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National Survey of
Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay
February-March 1965

Bulletin N o . 1 4 6 9

I



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. W illard W irtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner




National Survey of
Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay
February-March 1965

Accountants and A u d ito r s
A tto rn e y s
P e rso n n e l M a n a g e m e n t
E n g in e e r s and Chemists
E n g in e e r in g Te chnic ia ns
D ra fts m e n
O ffic e Clerical

Bulletin No. 1469
O ctober 1965

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W.Willard W irtz, Secretary
B UR EAU O F L A B O R STATISTICS
A rth u r M. Ross, C om m issio ne r

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price 45 cents






Preface

The Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in this bulletin the results of
the sixth in a series of annual nationwide surveys of compensation for selected
professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in private indus­
try. The data, which relate to representative establishments in a broad spectrum
of American industry, were obtained by personal visits of Bureau field econo­
mists.
The salary data are representative of the period February—
March 1965.
(See appendix A , timing of survey.)
The design for this annual series of surveys was developed by the Bu­
reau of Labor Statistics in conjunction with the Bureau of the Budget and the
Civil Service Commission.
The surveys provide a fund of broadly based infor­
mation on salary levels and distributions in private employment.
As such, the
results are useful for wide, general economic analysis.
In addition, they pro­
vide information on pay in private industry in a form suitable for use in ap­
praising the compensation of salaried employees in the Federal civil service.
(See appendix D .) It should be emphasized that these surveys, like any other
salary surveys, are in no sense calculated to supply mechanical answers to
questions of pay policy.
The list of occupations studied represents a wide range of pay levels.
Individually, the occupations selected were judged to be (a) surveyable in indus­
try within the framework of a broad survey design, and (b) representative of
occupational groups which are numerically important in industry as well as in
the Federal service.
Occupational definitions prepared for use in the collection of the salary
data reflect duties and responsibilities in industry; however, they are designed
to be translatable to specific pay grades in the general schedule applying to
Federal Classification Act employees.
This necessitated limiting some occu­
pations and work levels to employees with specific job functions that could be
classified uniformly among establishments.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics and
the Civil Service Commission collaborated in the preparation of the definitions.
(See appendix C . )
This survey was expanded to include establishments in nonmetropolitan
counties in addition to metropolitan areas, to which earlier surveys in this
series relate.
Comparability with the earlier studies was maintained, how­
ever, by providing for separate presentation of data for establishments in metro­
politan areas.
(See appendix B for details on survey changes.)
Information on supplementary benefits, such as paid vacations and holi­
days and health, insurance, and pension plans relating to office workers, has
been incorporated in separate reports.
(See order form at the back of this




m

bulletin.)
Data are provided in summary reports for all metropolitan areas
combined and by region, and in separate area reports for each area in which
occupational wage surveys are conducted.
The survey could not have been accomplished without the wholehearted
cooperation of the many firms whose salary scales provide the basis for the
statistical data presented in this bulletin.
The Bureau, on its own behalf and
on behalf of the other Federal agencies that collaborated in planning the survey,
wishes to express sincere appreciation for the splendid cooperation it has r e ­
ceived in this difficult undertaking.
This study was conducted in the Bureau1s Division of Occupational Pay
by Toivo P. Kanninen under the general direction of J . R. Linsenmayer, A s ­
L
sistant Commissioner for Wages and Industrial Relations.
Samuel E. Cohen
devised the sampling procedures and supervised the selection of the sample, a s ­
sisted by Theodore J. Golonka, who was responsible for the preparation of the
estimates.
The analysis was prepared by Louis E. Badenhoop.
Field work
for the survey was directed by the Bureau’ s Assistant Regional Directors for
Wages and Industrial Relations.




iv

Contents
Page
Summary
--------------- ----------------------------------------------------------> --------------------- ------ ---------Characteristics of the survey------------------------------- ----------------------------- --------------------Changes in salary levels ------------------------- ------- ------------------------ ------------------------- -----Average salaries, February—
March 1965----------------- ------------------------------------------ -—
Salary levels in metropolitan a re a s-----------------------------------------------------------------------Salary levels in large establishm ents---- ------- ------------------------------------------------------Salary distributions _____________________________________ _______ ______________ _______
Pay differences by industry---------------------------------------------------- ------------ --------- ----------Average weekly hou rs__________________________------------------------------- -----------------------

1
1
3
6
9
9
10
13
15

T ables:
Average salaries:
1. United States-------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------Z. Metropolitan a re a s------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------3. Establishments employing 2,500 or m o r e ----------------- --------------------------

16
18
20

Employment distribution by salary:
4. Professional and administrative occupations - ---------------- ---------------------5. Engineering technicians--------- --------------------------— -----------------------------------6. Drafting and clerical occupations-----------— --- --------------- -------------------------

22
27
28

Table 7*
Table 8.
Table 9.

Occupational employment distribution:
By industry d iv isio n ____________________ - ___________________ _______
Relative salary levels: Occupation by industry division-------------Average weekly hours: Occupation by industry division_________

30
31
32

Charts:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Rise in average (mean) salaries for selected occupational
groups, 1961 to 1965 _________________________ _____________ ____ - ___________
Salaries in professional and technical occupations,
February—
March 1965 ________________________ ___________________ _________Salaries in administrative and clerical occupations,
February—
March 1965 ___________________________ ______-________ ____ ______
Relative employment in selected occupational groups by
industry division, February—
March 1965 ____________ -__________________

4
11
12
14

Appendixes:
A.
B.
C.
D.

Scope and method of survey---------------------------- ----------------------------------------- _
Survey changes in 1965 —. __________________________________________________
Occupational definitions_______________________________ _____________________
Comparison of average annual salaries in private industry,
February—
March 1965, with corresponding salary rates in
Federal Classification Act General Schedule------------------------------------------




v

33
39
41

65




National Survey of Professional, Administrative, Technical, and
Clerical Pay, February—March 1965

Increases in salary levels (mean) during the year ending February—
March 1965 ranged from 2 to 5 percent for three-fourths of the professional and
administrative occupation work levels and from 2 to 3 percent for nearly all
clerical levels surveyed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Among the numer­
ically more important occupations studied, increases during the year averaged
3. 2 percent for engineers, 3. 5 percent for accountants, 2. 3 percent for engi­
neering technicians, and 2 .4 percent for clerical employees, all levels combined.
Over the 4-year period ending February—
March 1965, the relative rise in average
salaries was smaller for clerical levels than for the professional and adminis­
trative levels.
Among the 74 professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occu­
pation work levels surveyed, average (mean) monthly salaries ranged from $265
for clerks engaged in routine filing to $2, 067 for attorneys in charge of legal
staffs, handling complex legal problems but usually subordinate to a general
counsel or his immediate deputy in large firms.
For engineers, the largest
professional group studied, average salaries ranged from $626 a month for recent
college graduates in trainee positions to $1,759 for those in the highest among
eight levels studied. Monthly salaries averaged $361 for general stenographers,
the largest clerical group represented in the survey. Average monthly salaries
of engineering technicians ranged from $411 to $723 among five work levels.
For most of the occupations, salary levels in metropolitan areas and in large
establishments were higher than in all establishments in all areas surveyed com­
bined. Salary levels in finance and retail trade industries generally were lower
than in other major industry divisions represented in the survey.
The lower
salaries in finance industries were offset in part by a shorter average workweek.
Characteristics of the Survey
This annual salary survey, the sixth in a series, relates to establish­
ments employing 250 workers or more in the United States except Alaska and
Hawaii. * Nationwide estimates of salary levels and distributions are provided
2
for 74 occupation work level categories surveyed in the following industries:
Manufacturing; transportation, communication, electric, gas, and sanitary serv­
ices; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; engineer­
ing and architectural services; and research, development, and testing laboratories
operated on a commercial basis. 3 Although the survey was conducted over a
longer time period, on the average, the data are representative of the period
February—
March 1965.
Definitions for the occupations selected for study provide for classifica­
tion of employees according to appropriate work levels (or classes). Within each

* See the explanation of survey tim ing in appendix A.
2 Earlier surveys in this series were lim ited to establishments in metropolitan areas. Results of the earlier survey
reports were presented under the title: National Survey of Professional. Administrative. Technical, and C lerical Pay.
Winter 1959-60 (BLS Bulletin 1286, 1960)j Winter 1960-61 (BLS Bulletin 1310, 1961); Winter 1961-62 (BLS Bulletin 1346,
1962); February—March 1963 (BLS Bulletin 1387, 1963); and February—
March 1964 (BLS Bulletin 1422, 1964).
3 For a detailed description o f the scope and method of survey, see appendix A.




1

2

occupation, the work levels surveyed, usually designated by Roman numerals with
class I assigned to the lowest level, are defined in terms of duties and responsi­
bilities.
Specific job factors determining classification, however, varied from
occupation to occupation.
The number of work levels defined for survey in each occupation ranges
from one for office boys or girls to eight each for chemists and engineers.
More
than one level of work was defined for survey in most of the occupations; however,
some occupations were purposely defined to cover specific bands of work levels,
which were not intended to represent all levels or all workers that may be found
in those occupations.
The geographic coverage of this survey was expanded to include nonmetropolitan counties in addition to metropolitan areas, to which earlier surveys
in this series relate.
The survey was designed, however, to permit separate
presentation of data for metropolitan areas.
Coverage in metropolitan areas
was extended to include the 218 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the
United States except Alaska and Hawaii, as revised in 1964 by the Bureau of the
Budget, instead of the 212 areas represented in the previous survey.
No changes
were made in the industrial coverage.
Bookkeeping-machine operators were
dropped from the survey and revisions were made in the level definitions for
draftsmen and switchboard operators. 4
Approximately four-fifths of the total employment and nine-tenths of the
employment in professional, administrative, technical, clerical, and related oc­
cupations within scope of this survey was accounted for by establishments located
in metropolitan areas. Nine-tenths of the employees in the selected occupations
studied also were employed in metropolitan areas, although the proportion varied
considerably among the professional and administrative occupations.
The selected occupations as defined for the study accounted for more
than 1, 100, 000 employees or about a fifth of the estimated total employment in
professional, administrative, technical, clerical, and related occupations in all
establishments within scope of the survey. Employment in the selected occupa­
tions varied widely, reflecting actual differences in employment in the various
occupations, as well as differences in the range of duties and responsibilities
covered by each occupational definition. Among the professional and administra­
tive occupations, the eight levels of engineers accounted for a total of nearly
332,000 employees, whereas, fewer than 5, 000 were employed in each of four of
the occupational categories as defined for the study (chief accountants, managers
of office services, job analysts, and directors of personnel). (See table 1.) In
the clerical field, three occupations at all work levels studied (accounting clerks,
stenographers, and typists) accounted for three-fifths of the 520,000 employees
in those occupations studied.
The selected drafting room occupations had ag­
gregate employment of about 76, 000 and the five engineering technician levels
together accounted for about 79,000.
Although women accounted for two-fifths of the total employment in the
occupations studied, they were largely employed in clerical positions. The cleri­
cal occupations, in which the proportion of women amounted to more than 90 per­
cent of the employment in all levels studied, were file clerks, keypunch operators,
stenographers, switchboard operators, and typists.
Among tabulating-machine
operators, however, women accounted for only a third of the work force, and
office girls were outnumbered by office boys in a ratio of about 3 to 2. Women
accounted for a fourth of the draftsmen-tracers but less than 5 percent of the
draftsmen and engineering technicians.
The few women employees in the pro­
fessional and administrative occupations were usually reported in the first few

4 For more detailed explanation o f survey changes, see appendix B.




3
levels; those in which women accounted for as many as 10 but less than 25 per­
cent of the employment were: Accountants I, job analysts I and II, and chem­
ists I and II.
The time unit in which salary rates were expressed varied among and
within establishments. Although monthly rates were widely reported in the pro­
fessional and administrative occupations, annual rates were not uncommon, par­
ticularly among the high salaried positions. Clerical pay rates were commonly ex­
pressed in weekly term s, but other time units were in use in many establishments.
The general level of salaries for each occupation or work level is pre­
sented in this study as the arithmetic mean of all the individual salary rates.
Median salaries, the amount below and above which the salaries for 50 percent
of the employees are found, are also presented in tables 1, 2, and 3.
Changes in Salary Levels
Increases in average salary levels ranged from 2. 3 to 4. 3 percent during
the year ending February—
March 1965 among the 11 occupational groups studied
in which comparisons could be made. Average pay rates for engineering tech­
nicians and for clerical occupations as a group rose 2 .3 and 2 .4 percent, r e ­
spectively, whereas the increase for each of the nine professional and adminis­
trative occupations exceeded 3 percent. The range of increases during the most
recent period was similar to that recorded annually since the 1Winter 1960—61"
1
(February—
March 1961) survey, as shown in the following tabulation. 5 In each of
the earlier periods, however, a smaller proportion of the increases exceeded
3 percent. Over the 4-year period (1961—
65), increases ranged from 11. 2 to
16. 2 percent, as shown below and presented in chart 1.
_____ Percent increase in average salaries_______

Occupational group
—
Accountants-------------------------------■
Auditors-------------------------------------- ----Chief accountants--------------------- ----A ttorneys-----------------------------------—
Managers, office serv ices-------- ----Job analysts-------------------------------------Directors of personnel---------------------Chemists------------------------------------ ----Engineers------------------------------------ ----Engineering technicians-----------------Drafting-------------------------------------- —
C le r ic a l------------------------------------ ------

1964
to
1965

1963
to
1964

1962
to
1963

1961
to
1962

1961
to
1965

3 .5
3 .9
3 .9
4 .2
4 .3
4 .3
3 .5
3 .9
3 .2
2 .3

2 .8
3. 1
4 .8
3 .3
2 .7
3 .5
4 .6
3. 3
2 .9
3 .6
2 .6
2 .9

3 .3
3 .6
2 .8
4 .6
2 .2
2 .6
3 .0
3 .8
4 .4
2 .9
3 .6
2 .6

2 .8
2 .9
2 .6
3. 2
3 .3
1 .4
3 .7
3 .9
2 .6

1 3.0
14.2
14.8
16. 2
13.1
12.3
15.6
15.8
13.7

(M
3 .8
2 .9

(M
(2)
11.2

<2 )
2 .4

1 Engineering technicians were not surveyed before 1962.
2 Comparison with the 1965 data was not possible for draftsmen because
of changes in the level definitions.

Although the percent change in average salaries during the recent year
differed among the various work levels studied, for the 48 professional and ad­
ministrative levels, nearly three-fourths had salary increases from 2 to 5 per­
cent, while nearly all of the 17 clerical levels had salary increases from 2 to
3 percent (table 2).

5
In the comparisons of year-to-year changes, employment in the most recent year was used as a constant em­
ployment weight in both periods to eliminate the effect of year-to-year changes in the proportions of employees in
various work levels within an occupational category.
Changes over the 4-year period were obtained by linking to­
gether the year-to-year changes.




4

Chart 1. Rise in Average (Mean) Salaries for Selected Occupational Groups,
1961 to 1965

OCCUPATIONAL
GROUPS

PERCENT
0

Attorneys

Chemists

Directors of personnel

Chief accountants

Auditors

Engineers

Managers, office services

Accountants

Job analysts

Clerical employees




2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

II

I2

13

14

15

16

5

In order to examine the relative rise in average salaries over the 4-year
period (1961—65) among various levels of work, all occupation work levels in
which the survey definitions had not been revised between selected periods were
classified into three broad groupings, as shown in the following tabulation.
The
median increases shown were determined by arraying the relative increases in
average salaries for the occupation work levels within each of the groupings that
were identical for both periods.
1964 to 1965_______1963 to 1965

Work level groupings
C lerical and beginning
technician l e v e l s ------------Entry and development pro­
fessional levels, advanced
technician levels, super­
visors of nonprofessional
l e v e ls ---------------------------Fully experienced profes­
sional working levels,
supervisors of professional
levels, and program administrative le v e l s ------------

Number
of
work
levels

Median
percent
increase

17

2 .4

22

29

Number
of
work
levels

1961 to 1963

Median
percent
increase

Number
of
work
levels

17

5. 1

12

3 .4

22

6 .6

3 .9

29

7 .9

1961 to 1965
Number
of
work
levels

Median
percent
increase

5 .5

8

10.6

19

6 .7

19

13.7

27

7 .0

27

15.2

Median
percent
increase

As indicated by this comparison, average salaries have been rising at a
higher rate in the professional and administrative levels than in the clerical
levels. Over the 1961— period, the median increase was 10. 6 percent for the
65
grouping representing primarily clerical levels, compared to 13. 7 percent for the
grouping of lower professional and administrative levels, and 15.2 percent for
the fully experienced levels of these occupations studied. A similar pattern of
larger median increases at the higher work levels also is apparent for each of
the intermediate periods shown.
The increases for the levels within the clerical
grouping were clustered more closely about the median than were the increases
for the other two groupings in each period. For example, in the 1964—65 period,
the increases were within 1 percentage point of the median in 16 of the 17 levels
in the clerical grouping, compared to a range within 2 percentage points of the
median for 21 of the 29 levels of fully experienced personnel in professional
and administrative occupations.
Changes in average salaries reflect not only general salary increases
and merit or other increases given to individuals while in the same work level
category, but they also may reflect other factors such as employee turnover,
expansions or reductions in the work force, and changes in staffing patterns
within establishments with different salary levels.
For example, an expansion
in force may increase the proportion of employees at the minimum of the salary
range established for a work level, which would tend to lower the average,
whereas, a reduction or a low turnover in the work force may have the opposite
effect.
Similarly, year-to-year promotions of employees to higher work levels
of professional and administrative occupations may affect average salaries, lower­
ing or raising the average. For example, the established salary ranges for such
occupations are relatively wide, and promoted employees, who may have been
paid the maximum of the salary scale for the lower level, are likely to be re­
placed by less experienced employees who may be paid the minimum; or vacan­
cies may exist at the time of the resurvey. Occupations most likely to reflect




6

such changes in the salary averages are the higher levels of professional and ad­
ministrative occupations and single-incumbent positions such as chief accountant,
director of personnel, and manager of office services.6
Average Salaries, February—
March 1965
Average (mean) monthly salaries among the 74 professional, administra­
tive, technical, and clerical occupation work levels defined for the current survey
ranged from $265 for file clerks I to $2,067 for attorneys VII (table 1).
These
levels range from clerks, who file material that has been classified or is easily
classified in a simple serial classification system, to heads of legal staffs with
responsibility for planning and conducting legal studies and approving recommen­
dations of subordinates on important technical legal questions, but who are usually
subordinate to a general counsel or his immediate deputy in large fir m s .7
Among the five levels of accountants surveyed, average monthly salaries
ranged from $526 for accountants I to $995 for accountants V. Auditors in the
four levels defined for survey had average salaries ranging from $517 a month
for auditors I to $894 for auditors IV. Level I in both the accounting and auditing
series included trainees with bachelor's degrees in accounting or the equivalent
in education and experience combined. Only at level I were salaries of auditors
below those for accountants; at level III, which accounted for the largest group
of employees in each series, monthly salaries averaged $729 for auditors and
$ 677 for accountants.
Half the relatively few auditors I and approximately a
fifth of those in the higher levels were employed in finance industries, whereas,
more than four-fifths of the accountants at all levels were employed in manufac­
turing and public utilities industries together. 8 The proportion of employees in
each major industry division within scope of the survey is shown for each occu­
pation in table 7 and presented graphically in chart 4.
Chief accountants were surveyed separately from accountants and included
those who develop or adapt and direct the accounting program for a company or
an establishment (plant) of a company.
Level classification was determined by
the extent of delegated authority and responsibility; the technical complexity of the
system; and, to a lesser degree, the size of the professional staff directed.
Chief accountants at level I, who have authority to adapt the accounting system,
established at higher levels, to meet the needs of an establishment of a company
with relatively few and stable functions and work processes (directing one or two
accountants), averaged $895 a month. Chief accountants IV, 9 who have authority
to establish and maintain the accounting program, subject to general policy guide­
lines, for a company with numerous and varied functions and work processes
(directing as many as 40 accountants), averaged $ 1,419 a month. Nearly threefourths of the chief accountants who met the requirements of the definitions for
these four levels were employed in manufacturing industries.
Attorneys classified at level I averaged $ 614 a month. These were train­
ees with LL. B. degrees and bar membership who held positions in legal advisory
departments of firms in which their full professional training could be utilized.1
0

These types of occupations also may be subject to greater sampling error, as explained in the last paragraph
of appendix A.
7 Classification of employees in the occupations and work levels surveyed was based on factors detailed in the
definitions in appendix C.
8 Establishments primarily engaged in providing accounting and auditing services were excluded from the survey.
9 Although level V of chief accountant was surveyed, as defined in appendix C, too few employees met re­
quirements for this level to warrant presentation of salary figures.
10 Establishments primarily engaged in offering legal advice or legal services were excluded from the survey.




