su perviso rs .....................................
Messengers (o ffic e b o y s and girls) ................
S e c r e t a r ie s ..........................................................
Sten og rap h ers ...................................................
T y p is t s .................................................................

(4)

2.5

surveyed in 1 9 7 0 ) , n o t show n a bove, are in clu d e d in the averages
fo r th e periods d u rin g w h ic h th e y w e re surveyed.
4 C o m p a ra b le data n o t a vailab le fo r b o th years.
5 C o m p ariso n over th is p e rio d was n o t possible because o f
changes in th e d e fin itio n o f th e o c c u p a tio n .

A ctu al s u rvey-to-survey increases have been p ro ra te d to a
1 2 -m o n th p eriod because changes in tim in g leng thened the
period b etw een th e 1 9 6 6 and 1 9 6 7 surveys,

o

T h e 1971 to 1 9 7 2 increases are fo r th e 9 -m o n th p e rio d ,
June 1 9 7 1 -M a rc h 1 9 7 2 .
o

^ N o t surveyed.
7 T h e average a nnu al rate o f increase relates to th e 1 9 6 2 to
1 9 7 2 p e rio d .

D ata fo r 1 a d m in is tra tiv e o c c u p a tio n (m anagers o f o ffic e
services, last surveyed in 1 9 6 8 ), and 3 clerical occupatio ns
(b o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p erators last surveyed in 1 9 6 4 , and
s w itc h b o a rd o p era to rs and ta b u la tin g -m a c h in e op erators, last

NO TE:

file clerks I to $2,902 for the top level of attorney
surveyed. These extremes reflect the wide range of
duties and responsibilities represented by the occupa­
tional work levels surveyed. Average salaries for the
occupational levels, and a brief indication of the duties
and responsibilities they represent, are summarized in
the following paragraphs. 7
Among the five levels of accountants surveyed,
average monthly salaries ranged from $756 for
accountants I to $1,447 for accountants V. Auditors in
the four levels defined for survey had average salaries
ranging from $802 a month for auditors I to $1,319 for
auditors IV. Level I in both the accounting and auditing
series included trainees who had bachelor’s degrees in
accounting or the equivalent in education and experi­
ence combined. At each corresponding level, average
salaries were higher for auditors than for accountants. For
level III, the most heavily populated group in both




F o r m eth o d of c o m p u ta tio n , see a p p e n d ix A .

series, monthly salaries averaged $990 for accountants
and $1,073 for auditors. Whereas two-thirds of the
accountants were employed in manufacturing, this
industry division employed 40 percent of the auditors. 8
Other industry divisions which accounted for large
numbers of auditors were finance, insurance, and real
estate (27 percent), and public utilities (19 percent).
Chief accountants were surveyed separately from
accountants and included those who develop or adapt
and direct the accounting program for a company or an
establishment (plant) of a company. Classification by
level was determined by the extent of delegated
authority and responsibility; the technical complexity of
7 Classification of employees in the occupations and work
levels surveyed was based on factors detailed in the definitions in
appendix C.
8 Establishments primarily engaged in providing accounting
and auditing services were excluded from the survey.

3

CHART 1

Cumulative Rise in Average (Mean) Salaries for Selected Occupational
Groups, 1961 to 1972
PERCENT
OCCUPATIONAL 0




5

10

15

20

25

30

4

35

40

45

50

55

60

65

70

the accounting system;and, to a lesser degree, the size of
the professional staff directed. Chief accountants at level
I, who have authority to adapt the accounting system
established at higher levels to meet the needs of an
establishment of a company with relatively few and
stable functions and work processes (directing one or
two accountants), averaged $1,279 a month. Chief
accountants IV, 9 who have authority to establish and
maintain the accounting program, subject to general
po'icy guidelines, for a company with numerous and
varied functions and work processes (directing as many
as 40 accountants), averaged $2,210 a month. About
three-fifths of the chief accountants who met the
requirements of the definitions for these four levels were
employed in manufacturing industries.
Attorneys were classified into survey levels based
upon the difficulty of their assignments and their
responsibilities. 10 Attorneys I, which included new law
graduates with bar membership and those performing
work that was relatively uncomplicated due to clearly
applicable precedents and well-established facts,
averaged $1,125 a month. Attorneys in the top level
surveyed, level VI, earned an average of $2,902 a month.
These attorneys dealt with legal matters of critical
importance to their organizations, and were usually
subordinate only to the general counsel or his immediate
deputy in very large firms. Finance, insurance, and real
estate industries employed about four-tenths of the
attorneys; manufacturing industries employed about
three-tenths; and public utilities, one-fifth.
Buyers averaged $782 a month at level I, which
included those who purchased “off-the-shelf’ and
readily available items and services from local sources.
Buyers IV, who purchased large amounts of highly
complex and technical items, materials, or services were
paid monthly salaries averaging S i,296. Manufacturing
industries accounted for 86 percent of the buyers in the
four levels.
In the personnel management field, four work levels
of job analysts and five levels of directors of personnel
Table B.

were studied. 11 Job analysts I, defined to include
trainees under immediate supervision, averaged $787,
compared with $1,255 for job analysts IV, who analyze
and evaluate a variety of the more difficult jobs under
general supervision and who may participate in the
development and installation of evaluation or compensa­
tion systems. Directors of personnel were limited by
definition to those who had programs that included, at a
minimum, responsibility for administering a job evalua­
tion system, employment and placement functions, and
employee relations and services functions. Those with
significant responsibility for actual contract negotiation
with labor unions as the principal company representa­
tive were excluded. Provisions were made in the defini­
tion for weighing various combinations of duties and
responsibilities to determine the level classification.
Among personnel directors with job functions as
specified for the four levels of responsibility, average
monthly salaries ranged from $1,193 for level I to
$2,062 for level IV. Manufacturing industries accounted
for 64 percent of the job analysts and 73 percent of the
directors of personnel included in the study; the finance,
insurance, and real estate industries ranked next, with 25
percent of the job analysts and 11 percent of the
directors of personnel.
Chemists and engineers each were surveyed in eight
levels. Both series started with a professional trainee
level, typically requiring a B.S. degree. The highest level
surveyed involved either full responsibility over a very
broad and highly complex and diversified engineering or
chemical program, with several subordinates each
directing large and important segments of the program;
or individual research and consultation in difficult
9 Although chief accountants V and directors of personnel V
were surveyed, as defined in appendix C. too few employees in
each occupational level met requirements for the level to warrant
presentation of salary figures.
10 Establishments primarily engaged in offering legal advice
or legal services were excluded from the survey.
11 See footnote 9.

Percent increases in average salaries, 1961-1972, by work level category
—
1961

|

i

G ro u p A (G S grades 1-4 in a p p e n d ix D ) ..................
G ro u p B (G S grades 5-10 in a p p e n d ix D ) ................
G ro u p C (G S grades 11 -15 in a p p e n d ix D) ..............

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

1962

W o r k le v e l c a t e g o r y

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967 1

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972 2

1972

2.8
2.6
3.5

2.7
4 .0

2 .7

2.2

2.9

2.6
3.5

3 .3

3 .7

4 .2

4 .2

4.5
4.8
4.1

5.1
5.8
4.7

5.5
6.5
5.9

6.2
6.3
6.4

6.2
6.3
6.2

4.7
3.9
4.2

56.1
6 2.6
6 4 .0

3 .7

1 A c tu a l survey-to-survey increases have been p ro ra te d to a
1 2 -m o n th period because changes in tim in g leng thened the
period b e tw een th e 1 9 6 6 and 1 9 6 7 surveys.
2

The

1 9 7 1 -7 2

increases are fo r the 9 -m o n th




1961

1 9 7 1 — M arch 1 9 7 2 . T h e p ercen t increases w ere c o m p u te d using
data based upon th e scope o f the 1 9 7 1 survey in bo th years.
NOTE:

p eriod June

5

F o r m e th o d o f c o m p u ta tio n , see a p p e n d ix A .

CHART 2

Increases in Average Salaries for Selected Occupational Groups, 1961 to 1972

Mean
increase
1961
to
1972

1961
to
1962

1962
to
1963

1963
to
1964

1964
to
1965

1966
to
1967

1965
to
1966

Data were adjusted to a 1 2-month period.




6

1967
to
1968

1968
to
1969

1969
to
1970

1970
to
1971

1971
to
1972

problem areas where the engineer or chemist was a
recognized authority and where solutions would
represent a major scientific or technological advance. 12
Average monthly salaries ranged from $910 for engineers
I to $2,324 for engineers VIII, and from $820 for
chemists I to $2,569 for chemists VIII. Although, at
level I, the average salaries of engineers exceeded those
for chemists by 11 percent, at level IV the difference
narrowed to 3 percent, and at level VIII, the average
salaries of chemists exceeded those for engineers by 11
percent. Level IV, the largest group in each series,
included professional employees who were fully
competent in all technical aspects of their assignments,
worked with considerable independence, and, in some
cases, supervised a few professional and technical
workers. Manufacturing industries accounted for threefourths of all engineers and nine-tenths of all chemists;
public utilities, 11 and 1 percent, respectively; and the
surveyed engineering and scientific services employed
virtually all of the others.
By definition, the five-level series for engineering
technicians was limited to employees providing semiprofessional technical support to engineers engaged in
such areas as research, design, development, testing, or
manufacturing process improvement, and whose work
pertained to electrical, electronic, or mechanical com­
ponents or equipment. Technicians engaged primarily in
production or maintenance work were excluded.
Engineering technicians I, who performed simple,
routine tasks under close supervision, or from detailed
procedures, were paid monthly salaries averaging $601.
Engineering technicians V, the highest level surveyed,
averaged $1,022 a month. That level included fully
experienced technicians performing more complex
assignments involving responsibility for planning and
conducting a complete project of relatively limited
scope, or a portion of a larger and more diverse project
in accordance with objectives, requirements, and design
approaches as outlined by the supervisor or a profes­
sional engineer. Averages for intermediate levels III and
IV,at which a majority of the technicians surveyed were
classified, were $792 and $899, respectively. As might
be expected, nearly all of the technicians as defined were
employed in manufacturing (74 percent) and in the
scientific services industries studied (16 percent).
Although the ratio of such technicians to engineers
studied was about 1 to 4 in all manufacturing industries,
ratios of approximately 1 to 3 were found in establish­
ments manufacturing mechanical and electrical equip­
ment and 1 to 2 in research, development, and testing
laboratories.
In the drafting field, the definitions used in the
survey covered four levels of work - draftsmen-tracers,




and draftsmen I, II, and III. Monthly salaries averaged
$524 for draftsmen-tracers and ranged from $629 to
$958 among the three levels of draftsmen. Draftsmentracers copy plans and drawings prepared by others or
prepare simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized
items. The three draftsman levels as defined ranged from
employees preparing detail drawings of single units or
parts (level I) to those who, working in close support
with the design originator, plan the graphic presentation
of complex items having distinctive design features, and
either prepare or direct the preparation of the drawings
(level III). The drafting employees were distributed by
industry in about the same proportion as engineers, with
72 percent in manufacturing, 11 percent in public
utilities, and 15 percent in the selected engineering and
scientific services industries studied.
Keypunch supervisors were classified on the basis of
combinations of three elements — level of supervisory
responsibility, difficulty of keypunch work supervised,
and number of employees supervised. Keypunch
supervisors I, who were responsible for the day-to-day
supervision of fewer than 20 operators performing
routine keypunching operations, averaged $634 a
month. At level V, the highest level defined for survey,
keypunch supervisors averaged $1,027. Individuals classi­
fied at this level^ supervised more complex keypunch­
ing operations, 50 or more operators, and performed
at a higher level of supervisory authority.
Among the 16 clerical jobs included in this study,
average monthly salaries for secretaries, the most heavily
populated clerical occupation studied, ranged from $581
at level I to $758 at level IV. Average salaries of $515
and $589 were reported for general and senior steno­
graphers; $489 and $628 for accounting clerks I and II;
and the two levels of typists averaged $436 and $508.
Generally, average salaries for clerical workers were
highest in public utilities and manufacturing industries
and lowest in the finance, insurance, and real estate, and
retail trade divisions. Employment in manufacturing
exceeded that in any of the nonmanufacturing divisions
within scope of the survey in 11 of the 16 clerical work
levels; highest employment totals in the other five levels
were in the finance, insurance, and real estate division.
Women accounted for 95 percent or more of the
employees in 12 of the clerical work levels, while men
accounted for one-half or more in only one (messenger).
Median monthly salaries (the amount below and
above which 50 percent of the employees were found)
for most of the work levels were slightly lower than the
weighted averages (means) cited above (i.e., the salaries
12
It was recognized in the definition that top positions of
some companies with unusually extensive and complex
engineering or chemical programs were above that level.

7

in the upper halves of the arrays had a greater effect on
the averages than did the salaries in the lower halves).
The relative difference between the median and the
mean was less than 3 percent for 58 of the 77 work
levels and between 3 and 7 percent in the 19 other
levels.

tion (all-establishment average for each category = 100
percent):
Professional,
adm inistrative.
and technical
categories
Total number of categories

In most of the occupational work levels, average
salaries for employees in metropolitan areas (table 2)
were either identical to or slightly higher than average
salaries for employees in all establishments within full
scope of the survey (table 1). Only in 11 of the 75 work
levels studied 13 were average salaries more than 1.5
percent higher in metropolitan areas than in all areas
combined. Employment in the survey occupations in
metropolitan areas accounted for about seven-eighths of
the total nationwide employment reported in these
occupations. The proportions varied, however, among
occupations and work levels. Nearly all of the attorneys,
for example, but only three-fourths of all directors of
personnel, were employed in metropolitan areas. In 57
of the 75 work levels studied, 85 percent or more of the
employment was in metropolitan areas. It is apparent,
therefore, that, for most work levels, salaries in nonmetro­
politan counties could have little effect upon the averages
for all establishments combined.

20

23
18
8

—

9
11

Relative salary levels in large establishments tended to
be highest for work levels in which large establishments
accounted for small proportions of the total
employment.
Salary distributions

Percent distributions of employees by monthly salary
are presented for the professional and administrative
occupations in table 4. and for engineering technicians
and keypunch supervisors in table 5; distributions by
weekly salary are shown for employees in drafting and
clerical occupations in table 6. 14 Within almost all of
the 77 occupation work levels, salary rates for the
highest paid employees were twice those of the lowest
paid employees. The absolute spread between highest
and lowest paid workers within a given work level
tended to widen with each rise in work level for most
occupations. All occupations showed a substantial
degree of overlapping of individual salaries between
work levels. Ranges in salary rates of employees in
established pay grades or work levels within salary
structures of individual firms also often overlapped
substantially.
The middle 50 and 80 percent of the salary range,
and the median salary for each occupation work level,
have been charted (charts 3 and 4) to point up
occupational pay relationships as well as the typically
greater degree of salary dispersion associated with the
higher work levels in each occupational series.
Expressing the salary range of the middle 50 percent
of employees in each work level as a percent of the
median salary permitted comparison of salary ranges and
eliminated extreme low and high salaries from each
comparison. As shown in table C, the degree of
dispersion was between 15 and 30 percent of the median
salary in 73 of the 77 work levels. The degree of
dispersion tended to be greater in the clerical and

Salary levels in large establishments

It was possible to present separate data for 69
occupational work levels for establishments with 2,500
employees or more (table 3). Comparisons between
employment and relative salary levels in these establish­
ments and the full survey are also presented. Establish­
ments employing 2.500 or more accounted for over
one-third o f the professional, administrative, super­
visory, and clerical employment within scope of the
survey, and almost three-eighths of the employment in
the selected occupations studied. Large establishments
accounted for varying proportions of employment in the
69 occupational work levels shown in table 3, ranging
from 9 to 84 percent (keypunch supervisors I and iob
analysts IV, respectively). Tne range was from 9 to 40
percent for clerical and clerical supervisory jobs, and
from 23 to 84 percent for nonclerical jobs.
The salary levels in large establishments, expressed as
a percent of levels in all establishments combined,
ranged from 101 to 123. Salary averages in large
establishments exceeded the all-establishment averages
by 5 percent or more in all clerical and clerical
supervisory job categories, but in only 26 of 49
nonclerical categories, as shown by the following tabula­




49

101 —104 p e r c e n t......................
105—109 p e r c e n t......................
110 percent and o v e r ..............

Salary levels in metropolitan areas

Clerical
and
clerical
supervisory
categories

13 Two work levels (chief accountant I and chemist V III) did
not meet criteria for publication in this segment of the survey.
14 Technical considerations dictated the summarization ot
employee distributions by weekly,rather than monthly,salary for
drafting and clerical jobs.

8

CHART 3

Salaries in Professional and Technical Occupations, March 1972




Median M onthly Salaries and Ranges W ithin Which Fell 50 Percent and 80 Percent o f Employees
0

$500

$ 1 ,0 0 0

$ 1 ,5 0 0

9

$ 2 ,0 0 0

$ 2 ,5 0 0

$ 3 ,0 0 0

$ 3 ,5 0 0

$ 4 ,0 0 0

CHART 4

Salaries in Administrative and Clerical Occupations, March 1972




Median M onthly Salaries and Ranges W ithin Which Fell 50 Percent and 80 Percent o f Employees
0

$400

$800

$ 1 ,2 0 0

10

$ 1 ,6 0 0

$ 2 ,0 0 0

$ 2 ,4 0 0

$ 2 ,8 0 0

CHART 5

Relative Employment in Selected Occupational Groups by Industry Division,
March 1972
PERCENT
OCCUPATIONAL
GROUP

Accountants and
chief accountants

Auditors

Attorneys

Buyers

Directors o f personnel
and job analysts

Chemists

Engineers

Engineering technicians
and draftsmen

Keypunch supervisors

Clerical employees




Manufacturing

Public utilities

Finance, insurance,
and real estate

Trade and selected services

Table C. Distribution of work levels by degree of salary dispersion
Number of levels having degree of
dispersion1 o f —

Occupation

Number
of
w ork
levels

15
Under

15

20

25

and
under

and
under

and
under

All occupat'ons ..................................................................

77

A c c o u n ta n ts ............................................................................................
A u d ito r s ...................................................................................................
Chief accountants .................................................................................
A ttorneys .................................................................................................
Buyers ......................................................................................................
Job a n a ly s ts ............................................................................................
Directors of personnel ..........................................................................
Chemists .................................................................................................
E n g in e e rs.................................................................................................
Engineering technicians .......................................................................
D r a ft in g ...................................................................................................
Keypunch supervisors .........................................................................
C le ric a l......................................................................................................

5
4
4
6
4
4
4
8
8
5
4
5
16

25

30

percent

percent

20

38

15

2
3
3

2

20
percent

percent

3

2

2

30
percent
and
over

1
5
4

1
1
4
4
2
3

2

2

1

7

1
1
4

1
6

3
10

1

1 D egree o f dispersion equals th e salary range of th e m id d le 5 0 p e rc e n t o f em p lo y e e s in a w o rk level expressed as a p e rce n t o f th e
m edian salary fo r th a t level.

For most of the occupations studied, relative salary
levels were lower in retail trade and in finance,
insurance, and real estate than in other industry
divisions. In those occupations in which retail trade and
the finance industries contributed a substantial propor­
tion of the total employment, the average salary in the
occupation for all industries combined was lowered, and
the relative levels in industries such as manufacturing
and public utilities tended to be well above 100 percent
of the all-industry level. For example, relative pay levels
for file clerks (107 percent of the all-industry level in
manufacturing and 132 percent in public utilities)
reflected the influence of lower salaries for the high
proportion (56 percent) of all-industry employment
included in the finance industries. The finance
industries, however, also reported lower average standard
weekly hours than the other industries surveyed, as
shown in table 9.

keypunch supervisory occupations than in the other
occupations studied.
Differences in the range of salaries paid individuals
within work levels surveyed reflect a variety of factors
other than differences in the range of duties and
responsibilities encompassed by the various work level
definitions. Two of these factors are: salary structures
within establishments which provide for a range of rates
for each grade level; and regional variations, particularly
in the clerical levels (clerical employees are usually
recruited locally, while the job field tends to be broader
regionally, often national in scope, for the professional
and administrative occupations). 15 A third factor is
industry variation. (Table 7 and chart 5 show how em­
ployment in surveyed occupations varies by industry.)
Pay differences by industry

The survey was planned to permit publication of
national salary estimates by level of work. By combining
the data for all levels of work studied in each occupa­
tion, it was possible to present comparisons between
relative salary levels in major industry divisions and all
industries combined (table 8).
The relative salary levels for most of the professional,
administrative, clerical supervisory, and technical
support occupations tended to be closest to the averages
for all industry divisions in manufacturing, which had
63 to 91 percent of the employees in 9 of the 12 occu­
pations. Relative salary levels in the public utilities in­
dustry division were generally the highest.




Average standard weekly hours

The length of the standard workweek, on which the
regular straight-time salary was based, was obtained for
individual employees in the occupations studied. When
individual weekly hours were not available, particularly
for some higher level professional and administrative
positions, (he predominant workweek of the office work
15 For an analysis o f interarea pay differentials in clerical
salaries, see Area Wage Surveys: Metropolitan Areas, United
States and Regional Summaries, 1969 - 70. (BLS Bulletin 1660
- 92, 1972).

12

force was used as the standard workweek. The
distribution of average weekly hours (rounded to the
nearest half-hour) is presented in table 9 for all work
levels of each occupation combined in major industry
divisions surveyed. Average weekly hours were lower in
finance, insurance, and real estate (38 hours for a




majority of the occupations) than in the other industry
divisions (39 or 39.5 hours). 16
*6 For information on scheduled weekly hours o f officeworkers employed in metropolitan areas, see Area Wage Surveys:
Selected Metropolitan Areas, 1970 — 1971 (BLS Bulletin 1685
- 9 1 ,1 9 7 2 ).

13

T a b le 1.

A v e r a g e salaries:

U n ite d S t a t e s

(Employment and average salaries for selected professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in private industry, 1 United States
except Alaska and Hawaii, March 1972, and percent increase in mean salaries since June 1971 2)
M o n th l y s a l a r i e s 4
Number
of
em ployees3

Mean

M edian

___________________________________
----------------- ---------- ------------- ----------------------------------------------------------. —
— ---------------------------------------------------------------------

4, 230
10,657
25, 8 7 2
18, 4 3 9
6, 41 6

$756
888
990
1, 188
1, 4 47

I
II —
---------------- ---- ----------- ---------III — --------- -------- ------------- ---- -------IV — ------ — ----- —
- _

854
2, 6 0 3
4, 2 92
2,618

O c c u p a t i o n an d c l a s s
( S e e d e f i n i t i o n s in a p p e n d i x C)

Middle

Annual s a l a r i e s 4
range 5

M iddle ra n g e 5
Mean

M edian

Percent
increase
in
mean
salaries 6

First
quartile

T hird
quartile

$750
87 5
975
1, 174
1,430

$683
800
88 5
1,075
1, 2 99

$825
979
1,080
1, 291
1, 5 86

$ 9 , 06 7
10,655
11, 8 7 9
14, 259
17, 368

$ 9 , 0 00
10,500
11, 7 00
14, 0 88
17,160

$ 8 , 196
9, 6 00
10,620
12, 90 0
15,588

$9, 90 0
11, 7 4 8
12, 9 6 0
1 5,492
19, 0 3 2

0.
4.
4.
4.
4.

802
91 0
1, 0 7 3
1, 319

790
89 5
1,060
1, 3 04

713
8 00
959
1, 195

850
980
1, 156
1,430

9,628
10, 9 2 4
12, 88 1
15, 8 2 3

9, 4 80
10,740
12, 7 2 0
15, 6 48

8 , 556
9,600
11, 50 8
14, 340

10,200
11, 7 6 0
13,872
17,160

1.9
2.6
4. 8
4. 5

386
1, 185
628
218

1, 2 79
1,452
1,766
2, 210

1, 190
1,46 3
1,700
2, 182

1,
1,
1,
1,

126
299
5 85
964

1, 416
1, 5 8 3
1,874
2, 366

15, 348
17,419
21, 198
26,521

14, 280
17,556
20,400
26,184

13, 5 1 2
15,588
19, 0 2 0
23 , 56 8

16,992
18, 9 96
2 2 , 4 88
2 8 ,3 9 2

6. 2
1.7
1.4
7. 8

346
1, 288
2, 301
1, 6 64
8 98
534

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

125
220
5 33
954
2 94
902

1, 100
1, 175
1,499
1, 917
2, 208
2 ,812

1,030
1, 0 7 8
1, 337
1, 6 6 6
2, 0 1 5
2, 5 4 3

1, 25 0
1, 350
1,700
2, 166
2, 5 1 3
3, 28 0

13, 4 98
14,640
18, 392
23 , 4 48
27,528
34, 8 2 8

13, 200
14, 100
17,988
23,004
26, 496
33 , 7 4 4

12, 360
12, 93 6
16,044
19,992
24 , 180
30 , 51 6

15,000
16,200
20,400
2 5,992
30,156
39, 360

(7 )
2. 1
5. 0
5. 4
4. 8
4. 4

6 40
92 9
213
4 09

782
9 10
1, 0 9 3
1, 296

755
891
1, 075
1, 25 4

695
800
9 66
1, 139

8 61
1, 0 0 3
1, 197
1, 4 25

9, 380
10, 9 2 2
13,117
15,555

9, 06 0
10,692
12, 900
15, 0 4 8

8,
9,
11,
13,

340
600
592
668

10,332
12,036
14, 3 6 4
17, 100

4.
5.
4.
5.

2
3
2
2

98
358
492
5 08

787
9 02
1, 0 4 4
1, 255

778
903
1, 0 3 2
1, 257

710
816
9 16
1, 130

875
99 0
1, 150
1, 3 72

9, 441
10, 8 2 8
12, 52 6
15,057

9, 336
10, 8 3 6
12,384
15,084

8, 5 2 0
9,792
10,992
13, 5 6 0

10,500
11, 8 8 0
13, 8 0 0
16, 4 6 4

2.
4.
4.
6.

3
1
2
8

904
1, 701
1,035
346

1,
1,
1,
2,

193
367
679
062

1,
1,
1,
1,

1,
1,
1,
1,

034
195
465
682

1,
1,
1,
2,

310
498
874
325

14, 313
16,401
20 , 153
2 4 , 7 38

14,100
15,996
19, 8 1 2
23, 148

12, 4 0 8
14, 340
17,580
2 0,184

15, 7 2 0
17, 9 7 6
2 2 , 48 8
27,900

4. 2
3. 0
1.7
3.6

9 70
755
094
600
383
471
57 5
421

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

820
924
075
306
5 48
773
157
569

830
9 25
1,066
1, 291
1, 5 25
1, 755
2, 100
2, 5 20

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,

725
840
95 0
153
380
5 75
917
249

90 0
1, 0 1 4
1, 180
1, 4 4 9
1,695
1, 9 5 2
2, 381
2,7 9 2

9, 8 3 8
11, 0 9 2
12, 901
15,670
18, 581
21,277
25 , 88 8
30 , 827

9, 9 60
11,100
12, 7 9 2
15,492
18, 300
21,060
25,200
30 , 240

8, 7 0 0
10,080
11, 4 0 0
13,836
16,560
18, 900
23 , 0 0 4
2 6 , 9 88

10,800
12,168
14, 160
17,388
2 0 , 340
23 , 4 2 4
28 , 5 7 2
33 , 5 0 4

1.5
2.9
3. 5
4. 2
3.6
3. 7
5. 6
3.7

F irst
q ua rtile

Third
q ua rtile

A c c o u n t a n t s an d a u d i t o r s
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
A ccountants
Accountants
A uditors
Auditors
A uditors
A uditors
Chief
C hief
C hief
C hief

I
II
III
IV
V

accountants
accountants
accountants
accountants

I -------------------------------------------II ---------_ — __ - ____
III ------------------------------------------IV -------------------------------------------

7
3
2
5
5

A ttorneys

A t t o r n e y s I -------------------------------------------------------------A t t o r n e y s I I ___________ —_________- ________________
A t t o r n e y s III ____________ _____ _____ _______________
A t t o r n e y s IV
-------- ------ ---- - -------- --------A t t o r n e y s V _______ ________ ___ - ________ __ —
A t t o r n e y s VI ----------------------------------------------------------

Buyers
Buyers I —
—
_
___
- _
B u y e r s II ____ ___ _____ _______
B u y e r s I I I _______ ____ ___ ____ _______ __________ _
B u y e r s IV ----------------------------------------------------------------

2,
9,
12,
4,

P ersonnel m anagem ent
Job
Job
Job
Job

an alysts I
_ —
----_
a n a l y s t s II _
— - ____
__
a n a l y s t s III -------- — __ — _ — -------- —
a n a l y s t s IV
_
—

D irectors
D irectors
D irectors
D irectors

of
of
of
of

personnel
personnel
personnel
personnel

C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists

I —
__
II
------------------------------------------- —
I I I ___ __ _____________ __ ____ __________
IV __________ ___ ______ __ _________ __
V —.------.
—
■ -------------- VI _____________________ ___________ ___
V I I ____________________________ __ ____
V I I I -------------------------------------------------------

E ngineers
E nginee r s
Engineers
E ngineers
E ngineers
Engineers
E n gi ne e r s
E ngineers

I _______________________________________
II —
__
III -----IV
_ _
V ____ ___________________ __ _______ . . . . .
- ■
V I -------V I I _________________________________ ___
VIII __ — ------- _
----------------- -

C h em ists

I — - _______________
II -------------------------------III -------------------------------I V ___ ___
____ __

175
333
6 51
929

an d e n g i n e e r s

3,
8,
9,
7,
4,
1,

9, 390
2 8 , 140
7 9 ,7 7 9
11 2, 0 7 4
7 4,629
38,532
14, 4 3 8
3, 07 0

9 10
1, 0 06
1, 140
1, 347
1, 5 5 2
1,784
2, 0 31
2, 324

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

902
999
130
339
542
764
0 00
27 5

850
9 28
1, 0 4 3
1, 221
1, 4 1 4
1,625
1, 8 25
2, 0 6 8

96 5
1, 0 7 5
1, 2 3 4
1,464
1,674
1, 92 6
2. 216
2, 52 9

10,921
12, 071
13, 6 8 2
16,159
18,628
2 1 ,402
2 4 , 367
27 , 885

10 , 8 2 4
11, 9 88
13, 5 6 0
16,068
18,504
21,168
2 4 , 0 00
27 , 300

10, 2 00
11, 136
12, 516
14, 6 5 2
16,968
19, 5 0 0
21,900
24, 816

11, 5 8 0
12y 9 0 0
14, 8 0 8
17,568
2 0,088
2 3 , 1 12
26 , 5 9 2
30, 3 4 8

2.
3.
4.
4.
3.
4.
3.
4.

3, 374
10, 5 8 3
2 3 , 6 97
28 , 5 4 3
17,207

6 01
684
792
899
1,022

608
682
7 91
898
1, 0 1 3

535
608
712
813
926

654
743
870
975
1, 108

7 , 208
8, 207
9, 50 7
10,788
12, 2 5 9

7 , 296
8, 184
9, 4 9 2
10,776
12, 156

6,4 2 0
7 , 2 96
8, 5 4 4
9, 7 5 6
11, 112

7,8 4 8
8, 916
10, 4 4 0
11, 7 0 0
13, 2 9 6

5. 2
3. 1
3 .9
3 .8
3. 8

3
2
3
0
6
2
7
3

T ech n ic a l support
E ngineering
E ngineering
E ngineering
E ngineering
E ngineering

technicians
tech nician s
tech nician s
tech nician s
tech nician s

I
I I ------------------------------III __________________
IV
V -------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table.




14

T ab le 1.