7

A tto r n e y s V II, the h ig h e s t le v e l s u r v e y e d in th is s e r i e s , w e r e p a id m o n th ly s a l ­
a r i e s a v e r a g in g $ 2 ,0 6 7 .
L e v e l VII w a s d e fin e d to in c lu d e a tto r n e y s in c h a r g e o f
le g a l s t a f f s , h an d lin g a s s ig n m e n ts in one o r m o r e b r o a d le g a l a r e a s , w ith r e ­
s p o n s ib ilit y f o r a p p ro v in g r e c o m m e n d a tio n s o f s u b o r d in a te s w h ich m a y h a v e an
im p o r ta n t b e a r in g on the com p a n y *s b u s in e s s . A lth o u g h th is w a s the h ig h e s t le v e l
s u r v e y e d , s u ch a tto r n e y s w e r e u s u a lly s u b o r d in a te to a g e n e r a l c o u n s e l o r h is
im m e d ia te d ep u ty in la r g e f ir m s .
M a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s tr ie s and the fin a n c e , in ­
s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te in d u s tr ie s e a c h e m p lo y e d a th ir d o f the a tto r n e y s ; a
h igh p r o p o r t io n o f the r e m a in d e r w e r e e m p lo y e d in p u b lic u tilitie s (22 p e r c e n t ).

M
anagers of office services, a s d e fin e d f o r the stu d y , in c lu d e d fo u r le v e ls
b a s e d on the v a r ie t y o f c l e r i c a l and o th e r o f f i c e s e r v i c e s s u p e r v is e d and the
s iz e o f the o r g a n iz a tio n s e r v i c e d .
T h o s e a t l e v e l I w e r e r e s p o n s ib le f o r p r o ­
v id in g 4 o r 5 o f the 9 o f f i c e s e r v i c e fu n ctio n s e n u m e ra te d in the s u r v e y d e f i ­
n itio n f o r a s t a ff o f 300 to 600 e m p lo y e e s , c o m p a r e d w ith s e v e n o r e ig h t f u n c ­
tio n s f o r a bou t 1, 500 to 3 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s at le v e l IV .
A m o n g th e se l e v e l s ,
a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r ie s ra n g e d f r o m $ 6 4 6 to $ 1, 152. M a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s tr ie s
a c c o u n te d f o r a b ou t t h r e e - f if t h s o f the e m p lo y e e s in the fo u r le v e ls c o m b in e d , and
an a d d itio n a l fifth w e r e e m p lo y e d in fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te in d u s t r ie s .
In the p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t fie ld , fo u r w o r k l e v e ls e a ch o f job analysts
and directors of personnel w e r e s tu d ie d . 11 J ob a n a ly s ts I, d e fin e d to in c lu d e tr a in e e s
u n d e r im m e d ia te s u p e r v is io n , a v e r a g e d $ 5 5 8 c o m p a r e d w ith $ 8 8 9 f o r jo b a n a ­
ly s t s IV , who a n a ly z e and ev a lu a te a v a r ie t y o f the m o r e d iffic u lt jo b s u n d e r
g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n and w ho m a y p a r tic ip a t e in the d e v e lo p m e n t and in s ta lla t io n
o f e v a lu a tio n o r c o m p e n s a tio n s y s t e m s .
D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l w e r e lim it e d
b y d e fin itio n to th o s e w ho had p r o g r a m s that in c lu d e d , at a m in im u m , r e s p o n ­
s ib ilit y f o r a d m in is te r in g a f o r m a l jo b e v a lu a tio n s y s t e m , e m p lo y m e n t and p l a c e ­
m e n t fu n c tio n s , and e m p lo y e e r e la t io n s and s e r v i c e s fu n c tio n s .
T h o s e w ith
r e s p o n s ib ilit y f o r a ctu a l c o n t r a c t n e g o tia tio n w ith la b o r u n ion s as the p r in c ip a l
co m p a n y r e p r e s e n t a t iv e w e r e e x c lu d e d .
P r o v is io n s w e r e m a d e in the d e fin itio n
f o r w e ig h in g v a r io u s c o m b in a tio n s o f d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b i li t i e s to d e te r m in e the
l e v e l c l a s s if i c a t io n .
A m o n g p e r s o n n e l d i r e c t o r s w ith jo b fu n ctio n s a s s p e c if ie d
f o r the fo u r l e v e ls o f r e s p o n s ib ilit y , a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r ie s ra n g e d f r o m
$ 798 f o r l e v e l I to $ 1 ,4 1 3 f o r le v e l IV .
M a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s tr ie s a c c o u n te d f o r
81 p e r c e n t o f the jo b a n a ly s ts and 79 p e r c e n t o f the d i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l i n ­
c lu d e d in the stu d y ; the fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te in d u s tr ie s ra n k e d n ex t
w ith 12 p e r c e n t o f the jo b a n a ly s ts and 8 p e r c e n t o f the d ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l.

Chemists and engineers e a ch w e r e s u r v e y e d in e ig h t l e v e l s .
E a ch s e r i e s
s ta r te d w ith a p r o f e s s i o n a l tr a in e e l e v e l , t y p ic a lly r e q u ir in g a B .S . d e g r e e .
The
h ig h e s t l e v e l s u r v e y e d in v o lv e d e ith e r fu ll r e s p o n s ib ilit y o v e r a v e r y b r o a d and
h ig h ly c o m p le x and d iv e r s if ie d e n g in e e r in g o r c h e m ic a l p r o g r a m , w ith s e v e r a l
s u b o r d in a te s e a ch d ir e c t in g la r g e and im p o r ta n t s e g m e n ts o f the p r o g r a m ; o r i n ­
d iv id u a l r e s e a r c h and c o n s u lta tio n in d iffic u lt p r o b le m a r e a s w h e r e the e n g in e e r
o r c h e m is t w a s a r e c o g n iz e d a u th o r ity and w h e r e s o lu tio n s w ou ld r e p r e s e n t a
m a jo r s c ie n t if ic o r t e c h n o lo g ic a l a d v a n ce . 12 A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r ie s ra n g e d
f r o m $ 6 2 6 f o r e n g in e e r s I to $ 1, 759 f o r e n g in e e r s V III, and f r o m $ 5 5 1 f o r
c h e m is t s I to $ 1 ,8 5 1 f o r c h e m is t s VIII. A lth o u g h , at l e v e l I , the a v e r a g e s a l a r ie s
o f e n g in e e r s e x c e e d e d th o s e f o r c h e m is ts by a lm o s t 14 p e r c e n t , at le v e l IV the
d if fe r e n c e n a r r o w e d to l e s s than 4 p e r c e n t , and at le v e l V III the a v e r a g e s a l a r ie s
o f c h e m is t s e x c e e d e d th o s e f o r e n g in e e r s by 5 p e r c e n t .
L e v e l IV , the la r g e s t

Although level V of director of personnel was surveyed, as defined in appendix C, too few employees met
requirements for this level to warrant presentation of salary figures.
12
It was recognized in the definition that top positions of some companies with unusually extensive and com ­
plex engineering or chem ical programs were above that level.




8

g r o u p in e a ch s e r i e s , in c lu d e d p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p lo y e e s w h o w e r e fully c o m p e te n t
in a ll t e c h n ic a l a s p e c t s o f t h e ir a s s ig n m e n ts , w o r k e d w ith c o n s id e r a b le in d e ­
p e n d e n c e , and, in s o m e c a s e s , s u p e r v is e d a fe w p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n ic a l w o r k ­
ers.
M a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s tr ie s a c c o u n te d f o r 83 p e r c e n t o f a ll e n g in e e r s and
93 p e r c e n t o f a ll c h e m is t s ; p u b lic u t ilit ie s , 9 and l e s s than 4 p e r c e n t , r e s p e c ­
t iv e ly ; and the s u r v e y e d e n g in e e r in g and s c i e n t if ic s e r v i c e s e m p lo y e d v ir tu a lly
a ll o f the o t h e r s .
T h e f i v e - l e v e l s e r i e s f o r engineering technicians w a s lim it e d , by d e fin itio n ,
to e m p lo y e e s p r o v id in g s e m ip r o f e s s i o n a l t e c h n ic a l s u p p o rt to e n g in e e r s e n g a g e d
in s u ch a r e a s as r e s e a r c h , d e s ig n , d e v e lo p m e n t, te s tin g , o r m a n u fa ctu rin g p r o c e s s
im p r o v e m e n t , and w h o s e w o r k p e r ta in e d to e l e c t r i c a l , e l e c t r o n i c , o r m e c h a n ic a l
co m p o n e n ts o r e q u ip m e n t. T e c h n ic ia n s e n g a g e d p r i m a r il y in p r o d u c tio n o r m a in ­
te n a n c e w o r k w e r e e x c lu d e d .
E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s I, w h o p e r f o r m e d s im p le ,
ro u tin e ta s k s u n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v is io n , o r f r o m d e ta ile d p r o c e d u r e s , w e r e p a id
m o n th ly s a l a r ie s a v e r a g in g $ 4 1 1 .
E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s V , the h ig h e st le v e l
s u r v e y e d , a v e r a g e d $ 7 2 3 a m on th .
T h at l e v e l in c lu d e d fu lly e x p e r ie n c e d t e c h ­
n ic ia n s p e r f o r m in g m o r e c o m p le x a s s ig n m e n ts in v o lv in g r e s p o n s ib ilit y f o r p la n ­
n ing and co n d u ctin g a c o m p le t e p r o je c t o f r e la t iv e ly lim it e d s c o p e , o r a p o r t io n
o f a l a r g e r and m o r e d iv e r s e p r o je c t , in a c c o r d a n c e w ith o b je c t i v e s , r e q u i r e ­
m e n ts , and d e s ig n a p p r o a c h e s as o u tlin e d b y th e s u p e r v is o r o r a p r o f e s s i o n a l
e n g in e e r .
A v e r a g e s f o r in t e r m e d ia te l e v e ls III and IV , at w h ich a m a jo r it y o f
the te c h n ic ia n s s u r v e y e d w e r e c l a s s i f i e d , w e r e $ 5 6 9 and $ 6 4 0 , r e s p e c t i v e l y .
A s m igh t be e x p e c t e d , n e a r ly a ll o f th e t e c h n ic ia n s as d e fin e d w e r e e m p lo y e d in
m a n u fa ctu rin g (82 p e r c e n t ) and in th e s c i e n t if ic s e r v i c e s in d u s tr ie s stu d ied (13 p e r ­
c e n t).
A lth ou gh th e r a tio o f su ch t e c h n ic ia n s to e n g in e e r s stu d ie d w a s a bou t 1 to
4, r e s p e c t i v e l y , in a ll m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s , h ig h e r r a t io s o f a p p r o x im a te ly
2 to 7 w e r e fou n d in e s ta b lis h m e n ts m a n u fa ctu rin g m e c h a n ic a l and e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip ­
m en t, and 1 to 2 in r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p m e n t, and te s tin g l a b o r a t o r i e s .
In th e
drafting field, th e r e v is e d d e fin itio n s u s e d in th is s u r v e y c o v e r e d
fo u r l e v e ls o f w o r k — d r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s , and d r a ft s m e n I, II, and III.
M on th ly
s a l a r ie s a v e r a g e d $ 3 6 2 f o r d r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s and ra n g e d f r o m $ 4 5 2 to $ 6 7 0
a m on g th e t h r e e le v e ls o f d r a fts m e n .
D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s c o p y p la n s and d r a w ­
in g s p r e p a r e d b y o th e r s o r p r e p a r e s im p le o r r e p e t it iv e d ra w in g s o f e a s ily v i s ­
u a liz e d i t e m s .
T h e th r e e d r a fts m e n l e v e ls , as d e fin e d , ra n g e f r o m e m p lo y e e s
p r e p a r in g d e ta il d ra w in g s o f s in g le u n its o r p a r ts ( le v e l I) to th o s e w h o, w o r k in g
in c l o s e su p p o rt w ith th e d e s ig n o r ig in a t o r , p la n th e g r a p h ic p r e s e n ta tio n o f c o m ­
p le x ite m s h av in g d is t in c t iv e d e s ig n fe a t u r e s , and e ith e r p r e p a r e o r d ir e c t the
p r e p a r a t io n o f th e d ra w in g s (le v e l III).
T h e d r a ftin g e m p lo y e e s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d
by in d u s try in abou t the s a m e p r o p o r t io n as e n g in e e r s , w ith 8 4 p e r c e n t in m a n u ­
fa c tu r in g , 8 p e r c e n t in p u b lic u t ilit ie s , and n e a r ly a ll o f the r e m a in d e r in the
s e le c t e d e n g in e e r in g and s c i e n t if ic s e r v i c e s in d u s tr ie s s tu d ie d .
A m o n g the 17 clerical jobs r e p r e s e n t e d in the stu dy, m on th ly s a l a r ie s
ra n g e d f r o m $ 2 6 5 f o r f il e c l e r k s I to $ 50 8 f o r ta b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s III,
w ho w e r e r e q u ir e d to p e r f o r m , w ith ou t c l o s e s u p e r v is io n , c o m p le t e r e p o r tin g
a s s ig n m e n ts b y m a c h in e , in clu d in g d iffic u lt w ir in g a s r e q u ir e d .
A v e r a g e s w ith in
the ra n g e o f $ 3 0 0 th ro u g h $ 39 8 a m on th w e r e r e c o r d e d f o r 11 o f th e o th e r 15 w o r k
l e v e l s ; g e n e r a l s t e n o g r a p h e r s , the l a r g e s t g r o u p o f c l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s stu d ie d ,
a vera ged $361.
O f fic e b o y s o r g i r l s , t w o - f if t h s o f w h o m w e r e e m p lo y e d in m a n u ­
fa c tu r in g in d u s t r ie s , a v e r a g e d $ 2 4 a m on th m o r e than f il e c l e r k s I, w ho w e r e m o r e
h e a v ily r e p r e s e n t e d in the fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te in d u s t r ie s .
W om en
a c c o u n te d f o r n in e -te n th s o r m o r e o f th e e m p lo y e e s in 11 o f th e c l e r i c a l w o r k
l e v e ls , and the m e n a c c o u n te d f o r h a lf o r m o r e in 3 (ta b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s II
and III, and o f f i c e b o y s o r g i r l s ) . A lth ou g h e m p lo y m e n t in m a n u fa ctu rin g e x c e e d e d
that in th e fiv e o th e r n o n m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s try d iv is io n s w ith in s c o p e o f the
s u r v e y in 15 o f th e 17 c l e r i c a l w o r k l e v e l s , in o n ly s e v e n in s ta n c e s d id m a n u ­
fa c tu r in g a cco u n t f o r m o r e than h a lf the e m p lo y e e s .




9

M e d ia n m o n th ly s a l a r ie s (the am ou n t b e lo w and a b o v e w h ich 50 p e r c e n t o f
the e m p lo y e e s w e r e found) f o r m o s t o f the w o r k le v e ls w e r e s lig h tly lo w e r than
the w e ig h te d a v e r a g e s (m e a n s ) c ite d a b o v e (i. e. , the s a l a r ie s in the u p p e r h a lv e s
o f the a r r a y s had a g r e a t e r e f fe c t on the a v e r a g e s than did the s a l a r ie s in the
lo w e r h a lv e s ).
T h e r e la t iv e d if fe r e n c e b e tw e e n the m e d ia n and the m e a n w as
le s s than 2 p e r c e n t f o r 56 o f the 74 w o r k le v e ls and as m u ch as 2 but le s s than
3 p e r c e n t in 9 a d d itio n a l l e v e ls .
T h e w e ig h te d a v e r a g e s a la r ie s e x c e e d e d the
m e d ia n s b y 4 p e r c e n t o r m o r e o n ly f o r d ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l IV (5 p e r c e n t ),
c h e m is ts VIII ( 4 .2 p e r c e n t ), and o f f i c e b o y s o r g i r l s (4 p e r c e n t ).

S a la r y L e v e ls in M e t r o p o lita n A r e a s
A v e r a g e s a l a r ie s f o r m o s t o f the o c c u p a tio n w o r k le v e ls w e r e e ith e r
id e n tic a l w ith o r o n ly s lig h t ly h ig h e r in e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith in m e tr o p o lit a n a r e a s ,
p r e s e n t e d in ta b le 2, than in a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts in m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s and n o n ­
m e tr o p o lit a n co u n tie s c o m b in e d (ta b le 1).
T h e s u r v e y w as n ot d e s ig n e d to p e r m it
s e p a r a te p r e s e n ta tio n o f d ata f o r e s ta b lis h m e n ts in n o n m e tr o p o lita n c o u n tie s .
E m p lo y m e n t in the s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s a cco u n te d f o r a p ­
p r o x im a t e ly n in e -te n th s o f the to ta l e m p lo y m e n t in th e s e o c c u p a tio n s w ith in s c o p e
o f the s u r v e y .
T h e p r o p o r t io n s v a r ie d , h o w e v e r , a m o n g o c c u p a tio n s and w o r k
l e v e ls .
N e a r ly a ll o f the a tto r n e y s at e a ch le v e l, f o r e x a m p le , w e r e e m p lo y e d
in m e tr o p o lit a n a r e a s , w h e r e a s the p r o p o r t io n o f c h ie f a cco u n ta n ts and d i r e c t o r s
o f p e r s o n n e l f o r a ll le v e ls c o m b in e d w as a p p r o x im a te ly f o u r - f i f t h s w ith a s m a l le r
p r o p o r t io n at the lo w e s t l e v e ls .
In a m a jo r i t y o f the 74 w o r k le v e ls s tu d ie d ,
m o r e than n in e -te n th s o f the e m p lo y m e n t w as in m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s .
It is a p ­
p a r e n t , t h e r e f o r e , that alth ou gh a v e r a g e s a la r ie s u s u a lly w e r e lo w e r in the n o n m e t r o p o lit a n c o u n tie s , in th o s e w o r k le v e ls in w h ich n e a r ly a ll o f the e m p lo y m e n t
w as in m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s , the a d d ed co u n tie s co u ld h av e little e f fe c t u pon the
a v e r a g e s f o r a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts c o m b in e d .
O n ly in 12 o f the 74 w o r k le v e ls
stu d ied w e r e a v e r a g e s a l a r ie s as m u ch as 1 (bu t n o t m o r e than 2. 5) p e r c e n t
h ig h e r in m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s than in a ll a r e a s c o m b in e d ; in e a ch o f th e s e c a s e s
the p r o p o r t io n o f the to ta l e m p lo y m e n t w ith in n o n m e tr o p o lita n co u n tie s e x c e e d e d
10 p e r c e n t .
M a n u fa ctu rin g a c c o u n te d f o r n in e -te n th s o f the e s ta b lis h m e n ts and e m ­
p lo y m e n t a dd ed to the s u r v e y s c o p e b y the a d d itio n o f n o n m e tr o p o lita n c o u n tie s ;
e m p lo y m e n t in s u ch c o u n t ie s , h o w e v e r , is m o r e h e a v ily c o n c e n tr a te d in c o n s u m e r g o o d s in d u s tr ie s and in r e la t iv e ly s m a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts than is the c a s e w ith
m a n u fa ctu rin g in m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s .