A v e r a g e s a laries:

U n ite d S t a t e s —C o n t in u e d

(Employment and average salaries for selected professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in private industry, 1 United States
except Alaska and Hawaii, M a r c h 1972, and p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in m e a n s a l a r i e s since June 19712
.)
M o n th l y

—
O c c u p a t i o n an d c l a s s
( S e e d e f i n i t i o n s in a p p e n d i x C)

Number
of
em ployees3

salaries 4

Annual s a l a r i e s 4
M iddle

M iddle ran ge 5
Mean

Median

4, 365
16, 71 0
29,607
30,175

$524
629
7 67
9 58

919
1,693
1, 106
391
59

82, 549
59, 930
24, 0 37
22,754
6, 936
61 , 700
4 5,043
25 , 245
80,584
90, 6 5 2
50,937
16,030
49 , 0 96
4 8,960
39 , 4 26
37, 199

Mean

Median

F irst
quartile

T hird
quartile

$513
610
754
917

$452
547
6 75
826

$567
695
850
1, 0 21

$6,
7,
9,
11,

6 34
710
777
908
1, 027

591
708
756
905
975

539
6 08
661
783
9 09

735
800
8 66
1, 0 16
1, 118

7,612
8, 516
9, 325
10,891
12, 322

7,0 9 2
8, 49 6
9, 07 2
10,860
11, 7 0 0

489
628
3 83
419
518
48 0
54 5
424
581
653
703
758
51 5
589
43 6
508

471
607
369
400
49 5
456
534
410
575
645
695
750
50 0
580
42 5
49 5

413
531
339
360
43 5
404
478
365
50 5
5 69
600
637
43 5
501
376
44 0

543
713
413
4 56
5 69
5 25
600
469
650
728
79 5
855
57 8
669
48 0
56 0

5, 8 7 0
7, 537
4, 6 0 2
5, 0 27
6, 214
5, 7 5 6
6, 5 3 9
5, 087
6, 9 7 2
7,8 4 0
8, 4 36
9, 0 9 2
6, 181
7, 0 7 4
5, 22 9
6, 093

5, 6 57
7, 288
4, 4 3 2
4, 7 97
5, 9 4 4
5, 47 5
6, 41 3
4,9 1 9
6, 8 9 9
7, 738
8, 342
8, 998
5, 996
6, 95 9
5,0 9 9
5, 940

F irst
q ua rtile

range 5
T hird
q ua rtile

Percent
increase
in
mean
salaries 6

T e c h n ic a l support— Continued
D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s ----------------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n I ---------------------------------------------- --------D r a f t s m e n II ---------------------------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n III ---------------------------------------------------------

288
55 0
201
492

$6,
7,
9,
11,

153
318
052
002

$ 5,
6,
8,
9,

423
570
098
907

$6,
8,
10,
12,

804
342
198
2 57

6. 8
4. 6
4. 4
6.4

6, 468
7 , 296
7, 9 3 2
9, 396
10,908

8, 820
9, 6 0 0
10,392
12, 192
13, 4 16

6. 5
3. 8
5. 2
1.9
8. 9

4, 9 53
6, 376
4, 06 7
4, 319
5, 21 4
4, 8 4 9
5, 73 5
4, 375
6,0 5 9
6 ,8 2 9
7, 198
7,6 3 9
5, 2 14
6, 0 07
4, 5 1 2
5, 277

6,5 1 8
8 , 551
4, 960
5,475
6, 832
6,299
7, 198
5, 631
7,799
8, 731
9, 5 38
10,258
6,9 3 9
8, 03 0
5,756
6, 71 6

4.6
4. 4
4. 2
3. 4
5. 3
5. 1
5. 2
4. 7
4. 3
4. 9
4. 5
4. 6
3 8
5. 7
3. 9
5. 0

C lerical supervisory
Keypunch
Keypunch
Keypunch
Keypunch
Keypunch

s u p e r v i s o r s I -----------------------------------s u p e r v i s o r s II
_— ---------------- —
s u p e r v i s o r s III ----- ------------------------s u p e r v i s o r s I V ------------- -------------------s u p e r v i s o r s V ------------------------------------

C lerical
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g I -----------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g II __________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e I -----------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , f i l e I I ___________________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e III ------ — — - -------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I -------------------------------- -----K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s II ___________________________
M e s s e n g e r s ( o f f i c e b o y s an d g i r l s ) ---------------S e c r e t a r i e s I ______________________________________
S e c r e t a r i e s II --------- -----------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s III __ ____ ____________________________
S e c r e t a r i e s I V __ - ______________________ ___ - ____
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l -------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ------------— —
T y p i s t s I ___________________________________________
T y p i s t s II --------------------------------------------------------------

1 F o r s c o p e o f s t u d y , s e e t a b l e in a p p e n d i x A.
2 F o r l i m i t a t i o n s o f p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s a s a m e a s u r e o f c h a n g e in s a l a r y s c a l e s , s e e a p p e n d i x A, p. 31.
3 O ccupational em p lo y m e n t e s t im a te s
r e l a t e to the t o t a l in a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h i n s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y and n ot to th e n u m b e r a c t u a l l y s u r ­
veyed.
F o r f u r t h e r e x p l a n a t i o n , s e e a p p e n d i x A, p. 33.
4 S a l a r i e s r e p o r t e d r e l a t e to t h e s t a n d a r d s a l a r i e s th a t w e r e p a id f o r s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s ; i. e . , th e s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d i n g to
th e e m p l o y e e * s n o r m a l w o r k s c h e d u l e e x c l u d i n g o v e r t i m e h o u r s .
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g p a y m e n t s a n d i n c e n t i v e e a r n ­
ings are included.
5 T h e m i d d l e r a n g e ( i n t e r q u a r t i l e ) u s e d h e r e i s th e c e n t r a l p a r t o f th e a r r a y e x c l u d i n g th e u p p e r a n d l o w e r f o u r t h s o f the e m p l o y e e d i s t r i b u t i o n .
6 F o r y e a r -to - y e a r co m p a r iso n s,
a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s in 1 9 7 2 w e r e a d j u s t e d b y i n c l u d i n g d at a f o r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in t h e f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s ­
ta t e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n e m p l o y i n g 50 to 99 w o r k e r s to c o r r e s p o n d to s c o p e of 1971 s u r v e y .
7 1971 d a ta did n ot m e e t p u b l i c a t i o n c r i t e r i a .




15

Table 2.

A v e r a g e s a la r ie s :

M e t r o p o l i t a n a reas

(Employment and average salaries for selected professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in private industry, metropolitan
areas. 1 March 1972)
Monthly s a l a r i e s 1

I
O c c u p a t i o n and c l a s s
( S e e d e f i n i t i o n s in a p p e n d i x C)

J

‘ '“ o f * 1
e m p l o y e e s “1

Mean

M itU un

!

r'irst
qua r t i l e

___________
A c c o u n t a n t s an d a u d i t o r s
3. 806
9, 807
22.025
15, 807
5.627 .

$ 7o 1
894
1,001
1. 196
1,465

8750
880
987
1, 1 s i
1,434

I ---------------------------------------------------------—----II ---------------------------------------------------------------I I I -------------------------------------------------------------I V --------------------------------------------------------------

758
2,449
4 ,124
2,4 3 9

80 8
911
1,074
1, 3 2 4

’‘ hir d
T
q uartile

'
;

r
l
Mean

C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s II ---------------------------------------------C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s III --------— --------------------------—----C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s I V ----------------------------------------------

935
547
197

1,453
1, 7 7 7
2,2 0 6

315
1, 255
2, 22 9
1, 567
869
533

i

|
i
!
i

8 0 87
800
8 94
i.083
1 ,300

j
1
,
;
!

Middle r a n g e 4
F irst
qua r t i l e

|
j

Third
qua r t i l e

1
I

$ 9 ,000
10, 5 o 0
11, 844
14, 172
17,208

!
j
1
1

$ 8, 2 4 4
9. 6 0 0
10,728
12.996
1 5 , oOO

9,4 9 2
10, 7 l e
12 ,7 -0
15,792

'

j

8, 6 l o
9,6 0 0
1 1 ,508
14, 3 5 2

17.431
2 1,319
26,475

17,556
20 , 8 20
2 o , 076

;
;
j

1 5,480
18 , 9 12
23, 460

1 8, 9 9 6
2 3 , 0 64
2 8 , 392

1 ,250
1, 35 0
1,716
2, 1 6 8
2, 5 5 2
3, 2 9 0

13, 52 6
14,632
18,466
2 3 , 63 6
2 7 . 541
34 844

1 3 ,2 4 8
14,076
18,000
2 3 , 172
2 6 ,4 8 4
33,744

i

12, 0 0 0
12 , 7 8 0
1 6,164
2 0 , 196
2 4 , 180
30 , 5 2 8

15,000
16, 2 00
2 0 , 5 92
26, 016
30 , 6 2 4
39 , 4 8 0

705
821
975
1, 141

868
1, 021
1,208
1.425

9. 509
11.192
13 ,2 0 9
15,596

9,240
10, 896
12,984
15,060

8 ,460
9, 852
11,700
13, o9 2

10. 4 1 6
12,252
14,496
17, 10 0

778
908
1,030
1 253

703
827
91o
1. 1 3 0

87 5
990
1, 15 0
1, 3 75

9.469
10. 869
12,549
15. 0 7 8

9,
10,
12,
15,

3 36
896
360
0 60

8,436
9,924
10, 992
13, 5 6 0

10. 5 0 0
11. 880
13, 800
16,500

1.
1.
i,
1,

182
348
DO C
999

1, 0 3 4
1, 2 0 4
1,499
1 ,672

1, 3 0 0
1,512
1, 874
2, 3 32

14,363
l f c . 5 69
2 0 , 567
2 4 .806

14, 184
16,176
19, 992
23, 988

12,408
14,448
1 7,988
2 0 , 06 4

15, 6 0 0
18, 144
2 2,488
27, 984

715
835
970
1,170
1.406
1,628
1,967

900
1,021
1 ,200
1 ,470
1,725
1,985
2,437

9, 7 9 8
11.111
13, 100
15, 911
i 8, 6 96
2 1 ,762
2 6 . 6 34

9, 9 6 0
11 124
1 2 ,99o
15, 7 8 0
1 3, 907
2 1 ,600
2o, 028

8, 5 8 0
10, 0 2 0
1 1,640
14,040
16. 872
19, 53 6
2 3 , 604

10, 800
12,252
14,400
17,640

855
934
1 ,050
1 ,234
1,425
1,641
1,8 3 8
2,0 8 3

965
1,0 7 8
1,241
1,475
1, 6 8 6
1,935
2, 2 2 7
2, 5 5 0

10. 9 60
12, 13 8
13. 78 0
i 6,254
18. 7 6 6
21,528
24,477
28, 084

10, 8 4 8
12, 0 0 0
13, 692
lo , 200
18. 0 36
2 1,300
2 4 , 0 96
27, 420

10, 2 6 0
11 ,208
12, 6 0 0
14, 8 0 8
17, 100
19, 6 92
22.056
2 4 , 9 96

1 1, 5 80
12, 9 3 6
14, 892
17,700
20, 232
23, 220
2 6 ,724
30, 6 0 0

7,2 9 6
8, 2 4 4
9, 54 0
10, 800
12, 180

0,516
7, 356
8, 5 80
9, 804
11 , 112

7,
8,
10,
11.
13,

6,231
7 ,446
9, 177
11, 121

5,
6,
8.
10,

527
67 4
218
011

6, 83 0
8.458
10, 4 0 2
12, 47 7

7. 32 0
8,496
9, 120
10,860
11,700

6,
7,
8,
9.
10,

720
392
2 20
384
9 44

8, 8 6 8
9, 6 0 0
10,404
12,216
13, 32 0

8 829
988
1,091
1, 3 0 0
1,545

8 9 J 30
10 732
12.007
14.349
17.459

718
800
959
1.19o

8 59
982
1,158
1,435

9. o 9 o
10.929
1 2, b8o
15,870

1,463
1, 73 5
2, 173

1, 2 9 0
1, 5 76
1,955

1,5 8 3
1,922
2, 3ob

1, 127
1,219
1, 5 3 9
1, 9 7 0
2, 29 5
2, 9 0 4

1, 104
1. 173
1, 5 0 0
1 ,9 3 1
2, 2 0 7
2, 812

1 ,000
1, 0t>5
1, 3 47
1,6 8 3
2, 0 15
2. 5 4 4

2, 190
7, 6 5 0
9. 872
3 .994

7 92
933
1. 101
1, 3 0 0

770
908
1.0 8 2
1, 2 55

94
350
437
4 85

7 89
9 06
1.0 4 6
1.257

5o0
1,274
S3o
260

I ---------------------------------------------------------II — ---------- ----- --------—----- —-----------------I I I --------------------------------------------------------IV
■ . .......
V -----------------------------------------------------------

j

I
i

791
89 3
1 ,060
1,316

A uditors
Auditors
A uditors
A uditors

!
|

1

j

'

Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
A ccountants
A ccountants

Annual s a l a r i e s J

1

Middle range 1

1, 197
1, 381
1,714
2, 0 o7

i

1
1
j

:

j

!
j
!
|
|

!
;
:

$ 9 , 948
11, 856
13,092
15, 6 0 0
19,140
10, 3 0 8
11.784
1 3 , 89 o
17, 22 0

Attorneys
i
Attorneys
A ttorneys
A ttorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
A ttorneys

I ---------- —-----— -----------------------—------------II ------------------------------------------------------------III ----------------------------------------------------------I V -----------------------------------------------------------V ------------------------------------------------------------V I -----------------------------------------------------------

!
i
;

Buyers
Buyers
Euyers
Buyers
Buyers

I
II — ---------— — ----------------- ----- ------------------I I I ----------------------------------------------------------------I V ----------------------------------------------------------------P ersonn el managem ent

Job
Job
Job
Job

an alysts
an alysts
an alysts
an alysts

I
■.......
I I --------------------------------------------------------I I I ------------------------------------------------------I V ------------. . . ------- ---------- — -----------------

D irectors
D irecto rs
D irectors
D irectors

of
of
of
of

personnel
personnel
personnel
personnel

I --------------------------------------I I -------------------------------------I I I -----------------------------------I V ------------------------------------

C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C h em ists

I ---------------------------------------------------------------II —---------------------------------------------------------I I I ------------------------------------------------------------IV --------------------- --------------------------------------V -------------------------------------------------------------V I ------------------------------------------------------------V I I -----------------------------------------------------------

791
3, 187
6, 451
7, 861
6, 103
3, 4 6 4
1,209

816
926
1, 09 2
1, 3 2 6
1 ,576
1, 814
2, 2 2 0

830
9 27
,1 .0 8 3
1,315
1, 5 5 8
1, 8 00
2, 169

E ngineers
E ngineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
E ngineers
E ngineers
Engineers

I ------------------------------------------------------------I I ------------------------------------------------------------I L L ----------------------------------------------------------I V ----------------------------------------------------------V ------------------------------------------------------------V I ----------------------------------------------------------V I I ---------------------------------------------------------V I I I ---------------------------------------------------------

8, 4 3 9
25,947
71,257
100,146
6 7,200
34,765
13, 107
2, 744

913
1, 01 I
1,1 4 8
1, 357
1 . 5c4
1, 7 94
2, 0 40
2, 3 4 0

1,
1.
1,
1,
1.
2,
2,

C h e m i s t s an d e n g i n e e r s

904
000
141
3 50
55 3
775
008
285

technicians
technicians
technicians
technicians
technicians

1
!
1

I -----------------------------------I I ----------------------------------I I I ------ ----- —-----------------I V ----------------------------------V -----------------------------------

2, 9 4 3
8, 74 3
19, 711
25,071
15,419

604
688
796
9 04
1, 025

608
687
795
400
1,0 1 '

j
1
!
!

5 43
613
715
817
926

654
747
874
9 85
1,113

7.2 5 0
8. 2 5 9
9, 557
10. 850
12.303

D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s -----------------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n I -----------------------------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n I I ----------------------------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n I I I -----------------------------------------------------------

3, 761
13,777
2 4 ,538
26 , 870

531
639
778
971

519
620
1 DD
92 7

!
|
1
j

4b 1
556
685
834

569
785
867
1 ,040

6, 374
7. 66 7
9, 331
11,656

739
8 00
So?
1,018
1,110

7. 844
S, o 06
9, 4 2 2
10, 8 88
12.300

C lerical su pervisory
K eypunch
Keypunch
K eypunch
K eypunch
Keypunch

s u p e r v i s o r s I ---------------------------------------s u p e r v i s o r s I I -------------------------------------------------------s u p e r v i s o r s I I I -----------------------------------------------------s u p e r v i s o r s IV ------------------------------------s u p e r v i s o r s V ---------------------------------------

2 3 , 8 20
2 9 ,244

1-

i

8 48
96 4
488
820
35 6

1

|
805
1.5 2 3
1.018
381
57

-

-

654
717
7 85
9 07
1, 02 5

-

-

-

ol0
706
7u 0
9 05
9 75

-

See footnotes at end of table.




20 , 700

|

T ech n ica l support
E ngineering
E ngineering
Engineering
E ngineering
E ngineering

;

16

;

;

-i

-

5o0
6iO
o85
7 82
912

j

I

Tab l e 2.

A v e r a g e salaries:

Metropolitan areas— C o n t i n u e d

(E m p lo y m e n t and a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s for s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l, a d m in is t r a t i v e , t ec hn ic a l, and c l e r i c a l o c c upa tio ns in pr iv ate ind ustry, m et r op ol ita n
a r e a s , 1 Mar ch 1972)
Monthly s a l a r i e s 3
Occup atio n and c l a s s
(See def ini tio ns in ape ndix C)

Number
of
em ployees 2

Annual s a l a r i e s 3
Middle ra nge 4

Middle ra nge 4
Mean

Median

First
quar tile

Thir d
quar tile

Mean

Median

$5, 952
7,615
4, 628
5, 053
6, 241
5, 883
6, 606
5, 087
7, 069
7, 895
8, 525
9, 250
6, 289
7, 160
5, 282
6, 128

$5, 735
7, 327
4,432
4, 823
5, 996
5, 592
6, 457
4, 914
6, 9 87
7, 799
8, 398
9, 177
6, 059
7, 039
5,162
5, 996

First
quartile

Third
quartile

$5 , 039
6,478
4, 067
4, 328
5,266
4, 953
5, 788
4, 379
6, 215
6, 882
7, 300
7, 808
5, 336
6, 1 31
4, 588
5, 308

$6, 570
8, 603
5, 005
5, 492
6. 882
6,465
7, 294
5, 605
7, 859
8, 7 80
9,597
10, 390
7, 039
8, 082
5, 807
6, 726

Cle rica l
C l e r k s , acc oun tin g I -----------------------------------------C l e r k s , acco unt ing I I ----------------------------------------C l e r k s , file I -----------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , fil e I I ---------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , file I I I --------------------------------------------------Keypunch op e r a to r s I ----------------------------------------Keypunch op e r a to r s I I -------------- ------------------------M e s s e n g e r s (office boys and g i r l s ) -----------------S e c r e t a r i e s I -----------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I ----------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I I ---------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I V ------------- _________——
—_— — ______
---St e n o g r a p h e r s, g e n e r a l ------------------------------------St e n o g r a p h e r s, s e n io r -------------------------------------T y p is t s I -------------------------------------------------------------T y p is t s I I -------------------------------------------------------------

71,544
51,482
21,530
20, 590
6, 264
53, 346
39, 989
22, 814
70, 021
82, 642
46, 607
14, 428
42, 164
43, 333
52,466
33,592

$4 9 6
635
3 86
421
520
490
550
424
5 89
65 8
710
771
524
597
44 0
511

$4 7 8
611
369
402
500
466
538
409
5 82
650
700
765
505
5 87
430
5 00

$4 2 0
540
339
361
439
413
4 82
365
518
574
60 8
651
445
511
3 82
442

$54 7
717
41 7
458
574
539
608
467
655
732
800
866
5 87
673
4 84
561

1 F o r s co pe of study, se e table in appendix A.
2 Occup ation al e m p lo y m e n t e s t i m a t e s re la te to the t ota l in a ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s within s c o pe of the s u r v e y and not to the nu m be r ac tu a lly sur v e ye d .
F o r fur the r explanation, s e e appendix A, p. 33.
3 S a l a r ie s r ep or ted r e la t e to the standard s a l a r i e s that w e r e paid f or standard wo rk s c h e d u l es ; i. e, , the s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d in g to
the e m p l o y e e ' s n or m al wo r k s c he du le ex clu d in g o v e r ti m e ho ur s.
Nonproduction b o n u se s a r e e xc lud ed , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g pa y m e n ts and in c en tiv e ea r ni n g s
ar e included.
4 The middle ra nge ( in te rqu ar til e) us ed he r e i s the c e nt r a l part of the a r r a y exc lud ing the upper and lo w e r fo urths of the e m p lo y e e distr ib ut ion .




17

Table 3.

A v e r a g e salaries:

Establishments e m p l o y i n g 2 , 5 0 0 or m o r e

( E m p lo y m e n t and a v e r a g e monthly s a l a r i e s for s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l, a d m in is t r a t i v e , t e c hn ic a l, and c l e r i c a l o c c up a tio ns in p r i v a te i n d u s t r y 1 in
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p lo y in g 2, 500 w o r k e r s or m o r e , 2 United State s e x c ep t A l a s k a and Hawaii, March 1972, p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in m e a n s a l a r i e s s in c e
June 1971, 3 and c o m p a r i s o n with l e v e l s in all e s t a b l i s h m e n t s comb ined )
Monthly s a l a r i e s 5
O ccu pa tio n and c l a s s
(See def in it io ns in appen dix C)

of
e m p loyees 4

Middle ra nge 6
Mean

Median

First
quar tile

Third
qua rtile

B e v e l s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
Percent
e m p lo y i n g 2 , 5 0 0 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
increase
e x p r e s s e d as p e r c e n t o f t h o s e in
in
a ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s co mb in ed
m ea n
Mean
Em p lo ym e n t
salaries 3
salaries

A cc ou nt an ts and a ud it o rs
209
961
336
182
311

$838
958
1, 061
1, 247
1, 500

$8 2 7
964
1,050
1, 234
1,499

$768
873
950
1, 124
1, 340

$9 0 0
1,052
1, 177
1, 365
1, 6 4 1

5.
6.
5.
5.
5.

0
4
6
5
9

29
47
28
28
36

in
108
107
105
104

I -------------------------------------------------I I ------------------------------------------------I I I -----------------------------------------------I V ------------------------------------------------

379
987
1, 636
1, 086

863
957
1,118
1, 351

850
912
1, 083
1, 345

750
831
962
1,206

987
1 ,0 8 6
1, 241
1 ,4 7 3

3.
3.
4.
5.

9
7
0
7

44
38
38
41

108
105
104
102

Ch ief ac co unt ant s I V ------- -------------------------

94

2, 362

2, 330

2, 089

2, 577

10. 3

43

107

154
355
61 1
640
345
229

1, 189
1. 383
1, 646
2, 048
2,407
3, 006

1, 166
1, 347
1, 5 9 2
2, 000
2, 375
2,993

1,075
1,225
1,450
1, 750
2, 125
2, 542

1, 298
1, 540
1, 833
2, 276
2, 666
3,465

n
5. 6
2.4
4. 1
5.9
4. 8

45
28
27
38
38
43

106
113
107
105
105
104

619
2, 450
4, 440
2, 529

870
1, 008
1, 144
1, 311

865
975
1,119
1 ,2 4 2

760
869
995
1,130

960
1, 130
1,270
1,466

5. 2
8. 0
4.9
5. 0

23
25
36
57

111
111
105
102

Job a n a l y s ts I I ---------------------------------Job a n a l y s t s I I I -------------------------------Job a n a l y s ts I V --------------------------------

205
304
425

928
1, 069
1, 264

925
1, 050
1,270

830
950
1, 129

1,025
1, 170
1, 385

6. 2
4. 9
5.9

57
62
84

103
102
101

D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l I V ---------------

no

2, 304

2, 221

1,924

2, 640

2. 2

32

112

Ac c ou nt a nt s
Acc ount ant s
A cco un tan ts
Ac c ou nt a nt s
A cc ou nt an ts
Au dit or s
Au dit or s
Au dit or s
Au di to rs

I -----—
------------------ -----------------I I ------------------------------------------I I I ----------------------------------------I V ------------------------------------------V --------------------------------------------

1,
4,
7,
5,
2,

A tt or ne ys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
A tt or ne y s
Attorneys
Attorneys

I -------------------------------I I ------------------------------I I I ----------------------------I V ------------------------------—
V ------------------------ —
V I ----------------------------Buyers

Buyers
Buyers
Buyers
Buyers

I ------------------------------------I I -----------------------------------I I I ---------------------------------IV ---------------------------------Personnel management

C h e m i s t s and e n g i n e e r s
274
1,414
3, 004
3, 568
2, 699
2, 143
775
225

1.
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

906
991
159
379
596
7 86
175
692

910
993
1, 157
1, 385
1, 575
1,769
2, 131
2,599

835
910
1,035
1,230
1,414
1, 570
1,925
2, 369

960
1,077
1,283
1, 516
1, 750
1,959
2, 399
3, 007

3. 3
4. 3
3.6
4. 2
2.5
2. 6
4. 3
6. 1

28
38
37
37
37
48
49
53

110
107
108
106
103
101
101
105

3, 963
14 ,6 2 2
42,530
64, 207
39, 989
19, 722
7, 120
1, 558

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,

943
031
172
392
602
839
101
3 82

933
1,021
1, 170
1, 391
1, 599
1, 825
2, 075
2, 310

87 8
952
1,078
1, 282
1,475
1,686
1,910
2, 107

991
1,101
1 ,2 6 6
1 ,5 0 3
1, 722
1,977
2,292
2, 624

3.
4.
4.
4.
3.
4.
2.
1.

3
0
6
3
8
0
5
9

42
52
53
57
54
51
49
51

104
102
103
103
103
103
103
102

I -------------------I I ------------------I I I ---------------I V -----------------V ------------------

1, 843
4, 657
9, 943
16, 170
1 1, 9 8 4

616
722
807
917
1, 033

617
725
808
915
1, 022

560
650
7 34
835
939

673
78 8
87 8
993
1, 125

6.
4.
4.
4.
3.

0
5
1
1
3

55
44
42
57
70

102
106
102
102
101

D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s -----------------------------D r a f t s m e n I -----------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n I I ---------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n III ---------------------------------------

1,687
4, 754
8, 570
12, 802

571
690
823
1, 060

550
670
802
993

484
60 8
730
875

614
751
897
1,258

10. 0
6. 3
4. 8
9.2

39
28
29
42

109
110
107
111

84
407
298
139

781
791
842
980

735
767
843
999

675
6 82
747
85 8

911
887
916
1,083

1.2
9. 0
5. 8
7. 6

9
24
27
36

123
111
108
108

Chem ists
Chem ists
Chem ists
Chem ists
Chem ists
Chem ists
Chem ists
Chem ists

I ----II —
III —
IV —
V —
VI —
VII VIII

E n g in e e r s I ----

E n g in e e r s
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
E n g in e e r s

II —
III IV V —
VI VII
VIII
T e c h n i c a l su pport

E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g

t ec h n ic ia n s
t ec h n ic i a n s
t e c h n ic i a n s
t e c h n ic i a n s
t ec h n ic i a n s

C l e r ic a l s u p e r v i s o r y
Keypunch
Keypunch
Keyp unch
Keyp unch

supervisors
supervisors
supervisors
supervisors

I ----------------------I I ---------------------I I I -------------------I V --------------------

S ee fo o t n o t e s at end o f ta b le .




18

#
Table 3.

A v e r a g e salaries:

Establishments e m p l o y i n g 2 , 5 0 0 or m o r e — C o n t i n u e d

(E m p lo y m e n t and a v e r a g e mo nth ly s a l a r i e s for s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m in is t r a t i v e , t e c hn ic a l, and c l e r i c a l o c c up a t io ns in pr iv a te i n d u s t r y 1 in
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p lo yi n g 2, 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e , 2 United St at es e x c e p t Al as ka and H awa ii, Mar ch 1972, p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in m ea n s a l a r i e s s in ce
June 1971, 3 and c o m p a r i s o n with l e v e l s in all e s t a b l i s h m e n t s com bi ned )
Monthly s a l a r i e s 5
Occ up at io n and c l a s s
(See def in it io ns in append ix C)

Number
of
em ployees 4

Middle range 6
Mean

Median

First
quartile

Thir d
quar tile

L e v e l s in e s ta b l i s h m e n t s '
Pe rcent
e m p lo y i n g 2, 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
increase
e x p r e s s e d a s p e r c e n t of th o se in
in
a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s co mb in ed
m ean
Mean
salaries 3
Employment
salaries

C l e r ic a l
C l e r k s , ac co unt ing I ----------------------------------------C l e r k s , ac co un tin g I I ----------------------------------------C l e r k s , f il e I ----------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , file I I ----------------------------------------- — ------C l e r k s , fil e I I I --------------------------------------------------Keypunch o p e r a t o r s I ----------------------------------------Keypunch o p e r a t o r s I I ------------------------ —
-----------M e s s e n g e r s ( off ice boys and g i r l s ) -----------------S e c r e t a r i e s I ------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I ----------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I I ---------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I V ---------------------------------------------------St e n o g r a p h e r s, g e n e r a l ------------------------------------St e n o g r a p h e r s, s e n io r -------------------------------------T y p is t s I ------------------------------------------------------------T y p i s t s I I ------------------------------------------------------------

16, 639
13, 989
4, 726
5, 089
2, 485
15,418
1 2, 77 2
6, 289
22, 020
35, 936
14, 627
4, 020
15, 892
18, 066
13, 485
13, 766

$560
700
431
481
560
558
597
461
615
707
797
871
558
639
479
540

$54 1
67 8
413
460
540
524
5 85
43 9
60 8
700
7 82
850
544
641
461
517

$4 6 5
5 87
369
41 0
482
45 8
523
391
550
623
704
765
478
555
421
464

$634
807
46 9
521
622
652
673
513
673
77 8
880
970
626
719
521
597

9. 8
6. 9
6.4
6. 2
5. 5
9. 8
5. 9
5.5
5. 3
6. 3
5. 8
6. 6
5. 3
7. 4
5.0
6. 5

20
23
20
22
36
25
28
25
27
40
29
25
32
37
23
37

115
111
113
115
108
116
110
109
106
108
113
115
108
108
110
106

1 F o r s c o p e of study, s e e tab le in append ix A.
2 Inclu des data fo r a few e s t a b l i s h m e n t s with l e s s than 2, 500 e m p l o y e e s o f 6 l a r g e c o m p a n ie s stu died that p r o v id e d c o mp any wi de data uni dentified
by s i z e of e s ta b l i s h m e n t . T h is a p p l ie s only to data for oc c up a tio ns ot he r than dr afting and c l e r i c a l .
3 F o r li m it a t io n s of p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s as a m e a s u r e of change in s a l a r y s c a l e s , s e e appendix A, p. 31.
4 O ccu pa tio nal e m p lo y m e n t e s t i m a t e s re la te to the tota l in all e s t a b l i s h m e n t s within s c o p e o f the s u r v e y and not to the nu m be r a c tu a lly s u r v e y ed .
F o r fu rth er exp lan ation , s e e appendix A, p. 33.
5 S a l a r ie s r e po r te d r e la t e to the stan dar d s a l a r i e s that w e r e paid f o r stan dard work s c h e d u l e s ; i . e . , the str a i g h t -t im e s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d in g to
the e m p l o y e e ’s n o r m a l wo rk sc h e d u l e excl ud in g o v e r t i m e h o u r s . Non production bo nu se s a r e ex clu d ed , but c o s t- o f -l iv in g pa y m e n ts and i nc en ti v e ea rn in g s
a r e included.
6 The m id d le ra nge (in t e r q u ar ti l e) us e d he r e is the c e nt r a l part of the a r r a y ex clu d in g the up p er and l o w e r four ths of the e m p lo y e e di str ib ut ion .
7 1971 data did not m e e t pu bl ica ti on c r i t e r i a .




/

19

I
Table 4.

E m p l o y m e n t distribution by salary:

Professional a n d administrative o c c u p a t i o n s

( P e r c e n t d is tr ib ut io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t i v e o c c u p a t io n s , by m on th ly s a l a r i e s , United St a te s e x c e p t A la s ka
and H aw ai i, 1 Mar ch 1972)
Accou nt ant s

A u d it o r s

Ch ief a cc oun ta nts

Monthly s a l a r i e s
i
Under $ 500 __________________________ _
_________________
___ _____________
_____ ____________
.............. ...... ........... ...

II

IV

III

V

i

II

III

IV

i

III

II

IV

(0 .4)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

-

-

1.6
.8
1.0
3.8

_

_
-

,
_
_

_

.

.

.

_

.

.

-

_
_
-

-

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
-

_
_

_

-

-

-

-

_
(0. 5)
1. 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .4
2.6
8. 4
5. 8

_
(1. 1)
2. 0
1. 7

_
_
(1. 1)

_

_

_

_

.

-

-

_

_
_

_
_

_
.
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

$500
$5 2 5
$5 5 0
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 525
$ 550
$575
$6 0 0

$6 0 0
$6 2 5
$65 0
$6 7 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 6 2 5 _____ __________
$6 5 0 _________________
$ 6 7 5 _________________
$ 7 0 0 _________________

$7 0 0
$7 2 5
$7 50
$7 7 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$750
$775
$800

_______ __________
_________________
_________________
_________________

8.4
1 1. 2
10. 0
7.4

3.
3.
7.
6.

0
2
5
4

1.0
1. 0
1.8
2. 8

-

-

$8 0 0
$825
$8 50
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$8 5 0
$875
$90 0

_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________

8. 4
7.9
6. 3
3 .8

9.
7.
7.
7.

0
3
9
0

3.
4.
5.
6.

4
9
3
7

_

( 0 .7 )
1. 2
.9

_
-

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 ____ _____________
$ 9 5 0 __________________
$9 7 5 --------------------------$ 1 , 0 0 0 __________ ____

2.7
1. 3
1. 1
1. 1

6.
5.
5.
5.

8
7
3
3

7.
6.
7.
5.

8
2
6
6

2. 0
1. 9
2. 3
2. 8

1. 1
1. 1
( 0 .5 )
-

7.
10.
1.
1.
(0.

3
3
7
0
5)

13.
9.
7.
5.
3.

1
9
0
2
4

8. 8
9. 7
1 2 .4
12. 7
10. 2

1.
1.
3.
3.
7.