S a la r y L e v e ls in L a r g e E s ta b lis h m e n ts
It w a s p o s s i b l e to p r e s e n t s e p a r a te d ata f o r 64 o f the 74 o c c u p a tio n w o r k
le v e ls f o r a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith 2 ,5 0 0 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e (ta b le 3 ).
C om ­
p a r is o n s b e tw e e n e m p lo y m e n ts and r e la t iv e s a la r y le v e ls in th e s e e s ta b lis h m e n ts
and a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts c o m b in e d a ls o a r e p r e s e n t e d .
E s ta b lis h m e n ts e m p lo y in g
2 ,5 0 0 o r m o r e a c c o u n te d f o r tw o -fift h s o f the to ta l e m p lo y m e n t in p r o f e s s i o n a l ,
a d m in is tr a tiv e , s u p e r v is o r y , and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s w ith in s c o p e o f the s u r v e y ,
and a p p r o x im a t e ly the s a m e p r o p o r t io n o f to ta l e m p lo y m e n t in the s e le c t e d o c c u ­
p a tio n s stu d ied .
A m o n g the 64 o c c u p a tio n w o r k le v e ls sh ow n in ta b le 3, the
p e r c e n t o f to ta l e m p lo y m e n t in the la r g e e s ta b lis h m e n ts v a r ie d f r o m 16 to 75 p e r ­
ce n t ( d i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l III and e n g in e e r in g te c h n ic ia n s V , r e s p e c t i v e l y ) .
T h e s a la r y le v e ls in la r g e e s ta b lis h m e n ts e x p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t o f
l e v e ls in a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts c o m b in e d , ra n g e d f r o m l e s s than 100 ( f o r the top
le v e l s u r v e y e d in e a c h o f the a cco u n ta n t, c h ie f a cco u n ta n t, and a tto r n e y s e r i e s )




10

to 113 f o r f ile c l e r k s II.
A s sh ow n in the fo llo w in g ta b u la tio n , s a la r y a v e r a g e s
f o r la r g e e s ta b lis h m e n ts e x c e e d e d the a ll-e s t a b lis h m e n t a v e r a g e s b y 5 p e r c e n t o r
m o r e in 15 o f 17 c l e r i c a l jo b s and in 13 o f 47 n o n c l e r i c a l j o b s .
Number of job categories
Professional,
administrative,
and technical

C lerical

T o t a l ----------------------------------

47

17

97-100 ......................................................
101-104......................................................
105-109......................................................
110 and over-----------------------------

8

_

10
3

2
13
2

Pay levels as percent of all
establishment average

T h e s e r e la t iv e s a la r y le v e ls in la r g e e s ta b lis h m e n ts ten d ed to b e h ig h e s t
f o r w o r k le v e ls in w h ich s u ch e s ta b lis h m e n ts a c c o u n te d f o r the s m a lle s t p r o p o r ­
tio n o f the to ta l e m p lo y m e n t.
T h u s , the d e g r e e o f e m p lo y m e n t c o n c e n tr a tio n
(in la r g e e s ta b lis h m e n ts ) ra n g e d f r o m 24 to 43 p e r c e n t f o r c l e r i c a l jo b s ; in m o r e
than h a lf o f the n o n c l e r i c a l jo b s , m o r e than 40 p e r c e n t w e r e in e s ta b lis h m e n ts
w ith 2 ,5 0 0 o r m o r e e m p lo y e e s .

S a la r y D is t r ib u tio n s
P e r c e n t d is tr ib u t io n s o f e m p lo y e e s b y m o n th ly s a l a r ie s a r e p r e s e n t e d f o r
the p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s in ta b le 4 , and f o r e n g in e e r in g
te c h n ic ia n s in ta b le 5; d is tr ib u t io n s b y w e e k ly s a la r ie s a r e sh ow n f o r e m p lo y e e s
in the d r a ftin g and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s in ta b le 6. 13
W ithin n e a r ly a ll o f the
74 o c c u p a tio n w o r k l e v e l s , s a la r y r a te s f o r s o m e o f the h ig h e s t p a id e m p lo y e e s
w e r e t w ic e th o s e o f the lo w e s t p a id e m p lo y e e s .
A ll o c c u p a tio n s in w h ich tw o
le v e ls o r m o r e o f w o r k w e r e s u r v e y e d sh o w e d a s u b s ta n tia l d e g r e e o f o v e r la p p in g
o f in d iv id u a l s a l a r ie s b e tw e e n w o r k l e v e ls in the s a m e o c c u p a tio n .
R a n g e s in
s a la r y r a te s o f e m p lo y e e s in e s ta b lis h e d p a y g r a d e s o r w o r k le v e ls w ith in s a la r y
s t r u c t u r e s o f in d iv id u a l f ir m s a ls o e x h ib ite d s u b s ta n tia l o v e r la p p in g .

T h e m id d le 50 and 80 p e r c e n t o f the r a n g e , and the m e d ia n s a la r y f o r
e a ch o c c u p a tio n w o r k l e v e l h a v e b e e n ch a r te d (c h a r t s 2 and 3) to p o in t up o c c u ­
p a tio n a l p a y r e la tio n s h ip s a s w e ll as th e t y p ic a lly g r e a t e r d e g r e e o f s a la r y d i s ­
p e r s io n a s s o c ia t e d w ith the h ig h e r w o r k le v e ls in e a ch o c c u p a tio n a l s e r i e s .

T h e a b s o lu te s p r e a d b e tw e e n h ig h e s t and lo w e s t p a id w o r k e r s w ith in
g iv e n w o r k l e v e ls ten d ed to w id en w ith e a ch s u c c e s s i v e w o r k le v e l f o r m o s t o c ­
cu p a tio n s in w h ich tw o l e v e ls o r m o r e w e r e s u r v e y e d .
T h e r e la t iv e s p r e a d in
s a la r y ra n g e s sh ow ed c o n s id e r a b le v a r ia t io n a m o n g o c c u p a t io n s , and in m a n y
c a s e s , the r e la t iv e s p r e a d w a s s m a l le r f o r p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e w o r k
le v e ls than f o r c l e r i c a l le v e ls s tu d ie d .
E x p r e s s in g the s a la r y ra n g e o f the m id d le
50 p e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s as a p e r c e n t o f the m e d ia n s a la r y p e r m itte d c o m p a r is o n s
o f s a l a r y r a n g e s f o r the v a r io u s w o r k l e v e ls on the s a m e b a s i s , and a ls o e l i m i ­
n ated e x t r e m e lo w and h ig h s a la r ie s f r o m e a ch c o m p a r is o n .

13
Technical considerations dictated the summarization o f employee distributions by weekly salaries in the case
of the drafting and clerical jobs.




11

Chart 2. Salaries in Professional and Technical Occupations, February-March 1965




Median Monthly Salaries and Ranges Within Which Fell 50 Percent and 80 Percent o f Employees
0

$250

$500

$750

$ 1,000

$ 1,250

$ 1,500

$ 1,750

$2,000

$2,250

$2,500

$2,750

12
Chart 3. Salaries in Administrative and Clerical Occupations, February-March 1965




Median Monthly Salaries and Ranges Within Which Fell 50 Percent and 80 Percent o f Employees

13

Distribution of work levels by degree of dispersion
(salary range of middle 50 percent of employees
expressed as a percent of median salary)______

Occupational group

T otal

A ll levels ------------------ —

74

A ccountants------------------------—
A u d ito rs---------------------------- —
Chief accoun tan ts---------------- —
Attorneys---------------------------- —
Managers, office s e r v ic e s ------ —
Job a n a ly s ts ------------------------—
Directors of personnel------------ —
Chem ists---------------------------- —
E n g in eers---------------------------—
Engineering tech n ician s--------- —
D ra ftin g ---------------------------C l e r i c a l ---------------------------- —

5
4
4
7
4
4
4
8
8
5
17

Under
15
6

1
1
2
2

15
and
under
20

20
and
under
25

25
and
under
30

19

31

16

4
1
1
1
1
1

1
3
3
3
2
1
1
3
3

4
3
3

3
8

30
and
over
2

3
2
2

1

1
8

1

T h u s, in th is c o m p a r is o n , the m id d le ra n ge f o r a tto rn e y le v e ls a m ou n ted
to 20 p e r c e n t o r m o r e o f the c o r r e s p o n d in g m e d ia n in 6 o f 7 l e v e l s , w h e r e a s
the ra n ge w a s l e s s than 20 p e r c e n t o f the c o r r e s p o n d in g m e d ia n f o r 5 o f the
8 le v e ls o f b oth e n g in e e r s and c h e m is t s .
T h e r e la tiv e s p r e a d ten d ed to w id en
at the h ig h e r le v e ls o f m o s t o f the p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a t io n s .
F o r e x a m p le , e n g in e e r s w e r e d is tr ib u t e d b y le v e l in the p r e c e d in g ta b u la tio n as
f o ll o w s :
L e v e ls I and II, u n d e r 15 p e r c e n t ; III and IV, 15 and u n d e r 20 p e r c e n t ;
and le v e ls V th ro u g h V III, 20 and u n d e r 25 p e r c e n t w ith the e x c e p t io n o f le v e l VII
(19 p e r c e n t ).
F o r the c l e r i c a l le v e ls stu d ie d , the ra n g e w a s b e tw e e n 20 and
30 p e r c e n t o f th e c o r r e s p o n d in g m e d ia n s w ith o n e e x c e p t io n (31 p e r c e n t f o r s w it c h ­
b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I).
D iff e r e n c e s in the ra n g e o f s a l a r ie s p a id in d iv id u a ls w ith in w o r k le v e ls
s u r v e y e d r e f l e c t a v a r ie t y o f f a c t o r s , o th e r than d if fe r e n c e s in th e ra n g e o f d u ties
and r e s p o n s i b i li t i e s e n c o m p a s s e d b y the v a r io u s w o r k - l e v e l d e fin itio n s .
S a la r ie s
o f in d iv id u a ls in the s a m e o c c u p a tio n and g r a d e le v e l m a y v a r y c o n s id e r a b ly w ith in
e s ta b lis h m e n ts .
S a la r ie s o f w h i t e - c o l l a r e m p lo y e e s a r e g e n e r a lly d e te r m in e d on
an in d iv id u a l b a s is o r u n d er f o r m a liz e d p a y p la n s w h ich p r o v id e f o r a ra n ge in
s a la r y r a te s f o r e a ch g r a d e le v e l w ith in e a ch o c c u p a tio n .
T h e i n - g r a d e s a la r y
s p r e a d (i. e . , the p e r c e n t d if fe r e n c e b e tw e e n the m in im u m and m a x im u m ra te s
f o r a g r a d e ) ten d s to b e g r e a t e r in the p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e jo b s than
in the c l e r i c a l jo b s . 141 F o r the p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a t io n s , the
5
jo b f ie ld ten d s to b e n a tio n a l in s c o p e .
O ffic e c l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s , on the o th e r
hand, a r e u s u a lly r e c r u it e d l o c a ll y . 5 A s p o in te d out e a r l i e r (and in d ic a te d in
ta b le 7 and c h a r t 4 ), e m p lo y m e n t in the v a r io u s in d u s tr ie s w ith in the s c o p e o f
the s u r v e y v a r i e s c o n s id e r a b ly f r o m o c c u p a tio n to o c c u p a tio n .
T h e s e v a r ia t io n s
in e m p lo y m e n t a ls o a r e r e f l e c t e d in s a la r y le v e ls and d is tr ib u t io n s to th e exten t
that s a l a r ie s d i f f e r b y in d u s tr y , as e x p la in e d in the fo llo w in g s e c t io n .
P a y D iff e r e n c e s b y In d u stry
T h e s u r v e y w a s p la n n ed to p e r m it p u b lic a tio n o f n a tio n a l s a la r y e s tim a te s
b y le v e l o f w o r k f o r the p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s in a ll in d u s ­
t r ie s w ith in s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .
B y co m b in in g the data f o r a ll le v e ls o f w o r k

14 "For a separate study in depth of salary structure characteristics, see Salary Structure Characteristics in Large
Firms. 1963 (BLS Bulletin 1417, 1964).
15 For an analysis of interarea pay differentials in clerical salaries, see Wages and Related Benefits: Metropol­
itan Areas. United States and Regional Summaries. 1963-64 (BLS Bulletin 1385-82, 1965, Pt. II).




14

Chart 4. Relative Employment in Selected Occupational Groups by
Industry Division, February-March 1965
PERCENT
OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

Accountants and chief
accountants

Auditors

Attorneys

Managers, office services

Directors of personnel
and job analysts

Chemists

Engineers

Engineering technicians
and draftsm en

Clerical employees




M anufacturing

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

Public Utilities

Trade and Selected Services

70

80

90

100

15

stu d ied in e a c h o c c u p a tio n , it w as p o s s i b l e to p r e s e n t c o m p a r is o n s b e tw e e n r e l a ­
tiv e s a la r y le v e ls in m a jo r in d u s try d iv is io n s and a ll in d u s tr ie s co m b in e d (ta b le 8).
T o ob ta in r e la t iv e s a la r y l e v e l s , a g g r e g a t e s f o r the w o r k le v e ls in e a c h o c c u p a ­
tio n c o m b in e d w e r e co m p u te d f o r a ll in d u s tr ie s and f o r e a ch m a jo r in d u s tr y d i ­
v is io n .
T h e a ll -i n d u s t r y e m p lo y m e n t in e a ch w o r k l e v e l w a s u s e d as a co n sta n t
e m p lo y m e n t w eig h t in co m p u tin g a g g r e g a t e s f o r the v a r io u s o c c u p a tio n s b y in d u s ­
t r y to e lim in a te the in flu e n c e o f d if fe r e n c e s a m o n g in d u s tr y d iv is io n s in the p r o ­
p o r t io n o f e m p lo y m e n t in v a r io u s w o r k l e v e ls . Th e a g g r e g a t e s f o r e a ch o c c u p a tio n
and in d u s tr y d iv is io n w e r e then e x p r e s s e d as p e r c e n t a g e s o f the c o r r e s p o n d in g
g r o u p s in a ll in d u s tr ie s c o m b in e d .
F o r a ll o f the c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d , and f o r a m a jo r i t y o f the
p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s in w h ich c o m p a r is o n s co u ld b e m a d e ,
r e la t iv e s a la r y l e v e ls w e r e lo w e r in r e t a il tr a d e and in fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and
r e a l e s ta te than in o th e r in d u s tr y d iv is io n s (ta b le 8 ).
It is a p p a re n t, t h e r e f o r e ,
that in th o s e o c c u p a tio n s in w h ich r e t a il tr a d e and the fin a n c e in d u s tr ie s a cco u n t
f o r a su b s ta n tia l p r o p o r t io n o f the to ta l e m p lo y m e n t, as sh ow n in ta b le 7, the
a v e r a g e s a la r ie s f o r a ll in d u s tr ie s c o m b in e d a r e lo w e r e d and the r e la tiv e le v e ls
in in d u s tr ie s s u ch as m a n u fa ctu rin g and p u b lic u tilitie s tend to b e w e ll a b ov e
100 p e r c e n t o f the a ll-in d u s t r y l e v e l (ta b le 8).
F o r e x a m p le , r e la t iv e p a y le v e ls
f o r f il e c le r k s o f 108 p e r c e n t in m a n u fa ctu rin g and 119 p e r c e n t in p u b lic u tilitie s
r e f l e c t the in flu e n c e o f lo w e r s a la r ie s f o r the h ig h p r o p o r t io n (45 p e r c e n t ) o f
a ll-in d u s t r y e m p lo y m e n t a cco u n te d f o r b y the fin a n c e in d u s t r ie s .
In fin a n c e in ­
d u s t r ie s , h o w e v e r , the r e la t iv e ly lo w e r s a la r y l e v e ls w e r e o f fs e t to the exten t
that a v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs in that in d u s tr y w e r e lo w e r than in the o th e r in d u s ­
t r ie s s u r v e y e d , as sh ow n in ta b le 9.
T h e r e la t iv e s a la r y le v e ls f o r p r o f e s s i o n a l ,
a d m in is t r a t iv e , and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s ten d ed to b e n e a r e s t to 100 p e r c e n t o f
the a ll-in d u s t r y l e v e ls in m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s , w h ich a c c o u n te d f o r a h igh
p r o p o r t io n o f the to ta l e m p lo y m e n t in m o s t o f th e s e o c c u p a t io n s .
R e la tiv e s a la r y le v e ls f o r a m a jo r i t y o f the c l e r i c a l and the p r o f e s s i o n a l
and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s w e r e s lig h tly h ig h e r in p u b lic u tilitie s than in
m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s .
F o r e n g in e e r s , h o w e v e r , r e la t iv e s a la r y le v e ls in
u t ilit ie s w e r e 97 p e r c e n t o f the a ll-in d u s t r y l e v e l, c o m p a r e d w ith 100 f o r m a n u ­
fa c tu r in g and 99 f o r the s e le c t e d s e r v i c e s .
T h e r e la t iv e s a la r y p o s it io n o f c h e m ­
is t s w a s a b o v e that f o r e n g in e e r s in the s e le c t e d s e r v i c e s ; th is r e f l e c t e d the
r e la t iv e ly fe w c h e m is ts c o m p a r e d w ith e n g in e e r s w ith in th is g ro u p in g w h o w e r e
e m p lo y e d in e n g in e e r in g and a r c h it e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s f i r m s , w h e r e s a la r y le v e ls
w e r e lo w e r than in the r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p m e n t, and te s tin g l a b o r a t o r i e s .
S a la r y
le v e ls o f e n g in e e r s in the la tte r in d u s tr ie s w e r e n e a r ly 10 p e r c e n t h ig h e r than
in e n g in e e r in g and a r c h it e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s in d u s tr ie s as a g r o u p .
A v e r a g e W e e k ly H ou rs
T h e len g th o f the w o r k w e e k , on w h ich the r e g u la r s t r a ig h t -t im e s a la r y
w as b a s e d , w a s o b ta in ed f o r in d iv id u a l e m p lo y e e s in the o c c u p a tio n s stu d ie d .
The d is tr ib u t io n o f a v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs (ro u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r) is
p r e s e n t e d in ta b le 9 f o r a ll w o r k le v e ls o f e a ch o c c u p a tio n c o m b in e d in m a jo r
in d u s tr y d iv is io n s s u r v e y e d .
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs w e r e lo w e r in fin a n c e , in ­
s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te than in the o th e r in d u s tr y d iv is io n s f o r e a ch o f the o c ­
cu p a tio n s that co u ld b e c o m p a r e d .
T h u s , in fin a n c e in d u s t r ie s , w o r k w e e k s a v ­
e r a g e d 38 h o u r s f o r a m a jo r i t y o f the o c c u p a t io n s , c o m p a r e d to 3 9 .5 h o u rs in
m a n u fa ctu rin g and f r o m 39 to 39. 5 h o u rs in the r e m a in in g in d u s tr ie s s u r v e y e d . 161

16
For additional information on scheduled weekly hours of office workers employed in metropolitan areas, see
Wages and Related Benefits: Metropolitan Areas, United States and Regional Summaries, 1963-64 (BLS Bulletin 1383-82,
1965, Pt. II).




16

Table 1. Average Salaries:

United States

( E m p l o y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s f o r s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s in
p r i v a t e i n d u s t r y , 1 U n i t e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i , F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 9 6 5 )

Monthly s a l a r i e s 3
O ccu pation and c l a s s
( S e e d e f i n i t i o n s in a p p e n d i x C)

Number
of
em ployees2

Annual s a la r i e s 3
M iddle range 4

M iddle range 4
Mean

M edian

Mean

M edian

First
quartile

Third
quartile

F irst
quartile

Th ird
quartile

809
977

$480
5 38
621
741
885

$ 57 3
636
727
887
1 ,0 9 4

$ 6 , 312
7 ,04 4
, 1 24
9 ,7 9 2
1 1,9 4 0

$ 6 , 3 36
6 ,996
8 ,05 2
9 ,70 8
1 1 ,7 2 4

512
613
718
8 81

472
556
651
793

558
6 91
819
987

6 ,20 4
7,44 0
8 ,7 4 8
10,7 2 8

, 144
7, 356
8 ,6 1 6
10,5 7 2

9, 5 1 6

9 ,82 8
1 1 ,8 4 4

879
1 ,0 5 4

1 ,41 9

1, 1 89
1 ,43 8

799
942
1 ,072
1,28 6

979
1, 1 6 9
1, 3 5 9
1, 5 3 6

10,7 4 0
12,5 8 8
1 4 ,6 0 4
1 7,0 2 8

10,5 4 8
1 2,6 4 8
1 4,2 6 8
17,2 5 6

9 ,588
11,3 0 4
1 2 ,8 6 4
15,4 3 2

11,7 4 8
14,0 2 8
1 6,3 0 8
18,4 3 2

614
745

624
757

560
665

859

1, 3 70
1,661
2,03 1

759
999
1 ,215
,460
1,75 1

669
819
970
1 ,2 8 4
1 ,53 6
,928
, 3 09

1
2

7 , 368
8 ,94 0
1 0 ,5 1 2
1 3 ,6 4 4
1 6,5 0 0
2 0,0 4 0
2 4,8 0 4

7 ,488
9 ,0 8 4
10,3 0 8
1 3,5 1 2
16,4 4 0
19,9 3 2
24,3 7 2

637
790

590
754
8 51
1 ,038

708
867
1 ,07 6
1 ,2 7 3

7, 752
9 ,62 4

917
1, 1 6 7

1 1,4 1 2
1 3 ,8 2 4

7, 6 4 4
9 ,48 0
1 1,0 0 4
1 4,0 0 4

542
643
727
887

481

774
924
1 ,2 0 3
1, 3 46

705
819
1 ,03 4

511
584
670

A c c o u n t a n t s and a u d i t o r s
I _________________________
I I ________ ________ ________
I I I ________________________
I V ______ _____ _____________
V ..... _ _ ...

4 ,8 1 1
, 202
2 1,877
15,9 5 5
6 ,24 7

$ 526
5 87

I ________________________________
II
_ ......
.. ....
I I I ______________________________
IV

510
1,96 9
3, 781
2,42 5

517
620

Accountants
A ccountants
A ccountants
Accountants
Accountants
A uditors
Auditors
A uditors
Auditors
C hief
Chief
C hief
C hief

accountants
accountants
accountants
accountants

I
.....................
I I __________________
I I I ______ __________
I V _________________

9

474
1, 3 7 3
726
354

677
816
995

729
894
895
1,04 9
1,21 7

$ 528
583
671

8

6

$ 5 ,7 6 0
6 ,45 6
7,45 2
8 ,89 2
10,6 2 0
5, 6 6 4
6 ,672
7 ,812

$ 6 ,8 7 6
7 ,63 2
8 ,72 4
1 0 ,6 4 4
1 3,1 2 8

6,696
8,292

Attorneys
A ttorneys
A ttorneys
Attorneys
A ttorneys
Attorneys
A ttorneys
Attorneys

I
.............................
II
................
I I I _______________________ ____
IV
V _________ ___________________
V I _________ __________________
V I I ...
..........
_ _ ___
.

183
525
1 , 1 84
1, 3 1 0
1 ,11 6
558
460

876
1, 1 3 7
1, 3 7 5
1 ,67 0
2 ,067

1, 1 2 6

1

6, 7 2 0
7 ,980
9, 1 0 8
21,012

8 ,02 8
9 ,82 8
1 1 ,6 4 0
15,4 0 8
1 8,4 3 2
2 3,1 3 6
27,7 0 8

7,08 0
9 ,04 8

8 ,4 9 6
1 0 ,4 0 4

1 2 ,4 5 6

1 2,9 1 2
1 5 ,2 7 6

5, 7 7 2
, 588
8,02 8
9 ,42 0

7 ,69 2
8 ,58 0
9 ,75 6
1 1 ,9 0 4

8 ,46 0

10,7 8 8
1 2,6 3 6
1 5 ,9 8 4
20,0 4 0

11,9 8 8
14,5 8 0
1 7,520

Office s e rv ic e s
M anagers,
M anagers,
M anagers,

office s e r v i c e s I
o f f i c e s e r v i c e s II
o f f i c e s e r v i c e s I I I ____

M anagers,

office

s e r v i c e s I V ____

418
717
331
79

646
802
951
1, 1 5 2

10,212

Personnel m anagem ent
Job
Job
Job
Job

an alysts
an alysts
an alysts
an alysts

D irectors
D irectors
D irectors
D irectors

I
_ _
II
I I I ________________________
I V .... _

of
of
of
of

personnel
personnel
personnel
personnel

C hem ists
C hem ists
C h em ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C h em ists
C hem ists
C hem ists

I
...
II
I II
IV

639
7 41
889

1,07 8
1,68 9
1 ,07 0
418

798
946

1,210
1 ,41 3

549
669
785

1,210

6 41
715
813
992

6

10,668

, 504
7, 716
8 ,7 2 4
10,6 4 4

899
1 ,05 3
1, 3 3 2
1,67 0

9 ,57 6
1 1 ,3 5 2
14,5 2 0
1 6,9 5 6

, 288
1 1,0 8 8
1 4 ,4 3 6
1 6,1 5 2

600
674
790
1 ,0 1 3

6 ,61 2
7 ,58 4
8 ,8 0 8
1 0,9 8 0
13, 0 68
15,1 6 8
17,9 2 8

6 ,6 3 6
7, 668
8 ,89 2

9

6

9, 8 2 8
12,4 0 8
14,5 2 0

and e n g i n e e r s

I ______________________________
I I ....... ............... ......... ......... ...........
I I I _____________________________
I V _____________________________
V ______________________________
V I _____________________________
V I I ...
VIII

Engineers I
E n g in eers.il
E n g i n e e r s III
E n g in e er s IV
Engineers V
E n gin e ers VI

553

137
3 15
857
577

...
_ ._

............

2 , 307
5 , 531
9 , 187
1 0 ,7 8 6
7 , 318
4 , 345
1 ,66 2
500

1 ,08 9
1 ,26 4
1 ,49 4
1 ,851

557
624
724

91
0
1,07 3
1,24 7
1 ,491
1 ,77 7

1 0 ,4 5 5

626

2 9 ,4 2 8

6 91
789
948
, 1 06
1 ,278
1, 5 0 1

1,27 9
1 ,4 9 4

1 ,759

1 ,701

411

401
490
570

7 9 ,5 5 1

_

5 51
632
734
915

102,899
62,922

.......

_

E n g i n e e r s V I I ___________________________
E n g i n e e r s V l ! ll _

3 2 ,9 9 2
1 1 ,0 0 5
2, 678

1

625

66
8
787
940
1,09 5

819
985
1, 1 4 0
1, 3 4 3
1,65 2
600
648
726
852
978
1, 1 3 5
1, 3 5 3
1, 5 5 7

1,202

1, 3 7 2
1 ,6 1 5

2,021
660
735
853
1,03 7

1,221

1 ,41 6
1,63 7
1 ,931

22,212
7, 512

8, 2 9 2

9,46 8
1 1,3 7 6
13, 2 72
1 5 ,3 3 6
1 8,0 1 2

6, 6 8 4
7 ,488
8,688
10,8 1 2
12,8 7 6
14,9 6 4
17,8 9 2
21,3 2 4
7, 500
8 ,23 2
9 ,44 4
11,2 8 0
1 3 , 140

2 1 ,1 0 8

1 5,3 4 8
1 7,9 2 8
20,4 1 2

4 ,9 3 2
5 ,89 2
6 ,82 8
7 ,68 0
8 ,6 7 6

4 ,81 2
5 ,88 0
6 ,84 0
7, 644
8 ,61 6

6, 1 3 2
7 ,008
8, 0 4 0
9, 8 2 8
1 1,8 2 0
13, 680
1 6 ,1 1 6
__ 1 9 , 8 2 4
7, 200
7, 776
8 ,71 2
1 0 ,2 2 4
1 1,7 3 6
13, 6 20
1 6,2 3 6
1 8,6 8 4

7 ,2 0 0
8 ,0 8 8
9 ,48 0
1 2 ,1 5 6
1 4 ,4 2 4
1 6 ,4 6 4

19

,3 8 0
2 4,2 5 2
7 ,9 2 0
8 ,82 0
1 0 ,2 3 6
1 2 ,4 4 4
1 4 ,6 5 2
1 6 ,9 9 2
1 9 ,6 4 4
2 3,1 7 2

E n g in e erin g technicians
Engineering
E ngineering
E ngineering
Engineering
E ngineering

technicians
tech nician s
tech nician s
tech nician s
tech nician s

I _ ._ ....
II
I I I _______
I V _______
V ________

S e e f o o t n o t e s at end of tab le ,




4 , 607
1 2 ,0 1 4
2 2,6 2 0
2 6,9 3 5
1 2,9 9 1

491
569
640
723

637
718

371
452
524
594
670

448
529
620
684
775

4 ,45 2
5,42 4

6, 2 8 8

7 , 128
8 ,04 0

5, 376
, 3 48
7 ,44 0
8 ,2 0 8
9 ,3 0 0

6

17
Table 1. Average Salaries:
( E m p l o y m e n t and a v e r a g e

United States-----Continued

sa la ries for selected p ro fessio n a l,

adm inistrative,

p r i v a t e i n d u s t r y , 1 U n ite d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a and H a w a i i ,

tech nical,

Monthly s a l a r i e s 3
O ccu pation and c l a s s
(S e e d e f i n i t i o n s in a p p e n d i x C)

Number
of
em ployees2

a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s in

F e b r u a r y —M a r c h

1965)

Annual salaries 3

M iddle range 4
Mean

M edian

$445

F irst
quartile

Third
quartile

M iddle range 4
Mean

M edian

First
quartile

T hird
quartile

D raftsm en
D raftsm en I
_ ... ..........
D r a f t s m e n I I ____________________________

1 9,3 7 0
3 3 , 6 81

$452
573

____________
D r a f t s m e n I I I ___________
D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s ___________________

18,9 7 6
4 , 1 66

670
3 62

6 0 ,4 0 1
4 3,4 4 7
18,7 8 5
2 2,6 4 3
7 ,46 2
3 7,9 3 1
2 8 ,0 8 7
2 3,5 5 5
72,0 5 7
4 8 ,8 2 7
1 0 ,3 0 4
8 ,04 0

353
466
265
300
376

345
458
256

3 29
38 3

563
658
358

$393
508
593
3 17

$ 4 ,7 1 9
, 100
7 ,11 7
3, 8 0 6

$ 6 ,0 7 4
7 , 5 08
38
4 ,79 7

3,07 6
3 ,46 7
4 ,40 6
3,83 2
4 , 536
3, 3 3 7
4, 275
4, 927
4 , 145
4, 797

3, 5 46
4 , 771
2,81 6
3, 0 7 6
3, 8 0 6
3, 3 8 9
4 ,0 1 5
2 ,998
3, 7 2 8
4 ,40 6
3, 5 46
4 , 249

4 ,771
, 3 61
3 ,441
4 ,0 1 5
5 ,08 4
4 ,43 2
5, 162
3 ,8 0 6
4 ,901
5, 501
4 ,8 2 3
5, 344

4 ,01 5

3, 5 4 6

4 , 5 88

5 ,032

4 ,45 8

5, 6 5 7

6 ,07 4
3, 5 72
4 , 275

5 ,44 9
3 , 1 81
3, 8 0 6

6 ,778
4 ,01 5
4 ,82 3

$506
626
736
400

$ 5, 4 2 4
6 ,87 5
8 ,0 3 8
4 , 3 45

$ 5 , 3 44
, 752

3 98
530

4 ,2 3 5
5, 589
3, 176

4 , 145
5,50 1

6

7 ,899
4 , 302

6

8,8

C lerical
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g I _________________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g I I ________________
C l e r k s , f i l e I ___________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e I I __________ ______ ________
C l e r k s , f i l e I I I ________________________
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I ________________
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s II
O f f i c e b o y s o r g i r l s __________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ____________
Sten ograp h e rs, senior
S w itchboard o p e ra to rs I
S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s II
T abulating -m a c h i n e
o p e r a t o r s I ____________________________
T ab ulating-m achine
o p e r a t o r s II ...... ....................
Tabulating-m achine
o p e r a t o r s I I I __________________________
T y p i s t s I __________ _________ _____________
T y p i s t s II ......

1
2

289
361
412
345
3 98

3 19
378
278
3 56
411
3 45
400

295
398
235
256
317
282
335
250
311
3 67
295
354

369
430
317
408
458
402
445

3, 5 99
4 , 512
3 ,94 7
4 , 590
3 ,4 7 2
4 , 338
4, 946
4 , 140
4, 774

8 ,4 9 9

342

3 35

295

3 82

4 , 105

17,2 1 0

421

419

371

471

508
304

506

28
9

454
265

361

3 56

3 17

565
3 35
402

8,926
6 6,458
3 7 ,6 4 6

289
3 67

287
335
424

5, 0 5 4

6, 0 9 7
3, 6 4 6
4, 336

6

F o r sc o p e of study,
s e e t a b le ip a p p e n d i x A .
O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e l a t e t o t h e t o t a l in a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h i n s c o p e o f t h e s u r v e y a n d n o t t o t h e
a ctu ally s u rv e y e d .
F o r fu rth e r explanation,
s e e p. 33 of a p p e n d i x A .
3 S a l a r i e s r e p o r t e d r e l a t e t o t h e s t a n d a r d s a l a r i e s t h a t w e r e p a i d f o r s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s ; i. e . , t h e s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d i n g to the e m p l o y e e ' s n o r m a l w o r k s c h e d u l e e x c lu d i n g o v e r t i m e h o u r s .
N onproduction bon u ses
are exclu ded,
but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g b o n u s e s an d i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e in c l u d e d .
4 T h e m i d d l e r a n g e ( i n t e r q u a r t i l e ) u s e d h e r e is the c e n t r a l p a r t of the a r r a y e x c l u d i n g the u p p e r an d l o w e r f o u r t h s of
the e m p l o y e e d i s t r i b u t i o n .
number




18
Table 2.

Average Salaries:

M etropolitan Areas

(E m p l o y m e n t and a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s fo r s e le c te d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m in is t r a t i v e , te c h n ic a l, and c l e r i c a l occu p ation s
i n p r i v a t e i n d u s t r y , m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s , 1 F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 9 6 5 , a n d p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in
m e a n s a l a r i e s d u r i n g the y e a r 2 )

O ccu pation and c l a s s
( S e e d e f i n i t i o n s in a p p e n d i x C )

Number
of
em ployees 3

M onthly s a la rie s 4

Mean

Median

F irst
quartile

Percent

Annual s a l a r i e s 4

M id d le range 5
Th ird
quartile

M i d d l e :r a n g e 5
Mean

^IcciicLH

F irst
quartile

Third
quartile

$ 5 , 772
,4 - 0

$ 6 ,8 8 8
7 ,6 6 8
8 ,79 6
10,7 4 0
13, 176

increase
in
salaries

A c c o u n t a n t s and a u d i t o r s
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
A u ditors
A uditors
A uditors
Auditors
Chief
Chief
Chief
Chief

I
II
III
IV
V ...

I .
II
III
IV

..

....... ..........

accountants
accountants
accountants
accountants

I
II
III
IV

. ...
.

$529
584
674
814
987

518
621
732
898

512
614
720
884

3 37
1 ,09 0
623
311

....
..

$ 527
590
682
822

497
1 ,92 3
3, 6 2 2
2, 334

............

4 ,401
8 ,26 7
19,6 0 3
1 4 ,1 0 0
5 ,6 3 3

915

$ 481
540
626
751

$574

889

1,09 8

472

560
692
824

7 ,45 2
8 ,7 8 4

797

991

1 0 ,7 7 6

779
957
1, 1 03
1, 2 7 3

1 ,0 4 0

10,980

1,23 6
1 ,42 6

913
1 ,06 2
1 ,2 0 3
1 ,43 0

1 , 1 91
1 ,4 0 3
1, 5 5 4

1 2 ,7 4 4
1 4 ,8 3 2
1 7 ,1 1 2

629
758
857
1, 1 3 0
1, 3 7 3
1 ,66 5
2 ,03 0

560
664

459

615
745
876
1, 140
1, 3 76
1 ,6 7 4
2 ,06 7

1 ,74 9

669
819
969
1 ,28 6
1, 5 38
1 ,9 3 3
2, 3 10

7, 380
8 ,94 0
1 0 ,5 1 2
13,6 8 0
1 6,5 1 2
20,0 8 8
2 4 ,8 0 4

2 4,3 6 0

20,988

371
637
312
78

653
801
952
1,15 6

1, 1 6 9

599
753
852
1,041

711

791
915

1 ,0 7 4
1 ,2 7 4

7 , 8 36
9 ,6 1 2
1 1,424
13,8 7 2

7 ,68 0
9 ,49 2
10,9 8 0
1 4,0 2 8

7 , 188
9 ,0 3 6
1 0 ,2 2 4
1 2 ,4 9 2

15,2 8 8

4. 0
3. 9
7. 1

1 33
304

553
641
745

549
645
731

480

643

548
672
786

719
817
992

5 ,76 0
, 576
8 ,0 6 4
9 ,4 3 2

7,71 6
8 ,62 8
9 ,80 4
11,9 0 4

.
3.
4.
5.

824
934

707
833
1,03 8
1,20 6

913
1 ,06 0
1, 3 42
1,67 7

8 ,4 8 4
9 ,99 6
1 2 ,4 5 6
14,4 7 2

10,9 5 6
12,7 2 0
1 6,1 0 4
2 0,1 2 4

.
3.
5.
.

509
583
676
828

683
798

1,002

1,062

549
653

639
733
895

$ 6 , 324
7 ,08 0
, 1 84
9 ,86 4
1 2 ,0 2 4

8

6,216

$ 6 , 348
7 ,00 3
8 ,08 3
9,76 8
1 1 ,8 4 4

6

6
7 , r .2
9,012
10,668

, 1 44
7 , 3 68
8 ,6 4 0
10,6 0 8

5, 6 6 4
6 ,58 8
7 ,83 6
9 ,56 4

1 0,9 5 6
1 2 ,7 4 4
1 4,4 3 6
1 7,1 6 0

9 , 3 48
1 1 ,4 8 4
13, 236
1 5,2 7 6

6, 7 2 0
8, 3 0 4
9,888
11,892
12,4 8 0
1 4,2 9 2
16,8 3 6
1 8,6 4 8

1.
3.
3.
3.