3. 7
1. 1
( 1 .4 )

10. 9
7. 2
4. 2

8. 0
10. 2
8. 1

-

_

_
-

$
$
$
$
$

1,0 0 0
1,050
1, 100
1, 150
1,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1, 0 5 0 ___________
$ 1 , 1 0 0 ____________
$ 1 , 1 5 0 ___________
$ 1 , 2 0 0 _____________
$ 1 , 2 5 0 ____________

$
$
$
$
$

1,2 5 0
1, 300
1, 350
1 ,4 0 0
1,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 3 0 0
1, 350
1, 4 0 0
1, 4 5 0
1, 5 0 0

____________
______ ____
..........................
_______ ____
____________

-

-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,5 0 0
1 ,5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 5 5 0
1, 6 0 0
1, 6 5 0
1,700
1, 750

____________
____________
____________
____________
____________

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

'

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

.

1.
2.
6.
3.

_
_
( 1 .0 )
0
9
3
3
1

(0.
1.
.
2.

9)
0
9
2

4
1
3
9

2.
2.
5.
6.

0
1
8
8

4.
8.
6.
2.

-

5
6
8
6

10.
4.
14.
12.

.

3
8
7
5

6.
7.
7.
8.

5
6
2
1

(3.
3.
2.
3.

3)
1
0
4

3. 3
1.9
2. 1
1. 6

7.
8.
6.
3.

6
8
3
3

5.
4.
7.
5.

8
2
1
1

(1. 1)
1. 3
.7

3. 9
5. 9
.7
_

6.
5.
4.
2.
1.

0
1
2
7
0

13.
13.
13.
8.
3.

1
2
4
4
8

2.
5.
7.
7.
10.

8
0
1
7
7

7.
25.
18.
5.

3
1
1
4

4.
3.
7.
5.

6
2
0
0

-

12.
10.
9.
9.
7.

0
4
1
1
3

7.
3.
5.
11.
8.

0
1
2
1
8

6.
5.
2.
10.
15.

3
7
8
6
8

( 1 .0 )
3. 3
3. 0
4. 8
6. 4

( 1 .8 )

6
1
8
3
0

1.
.
2.
.
.

0
3
8
5
3

11.
5.
7.
3.
3.

2
6
3
1
3

4. 0
4. 3
1 6 .4
6. 4
4. 1

3.
2.
.
.
4.

_
-

3. 3
( 0 .6 )

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

.

.

_

.

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

.

_
_

.
_
_

_
_

.
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

-

.

9. 3

-

-

6.
7.
6.
4.
3.

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

5.
3.
1.
2.
1.

1. 0

3
6
0
5
9

_
-

_
-

4. 5
2. 3
1.8
1 .8
( 3 .5 )

3. 1
1. 9
1. 3
( 1 .8 )

-

-

■

$ 1 ,7 5 0 and under $ 1 , 8 0 0 ____________

_

_

_

_

_

.

-

_

_

-

2. 8
2. 0
(4. 1)

_

$ 1, 85 0 and under $ 1 , 9 0 0 ____________
$ 1, 90 0 and under $ 1 , 9 5 0 ____________
$ 1,9 5 0 and under $ 2 , 0 0 0 ____________

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

'

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2,000
$ 2 , 050
$ 2 , 100
$ 2 , 150
$2,200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 , 0 5 0 ____________
$ 2 , 1 0 0 ____________
$ 2 , 1 5 0 ____________
$ 2 , 200 ____________
$ 2 , 2 5 0 _ __________

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

'

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.
1.
1.
2.
4.

$2,250
$ 2 , 300
$ 2 , 350
$2,400
$2,450

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2,300
$ 2 , 350
$2,400
$2,450
$2,500

____________
____________
..........................
____________
____________

_

_

.

.

_

_
_

_

-

_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.8
1 .0
(3. 5)

$2,500
$ 2,600
$ 2, 700
$2,800
$ 2 , 900

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2,600
$ 2,700
$2,800
$2,900
$3,000

____________
____________
____________
____________
____________

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

.
_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 3, 00 0 and under $ 3, 1 0 0 ____________
$ 3, 100 and under $ 3 , 2 0 0 ____________

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 3 , 2 0 0 and o v e r ....... ....................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

_

T o t a l ------------------------------------------Nu mber of e m p l o y e e s

___

A v e r a g e mon thly s a l a r i e s „

-

-

_

100. 0

100. 0

4.230

1 0 ,6 57

25,872

1 8, 4 3 9

$756

$88 8

$9 9 0

$ 1, 188

100. 0

_
_

100. 0

2
3
5
5
1

2. 0

7. 5

3. 2

2. 8
(3.0)

4. 6
2.4
4. 1

3. 7
4. 1
2. 8

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

6,416

854

2, 603

4, 292

2,618

386

$1,447

$802

$910

$1,073

$1,319

$1,279

20

1
6
8
2
6

6. 0
10. 1
1.4
7. 3
7. 3
4. 1
9. 2
3. 2
2. 8
1.4

.
_

_
_
_

.

100. 0

100. 0

_
_

_

100. 0

See fo otnote at end of tab le.




-

.
_

.6

-

100. 0

-

1. 8
1 .6
(0. 5)

-

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0
1, 185
$1,452

100. 0

3. 2
4. 1
5. 0
1. 8
1 .8
5. 4
2. 3
( 1 .4 )
100. 0

628

218

$1,766

$2, 210

Table 4.

E m p l o y m e n t distribution by salary:

Professional a n d administrative occupations— Continued

( P e r c e n t d is tr ib ut io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t i v e oc cu pat ion s, by monthly s a l a r i e s , United State*? e x c ep t Alaska
and Hawaii, 1 March 1972)
B u y er s

A tt o rn ey s
Monthly s a l a r i e s
I
Un der $5 50 ------------------------------------$ 5 5 0 and und er $57 5 ---- ---------------$ 5 7 5 and un d er $60 0 ---------------------

II

III

IV

-

-

'

_
-

-

_
-

3.
4.
4.
9.

_
-

_
-

9.
8.
1 1.
5.

_

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

$700
$7 2 5
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
un d er

$72 5
$75 0
$77 5
$8 0 0

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
_
_
5. 5

_
-

_
-

_
.

$8 0 0
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

und er
under
und er
und er

$82 5
$8 5 0
$87 5
$9 0 0

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. 2
4.6
1. 7
-

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

-—
$9 25 -------------- —
$9 5 0 --------------------$9 75 --------------------$1, 000 ----------------$1,
$ 1,
$1,
$1,
$1,

050 ------------1 0 0 ------------1 5 0 ------------200 ------------250 -------------

$1,
$1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

und er
under
under
under
under

$1.
$ 1.
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

300 ------------^ 5 0 ------------400 ------------450 ------------500 -------------

$1,
$ 1,
$1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

500
550
600
650
700

and
and
and
and
and

under
und er
und er
und er
und er

$1,
$1,
$1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

550
600
650
700
750

------------------------------------------------■
■

$1,
$1,
$1,
$ 1,
$1,

750
800
850
900
950

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
und er
under
und er

$1,
$1,
$1,
$ 1,
$2,

800
850
900
950
000

------------------------- - ------------------- ------

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

000
050
100
150
200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

050 ------------100 —---- -----1 5 0 ------------200 -------- ---250 —-----------

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
und er
un d er
un d er

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

300
350
400
450
500

------------------------------------------------— ---- -----

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

500
600
700
800
900

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
under
under
under
und er

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$3,

600
700
800
900
000

--------------------------------------------------------------

$3,
$3,
$3,
$3,
$3,

000
100
200
300
400

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$3,
$3.
$3.
$3.
$3,

1 0 0 ------------200 ——— —
—
300 ------------400 ------------500 -------------

$3,
$3,
$3,
$3,
$3,

500
600
700
800
900

and
and
and
and
and

under
und er
under
und er
under

$3,
$3,
$3,
$3,
$4,

600
700
800
900
000

------------------------------------------------— ---------

$4, 000 and o v e r ----------------------------T -til

( 1.8)
2. 7
.9

-

$62 5
$65 0
$67 5
$7 0 0

under
under
under
under
under

( 2 .6 )
1. 4
4. 0
. 3
1.8
2.2

.6
1. 3
1. 9
1. 1

_
-

_
-

0
3
7
9

4.
3.
5.
4.

8
7
5
5

_
( I . 0)
I. 0
.8

-

3. 9
6.8
5. 8
5. 5

5.
7.
6.
8.

5
8
0
3

1.
2.
2.
3.

1
6
1
7

-

4.
2.
1.
1.

2
0
9
8

8.
4.
5.
3.

0
0
5
0

3.
4.
5.
5.

8
5
5
4

_
12. 2)
1. 6
.9

2. 8
2.4
( 1 .7 )
-

7.
7.
3.
2.
2.

2
0
3
5
1

12. 7
1 1. 6
9. 8
9.8
5. 4

4. 8
7. 6
Q.8
10. 5
1 1 .4

-

-

_
(0. 8)

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
.
-

_
-

'
_
-

-

-

-

_
( 1 .5 )
1. 3
4. 7

_
-

.
-

_
.
-

1. 1
(2. 8)
-

_

_

_

.
•
-

.
-

-

1. 4
( 1 .2 )
.

*

-

-

_

_

_

•

.

-

-

-

-

_

.
.
-

_
.
_

-

*

-

1. 1
1 .4
2. 8
2. 1
5. 2

9. 2
4. 9
3. 8
1. 7
1 .4

6.
7.
6.
2.
4.

9
1
1
4
3

6.
7.
7.
8.
7.

2. 0
( 2 .3 )

4.
.
2.
2.
(2.

2
9
2
3
8)

5. 3
7. 5
4. 9
6. 6
3.9

6.
3.
4.
5.
3.

9
6
7
1
7

1.
.
1.
.
5.

2
8
1
8
0

2.4
5. 3
3. 8
1. 5
1. 6

3.
7.
2.
7.
6.

2
7
9
8
8

.
2.
3.
3.
1.

7
4
0
0
2

(2. 1)

1. 2
2. 0
.7
1 .0
(1-7 )

4.
4.
3.
5.
5.

2
7
2
8
0

10.
4.
4.
9.
6.

5
3
1
0
0

3.4
1. 3
.7
.7
I. 5

_

3.
1.
1.
1.
2.

2
6
4
3
4

_
.
*
.
_
-

6
0
4
3
7

-

-

-

_

_

_

•
-

-

-

*

-

-

-

2. 3
1. 0
1. 9
( 2 .0 )

-

-

4. 1
3.9
2. 6
2. 6
6. 9
4.
5.
4.
3.
3.

5. 4
1.9
7. 1
5. 1
5. 2

_

.
-

-

•
-

1. 9
1. 3
1. 6
( 1 .2 )
-

_

-

9
4
4
7
2

15. 5
8. 6
8. 1
5. 1
6.4

_
.

.
.
2.
.
3.

6.
3.
2.
2.
1.

-

2
5
5
6
0

_

_

0
3
1
5

.
-

6
7
3
2
0

.

-

_
-

11.
4.
13.
1 1.
8.

-

-

-

7
7
9
8
3

-

.

(0. 4)
1. 2

_
.
-

8.
10.
24.
5.
4.

-

IV

III

_
,

3
3
3
3

.

1

-

-

_

2.
.
2.
2.

-

n

I

-

under
under
under
und er

and
and
and
and
and

i

-

and
and
and
and

000
050
100
150
200

VI

.
-

$600
$625
$650
$67 5

$1,
$ 1,
$1,
$1,
$1,

V

_

_

_

-

-

.
.

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

3.4
2. 6
2. 2
. 7
3. 6

-

-

-

-

-

( 1 .7 )

-

10.
7.
6.
4.
4.

2
9
8
2
6

3.°
3. 7
2. 2
3. 4
1.2
1. 1
1. 2
( 2 .0 )
-

_

_

_
*

.
.
_
-

_
.
.
-

_

_

.
-

-

.
.

.
-

.
.
.

_
_
_
-

*

-

.

-

*

_

_

_

.
-

-

-

.
-

-

-

_

-

.
•
-

-

_
-

.

_

-

1

-

"

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

ion. o

N u m b e r of e m p l o y e e s — —
—-----------

346

1. 288

2, 301

1, 664

898

534

2. 640

9, 929

12.213

A v e r a g e mo nth ly s a l a r i e s --------------

$1, 125

$1, 220

$1, 533

$1. 954

$2, 294

$2. 902

$7 8 2

$910

$1,093

See fo o tn o te at end o f ta b le .




21

1
3
5
8
2

j

100. 0
4. 409

j

$1. 296

Table 4.

E m p l o y m e n t distribution by salary:

Professional a n d administrative occupations— C o n t i n u e d

( P e r c e n t di str ib ut io n of e m p l o y e e s in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t i v e oc cu pat ion s, by mo nth ly s a l a r i e s ,
and Ur.waii, 1 M ar ch 1972}
Job a n a l y s ts

United St a tes e x c ep t A la sk a

D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l

--

Monthly s a l a r i e s
II

i

III

i

II

III

IV
_

-

-

_

-

_

$600
$6 25
$6 5 0
$6 75

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
und er

$62 5 ----------------------------------------$65 0 ----------------------------------------$675 ----------------------------------------$7 0 0 ----------------------------------------

1.
1.
2.
7.

0
0
0
1

(1.
1.
1.
2.

1)
7
1
0

_
1. 2
-

_
-

$7 0 0
$7 25
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$72 5 ----------------------------------------$7 5 0 ----------------------------------------$77 5 ----------------------------------------$8 0 0 -----------------------------------------

9.
5.
7.
18.

2
1
1
4

2.
3.
4.
4.

5
9
5
7

1. 0
1. 0
1. 0

$80 0
$82 5
$8 5 0
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$8 50
$875
$9 00

1.
6.
4.
8.

0
1
1
2

4.
7.
9.
7.

2
8
5
0

1.2
5. 1
4. 5
5. 9

_
_
_
( 0. 6)
1. 0
1. 2

_
_
_
-

$90 0
$92 5
$9 5 0
$97 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 ----------------------------------------$9 50 ----------------------------------------$9 75 ----------------------------------------$ 1, 000 ---------------------------------7
----

$5 7 5 and under $60 0

-----------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 1,
$1,
$1,
$1,
$ 1,

000
050
100
150
200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1,
$1,
$1,
$1,
$ 1,

050
100
150
200
250

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 1,
$1,
$1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

250
300
350
4 00
450

and
and
and
and
and

under
und er
under
under
und er

$ 1,
$1,
$1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

300
350
400
450
500

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 1,
$ I,
$1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

500
550
600
650
700

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
und er

$ 1,
$ 1,
$1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

550
600
650
700
750

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$1,
$ 1,
$1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

750
800
850
900
950

and
and
and
and
and

under
und er
under
under
under

$1,
$ 1,
$1,
$ 1,
$2,

800
850
900
950
000

- - - -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

000
050
100
150
200

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
un d er
under
under

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

050
100
150
200
250

---------------------------------

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

300
350
400
450
500

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,

500
600
700
800
900

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$3,

600
700
800
900
000

-----------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------------------------------

$3, 000 and under $3, 1 0 0 --------------------------------$3, 100 and under $3, 200 --------------------------------$3, 200 and o v e r -------------------------------------------------

1 1. 2

_

IV

1.
3.
2.
.

1
1
7
8

1. 3
_
1. 2
.4

7
7
7
1
4

18.
4.
9.
14.
6.

3
3
1
3
2

3.
7.
6.
5.
6.

5
4
7
2
6

_
_
_
_
.
_
_
1. 2
1. 2
1. 4
3. 1

8
4
7
5
7

7.
6.
7.
5.
2.

0
3
9
6
8

10.
12.
8.
8.
5.

5
4
0
2
4

4.
4.
3.
4.
8.

5
0
2
1
5

3.
.
.
1.
1.

3
1
1
1
1

6.
2.
1.
2.
2.

9
4
2
3
2

8.
6.
2.
9.
2.

7
6
9
3
9

(I . 0)

1.
.
1.
.
.

5
6
6
3
1

4. 2
5. 4
8. 2
3.4
4.4

_

4.9
2. 6
1. 4
1. 0
( 0 .6 )
_
_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_
_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

2. 0
6. 1
2. 0

8. 1
5. 9
4. 7
8.9

6. 1
1. 0
1. 0
_
_
-

8.
7.
2.
1.
.

-

.
-

_

-

1
5
8
1
6

.4
1.4
2. 4
2. 0

6.
2.
6.
4.

7
4
1
3

13.
10.
11.
8.
4.

2
2
0
1
7

4.
7.
5.
9.
12.

4. 3
4. 1
2. 0
( 2. 0)

9.
12.
8.
6.
3.

1. 1
1. 1
_
_
_
_

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
1. 8
2. 2

-

-

.2
1. 5
( 2. 2)
-

-

1.
1.
2.
.
3.

.
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_

(0. 3)
1. 2
2. 0
1.4
6.
5.
4.
4.
3.

6
8
0
3
2

3. 2
3. 8
2. 3
12. 1
4.0

8
2
2
7
8

5. 8
3.8
1. 2
2. 3
2. 3

( 3 .4 )
_
-

3. 8
4. 6
1. 2
. 3
.6

_
,
_
-

4.9
2.0
5. 2
1. 7
2. 0

-

.9
1. 2
( 2 .0 )

_

-

T o t a l ---------------------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

Nu mb er of e m p l o y e e s -----------------------------------------

98

358

492

508

904

1, 701

1, 035

346

A v e r a g e mo nth ly s a l a r i e s ---------------------------------

$7 8 7

$9 02

$1. 044

$1, 255

$1, 193

$ 1, 367

$1. 679

$2, 062

Se e footnote at end of t abl e.




22

100. 0

Table 4.

E m p l o y m e n t distribution by salary:

( P e r c e n t di str ib ut ion of e m p l o y e e s
and H aw ai i, 1 Mar ch 1972)

Professional a n d administrative occupations— Continued

s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t i v e o c c u p a t io n s , by mon thly s a l a r i e s , United St a te s e x c e p t Ala sk a

Chem ists
Monthly s a l a r i e s
I
Unde r $ 5 7 5 ____________________________________
$ 5 7 5 and under $6 0 0 __________________________

VII

III

IV

*

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

.
_
_
( 2 .2 )
1 .8
3. 7
3. 1

_
_
_
_
.
_
-

(1.3)
2. 7

'
(0.
1.
2.
1.

5)
1
5
2

_
-

V

VI

II

vm

$600
$6 2 5
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$6 2 5 __________________________
$6 5 0 __________________________
$ 6 7 5 __________________________
$7 0 0
-------- ------------------------------

_
2. 7
9. 0
3. 9

$7 0 0
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$7 2 5 __________________________
$7 5 0 ------------------ ---------------------$7 7 5 __________________________
$8 0 0 ....................... ........... ................ .

4.
3.
5.
7.

3
8
4
9

2.
.
2.
4.

6
8
7
6

( 1 .0 )
1 .0
.5
1. 2

$8 0 0
$825
$8 5 0
$875

and
and
and
and

und er
under
under
under

$8 2 5
$8 5 0
$875
$9 0 0

________ ________________
___________________________
__________________________
__________________________

6.
9.
7.
10.

1
4
0
2

6.
5.
6.
6.

2
1
2
7

1.4
1. 7
2.6
4. 0

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
und er
under
under

$9 2 5 ___________________________
$9 5 0 __________________________
$9 7 5 ___________________________
$ 1, 00 0 _________________________

6.
6.
3.
2.

7
2
8
2

8.
9.
8.
5.

1
1
0
7

6.
3.
5.
5.

4
7
2
3

_
.
(3. 1)
1. 1
1. 3

11. 1
8. 2
6. 0
2. 2
1 .2

11.
13.
9.
9.
6.

3
7
7
2
8

4. 4
5.9
7.9
8. 7
9. 3

(0.6)
1.6
1. 8
1.9
2.8

_
_
_
.
(l.D
1. 2

(0. 3)
_
_
-

5. 4
3. 2
3. 3
1 .4
(2. 1)
_
_
-

9. 9
9.7
7. 8
6. 2
5.8

5. 6
7.4
5.8
8. 7
9. 1

.
2.
3.
3.
4.

4
2
0
5
4

6.
4.
3.
2.
1.

8.
6.
8.
6.
5.

2
8
7
5
3

5.
6.
6.
8.
6.

2
5
1
8
7

4. 5
3. 5
3. 2
1.8
1.9

7.
7.
6.
4.
6.

5
3
2
6
4

4.
4.
4.
7.
5.

6
3
0
3
5

( 0 .2 )
1. 2
1. 9
3. 6
1. 4

1 .4
(3.2)
_
-

3.
3.
2.
2.
1.

3
8
1
6
8

7. 3
6. 0
6. 3
4.6
5.6

1. 7
3.6
3. 6
4. 0
6.9

3.
4.
2.
5.
2.

2
1
8
7
2

6.
3.
2.
3.
2.

7
3
4
6
6

3.
3.
2.
2.
2.

9
2
0
3
4

15.
7.
5.
2.
4.

7
6
7
4
3

1. 3
(1. 0)

4.
1.
2.
3.
2.

0
0
4
8
1

$
$
$
$
$

1,000
1,050
1, 100
1, 150
1,200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1,050
$ 1, 100
$ 1, 150
$ 1,200
$1,250

___________________ __
____________________
______________________
---- ---------------------------______________________

$
$
$
$
$

1,250
1,3 0 0
1, 350
1,400
1,450

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1, 300
$ 1,350
$1,400
$1,450
$ 1, 500

______________________
______________________
______________________
______________________
______________________

$
$
$
$
$

1,500
1,550
1 , 6 00
1 , 6 50
1,700

and
and
and
and
and

und er
und er
under
under
und er

$
$
$
$
$

______________________
______________________
_____________________
______________________
______________________

$ 1, 750
$ 1,8 0 0
$1,850
$ 1,900
$ 1,950

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

___ ___ ____ ________
$1,800
$ 1 , 8 5 0 ________ _____________
$ 1 , 9 0 0 ______________________
$ 1 , 9 5 0 -____ ________________
$ 2 , 0 0 0 _____________ ________

$2,000
$2,050
$ 2 , 100
$2,150
$ 2 , 200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2,050
_____ ____ ________
$ 2 , 100 ....................................... .
$ 2 , 150
___ ________ ________
$ 2 , 2 0 0 ______________________
$ 2 , 2 5 0 _____________________

$2,250
$ 2 , 300
$2,350
$2,400
$2,450

and
a .id
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2,300
$ 2 , 350
$2,400
$2,450
$2,500

_____________________
_____________________
______________________
______________ ____ —
_____________________

$2,
$2,
$2,
$2,
$ 2,

500
600
700
800
900

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2,600
$ 2 , 700
$2,800
$2,900
$3,000

_____________________
______________________
______________________
______________________
______________________

$ 3, 000
$ 3, 100
$ 3, 200
$ 3, 300
$3,400

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3, 100
$ 3, 200
$ 3, 300
$3,400
$ 3,500

______________________
______________________
______________________
______________________
______________________

1, 550
1,600
1,650
1,700
1,750

$ 3 , 500 and under $ 3 , 6 0 0 ______________________
$ 3, 600 and under $ 3 , 700 ______________________
$ 3, 700 and o v e r __________ ______________________
T o t a l ____

_______________________________

Nu mb er of e m p l o y e e s ___________ _______ ________
A v e r a g e mo nth ly s a l a r i e s

_____________________

4. 3
1.9
(1-2)
_
_
*
_
_
_
-

( 2 .6 )
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

1.4
1. 0
( 3 .0 )
_
-

-

_
-

-

-

.2
2. 6
( 1 .7 )

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

970

3, 755

8,094

9,600

7, 383

4, 471

1,575

421

$820

$924

$1,075

$1.306

$1,548

$1,773

$2,157

$2,569

Se e footnote at end of ta bl e.




2
1
1
0
1

23

100. 0

Table 4.

E m p l o y m e n t distribution by salary:

Professional a n d administrative occupations— C o ntinued

( P e r c e n t dis tri but ion of e m p l o y e e s in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t i v e o c c u p a t io n s , by mo nt h ly s a l a r i e s ,
and H aw ai i, 1 Ma rch 1?72'»

United St a tes e x c ep t Alaska

Eng i n e e r s
Monthly s a l a r i e s
i
Under >'7/5
_
TT .....
$ 7 2 5 and under ¥7 5 0 ................................................ ....
$ 7 5 0 and under $77 5 ...................................................
$77 5 and under $ POO .....................................................
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$8 2 5
$8 50
$875
$9 0 0

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$9 2 5 ................................ .....................
$9 5 0 ___________________________
$9 7 5
_____ _____ _____________
$ 1 , 0 0 0 ........................ ..........................

$
$
$
$
$

1,0 0 0
1,050
1,100
1 ,1 5 0
1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
und er

$ 1 , 0 5 ^ __________________ __
$ 1, 100 ______________________
$ 1, 1 5 0 ______________________
$ 1 , 2 0 0 ______________________
$ 1 , 25 0 ______________________

$ 1,250
$ 1 . ion
$ 1,3 5 0
$1.40°
$ 1,4 5 0

and
,nd
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1, 30 0 ______________________
$ 1. 550
$ 1, 40 0 _
$1,450
__
_
$ 1, 50 0 ______________________

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,5 0 0
1 ,5 5 0
1,6 0 0
1,650
1,700

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
und er
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

$ ],7 5 0
$ 1,8 0 0
$1,850
$ 1. 00 0
$ 1,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1,8 0 0
$ 1,850
$ 1 , 90 0
$ 1,950
$2,000

$2,000
$2,050
$ 2 , 100
$ 2 , 150
$2,200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 , 0 50 ______________________
$ 2 , 1 0 0 _______ _____________
$ 2 , 1 5 0 ______________________
$ 2 , 2 0 0 ______________________
$ 2 , 2 5 0 ______________________

$ 2 , 250
$ 2 , 300
$ 2 , 350
$2,400
$2,450

and
and
and
and
and

under
und er
under
under
under

$ 2 , 300
$ 2 , 350
$2,400
$2,450
$ 2 , 500

______________________
__________ ____________
.............................................
......... ..................................
______________________

$ 2 , 500
$ 2,600
$ 2, 700
$ 2 , 800
$ 2,900

and
and
and
and
and

und er
under
under
under
under

$2,600
$2,700
$2,800
$ 2 , 900
$ 3,000

__________ ________ ____
. ______________ _______
. __________ ______ _ . .
____________________. . .
. _____________________

1, 55 0
1,600
1, 65 0
I ,700
1, 75 0

______________________
______________________
______________________
______________________
______________________
_______________________
______________________
................................. ..........
______________________
_________________ ____

$ 3 , 0 0 0 and under $ 3 , 100 ______________ ________
$ 3 , 100 and o v e r ------- ,..
Tot al

0 .6 )
1. 3
2. 4
3. 1

III

II

_
-

iv

•

y

VI

VII

VIII

_
.
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

( 0 .9 )
1. 7
2. 4
2. 7
3. 0

1 6 .9
13. 6
8. 3
5. 0
2. 5

11.
14.
13.
13.
10.

1
4
8
2
2

2.
3.
5.
7.
8.

4
6
5
6
9

_
_
_
_
_
.
_
_
_
_
( 1 .2 )
1. 8
2. 6

1.7
( 1 .2 )
-

9. 1
6. 0
3. 8
2. 0
(1. 6)
-

10.
12.
10.
10.
8.

7
0
1
1
0

4. 1
5.6
6. 8
9.0
9. 4

.
.
0 .5 )

-

5.
7.
13.
12.

4
9
2
0

1.
2.
4.
5.

1
6
3
3

_
0 . 9)
1. 1

12.
9.
8.
8.

4
3
6
1

8.
8.
9.
9.

1
8
6
4

2. 1
2. 3
3.2
4.3

8. 4
3. 6
1.8
0 .0 )
_
-

!

-

_
-

-

_

-

-

-

_
.
-

_
_
■.
_
_
.
0 .5 )

_

_
( 0 .6 )
1. 1
1. 1
1. 2

5
2
1
2
2

4.
5.
6.
8.
9.

6
6
9
8
7

1. 7
2. 5
2. 8
4. 1
3.9

( 1 .8 )
_
.
-

4.
3.
2.
1.
1.

7
1
5
7
1

9.
8.
7.
5.
5.

2
0
5
9
4

4.
6.
5.
7.
6.

8
2
8
9
9

2. 0
2. 4
2.4
3. 4
4. 2

4.
3.
2.
2.
1.

4
6
6
1
5

6.
7.
4.
5.
4.

8
4
4
7
0

4. 4
6.4
4. 0
5. 0
8. 3

1. 3
(2. 1)
_

4.
3.
2.
2.
1.

7
6
5
8
8

7.
7.
2.
4.
3.

0
1
7
5
8

7.
4.
5.
3.
2.

4
8
1
3
3

-

-

-

-

-

*
-

*
-

-

.

(1.2)
1. 1

10.
10.
9.
8.
6.

.
-

_

_
_
_
_

6. 9
5. 0
3. 1
1.9
1.0

(2. 2)
.
.
-

_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

.
.
.
-

2. 9
2. 0
1. 3
(1. 1)
-

_

_

-

-

2. 0
( 3 .4 )

_________ ______ ____ ___________ . . . . .

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N um ber of e m p l o y e e s __________________________

9, 390

28,140

79,779

112,074

74,629

38,532

1 4 ,4 3 8

3,070

A v e r a g e mo nth ly s a l a r i e s ........................ ...................

$910

$1,006

$1.140

$1. 347

$1,552

$1,784

$ 2 ,0 3 1

$2,324

1 F o r s c op e of study, s e e ta bl e in appendix A. To av oid showing s m a l l pr o po r tio ns of e m p l o y e e s s c a t t e r e d at or n e a r the e x t r e m e s of the d i s t r i ­
bution for s o m e o c c u p at io n s , the p e r c e n t a g e s of e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e i n t e r v a l s have bee n a c c u m u la t e d and a r e shown in the i nt e r v a l above or be lo w the
e x t r e m e i n te r v a l containing at l e a s t 1 pe rc en t.
The p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n t in g t h e s e e m p l o y e e s a r e shown in p a r e n t h e s e s .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e of rounding, s u m s of individual i t e m s m a y not equal 100.




24

Tab l e 5.

E m p l o y m e n t distribution by salary:

Engineering technicians a n d k e y p u n c h supervisors

( P e r c e n t d is tr ib ut io n of e n gi n e er in g t e c h n ic i a n s and keypunch s u p e r v i s o r s , by m onthly s a l a r i e s , United St a tes e x c ep t A l a s k a
and H a w a i i, 1 Mar ch 1972)
E n gi ne e r in g t ec h n ic i a n s

Keypunch s u p e r v i s o r s

Monthly s a l a r i e s
I
Under $37 5 ------------------------------------$37 5 and under $4 0 0 ---------------------

II

III

IV

V

(1.2)
. 7

:

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(2. 1)

-

-

-

_
(0.9)
1. 0
1. 3

_

_
-

i

II

7
5
7
0

-

-

0. 9

_

.
6.
3.
6.

1
5
0
6

1. 3
.9
5.4

.
-

-

5. 5
8. 3
12. 8
9.4

-

-

_
. -

5.
4.
6.
4.

5
7
9
2

6.
5.
7.
6.

7
3
4
0

5.
5.
7.
4.

6
9
2
8

_
(2. 3)
1. 8
1. 3

_
-

_
(0.9)
1. 0
1. 8

2.
4.
4.
2.

7
8
7
7

8.
8.
6.
4.

9
4
2
0

6.
9.
6.
4.

1
8
1
6

1.
10.
4.
7.

0
0
6
9

1. 7
_
1. 7

2.
1.
1.
.

7
0
6
4

5.
3.
3.
3.

7
4
0
4

5.
8.
7.
3.

3
1
6
5

10.
3.
2.
4.

5
1
3
6

1. 7
_
11. 9
5. 1

2.
1.
1.
1.

4
4
9
2

2.
2.
3.
.

5
1
3
9

3.
7.
3.
5.

fa
9
3
1

6.
11.
8.
10.

8
9
5
2

_
-

1. 4
(1.4)

-

-

2.
2.
1.
(1.

6
6
5
1)

13.
6.
2.
3.
3.

8
4
8
3
1

3.
6.
10.
1.

4
8
2
7

$4 2 5
$4 50
$47 5
$5 00

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1.
.
4.
2.

5
7
3
7

$ 50 0
$52 5
$5 5 0
$5 7 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$52 5
$5 50
$5 7 5
$6 00

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.
9.
10.
8.

5
5
0
9

2.
3.
5.
6.

8
7
7
6

$6 0 0
$6 2 5
$6 5 0
$6 7 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$62 5
$650
$6 75
$7 00

------------------------------------ '--------------------------------------------

17.
8.
7.
4.

2
7
8
8

8.
6.
10.
10.

5
9
1
7

2.
3.
5.
6.

8
2
7
5

$ 70 0
$72 5
$750
$77 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$7 25
$7 5 0
$775
$8 0 0

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.
2.
2.
3.

9
7
1
0

9.
9.
6.
5.

7
7
2
0

6.
8.
8.
8.

4
4
6
0

3.
3.
5.
5.

0
8
2
0

$800
$825
$850
$87 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$82 5
$8 5 0
$8 7 5
$9 0 0

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. 1
(0. 7)
-

3.
2.
1.
1.

7
7
8
0

8.
7.
6.
7.

9
9
3
1

5.
7.
8.
7.

5
3
4
4

2.
3.
4.
4.

0
8
4
6

$900
$925
$9 5 0
$9 7 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 --------------------$ 9 5 0 --------------------$97 5 --------------------$1, 0 0 0 ------------------

5.
4.
1.
1.

6
3
9
2

8.
8.
7.
5.

6
1
7
1

5.
6.
8.
6.

5
3
6
8

1. 3
4. 6
(1. 8)
-

8. 3
5. 6
3. 9
1. 4
(1.0)

13.
14.
9.
6.
4.

1
1
2
8
5

$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,
$ 1,

000
050
100
150
200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
und er
under

$
$
$
$
$

1 , 0 5 0 -------------1, 1 0 0 -------------1, 1 5 0 -------------1 , 2 0 0 -------------1, 250 --------------

$ 1, 250 and under $ 1, 300 -------------$ 1, 300 and o v e r -----------------------------

-

1. 1
1. 0
(1.3)
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 2
1. 2
( 0 .6 )
-

-

_
(1.0)
1. 3
2. 5

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

100. 0

100. 0

_
_

0.
2.
.
2.

under
under
under
under

-

V

3
7
6
7

3.
3.
3.
3.

and
and
and
and

_
_

IV

-

$ 40 0
$42 5
$ 45 0
$47 5

-

III

5. 5

(l.D

-

-

_

_

-

100. 0

-

_
-

$71 0

$777

$792

$899

;

59

$6 3 4

23, 697

$6 84

-

100. 0

3. 4
( 8 .5 )

$1 , 027

1, 693

$1, 022

10. 583

$601

6. 8

(1.3)

391

919

1, 106

3, 374

-

$908

100. 0
17, 207

A v e r a ge m onthly s a l a r i e s -------------

-

-

100. 0

100. 0

Nu mber of e m p l o y e e s ---------------------

,

100. 0

100. 0

28, 543

-

100. 0

1
F o r s c op e of study, s e e tab le in appendix A.
To avoid showing s m a l l p r o p o r t io n s of e m p l o y e e s s c a t t e r e d at or n e a r the e x t r e m e s of the d i s t r i ­
but ions for s o m e oc cup at ion s, the p e r c e n t a g e s of e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e i n t e r v a l s have b e e n a c c u m u la t e d and a re shown in the i n te r v al above or be l o w the
e x t r e m e i nt e r va l containing at l e a s t 1 p e r c en t.
The p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e s e e m p l o y e e s a r e shown in p a r e n t h e s e s .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e of rounding, s u m s of individual i t e m s m a y not equal 100.




25

T a b le 6.

Em ploym ent d istrib u tio n by sa la ry:

D ra ftin g and c le ric a l o c c u p a tio n s

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d d r a ftin g and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s , b y w e e k ly s a la r i e s ,
M a r c h 1972)

W e e k ly s a la r i e s

D r a ft s ­
m entra cers

$ 75
$80
$85
$90
$95

and
and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
u n d er
under
under

II

i
.

-

-

-

$ 8 0 ---------------$ 8 5 ---------------$ 9 0 ---------------$ 9 5 ---------------$ 1 0 0 -------------

1 .5
1. 8
2. 0
4. 7
5. 9

(0 . 4)
1. 1
1. 0

I

III

.

-

U n d er $ 6 5 ------------------------------$ 6 5 and u n d e r $ 7 0 ---------------$ 7 0 and u n d e r $ 7 5 ---------- -—

C le r k s ,
a cco u n tin g

D r a fts m e n

_

_

-

-

'

-

(2 . 7)

.

_

$125
$130
$135
$140
$ 145

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
under
under
under

$ 1 3 0 -----------$ 1 3 5 -----------$ 1 4 0 -----------$ 1 4 5 -----------$ 150 ------------

7. 2
9. 1
5. 0
3. 4
1 .9

6. 6
8 .9
8. 7
7. 5
5. 7

1.
2.
2.
4.
4.

$150
$ 160
$170
$ 180
$190

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 6 0 ------- —
$ 1 7 0 -----------$ 1 8 0 — ------$ 1 9 0 ---------- $ 2 0 0 — -----—

2. 6
2. 1
1. 1
1. 9
(1 .8 )

13. 5
8. 9
5. 5
5. 3
2.-3

12. 4
14. 3
13. 6
1 1 .4
8. 7

1.
4.
6.
10.
12.

5
6
9
3
0

$200
$210
$220
$230
$240

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 1 0 ------- —
$ 2 2 0 -----------$ 2 3 0 -----------$ 2 4 0 -----------$ 2 5 0 ------------

_

1. 0
( 2 .6 )

6 .5
6 .8
2. 8
1. 6
1. 3

11.
11.
8.
9.
4.

5
7
2
2
4

$250
$260
$270
$280
$290

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$260
$270
$280
$290
$300

--------------------------------------------------------

$300
$310
$320
$330
$340

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$310
$320
$330
$340
$350

--------------------------------------------------------

_
_
_
-

_
-

_
.

4
5
8
4
5

.9
1. 0
(0 .5 )
-

-

_
(1 .5 )

2. 8
1. 3
1 .4
1. 3
1. 9

-

-

-

2. 0
1. 5
1. 7
1. 3
1 .9

-

$ 3 5 0 and o v e r -----------------------T o t a l ------------------------------

8
3
1
1
8

.

-

( 0 .5 )
2 .9
4. 5

-

( 0 .5 )
1. 4

12. 6
17. 8
14. 5
10. 0
7 .8

7.
15.
14.
10.
9.

5
5
0
8
6

(1 . 1)
2. 3
6 .5
5 .4
8. 2

2. 1
6. 3
7. 5
9 .9
10. 4

( 1 .0 )
2 .2
2. 8
4. 1

6. 2
' 1l f .f r
12. 2
1 1 .9
10. 1

8
5
0
1
1

5 .4
5. 0
2 .7
2. 1
1. 2

9.
6.
4.
3.
2.

6
1
6
0
3

9 .6
9. 2
8. 2
8. 6
8 .5

11.
8.
8.
6.
5.

7
6
I
6
2

6. 8
7 .4
10. 2
9 .4
9 .9

9 .5
6 .4
5 .5
4. 3
2. 8

7. 0
7 .9
7. 2
6. 8
5. 5

(2 .5 )

1.
1.
1.
1.
.

7
6
5
0
6

5 .9
4. 6
2 .8
2. 7
2. 6

3.
3.
2.
2.
1.

7
3
1
2
4

8.
9.
5.
6.
3.

0
2
1
1
7

2. 7
1. 6
1. 6
1. 2
.9

1. 2
( 1 .5 )

4. 2
3. 1
3 .4
1 .8
(1 .2 )

2. 6
2. 0
2. 6
1 .4
(0 . 3)

5. 8
4 .4
1 .8
1 .0
(1 . 1)

1. 0
(1 .1 )

_
_

.

.

(0 .6 )
1 .4

-

-

9. 8
7. 1
9 .9
9. 5
1 1 .6

-

(0 . 6)
3 .9
13. 8

-

-

$ 1 0 5 -----------$ 1 1 0 -----------$ 115 -----------$ 1 2 0 -----------$ 1 2 5 ------------

.

i

.

under
under
under
under
under

-

HI

_

and
and
and
and
and

_
_

II

.

$ 100
$ 105
$ 110
$115
$120

1.
2.
3.
7.
6.

I

II

-

-

( 0 .8 )

_
_

2. 5
5. 0
5. 7
8. 5
9 .0
10.
9.
8.
7.
6.

5
1
1
6
8

5. 3
4 .4
2. 5
2. 7
1. 8
3.
1.
1.
1.
(1 .

3
6
4
2
1)

*
_

(1 . 1)
1. 4
1. 9
2.
3.
5.
6.
6.

9. 2
8. 2
6. 2
5. 3
3 .4

_
-

_
.
.
-

-

-

-

1. 9
1. 6
( 1 .9 )

_

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

_
_
_

_
.
_

_

-

-

-

_

M essen­
gers^
(o f fic e
b o y s and
g ir ls )

K eyp u n ch
op era tors

C l e r k s , f i le

-

_

U n ited S ta tes e x c e p t A la s k a and H a w aii, 1

H

_

-

_

_
_
_
-

-

,

■_
"■< GVi#’iS.

_

•

(0 .7 )
3. 6
5 .6

_

_

-

-

-

_
_

*

_
-

-

--

. _

_

.

;;

c

-X i
)i t

_

-

.

.

.
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

•

_
-

_
_
_

_

_

_
_

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s ------ —

4, 365

16, 710

29. 607

30, 175

82, 549

59, 930

24, 037

22, 754

6, 936

61, 700

45, 043

25, 245

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r i e s -----

$121

$ 14 5

$ 17 6

$220

$113

$145

$ 88

$96

$119

$110

$ 12 5

$ 98

S ee fo o t n o t e at en d o f t a b le .




26

Table 6.

Em p lo y m en t d istrib u tio n by salary:

D ra ftin g and cle ric a l o c c u p a tio n s — Co n tin u ed

(P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d d r a ftin g and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s , b y w e e k ly s a la r i e s ,
M a rc h 1972)

S te n o ­
g ra ph ers,
g en era l

S e c r e t a r ie s
W e e k ly s a la r ie s
I
$ 6 5 and u n d e r $ 7 0 --------------------------$ 7 0 and u n d e r $ 7 5 --------------------------$75
$80
$85
$90
$95

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

8 0 --------------------------8 5 --------------------------9 0 --------------------------9 5 --------------------------1 0 0 ------------------------

II

-

III

-

( 1 .8 )
1. 8
2. 6

.

IV

.4
1. 3

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

( 1 .9 )

( 1 .9 )

*

1.
1.
1.
3.
3.

(3 .3 )
2. 2
2. 6

$100
$ 105
$ 110
$ 115
$ 120

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
u n d er
u n d er
under

$ 1 0 5 ----------------------$ 1 1 0 ----------------------$ 1 1 5 ----------------------$ 1 2 0 ----------------------$ 1 2 5 -----------------------

4.
5.
5.
7.
7.

7
0
5
6
8

1.
2.
2.
4.
5.

$ 125
$ 130
$135
$140
$ 145

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
u n d er
under
under

$ 130 $ 1 3 5 --------------------- $ 1 4 0 ----------------------$ 1 4 5 ----------------------$ 1 5 0 -----------------------

8.
9.
7.
7.
6.

3
1
7
5
1

5 .4
7. 1
7. 4
7. 3
7. 2

$150
$160
$ 170
$180
$190

and
and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
under
u n d er
under

$ 1 6 0 ---------------------$ 1 7 0 ----------------------$ 1 8 0 ----------------------$ 1 9 0 ----------------------$ 2 0 0 -----------------------

10. 1
6 .8
4. 1
1. 7
(1 .7 )

1 3 .4
1 1. 6
8. 5
5. 5
3. 5

11.
11.
11.
8.
6.

$200
$210
$220
$230
$240
$250

and
and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 1 0 ----------------------$ 2 2 0 ----------------------$ 2 3 0 ----------------------$ 2 4 0 ----------------------$ 2 5 0 ----------------------$ 2 6 0 -----------------------

2.
1.
1.
(0 .

4. 2
3. 1
2. 0
1. 5
(1 .8 )

$ 2 6 0 and o v e r -----------------------------------

_
-

-

. 7
2. 7
4. 4
6 .4
7. 7

*

_

6
5
6
4
0

1
7
0
5)

-

-

-

5
7
7
0
3

3. 6
4. 8
4. 8
5. 8
5 .6
8
7
0
7
7

-

-

U n ited S ta tes e x c e p t A la s k a and H aw aii, 1

_

_

2.
3.
4.
4.
5.

6
3
6
5
1

S te n o ­
g ra ph ers,
s e n io r

T y p is ts
I

II

-

( 1 .0 )
4. 8

-

..
( 1 .7 )
1 .9
2. 6

4. 3
9 .0
11. 1
12. 2
11. 3

(1 .3 )
2. 1
4. 3
6 .5
7 .8

9 .5
8. 3
8. 2
8. 4
7. 2

5. 2
5. 3
5 .6
7. 6
7 .5

1 1. 0
8. 3
7. 7
5. 8
3 .7

10. 3
9 .8
9. 2
9. 7
9 .0

6.
5.
4.
4.
2.

7. 3
7. 1
6 .6
6 .4
5. 8

2 .5
2. 4
1. 4
1. 0
( 2 .4 )

6 .6
5. 7
3. 3
3 .4
2. 3

1
3
2
3
3

5. 2
3. 0
2 .9
1. 1
(0 .4 )

7.
4.
2.
2.
1.
2.

_

(0 . 6)

.
-

_

_

_

_

_

-

1
6
7
7
9
0

( 2 . 0)

10.
9.
4.
3.
2.

2
3
2
1
0

_

8. 7
9 .4
10. 3
11. 6
8 .9

-

.
-

2. 7
3. 0
1. 6
1. 0
( 0 .2 )
.

_

_

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

_

_

T o t a l ----------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s ---------------------

80. 584

90, 652

50, 937

16, 030

49, 096

48, 960

59, 426

37, 199

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s ----------------

$ 134

$150

$162

$174

$ 11 9

$135

$100

$ 11 7

1
F o r s c o p e o f study, s e e ta b le in a p p en d ix A .
T o a v o id sh ow in g s m a ll p r o p o r t io n s o f e m p lo y e e s s c a t t e r e d at o r n e a r the e x t r e m e s o f th e d i s t r i ­
b u tion fo r s o m e o c c u p a t io n s , the p e r c e n t a g e s o f e m p lo y e e in t h e s e in t e r v a l s h a ve b e e n a c c u m u la te d and a r e show n in th e in te r v a l a b o v e o r b e lo w th e e x ­
t r e m e in t e r v a l con ta in in g at le a s t 1 p e r c e n t .
T he p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n tin g th e s e e m p lo y e e s a r e show n in p a r e n th e s e s .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f rou n d in g,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u a l 100.

27

T a b le 7.

O c cu p a tio n a l em ploym ent d istrib u tio n :

4 ? » ; *

J -H

By industry division^

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l, a d m in is t r a t iv e , t e c h n ic a l, and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s , 1 b y in d u str y d iv is io n , 2 U n ited S ta tes
e x c e p t A la s k a and H a w a ii, M a r c h 1972)

M anu­
fa c t u r in g

O cc u p a tio n

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 3

F in a n c e ,
in s u r a n c e ,
and
r e a l e s ta te

W h o le s a le
tra d e

R e t a il
tr a d e

6
7
10
5
n
(5 )
7
(5 )
(5 )

(5 )

8

6

7
4
(5 )
(5 )
5
(5 )
(5 )

27
6
41
(5 )
25
11
(5 )
(5)

n
<*>

(!)
< )
5

16

36

(5 )

(’ )
(5 )
e)
(> . y - . *
< )
5
h
n

S e le c t e d
s e r v ice s 4

P r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t iv e
A c co u n ta n ts -----------------------------------------------------------__
_________ _____
_ __ _ _
A u d it o r s ___
C h ie f a cco u n ta n ts ------------------------------------------------A t t o r n e y s _______ _ __________ _________________
B u y e r s --------------------------------------------------------------------J o b a n a ly s ts
_______ __ _
_ --------- ----D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l --------------------------------------C h e m is t s ---------------------------------------------------------------E n g in e e r s --------- — — -----— ------ —

67
40
63
30

14
19
9
20

86

6

64
73
91
75

5
(!)
< )
5
11

74

10

72

11

(!)
(5 )

-------- —

35

11

10

8

C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g
C l e r k s , fi le ----- - -_ -------—
----- K ey p u n ch o p e r a t o r s -------------------------------------------M e s s e n g e r s ( o f f ic e b o y s and g i r l s ) ---------------S e c r e t a r ie s ______________________ ____ _____ _
S ten og ra p h ers ----T y p is t s
------------------------------------------------------------------

43

17
6

10
8

14

16

8

56

11
15

12

9
4

25

(5 )
c>
5
(!)
(5 )
(? )
(5 )
7
13

T e c h n i c a l su p p o r t
E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s -----------------------------------D r a ft s m e n
------- - _ -------- - ------

15

C l e r i c a l s u p e r v is o r y
K eyp u n ch s u p e r v is o r s

-------- -

--------

C le rica l

21

42
32
52
49
37

18

7
7
7

10

6

10

5

39
23

(5 )
4

21
41

1 E a ch o c c u p a t io n in c lu d e s the w o r k l e v e l s , a s d e fin e d f o r the s u r v e y , f o r w h ic h e m p lo y m e n t e s t im a t e s in a ll in d u s t r ie s w ith in s c o p e o f the
stu d y a r e sh ow n in ta b le 1.
2 F o r s c o p e o f stu d y , s e e ta b le in a p p en d ix A .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( lim it e d to r a il r o a d , l o c a l and su b u rb a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r , and a ir t r a n s p o r t a t io n in d u s t r ie s ) , c o m m u n ic a t io n , e l e c ­
t r i c , g a s , and s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s .
4 E n g in e e r in g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c i a l l y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p m e n t , and te s t in g la b o r a t o r i e s o n ly .
5 L ess than 4 p e r c e n t .




28

T a b le 8.

R elative salary levels:

O ccu p a tio n by industry d ivisio n

(R e la t iv e s a la r y le v e l s l o r s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l,
A la s k a and H a w a ii, M a r c h 1972)

a d m in is t r a t iv e ,

t e c h n ic a l,

and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s , 1 by in d u s tr y d i v is i o n 2,

United S ta tes e x c e p t

^ A v e r ^ e ^ s a la r ^ fo ^ ^ a ^ c l^ o c c u jD a t io n ^ i^ ^ U ^ ^ in d u s t r ie s ^ O O ^

O ccupation

Manu­
facturing

Public
utilities 3

W holesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance,
insurance,
and
real estate

i

Selected
s e r v ic e s 4

1
i

P r o fe s s io n a l and adm inistrative

|

Account ant s ------------------------------------- ------—
------Audito r s ______________________________________ _
C hief accountants _____________________________
A t t o r n e y s ----------------- —---------------—— ----------------B u y e r s ____ _____ __________ __ _______________
Job analysts ----------------------- ------------ -----------D ir e c to rs of person n el _ --------------------- — —
C h em ists _
_ - - ________ E n g in e e r s ----------------------------------------------------------

100

103

98

97

103

103

105

96

101

97

105

101
101

110

101
102

100

105

105

107

103
99

100
100

112
102
(?)
<
5)

(5)
107

(5 )
100

98
98
(?)
(5 )

97
93

102
1l 4

\M
('•

(51
96

♦ 7

<5>
88

H'9
V
ri

103

(5)
(5)

100

l5 >

97

4b

T ech n ical support
E ngineering t e c h n ic ia n s -----------------------------------

96

101

107
104

93

102

122

(5 )

99

(5 )

100

(=)

C le r ica l su p ervisory
Keypunch su p ervisors

--------- — -----------------------

97

:-y

C le r ica l
C lerk s, a c c o u n t in g ____________________________
C lerk s, file
. ____________ _________ _
Keypunch o p e r a t o r s ___________________________
M essen gers (o ffice boys and g i r l s ) ---------------S e creta ries ------------------------------------------------------St e no g r a phe r s __________ _________________ _
Typists --------------------------------------------------------------

92

102

C

f

•

112

97

107

132

102

91
97

91
94

114

102

117
117

96

96

93

102

95
98

95
93

92
93

1U2

89
94

100

104

102
102

111
108

1

97

90

103

110

|

100

101

1 05

103
98

E a ch o c c u p a t io n in c lu d e s the w o r k l e v e l s , as d e fin e d fo r the s u r v e y , f o r w h ic h da ta a r e p r e s e n t e d in ta b le 1.
In co m p u tin g r e la t iv e s a la r y
le v e l s fo r e a c h o c c u p a t io n b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n , the t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t in e a c h w o r k le v e l in a ll in d u s t r ie s s u r v e y e d w a s u s e d a s a co n s ta n t e m p l o y ­
m en t w eig h t to e lim in a t e the e f f e c t o f d i f f e r e n c e s in the p r o p o r t io n o f e m p lo y m e n t in v a r io u s w o r k le v e l s w ith in e a c h o c c u p a t io n .
1 F o r s c o p e o f stu d y , s e e ta b le in a p p en d ix A .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t io n (lim it e d to r a il r o a d , lo c a l and su b u rb a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r , and a ir t r a n s p o r t a t io n in d u s t r ie s ) , c o m n .u n ic a t io n , e l e c ­
t r i c , g a s , and s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s .
E n g in e e r in g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c i a l l y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p m e n t , and t e s tin g la b o r a t o r i e s o n ly .
5 I n s u ffic ie n t e m p lo y m e n t in 1 w o r k le v e l o r m o r e to w a r r a n t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n o f da ta .




29

T a b le 9.

A ve ra g e sta n d a rd w eekly hours:

O c cu p a tio n by industry d ivision

(A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s 1 f o r e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l, a d m in is t r a t iv e , t e c h n ic a l, and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s , 2 by in d u s tr y d iv is io n , 3 U n ited
S ta tes e x c e p t A la s k a and H a w a ii, M a r c h 1972)

O c c u p a tio n

M anu­
fa c t u r in g

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 4

W h o le s a le
tra d e

R e t a il
tra d e

F in a n c e ,
in s u r a n c e ,
and
r e a l e s ta te

S e le c t e d
s e r v ic e s 5

P r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t iv e
A c c o u n t a n t s --------------------------------------------------- -------A u d ito r s -----------------------------------------------------------------C h ie f a cco u n ta n ts -----------------------------------------------A t t o r n e y s ---------------------------------------------------------------B u y e r s --------------------------------------------------------------------J o b a n a ly s ts —---------- ------------------------D ir e c to r s o f p e rso n n e l C h e m is t s —
_
—
— E n g i n e e r s ---------------------------------------------------------------

(‘ >
(6 )

38. 0
3 7 .5
(6 )
38. 0
(6 )
37. 5
38. 5
(6 )
(6 )

39. 5
3 9 .5
40. 0
(6 )
39. 5
3 9 .5
40. 0
39. 5
3 9 .5

3 8 .5
3 9 .5

(6 )
38. 5

(6 )

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

39. 0

(6 )

3 9 .5

38. 0

(6 )

39. 0
3 9 -0
39. 5
39. 0
39. 0
39. 5
39. 0

39. 5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
38. 5
39. 0
3 9 .0

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
39. 0
39. 0
39. 0
3 9 .5
39. 0

38. 0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
38. 0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
37. 5

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
39. 5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

39. 5
39. 0
39. 5
38. 5
39. 5
3 9 .0
40. 0
3 9 .5
40. 0

39. 5
39. 0
39. 0
3 9 .5
39- 5
(6 )
39- 5
(6 >
39. 5

39. 0
3 9 .5
40. 0
3 8 .0
39. 0
3 9 .0
38. 5
(‘ )
(6 )

39.
39.
40.
39.
39.
37.
40.

4 0. 0
4 0 .0

3 9 .5
39. 5

3 9 .5

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
39. 5
39. 0
39. 5
39. 5
39. 5

5
5
0
0
5
5
5

T e c h n i c a l su p p o r t
E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s -------------------- — --------D r a ft s m e n
--------------------- ----- ------------------------ ----- —

C l e r i c a l s u p e r v is o r y
K eyp u n ch s u p e r v i s o r s ------------------------------------------

C le r ic a l
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g ----------------------------------------------C l e r k s , f i le -----------------------------------------------------------K ey p u n ch o p e r a t o r s
M e s s e n g e r s ( o f f i c e b o y s and g i r l s ) __________
S e c r e t a r i e s ------------------------------------------------------------S ten og ra p h ers . . . . .
.
T y p is t s
------ - —

* B a s e d on the s ta n d a rd w o r k w e e k fo r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e th e ir r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a la r y .
If sta n d a rd h o u r s w e r e not a v a ila b le , the
sta n d a rd h o u r s a p p lic a b le fo r a m a jo r it y o f the o f f i c e w o r k f o r c e in the e s t a b lis h m e n t w e r e u s e d .
T h e a v e r a g e f o r e a c h j o b c a t e g o r y w a s ro u n d e d
to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r .
2 E a c h o c c u p a t io n in c lu d e s the w o r k l e v e l s , a s d e fin e d f o r the s u r v e y , f o r w h ic h da ta a r e p r e s e n t e d in ta b le 1.
3 F o r s c o p e o f stu d y , s e e ta b le in a p p en d ix A .
4 T r a n s p o r t a t io n (lim it e d to r a il r o a d , l o c a l and s u b u rb a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r , and a ir t r a n s p o r t a t io n in d u s t r ie s ) , c o m m u n ic a t io n , e l e c ­
t r i c , g a s , and s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s .
E n g in e e r in g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c ia l ly o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p m e n t , and t e s t in g la b o r a t o r i e s o n ly .
6 I n s u ffic ie n t e m p lo y m e n t in 1 w o r k le v e l o r m o r e to w a r r a n t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n o f da ta .




30

Appendix A.

Scope and M ethod of Survey

Scope of survey

industry. Within each industry, a greater proportion of
large than of small establishments was included. In
combining the data, each establishment was weighted
according to its probability of selection, so that unbiased
estimates were generated. To illustrate the process,
where one establishment out of four was selected, it was
given a weight of 4, thus representing itself plus three
others. In instances where data v/ere not available for the
original sample member, an alternate of the same
original probability of selection was chosen in the same
industry-size classification. Where there was no suitable
substitution for the original sample member, the missing
unit was accounted for by assigning additional weight to
an existing sample member that was as nearly similar as
possible to the missing unit.

The survey relates to establishments in the United
States, except Alaska and Hawaii, in the following
industries: Manufacturing; transportation, communica­
tion, electric, gas, and sanitary services; wholesale trade;
retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate;
engineering and architectural services; and commercially
operated research, development, and testing laboratories.
Excluded are establishments employing fewer than the
minimum number of workers, as indicated in the accom­
panying table for each industry division, at the time of
reference of the universe data (generally, first quarter of
1970).The variable minimum employment size, which was
adopted in the 1966 survey, more nearly equalizes the
white-collar employment of establishments among the
various industry divisions.
The estimated number of establishments and the total
employment within scope of this survey, and within the
samples actually studied, are shown for each major
industry division in the accompanying table. These
estimates also are shown separately for establishments
employing 2,500 workers or more and those located in
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas. 1

Nature of data collected and presented

The reported salaries relate to standard salaries paid
for standard work schedules, i.e., the straight-time salary
corresponding to the employee’s normal work schedule
excluding overtime hours. Nonproduction bonuses are
excluded, but cost-of-living payments and incentive
earnings are included. The average salaries presented
relate to full-time employees for whom salary data are
available.
Data presented on year-to-year changes in average
salaries are subject to limitations which reflect the
nature of the data collected. Changes in average salaries
reflect not only general salary increases and merit or
other increases given to individuals wh'ile in the same
work level category, but they also may reflect other
factors such as employee turnover, expansions or reduc­
tions in the work force, and changes in staffing patterns

Timing of survey and method of collection

Survey data collection was planned so that the data
would reflect an average reference period of March
1972. 2
Data were obtained by Bureau field economists who
visited a nationwide sample of representative establish­
ments within the scope of the survey between January
and May. Employees were classified according to
occupation and level, with the assistance of company
officials, on the basis of the BLS job definitions which
appear in appendix C. In comparing actual duties and
responsibilities of employees with those in the survey
definitions, extensive use was made of company occupa­
tional descriptions, organization charts, and other
personnel records.

1 The metropolitan area data in the 1972 survey relate to all
229 SMSA’s (within the 48 States surveyed) as revised through
January 1968 by the U.S. O ffice o f Management and Budget.
Earlier surveys represented SMSA’s ranging in numbers from 188
in 1962 and earlier surveys to 229 in the 1970 and 1971 surveys.
2 The 1967 through 1971 surveys had a June reference
period for all occupations. Prior to the 1967 study, the average
reference period was February for clerical and drafting jobs, and
March for all other occupations. Until 1963, reports listed
“ Winter” as the reference period. From 1963 through 1966, the
more specific designation, “ February-March,” was used.

Sampling and estimating procedures

The sampling procedures called for the detailed
stratification of all establishments within scope of the
survey by location, industry, and size of employment.
From this universe, a nationwide sample of about 3,000
establishments (not companies) was selected systema­
tically. 3 Each industry was sampled separately, the
sampling rates depending on the employment size of the




3 A few o f the largest employers, together employing
approximately one and a quarter million workers, gave data on a
companywide basis. These companies were eliminated from the
universe to which the preceding procedure applies. The sample
count includes the establishments o f these companies within the
scope o f the survey.

31

Num ber of e sta b lish m e n ts and w orkers w ith in scope of s u rv e y 1 and num ber studied by in d u stry
d iv isio n , M a rch 1972
—
W ithin s c o p e o f s u r v e y 1
M inim um
em p lo y m e n t
In d u stry d iv is io n

S tu died

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts
N u m b er
of esta b ­
lis h m e n ts

lis h m e n ls
in s c o p e o f
su rvey

T ota l

P r o f e s s io n a l ,
a d m in is t r a t iv e ,
super*, is o r y ,
and c l e r i c a l *

18, o 8 o , 310

N u m b er
o f esta b ­
lis h m e n t s

T ota l

P r o f e s s io n a l ,
a d m in is t r a t iv e ,
s u p e r v is o r y ,
and c l e r i c a l *

3, l i t .

0 , 9 3 5 ,4 9 0

2, 8 o 1 .7 9 2

3. 317, 239

1, 880

4, 3 7 4 ,0 9 1

1, 4 8 9 , 397

301, 9 3 9
86 3 , 253
2 , 4 i y , 3yo

1, 107, yoo
4 1 3 ,0 9 3
48 1 , 790

.37
174

1. 125, 534
7 9, 176

283

7 1 9 ,5 1 5

5 6 9 ,3 5 2
4 7 .2 7 0
1 5 6 ,2 8 8

1 ,6 5 0 , y i2

1, 6 0 8 , 326

339

5 1 6 ,4 3 5

5 1 6 ,0 3 8

250

14, 2o0

100
100
250

2 , 900
4, 067
2, 692

2,

100

------------------ — —------ — — —
M a n u fa ctu r in g
N oiirnanuiuc lu r in g :
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , i* c o m m u n ic a t io n ,
e l e c t r i c , g.-^s, and sa n ita ry
s e r v ic e s
,------ —.. -t . . ______ _____ ____
—
W h o le s a le t r a d e --------------------------------------

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s

4, 357

11, 23 3, 25y

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and
S e rv ice s:
E n g in e e r in g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l
s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c ia l ly
op e ra te d , r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p ­
m e n t, and t e s tin g la b o r a t o r i e s
o n i y ---------------------------------------------------

5 27

2 1 7 ,5 5 7

1 5 5 ,3 8 3

103

1 2 0 ,7 3 9

8 3 , 447

22, 028

15, 1 5 1 ,0 1 1

6. 304, 453

2, 555

6, 2 9 5 ,8 2 8

2 ,6 9 9 , 241

9, 228

100

8, 1 4 2 ,0 9 2

2, 7 3 8 , 830

1, 399

3 , 7 8 0 ,0 8 2

I , 348, 544

311
159

1

250
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ;
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , 3 c o m m u n ic a t io n ,
4
e l e c t r i c , g a s , and s a n ita ry
s e r v i c e s _____ ____ ___ _____ ______ «__- __
W h o le s a le tra d e ___________ ____________

100
100

E s ta b lis h m e n ts e m p lo y in g 2, 500 w o r k e r s

2, 474

2, 149, 795
7 8 6 , 159
2, 317, 005

1, 04 9 , 410
382, 485
4 6 8 ,1 8 4

271

1, 112, 849
7 6 ,2 2 4
7 1 0 ,6 1 2

5 6 3 ,6 1 8
4 5 ,9 1 4
1 5 5 ,2 1 4

lo o

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and
r e a l e s t a t e - - - - - - - - - ——- —
— -S e rv ice s:
E n g in e e r in g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l
s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c ia l ly
o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p ­
m e n t, and t e s t in g la b o r a t o r i e s
o n iy ____________ ____ — -___ __________

2, 292
3, 605

250

3, 915

1, 55 6 , 8o 1

1, 5 2 1 ,0 1 5

322

5 1 2 ,1 0 0

5 1 1 ,9 2 9

514

1 9 8 ,4 9 9

144, 529

93

103, 961

7 4 ,0 2 2

1 , 0b3

6, 266, 934

2, 49 0 , 925

763

5, 162, 121

2, 130, 164

t>17

3, 787, 146

1, 3 1 5 ,6 1 8

472

3, 290, 922

1, 159, 092

.

.