3
5
5
8

3. 9

6. 6
3. 7
3. 1
4. 8

6. 6
1. 3
5. 0
7. 3

A ttorneys
A ttorneys
A ttornevs
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attorneys
Attornevs
Attorneys

I ______________________________
II
III .
I V _______
_
_____
V __ ___
_ _
VI _
VII

177
519

1, 1 6 0
1 ,28 2
1 ,098
5 48

759
1 ,004
1 ,214
1 ,461

7, 548
9 ,0 9 6
1 0 ,2 8 4
1 3 ,5 6 0
1 6 ,4 7 6

19,980

6, 7 2 0
7,96 8
9 , 108
12, 0 4 8
1 4,5 6 8
1 7,5 3 2

1

8 ,02 8
9 ,82 8
1 1,6 2 8
15,4 3 2
1 8 ,4 5 6
2 3 , 196
27,7 2 0

. 8
4. 8
. 5

8 ,53 2
1 0 ,4 1 6

4. 5

6. 7
3. 0

9. 1

2. 1

Office s e rv ic e s
M anagers,
M anagers,
M anagers,
M anagers,

office s e r v i c e s
office s e r v i c e s
office s e r v i c e s
office s e r v i c e s

I
II
I I I ____
I V ____

640

88
6

12,888

Personnel m anagem ent
Job
Job
Job
Jo b

analysts
a n a lysts
a n alysts
a n alysts

D irectors
D irectors
D irectors
D irectors

of
of
of
of

I _______ __________________
II ............................ ...............
III _______________________
I V _______________________
personnel
personnel
personnel
personnel

I
.
II.
I II ________
IV

779
548

86
9
3 82

86
8

889

644
1, 365

818

90
6
1 ,21 7
1 ,41 6

1,201
1, 3 66

6

, 636
7 ,69 2
8 ,94 0

6

10,668

, 588
7 ,74 0
8 ,7 7 2
1 0 ,6 3 2

9 ,81 6
11,5 2 0
1 4 ,6 0 4
1 6,9 9 2

1 1,2 0 8
1 4 ,4 1 2
,392

9,888
16

6

9
2
6
0

16
2
1

29

C h e m i s t s and e n g i n e e r s
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C h em ists
C hem ists
C h em ists
C h em ists
C hem ists
E ngineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers
E ngineers
Engineers
Engineers
Engineers

I
II
III
I V _____________________________
V
........................
VI
____
.
...
_ .
VI I
.. . _
VIII
... .
I
II
III
........ .......................
IV
V
V I ........
_
V I I ..............
VIII

6

551
635
741
924
1, 1 0 5
1 ,26 9
1, 5 0 4
1,85 0

1,25 1

1, 3 99
465

626
687
792

9 ,92 9
2, 504

628
692
793
953
1 ,113
1 ,284
1, 5 1 2
,762

947
1, 1 03
1 ,2 8 6
1,50 4
1 ,70 2

649
729
856
983
1, 1 42
1, 3 66
1,561

4 , 1 21
1 0 ,4 9 3
2 0,4 7 2
2 5,1 6 0
12, 237

413
492
573
642
723

414
490
572
638
718

372
453
528
597
6 71

2 ,01 5
4, 786
7 ,85 1
9, 279
, 153
3 ,8 0 6

9 , 3 41
2 6,9 4 9
7 2,968
9 5 ,0 7 5
5 7,219
3 0 ,4 5 0

1

560
628
732

90
1
1,090
1 ,491
,760

1

1,000
1, 1 4 4
1, 3 4 5
1 ,64 9
6 01

62
0
1,021
1,21 8
1, 3 8 1
1 ,62 5
2 ,00 5
661
736
856
1 ,0 4 3
1 ,23 0
1 ,42 2
1,64 3
1 ,92 9

6

, 612
7 ,62 0
8 ,8 9 2
11,0 8 8
1 3,2 6 0
15,2 2 8
1 8 ,0 4 8

6

, 720
7 ,53 6
8 ,78 4

7 ,22 4

8, 1 9 6

2 .4
4. 1
3. 3
4. 3
4. 0
3. 3
4. 2

13, 728
16,1 4 0
19,7 8 8

9, 576
1 2,2 5 2
1 4,6 1 6
16,5 7 2
,5 00
24,0 6 0

9, 504
1 1 ,3 6 4
13, 236
1 5,4 3 2
1 8 ,0 4 8
2 0,4 2 4

7 ,21 2
7,78 8
8 ,74 8
1 0 ,2 7 2
,7 9 6
1 3 ,7 0 4

7 ,93 2
8 ,83 2
1 0 ,2 7 2
,516
14,7 6 0
1 7 ,0 6 4

3. 4
3 .8
3. 3
4. 0

1 8,7 3 2

,716
2 3 , 148

3. 2

4 ,96 8
5,88 0
, 864
7, 656
8 ,6 1 6

4 ,4 6 4
5 ,43 6
, 336
7 ,16 4
8 ,05 2

10,920
13, 080
1 5 ,0 1 2
1 7 ,8 9 2

22,200

21,120

7, 536
, 304
9 ,51 6
1 1 ,4 3 6
1 3 ,3 5 6
15,4 0 8
1 8 ,1 4 4
2 1,1 4 4

7, 512
8 ,24 4

4, 956
5 ,90 4
6 ,8 7 6
7 ,70 4
8 ,6 7 6

8

6, 1 0 8
6 ,99 6
8, 1 1 2
9 ,93 6
12,000

11
16, 3 9 2

19

12

19

5. 3

2. 6
3. 7

2.8

E n g in e erin g technicians
En gin eerin g technicians I
.... ....
E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s II
E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s I II _ .....
E n g in e e r in g te c h n ic ia n s IV
En gin eerin g technicians V

S e e f o o t n o t e s at end o f tab le ,




450
530
622

66
8

777

6

6

5 ,4 0 0

6

, 3 60
7 ,46 4
8 ,23 2
9, 324

1. 7
1 .4
3. 1
. 6
1.4

2

19
Table 2.

Average Salaries: M etropolitan Areas— Continued

( E m p l o y m e n t and a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s f o r s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , an d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s
i n p r i v a t e i n d u s t r y , m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s , 1 F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 9 6 5 , a n d p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in
m e a n s a l a r i e s d u r i n g the

O c c u p a t i o n and c l a s s
( S e e d e f i n i t i o n s i n a p p e n d i x C)

Number
of
em ployees 3

y e a r 2)

Monthly s a l a r i e s 4

Annual s a l a r i e s 4

M id d le range 5
Mean

M edian

First
quartile

Third
quartile

M iddle range 5
Mean

M edian

F irst
quartile

Third
quartile

6, 1 7 9

$ 6 , 153
7, 586

7, 1 43
3, 8 3 2

4, 823

Percent
m e rease
in
m ean
salaries

D raftsm en
D r a f t s m e n I _____________________________
D r a f t s m e n II
...... ...
...............
D r a f t s m e n H I -----------------------------------------D raftsm en -tracers
... _

17,0 4 9
3 0,0 1 1
1 7,273
3, 7 2 2

$458
580
675
365

$450

356

350
463

569
665
361

$398
515
597
3 19

$513
632
743
402

$ 5 , 500
,957
, 105
4 , 376

$ 5 , 3 96
6 ,830
7, 9 7 7
4 , 328

$ 4 , 7 71

402
534

4, 274
5, 632
3, 1 84
3, 6 0 2
4 ,51 3
3, 9 9 6
4, 637
3, 4 7 0
4 , 364
4 ,9 5 9
4 , 150
4, 806

4 , 197
5, 553
3, 102
3 ,4 9 3
4 ,40 6
3,88 4
4 , 588
3, 3 37
4, 302
4, 927
4 , 171
4 ,82 3

3, 5 98
4, 797
2 ,81 6
3, 0 7 6
3 ,8 0 6
3 ,4 1 5
4, 067
2, 998
3, 7 5 4
4 ,40 6
3, 5 4 6
4, 275

4, 823
6 ,41 3
3,46 7
4 ,01 5
5,08 4
4, 510
5, 188
3 ,8 0 6
4, 953
5 , 5 27
4, 823
5, 3 96

(7 )

4 , 5 88

2. 2

6
8

8,916

(6)
(6)
(6)
(6 )

C lerical
C lerks,
C lerks,
C lerks,

accounting I .
....................
a c c o u n t i n g II _ _ ..
fil e I

C l e r k s , f i l e II
_ _
.............
C l e r k s , f i l e III _________________ _
Kevpunch o p era to rs I.
. ..
K e v p u n c h o p e r a t o r s II
O ffice bo y s or g ir ls
_ ...
Stenographers, general
.............. .
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ______________
Sw itchboard o p e ra to rs I
S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s II
Tabu latin g-m achin e
operator s i . .
T abulating -m a c h i n e
o p e r a t o r s II
. _____
T abu latin g-m achin e
o p e r a t o r s I II _ _
___
T y p i s t s I ......................... .............. ..............
T v p i s t s II
..
_ ...

5 4,7 1 2
3 8 ,6 6 0
1 6,951
21,8 2 2
7,21 7
3 3,824
2 5,2 2 3
2 2,4 2 1
6 6,6 4 3
4 4,9 0 4
9 ,67 8

469
265
3 00
376
333
386

3 00
400
235
256
317
285

348
402

339
250
313
367
295
356

289
335
424
376
432
3 17
413
461
402
450

343

337

295

382

4 , 118

4 ,041

3, 5 4 6

1 5 ,6 7 2

421

419

371

471

5, 0 5 6

5, 0 3 2

4 ,4 5 8

8 ,20 8
6 0,4 8 2
3 5 ,4 2 2

508
305
363

506
300
358

452
267
317

563
337
404

6, 0 9 1

6, 0 7 4

3, 6 61
4 , 351

3, 5 9 8
4 , 302

7, 392

289
364
413
346
401

7, 791

259
291
367
324
382
278
358
411

5 ,42 3
3 ,207
3, 8 0 6

5, 6 5 7

6, 7 5 2
4 , 0 41
4, 849

2. 5

1.8
2
2
2

2. 5
. 0
. 1
. 0
2. 7
3. 0
. 2
2 .4

2

(7 )

2. 4
2. 4
. 6
2. 4

2

1
2
3

F o r s c o p e of s tu d y , s e e t a b l e in a p p e n d i x A .
F o r l i m i t a t i o n s o f p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e i n a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s a s a m e a s u r e o f c h a n g e in s a l a r y s c a l e s , s e e
p.
5 of text.
O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e l a t e to the t o t a l in a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it hin s c o p e o f the s u r v e y and not to the
number
actu ally su rv e y e d .
F o r fu rth e r explan ation,
s e e p. 33 of
appendix A .
4 S a l a r i e s r e p o r t e d r e l a t e to the s t a n d a r d s a l a r i e s that w e r e p a id f o r s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s ; i. e . , the s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d i n g to th e e m p l o y e e ' s n o r m a l w o r k s c h e d u l e e x c l u d i n g o v e r t i m e h o u r s . N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d ,
but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g b o n u s e s an d i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e in c l u d e d .
5 T h e m i d d l e r a n g e ( i n t e r q u a r t i l e ) u s e d h e r e is th e c e n t r a l p a r t of the a r r a y e x c l u d i n g th e u p p e r an d l o w e r f o u r t h s of
the e m p l o y e e d i s t r i b u t i o n .

6

B e c a u s e of c h a n g e s in th e n u m b e r and d e f i n i t i o n s o f l e v e l s b e t w e e n s u r v e y s , i n c r e a s e s
in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s d u r i n g
fo r d r a f t s m e n could not be p r e s e n t e d .
R e v i s i o n s in l e v e l d e f i n i t i o n s b e t w e e n s u r v e y s l i m i t c o m p a r i s o n o f c h a n g e to a l l s w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s c o m b i n e d ;
a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s f o r t h e s e e m p l o y e e s a s a g r o u p i n c r e a s e d 2 . 9 p e r c e n t d u r i n g th e y e a r .
the

year

7




20
T able 3.

A verage Salaries:

Establishments E m ploying 2,500 o r M ore

(Em ploym ent and average sa la ries fo r s elected p ro fe ssio n a l, a dm inistrative, tech n ical, and c le r ic a l
occu p ation s1 in establishm ents em ploying 2, 500 w ork ers o r m o r e ,2 United States except
A laska and Hawaii, F eb ru a ry -M a rch 1965, and co m p a rison with
lev els in all establishm ents com bined)
L evels in la rge establishm ents
e x p re ss e d as p ercen t o f those
in all establishm ents com bined

Monthly s a la r ie s 4
O ccupation and cla ss
(See definitions in appendix C)

Number
of
e m p loy ees3

M iddle range5
Mean

Median

F irs t
quartile

T hird
quartile

Em ploym ent

Mean
sala ries

Accountants and auditors
I _______ ___
_
___
____
II_
I I I ________________________
IV _____ ___
V
__
___
_____

2, 382
3.959
7,488
4. 891
2,406

$557
612
703
834
983

$558
605
691
819
951

$514
558
639
759
876

$601
662
755
901
1, 083

50
43
34
31
39

106
104
104
102
99

A uditors I I ______________________________

869
1,448
1, 114

637
749
891

638
734
878

568
656
796

709
847
979

44
38
46

103
103
100

160
106

1, 312
1, 397

1, 308
1, 381

1,099
1, 149

1,445
1,585

22
30

108
98

203
361
423
380
199
174

787
963
1, 181
1, 376
1,723
2, 001

774
940
1, 164
1, 383
1,694
1,934

696
832
1, 031
1,219
1,508
1,771

872
1, 084
1, 340
1, 536
1,938
2,2 6 8

39
30
32
34
36
38

106
110
104
100
103
97

152

954

933

832

1, 079

46

100

Job a n a ly sts TT
I
Job analysts I V ________________________

217
542
407

670
764
890

664
756
889

571
684
797

749
841
988

69
63
71

105
103
100

D ire cto rs o f p erson n el III________
D ire ctors o f p erson n el I V -------- -------

167
146

1, 332
1,569

1, 393
1,558

1, 070
1, 381

1,586
1,810

16
35

110
111

574
1,918
2 ,9 2 3
3,699
3, 002
1,985
649
214

601
670
772
942
1, 097
1,277
1, 550
1,887

606
659
757
935
1, 085
1,262
1,529
1,835

566
608
698
842
996
1, 151
1, 393
1,674

639
729
841
1,040
1,200
1, 383
1,660
2, 122

25
35
32
34
41
46
39
43

109
106
105
103
101
101
104
102

5,887
17,954
47,665
62,799
35,604
19,021
5,487
1,434

638
695
805
974
1, 133
1, 302
1,558
1, 815

636
689
807
970
1, 131
1, 311
1,547
1,766

607
651
744
876
1, 006
1, 155
1,407
1,604

669
738
866
1,063
1,254
1,449
1,689
1,997

56
61
60
61
57
58
50
54

102
101
102
103
102
102
104
103

2,246
5 ,5 4 4
12,253
16,463
9,7 4 7

416
500
582
647
721

418
497
581
643
719

379
457
536
601
672

455
540
636
692
777

49
46
54
61
75

101
102
102
101
100

Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
A u d ito rs III

A uditors IV

_ _

C h ie f accou n tan ts III

C hief accountants I V _________________
A ttorneys
A ttorneys
A ttorneys
A ttorneys
Attorneys

I I ____________________________

I I I ______________________
_
_
___
IV _

V _____________________________
A tto r n e y s V I
.
_
A ttorneys V I I __________________________

O ffice s e rv ice s
M anagers, o ffice s e rv ice s III____
P erson n el m anagem ent
Job a n a ly sts II

__

C hem ists and engineers
C h e m is t s I

C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists

I I --- --- --------------------- -------III_
IV
_
V
VI
V II______ ____—_____ _____
V III---- ------- ------------ --------

E n g in e e r s I

E ngineers I I ___ ___________________
E n g in e e r s IIT

E ngineers I V .
E n g in e e r s V

E ngineers V I ______________________
E ngineers V II----------------- ---------------E n g in e e r s VTTI

E ngineering technicians
Engineering technicians I

---- „„„

E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s IT

E ngineering technicians III _ _____
E ngineering technicians IV-----------E ngineering technicians V
See footnotes at end o f table.




21
Table 3. Average Salaries: Establishments Employing 2,500 or More----Continued
(E m p lo y m e n t and a v e r a g e s a la r i e s f o r s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l, a d m in is t r a t iv e , t e c h n ic a l, and c l e r i c a l
o c c u p a t i o n s 1 in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g 2 , 5 0 0 w o r k e r s o r m o r e , 2 U n it e d S t a t e s e x c e p t
A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i, F e b r u a r y - M a r c h 1 9 6 5 , a n d c o m p a r i s o n w it h
l e v e l s in a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s c o m b i n e d )
M o n t h ly s a l a r i e s 4
O c c u p a t io n and c l a s s
(S e e d e f i n i t i o n s in a p p e n d ix C )

L e v e l s in l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
e x p r e s s e d as p e r c e n t o f th o se
in a ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s c o m b i n e d

N u m ber
of
e m p lo y e e s 3

M ean

M e d ia n

F ir s t
q u a r t ile

T h ir d
q u a r t ile

6 ,9 8 3
1 3 , 176
9 , 506
1 ,7 0 8

$494
605
692
391

$489
591
676
382

$428
528
608
339

$554
665
763
452

36
39
50
41

109
106
1 03
108

1 4 ,9 8 2
1 0, 7 7 0
4 , 4 46
6 , 105
2, 800
11, 902
1 0 ,6 0 4
7 , 3S8
2 5 ,7 2 5
2 0 ,9 9 2
2 , 851
3, 011
2, 962
6 , 871
3 ,6 6 7
17, 6 73
1 5 ,5 0 3

379
507
293
338
409
3 58
406
312

371
504
282
332
398
348
406
295
382
439
376
428
352
428
5 28
322
376

319
432
259
293
356
3 04
356
267
337
393
3 15
3 80
311
3 78
471
287
335

432
574
3 24
378
454
411
456
3 50
435
474
424
474
406
487
5 87
371
430

25
25
24
27
38
31
38
31
36
43
28
38

107
109
111
1 13
109
109
106
108
106
106
107
107
106
102
104
109
106

M i d d le r a n g e 5

E m p lo y m e n t

M ean
s a la r ie s

D r a fts m e n
D r a f t s m e n I __________ _________________
D r a f t s m e n I I ________ _____ _________ _
D r a f t s m e n I I I ____ ______ _____________
D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s ------------ ----------------C le rica l
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g I _________________
___________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g II
C l e r k s , f i l e I ___ _
_ ____ ___________
_
C l e r k s , f i l e I I _______ ____ __________
C l e r k s , f i l e III ______ ______ _________
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I ________________
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I I _______________
O f f i c e b o y s o r g i r l s ____ _____ ________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l _____________
_
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r _ ______ _____
_
_
S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I __ _____ _
S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s II ________ _
T a d u la t in g -m a c b in e o p e r a t o r s I
T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s II —
T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s III_
_
____
T y p i s t s I ___________ _____ ______ _
T y p i s t s I I -----------------------------------------------

384

435
369
425
361
431
5 29
3 32
382

35

40
41
27
41

1 F o r s c o p e o f s t u d y , s e e t a b le in a p p e n d ix A .
2 In clu d e s
d a t a f o r a f e w e s t a b l i s h m e n t s wT h f e w e r t h a n 2 , 5 0 0 e m p l o y e e s
it
o f 5 o f th e
l a r g e s t c o m p a n i e s s t u d ie d th a t
p r o v id e d c o m p a n y w id e d a ta u n id e n tifie d b y s i z e o f e s t a b lis h m e n t .
T h is a p p l i e s o n l y
to d a ta f o r o c c u p a t io n s o th e r
th a n d r a f t in g
and c l e r ic a l.
3 O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e l a t e to th e t o t a l in a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h i n s c o p e o f th e s t u d y a n d n o t t o the
n u m b e r a c t u a lly s u r v e y e d .
F o r f u r t h e r e x p l a n a t io n , s e e p . 33 o f t e x t .
4 S a la r ie s
r e p o r t e d r e l a t e to th e s t a n d a r d s a l a r i e s t h a t w e r e p a i d f o r s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s ; i. e . , th e s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d i n g t o th e
e m p l o y e e 's n o r m a l w o r k s c h e d u l e e x c l u d i n g o v e r t i m e h o u r s . N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d ,
b u t c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a n d in c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e in c lu d e d .
5 T h e m id d l e r a n g e ( i n t e r q u a r t i l e ) u s e d h e r e is th e c e n t r a l p a r t o f th e a r r a y e x c l u d i n g th e u p p e r a n d l o w e r f o u r t h s o f
th e e m p l o y e e d i s t r i b u t i o n .




22
Table 4. Employment Distribution by Salary: Professional and Administrative Occupations
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s 1 in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s , 2 b y a v e r a g e
m o n t h l y s a l a r i e s , U n it e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i, F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 9 6 5 )
A ccou n ta n ts

A u d it o r s

C h ie f a cco u n ta n ts

A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r i e s
II

I
U n d e r $ 4 0 0 __________________________

1. 9

III

V

IV

I
1. 4

-

-

-

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

_____________
_____________
_____________
--------------------

4.
5.
11.
1 0.

0
8
2
2

(1 .0 )
2. 2
2. 7
5. 1

_

.
-

$500
$525
$ 550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525
$ 550
$575
$600

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

14.
13.
1 3.
8.