100

i

!

j

1
___________________
1 T h e study r e l a t e s to e s t a b lis h m e n t s in in d u s t r ie s lis t e d , w ith t o ta l e m p lo y m e n t at o r a b o v e the m in im u m lim it a t io n in d ic a t e d in the f i r s t c o l ­
um n, in the U nited Sta tes e x c e p t A la s k a and H a w a ii.
In clu d e s e x e c u t i v e , a d m in is t r a t iv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, s u p e r v is o r y , and c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s , but e x c lu d e s te c h n ic ia n s and d r a ft s m e n , and s a le s p e r s o n n e 1.
L im it e d to r a ilr o a d , lo c a l and su b u rb a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r (fo r e ig n and d o m e s t ic ) , and a ir t r a n s p o r t a t io n in d u s t r ie s a s d e fin e d in the
19o7 e d itio n o f the S ta n d a rd I n d u s tria l C l a s s if ic a t i o n M anual.
4 S ta n da rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a s in the U n ited S ta te s , e x c e p t A la s k a and H a w a ii, as r e v i s e d th rou g h J a n u a ry 1968 b y the U. S. O ffic e o f
M a n a g em en t and B u d get.




32

within establishments with different salary levels. For
example, an expansion in force may increase the
proportion of employees at the minimum of the salary
range established for a work level, which would tend to
lower the average, whereas a reduction or a low turnover
in the work force may have the opposite effect.
Similarly, year-to-year promotions of employees to
higher work levels of professional and administrative
occupations may affect the average of each level. The
established salary ranges for such occupations are
relatively wide, and promoted employees, who may have
been paid the maximum of the salary scale for the lower
level, are likely to be replaced by less experienced
employees who may be paid the minimum. Occupations
most likely to reflect such changes in the salary averages
are the higher levels of professional and administrative
occupations and single incumbent positions such as chief
accountant and director of personnel. 4
About 5 percent of the establishments asked to
supply data would not do so. These corresponded to an
estimated total in the universe studied of approximately
1,050,000 workers, about 5.6 percent of 18,686,310.
The noncooperating units were replaced by others in the
same industry-size-location classes. If all similar units
were already in the sample, the weights of the included
establishments were increased to account for the missing
units.
Some companies had an established policy of not
disclosing salary data for some of their employees. Often
this policy related to. higher level positions, because
these employees were considered part of the manage­
ment group or were classified in categories which
included only one employee. In nearly all instances,
however, information was provided on the number of
such employees and the appropriate occupational classi­
fication. It was thus possible to estimate the proportion
of employees in each category for whom salary data
were not available. The number of work level categories
affected and the proportion of employees in these
categories for whom salary data were not available are as
follows:

for which data were available.
Occupational employment estimates relate to the
total in all establishments within the scope of the survey
and not the number actually surveyed. Employees for
whom salary data were not available were not taken into
account in the estimates. 5 These estimates were derived
by weighting full-time employees in the occupations
studied in each sample establishment in proportion to
the number of establishments it represented within the
scope of the survey. For example, if the sample
establishment was selected from a group of four
establishments with similar employment in the same
industry and region, each full-time employee found in an
occupation studied was counted as four employees in
compiling the employment estimates for the occupa­
tions. In addition, the survey occupations were limited
to employees meeting the specific criteria in each survey
definition and were not intended to include all
employees in each field of work. 6 For these reasons,
and because of differences in occupational structure
among establishments, the estimates of occupational
employment obtained from the sample of establishments
studied serve only to indicate the relative importance of
the occupations and levels as defined for the survey.
These qualifications of the employment estimates do not
materially affect the accuracy of the earnings data.
Wherever possible, data were collected for men and
women separately. If identification by sex was not
possible, all workers were reported as the predominant
sex. In the professional, administrative, and technical
support occupations, men were sufficiently predominant
to preclude presentation of separate data by sex. For
those clerical occupations in which both men and
women are commonly employed, separate data by sex
are available from the area wage survey reports compiled
by metropolitan area. The occupations and work levels
included in this study, and in which women accounted
for 5 percent or more of the employment, were

1 category (directors of
personnel I V ) .............................................
4 categories (directors of
personnel I II, chief
accountants III and IV ,
engineers VI11) ...........................................
14 categories....................................................
58 categories....................................................

5 Also not taken into account were a few instances in which
salary data were available for employees in an occupation, but
where there was no satisfactory basis for classifying the
employees by work level.

4 These types o f occupations also may be subject to greater
sampling error, as explained in the last paragraph o f appendix A.

18 percent

6 Engineers, for example, are defined to permit classification
o f employees engaged in engineering work within a band o f eight
levels, starting with inexperienced engineering graduates and
excluding only those within certain fields o f specialization or in
positions above those covered by level VIII. In contrast, such
occupations as chief accountants and directors o f personnel are
defined to include only those with responsibility for a specified
program and with duties and responsibilities as indicated for
each o f the more limited number o f work levels selected for

5 to 9.9 percent
1 to 4.9 percent
Less than 1 percent

Comparisons between establishments that provided
salary data for each specific occupation level and those
not doing so indicated that the two classes of establish­
ments did not differ materially in industries represented,
employment, or salary levels for other jobs in this series



study.

33

using $1 class intervals. Weekly salary class intervals were
used for draftsmen and clerical occupations and monthly i
salary class intervals were used for all other occupations.
The weekly values were multiplied by 4.345 to obtain
monthly values and by 52.14 to obtain annual values.
The annual values for other than draftsmen and clerical
occupations were obtained by multiplying monthly
values by 12.

distributed according to the proportion of women
employees, as follows:
W o m e n (p e r c e n t )

95 or m o re ............

90-94 ......................
85-89 ......................
70-74 ......................
65-69 ......................
55-59 ......................
45-49 ......................
40-44 ......................
35-39 ......................
25-29 ......................
20-24 ......................
1 5 -1 9 ......................
1 0 -1 4 ......................
5 - 9 ..........................

O c c u p a tio n a n d le v e l

File clerks I and II, all levels of keypunch
operators, secretaries, stenographers, and
typists
Accounting clerks I, file clerks I I I , key­
punch supervisors II
Keypunch supervisors I and III
Accounting clerks II
Keypunch supervisors IV
Keypunch supervisors V
Messengers (office boys and girls)
Job analysts I
Draftsmen-tracers
Engineering technicians I
Job analysts II
Job analysts III, chemists I, and buyers I
Accountants I and II, chemists II and III,
and engineering technicians II
Accountants III, auditors I and II, job
analysts IV , directors of personnel II,
attorneys 11, buyers 11, and draftsmen I

Estimates of sampling error

The survey procedure yields estimates with widely
varying sampling errors, depending on the frequency
with which the job occurs and the dispersion of salaries.
Thus, for the 77 surveyed occupational work levels, the
relative sampling errors of the average salaries were
distributed as follows: 53 were under 2 percent; 13 were
2 and under 4 percent; 6 were 4 and under 6 percent;
and 5 were 6 percent and over. 7 These sampling errors
measure the validity of the band within which the true
average is likely to fall. Thus, for an occupation with a
sample average monthly salary of $ 1,000 and sampling
error of 4 percent, the chances are 19 out of 20 that the
true average lies within the band from $960 and $1,040.

Conversion of salary rates

Salary data for the selected occupations were
collected in the form in which they were most readily
available from company records, i.e., on a weekly,
biweekly, semimonthly, monthly, or annual basis. For
the initial tabulations, the salary data were first
converted to a weekly basis for the clerical and drafting
occupations and to a monthly basis for all others. The
factors used to convert these data were as follows:

Methods of computation of annual percent increases

The percent increases for each occupation in table A
were obtained by adding the aggregate salaries for each
level in each of two successive years (employment in the
most recent year, to eliminate the effects of year-to-year
employment shifts, multiplied by the average salaries in
both years) and dividing the later sum by the earlier
sum. The resultant relative, less 100, is the percent of
increase. Changes in the scope of the survey and in
occupational definitions were incorporated into the
series on a continuing basis as soon as two comparable
periods were available. The increases for each of the two
broad occupational groups were obtained by averaging
the increases of the occupations within the group. The
increases for all survey occupations were determined by
averaging the increases for the two broad occupational
groups. The annual increases were then linked together
to obtain the changes that had occurred since this series
was begun and to compute average annual rates of
increase for each occupation and group, and all
occupations combined.
The year-to-year percent increases for each group in
table B were determined by adding average salaries for
all occupations in the group for 2 consecutive years, and
dividing the later sum by the earlier sum. The resultant

C o n v e r sio n fa cto r s
P a y r o ll b a sis

j Q v v e e j<i y

7~o

m o n th ly

b a sis

W e e k ly .............................
Biweekly ........................
S em im o nthly.................
M o n th ly ..........................
A n n u a l.............................

b a sis

1.0000
.5000
.4602
.2301
.0192

4.3450
2.1725
2.0000
1.0000
.0833

Average monthly salaries presented in tables 1, 2, and 3
and annual salaries presented in tables 1 and 2 for the
clerical and drafting occupations are derived from the
average weekly salaries (to the nearest penny) by use of
factors 4.345 and 52.14, respectively, and rounding
results to the nearest dollar. Average weekly salaries for
these occupations, presented in table 6, are rounded to
the nearest half-dollar. Average monthly salaries
presented in tables 1, 2, and 3 for all other occupations
are rounded to the nearest dollar. To obtain the annual
salaries, average monthly salaries (to the nearest penny)
are multiplied by 12 and rounded to the nearest dollar.

7
The 6 percent and over group included: Chemists VI — 6.1
percent; chemists VIII - 9.5 percent; chief accountants I - 7.1
percent; chief accountants II - 6.6 percent; and chief
accountants III - 6.0 percent.

Method of determining median and quartile values

Median and quartile values presented in this report
were derived from distributions of employees by salary




34

relative, less 100, shows the percent of increase. Changes
in the scope of the survey or in the occupational
definitions were incorporated into the series as soon as




comparable data for 2 consecutive periods were
available. The 11-year trends were obtained by linking
changes for the individual periods.

35

Appendix B.

Survey Changes in 1972

Changes in the 1972 survey included: Modification of
the scope of the survey; a change in the survey reference
period; a change in sampling procedures; and changes in
the definitions of five occupations. Each of these
changes is described in detail below.

byproduct of the Bureau’s area wage surveys in selected
metropolitan areas (89 in 1971). In 1972 data for all
occupations were obtained from the same nationwide
sample of establishments. The change in sampling
procedures caused small declines in the number of
employees reported in some (principally clerical)
occupations.

Change in scope of survey

The minimum employment in finance, insurance, and
real estate establishments within scope of the survey was
raised from 50 employees to 100 employees. This was
the first change in minimum survey employment size
since the February-March 1966 survey. The change was
requested by the President’s agent to insure that data
would be available for development of Federal pay
comparability as required by the Federal Pay
Comparability Act of 1970.
The change in scope had practically no effect on the
estimates of salaries and employment of the
professional, administrative, technical support, and
clerical supervisory occupations. The number of
employees in the clerical occupations studied was
reduced by about 3 percent and average salaries were
increased by a small amount (generally less than one-half
of 1 percent) by the change in scope. Information on
changes in salaries from 1971 to 1972 presented in
tables or text is unaffected by the change in scope
because salary changes have been computed using data
based on the 1971 survey scope in both years, i.e.,
including establishments with fewer than 100 employees
in the finance, insurance, and real estate industries.

Change in survey timing

Since the 1967 survey, data collection had been
timed so that the salary estimates related, on the
average, to June. The reference period was changed to
March in 1972 at the request of the President’s agent to
adjust the timing of the survey to fit the time schedule
for Federal pay adjustments set by the Federal Pay
Comparability Act of 1970.
Changes in occupational coverage and definitions

Buyer. Level V was dropped from the survey. A
paragraph was added to the level IV definition to more
clearly define the upper limit of occupational coverage.
File Clerk, Stenographer, Secretary, and Typist. The
' if
i ! ‘ iy iJ A
survey definitions for these occupations were revised
slightly to clarify the intent of the definitions and
facilitate uniform interpretation by data collectors,
respondents, and users. The work levels of each
occupation are intended to represent the same types of
jobs as did the same levels of the previous definitions.
An examination of the survey data and the collection
experience revealed that the revised definitions did not
significantly change classifications that had been made in
the past. Comparisons of data for trend purposes,
therefore, were not affected by the changes in
occupational definitions.
it

Change in sampling procedures

In prior years, the nationwide estimates for the
clerical and drafting occupations were, in large part, a




36

Appendix C. O ccupa tio na l Definitions
l

The primary purpose of preparing job definitions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to
assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations, or levels within occupa­
tions, workers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work ar­
rangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This permits the
grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. To secure
comparability of job content, some occupations and work levels are defined to include
only those workers meeting specific criteria as to training, job functions, and responsi­
bilities. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of
occupational content, the Bureau’s occupational definitions may differ significantly
from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes.
Also see note referring to the definitions for the drafting and clerical occupations on
p. 64.

A c c o u n t a n t s an d A u d i t o r s

Planning the manner in which account structures
should be developed or modified;

ACCOUNTANT

Performs professional accounting work requiring
knowledge of the theory and practice of recording,
classifying, examining, and analyzing the data and
records of financial transactions. The work generally
requires a bachelor’s degree in accounting or, in rare in­
stances, equivalent experience and education combined.
Positions covered by this definition are characterized
by the inclusion of work that is analytical, creative,
evaluative, and advisory in nature. The work draws upon
and requires a thorough knowledge of the fundamental
doctrines, theories, principles, and terminology of ac­
countancy, and often entails some understanding of
such related fields as business law, statistics, and general
management. (See also chief accountant.)
Professional responsibilities in accountant positions
above the entry and developmental levels include sev­
eral such duties as:

Assuring the adequacy of the accounting system as
the basis for reporting to management;
Considering the need for new or changed controls;
Projecting accounting data to show the effects of
proposed plans on capital investments, income, cash
position, and overall financial condition;
Interpreting the meaning of accounting records,
reports, and statements;
Advising operating officials on accounting matters;
and
Recommending improvements, adaptations, or re­
visions in the accounting system and procedures.
(Entry and developmental level positions provide op­
portunity to develop ability to perform professional
duties such as those enumerated above.)
In addition to such professional work, most accoun­
tants are also responsible for assuring the proper record­
ing and documentation of transactions in the accounts.

Analyzing the effects of transactions upon ac­
count relationships;
Evaluating alternative means of treating trans­
actions;




37

They, therefore, frequently direct nonprofessional per­
sonnel in the actual day-to-day maintenance of books of
accounts, the accumulation of cost or other comparable
data, the preparation of standard reports and statements,
and similar work. (Positions involving such supervisory
work but not including professional duties as described
above, are not included in this description.)
Excluded are accountants whose principal or sole
duties consist of designing or improving accounting
systems or other nonoperating staff work, e.g., financial
analysis, financial forecasting, tax advising, etc. (The
criteria that follow for distinguishing among the several
levels of work are inappropriate for such jobs.) Note,
however, that professional accountant positions with
responsibility for recording or reporting accounting data
relative to taxes are included, as are operating or cost
accountants whose work includes, but is not limited to,
improvement of the accounting system.
Some accountants use electronic data processing
equipment to process, record, and report accounting
data. In some such cases the machine unit is a subordi­
nate segment of the accounting system; in others it is a
separate entity or is attached to some other organiza­
tion. In either instance, providing the primary responsi­
bility of the position is professional accounting work of
the type otherwise included, the use of data processing
equipment of any type does not of itself exclude a posi­
tion from the accountant description nor does it change
its level.

tions or other specific accounting requirements; recon­
ciling reports and financial data with financial state­
ments already on file, and pointing out apparent in­
consistencies or errors; carrying out assigned steps in an
accounting analysis, such as computing standard ratios;
assembling and summarizing accounting literature on a
given subject; preparing relatively simple financial state­
ments, not involving problems of analysis or presenta­
tion; and preparing charts, tables, and other exhibits to
be used in reports. In addition to such work, may
also perform some nonprofessional tasks for training
purposes.
Responsibility for direction o f others. Usually none.

Accountant II

General characteristics. At this continuing develop­
mental level the professional accountant makes practical
applications of technical accounting practices and con­
cepts beyond the mere application of detailed rules and
instructions. Assignments are designed to expand his
practical experience and to develop his professional judg­
ment in the application of basic accounting techniques
to simple professional problems. He is expected to be
competent in the application of standard procedures
and requirements to routine transactions, to raise ques­
tions about unusual or questionable items, and to sug­
gest solutions. (Terminal positions are excluded.)

Accountant I

Direction received. Work is reviewed closely to verify its
general accuracy and coverage of unusual problems, to
insure conformance with required procedures and special
instructions, and to assure his professional growth. His
progress is evaluated in terms of his ability to apply his
professional knowledge to basic accounting problems in
the day-to-day operations of an established accounting
system.

General characteristics. At this beginning professional
level, the accountant learns to apply the principles,
theories, and concepts of accounting to a specific sys­
tem. The position is distinguishable from nonprofes­
sional positions by the variety of assignments; rate and
scope of development expected of the incumbent; and
the existence, implicit or explicit, of a planned training
program designed to give the entering accountant prac­
tical experience. (Terminal positions are excluded.)

Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety
of accounting tasks, e.g., prepares routine working
papers, schedules, exhibits, and summaries indicating
the extent of his examination, and presenting and sup­
porting his findings and recommendations. Examines
a variety of accounting documents to verify accuracy of
computations and to ascertain that all transactions are
properly supported, are in accordance with pertinent
policies and procedures, and are classified and recorded
according to acceptable accounting standards.

Direction received. Works under close supervision of an
experienced accountant whose guidance is directed pri­
marily to the development of the trainee’s professional
ability and to the evaluation of his potential for advance­
ment. Limits of assignments are clearly defined, methods
of procedure are specified, and kinds of items to be
noted and referred to supervisor are identified.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety
of accounting tasks such as: Examining a variety of
financial statements for completeness, internal accuracy,
and conformance with uniform accounting classifica­




Responsibility for direction o f others. Usually none,
although he may supervise a few clerks.
38

higher levels. Such recommendations are derived from
his own knowledge of the application of well-established
principles and practices.

Accountant III

General characteristics. Performs professional operating
or cost accounting work requiring the standardized
application of well-established accounting principles,
theories, concepts, and practices. Receives detailed
instructions concerning the overall accounting system
and its objectives, the policies and procedures under
which it is operated, and the nature of changes in the
system or its operation. Characteristically, the account­
ing system or assigned segment is stable and well
established (i.e., the basic chart of accounts, classi­
fications, the nature of the cost accounting system,
the report requirements, and the procedures are changed
infrequently).
Depending upon the workload involved, the accoun­
tant may have such assignments as supervision of the
day-to-day operation of: (a) The entire system of a
subordinate establishment, or (b) a major segment
(e.g., general accounting; cost accounting; or financial
statements and reports) of a somewhat larger system,
or (c) in a very large and complex system, may be
assigned to a relatively narrow and specialized segment
dealing with some problem, function, or portion of
work which is itself of the level of difficulty charac­
teristic of this level.

Responsibility for the direction o f others. In most in­
stances he directs the work of a subordinate nonpro­
fessional staff.

Accountant IV

General characteristics. Performs professional operating
or cost accounting work which requires the application
of well-established accounting principles, theories, con­
cepts, and practices to a wide variety of difficult prob­
lems. Receives instructions concerning the objectives
and operations of the overall accounting system. At this
level, compared with level III, the accounting system
or assigned segment is more complex, i.e., (a) is rela­
tively unstable, (b) must adjust to new or changing
company operations, (c) serves organizations of unusu­
ally large size, or (d) is complicated by the need to pro­
vide and coordinate separate or specialized accounting
treatment and reporting (e.g., cost accounting using
standard cost, process cost, and job order techniques)
for different operations or divisions of company.
Depending upon the workload and degree of coor­
dination involved, the accountant IV may have such
assignments as the supervision of the day-to-day opera­
tion of: (a) The entire accounting system of a subordi­
nate establishment, or (b) a major segment (e.g., gen­
eral accounting; cost accounting; or financial state­
ments and reports) of an accounting system serving a
larger and more complex establishment, or (c) the
entire accounting system of a large (e.g., employing
several thousand persons) subordinate establishment
which in other respects has an accounting system of the
complexity that characterizes level III.

Direction received. A higher level professional accoun­
tant normally is available to furnish advice and assistance
as needed. Work is reviewed for technical accuracy, ade­
quacy of professional judgment, and compliance with
instructions through spot checks, appraisal of results,
subsequent processing, analysis of reports and state­
ments, and other appropriate means.
Typical duties and responsibilities. The primary respon­
sibility of most positions at this level is to assure that
the assigned day-to-day operations are carried out in
accordance with established accounting principles, poli­
cies, and objectives. The accountant performs such pro­
fessional work as: Developing nonstandard reports and
statements (e.g., those containing cash forecasts reflect­
ing the interrelations of accounting, cost budgeting, or
comparable information); interpreting and pointing out
trends or deviations from standards; projecting data
into the future; predicting the effects of changes in
operating programs; or identifying management infor­
mational needs, and refining account structures or re­
ports accordingly.
Within the limits of his delegated responsibility,
makes day-to-day decisions concerning the accounting
treatment of financial transactions. Is expected to
recommend solutions to complex problems and pro­
pose changes in the accounting system for approval at



Direction received. A higher level accountant normally
is available to furnish advice and assistance as needed.
Work is reviewed by spot checks and appraisal of re­
sults for adequacy of professional judgment, compli­
ance with instructions, and overall accuracy and quality.
Typical duties and responsibilities. As at level III, a pri­
mary characteristic of most positions at this level is
the responsibility of operating an accounting system
or major segment of a system in the intended manner.
The accountant IV exercises professional judgment
in making frequent appropriate recommendations for:
New accounts; revisions in the account structure;
new types of ledgers; revisions in reporting system
or subsidiary records; changes in instructions regarding
39

the use of accounts; new or refined account classi­
fications or definitions; etc. He also makes day-to-day
decisions concerning the accounting treatment of finan­
cial transactions and is expected to recommend solu­
tions to complex problems beyond the scope of his
responsibility.

the accounting meaning of the reports and statements
for which he is responsible. Accountants V are neces­
sarily deeply involved in fundamental and complex ac­
counting matters and in the managerial problems that
are affected.
Responsibility for direction o f others. Accounting staff
he supervises generally includes professional accountants.

Responsibility for direction o f others. Accounting staff
he supervises, if any, may include professional
accountants.

A U D IT O R

Performs professional auditing work requiring a bach­
elor’s degree in accounting or, in rare instances, equiva­
lent experience and education combined. Audits the
financial records and practices of a company, or of divi­
sions or components of the company, to appraise sys­
tematically and verify the accounting accuracy of
records and reports and to assure the consistent applica­
tion of accepted accounting principles. Evaluates the
adequacy of the accounting system and internal finan­
cial control. Makes appropriate recommendations for
improvement as necessary. To the extent determined
necessary, examines the transactions entering into the
balance sheet and the transactions entering into income,
expense, and cost accounts. Determines:

Accountant V

General characteristics. Performs professional operating
or cost accounting work which is of greater than average
professional difficulty and responsibility because of the
presence of unusual and novel problems or the unusual
magnitude or impact of the accounting program. Typi­
cally this i*vc’ J difficulty arises from (a) the large
size o f the accounting and operating organization,
0>) the atypical nature o f the accounting problems
encountered, or (c) the unusually great involvement
in accounting systems design aim development.
Examples of assignments characteristic o f this level
are the supervision of the day-to-day operation of:
(a) The entire accounting system of a subordinate
establishment having an unusually novei and complex
accounting system, or (b) the entire accounting sys­
tem of a large (e.g., employing several thousand per­
sons) subordinate establishment which in other re­
spects has an accounting system of the complexity that
characterizes level IV, or (c) the entire accounting sys­
tem of a company or corporation that has a relatively
stable and conventional accounting system and employs
several thousand persons and has a few subordinate
establishments which include accounting units, or (d) a
major segment of an accounting system that substan­
tially exceeds the characteristics described in any one of
the preceding examples.

(1) The existence of recorded assets (including the
observation of the taking of physical inventories) and
the all-inclusiveness of recorded liabilities.
(2) The accuracy of financial statements or reports
and the fairness of presentation of facts therein.
(3) The propriety or legality of transactions.
(4) The degree of compliance with established poli­
cies and procedures concerning financial transactions.
Excluded are positions which do not require full
professional accounting training because the work is
confined on a relatively permanent basis to repetitive
examinations of a limited area of company operations
and accounting processes, e.g., only accounts payable
and receivable; demurrage records and related functions,
or station operations only of a railroad company;
branch offices which do not engage in the full range of
banking and accounting activities of the main bank;
warehouse operations only of a mail order company;
checking transactions to determine whether or not they
conform to prescribed routines or procedures. (Exami­
nations of such repetitive or limited nature normally
do not require or permit professional audit work to be
performed.)

Direction received. An accountant of higher level nor­
mally is available to furnish advice and assistance as
needed. Work is reviewed for adequacy of professional
judgment, compliance with instructions, and overall
quality.
Typical duties and responsibilities. The work is charac­
terized by its unusual difficulty or responsibility. Ac­
countants V typically are directly concerned on a rela­
tively continuous 'basis with what the nature of the ac­
counting system should be, with the devising or revising
of the operating accounting policies and procedures
that are necessary, and with the managerial as well as



40

Auditor !

General characteristics. As a trainee auditor at the
entering professional level, performs a variety of routine
assignments. Typically, he is rotated through a variety of
tasks under a planned training program designed to pro­
vide practical experience in applying the principles,
theories, and concepts of accounting and auditing to
specific situations. (Terminal positions are excluded.)
Direction received. Works under close supervision of an
experienced auditor whose guidance is directed primarily
to the development of the trainee’s professional ability
and to the evaluation of his potential for advancement.
Limits of assignments are clearly defined, methods of
procedure are specified, and kinds of items to be noted
and referred to supervisor are identified.

Auditor ill

General characteristics. Work at this level consists of the
audit of operations and accounting processes that are
relatively stable, well-established, and typical of the in­
dustry. The audits primarily involve the collection and
analysis of readily available findings; there is previous
audit experience that is directly applicable; the audit
reports are normally prepared in a prescribed format
using a standard method of presentation; and few if any
major problems are anticipated. The work performed
requires the application of substantial knowledges of
accounting principles and practices, e.g., bases for dis­
tinguishing among capital maintenance and operating
expenses; accruing reserves for taxes; and other account­
ing considerations of an equivalent nature.

Typical duties and responsibilities. Assists in making
audits by performing such tasks as: Verification of the
accuracy of the balances in various records; examination
of a variety of types of documents and vouchers for
accuracy of computations; checking transactions to
assure they are properly documented and have been
recorded in accordance with correct accounting classifi­
cations; verifying the count of inventories; preparing
detailed statements, schedules, and standard audit work­
ing papers; counting cash and other assets; preparing
simple reconciliations; and similar functions.

Direction received. Work is normally within an estab­
lished audit program and supervision is provided by a
higher level auditor who outlines and discusses assign­
ments. Work is spot-checked in progress. Completed
assignments are reviewed for adequacy of coverage,
soundness of judgment, compliance with professional
standards, and adherence to policies.

Auditor II

General characteristics. At this continuing developmental
level the professional auditor serves as a junior member
of an audit team, independently performing selected por­
tions of the audit which are limited in scope and com­
plexity. Auditors at this level typically have acquired
knowledge of company operations, policies, and proce­
dures. (Terminal positions are excluded.)

Typical duties and responsibilities. The auditor ex­
amines transactions and verifies accounts; observes and
evaluates accounting procedures and internal controls;
prepares audit working papers and submits an audit
report in the required pattern containing recommenda­
tions for needed changes or improvements. He is
usually responsible for selecting the detailed audit
methods to follow, choosing the audit sample and its
size, determining the extent to which discrepancies
need to be investigated, and deciding the depth of the
analyses required to support reported findings and
conclusions.
Examples of assignments involving work of this
level:

Direction received. Detailed instructions are furnished
and the work is reviewed to the extent necessary to
verify its general accuracy and coverage of unusual prob­
lems, to insure conformance with required procedures
and special instructions, and to assure the auditor’s pro­
fessional growth. Any technical problems not covered by
instructions are brought to the attention of a superior.
His progress is evaluated in terms of liis ability to apply
his professional knowledge to basic auditing situations.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Applies knowledge of
accounting theory’ and audit practices to a variety of rela­
tively simple professional problems in his audit assign­
ments, including such tasks as: The verification of re­
ports against source accounts and records to determine



their reliability; reconciliation of bank and other ac­
counts and verifying the detail of recorded transactions;
detailed examinations of cash receipts and disbursement
vouchers, payroll records, requisitions, work orders,
receiving reports, and other accounting documents to
ascertain that transactions are properly supported and
are recorded correctly from an accounting or regulatory
standpoint; or preparing working papers, schedules, and
summaries.

(1)
As a team leader or working alone, independ­
ently conducts audits of the complete accounts and
related operations of smaller or less complex com­
panies (e.g., involving a centralized accounting sys­
tem with few or no subordinate, subsidiary, or branch
41

accounting records) or of comparable segments of
larger companies.
(2)
As a member of an audit team independently
accomplishes varied audit assignments of the above
described characteristics, typically major segments
of complete audits, or assignments otherwise limited
in scope of larger and more complex companies
(e.g., complex in that the accounting system entails
cost, inventory, and comparable specialized systems
integrated with the general accounting system).
Illustrative of such assignments are the audit and initial
review of accounting treatment and validity of report­
ing of overhead expenses in a large manufacturing or
maintenance organization (e.g., major repair yard of a
railroad); or, the checking, verification, and balancing
of all accounts receivable and accounts payable; or, the
analysis and verification of assets and reserves; or, the
inspection and evaluation of accounting controls and
procedures.

Included in the scope of work that characterizes this
level are such functions as: Evaluation of methods used
for determining depreciation rates of equipment; evalua­
tion of assets where original costs are unknown; evalua­
tion of the reliability of accounting and reporting sys­
tems; analysis of cost accounting systems and cost re­
ports to evaluate the basis for cost and price setting;
evaluation of accounting procurement and supply man­
agement records, controls, and procedures; and many
others.
Examples of assignments involving work at this
level:
(1) As a team leader or working alone, independ­
ently plans and conducts audits of the complete
accounts and related operations of relatively large
and complex companies (e.g., complex in that the
accounting system entails cost, inventory, and com­
parable specialized accounting systems integrated
with the general accounting system) or o f company
branch, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations which
are individually of comparable size and complexity,
or
(2) As a member of an audit team independ­
ently plans and accomplishes audit assignments that
constitute major segments of audits of very large
and complex organizations, for example, those with
financial responsibilities so great as to involve special­
ized subordinate, subsidiary, or affiliate accounting
systems that are complete in themselves.

Auditor IV

General characteristics. Auditors at this level are ex­
perienced professionals who apply thorough knowledge
of accounting principles and theory in connection with
a variety of audits. Work at this level is characterized by
the audit of organizations and accounting processes
which are complex and difficult because of such factors
as: Presence of new or changed programs and accounting
systems; existence of major specialized accounting func­
tions (e.g., cost accounting, inventory accounting, sales
accounting), in addition to general accounting; need to
consider extensive and complicated regulatory require­
ments; lack of or difficulty in obtaining information;
and other similar factors. Typically, a variety of differ­
ent assignments are encountered over a period of time,
e.g., 1 year. The audit reports prepared are comprehen­
sive, explain irregularities, cite rules or regulations
violated, recommend remedial actions, and contain
analyses of items of special importance or interest to
company management.

NOTE: Excluded from level IV are auditors who, as
team leaders or working alone, conduct complete audits
of very large and complex organizations, for example,
those with financial responsibilities so great as to in­
volve specialized subordinate, subsidiary, or affiliate
accounting systems that are complete in themselves;
or are team members assigned to major segments of
audits of even larger or more complex organizations.

Direction received. Within an established audit pro­
gram, have responsibility for independently planning
and executing audits. Unusually difficult problems
are discussed with the supervisor who also reviews
completed assignments for adherence to principles and
standards and the soundness of conclusions.

C H IEF A C C O U N TA N T

As the top technical expert in accounting, is respon­
sible for directing the accounting program for a com­
pany or for an establishment of a company. The mini­
mum accounting program includes: (1) General ac­
counting (assets, liabilities, income, expense, and capital
accounts, including responsibility for profit and loss
and balance sheet statements); and (2) at least one

Typical duties and responsibilities. Auditors at this level
have full responsibility for planning the audit, including
determination of the aspects to emphasize, methods to



be used, development of nonstandard or specialized
audit aids such as questionnaires, etc., where previous
audit experience and plans are o f limited applicability.

42

other major accounting activity, typically tax account­
ing, cost accounting, property accounting, or sales ac­
counting. It may also include such other activities as
payroll and timekeeping, and mechanical or electronic
data processing operations which are an adjunct of the
accounting system. (Responsibility for an internal audit
program is typically not included.)

Authority and Responsibility

AR-1. The accounting system (i.e., accounts, proce­
dures, and reports to be used) has been prescribed in
considerable detail by higher levels in the company or
organization. The chief accountant has final, unre­
viewed authority within the prescribed system, to ex­
pand it to fit the particular needs of the organization
served, e.g., in the following or comparable ways:

The responsibilities of the chief accountant in­
clude all of the following:
(1) On own responsibility, developing or adapt­
ing or revising an accounting system to meet the
needs of the organization.

Provides greater detail in accounts and reports
or financial statements;

(2) Supervising, either directly or through sub­
ordinate supervisors, the operation of the system
with full management responsibility for the quality
and quantity of work performed, training and de­
velopment of subordinates, work scheduling and
review, coordination with other parts of the or­
ganization served, etc.

Establishes additional accounting controls, ac­
counts, subaccounts, and subsidiary records; and
Provides special or interim reports and statements
needed by the manager responsible for the day-torday
operations of the organization served.

(3) Providing directly or through an official such
as a comptroller, advisory services to the top man­
agement officials of the organization served as to:

AR-2. The basic accounting system is prescribed in
broad outlines rather than in specific detail. While
certain major financial reports, overall accounts, and
general policies are required by the basic system, the
chief accountant has broad latitude and authority to
decide the specific methods, procedures, accounts, re­
ports, etc.— to be used within the organizational seg­
ment served. He must secure prior approval from higher
levels for only those changes which would basically
affect the broad requirements prescribed by such higher
levels. Typical responsibilities include:

(a) The status of financial resources and the
financial trends or results of operations as re­
vealed by accounting data, and selecting a manner
of presentation that is meaningful to management.
(b) Methods for improving operations as sug­
gested by his expert knowledge of accounting,
e.g., proposals for improving cost control, prop­
erty management, credit and collection, tax re­
duction, or similar programs.
Excluded are positions with responsibility for the
accounting program i f they also include (as a major
part of the job) responsibility for budgeting; work
measurement; organization, methods and procedures
studies; or similar nonaccounting functions. (Positions
of such breadth are sometimes titled comptroller,
budget and accounting manager, financial manager, etc.)
Some positions responsible for supervising general
accounting and one or more other major accounting
activities but which do not fully meet all of the responsi­
bilities of a chief accountant specified above may be
covered by the descriptions for accountant.

Evaluating and taking final action on recommenda­
tions proposed by subordinate establishments for
changes in aspects of the accounting system or ac­
tivities not prescribed by higher authority;
Extending cost accounting operations to areas not
previously covered;
Changing from one cost accounting method to an­
other;
Expanding the utilization of computers within the
accounting process; and

Chief accountant jobs which meet the above charac­
teristics are classified by level 1 of work according to




(a) authority and responsibility and (b) technical com­
plexity, using the chart which follows the definitions
below.

1 Insufficient data were obtained for level V to warrant
presentation o f average salaries.

43

Authority
and
responsibility 1

Class

Technical
complexity 1

Subordinate staff of professional accountants in
the system for which he is responsible.

I

AR-1

TC-1

Only one or two professional accountants, who
do not exceed the accountant III job definition.

II

AR-1

TC-2

About 5 to 10 professional accountants, with at
least one or two matching the .accountant IV
job definition.

AR-2

TC-1

About 5 to 10 professional accountants. Most
of these match the accountant III job definition,
but one or two may match the accountant IV
job definition.

AR-3

TC-1

Only one or two professional accountants, who
do not exceed the accountant IV job definition.

AR-1

TC-3

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. At
least one or two match the accountant V job
definition.

AR-2

TC-2

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. Many
of these match the accountant IV job definition,
but some may match the accountant V job
definition.

AR-3

TC-1

About 5 to 10 professional accountants. Most of
these match the accountant III job definition, but
one or two may match as high as accountant V.

AR-2

TC-3

About 25 to 40 professional accountants. Many
of these match the accountant V job definition,
but several may exceed that level.

AR-3

TC-2

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. Most of
these match the accountant IV job definition, but
several may match the accountant V and one or
two may exceed that level.

AR-3

TC-3

About 25 to 4 0 professional accountants. Many
of these match the accountant V job definition,
but several may exceed that level.

or
t

or

III

or

or

IV

or

V

A R -1 , -2 , and -3 ; and T C -1 , -2 , and -3 are e x p la in e d on th e p reced ing pages.




4 4

Preparing accounting reports and statements reflect­
ing the events and progress o f the entire organization
for which he is responsible; often consolidating data
submitted by subordinate segments.

ing. The accounting system operates in accordance with
well-established principles and practices or those o f
equivalent difficulty which arc typical o f that industry'.

This degree o f authority is most typically found at
intermediate organizational levels such as regional o f­
fices, or division or subsidiary headquarters. It is also
found in some company level situations where the

TC-2. The organization which the accounting'program
serves has a relatively large number o f functions, prod­
ucts, work processes, etc., which require substantial
and frequent adaptations o f the basic system to meet

management needs (e.g., adoption o f new accounts,
subaccounts, and subsidiary records: revision o f in­
structions for the use o f accounts; improvement or
expansion o f methods for accumulating and reporting
cost data in connection with new or changed work

authority o f the ch ief accountant is less extensive
than is described in AR-3. More rarely it is found in
plant level ch ief accountants who have been delegated
more authority than usual for such positions as described
in AR-1.

processes).

A R -3 . Has complete responsibility for establishing and

maintaining the framework for the basic accounting

TC-3. The organization which the accounting program
serves puts a heavy demand on the accounting organiza­

system used in the company, subject only to general

tion fo r specialized and extensive adaptations o f the

policy guidance and control from a higher level com ­
pany official responsible for general financial manage­

basic system to meet management needs. Such demands

ment. Typical responsibilities include:

etc., o f the organization are very numerous, diverse,

arise because the functions, products, work processes,

Determining the basic characteristics o f the com ­

unique, or specialized, or there are other comparable

pany’s accounting system and the specific accounts
to be used;

complexities. Consequently, the accounting system, to a

Devising and preparing accounting reports and

lished principles and accounting practices in order to:

considerable degree, is developed well beyond estab­

statements required to meet management’ s needs

Provide for the solution o f problems for which

for data;

no clear precedents exist; or

Establishing basic accounting policies, interpreta­
tions, and procedures;

Provide for the development or extension o f ac­
counting theories and practices to deal with prob­
lems to which these theories and practices have not

Reviewing and taking action on proposed revi­
sions to the com pany’s accounting system suggested
by subordinate units; and

previously been applied.

Taking final action on all technical accounting
matters.

Subordinate Staff

Characteristically, participates extensively in broad
company management processes by providing account­

In the chart that follows, the number o f profes­
sional accountants supervised is recognized to be a
relatively crude criterion for distinguishing between
various classes. It is to be considered less important
in the matching process than the other criteria. In

ing advice, interpretations, or recommendations based
on data accumulated in the accounting system and on
his professional judgment and experience.

Technical Complexity
TC-1. The organization which the accounting program

addition to the staff o f professional accountants in the
system for which the chief accountant is responsible,

serves has relatively few functions, products,

there are clerical, machine operation, bookkeeping, and

work

processes, etc., and these tend to be stable and unchang­

related personnel.

Attorneys
ATTORNEY

privileges, and obligations of the company. The work

Performs consultation and advisory work and carries

performed requires completion o f law school with an

out the legal processes necessary to effect the rights,

LL.B. degree (o r the equivalent) and admission to the




45

bar. Responsibilities or functions include on e or m ore

Excluded from this definition are:

o f the follow in g or comparable duties:

Patent work which requires professional train­
ing in addition to legal training (typically a
degree in engineering or in a science);

Preparing and reviewing various legal instru­
ments and documents, such as contracts, leases,
licenses, purchases, sales, real estate, etc;

Claims examining, claims investigating or simi­
lar w ork fo r which professional legal training

Acting as agent o f the company in its trans­
actions;

and bar m embership is n o t essential;

Attorneys, frequently titled “ general counsel”
(and their immediate full associates or deputies),

Examining material (e.g., advertisements, pub­
lications, etc.) for legal implications; advising
officials o f proposed legislation which might
affect the company;

who serve as company officers or the equivalent
and are responsible for participating in the overall
management and formulation o f policy for the
company in addition to directing its legal work.

Applying for patents, copyrights, or registra­
tion o f com pany’s products, processes, devices
and trademarks; advising whether to instigate or
defend lawsuits;

Attorney jobs which meet the above definition are to

Conducting pre-trail preparations; defending
the company in lawsuits; and

be classified and coded in accordance with the chart
below.

Advising officials on tax matters, Government

D -1. Legal questions are characterized by: Facts that are

(The duties and responsibilities o f such positions
exceed level VI as described below .)

regulations, and/or corporate rights.

well-established; clearly applicable legal precedents; and
' ■ T i? r .
"
Vrtl
I-C \

.■ 'm
•b

Class

1

II

Difficulty level
of legal work 1

Responsibility
level of job 1

This is the entry level. The duties and responsibilities after initial orientation and training
are those described in D-1 and R-1.

Experience required

Completion of law school with an LL.B. or J.D.
degree plus admission to the bar.

R-1

D-1

Sufficient professional experience (at least 1 year,
usually more) at the "D -1 " level to assure competence as an attorney.

R-2
or

D-2

III

D-2
D-3

or

R-2
R-1

At least 1 year, usually more, of professional
experience at the "D -2" level.

IV

D-2
D-3

or

R’3
R-2

Extensive professional experience at the "D -2 "
or a higher level.

V

D-3

R-3

Extensive professional experience at the "D -3"
level.

VI

D-3

R-4

Extensive professional experience at the "D -3"
and "R -3 " levels.

*0 -1 , D-2, D-3, and R-1, R-2, R-3, and R-4 are explained below.




46

ing and evaluation o f expert testimony regarding con­
troversial issues in a scientific, financial, corporate
organization, engineering, or other highly technical
area; the legal matter is o f critical importance to the
organization and is being vigorously pressed or con­
tested (e.g., sums such as $ U million or more are
generally directly or indirectly involved).

matters not o f substantial importance to the organiza­
tion. (Usually relatively limited sums o f money, e.g., a
few thousand dollars, are involved.)
Exam ples o f D - l w ork:

(a) Legal investigation, negotiation, and research
preparatory to defending the Organization in poten­
tial or actual lawsuits involving alleged negligence

Exam ples o f D -3

where the facts can be firmly established and there
are precedent cases directly applicable to the situa­

(a) Advising on the legal aspects and implications
o f Federal antitrust laws to projected greatly ex­

tion.
(b ) Searching case reports, legal documents, peri­
odicals, textbooks, and other legal references, and

panded marketing operations involving joint ventures
with several other organizations.

preparing draft opinions on employee compensa­

(b ) Planning legal strategy and representing a
utility company in rate or Government franchise
cases involving a geographic area including parts or

tion or benefit questions when there is a substantial
amount o f clearly applicable statutory, regulatory,
and case material.
(c ) Drawing up contracts and other legal docu­
ments in connection with real property transactions
requiring the development o f detailed information

D -2. Legal work is regularly difficult by reason o f one

and staff o f an insurance company on the legal
problems in the sale, underwriting, and administra­

directly applicable legal precedents; the different pos­
sible interpretations that can be placed on either the

tion o f group contracts involving nationwide or

facts, the laws, or the precedents involved; the substan­

multistate coverages and laws.

tial importance o f the legal matters to the organization

(e)

(e.g., sums as large as $100,000 are generally directly

or in effectuating new major financing steps.

pressed or contested in formal proceedings or in negotia­
tions by the individuals, corporations, or Government

R -l .

agencies involved.

little deviation from standard practice is involved. Any
decisions or actions having a significant bearing on the

(a) Advising on the legal implications o f adver­
tising representations when the facts supporting the
representations and the applicable precedent cases

organization’s business are reviewed. (Is given guidance

in the initial stages o f his assignment. Assignments are
than carried out with moderate independence although
guidance is generally available and is sought from timeto-time on problem points.)

are subject to different interpretations.
(b ) Reviewing and advising on the implications o f
laws

affecting

the organization.

(c) Presenting the organization’ s defense in court

R -2. Usually works independently in investigating the

in a negligence lawsuit which is strongly pressed by

facts, searching legal precedents, defining the legal and

counsel for an organized group.
Providing legal

counsel

factual issues, drafting the necessary legal documents

on tax questions

and developing conclusions and recommendations. Deci­

complicated by the absence o f precedent decisions
that are directly

sions having an important bearing on the organization’ s

applicable to the organization’ s

business are reviewed. (Receives information from su­

situation.
D -3.

Responsibility for final action is usually limited

to matters covered by legal precedents and in which

Exam ples o f D -2 w ork :

(d )

Performing the principal legal work in a

nonroutine major revision o f the com pany’ s charter

or indirectly involved); the matter is being strongly

revised

(c ) Preparing and presenting a case before an
appellate court where the case is highly important to

(d ) Serving as the principal counsel to the officers

or more o f the following: The absence o f clear and

or

all o f several States.

the future operation o f the organization and is
vigorously contested by very distinguished (e.g.,
having a broad regional or national reputation) legal
talent.

but n o t involving serious questions regarding titles
to property or other major factual or legal issues.

new

w ork:

pervisor regarding unusual circumstances or important
policy considerations pertaining to a legal problem.

Legal work is typically com plex and difficult

because o f one or more o f the following: The questions

If trials are involved, may receive guidance from a

are unique and require a high order o f original and

supervisor regarding presentation, line o f approach,
possible line o f opposition to be encountered, etc. In

creative legal endeavor for their solution; the questions
require extensive research and analysis and the obtain­




4 7

the case o f nonroutine written presentations the final

product is reviewed carefully, but primarily for overall

trials, and personally confers and negotiates with top
attorneys and top-ranking officials in private companies
or in Government agencies. On various aspects o f his
assigned work may give advice directly and personally

soundness o f legal reasoning and consistency with
organization policy. Some, but not all attorneys, make
assignments to one or more lower level attorneys, aids,

R-S. Carries out assignments independently and makes

to corporation officers and top level managers, or
may work through the general counsel o f the company
in advising officers. (Generally receives no preliminary

or clerks.)

final legal determinations in matters o f substantial

instruction on legal problems. On matters requiring the

importance to his organization. Such determinations

concentrated

are subject to review only for consistency with company

specialists, is responsible for directing, coordinating

policy, possible precedent effect, and overall effective­

and reviewing the work o f the attorneys involved.)

efforts

of

several

attorneys

or other

ness. T o carry out his assignments he deals regularly
with

company

officers

and

top

level management

OR

officials and confers or negotiates regularly with senior
or in

As a primary responsibility, directs the work o f a

Government agencies on various aspects o f his assigned

attorneys,

and

officials

in other

companies

staff o f attorneys, one, but usually more, o f whom

work. (Receives little or no preliminary instruction on

regularly perform

legal problems and a minimum o f technical legal super­

D-3 legal work. With respect to

the work directed, gives advice directly to corporation

vision. May assign and review work o f a few attorneys,

officers and top managerial officers, or may give such

but this is not a primary responsibility.)

advice through the general counsel. (Receives guidance
R -4. Carries out assignments which entail independently

as to organization policy but no technical supervision

planning investigations and negotiations on legal prob­

or assistance except when he might request advice from,

lems

highest importance to his organization

or be briefed on, the overall approach to the most diffi­

and developing completed briefs, opinions, contracts,
or other legal products. To carry out his assignments he

cult, novel or important legal questions, by the general

represents his organization at conferences, hearings, or

deputy.)

o f the

counsel. Usually reports to the general counsel or his

Buyers
In addition to the work described above, some (but
not all) buyers direct the work o f one or a few clerks who
perform routine aspects o f the work. As a secondary and

BU YER

Purchases materials, supplies, equipment, and services
(c.g.. utilities, maintenance, and repair). In some in­

subsidiary duty, some buyers may also sell or dispose o f

stances items are o f types that must be specially de­
signed, produced, or modified by the vendor in accord­
ance with drawings or engineering specifications.

surplus, salvage, or used materials, equipment, or supplies.
N O T E : Some buyers are responsible for the purchas­

Solicits bids, analyzes quotations received, and se­

ing ot a variety o f items and materials. When the variety

lects or recommends supplier. May interview prospective

includes items and work described at more than one o f

vendors. Purchases items and services at the most favor­

the loilowing levels, the position should be considered to

able price consistent with quality, quantity, specification

equal

requirements, and other factors. Prepares or supervises

the highest level that characterizes at least a

substantial portion o f the buyer’ s time.

preparation o f purchase orders from requistions. May
expedite delivery and visi! vendors' offices and plants.

E xcluded are:

Normally, purchases are un reviewed when they are
consistent with past experience, and are in conformance

(a) Buyers o f items for direct sale, either whole­
sale or retail;

with established rules and policies. Proposed purchase
transactions that deviate from the usual or from past ex­

(b ) Brokers and dealers buying for clients or for
investment purposes;

perience in terms o f prices, quality o f items, quantities,

(c ) Positions that specifically require professional

etc., or that may set precedents for future purchases, are

education and qualifications in a physical science or

reviewed by

in engineering (e.g., chemist, mechanical engineer);

higher authority prior to final action.




48

(d ) Buyers who specialize in purchasing a single
or a few related items o f highly variable quality
such as raw cotton or w ool, tobacco, cattle, or
leather for shoe uppers, etc. Expert personal knowl­
edge o f the item is required to judge the relative

test instruments; standard electronic parts and com p o­
nents; electric motors; gasoline service station equip­
ment; PBX or other specialized telephone services;
and routine purchases o f com m on raw materials such

value o f the goods offered, and to decide the quan­

as standard grades and sizes o f steel bars, rods, and
angles.

tity, quality, and price o f each purchase in terms o f
its probable effect on the organization’s profit and

Also included at this level are buyers o f materials o f the

competitive status;

types described for buyer I when the quantities pur­

(e) Buyers whose principal responsibility is the
supervision o f other buyers or the management,

chased are large so that local sources o f supply are

direction, or supervision o f a purchasing program;

generally inadequate and the buyer must deal directly
with manufacturers on a broader than local scale.

(f) Persons predominantly concerned with con ­
tract or subcontract administration;
(g) Persons whose major duties consist o f order­

Buyer III

ing, reordering, or requisitioning items under existing

Purchases items, materials, or services o f a technical

contracts; and
(h ) Positions restricted to the clerical functions

and specialized nature. The items, while o f a comm on

or to purchase expediting work.
■ii'JUi

■ :

Buyer

I

Purchases “ off-th e-sh elf’ types o f readily available,
com m only used materials, supplies, tools, furniture,
services, etc.
Transactions usually involve local retailers, whole­
salers, jobbers, and manufacturers’ sales representatives.
Quantities purchased are generally small amounts,
e.g., those available from local sources.

factors (quality, delivery dates

and places, etc.) that

are difficult to evaluate.
The quantities purchased o f any item or service may
be large.
Many o f the purchases involve one or more o f such
complications as: Specifications that detail, in technical
terms, the required physical, chemical, electrical, or
acceptance;

supplies; standard types o f

grouping o f items for lot bidding and

awards; specialized processing, packing, or packaging
requirements; export packs; overseas port differentials;
etc.

office furniture and fixtures; standard nuts, bolts,
screws; janitorial and com m on building maintenance
supplies; and com m on building maintenance or com ­
m on utility services.
Buyer

to meet the user’s specific needs and specifications.
Transactions usually require dealing with manufac­
turers. The number o f potential vendors is likely to be
small and price differentials often reflect important

other comparable properties; special testing prior to

Exam ples o f items purchased include: Common

stationery and office

general type, are usually made, altered, or customized

Is expected to keep abreast o f market and product
developments. May be required to locate new sources o f
supply.
Some positions may involve assisting in the training
or supervising o f lower level buyers or clerks.

1
1

Purchases “ off-th e-sh elf’ types o f standard, generally
available technical items, materials, and services.
Transactions usually involve dealing directly with
manufacturers, distributors, jobbers, etc.
Quantities o f items and materials purchased may be
relatively large, particularly in the case o f contracts for

Exam ples o f items purchased include: Castings; spe­
cial extruded shapes o f normal size and material;
special formula paints; electric motors o f special shape
or speed; special packaging o f items; and raw materials

continuing supply over a period o f time.

in substantial quntities.

May be responsible for locating or promoting possi­
ble new sources o f supply. Usually is expected to keep

Buyer IV

abreast o f market trends, changes in business practices
in

the

assigned

markets,

new or altered types o f

Purchases highly com plex and technical items, ma­

materials entering the market, etc.

terials,

or services, usually those specially

designed

and manufactured exclusively for the purchaser.
Industrial

Transactions require dealing with manufacturers and

types o f handtools; electronic tube and component

often involved persuading potential vendors to under­

Examples

of

items purchased include:




49

take the manufacturing o f custom designed items
according to com plex and rigid specifications.
large in order to satisfy the requirements for an entire

facilities; raw materials o f critically important charac­
teristics or quality; parts, subassemblies, com ponents,
etc., specially designed and made to order (e.g.,
communications equipment for installation in aircraft

large organization

being manufactured; com ponent assemblies for mis­

Quantities o f items and materials purchased are often

Complex

schedules

for an extended period o f time.
of

delivery

are often

siles and rockets; and m otor vehicle frames).

involved.

Buyer determines appropriate quantities to be con­
tracted for at any given period o f time.
N O T E : Excluded are buying positions above level IV.
Some buyers above level IV make purchases in such

Transactions are often complicated by the presence
o f one or more such matters as inclusion o f: Require­
ments for spare parts, preproduction samples and test­

unusually large quantities that they

can affect the

literature; or patent and royalty

market price o f a com m odity or produce other signifi­

provisions.
Keeps abreast o f market and product developments.

cant effects on the industry or trade concerned. Others
may purchase items o f either (1 ) extraordinary techni­

Develops new sources o f supply.
In addition to the work described above, a few posi­

cal com plexity, e.g., involving the outermost limits o f

ing,

or

technical

tions may also require supervision over a few lower level

science or engineering, or (2 ) unusually high individual
or unit value. Such buyers often persuade suppliers to

buyers or clerks. (N o position is included in this level

expand their plants or convert facilities to the produc­

solely because supervisory duties are perform ed.)

tion o f new items or services. These types o f buying
functions are often performed by program managers or

o f items purchased include: Special
purpose high cost machine tools and production

company officials, who have primary responsibilities
other than buying.

Exam ples

Personnel M a n a g e m e n t
JOB ANALYST

niques o f jo b analysis. Studies the least difficult jobs
and prepares reports for review by a jo b analyst o f

Performs work involved in collecting, analyzing, and

higher level.

developing occupational data relative to jobs, jo b qual­
ifications, and worker characteristics as a basis for com ­
pensating employees in a fair, equitable, and uniform
manner. Performs such duties as studying and analyzing
jobs and preparing descriptions o f duties and responsi­
bilities and o f the physical and mental requirements
needed by workers; evaluating jobs and determining
appropriate wage or salary levels in accordance with
their difficulty and responsibility; independently con­
ducting or participating with representatives o f other

Job Analyst II
Studies, describes, and evaluates jobs in accordance
with established procedures. Is usually assigned to the
simpler kinds o f both wage and salaried jobs in the
establishment. Works independently on such assign­
ments but is limited by instructions o f his superior and
by defined area o f assignment.

Job Analyst III

companies in conducting compensation survey* within
a locality or labor market area; assisting in administering

Analyzes and evaluates a variety o f wage and salaried

merit rating program; reviewing changes in wages and

jobs in accordance with established evaluation systems

salaries indicated by surveys and recommending changes

and procedures. May conduct wage surveys within the

in pay scales; and auditing individual jobs to check the

locality or participate in conducting surveys o f broad

propriety o f evaluations and to apply current jo b classi­
fications.

compensation areas. May assist in developing survey
methods and plans. Receives general supervision but
responsibility for final action is limited.

Job Analyst I
Job Analyst IV

As a trainee, performs work in designated areas and
of

Receives immediate

Analyzes and evaluates a variety o f job s in accord­

supervision in assignments designed to provide training

limited

occupational

ance with established evaluation systems and proce­

in the application o f established methods and tech­

dures, and is given assignment which regularly includes




scope.

50

responsibility

for the more difficult kinds o f jobs.

(2 ) E m p lo ym en t and placem ent fu n ction s; i.e.,
recruiting actively for at least some kinds o f workers
through a variety o f sources (e.g., schools or colleges,
employment agencies, professional societies, etc.);
evaluating applicants against demands o f particular
jobs by use o f such techniques as jo b analysis to
determine requirements, interviews, written tests o f
aptitude, knowledge, skill, reference checks, experi­

( “ More difficult” means jobs which consist o f hard-tounderstand work processes; e.g., professional, scientific,
administrative, or technical; or jobs in new or emerging
occupational fields; or jcb s which are being established
as part o f the creation o f new organizations; o r where
other special considerations o f these types apply.)
Receives general supervision, but responsibility for final
action is limited. May partic:pate in the development
and installation o f evaluation or compensation systems,
which may include those for merit rating programs. May
plan survey methods and conduct or direct wage surveys

ence evaluations, etc.; recommending selections and
jo b placements to management, etc.
(3 ) E m p lo yee relations and services fu n ction ; i.e.,

within a broad compensation area.

functions designed to maintain employees’ morale
and productivity at a high level (fo r example, admin­
istering a formal or informal grievance procedure;
identifying and recommending solutions for person­
nel problems such as absenteeism, high turnover, low

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL
Directs

a personnel

management

program for a

productivity, etc.; administration o f beneficial sug­
gestions system, retirement, pension, or insurance

company or a segment o f a company. Serves top man­
agement officials o f the organization as the source o f
advice and assistance on personnel management matters

plans, merit rating system, etc.; overseeing cafeteria
operations, recreational programs, industrial health

and problems generally; is typically consulted on the
personnel implications o f planned changes in manage­

and safety programs, etc.)
In addition, positions covered by this definition may,
but do not necessarily, include responsibilities in the fol­

ment policy or program, the effects on the organization
o f econom ic or market trends, product or production
method changes, etc.; represents management in con­

lowing areas:

tacts with other companies, trade associations, govern­

a. E m p lo y e e training and d evelop m en t;

ment agencies, etc., dealing primarily with personnel

b. Labor relations activities

management matters.

mainly to

which are confined

the administration, interpretation, and

Typically the director o f personnel for a company

application o f those aspects o f labor union contracts

reports to a company officer in charge o f industrial

that are essentially o f the type described under (3 )

relations and personnel management activities or an

above. May also participate in bargaining o f a sub­

officer o f similar level. Below the company level the

ordinate nature, e.g., to negotiate detailed settlement

director o f personnel typically reports to a company

o f such matters as specific rates, jo b classifications,

officer or a high management official who has respon­

work rules, hiring or la y o ff procedures, etc., within
the broad terms o f a general agreement reached at
higher levels, or to supply advice and information on

sibility for the operation o f a plant, establishment, or
other segment o f the company.
For a job to be covered by this definition, the
personnel management program m ust include respon­
sibility for all three o f the following functions:
(1 )

Administering a jo b evaluation system ;

technical points to the com pany’ s principal represen­
tative.
Excluded are positions in which responsibility for ac­
tual contract negotiation with labor unions as the prin­

i.e.,

a system in which there are established procedures
by which jobs are analyzed and evaluated on the

cipal company representative is a significant aspect o f

basis o f their duties, responsibilities, and qualifica­

the jo b , i.e., a responsibility which serves as a primary

tion requirements in order to provide a foundation

basis for qualification requirements and compensation.

for equitable compensation. Typically, such a system
Directors o f personnel jobs which meet the above def­

includes the use o f one or more sets o f jo b evaluation
factors and the preparation o f formal job descriptions.

inition are classified by level2 o f work in accordance with

It m ay also include such related functions as wage

the following tabulation:

and salary surveys or merit rating system administra­
tion. The jo b evaluation system(s) does not neces­
sarily cover all jobs in the organization, but does

2 Insufficient data were obtained for level V to warrant
presentation of average salaries.

cover a substantial portion o f the organization.




51

3
“ Type B " - organization serviced— a substantial number
of jobs present difficult recruitment, job evaluation, or training
problems because the jobs: Consist of hard-to-understand work
processes (e.g., professional, scientific, administrative, or tech­
nical); have hard-to-match skill requirements; are in new or

"Operations level"
personnel program
"T y p e A "
Number of employees in
work force serviced
250-750 ................................
1.000- 5,000 ................................
6.000- 12,000 .............................
15.000- 25,000

organization
serviced 2
I
II
Ill

"Type B"
organization
serviced 3

emerging occupations;or are extremely hard to fill. These condi­
tions are most likely to be found in organizations in which the
work force, organizational structure, work processes or func­
tions, etc., are complicated or unstable.
4
“Development level personnel program — either:
(a) Director of personnel servicing an entire company
(with or without subordinate establishments) where the per­
sonnel director plays an important role in establishment of
basic personnel policies, plans, objectives, etc., for the company,
subject to policy direction and control from company o ffi­
cers, or (b) director of personnel servicing an intermediate
organization below the company level, e.g., a division or a
subsidiary, to which a relatively complete delegation of per­
sonnel program planning and development responsibility is
made. In this situation only basic policy direction is given by
the parent company and local officers. The director of per­
sonnel has essentially the same degree of latitude and respon­
sibility for establishment of basic personnel policies, plans,
objectives, etc., as described above in (a).

II
III
IV

IV__________ V

..........................

"Development level"
4
personnel program
250-750 .............................
1,000-5,000 ......................
6,000-12,000
15,000-25,000

II
III
IV
V

III
IV
V
-

1 “Operations level" personnel program— director of per­
sonnel servicing an organizational segment (e.g., a plant) of a
company, where the basic personnel program policies, plans,
objectives, etc., are established at company headquarters or at
some other higher level between the plant and the company
headquarters level. The personnel director's responsibility is to
put these into operation at the local level, in such a manner as
to most effectively serve the local management needs.
2
" Type A " - organization serviced— most jobs serviced do
not present particularly difficult or unusual recruitment, job
evaluation, or training problems because the jobs consist of
relatively easy-to-understand work processes, and an adequate
labor supply is available. These conditions are most likely to
be found in organizations in which the work force and organi­
zational structure are relatively stable.

NOTE: There are gaps between different degrees of all three
elements used to determine job level matches. These gaps have
been provided purposely to allow room for judgment in getting
the best overall job level match for each job. Thus, a job which
services a work force of 850 employees should be matched with
level II if it is a personnel program operations level job where the
nature of the organization serviced seems to fall slightly below
the definition for the type B degree. However, the same job
should be matched with level I if the nature of the organization
serviced clearly falls well within the definition for the type A de­
gree.

C h e m ists and En g in ee rs
CHEMIST

chemistry as it relates to the com pany’s programs. May
also receive formal classroom or seminar type training.
(Terminal positions are excluded.)

Performs professional work in research, development,
interpretation, and analysis to determine the com posi­
tion, molecular structure, and properties o f substances;

Direction received. Works under close supervision. Re­

to develop or investigate new materials and processes;

ceives specific and detailed instructions as to required

and to investigate the transformation which substances

tasks and results expected. Work is checked during

undergo. Work typically requires a B.S. degree in chem­

progress, and is reviewed for accuracy upon completion.

istry or equivalent in appropriate and substantial college

Typical duties and responsibilities.

level study o f chemistry plus experience.