9
9
9
6

8. 4
11. 1
1 5 .4
13. 4

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$675
$700

_____________
__ ___________
_____________
_____________

6 ..9 .
41.0
2. 7
1. 2

$700
$725
$750
$ 775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 725
$750
$ 775
$ 800

_____________
_____________
____________ _
_____________

(.6 )
-

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$850
$875
$ 900

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

_
-

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 _____________
$ 9 5 0 _____________
$ 9 7 5 _____________
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ----------------

_
-

-

(2 .3 )
-

_

”

“

-

-

-

-

*

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

3. 4
2. 1
1 .4
(1 .5 )

-

11.
8.
7.
4.

9
3 :
1;
5

2. 8
1. 7
2. 4
(1 .9 )

-

_

(1 .4 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

(0 .8 )

-

_
-

_
-

-

~

-

“

-

0
5
7
1

6.
9.
1 1.
9.

6
4
1
3

1.
3.
3.
4.

8
1
2
3

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

7.
2.
2.
2.

_

5
2
0
0

9.
8.
6.
8.

6
3
8
2

6.
5.
9.
6.

0
3
9
2

_

_
1. 5
6. 3

_

_

_

2. 2

-

-

-

-

7.
2.
3.
2.

8
9
8
1

12.
6.
6.
4.

7
9
5
7

3.
3.
6.
6.

3
7
5
3

5.
1.
5.
4.

7
7
3
6

. 8
1. 5

_
-

-

-

-

2.
.
1.
1.

0
7
1
0

4.
6.
4.
4.

6
9
7
4

5 .4
8. 8
7. 1
7. 4

10.
9.
4.
8.

1
3
2
6

6. 0
3 .6
4. 7
2. 2

9.
1 0.
1 5.
1 0.

6
2
4
7

1.
2.
3.
4.

7
1
9
5

-

1 1.
5.
5.
3.

5
9
7
5

8.
6.
10.
9.

2
5
1
1

(2 .
1.
2.
1.

3)
1
7
9

1. 6
(.8 )
-

2.
2.
2.
1.

8
3
0
0

9.
10.
6.
5.

9
1
1
0

3.
4.
6.
6.

4
0
8
8

_

5.
3.
3.
2.

6
4
7
2

8.
6.
5.
4.

6
7
2
2

1 1.
1 1.
7.
4.
3.

0
6
0
3
7

_

-

-

_
-

“

-

-

_

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,

000
050
1 00
1 50
200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
unde r
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 0 5 0 _______
1, 1 0 0 _______
1, 1 5 0 _______
1 ,2 0 0 _______
1, 2 5 0 _______

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,2 5 0
1, 3 0 0
1, 3 50
1 ,4 0 0
1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 3 0 0
1, 3 5 0
1, 4 0 0
1, 4 5 0
1 ,5 0 0

_______
_______
_______
---------------------

-

-

-

-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,5 0 0
1, 5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
unde r
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 0 0
1, 7 5 0

_______
_______
_______
_______
_______

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1, 7 5 0
1, 8 0 0
1 ,8 5 0
1, 9 0 0
1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d e r $ 1, 8 0 0 _______
u n d e r $ 1, 8 5 0 _______
u n d e r $ 1, 9 0 0 _______
u n d e r $ 1, 9 5 0 _______
o v e r ____________________

_
-

_
-

„
-

-

_

_

-

-

-

T o t a l __________________________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s _____________

4 , 811

9 , 202 2 1 ,8 7 7

1 5 ,9 5 5

$677

$816

A v e r a g e m o n t h l y s a l a r i e s ___

S ee

fo o t n o t e s

at e n d o f ta b le




$526

$587

(.7 ;
-

~

$
$
$
$
$

_

IV

III

(0 .5 )
1. 2
2. 7
4. 4

2
8
9
8

-

II

4
6
3
1

2.
2.
3.
6.

3. 5
2. 5
(1 .5 )

I

1 8.
13.
5.
5.

-

(0 .6 )

IV

III

1.
9.
1 4.
15.

-

_

II

(1 .5 )
2. 9
2. 7

-

_
-

_
(0 .4 )

2. 5
_

1. 9
1 .4
1. 1
. 7

8.
5.
4.
3.

7
1
0
5

7.
6.
3.
4.

4
8
0
4

2.
2.
4.
1.

2
8
7
4

1.
1.
4.
.

1
2
4
4

1. 5
1, 1
(.3 )
-

7.
6.
3.
2.
.

7
6
0 1
8
8

3 .6
7. 4
1 .9
1. 5
3. 0

16.
17.
6.
7.
6.

5
4
2
6
0

14.
7.
13.
9.
9.

3
2
6
5
1

1.
2.
4.
6.
4.

7.
5.
2.
8.
7.

4
9
5
4
3

4. 2
6. 2
8. 8
1 1 .6
15. 5

-

-

-

_

.
-

_
-

1. 1
(1 .2 )
-

2. 5
(1 .2 )
-

-

“

"

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

_

4. 8
6. 0
1. 2
1. 5
(.8 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

2. 1
1. 5
1. 1
(2 .5 )

_

100. 0

100. 0

_
-

. 8

9.
4.
2.
4.
3.

7
3
2
5
0

6
0
5
0
1

3. 1
.6
. 8
1. 1
2. 9

100. 0

100. o

100. 0

100. 0

6 , 247

510

1, 9 6 9

3, 7 81

2 ,4 2 5

474

1, 3 73

726

3 54

$995

$•517

$620

$729

$894

$895

$ 1 ,0 4 9

$ 1 ,2 1 7

$ 1 ,4 1 9

100. 0

100. 0

23
Table 4. Employment Distribution by Salary: Professional and Administrative Occupations--- Continued
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s 1 in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s , 2 b y a v e r a g e
m o n t h l y s a l a r i e s , U n it e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i, F e b r u a r y - M a r c h 1 9 6 5 )
A ttorn eys
A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r i e s
II

I
U n d e r $ 4 5 0 __________________ ___________
$ 4 5 0 a n d u n d e r $ 4 7 5 _________________
$ 4 7 5 a n d u n d e r $ 5 0 0 __________ ______

3. 2
2. 2
-

III

IV

V

VI

V II

.

_

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

$ 500
$ 525
$ 550
$575

and
and
and
and

t in d e r
under
under
under

$ 525
$550
$ 575
$600

_________________
_________ _______
____________ . ___
_________________

4.
9.
1 3.
8.

9
3
1
7

3.
1.
2.
5.

4
7
5
9

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

$600
$625
$650
$ 675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$ 650
$675
$700

_______ _________
___________ — ___
_________________
_____ ____________

9.
7.
23.
.

3
1
5
5

2.
4.
7.
3.

9
2
6
4

(1 .2 )
2 .6
6. 1
1. 9

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

$700
$ 725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$750
$775
$800

_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________

7.
3.
3.
1.

1
8
8
1

7.
7.
13.
6.

0
8
1
5

6.
2.
12,
6.

3
6
2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

$800
$ 825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$ 850
$ 875
$900

_________________
_________________
________________ _
_____________ ____

. 5
1. 1
. 5

12.
5.
4.
2.

0
5
0
5

4.
4.
6.
5.

1
5
4
7

4.
3.
1.
2.

7
1
8
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

$ 900
$925
$ 950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 _________________
$ 9 5 0 _________________
$ 9 7 5 _________________
$ 1, 0 0 0 _____ _________

7. 3
3 .6
5. 3
1. 9

3.
1.
3.
3.

3
6
6
2

(1 .0 )
1. 3
1. 0
. 3

_
-

_
-

"

"

1 1.
8.
10.
9.
6.

3
2
4
2
6

4.
5.
3.
7.
5.

0
3
3
0
9

1. 6
. 7
. 2
1 .4

-

6.
5.
7.
3.
1.

4
1
4
1
6

7.
9.
8.
7.
5.

5
8
9
8
2

7.
4.
2.
5.
8.

7
5
2
2
1

9.
5.
4.
3.
3.

3
9
4
0
3

7.
5.
3.
9.
3.

3
9
2
3
9

4.
1.
2.
8.
2.

3
3
2
3
8

3.
6.
1.
4.
6.

9
3
3
3
1

6.
4.
2.
3.
3.

7
1
8
0
9

5.
4.
2.
.
.

7
1
7
5
9

7.
4.
1.
3.
5.

2
3
3
7
2

1. 1
(1 .9 )

6.
5.
1.
.
.

7
7
3
9
4

5.
2.
1.
.
1.

2
0
5
2
3

-$
$
$
$
$

1,
1,
1,
1.
1,

_
-

2. 5
.6
1. 9
2. 3

-

1. 1
(1 .6 )
-

000
050
100
150
200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 0 5 0 _______ ____
1, 1 0 0 _ _______ _
_
_____
1, 1 5 0 _____ •
1, 2 0 0 ____ ______
1 ,2 5 0 ___________

-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1, 2 5 0
1, 3 00
1 ,3 5 0
1 ,4 0 0
1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 3 00
1, 3 5 0
1 ,4 0 0
1 ,4 5 0
1, 5 0 0

________ __
_
___________
___________
____ ______
___________

-

_
-

-

-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1, 5 0 0
1, 5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1, 6 5 0
1, 7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 5 5 0
1, 6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1, 7 0 0
1 ,7 5 0

___________
___________
___________
_____ _____
___________

_
-

_
-

2. 7
. 7
1. 2
(1 .1 )

-

_
-

$
$
$
$
$

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,

750
800
850
900
950

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1, 8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1, 9 0 0
$ 1, 9 5 0
$ 2 , 000

___________
___________
__________ _
__________
________ _

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2. 8
(3 .0 )
-

-

-

$ 2 ,0 0 0
$ 2 , 050
$ 2 , 1 00
$ 2 , 1 50
$ 2, 2 00

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 , 0 5 0 ___________
$ 2 , 1 0 0 ___________
$ 2 , 1 5 0 ___________
$ 2 , 2 0 0 ___________
$ 2 , 2 5 0 ___________

$ 2, 250
$ 2 , 300
$ 2, 350
$ 2 ,4 0 0
$ 2 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2, 300
$ 2 , 350
$ 2, 4 00
$ 2 ,4 5 0
$ 2 ,5 0 0

_____
___________
___________
___________
___________

$
$
$
$
$

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

_ ___
_ _
_
_
_
_
___________
___________
___________

2, 500
2, 5 5 0
2, 600
2 ,6 5 0
2, 700

2, 550
2, 6 00
2, 6 5 0
2 ,7 0 0
2, 750

$ 2 , 7 5 0 a n d o v e r _______________________

4.
4.
4.
3.
2.

9
4
8
0
0

_
(0 .5 )
1. 1

(2 .7 )
-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

_
_

-

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

(2 .1 )
3. 0
.4
. 7

7. 3

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s ________________

183

525

1, 1 84

1, 3 1 0

1, 116

558

460

A v e r a g e m o n t h l y s a l a r i e s ___________

$614

$745

$876

$ 1, 137

$ 1, 3 75

$ 1 ,6 7 0

$ 2 , 067

S ee

fo o t n o t e s

at e n d o f ta b le .




100. 0

-

100. 0

100. 0

24
Table 4. Employment Distribution by Salary: Professional and Administrative Occupations— Continued
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s 1 in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s , 2 b y a v e r a g e
m o n t h ly s a l a r i e s , U n it e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i, F e b r u a r y ^ - M a r c h 1 9 6 5 )
M an agers,
o ffic e s e r v ic e s

A v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r i e s
I

III

II

J o b an a l y s t s
IV

I

III

II

D ir e c to r s o f p e r s o n n e l
IV

I

II

III

IV

U n d e r $ 4 0 0 ____________________________

-

-

-

-

2 .9

1 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

----------------------_______________
---------------------------------------------

_

_

_

_

_

-

_
-

_

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 2
5. 1
1 .6
1 .6

_

(0 .5 )
4. 1
1 .4

7. 3
6 .6
4. 4
16. 1

$ 500
$525
$ 550
$ 575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 525
$550
$ 575
$600

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

4.
3.
3.
12.

3
3
8
4

_
1. 4
. 3

_
-

-

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$675
$700

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

1 2.
1 6.
8.
4.

7
0
4
8

2.
2.
2.
1.

8
5
5
5

_

_

(2 .4 )
1. 2

-

$ 700
$ 725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 725
$ 750
$ 775
$800

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

1 0.
3.
2.
3.

3
8
4
3

6.
4.
1 7.
16.

8
2
9
9

1. 2
3. 9
2 .7

_
-

5. 8
1. 5
1. 5

-

-

5.
5.
2.
3.

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$ 850
$875
$900

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

5. 7
6. 4
8 .9
6. 7

6 .6
6. 6
1 2. 1
7. 3

3. 8
1. 3
1. 3

-

.6
2. 5
3. 5

-

-

-

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 _______________
$ 9 5 0 _______________
$ 9 7 5 _______________
$ 1, 0 0 0 ____________

9.
3.
2.
3.

1
3
4
6

2. 5
6. 3
2'. 5

_
-

9
9
3
3
2

_
2. 4
2. 6
1. 0
1. 2
. 2

6.
1.
2.
1.

0
0
8
0

2. 0
2. 1
(.7 )
-

1
7
1
2
3

-

-

3. 2
1 0. 5
7 .9
5. 4

(1 .5 )
1. 2
2. 9
2. 2

_
-

1.
1.
2.
1.

3
1
3
0

1 0.
10.
5.
6.

-

-

2
4
9
6
2
9
1
6

6. 3
7 .6
1 2 .4
7. 0

3.
5.
10.
8.

_

6
6
9
0

7
7
2
5

-

-

3
8
7
5

(i.o )
1. 7
3. 1

5.
.
6.
4.

13. 2
7 .4
9. 1
6. 3

3. 5
6 .4
6. 8
6 .6

12. 0
5. 8
9. 9
2 .9

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

_
(0 .9 )
1 .2

_

_

-

-

.9
5. 7
7. 4
2. 5

8.
4.
4.
5.

8
5
2
4

4. 8
6. 5
2. 4 !

9.
5.
8.
4.

2
1
5
3

7.
1.
2.
2.

7
1
1
3

1. 2
2. 6

-

2. 7
1 .6
1. 1
. 8

-

-

2. 0
(.3 )
-

5.
9.
3.
3.
3.

6
8
0
4
8

10. 2
7. 3
6 .4
7. 1
9 .7

4. 1
6. 9
4. 5
1 .9
8. 4

1
7
7
3)

10.
9.
2.
2.
1.

•7

4. 3
1 .6
3. 8
(.5 )

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

1.
1.
1.
(1 .
-

_
-

_
1. 3
2. 5

_
-

_
-

..
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

..
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

«.

_

-

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,2 5 0
1, 3 0 0
1, 3 50
1 ,4 0 0
1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,3 0 0
1, 3 5 0
1, 4 0 0
1, 4 5 0
1 ,5 0 0

_________
_________
_________
_________
_________

_
-

_
-

2. 7
(1 .2 )
-

-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1, 5 0 0
1, 5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
unde r
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 0 0
1 ,7 5 0

_________
_________
_________
_________
_________

_
-

_
-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,7 5 0
1 ,8 0 0
1, 8 5 0
1 ,9 .0 0
1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1, 8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1, 9 0 0
$ 1, 9 5 0
$ 2 , 000

_________
_________
_________
_________

_
-

$ 2 , 0 0 0 a n d o v e r _____________________
T o t a l ____________________________

100. 0

100. 0

_
100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

o
o
o

..
•
•

-

6.
1 0.
7.
7.
1.

-

4
3
7
1
2

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

3. 3
4. 8
1 .4
1. 0
1. 7

_

_

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

418

717

331

79

137

315

857

577

1, 0 7 8

1 ,6 8 9

$646

$ 802

$951

$ 1, 152

$553

$639

$741

$889

$798

$946




1 4.
4.
5.
4.
2.

5. 3
4. 1
1 .4
5. 0
3. 6

______

at e n d o f t a b l e

0
9
5
1
2

_

4. 3
2 .6
1. 8
5. 0
(2 .0 )

A v e r a g e m o n t h l y s a l a r i e s _________

S ee fo o t n o t e s

_

1. 9
1 .9
. 6

"

1. 0
-

1. 0
1. 2

3
5
1
8

_
-

1 ,0 5 0 _________
1, 1 0 0 _________
1, 1 5 0 _________
1 ,2 0 0 _________
1 ,2 5 0 _________

-

8.
5.
4.
4.

-

$
$
$
$
$

(0 .8 )
2. 2
1 .2
. 7

5. 8
4. 0
2. 5
9 .7

-

under
under
under
under
under

_
-

7
5
0
8

-

and
and
and
and
and

-

4.
7.
5.
7.

1 9. 0
5. 1
5. 1

1 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 5 0
1, 1 00
1, 150
1 ,2 0 0

_
-

6
1
2
5

5.
6.
4.
3.

10. 9
4. 9
4. 5
2. 1
(.7 )

$
$
$
$
$

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s _____

-

10.
4.
2.
3.

-

1 0.
1 2.
5.
1 5.
6.

-

6. 0
100. 0

100. 0

1 ,0 7 0

418

$ 1 ,2 1 0 $ 1, 4 1 3

25
Table 4. Employment Distribution by Salary: Professional and Administrative Occupations--- Continued
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s 1 in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s , 2 b y a v e r a g e
m o n t h l y s a l a r i e s , U n it e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i, F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 9 6 5 )
C h e m is ts
A v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r i e s
I

II

III

V

IV

V II

VI

V III

.

.

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

.

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

$500
$ 525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525
$ 550
$575
$600

_________ ,_____
_______ ________
______ _________
_________ ______

1 3.
1 2.
1 9.
1 1.

0
4
0
5

5. 7
4 .9
7. 1
12. 7

(1 .1 )
1. 6
2 .6

-

-

-

-

-

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
unde r
under
under

$ 6 2 5 _______________
$ 650
_______
_
$ 6 7 5 ____________ _
$ 7 0 0 _______________ _

1 2.
5.
2.
2.

1
7
9
2

1 7.
1 1.
1 3.
6.

4
4
2
8

4 .6
6. 5
1 0. 8
1 0. 0

_
(1 .6 )
2. 0

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

$700
$ 725
$ 750
$ 775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$ 7 5 0 _________ ______
$ 7 7 5 _____ __________
$800

1. 0
(1 .2 )
-

4 .9
4. 3
3. 9
1. 4

1 2 .9
1 1. 1
10. 0
6 .6

1. 9
3. 4
4. 8
6 .6

_

_

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

$800
$825
$ 850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 8 2 5 ______________ _
$ 8 5 0 _____________
$ 8 7 5 _______________
$900 _
___ ___

_
~

. 9
1. 0
(1 .5 )
"

6. 7
4. 2
2. 7
2 .6

6.
8.
7.
7.

2
1
8
2

_

_

-

-

_
_

-

-

-

$900
$925
$950
$ 975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 ___
_
_ _
$950
..._
_ __
$ 9 7 5 ______ ________
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ____________

_

_

-

-

7.
5.
5.
4.

9
5
0
6

4.
4.
5.
4.

1
7
2
8

(1 .0 )
1 .1
2. 0
. 8

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

1.
1.
.
.

-

-

-

1. 1
(.6 )
-

9 .4
7. 6
4. 6
2. 5
1. 5

1 6.
13.
9.
7.
9.

2
1
9
7
0

4.
7.
1 0.
1 0.
1 3.

5
5
1
3
6

(0 .8 )
2. 0
3. 6
4. 5

_
_
_

1 0.
1 0.
7.
5.
4.