Performs a variety

o f routine tasks that are planned to provide experience
and familiarization with the chemistry staff, methods,

Chemist I

practices and programs o f the company. The work
includes a variety o f routine qualitative and quantitative

General characteristics. This is the entry level o f pro­

analyses; physical tests to determine properties such as

fessional work requiring a bachelor’ s degree in chemistry

viscosity, tensile strength, and melting point; and assist­

and no experience, or the equivalent (to a degree) in

ing more experienced chemists to gain additional knowl­

appropriate education and experience. Performs assign­

edge through personal observation and discussion.

ments designed to develop professional capabilities and

R esponsibility f o r the direction o f others. Usually none.

to provide experience in the application o f training in




52

sary, develops or works out alternate or modified
methods with supervisor's concurrence. Assists in re­
search by analyzing samples or testing new procedures
that require specialized training because (a) standard
methods are inapplicable, (b ) analytical findings must
be interpreted in terms o f compliance or noncompliance
with standards, or (c ) specialized and advanced equip­

Chemist li
General characteristics. At this continuing developmen­

tal level, performs routine chemical work requiring
selection and application o f general and specialized
methods, techniques, and instruments com m only used
in the laboratory and the ability to carry out instruc­
tions when less com m on or proposed methods or proce­

ment and techniques must be adapted.

dures are necessary. Requires work experience acquired
in an entry level position, or appropriate graduate level

R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. May super­

study. For training and developmental purposes, assign­

vise or coordinate the work o f a few technicians or aids,

ments may include some work that is typical o f a higher

and be assisted by lower level chemists.

level. (Terminal positions are excluded.)
Chemist IV

Supervisor establishes the nature
and extent o f analysis required, specifies methods and

General characteristics. As a fully competent chemist

criteria on new types o f assignments, and reviews work

in all coventional aspects o f the subject-matter or the

Direction

received.

for thoroughness o f application o f methods and accu­

functional area o f the assignments, plans and conducts

racy o f results.

work requiring (a) mastery o f specialized techniques
or ingenuity in selecting and evaluating approaches to

Typical duties and responsibilities. Carries out a wide

unforeseen or novel problems, and (b ) ability to apply

variety o f standardized methods, tests, and procedures.

a research approach to the solution o f a wide variety o f

In accordance with specific instructions may carry out

problems and to assimilate the details and significance

proposed and less com m on ones. Is expected to detect
problems in using standardized procedures because o f

o f chemical and physical analyses, procedures, and tests.
Requires sufficient professional experience to assure

the condition o f the sample, difficulties with the equip­

competence as a fully trained worker; or, for positions

ment, etc. Recommends modifications o f procedures,

primarily o f a research nature, com pletion o f all require­
ments for a doctoral degree may be substituted for

e.g., extending or curtailing the analysis or using alter­
nate procedures, based on his knowledge o f the problem

experience.

and pertinent available literature. Conducts specified

Direction received. Independently performs most assign­

phases o f research projects as an assistant to an experi­

R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. May be as­

ments with instructions as to the general results ex­
pected. Receives technical guidance on unusual or
com plex problems and supervisory approval on pro­

sisted by a few aids or technicians.

posed plans for projects.

enced chemist.

v-:• ‘ H ‘ /4 ;r * •?
*

Chemist ill

ical tests and procedures utilized in the laboratory, using
judgment in the independent evaluation, selection, and
adaptation o f standard methods and techniques. May
carry through a complete series o f tests on a product in
its different process stages. Some assignments require a
specialized knowledge o f one or two comm on categories
o f related substances. Performance at this level requires

Conducts labora­

specialized area.
Responsibility fo r the direction o f others. May super­

vise a small staff o f chemists and technicians.

developmental experience in a professional position, or

Chemist V

Direction received. On routine work, supervision is very

General characteristics. Participates in planning lab­
oratory programs on the basis o f specialized knowledge

general. Assistance is furnished on unusual problems and
work is reviewed for application o f sound professional

o f problems and methods and probable value o f results.
May serve as an expert in a narrow specialty (e.g., class

judgment.
Typical duties and responsibilities. In accordance with

the

responsibilities.

pares reports, and may provide technical advice in his

equivalent graduate level education.

as to

and

tory assignments requiring the determination and evalua­
tion o f alternative procedures and the sequence o f
performing them. Performs com plex, exacting, unu­
sual analytical assignments requiring specialized knowl­
edge o f techniques or products. Interprets results, pre­

General characteristics. Performs a broad range o f chem­

instructions

i;

Typical duties

o f chemical compounds, or a class o f products), making

nature o f the problem, se­

recommendations and conclusions which serve as the

lects standard methods, tests or procedures; when neces­

basis for undertaking or rejecting important projects.




53

Development o f the knowledge and expertise required
for this level o f work usually reflects progressive experi­
ence through chemist IV

develops, coordinates, and directs a number o f larger
and important projects or a project o f major scope and
importance, or (b ) is responsible for the entire chemical
program o f a com pany, when the program is o f limited

received. Supervision and guidance relates
largely to overall objectives, critical issues, new con ­
cepts, and policy matters. Consults with supervisor con­

supervisors or team leaders with at least one in a posi­

cerning unusual problems and developments.

tion comparable to level V. (2 ) As individual researcher

D irection

Typical duties

the following:

and responsibilities.

One or both o f

com plexity and scope. Activities under his leadership are
o f a scope that they require a few (3 to 5) subordinate

or worker determines, conceives, plans, and conducts
projects o f major importance to the company. Applies a

(1 ) In a supervisory capacity plans, orga­

high degree o f originality and ingenuity in adapting,

nizes, and directs assigned laboratory programs. Inde­

extending, and synthesizing existing theory, principles,
and techniques into original combinations and configu­
rations. May serve as a consultant to other chemists in
his specialty.

pendently defines scope and critical elements o f the
projects and selects approaches to be taken. A substan­
tial portion o f the work supervised is comparable to that
described for chemist IV. (2 ) As individual researcher or
worker, carries out projects requiring development o f
new or highly m odified scientific techniques and proce­

R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. Plans, orga­

dures, extensive knowledge o f his specialty, and knowl­
edge o f related scientific fields.

and technicians. Evaluates progress o f the staff and

nizes, and supervises the work o f a staff o f chemists
results obtained, and recommends major changes to
achieve overall objectives. Or, as individual worker or

Responsibility fo r the direction o f others. Supervises,

coordinates, and reviews the work o f a small staff o f

researcher may be assisted on individual projects by
other chemists or technicians.

chemists and technicians engaged in varied research and
development projects, or a larger group performing
routine analytical work. Estimates manpower needs and

Chemist VII
General characteristics. Makes decisions and recommen­

schedules and assigns work to meet com pletion date. Or,

dations that are recognized as authoritative and have

as individual researcher or worker, may be assisted on

an important impact on extensive chemical activities.

projects by other chemists or technicians.

Initiates and maintains extensive contacts with key
chemists and officials o f other organizations and com ­

Chemist VI

panies, requiring skill in persuasion and negotiation o f
critical issues. At this level individuals will have demon­
strated creativity, foresight, and mature judgment in

General characteristics. Performs work requiring leader­

ship and expert knowledge in a specialized field, prod­

anticipating and solving unprecedented chemical prob­

uct, or process.
Formulates and conducts a systema­
tic attack on a problem area o f considerable scope and
com plexity which must be approached through a series
o f complete and conceptually related studies, or a num­
ber o f projects o f lesser scope. The problems are com ­

lems, determining program objectives and requirements,
organizing programs and projects, and developing stand­
ards and guides for diverse chemical activities.

plex because they are difficult to define and require

Direction received.

unconventional or novel approaches or have other diffi­

Receives general administrative di­

rection.

cult features. Maintains liaison with individuals and units
within and outside his organization with responsibility
Typical duties

and

the following:

(1 ) In a supervisory capacity is respon­

progressive experience including work comparable to

sible

chemist V.

program o f a company with extensive and diversified

for

responsibilities.

One or both o f

for acting independently on technical matters pertaining
to his field. Work at this level usually requires extensive

(a) an important segment o f a chemical

scientific requirements, or (b ) the entire chemical pro­
Direction

received.

Supervision received is essentially

administrative, with assignments given in terms o f broad

gram o f a company where the program is more limited
in scope. The overall chemical program contains critical

general objectives and limits.

problems the solution o f which requires major techno­
logical advances and opens the way for extensive related

Typical duties and responsibilities. One or both o f the

development. Makes authoritative technical recommen­

following:

dations concerning the scientific objectives and levels o f

(1 ) In a supervisory capacity (a) plans,




54

work which will be most profitable in the light o f com ­
pany requirements and scientific and industrial trends
and developments. Recommends facilities, personnel,
and funds required.
(2 ) As individual researcher and consultant selects
problems for research to further the com pany’ s objec­

programs needed to accomplish the objectives o f the
company, for choosing the scientific approaches, for
planning and organizing facilities and programs, and
for interpreting results. (2 ) As individual researcher and
consultant formulates and guides the attack on problems

tives. Conceives and plans investigations in which the

o f exceptional difficulty and marked importance to the
company and/or industry. Problems are characterized by
planning and organizing facilities and programs, and tor

phenomena and principles are not adequately under­

the lack o f scientific precedents and source materials,

stood, and where few or contradictory scientific prece­

or the lack o f success o f prior research and analysis so

dents or results are available for reference. Outstanding
creativity and mature judgment are required to devise

that their solution would represent an advance o f great

hypotheses and techniques o f experimentation and to
interpret results. As a leader and authority in his com ­

significance and importance. Performs advisory and con­
sulting work for the company as a recognized authority
for broad program areas o f considerable novelty and

pany, in a broad area o f specialization, or in a narrow
but intensely specialized one, advises the head o f a large

importance. Has made contributions such as new prod­
ucts or techniques, development o f processes, etc.,

laboratory or company officials on com plex aspects
o f extremely broad and important programs. Has re­

which are regarded as major advances in the field.

sponsibility for exploring, evaluating, and justifying
proposed and current programs and projects and fur­
nishing advice on unusually com plex and novel problems
in the specialty field. Typically will have contributed in­
novations (e.g., techniques, products, procedures) which
are regarded as significant advances in the field.

Responsibility fo r

the direction o f others.

Supervises

several subordinate supervisors or team leaders some o f
whose positions are comparable to chemist VII or in­
dividual researchers some o f whose positions are com ­
parable to chemist VII and sometimes chemist VIII. As
an individual researcher and consultant may be assisted

R esponsibility fo r the direction o f others. Directs several

on individual projects by other chemists or technicians.

subordinate supervisors or team leaders, some o f whom

N O T E : Individuals in charge o f a com pany’ s chemical

are in positions comparable to chemist VI; or, as individ­

program may match any o f several o f the survey jo b

ual researcher and consultant, may be assisted on individ­

levels, depending on the size and com plexity o f chemical

ual projects by other chemists and technicians.

programs. Excluded from level VIII are chemists in
charge o f programs so extensive and com plex (e.g.,

Chemist VIII

impact on extensive chemical and related activities o f

consisting o f highly diversified or unusually novel prod­
ucts and procedures) that one or more subordinate
supervisory chemists are performing at level VIII. Also
excluded from level VIII are individual researchers and

the company. Negotiates critical and controversial issues
with top level chemists and officers o f other organiza­
tions and companies. Individuals at this level have dem­

national authorities and scientific leaders in very broad
areas o f scientific interest and investigation.

General characteristics. Makes decisions and recommen­

dations that are authoritative and have a far-reaching

consultants who are recognized as national and/or inter­

onstrated a high degree o f creativity, foresight, and
mature judgment in planning, organizing, and guiding
extensive chemical programs and activities o f outstand­
ing novelty and importance.

ENGINEER

Direction received. Receives general administrative direc­

Performs professional work in research, development,
design, testing, analysis, production, construction, main­

tion.

tenance, operation, planning, survey, estimating, applica­

Typical duties and responsibilities. One or both o f the

tion, or standardization o f engineering facilities, sys­

(1) In a supervisory capacity is responsi­

tems, structures, processes, equipment devices, or mate­

ble for (a) the entire chemical program o f a company

rials requiring knowledge o f the science and art by

which is o f moderate scope, or (b ) an important segment

which materials, natural resources, and power are made

following:

o f a chemical program o f a company with very extensive

useful. Work typically requires a B.S. degree in engineer­

and highly diversified scientific requirements, where pro­

ing

grams are o f such com plexity and scope that they are o f

experience. (Excluded are: Safety engineers, industrial

critical importance to overall operations and include

engineers, quality control engineers, sales engineers, and
engineers whose primary responsibility is to be in charge

problems o f extraordinary difficulty that have resisted
solution. Decides the kind and extent o f chemical



or

the

equivalent

in

combined education and

o f nonprofessional maintenance work.)

and criteria, using judgment in making minor adaptations
and modifications. Assignments have clear and specified
objectives and require the investigation o f a limited
number o f variables. Performance at this level requires
developmental experience in a professional position, or
equivalent graduate level education.

Engineer I
General characteristics. This is the entry level o f profes­

sional work requiring a bachelor’s degree in engineer­
ing and no experience, or the equivalent (to a degree) in
appropriate education and experience. Performs assign­
ments designed to develop professional work knowl­

Direction

seminar type training. (Terminal positions are excluded.)

assignment objectives, com plex features, and possible
solutions. Assistance is furnished on unusual problems
and work is reviewed for application o f sound profes­

Direction received. Works under close supervision. Re­

ceives specific and detailed instructions as to required

received.

Receives instructions on specific

edges and abilities. May also receive formal classroom or

sional judgment.

tasks and results expected. Work is checked during pro­
Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs work which

gress, and is reviewed for accuracy upon completion.

involves
Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety o f

conventional types o f plans, investigations,

surveys, structures, or equipment with relatively few

routine tasks that are planned to provide experience and

com plex features for which there are precedents. Assign­

familiarization with the engineering staff, methods, prac­

ments usually include one or more o f the following:

tices, and programs o f the company.

Equipment design and development, test o f materials,
preparation o f specifications, process study, research

R esponsibility f o r the direction o f others. Usually none.

investigations, report preparation, and other activities
o f limited scope requiring knowledge o f principles and

Engineer 1
3

techniques com m only em ployed in the specific narrow
General characteristics. At this continuing developmen­

area o f assignments.

tal level, performs routine engineering work requiring
application o f standard techniques, procedures, and
criteria in carrying out a sequence o f related engineering

Responsibility fo r the direction o f others. May supervise

tasks. Limited exercise o f judgment is required on de­

others who assist in specific assignments.

or coordinate the work o f draftsmen, technicians, and

tails o f work and in making preliminary selections and
adaptations o f engineering alternatives. Requires work
experience acquired in an entry level position, or appro­

Engineer IV
General characteristics. As a fully com petent engineer

priate graduate level study. For training and develop­

in all conventional aspects o f the subject-matter or the

mental purposes, assignments may include some work

functional area o f the assignments, plans and conducts
work requiring judgment in the independent evaluation,
selection, and substantial adaptation and m odification
o f standard techniques, procedures, and criteria. Devises
new approaches to problems encountered. Requires
sufficient professional experience to assure competence
as a fully trained worker; or, for positions primarily o f
a research nature, com pletion o f all requirements for
a doctoral degree may be substituted for experience.

that is typical o f a higher level. (Terminal positions are
excluded.)
Supervisor screens assignments for
unusual or difficult problems and selects techniques
and procedures to be applied on nonroutine work.

Direction received.

Receives close supervision on new aspects o f assign­
ments.
Typical duties

and

responsibilities.

Using prescribed
Direction

broader assignment o f an experienced engineer. Applies
standard practices and techniques in specific situations,

signments with instructions as to the general results
expected. Receives technical guidance on unusual or

adjusts and correlates data, recognizes discrepancies in
results, and follows operations through a series o f re­

plans for projects.

lated detailed steps or processes.

Typical duties and responsibilities. Plans, schedules, con ­

Responsibility f o r the direction o f others.

received.

Independently performs most as­

methods, performs specific and limited portions o f a

com plex problems and supervisory approval on proposed
V. i ' J h f

- . *>
i

1 ")(■:

ducts, or coordinates detailed phases o f the engineering
work in a part o f a major project or in a total project o f

May be as­

sisted by a few aids or technicians.

moderate scope. Performs work which involves conven­
tional engineering practice but may include a variety o f

Engineer IN

com plex features such as conflicting design requirements,

General characteristics. Independently evaluates, selects,

unsuitability o f standard materials, and difficult coord i­

and applies standard engineering techniques, procedures,

nation requirements. Work requires a broad knowledge




56

Engineer VI

o f precedents in the specialty area and a good knowledge
o f principles and practices o f related specialties.

General characteristics. Has full technical responsibility

Responsibility fo r the direction o f others. May super­

for interpreting, organizing, executing, and coordinating

vise a few engineers or technicians on assigned work.

assignments. Plans and develops engineering projects
concerned with unique or controversial problems which
have an important effect on major company programs.
This involves exploration o f subject area, definition o f

Engineer V

scope and selection o f problems for investigation, and
General characteristics. Applies intensive and diversified

development o f novel concepts and approaches. Main­
tains liaison with individuals and units within or outside
his organization with responsibility for acting independ­
ently on technical matters pertaining to his field. Work
at this level usually requires extensive progressive ex­
perience including work comparable to engineer V.

knowledge o f engineering principles and practices in
broad areas o f assignments and related fields. Makes
decisions independently on engineering problems and
methods, and represents the organization in conferences
to resolve important questions and to plan and coordi­
nate work. Requires the use o f advanced techniques and

Supervision received is essentially
administrative, with assignments given in terms o f broad

Direction received.

the modification and extension o f theories, precepts and
practices o f his field and related sciences and disciplines.

general objectives and limits.

The knowledge and expertise required for this level o f
work usually results from progressive experience, in­

Typical duties and responsibilities „ One or more o f the

cluding work comparable to engineer IV.

following:

Direction

received.

develops, coordinates, and directs a number o f large and
important projects or a project o f major scope and

Supervision and guidance relates

largely to overall objectives, critical issues, new concepts,

importance, or (b ) is responsible for the entire engineering

and policy matters. Consults with supervisor concerning

program o f a company when the program is o f limited

unusual problems and developments.
Typical

duties

the following:
develops,

and responsibilities.

(1 )

or team leaders with at least one in a position comparable
to level V . (2 ) As individual researcher or worker con­

a number o f small

ceives, plans, and conducts research in problem areas o f

projects with many com plex features. A substantial
portion o f the work supervised is comparable to that

be approached through a series o f complete and concep­

engineering

directs

plans,

a large and im­

portant

and

com plexity and scope. The extent o f his responsibilities
generally require a few (3 to 5) subordinate supervisors

One or more o f

In a supervisory capacity

coordinates,

(1 ) In a supervisory capacity (a) plans,

project

or

considerable scope and com plexity. The problems must

described for engineer IV. (2 ) As individual researcher

tually related studies, are difficult to define, require

or worker carries out com plex or novel assignments

unconventional or novel approaches; and require sophis­

requiring the development o f new or improved tech­

ticated research techniques. Available guides and prec­

niques and procedures. Work is expected to result in
the development o f new or refined equipment, mater­
ials, processes, products, and/or scientific methods.
(3 ) As staff specialist develops and evaluates plans
and criteria for a variety o f projects and activities to
be carried out by others. Assesses the feasibility and
soundness o f proposed engineering evaluation tests,
products, or equipment when necessary data are in­
sufficient or confirmation by testing is advisable. Usu­

edents i contain critical gaps, are only partially related
to the problem, or may be largely lacking due to the
novel character o f the project. A t this level, the individual
researcher generally will have contributed inventions,
new designs, or techniques which are o f material signifi­
cance in the solution o f important problems. (3 ) As a
staff specialist serves as the technical specialist for the
organization (divisior or com pany) in the application
o f advanced theories, concepts, principles, and pro­

ally performs as a staff advisor and consultant as
to a technical speciality, a type o f facility or equip­

subject matter, function, type

ment, or a program function.

ment, or product). Keeps abreast o f new scientific

cesses

for

an

assigned

area

of

responsibility

(i.e.,

o f facility or equip­

methods and developments affecting his organization
Responsibility fo r the direction o f others. Supervises,

for the purpose o f recommending changes in emphasis

coordinates, and reviews the work o f a small staff o f

of

engineers and technicians; estimates manpower needs

developments.

programs

or

new

programs

warranted by such

and schedules and assigns work to meet com pletion date.
the direction o f others. Plans, or­

Or, as individual researcher or staff specialist may be

Responsibility fo r

assisted on projects by other engineers or technicians.

ganizes, and supervises the work o f a staff o f engineers




5 7

are in positions comparable to engineer V I; or, as indi­
vidual researcher and consultant, may be assisted on
individual projects by other engineers and technicians.

and technicians. Evaluates progress o f the staff and
results obtained, and recommends major changes to
achieve overall objectives. Or, as individual researcher
or staff specialist may be assisted on individual projects

Engineer VIII

by other engineers or technicians.

V-

M
.

General characteristics. Makes decisions and recommen­

Engineer VII

dations that are recognized as authoritative and have a

General characteristics. Makes decisions and recommen­

far-reaching impact on extensive engineering and related

dations that are recognized as authoritative and have an
important impact on extensive engineering activities.

activities o f the company. Negotiates critical and con­
troversial issues with top level engineers and officers o f

Initiates and maintains extensive contacts with key

other organizations and companies. Individuals at this

engineers and officials o f other organizations and com ­
panies, requiring skill in persuasion and negotiation o f

level demonstrate a high degree o f creativity, foresight,

critical issues. A t this level individuals will have demon­

ing extensive engineering programs and activities o f out­

and mature judgment in planning, organizing,

strated creativity, foresight, and mature engineering

standing novelty and importance.

judgment in anticipating and solving unprecedented
engineering problems, determining program objectives

D irection received.

and requirements, organizing programs and projects,

and guid­

rection.

Receives general administrative di­

and developing standards and guides for diverse engi­
neering activities.

Typical duties and responsibilities. One or both o f the
following: (1 ) In a supervisory capacity is responsible for

D irection received. Receives general administrative direc­

(a) an important segment o f a very extensive and highly
diversified engineering program o f a com pany, or (b ) the
entire engineering program o f a company when the pro­

tion.
Typical duties and responsibilities. One or both or the

gram is o f moderate scope. The programs are o f such
com plexity and scope that they are o f critical importance

following: (1 ) In a supervisory capacity is responsible
for (a) an important segment o f the engineering pro­
gram o f a com pany with extensive and diversified
engineering requirements, or (b ) the entire engineering
program o f a company when it is more limited in scope.
The overall engineering program contains critical prob­
lems the solution o f which requires major technological
advances and opens the way for extensive related de­
velopment. The extent o f his responsibilities generally
require several subordinate organizational segments or

to overall objectives, include problems o f extraordinary
difficulty that often have resisted solution, and consist
o f several segments requiring subordinate supervisors. Is
responsible for deciding the kind and extent o f engi­
neering and related programs needed to accomplish the
objectives o f the com pany, for choosing the scientific
approaches, for planning and organizing facilities and
programs, and for interpreting results. (2 ) As individual
researcher and consultant formulates and guides the

teams. Recommends facilites, personnel, and funds re­
quired to carry out programs which are directly related
with and directed toward fulfillment o f overall company
objectives. (2 ) As individual researcher and consultant is

attack on problems o f exceptional difficulty and marked
importance to the company or industry. Problems are
characterized by their lack o f scientific precedents and
source material, or lack o f success o f prior research and

a recognized leader and authority in his company in a

analysis so that their solution would represent an ad­

broad area o f specialization or in a narrow but intensely

vance o f great significance and importance. Performs ad­

specialized field. Selects research problems to further the

visory and consulting work for the company as a rec­

com pany’s objectives. Conceives and plans investigations

ognized authority for broad program areas or in an in­
tensely specialized area o f considerable novelty and

o f broad areas o f considerable novelty and importance
for which engineering precedents are lacking in areas

importance.

critical to the overall engineering program. Is consulted
extensively by associates and others with a high degree o f

R esponsibility fo r

reliance placed on his scientific interpretations and

the direction o f others.

Supervises

several subordinate supervisors or team leaders some o f

advice. Typically, will have contributed inventions, new

whose positions are comparable to engineer VII, or indi­

designs, or techniques which are regarded as major ad­

vidual researchers some o f whose positions are com ­

vances in the field.

parable to engineer VII and sometimes engineer VIII. As

R esponsibility f o r the direction o f others. Directs several

an individual researcher and consultant may be assisted

subordinate supervisors or team leaders, some o f whom

on individual projects by other engineers or technicians.




58

N O T E : Individuals in charge o f a com pany’s engineering program may match any o f several o f the survey
job levels depending on the size and com plexity o f
engineering programs. Excluded from level VIII are
engineers in charge o f programs so extensive and complex (e.g., consisting o f research and development on a
variety o f com plex products or systems with numerous

novel components) that one or more subordinate supervisory engineers are performing at level VIII. Also exeluded from level VIII are individual researchers and
consultants who are recognized as national and/or inter­
national authorities and scientific leaders in very broad
areas o f scientific interest and investigation,

T echnical Support
ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN

Conducts a variety o f standardized tests; may
prepare test specimens; sets up and operates standard

To be covered by these definitions, employees

test equipment; records test data.

must meet all o f the following criteria: (1 ) Pro­
vides semiprofessional technical support for engineers

Extracts engineering data from various prescribed

working in such areas as research, design, develop­

sources; processes the data following well-defined

ment, testing or manufacturing process improvement.

methods; presents the data in prescribed form.

(2 ) Work pertains to electrical, electronic, or mechan­
ical components or equipment. (3 ) Required to have

Engineering Technician III

some knowledge o f science or engineering. (Excludes

Performs assignments that are not completely stand­
ardized or prescribed. Selects or adapts standard pro­

production or maintenance workers, quality control
testers, craftsmen, draftsmen, designers, and engineers.)

cedures

or

equipment.

Receives initial instructions,

Engineering Technician I

equipment requirements and advice from supervisor or

Performs simple routine tasks under close super­

engineer; technical adequacy o f completed work is
checked. Performs at this level, one or a combination o f

vision or from detailed procedures. Work is checked in
process or on completion. Performs at this level, one

such typical duties as:

or a combination o f such typical duties as:

Constructs components, subunits or simple models
or adapts standard equipment. May troubleshoot

Assembles or installs equipment or parts requiring

and correct malfunctions.

simple wiring, soldering, or connecting.

Conducts various tests or experiments which may

Performs simple or routine tasks or tests such as

require minor modifications in test setups or pro­
cedures; selects, sets up and operates standard test

tensile or hardness tests; operates, and adjusts simple
test equipm ent; records test data.

equipment and records test data.

Gathers and maintains specified records o f engi­
neering data such as tests, drawings, etc.; performs
computations by substituting numbers in specified
formulas; plots data and draws simple curves and
graphs.

Extracts and compiles a variety o f engineering
data; processes or computes data using specified
formulas and procedures. Performs routine analysis
to check applicability, accuracy, and reasonableness
o f data.

Engineering Technician II
Performs

standardized

or

Engineering Technician IV
prescribed assignments,

Performs nonroutine assignments o f substantial variety

involving a sequence o f related operations. Follows

and com plexity. Receives objectives and technical advice

standard work methods or explicit instructions; technical

from supervisor or engineer; work is reviewed for tech­
nical adequacy. May be assisted by lower level tech­

adequacy o f routine work is reviewed on com pletion;
nonroutine

work may also be reviewed in process.

nicians. Performs at this level, one or a combination o f

Performs at this level, one or a combination o f such

such typical duties as:
Works on limited segment o f development project;

typical duties as:
Assembles or constructs simple or standard equip­

constructs experimental or prototype models to meet

ment or parts. May service or repair simple instru­

engineering requirements; conducts tests or experi­

ments or equipment.

ments; records and evaluates data and reports findings.




59

Conducts tests or experiments requiring selec­

with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracing limited to

tion and adaptation or modification o f test equip­

plans primarily consisting o f straight lines and a large

ment and test procedures; records data; analyzes

scale not requiring close delineation.)

data and prepares test reports.
and/or

Compiles and computes a variety o f engineer­
ing data; may analyze test and design data; develops
Prepares

or prepares schematics, designs, specifications, parts
lists

or

makes

items. May

recommendations

review

designs

or

regarding

specifications

simple or repetitive drawings o f easily vis­

ualized items. Work is closely supervised during progress.

these
for

■

Vc-

-

•

i

-->•

<

Draftsman I

adequacy.

Prepares detail drawings o f single units or parts for
Engineering Technician V

engineering, construction, manufacturing, or repair pur­

Performs nonroutine and com plex assignments in­

poses. Types o f drawings prepared include isometric
projections (depicting three dimensions in accurate

volving responsibility for planning and conducting a

scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning or com ­

complete project o f relatively limited scope or a por­

ponents and convey needed information. Consolidates

tion o f a larger and more diverse project. Selects and

details from a number o f sources and adjusts or trans­

adapts

plans, techniques, designs or layouts. May c o ­

poses scale as required. Suggested methods o f approach,

ordinate portions o f overall assignment; reviews, ana­
Supervisor or professional engineer outlines objectives,

applicable precedents, and advice on source materials
are given with initial assignments. Instructions are less
complete when assignments recur. Work may be spot

requirements and design approaches; completed work

checked during progress.

lyzes

and

integrates the technical work o f others.

is reviewed for

technical adequacy

and satisfaction
Draftsman II

o f requirements. May be assisted by lower level tech­
nicians. Performs at this level, one or a combination

Performs nonroutine and com plex drafting assign­

o f such typical duties as:

ments that require the application o f most o f the stand­
ardized drawing techniques regularly used. Duties typi­

Designs,

develops

and constructs major units,

cally involve such work as: Prepares working drawings o f
subassemblies with irregular shapes, multiple functions,

devices or equipment; conducts tests or experiments;
analyzes results and redesigns or modifies equipment

and precise positional relationships between components;
prepares architectural drawings for construction o f a
building including detail drawings o f foundations, wall

to improve performance; reports results.
Plans

or

equipment

assists in planning tests to evaluate
performance.

Determines

sections, floor plans, and roof. Uses accepted formulas
and manuals in making necessary computations to

test require­

ments, equipment modification and test procedures;

determine
capacities,
structions,
Completed

conducts tests, analyzes and evaluates data and pre­
pares

reports

on

findings and recommendations.

Reviews and analyzes a variety o f engineering

quantities o f materials to be used, load
strengths, stresses, etc. Receives initial in­
requirements, and advice from supervisor.
work is checked for technical adequacy.

data to determine requirements to meet engineer­
ing objectives; may calculate design data; prepares

Draftsman III

layouts, detailed specifications, parts lists, estimates,

Plans the graphic presentation o f com plex items

procedures, etc. May check and analyze drawings

having distinctive design features that differ significantly

\ v. .

......

• >

. ...

V-;

* '

or equipment to determine adequacy o f drawings

from established drafting precedents. Works in close

and design.

support with the design originator, and may recommend
minor design changes. Analyzes the effect o f each
change on the details o f form , function, and positional
relationships o f components and parts. Works with a
minimum o f supervisory assistance. Completed work is
reviewed by design originator for consistency with prior

D RAFTSM AN
Draftsman-tracer
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by

engineering determinations. May either prepare drawings,
or direct their preparation by lower level draftsmen.

placing tracing cloth or paper over drawings and tracing




60

C lerical Supervisory
i;

(c ) working supervisors, group leaders, or other over­
seers with more limited supervisory responsibility than
is described below.

KEYPUNCH SUPERVISOR
Supervises three or more keypunch operators who
keypunch or verify cards or tape for computer or

Keypunch

tabulating machine processing. May also, as an incidental

supervisory

positions

are

classified in

five levels (I through V ) on thq basis o f combinations

responsibility, supervise the operation o f other types
o f punching machines such as reproducers or gang

o f three elements— level and kind o f supervisory re­

punches.

sponsibility, difficulty o f keypunch work supervised,
Positions also responsible for

and number o f employees supervised. In the following

supervising the operation o f equipment such as com ­

table two levels o f supervision are described and each
is follow ed by a brief chart that shows the level o f key­

Excluded

are:

(a)

puters, tabulating machines, or other kinds o f office
machines; (b ) positions responsible for supervising clerical

punch supervisor for each combination o f the other two

work not directly related to the keypunch function; and

elements.

Level and kind of supervisory responsibility
'

■

'■ : ■

\

U

’ •• .• • • '

, -If

.

.,-:p

Lower

Upper

Is responsible for the day-to-day operations and flow of work
when the organization of the work, assignment of employees to
positions, the job types and levels, instructions and procedures,
etc., are prescribed by higher authority. Within this prescribed
framework, assigns work to individual employees; instructs em­
ployees in specific tasks and procedures; insures work meets
established standards of quality; checks attendance; keeps
production records; provides information to higher levels for
use in budgeting, planning of personnel changes, adjusting to
variations in the workload, etc., reports problems to a higher
level supervisor. (Exclude positions in which keypunching rather
than supervisory responsibility is the most significant function.)

In addition to being responsible for the functions of the lower
level of supervisory responsibility, plans and establishes the
organization and flow of work; plans changes to meet both
short- and long-term workload trends and changes; selects
employees and assigns them to positions; assigns and reviews
work of subordinates, initiates recommendations or formal
actions such as requests for staff, job evaluation actions, pro­
motions, etc,; approves absences and vacation schedules; recom­
mends disciplinary actions; in some positions, assists program­
mers, project planners, or other technical specialists in designing
card layouts and detailed punching instructions.

Difficulty of keypunch work
supervised

Difficulty of keypunch work
supervised

Number of
em ployees

Less d ifficu lt1

supervised
S ;

More difficult1
2

Less d ifficu lt1

3 - 1 5 ................................

2 0 -4 0 ............................
50 or m ore...................

1
II
III

More d ifficu lt2

Level of keypunch supervisor

Level of keypunch supervisor
II
III
IV

II
III
IV

III
IV
V

1 Less d iffic u lt keypunch work - Work is routine and repetitive. Under close supervision or following specific procedures or
instructions, works from various standardized source documents which have been coded, follows specified procedures which have
been prescribed in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. Refers to superivsor prob­
lems arising from erroneous items or codes or missing information. (This level is the same as the BLS Class B Keypunch Operator.)
2
( M ore d iffic u lt keypunch work - Work requires the application of experience and judgment in selecting procedures to be fol­
lowed and in searching for, interpreting, selecting, or coding items to be keypunched from a variety of documents. On occasion may
also perform some routine keypunch work. May train inexperienced keypunch operators. (This level is the same as the BLS Class A
Keypunch Operator.)
« ffii -V : !

:

■

NOTE:
If the keypunch activities include both "more difficult" and "less difficult" work, classification should be on the basis
of the more difficult work, provided that a significant proportion of the keypunch operators work at this level. The number of key­
punch operators performing more difficult work is considered significant when at least 25 percent of the operators work at this
level, provided there are at least two such operators in units with a total of 3 or 4 employees, 3 such operators in units with a total
of 5 to 12 employees, and 4 such operators in units with a total of 13 or more operators.