7
3
3
4
5

8 .4
6. 5
7. 8
10. 2
7. 5

0. 4
1. 0
2 .6
2. 0
1. 4

3. 3
2. 1
1. 8
1. 1
(2 .6 )

1 4. 0
7 .6
6 .8
6. 1
3. 1

1 .4
4. 6
9 .6
3. 5

(0 .1 )
2. 5

$
$
$
$
$

1, 0 0 0
1 ,0 5 0
1, 1 00
1, 1 50
1, 2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 0 5 0
____
1, 1 0 0 _________
1, 1 5 0 _________
1 ,2 0 0 _________
1 ,2 5 0 _________

-

-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1, 2 5 0
1, 3 0 0
1, 3 5 0
1 ,4 0 0
1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 3 0 0
1, 3 5 0
1 ,4 0 0
1 ,4 5 0
1, 5 0 0

_________
_________
_
__
_________

_

_

_

$
$
$
$
$

1, 5 0 0
1, 5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1, 6 5 0
1, 7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
v o id e r
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 0 0
1, 7 5 0

_________
_________
_________
_________
______ _

$
$
$
$
$

1, 7 5 0
1, 8 0 0
1, 8 5 0
1, 9 0 0
1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

v o id e r
under
under
under
under

$ 1, 8 0 0
$ 1, 8 5 0
$ 1, 9 0 0
$ 1, 9 5 0
$ 2 ,0 0 0

_________
____ .____
____
_________
_________

$ 2 , 0 5 0 ___
$ 2, 1 0 0
____
$ 2 , 150
$ 2 , 2 0 0 ----- -------$ 2 , 2 5 0 __

9
2
6
9

$2,
$ 2,
$2,
$ 2,
$ 2,

000
050
1 00
1 50
200

and
and
and
and
and

v o id e r
v o id e r
under
under
under

$ 2,
$2,
$ 2,
$ 2,

250
300
350
400

and
an d
and
and

u n d e r $ 2 , 3 0 0 ___ ______
u n d e r $ 2 , 350
v o id e r $ 2 , 4 0 0
o v e r __________________ __

T o t a l __ _

_

_

N u m b er o f e m p lo y e e s
A v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r i e s

See

fo o t n o t e s

a t e n d o f t a b le ,




-

(2 .7 )
1. 2
2. 1
3. 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 .9
4. 7
2. 2
1. 4
(2 .2 )

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

"

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

(1 .7 )
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

.6
‘ 1. 1
(2 .0 )

2. 8
3. 8
4. 2
1. 4
2 .4

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

4
0
6
4
4

5. 4
1 0 .4
1. 8
3. 8
5. 4

-

5.
4.
7.
14.
8.

9
7
6
7
3

1.
.
2.
.
1.

-

_

_

-

-

2. 2
1 .4
2. 0
5. 8

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

2 , 307

5 , 531

9 , 187

1 0, 7 8 6

7 , 3 18

4 , 345

1 ,6 6 2

500

$551

$632

$734

$915

$ 1, 0 8 9

$ 1 ,2 6 4

$ 1 ,4 9 4

$ 1, 8 51

26
Table 4. Employment Distribution by Salary: Professional and Administrative Occupations----Continued
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s 1 in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s , 2 b y a v e r a g e
m o n t h l y s a l a r i e s , U n it e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i, F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 9 6 5 )
E n g in e e rs
A v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r i e s
I

II

III

IV

V

V II

VI

V III

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

_______________
_______________
___________ __
_______________

( 1. 1)

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

$ 500
$525
$ 550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 525
$ 550
$ 575
$600

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

2.
2.
6.
12.

5
8
1
2

_

_

.

( 1- 2 )
1 .5
3. 1

(0 .7 )

.
_

_

_
_
_

_

_
_
"

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 6 2 5 _______________
$ 6 5 0 _______________
,$ 6 7 5
________
$ 7 0 0 _______________

25.
1 9.
1 5.
7.

0
5
1
0

8. 2
11.8
18. 1
1 4. 2

$ 7 00
$725
$750
$ 775

and
and
and
and

unde r
under
under
under

$ 725
$750
$775
$ 800

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

4.
2.
1.
(1.

0
4
2
2)

13. 3
9. 2
8 .4
4. 1

8.
9.
11.
9.

8
2
1
8

1.
2.
3.
4.

$800
$ 825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$ 850
$875
$900

_______________
_______ _____
_______________
_______________

_

2 .9
1. 8
1. 0
(1 .3 )

9.
9.
8.
5.

8
3
4
5

5 .6
6.6
7. 1
6. 8

$900
$925
$950
$ 975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 _______________
$ 9 5 0 _______________
$ 9 7 5 _______________
$ 1 , 0 0 0 ____________

_

_

-

-

-

-

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,0 0 0
1 , 050
1 , 100
1, 1 50
1, 2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 2 5 0
1, 3 0 0
1, 3 5 0
400
1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 3 0 0
1, 3 5 0
1 ,4 0 0
1 ,4 5 0
1 , 500

1, 5 0 0
1, 5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1, 5 5 0
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,7 0 0
1 ,7 5 0

1 , 750
1 ,8 0 0
1, 8 5 0
1 ,9 0 0
1 , 950

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1 ,8 0 0
1 ,8 5 0
1 ,9 0 0
1, 9 5 0
2 , 000

_________
_________
_________
_________
_________

$ 2 , 000
$ 2 , 050
$ 2 , 100
$ 2 , 150
$ 2 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 , 0 5 0 _________
$ 2 , 1 0 0 _________
$ 2 , 1 5 0 _________
$ 2 , 2 0 0 _________
$ 2 , 2 5 0 _________

$2,
$2,
$ 2,
$ 2,

and
and
and
and

u n d e r $ 2 , 3 00 _________
u n d e r $ 2 , 3 50 _________
u n d e r $ 2, 4 0 0 _________
o v e r _____________________

250
300
3 50
400

-

-

-

_

_

.

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

(1. 1)

-

-

-

-

4
1
4
2

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

..

-

-

-

-

-

_

( 1. 6 )

-

-

1. 9
2. 0
1 .9
1.6

_

_

(2 .
2.
4.
3.

1)
0
5
3

7.
6.
7.
6.

8
3
1
8

4 .5
3 .7
4. 5
4. 3

(1 .3 )

_________
_________
_________
_________
_________

$
$
$
$
$

_

4. 2
3. 3
2. 1
1.2

“

_________
_________
_________
_________
_________

$
$
$
$
$

-

1 ,0 5 0 _________
1 , 1 0 0 _________
1 , 1 5 0 _________
1, 2 0 0 _________
1, 2 5 0 _________

$
$
$
$
$

-

1 .4
2 .4
5. 2
6. 3

1 1. 5
8 .7
5. 3
3. 3
2. 4

1 1. 5
10. 7
10. 8
9 .7
8. 2

4.
6.
7.
8.
9.

8
3
1
0
0

(1 ,9 )
1. 7
2. 2
4. 9

(1. 6 )

1. 1
( 1. 1)

5. 8
4 .6
2 .7
2. 5
1 .9

10.
10.
8.
7.
5.

2
0
5
2
4

6. 4
7. 3
8 .7
9. 5
8.6

2. 2
1.6
1 .7
3. 2
4. 9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

1 .4
(1 .4 )
-

-

4 .6
3. 0
2. 1
1 .9
1. J

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

(1. 8 )
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10.
8.
7.
6.
3.

5
0
3
6
4

3.
4.
1.
1.
2.

7
3
6
5
2

1.
1.
.
3.

0
0
6
8

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8. 6
7. 4
6.6
12. 1
4. 4
2
5
5
8
8

-

-

..

7.
5.
5.
3.
3.

_

-

~

3. 5
3. 0
1 .4
1 .5
(3 .7 )

-

-

-

T o t a l ___________________________

100. 0

100. 0

lu O . 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s ---------------------

1 0, 4 5 5

2 9 ,4 2 8

7 9 ,5 5 1

102,899

62,922

3 2 ,9 9 2

1 1, 0 05

2. 6 7 8

A v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r i e s -------------

$626

$691

$789

$948

$ 1 , 106

$ 1 , 2 78

$ 1, 501

$ 3 ,7 5 9

1 T o a v o i d s h o w in g s m a l l p r o p o r t i o n s o f e m p l o y e e s s c a t t e r e d at o r n e a r t h e e x t r e m e s o f t h e d i s t r i b u t i o n f o r s o m e o c c u ­
p a t i o n s , t h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e i n t e r v a l s h a v e b e e n a c c u m u l a t e d a n d a r e s h o w n , in m o s t c a s e s , In th e i n t e r v a l
a b o v e o r b e l o w th e e x t r e m e i n t e r v a l c o n t a in in g a t l e a s t 1 p e r c e n t .
T h e p e r c e n ta g e s r e p r e s e n tin g th e se e m p lo y e e s a re sh ow n
in p a r e n t h e s e s .
2 F o r s c o p e o f s t u d y , s e e t a b l e in a p p e n d ix A .
NOTE:

B ecau se

o f r o u n d in g ,




sum s

o f in d iv i d u a l i t e m s

m ay

not eq u a l

100.

27
Table 5. Employment Distribution by Salary: Engineering Technicians
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s , 1 b y a v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r i e s ,
U n it e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i, F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 196 5)
E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s
A v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r i e s
I

IV

III

II

V

$ 2 75 a n d u n d e r $ 3 0 0 ______________

0. 4

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

(0 .9 )
2. 5
3. 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
5
2
2

6.
10.
15.
17.

6
5
8
4

(2 .
2.
3.
6.

16.
10.
6.
4.

2
3
6
0

1 1. 3
12. 1
1 5 .4
1 4. 1

3.
4.
7.
10.

2
1
8
4

(1 .4 )
1. 3
2. 0

9. 8
1 0. 4
6 .4
3. 3

14.
16.
13.
9.

8
0
3
5

4.
6.
12.
1 3.

1
0
4
9

6. 0
5. 4
3. 7
1 .4

12.
10.
11.
8.

0
5
2
9

6.
3.
2.
.

8
9
2
7

300
3 25
350
3 75

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 325 --------------------$ 3 5 0 ______________
$ 3 7 5 ---------------------$ 4 0 0 ______________

1.6
9 .7
1 6. 1
1 3. 0

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

______________
______________
______________
______________

19.
1 6.
12.
5.

$ 5 00
$ 5 25
$ 550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525
$550
$575
$600

______________
______________
______________
______________

3. 6
1.8
(.7 )

$600
$ 6 25
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$675
$700

______________
______________
______________
______________

_

$7 00
$ 7 25
$ 7 50
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$750
$775
$800

............. ............
______________
______________
______________

_

_

-

-

1.6
( 1. 2 )

-

-

-

-

-

$800
$ 8 25
$850
$ 875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
unde r

$825
$850
$875
$900

______________
______________
______________
______________

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

$
$
$
$

$ 9 0 0 a n d u n d e r $ 9 2 5 ---------------------$ 925 and o v e r _

-

2. 5
2. 0
( 1. 6 )

-

-

-

0)
4
7
1

-

_

_

-

-

(0 .9 )
1. 0

-

1. 1
(1 .3 )

-

_

.8
1. 9

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s _____________

4 , 607

1 2 ,0 1 4

2 2 , 620

2 6 ,9 3 5

1 2 , 991

A v e r a g e m o n t h ly s a l a r i e s _______

$411

$491

$569

T o t a l _____

$640

$723

1 F o r s c o p e o f s t u d y , s e e t a b l e in a p p e n d ix A .
T o a v o i d s h o w in g s m a l l p r o p o r t i o n s o f e m p l o y e e s s c a t t e r e d a t o r n e a r
th e e x t r e m e s o f th e d i s t r i b u t i o n s f o r s o m e o c c u p a t i o n s , t h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e i n t e r v a l s h a v e b e e n a c c u m u ­
la t e d a n d a r e s h o w n , in m o s t c a s e s , in th e i n t e r v a l a b o v e o r b e l o w th e e x t r e m e i n t e r v a l c o n t a in in g at l e a s t 1 p e r c e n t .
The
p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e s e e m p l o y e e s a r e s h o w n in p a r e n t h e s e s .
NOTE:

B ecau se

of




r o u n d in g ,

s u m s o f in d iv i d u a l i t e m s

m a y n o t e q u a l 100.

28
Table 6.

Employment Distribution by Salary: Drafting and Clerical Occupations

( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s 1 in s e l e c t e d d r a f t i n g an d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , 2 b y a v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r i e s ,
U n i t e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a an d H a w a i i , F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 96 5)

D raftsm en

D rafts m en—
tracers

A vera ge w eekly salaries
I
Under $50

__________

_

________

II

III

-

_____________
_______________
----------------------______________
-----------------------

-

-

_
(1. 1)
1 .4
3. 3

_
-

_
-

$50
$55
$60
$65
$70

and
a nd
an d
an d
and

under
under
under
under
under

$55
$60
$65
$70
$75

-

an d
an d
a nd
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 8 0 _____ ________
$ 8 5 _______________
$ 9 0 ____________ __
$ 9 5 ______________
$ 1 0 0 ----------------------

4.
7.
6.
9.
9.

3
3
9
9
9

_
(1.0)
1. 3
2. 5

_
-

11.
8.
8.
6.
5.

3
6
5
8
8

4. 2
5. 2
7. 2
9. 3
11.1

_

$100
$ 105
$ 1 10
$ 1 15
$120

and
a nd
a nd
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 0 5 -----------------$ 1 1 0 ------------------$ 1 15 ------------------$ 1 2 0 -----------------$ 1 2 5 --------—

$125
$130
$135
$140
$145

an d
an d
an d
an d
a nd

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 3 0 -----------------$ 1 3 5 ----------------$ 1 4 0 -----------------$ 1 4 5 -----------------$ 1 5 0 ------------------

4. 0
3. 6
1. 7
1.6
1 .4

$150
$ 160
$170
$180
$190

a nd
a nd
an d
a nd
a nd

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 6 0 -----------------$ 1 7 0 ----------------$ 1 8 0 ------------------$ 1 9 0 ------------------$ 2 0 0 -----------------

1. 7
(.8)

9.
9.
8.
7.
5.

2
6
6
3
0

-

8. 0
4. 6
2. 5
1. 2
(2 .4)

_
-

-

-

$ 200 an d u n d e r $ 2 1 0 ------------------$ 2 1 0 a nd o v e r _____________________

I

II

5
0
0
1
2

2. 9
5. 8
9 .4
10. 7
11.4

1
1
5
4
1

10.
1C.
11.
6.
5.

11

K eypunch
operators
III

I

5. 1

-

11.
16.
14.
6.
4.

(1 .0)
1. 6
3. 0
4. 1

I

_
(0. 8)
1. 5
2. 9

0.
2.
7.
8.
13.

-

Cle r k s ,
file

0. 4

-

-

$75
$80
$85
$90
$95

Clerks,
accoun ting

2. 1

-

24. 5
24. 3
18. 9
11.4
6. 7

9. 0
17.4
16. 7
14. 1
12.3

0.
2.
5.
9.
10.

2
5
7
5
0

3.
6.
7.
9.
8.

5
1
3
8
2

3. 1
2. 8
1. 3
1. 0
(1.0)

6. 0
5. 3
3. 1
1. 5
(1 .0)

4. 3
3. 6
2. 4
2. 2
1 .4

9.
8.
7.
7.
5.

0
2
8
6
8

_
-

1. 3
1. 0
(1. 1)
-

-

-

_
-

(1.8)
-

_

_

-

-

-

6. 3
4 .4
3. 9
2. 3
1. 3

_

_

5.
7.
7.
9.
8.

4
9
3
4
1

15.
12.
9.
6.
4.

3
6
1
5
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1. 5
2. 6

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 1
1. 0
(-3)
-

8.
6.
4.
3.
2.

8
5
3
3
4

II

0. 4

-

7
6
8
1
7

4.
7.
13.
14.
14.

1
7
2
0
9

0.
1.
3.
5.
9.

10. 3
11. 7
11.4
9. 1
7. 2

11.
9.
7.
5.
4.

2
2
0
7
3

10. 6
12. 9
13. 5
10. 3
9 .4

5.
4.
4.
2.
2.

1
9
3
3
0

3. 9
2. 1
(2 . i ;
-

_

-

(2 .8)
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

5
1
3
6
9

8. 4
6. 7
3. 6
1.8
1. 3
(.8)
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T o t a l --------------------------------------

100 . 0

100. 0

100 . 0

100 . 0

100 . 0

100 . 0

1 00. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s -----------------

19,370

33,681

18,976

4 , 166

60,401

43,447

18,785

22 , 6 43

7 ,4 6 2

37,931

28,087

A v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r i e s -----------

$ 104.00

$13 2. 00

$154.00

$ 8 3 . 50

$ 8 1 . 00

$107.00

$ 6 1 . 00

$ 6 9 . 00

$ 8 6 . 50

$ 7 5 . 50

$ 8 8 .0 0

See fo o tn o te s at end of ta ble.




100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

29
Table 6.

Employment Distribution by Salary: Drafting and Clerical Occupations— Continued

( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s 1 in s e l e c t e d d r a f t i n g and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , 2 b y a v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r i e s ,
U n i t e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i , F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1965)

Average

Under

w eekly salaries

O ffice
boys
or
g irls

$ 5 0 --------------------- ---------------------

2. 1

Stenog­
raph ers ,
general

0. 1

Stenog­
raphers ,
senior

-

_

an d
an d
an d
an d
a nd

under
under
under
under
under

$ 5 5 ---------------------------$ 6 0 -------- ------------------$ 6 5 ---------------------------$ 7 0 ---------------------------$ 7 5 -------------------_-------

14.
18.
19.
15.
10.

0
1
6
1
1

1.
3.
6.
9.
12.

$75
$80
$85
$ Qfi
$ 95

an d
an d
a nd
arid
an d

under
under
under
und^r
under

$ 8 0 — ----------------------$ 8 5 -------------------------------------------------$90
$9C
'
$ 1 0 0 ------------------------

5.
4.
3.
3
1.

5
2
7
4
8

12. 2
11.8
10. 8
8. 5
6] 6

7. 2
10. 4
12. 1
13.2
10. 7

1. 1
(1 .2)

7. 6
4. 5
2. 6
1. 3
(.9)

11.4
10. 2
6. 6
3. 9
3. 2

$ 100
$105
$110
$115
$120

an d
an d
and
a nd
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 0 5 -------------------$ 1 1 0 -------------------$ 1 1 5 ----- -------------$ 1 2 0 — ----$ 1 2 5 -----------------------

$125
$130
$135
$140
$145

a nd
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$130- —
-------$ 1 3 5 -------------------$ 1 4 0 ----------------------$ 1 4 5 -----. — -------$ 1 5 0 -------- -----------

$150
$ 1 60
$170
$180
$190

and
and
a nd
and
a nd

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 6 0 ----------------------$ 1 7 0 ----------------------$180$190
$ 2 0 0 -----------------------

“

_
-

0
5
2
9
2

_
_

0.
1.
2.
5.

I

II

!.8

$50
$55
$60
$65
$70

3
0
4
1

1 .4
(• 9)

Tabulatingm a chin e op era tors

Sw itchboard
operators

4. 8
5. 8
7. 1
9. 5
11.9
10.
10.
9.
9.
8.

1
3
3
3
7

II

0. 1

-

_

III
-

-

_

_

(0 . 6)
1 .4
3. 0
4. 1

8. 0
11.1
11.4
12. 9
12. 7

13. 5
11.2
10. 1
6. 4
4. 2

5. 9
8. 8
10. 4
12.9
11.0

(0 .
2.
2.
5.
6.

3. 0
3. 7
2. 1
1.0
(.5)

11.1
8. 9
6. 5
5. 5
4. 7

8. 6
11.2
9. 9
10. 3
9. 8

9.
8.
6.
3.
1.

3
3
6
1
3

(1 . 1)

_

-

_

2. 2
2. 0
(1.3)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

"

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

9)
C
9
2
5

7
6
9
3
4

3. 2
1 .3
(.3)

-

-

-

7.
13.
15.
17.
15.

_
_
_

7.
-8.
5.
3.
2.

II

0. 8

(1 .3)
2. 6
3. 8
6. 6

-

$ 200 a nd u n d e r $ 2 1 0 __________ ____
$ 21 0 an d o v e r -------------- ----------------- -

I

1 .6
5. 1
11.2
12. 1
14. 2

7. 7
2. 1
1 .0
(.8)

_

I

T ypists

4
5
7
4
5

0.
2.
5.
9.
13.

10.
7.
4.
2.
1.