61

Clerical
Clerk, File I

C LE R K , ACCOUNTING
accounting clerical tasks

Performs routine filing o f material that has already

such as posting to registers and ledgers; reconciling bank

Performs

one

or

more

been classified or which is easily classified in a simple

accounts; verifying the internal consistency, com plete­

serial classification system (e.g., alphabetical, chrono­

ness, and mathematical accuracy o f accounting docu­

logical, or numerical). As requested, locates readily

ments; assigning prescribed accounting distribution codes;

available material in files and forwards material; may
fill out withdrawal charge. May perform simple clerical

examining and verifying for clerical accuracy various
types o f reports, lists, calculations, posting, etc.; or pre­

and manual tasks required to maintain and service files.

paring simple, or assisting in preparing more complicated,
journal vouchers. May work in either a manual or

Clerk, File II

automated accounting system.

Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple

The work requires a knowledge o f clerical methods

(subject matter) headings or partly classified material

and office practices and procedures which relates to the
clerical processing and recording o f transactions and

by finer subheadings. Prepares simple related index and
cross-reference aids. As requested, locates clearly identi­

accounting information. With experience, the worker

fied material in files and forwards material. May per­

typically becomes familiar with the bookkeeping and

form related clerical tasks required to maintain and

accounting terms and procedures used in the assigned

service files.

work, but is not required to have a knowledge o f the
formal principles o f bookkeeping and accounting.

Clerk, File III

Positions are classified into levels on the basis o f
the following definitions.

Classifies and indexes file material such as correspond­
ence, reports, technical documents, etc., in an established
filing system containing a number o f varied subject
matter files. May also file this material. May keep records

Clerk, Accounting I
Under close supervision, following detailed instruc­

o f various types in conjunction with the files. May lead
a small group o f lower level file clerks.

tions and standardized procedures, performs one or
more routine accounting clerical operations, such as
posting to ledgers, cards, or worksheets where identifi­
cation o f items and locations o f postings are clearly indi­
cated; checking accuracy and completeness o f standard­
ized and repetitive records or accounting documents;
and coding documents using a few prescribed accounting

KEYPUNCH O PERATO R
Operates a keypunch machine to record or verify
alphabetic and/or numeric data on tabulating cards or
on tape.

codes.

Positions are classified into levels on the basis o f the
following definitions.

Clerk, Accounting II
Under general supervision, performs accounting cler­
ical operations which require the application o f ex­

Keypunch Operator I

perience and judgment, for example, clerically proc­
essing complicated or nonrepetitive accounting trans-

Work is routine and repetitive. Under close super­

’ actions, selecting among a substantial variety o f pre­

vision or following specific procedures or instructions,

scribed accounting codes and classifications, or tracing
transactions through previous accounting actions to

works from various standardized source documents
which have been coded, and follows specified procedures

determine source o f discrepancies. May be assisted by

which have been prescribed in detail and require little

one or more accounting clerks I.

or no selecting, coding, or interpreting o f data to be

C LE R K , FILE

erroneous items or codes or missing information.

recorded. Refers to supervisor problems arising from-

Files, classifies, and retrieves material in an estab­

Keypunch Operator II

lished filing system. May perform clerical and manual
tasks required to maintain files. Positions are classified

Work requires the application o f experience and judg­

into levels on the basis o f the following definitions.

ment in selecting procedures to be follow ed and in




62

(c ) Stenographers serving as office assistants to a
group o f professional, technical,or managerial persons;
(d ) Secretary positions in which the duties are
either substantially more routine or substantially
more com plex and responsible than those character­

searching for, interpreting, selecting, or coding items to
be keypunched from a variety o f source documents.
On occasion may also perform some routine keypunch
work. May train inexperienced keypunch operators.

ized in the definition;

MESSENGER (Office Boy or Girl)

(e ) Assistant type positions which involve more
difficult or more responsible technical, administrative,

Performs various routine duties such as running er­
rands, operating minor office machines such as sealers

supervisory, or specialized clerical duties which are

or mailers, opening and distributing mail, and other
minor clerical work. Exclude positions that require

not typical o f secretarial work.

operation o f a m otor vehicle as a significant duty.

NOTE:

The term “ corporate officer,” used in the

level definitions following, refers to those officials who
have a significant corporate-wide policymaking role with
regard to major company activities. The title “ vice

SECRETARY
Assigned

as personal secretary, normally

individual. Maintains

a close and highly

president,”

to one

responsive

dents whose primary responsibility is to act personally

relationship to the day-to-day work o f the supervisor.
Works fairly independently receiving a minimum o f

on individual cases or transactions (e.g., approve or deny
individual loan or credit actions; administer individual

detailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied cleri­

trust accounts; directly supervise a clerical staff) are not
considered to be “ corporate officers” for purposes o f

cal and secretarial duties, usually including most o f
the following:

applying the following level definitions:
Secretary I

(a)
Receives telephone calls, personal callers, and
incoming mail, answers routine inquiries, and routes

1. Secretary to the supervisor or head o f a small or­
ganizational unit (e.g., fewer than about 25 or 30 per­

technical inquiries to the proper persons;
(b )

Establishes, maintains, and revises the super­

sons); or

visor’s files;
(c)
Maintains the supervisor’s calendar and makes

2. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, pro­
fessional em ployee, administrative officer, or assistant,
skilled technician or expert. (NOTE: Many companies

appointments as instructed;
(d )

Relays

though normally indicative o f this role,

does not in all cases identify such positions. Vice presi­

messages

from

supervisor to subor­

assign stenographers, rather than secretaries as described

dinates;
(e)
Reviews correspondence, memoranda, and re­

above, to this level o f supervisory or nonsupervisory
worker.)

ports prepared by others for the supervisor’ s signa­
ture to assure procedural and typographic accuracy;
(0
Performs stenographic and typing work.

Secretary II
1.

Secretary to an executive or managerial person

May also perform other clerical and secretarial tasks

whose responsibility is not equivalent to one o f the
specific level situations in the definition for level III,

o f comparable nature and difficulty. The work typically
requires knowledge o f office routine and understanding

but whose organizational unit normally numbers at least
several dozen employees and is usually divided into or­

o f the organization, programs, and procedures related

ganizational segments which are often, in turn, further

to the work o f the supervisor.

subdivided. In some companies, this level includes a
wide range o f organizational echelons; in others, only
one or tw o; or
2. Secretary to

Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled “ secretary” possess

the head o f an individual plant,

factory, etc., (or other equivalent level o f official) that

the above characteristics. Examples o f positions which

employs, in all, few er than 5,000 persons.

are excluded from the definition are as follows:
(a)

Secretary III

Positions which do not meet the “ personal”

secretary concept described above;
(b ) Stenographers not fully trained in secretarial

1.
Secretary to the chairman o f the board or pres­
ident o f a company that employs, in all, fewer than

type duties;

100 persons; or




63

Stenographer, Senior

2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than chair­
man o f the board or president) o f a company that em­
ploys, in all, over 100 but few er than 5,000 persons; or

Dictation involves a varied technical or specialized
vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scien­
tific research. May also set up and maintain files, keep

3. Secretary to the head (immediately below the

records, etc.

officer level) over either a major corporate-wide func­
tional activity (e.g., marketing, research, operations, in­
dustrial relations, etc.) or a major geographic or or­

OR

ganizational segment (e.g., a regional headquarters; a
major division) o f a company that employs, in all, over

Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly
greater independence and responsibility than stenogra­

5,000 but fewer than 25,000 employees; or

pher, general, as evidenced by the following:
requires

4. Secretary to the head o f an individual plant,

a high

degree

of

stenographic

Work

speed and

accuracy; a thorough working knowledge o f general

factory, etc. (or other equivalent level o f official) that

business

employs, in all, over 5,000 persons; or

and

office

procedure

and o f the specific

5. Secretary to the head o f a large and important
organizational segment (e.g., a middle management

business operations, organization, policies, procedures,
files, w orkflow , etc. Uses this knowledge in performing
stenographic duties and responsible clerical tasks such

supervisor o f an organizational segment often involving

as maintaining follow-up files; assembling material for

as many as several hundred persons) o f a company that

reports, memorandums, and letters; com posing simple
letters from general instructions; reading and routing

employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.

incoming mail; answering routine questions, etc.
Secretary IV
TYPIST

1. Secretary to the chairman o f the board or pres­

Uses a typewriter to make copies o f various materials

ident o f a company that employs, in all, over 100 but

or to make out bills after calculations have been made

few er than 5,000 persons; or

by another person. May include typing o f stencils,

2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the

mats, or similar materials for use in duplicating proc­

chairman o f the board or president) o f a company that

esses. May do clerical work involving little special train­

employs, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000 per­

ing, such as keeping simple records, filing records and

sons; or

reports, or sorting and distributiong incoming mail.

3. Secretary to the head, immediately below the cor­
porate officer level, o f a major segment or subsidiary o f

Typist I

a company that employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.

Performs one or more o f the following: Copy typing
from rough or clear drafts; or routine typing o f forms,
insurance policies, etc.; or setting up simple standard

STENOGRAPHER

tabulations; or copying more com plex tables already set
up and spaced properly.

Primary duty is to take dictation using shorthand,
and to transcribe the dictation. May also type from
written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool.
May

occasionally

transcribe

from

voice

Typist II

recordings.
Performs one or more o f the following: Typing

NOTE: This job is distinguished from that o f a secre­

material

in final form

tary in that a secretary normally works in a confidential

material

from

when it involves combining

relationship with only one manager or executive and per­

correct

spelling,

forms more responsible and discretionary tasks as de­

technical or unusual words or foreign language material;

scribed in the secretary job definition.

or planning layout and typing o f complicated statistical

several sources; or responsibility for
syllabication,

punctuation, etc., o f

tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing.
May type routine form letters, varying details to suit
circumstances.
Stenographer, General
Dictation involves a normal routine vocabulary. May

NOTE: The definitions for the drafting and clerical

maintain files, keep simple records or perform other

occupations shown in this bulletin are the same as those

relatively routine clerical tasks.

used in the Bureau’s program o f occupational wage




6 4

surveys in metropolitan areas. (See the list o f areas on the
order form at the back o f this bulletin.) The level
designations used in this bulletin, however, differ from

those used in the area bulletins. The equivalent level
designations for the occupations concerned are as
follows:

National Survey of
Professional, Administrative. Technical, and
Clerical Pay

Occupation
D raftsm an ...............................................................................................

j

Occupational
Wage Surveys in
Metropolitan
Areas
q

II
III
Clerk, accounting .................................................................................

I

B
A

...............................................................................................

B

II
Clerk, file

I

A
C

II
III
Keypunch o p e ra to r..............................................................................

|

B
A
B

II
S ecretary.................................................................................................

I

A
D

II
III
IV
T y p is t ......................................................................................................

|

C
B
A

Is --

-




6 5

B

II

6, ' .

|

A




A ppendix D. C o m p a riso n of A verage A nnual S a la rie s in
Private Industry, M a rch 1972, w ith Corresponding
S a la ry R ates for Federal Em ployees
U nder the G eneral S ch ed u le
Statistics, prepared the occupational work level def­

The survey was designed to provide a basis for com ­
paring salaries under the General Schedule classification

initions used in the survey. Definitions were graded by
the Commission according to standards established for

and pay system with salaries in private enterprise. To
assure collection o f pay data for work levels equivalent

each grade level. The following table shows the sur­

to the General Schedule grade levels, the Civil Service
Commission, in cooperation with the Bureau o f Labor

veyed job s grouped by work levels equivalent to General




Schedule grade levels.

6 7

Com parison of average annual salaries in private industry,1 M arch 1972, w ith salary rates for Federal
em ployees under the General S ch edu le2

O cc u p a tio n and c l a s s
su rvey ed by B E S 3

A v era g e
annual
s a la r ie s
in p r iv a te
in d u s t r y 4

S a la r y r a te s f o r F e d e r a l e m p lo y e e s u n d e r the G e n e r a l S c h e d u le 2
P e r annum r a te s and step
10

$ 4 , 602
5, 087

$ 4 , 564

$ 4 , 716

54, 868

C l e r k s , fi le I I ----------------K eyp u n ch o p e r a t o r s I —
T y p is t s I --------------------------

5 ,0 2 7
5, 756
5, 229

5, 166

5, 338

C l e r k s , a cco u n tin g I -----------C l e r k s , fi le I I I ---------------------D r a ft s m e n - t r a c e r s -------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s I —
K eyp u n ch o p e r a t o r s I I --------K eyp u n ch s u p e r v is o r s I -----S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ------T y p is t s II -------------------------------

5,
6,
6,
7,
6,
7,
6,
6,

870
214
288
208
539
612
181
093

5, 828

6 , 022

6, 216

C l e r k s , a cco u n tin g II —
D r a ft s m e n I -------------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s II
K eyp u n ch s u p e r v is o r s II —
S e c r e t a r ie s I -----------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ------

7,
7,
8,
8,
6,
7,

537
550
207
516
972
074

6, 762

A c c o u n ta n ts I
A u d it o r s I ----B u y e r s I -------C h e m is t s I ---D r a ft s m e n I I ------------------------E n g in e e r s I --------------------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s IIIJ o b a n a ly s ts I -----------------------K eyp u n ch s u p e r v is o r s III —
S e c r e t a r i e s I I ------------------------

9,
9,
9,
9,
9,
10,
9,
9,
9,
7,

067
628
380
838
201
921
507
441
325
840

K eyp u n ch su p er
S e c r e t a r ie s
i ■

10, 891
8, 436

8, 153

A c c o u n ta n ts II ■
A u d it o r s I I ------B u y e r s I I -------C h e m is t s I I ----D r a ft s m e n I I I -----------------------E n g in e e r s I I ------------------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s I V J ob a n a ly s ts I I ----------------------K eyp u n ch s u p e r v is o r s V —
S e c r e t a r ie s I V -----------------------

10, 655
1 0 ,9 2 4
10, 922
11, 092
1 1 ,4 9 2
12, 071
10, 788
10, 828
12, 322
9, 092

9, 053 !

A c c o u n ta n ts I I I -------------------A t t o r n e y s I --------------------------A u d it o r s I I I ------------------------B u y e r s I I I ----------------------------C h e m is t s III -----------------------E n g in e e r s I I I -----------------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s V
J ob a n a ly s ts I I I -------------------

1 1 ,8 7 9
13, 498
12, 881
1 3 ,1 1 7
12, 901
13, 682
12, 259
12, 526

A c c o u n ta n ts IV A t t o r n e y s I I ----A u d it o r s I V ----B u y e r s I V -------C h e m is t s I V ----C h ie f a cco u n ta n ts I --------------D ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I —
E n g in e e r s I V -------------------------J o b a n a ly s ts IV -------------—
-----

1 4 ,2 5 9
1 4 ,6 4 0
1 5 ,8 2 3
15, 555
1 5 ,6 7 0
15, 348
1 4 ,3 1 3
16, 159
15, 057

$ 5 , 020

5, 510

C l e r k s , fi le I -------------------------------------M e s s e n g e r s ( o f f ic e b o y s and g ir ls )

rs IV -

55, 628

55, 780

$ 5 , 932

5, 854

6, 026

6, 198

6, 370

6, 542

6, 714

6, 410

6, 604

6, 798

6, 992

7, 186

7, 380

7, 574

6, 980

7, 198

7 ,4 1 6

7, 634

7, 852

8, 288

8, 506

7, 807

8, 051

9, 271

9, 515

8, 425

8, 697

8 ,9 6 9

9 ,2 4 1

9, 513

9, 785

1 0 ,3 2 9

1 0 ,6 0 1

9, 355

9, 657

9, 959 I 10, 261

1 0 ,5 6 3

1 0 ,8 6 5

1 1 ,1 6 7

1 1 ,4 6 9

11, 771

12, 518

12 , 886

1 3 ,2 5 4

13, 622

1 3 ,9 9 0

14,358

15, 085

15, 529

15, 973

16, 861

17, 305

12, 150

1 1 ,0 4 6

S ee fo o t n o t e s at end o f ta b le .




55, 476

68

Comparison of average annual salaries in private in du stry,1 M arch 1972, w ith salary rates for Federal
em ployees under the General Schedule^ —Continued

O c c u p a tio n and c l a s s
su rvey ed by B L S 3

A v era g e
annual
s a la r i e s
in p r iv a te
in d u s t r y 4

S a la r y r a t e s f o r F e d e r a l e m p lo y e e s u n d e r the G e n e r a l S c h e d u le 2
P e r annum r a t e s and s t e p 6
G ra d e 5
1
GS 12 $ 1 5 , 866

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

$ 16, 395 $ 1 6 , 924 $ 17, 453 $ 1 7 ,9 8 2 $ 1 8 , 511 $ 1 9 ,0 4 0 $ 1 9 , 569 $ 2 0 , 098 $ 2 0 , 627

A c co u n ta n ts V ----------------------------------------------------A tt o r n e y s I I I -------------------------------------------------------C h e m is t s V ---------------------------------------------------------C h ie f a cco u n ta n ts II -----------------------------------------D ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I I ---------------------------------E n g in e e r s V ---------------------------------------------------------

$ 1 7 ,3 6 8
18, 392
18. 581
1 7 ,4 1 9
16, 401
18, 628

A tt o r n e y s I V ------------------------------------------------------C h e m is t s VI — --------------------------------------------------C h ie f a cco u n ta n ts I I I -----------------------------------------D ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l III ------------------------------E n g in e e r s V I ------------------------------------------------------

2 3 ,4 4 3
2 1 ,2 7 7
2 1 ,1 9 8
2 0 ,1 5 3
2 1 ,4 0 2

GS 13

18, 737

1 9 ,3 6 2

1 9 ,9 8 7

2 0 ,6 1 2

2 1 ,2 3 7

2 1 ,8 6 2

22, 487

23, 112

2 3 ,7 3 7

2 4 ,3 6 2

A t t o r n e y s V --------------------------------------------------------C h e m is t s V II -----------------------------------------------------C h ie f a cco u n ta n ts I V -----------------------------------------D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l IV ------------------------------E n g in e e r s VII -----------------------------------------------------

27, 528
2 5 ,8 8 8
26, 521
2 4 ,7 3 8
2 4 ,3 6 7

GS 14

2 1 ,9 6 0

2 2 ,6 9 2

2 3 ,4 2 4

2 4 ,1 5 6

2 4 ,8 8 8

2 5 ,6 2 0

26, 352

2 7 ,0 8 4

2 7 ,8 1 6

28, 548

A t t o r n e y s VI -----------------------------------------------------C h e m is t s V I I I ----------------------------------------------------E n g in e e r s V I I I -----------------------------------------------------

3 4 ,8 2 8
3 0 ,8 2 7
27, 885

GS 15

25, 583

26, 4 36

27, 289

28, 142

2 8 ,9 9 5

29, 848

3 0 ,7 0 1

3 1 ,5 5 4

32, 407

3 3 ,2 6 0

1 F o r s c o p e o f s u r v e y , s e e a p p en d ix A .
2 S a la r y r a te s in e f f e c t in M a r c h 1972, r e f e r e n c e da te o f the BL.S s u r v e y , a s e s t a b lis h e d b y E x e c u t iv e O r d e r 11637 is s u e d u n d e r a u th o r ity o f
P u b lic L aw 9 2 -2 1 0 .
3 F o r d e fin it io n s , s e e a p p e n d ix C .
4 S u r v e y fin d in g s as s u m m a r iz e d in ta b le 1 o f this r e p o r t .
5 C o r r e s p o n d in g g r a d e s in the G e n e r a l S ch e d u le w e r e su p p lie d b y the U .S . C iv il S e r v i c e C o m m is s io n .
6 S e c t io n 5335 o f t it le 5 o f the U .S . C od e p r o v id e s f o r w ith in -g ra d e i n c r e a s e s on c o n d it io n that the e m p l o y e e 's w o r k is o f an a c c e p t a b le le v e l
o f c o m p e t e n c e a s d e fin e d b y the h ea d o f the a g e n c y .
F o r e m p lo y e e s w ho m e e t th is c o n d it io n , the s e r v i c e r e q u ir e m e n t s a r e 52 c a le n d a r w eek s
e a ch f o r a d v a n c e m e n t to s a la r y r a t e s 2, 3, and 4 ; 104 w e e k s e a ch f o r a d v a n c e m e n t to s a la r y r a te s 5, 6, and 7; and 156 w e e k s e a ch f o r a d v a n c e ­
m en t t o s a la r y r a t e s 8, 9, and 10.
S e c t io n 5 336 p r o v id e s that an a d d itio n a l w ith in -g ra d e i n c r e a s e m a y b e g ra n ted w ith in a n y p e r io d o f 52 w eek s
in r e c o g n it io n o f h ig h q u a lity p e r fo r m a n c e a b o v e that o r d in a r i ly found in the ty p e o f p o s it io n c o n c e r n e d .

U n d er S e c t io n 5303 o f t itle 5 o f the U n ited S ta tes C o d e , h ig h e r m in im u m r a te s (but not e x c e e d in g the m a x i m u m
sa a r y ra te p r e s c r ib e d in the G e n e r a l S ch e d u le f o r the g ra d e o r le v e l) and a c o r r e s p o n d i n g new s a la r y ra n g e m a y be
e s t a b lis h e d f o r p o s it io n s o r o c c u p a t io n s u n d e r c e r t a in c o n d it io n s .
T h e c o n d it io n s in clu d e a fin d in g that the G o v e r n m e n t 's
r e c r u it m e n t o r re te n tio n o f w e ll -q u a l if ie d p e r s o n s is s ig n ific a n t ly h a n d ica p p e d b e c a u s e the s a la r y r a te s in p r iv a t e in d u s tr y
a r e s u b s t a n t ia lly a b o v e the s a la r y r a te s o f the s ta tu to ry p a y s c h e d u le s .
A s o f M a r c h 1972, th e re w e r e n o s p e c i a l ra tes
f o r che o c c u p a t io n s c o v e r e d b y th is s u r v e y .
I n fo r m a t io n on s p e c i a l r a t e s m a y be o b ta in e d f r o m the U .S . C iv il S e r v i c e
C o m m i s s i o n , W a sh in g ton , D . C . 204 15 , o r its r e g io n a l o f f i c e s .




69




O rd e r Fo rm
TO:
S u p e rin te n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s

B ureau o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s —

or

U .S . G o v e r n m e n t P rin tin g O ff i c e

1 6 0 3 J F K F e d e ra l B u ild in g , G o v e r n m e n t

W a sh in g to n , D .C ., 2 0 4 0 2

C e n te r, B o s t o n , Mass, 0 2 2 0 3
1 5 1 5 B r o a d w a y , N e w Y o r k , N .Y .

10036

4 0 6 P en n S q u a re B u ild in g ,
1 3 1 7 F ilb e rt S t., P h ila d e lp h ia , Pa.

19107

1 3 7 1 P e a ch tre e S t., N E ., A tla n ta , G a . 3 0 3 0 9
9 1 1 W aln u t S t,, K an sas C ity , M o . 6 4 1 0 6
8 th F l o o r , 3 0 0 S o u th W a ck e r D riv e ,
C h ic a g o , I11T £ 0 6 0 6
1 1 0 0 C o m m e r c e S t., R m . 6 B 7
D allas, T e x , 7 5 2 0 2
4 5 0 G o ld e n G a te A v e ., B o x 3 6 0 1 7
San F r a n c is c o , C a lif. 9 4 1 0 2
E n c lo s e d

fin d s

$

___________

in

|

1c h e c k o r (

1 m oney

o r d e r . M ake c h e c k s o r

m oney

o r d e r s p a y a b le

to th e S u p e rin te n d e n t o f d o c u m e n ts . (T w e n ty -fiv e p e r c e n t d is c o u n t f o r b u n d le o r d e r o f 1 0 0 c o p ie s o r m o r e .)

Please send m e c o p ie s o f b u lle tin s as in d ic a te d .

N um ber
of
c o p ie s

1 9 7 0 -7 1 A R E A

B u lletin 1 6 8 5 - 9 1 .

W A G E S U R V E Y S S U M M A R Y B U L L E T IN S

A r e a W age S u r v e y s , S e l e c t e d M e tr o p o l i t a n A re a s,

1 9 7 0 -7 1 (1 9 7 2 ).

C o n s o lid a t e s
J u ly

1970

earnin gs

fo r

in fo r m a t io n
to

J u ne

fr o m

p la n t o c c u p a t io n s ,

in d u s try d iv is io n an d area.
B u lletin

1 6 8 5 -9 2 .

th e

in d iv id u a l

b u lle tin s

fo r

su rveys

A rea

and

in fo r m a t io n

on

m ade

d u rin g

th e

p e r io d

o c c u p a t io n s , average h o u r ly

e sta b lish m en t p ra ctic e s a n d s u p p le m e n ta ry w a g e p r o v is io n s b y

P rice $ 1 .

W age S u r v e y s ,

M e tr o p o lita n A re a s,

U n ite d S ta te s a n d R e g io n a l S u m m a ries,

P resents

area

1 9 7 1 . C o n ta in s average w e e k ly earn in gs f o r o f f i c e

o c c u p a t io n a l

1 9 7 0 -7 1

earnin gs,

(1 9 7 3 ).

esta b lish m e n t

p ra ctic e s ,

an d

su p p le m e n ta ry

w age

p ro v is io n s f o r all u ie trp p p lita n areas c o m b in e d a n d sep a ra tely b y in d u s try d iv is io n a n d r e g io n . A lso
p ro v id e s an a ly ses o f w age d iffe r e n c e s an d tre n d s o f o c c u p a t io n a l earn in gs.




P rice $ 1 .

1 9 7 1 -7 2 A R E A W A G E S U R V E Y B U L L E T IN S :

BLS
bulletin
number

Price
(in
cents)

1685-87

40

—

1725-49
1725-59

30
35

—
—

1685-75
1725-77
1725-16

30
45
35

—
—
—

1725-69
1725-6
1725-58

30
35
30

—
—
—

Boise City (Nov. 1 9 7 1 ) ..............
Boston (Aug. 1 9 7 1 )......................
Buffalo (Oct. 1 9 7 1 )......................
Burlington (Dec. 1 9 7 1 ) ..............
Canton (May 1 9 7 2 ) .....................
Charleston (Mar. 1 9 7 2 ) ..............
Charlotte (Jan. 1972) .................
Chattanooga (Sept. 1 9 7 1 ) ..........
Chicago (June 1 9 7 1 ) ...................

1725-27
1725-11
1725-34
1725-25
1725-75
1725-63
1725-48
1725-14
1685-90

30
40
45
25
35
35
35
30
70

—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—

Cincinnati (Feb. 1972) ..............
Cleveland (Sept. 1 9 7 1 ) ..............
Columbus (O ct. 1971) ..............
Dallas (O ct. 1 9 7 1 ) ........................
Davenport-Rock Island-Moline
(Feb. 1 9 7 2 ) .................................
Dayton (Dec. 1971) ...................
Denver (Dec. 1971) ...................

1725-56
1725-17
1725-19
1725-26

35
40
30
35

—
—
—
—

1725-55
1725-36
1725-44

35
35
35

—
—
—

Des Moines (May 1 9 7 2 )..............
Detroit (Feb. 1 9 7 2 )......................
Durham (Apr. 1 9 7 2 ) ...................
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood
and West Palm Beach
(Apr. 1 9 7 2 ) .................................
Fort Worth (O ct. 1 9 7 1 )...............
Green Bay (July 1 9 7 1 ) ..............
Greenville (May 1972) ..............
Houston (Apr. 1972) .................
Huntsville (Feb. 1972) ..............
Indianapolis (Oct. 1 9 7 1 ) ............
Jackson (Jan. 1972) ...................

1725-86
1725-68
1725-64

35
40
30

—
—
—

Area and payroll period
Akron (July 1971) ......................
Albany-Schenectady-Troy
(Mar. 1 9 7 2 ) .................................
Alburquerque (Mar. 1 9 7 2 )..........
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton
(May 1971) .................................
Atlanta (May 1 9 7 2 )......................
Baltimore (Aug. 1971) ...............
Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange
(Mav 1972) .................................
Binghamton (July 1 9 7 1 ) ............
Birmingham (Mar. 1 9 7 2 ) ............

Number
of
copies

____

1725-74
1725-21
1725-3
1725-66
1725-79
1725-50
1725-23
1725-38

35
30
30
30
35
35
30
30

Jacksonville (Dec. 1 9 7 1 ) ............
Kansas City (Sept. 1 9 7 1 )............
Lawrence-Haverhill
(June 1972) ...............................
Little Rock-North Little Rock
(July 1 9 7 1 ) .............................. .
Los Angeles-Long Beach and
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden
Grove (Mar. 1972) ...................

1725-39
1725-18

30
35

—

1725-81

35

—

1725-4

30

—

1725-76

45

—

Louisville (Nov. 1971) ..............
L ubbock (Mar. 1972) .................
Manchester (July 1 9 7 1 )..............
Memphis (Nov. 1 9 7 1 ) .................
Miami (Nov. 1 9 7 1 ) ......................
Midland and Odessa
(Jan. 1 9 7 2 ) .................................
Milwaukee (May 1 9 7 2 ) ...............

1725-29
1725-57
1725-2
1725-40
1725-28

35
35
30
35
30

—
—
—
—
—

1725-37
1725-83

30
45

—

—
—

—
—
—
—
—
—

—

Area and payroll period
Minneapolis-St. Paul ...................
(Jan. 1 9 7 2 ) .................................
Muskegon-Muskegon Heights
(June 1 9 7 2 ).................................
Newark and Jersey City
(Jan. 1 9 7 2 ) .................................
New Haven (Jan. 1 9 7 2 ) ..............
New Orleans (Jan. 1 9 7 2 ) ............
New York (Apr. 1 9 7 1 ) ..............
Norfolk-Portsmouth and Newport News-Hampton
(Jan. 1 9 7 2 ) .................................
Oklahoma City (July 1971) . . . .
Omaha (Sept. 1971) ...................
Paterson-Clifton-Passaic
(June 1 9 7 1 ).................................
Philadelphia (Nov. 1 9 7 1 ) ............
Phoenix (June 1 9 7 1 ) ...................
Pittsburgh (Jan. 1 9 7 1 ).................
Portland (Maine) (Nov. 1971) . .
Portland (Oreg.) (May 1971) . . .
Poughkeepsie-KingstonNewburg (June 1 9 7 2 ) ..............
Providence-PawtucketWarwick (May 1 9 7 2 ) .................

1725-45

50

1725-85

35

1725-52
1725-41
1725-35
1685-89

so
35
30
65

1725-42
1725-8

30
35

1725-13

35
.
35
50
30
40
35
35

1725-80

35

1725-70

30

Raleigh (Aug. 1 9 7 1 )......................
Richm ond (Mar. 1 9 7 2 ) ..............
Rochester (July 1971) ..............
R ockford (May 1 9 7 2 ) .................
St. Louis (Mar. 1972) .................
Salt Lake City (Nov. 1971) . . . .
San A ntonio (May 1 9 7 2 )............
San Bernardino-RiversideOntario (Dec. 1 9 7 1 )...................

1725-5
1725-72
1725-7
1725-84
1725-61
1725-24
1725-67

30
35
35
35
35
30
30

1725-43

30

San Diego (Nov. 1971) ..............
San Francisco-Oakland
(Oct. 1 9 7 1 ) .................................
San Jose (Mar. 1 9 7 2 )...................
Savannah (May 1 9 7 2 ) .................
Scranton (July 1 9 7 1 )...................
Seattle-Everett (Jan. 1972) . . . .
Sioux Falls (Dec. 1 9 7 1 )..............

1725-32

35

1725-33
1725-65
1725-73
1725-1
1725-47
1725-30

50
30
35
30
30
25

South Bend (Mar. 1 9 7 2 ) ............
Spokane(June 1 9 7 1 )...................
Syracuse (July 1 9 7 1 )...................
Tampa-St. Petersburg
(Nov. 1971) ...............................
T oledo (Apr. 1 9 7 2 ) .....................
Trenton (Sept. 1 9 7 1 )...................

1725-60
1685-88
1725-10

35
30
35

1725-31
1725-78
1725-12

35
35
30

Utica-Rome (July 1 9 7 1 ) ............
Washington, D.C. - Md. - Va.
(Apr. 1 9 7 1 ) .................................
Waterbury (Mar. 1 9 7 2 ) ..............
Waterloo (Nov. 1 9 7 1 ) .................
Wichita (Apr. 1 9 7 2 ).....................
Worcester (May 1 9 7 2 ) .................
Y ork (Feb. 1 9 7 2 )..........................
Youngst own-Warren
(Nov. 1 9 7 1 ).................................

1725-9

35

1685-56
1725-53
1725-20
1725-82
1725-71
1725-54

40
35
30
35
35
35

1725-51

35

Address
State

Price
(in
cents)

1685-84
1725-62
1685-86
1725-46
1725-22
1685-85

Name _


City


BLS
bulletin
number

Zip Code

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1699.

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th e
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A

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A M E R IC A N S ,

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B u lle tin

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*U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1973


A N D

( 1 9 3 9 - 7 0 ) , B u lle ­

512-377/1148

1-3

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