6
1
5
1
9

13. 3
14. 6
11.9
8. 5
6. 9

2. 4
(1.0)
-

5.
4.
2.
1.
(•

2
0
8
8
1

2
6
3
2
7)

_

_

_
_

_
_

-

“

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

100. 0

100 . 0

100.0

100. 0

100 . 0

100 . 0

1 00. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s ---------------------- 2 3 , 5 5 5

72,057

4 8,827

10,304

8 ,0 4 0

8 ,4 9 9

17, 210

8, 9 26

66,458

3 7,646

A v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r i e s ---------------- $ 6 6 . 50

$ 8 3 . 00

$ 9 5 . 00

$ 7 9 . 50

$ 9 1 .5 0

$ 7 8 . 50

$ 9 7 . 00 $ 117. 00

$ 70.00

$ 83.00

T o t a l ------------------------------------------

100 . 0

100 . 0

1 T o a v o i d s h o w i n g s m a l l p r o p o r t i o n s o f e m p l o y e e s s c a t t e r e d at o r n e a r the e x t r e m e s o f th e d i s t r i b u t i o n f o r s o m e o c c u ­
p a t i o n s , the p e r c e n t a g e s o f e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e i n t e r v a l s h a v e b e e n a c c u m u l a t e d and a r e s h o w n , in m o s t c a s e s , in th e i n t e r v a l
a b o v e o r b e l o w the e x t r e m e i n t e r v a l c o n t a i n i n g at l e a s t 1 p e r c e n t .
The p e r c e n t a g e s r e p re se n tin g these e m p lo y e e s a re shown
in p a r e n t h e s e s .
2 F o r s c o p e o f s t u d y , s e e t a b l e in a p p e n d i x A .
NOTE:

B ecause

o f r o u n d in g ,




sum s

o f in d iv i d u a l i t e m s

m a y not equal

100.

30
Table 7. Occupational Employment Distribution: By Industry Division
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s ,
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , 2 U n i t e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i , F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 96 5)
F in a n ce,
in sura nce,
an d
real estate

Manu­
facturing

O ccu pation

P ublic
u tilities3

73
45
73
33
62
81
79
93
83

12
21
7
22
6
o
(5 )
(5 )
9

(!)
(5 )
(!)
(5 )

(5 )
(5 )
5

5
23
7
33
20
12
8

(!)
(5 )

(5 )
(5 )

(5 )
(5 )
(5 )
(5 )
(5 '
(5 )
(5 )
5
8

82
84

5
8

(5 )
(5 )

(5 )
(5 )

(5 )
(5 )

13
8

48
31
50
42
59
42
47
49

20
7
15
15
14
17
21
8

W holesa le
trade

R etail
trade

Selected
services4

P r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t iv e
A c c o u n t a n t s -------------------------------------------------------A u d i t o r s ___________________________ ___________
C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s -------------------------------------------A t t o r n e y s ---------- ---------------------------------------------M a n a g e r s , o f f i c e s e r v i c e s _________________
J o b a n a l y s t s -----------------------------------------------------D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l ---------------------------------C h e m i s t s -----------------------------------------------------------E n g i n e e r s -------------------------------------- ---------------------

5
5
5
7
7

(5)
5
6

T echn ical
E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s _ ------------------------D r a f t s m e n --------------------------------------------------------C lerical
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g -------------------------------------C l e r k s , f i l e ------------------------------------------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------------O f f i c e b o y s o r g i r l s __________________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s -------------------------------------------------S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s ----- ---------------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ------------------T y p i s t s ---------------------------------------------------------------

6
4
5
4

12
11
7
7

(5 )
4
5

(5 )
17
5
6

(5 )

13
45
21
30
17
18
22
32

(!)
(5 )
(5 )
(5 )
(5 )
n
(!)
(5 )

1 E a c h o c c u p a t i o n i n c l u d e s th e w o r k l e v e l s , a s d e f i n e d f o r t h e s u r v e y , f o r w h i c h e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s
s c o p e o f t h e s t u d y a r e s h o w n in t a b l e 1.
2 F o r s c o p e o f s u r v e y , s e e t a b l e in a p p e n d i x A .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( l i m i t e d t o r a i l r o a d , l o c a l a n d s u b u r b a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r , a nd a i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n i n d u s t r i e s ) ,
c o m m u n i c a t i o n , e l e c t r i c , g a s , a nd s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s .
4 E n g i n e e r in g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c i a l l y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t , a d testin g l a b o r a t o r i e s on ly.
5 L e s s t ha n 4 p e r c e n t .

within

NOTE:

Because

o f roun din g,




s u m s o f i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s m a y n o t e q u a l 100 .

31

Table 8. Relative Salary Levels: Occupation by Industry Division
( R e l a t i v e s a l a r y l e v e l s f o r s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , an d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s ,
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , 1 U n it e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a an d H a w a i i , F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 96 5)
2
( A v e r a g e s a l a r y f o r e a c h o c c u p a t i o n in a l l i n d u s t r i e s = 100)
O ccu pa tion

Manu­
facturing

P u blic
utilities 3

W h olesale
trade

Retail
trade

100
103
100
104
101
102
100
100
100

104
102

101
99
104

101
101

99
100

106
100

106
108
102
103
102
104
104
104

104
119
109
112
107
112
100
107

F in a n ce,
in su ra n ce,
and
real estate

Selected
services 4

P r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e
A c c o u n t a n t s -------------------------------------------------------Auditors —
—
----------- -------------C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s -------------------------------------------A t t o r n e y s ----------------------------------------- ---------------M a n a g e r s , o f f i c e s e r v i c e s -------------------------J o b a n a l y s t s -----------------------------------------------------D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l --------------------------------C h e m i s t s -----------------------------------------------------------E n g i n e e r s -----------------------------------------------------------

(5 )
98
102
(5 )
107

(* )
(5 )
103

(5 )
97

(5 )
(5 )

(5 )
92
98
(5 )
97
(?)
(5 )

93
92
104
99
96
86
101
(!)
(5 )

100
(!)
(?)
(?)
(! }

(?)
(5 )
103
99

T echnical
E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s -------------------------------D r a f t s m e n --------------------------------- ---------- --------

(5 )

(5 )

(! )

104
101

88
89
92
93
90
82
94
94

87
93
91
92
88
93
92
92

102
109
105
98
100
103
107
107

(?)

(5 )

C lerical
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g ----------------------------------------C l e r k s , f i l e -----------------------------------------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------ --------O f f i c e b o y s o r g i r l s ---------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s -------------------------------------------------S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s -------------------T y p i s t s -----------------------------------------------------------------

106
100
103
99
104
106
106
102

1 E a c h o c c u p a t i o n i n c l u d e s th e w o r k l e v e l s , a s d e f i n e d f o r the s u r v e y , f o r w h i c h d a t a a r e p r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 1.
In c o m ­
p u t i n g r e l a t i v e s a l a r y l e v e l s f o r e a c h o c c u p a t i o n b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , th e t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t in e a c h w o r k l e v e l in a l l i n d u s t r i e s
s u r v e y e d w a s u s e d a s a c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t t o e l i m i n a t e the e f f e c t o f d i f f e r e n c e s in th e p r o p o r t i o n o f e m p l o y m e n t in
v a r i o u s w o r k l e v e l s w it h i n e a c h o c c u p a t i o n .
2 F o r s c o p e o f s u r v e y , s e e t a b l e in a p p e n d i x A .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( l i m i t e d to r a i l r o a d , l o c a l an d s u b u r b a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r , an d a i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n i n d u s t r i e s ) ,
c o m m u n i c a t i o n , e l e c t r i c , g a s , and s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s .
4 E n g i n e e r i n g an d a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; and c o m m e r c i a l l y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t , an d t e s t i n g l a b o r a t o r i e s o n l y .
5 I n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in 1 w o r k l e v e l o r m o r e to w a r r a n t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f da t a .




32

Table 9. Average Weekly Hours: Occupation by Industry Division
( A v e r a g e w e e k l y h o u r s 1 f o r e m p l o y e e s i n s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , a nd c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , 2
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , U n i t e d S t a t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a a n d H a w a i i , F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 96 5)

O ccupation

Manu­
facturing

P ublic
utilities3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

39. 5
39. 5

39. 5
39. 5
40. 0

39. 5
40. 0

F in a n ce,
in sura nce,
and
rea l estate

Selected
services4

P r o f e s s i o n a l an d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e
A c c o u n t a n t s -------------------------------------------------------A u d i t o r s _________________________________________
C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s -------------------------------------------A t t o r n e y s ----------------------------------------------------------M a n a g e r s , o f f i c e s e r v i c e s -------------------------J o b a n a l y s t s -----------------------------------------------------D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l ______________________
C h e m i s t s ________________________________________
E n g i n e e r s _______________________________________

39.
39.
39.
38.
39.
39.
40.
39.
4 0.

5
5
5
5
5
5
0
5
0

(5 )
39. 5
40. 0

38.
37.
38.
37.
38.
38.
38.

0
5
5
5
5
0
5

39. 5
39. 5
40. 0

(5 )
39. 5

(!)
(5 )
(5 )
39. 5

(5 )
40. 0
39. 0
(5 )
40. 5

(5 )
39. 0

(5 )
(5 )

(5 )
(5 )

(5 )
(5 )

(5 )
40. 0
39. 5
39. 5

40. 0
40. 0

39. 5
39. 5

(! }
(5 )

(! j
(5 )

({ )
(5 )

39. 5
40. 0

39.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.

38.
39.
39.
38.
39 .
39 .
38.
39.

(5 )
40. 0

T echn ical
E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s ____________________
D r a f t s m e n --------------------------------------------------------Cle rica l
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g ----------------------------------------C l e r k s , f i l e -----------------------------------------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------------O f f i c e b o y s o r g i r l s ---------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s --------------------------------------------------S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ------------------T y p i s t s __________________________________________

5
0
5
0
5
5
5
5

5
0
0
5
0
5
5
0

39.
39.
39.
38.
39.
38.
39.
39.

0
5
5
5
0
5
5
0

39.
39.
39 .
39.
39 .
39.
39.
39.

0
0
0
0
0
5
0
0

38.
38.
38.
37.
38.
38.
37.
38.

0
0
0
5
0
0
5
0

39.
39.
39.
39.
40.
39.
39.
39.

5
5
5
5
0
5
5
5

1 B a s e d o n the s c h e d u l e d w o r k w e e k f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y .
The average fo r
e a c h j o b c a t e g o r y w a s r o u n d e d t o th e n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r .
2 E a c h o c c u p a t i o n i n c l u d e s th e w o r k l e v e l s , a s d e f i n e d f o r th e s u r v e y , f o r w h i c h d a t a a r e p r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 1.
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( l i m i t e d t o r a i l r o a d , l o c a l a n d s u b u r b a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r , a nd a i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n i n d u s t r i e s ) ,
c o m m u n i c a t i o n , e l e c t r i c , g a s , an d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s .
4 E n g i n e e r i n g a nd a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; a n d c o m m e r c i a l l y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t , a nd t e s t i n g l a b o r a t o r i e s o n l y .
5 I n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in 1 w o r k l e v e l o r m o r e to w a r r a n t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f d a t a .




Appendix A. Scope and Method o f Survey
S cope o f S u rvey
T his su rv e y re la te s to esta b lish m en ts in the United States e x ce p t A la sk a and Hawaii
in the follow in g in d u s trie s : M anufacturing; tra n sp orta tion , com m u n ica tion , e le c t r ic , g a s, and
sa n ita ry s e r v ic e s ; w h o le sa le tra d e ; re ta il tra d e ; fin a n ce, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e sta te ; e n g i­
n eerin g and a rch ite c tu r a l s e r v ic e s ; and c o m m e r c ia lly o p e ra te d r e s e a r c h , develop m en t, and
testin g la b o r a t o r ie s . E sta b lish m en ts with fe w e r than 250 w o r k e r s at the tim e o f r e fe r e n c e
o f the u n iv erse data (in g e n e ra l, fir s t qu arter o f 1964) w e re ex clu d ed .
The in d u stria l co v e r a g e o f p re v io u s su rv ey s in this s e r ie s w as the sa m e, but the
g eog ra p h ic c o v e ra g e was lim ite d to esta b lish m en ts lo ca te d in Standard M etrop olita n S ta tistica l
A re a s . A lthough the cu rre n t s u rv e y was expanded to include esta b lish m en ts in both m e t r o ­
politan and n on m etrop olitan a r e a s , p r o v is io n was m ade in the su rv e y d esig n to p e rm it separate
p resen ta tion o f data fo r the 218 Standard M etrop olita n S ta tistica l A r e a s (within the 48 States
su rv ey ed ) as r e v is e d b y the B ureau o f the Budget in 1 9 6 4 .17
The estim a te d num ber o f esta b lish m en ts and the total em p loym en t within the sco p e
o f this su rv e y , and within the sa m p le actu a lly studied, are lis te d se p a ra te ly fo r ea ch m a jo r
in d u stry d iv ision in the accom p an yin g table.
A s in d ica ted in the table and exp la in ed la ter
in detail, the sco p e o f the study was the sam e fo r a ll o ccu p a tio n s; h ow e v e r, the 1965 su rv e y
co n s is te d o f the follow in g th ree sep a ra te p a rts: One sam p le o f e sta b lish m en ts studied in
m etrop olita n area s fo r the p r o fe s s io n a l and ad m in istra tive o c c u p a tio n s ;18 another la r g e r
sam ple in m etrop o lita n a rea s fo r drafting and c le r i c a l o ccu p a tio n s; and a th ird sam p le o f
establish m en ts in n on m etrop olita n cou nties fo r a ll o ccu p a tio n s.
T im in g o f S u rvey
The data r e fle c t s a la r ie s in e ffe c t during the p e r io d F e b r u a r y -M a r c h 1965, 19 although
the su rv e y was con d u cted o v e r a lon g er p e r io d , on the a v e ra g e .
The data fo r the p r o f e s ­
sion a l, a d m in istra tiv e, and en g in eerin g tech n icia n o ccu p a tion s w e re c o lle c te d b y p e r so n a l
v is its to sam p le e sta b lish m e n ts, la r g e ly betw een F e b ru a ry 1 and M ay 14, but with m o re
than h alf the v is its c o m p le te d b y the end o f M a rch . The m o s t r e c e n t in form a tion available
at the tim e o f the v is it was obtained. F o r the drafting and c le r i c a l o ccu p a tio n s, the su rv e y
was d esig n ed to d ev elop nationw ide e stim a tes fr o m the data c o lle c te d in the B u rea u ’ s o c c u ­
pational wage su rv e y s in m e tro p o lita n a re a s , con d u cted betw een A ugust 1964 and June 1965,
and supplem en ted b y data c o lle c t e d in the F e b ru a ry — ay 1965 p e r io d fo r e sta b lish m en ts ou t­
M
side o f m etrop olita n a r e a s . A lthough som e o f the m e tro p o lita n a rea s w e re su rv e y e d in 1964,
th ose su rv ey ed in the fir s t h a lf o f 1965 (with the a re a s they re p re se n te d in the nationw ide e s ­
tim a tes) accou n ted fo r w e ll o v e r h alf o f the o ffic e em p loym en t within the sco p e o f the su rv ey .
The average p a y r o ll r e fe r e n c e m onth studied fo r these e m p lo y e e s was F e b ru a ry 1965.
M ethod o f C o lle ctio n
Data w e re obtained b y p e r s o n a l v is its o f B u reau fie ld e c o n o m is ts to re p re se n ta tiv e
establish m en ts within the sco p e o f the s u rv e y . 2
0
E m p lo y e e s w e re c la s s ifie d a c c o r d in g to
occu p a tion and le v e l, with the a ssista n ce o f com p a n y o ffic ia ls , on the b a s is o f u n iform jo b
d efin ition s.
In com p a rin g actual duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s o f e m p lo y e e s w ith th ose in the
su rv ey d efin ition s, e x ten siv e use w as m ade o f com p a n y occu p a tion a l d e s c r ip tio n s , o r g a n i­
zation ch a rts, and oth er p e r s o n n e l r e c o r d s . The occu p a tion a l d efinition s u sed in c la s s ify ­
ing em p lo y e e s appear in appendix C.
The 1963 and 1964 surveys relate to all 212 SMSA’ s in the United States as revised in 1961 by the Bureau o f the Budget;
earlier studies related to 188 SMSA’ s in the United States, except Honolulu, as revised through 1959 by the Bureau o f the Budget.
18 Engineering technicians also were included in this part o f the survey.
19 Beginning with the 1963 survey report, the reference period has been designated as "February—
March, " instead o f "W inter,"
as in earlier bulletins in this series, to indicate more specifically the period represented by the data. The information for each o f the
six surveys in this series was collected during approximately the same tim e period.
20 The surveys in metropolitan areas, used to develop nationwide estimates for the drafting and clerical occupations, provide for
co lle ction o f data for some areas by a com bination o f m ail and personal visits in alternate years. For establishments reporting by m ail,
the occupational classifications are based on those made during personal visits in the preceding year.




33

34
N u m b e r o f E s t a b l i s h m e n t s a nd W o r k e r s W i t h in S c o p e o f S u r v e y 1 a nd N u m b e r S t u d i e d
b y I n d u s t r y D i v i s i o n , F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 196 5
W ithin s c o p e o f s u r v e y 1
W o r k e r s in e:s t a b l i s h m e n t s
Industry div ision

U nited Sta tes— all
i n d u s t r i e s 1-------------- --------------M a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------------N on m a nufactu rin g:
Transportation, 4 co m m u n i­
c a t i o n , e l e c t r i c , g a s , a nd
s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------------W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ---------------------------R e t a i l t r a d e ----------------------------------F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , an d
r e a l e s t a t e ----------------------------------S ervices:
E n g in e e rin g and a r c h i ­
t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; an d
co m m e rcia lly operated
r e s e a r c h , develop nent,
a nd t e s t i n g l a b o r a t o r i e s
o n l y ------------------------------------------M e tr o p o lita n a r e a s — all
i n d u s t r i e s 5----------------------------M a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------------N on m a n u factu rin g :
Transportation, 4 co m m u n i­
c a t i o n , e l e c t r i c , g a s , a nd
s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------------W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ---------------------------R e t a i l t r a d e ------------------------------------F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and
r e a l e s t a t e ----------------------------------Services:
E n g in e e rin g and a r c h i ­
t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; an d
co m m e rcia lly operated
re s e a r ch , developm ent,
an d t e s t i n g l a b o r a t o r i e s
o n l y ------------------------------------------E sta b lishm ents e m ­
ployin g 2 ,5 0 0 w o r k e r s
o r m o r e — a ll in d u s tr ie s —
M a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------------

N u m ber of
establish ­
m ents

T otal

Studied fo r p r o f e s s i o n a l
and a d m in is t r a t iv e
occupa tions

P rofession al,
N u m ber of
adm in istrative,
e stablish ­
su p ervisory,
m ents
and c l e r i c a l 3

W o r k e r s in
establish ­
m ents

Studied fo r drafting
a nd c l e r i c a l
occu pa tion s 2
N u m ber of
esta blish ­
m ents

W o r k e r s in
establish ­
m ents

16, 551

15, 2 6 0 , 000

5, 3 3 8 , 0 0 0

2, 325

5, 3 73 , 1 84

5, 667

7, 8 4 5 , 4 72

1 1,9 04

10, 6 9 8 , 100

3, 0 55 , 40 0

1, 651

3, 7 7 0 , 6 62

3, 213

4, 6 33 , 9 4 2

1, 275
538
1 ,6 5 8

1 ,6 7 8,1 00
279,300
1 , 6 1 0 , 200

816 ,10 0
169,400
3 63, 500

2 34
53
1 34

7 8 5 , 781
39, 372
325,317

708
268
888

1, 2 80, 46 0
142, 6 32
1, 127 , 449

1, 04 3

837 ,60 0

829 ,70 0

193

3 44 , 317

518

5 58,859

133

156,700

103 , 9 0 0

60

1 07, 7 35

72

102,130

12, 368

12, 6 0 6 , 200

4, 8 6 1 , 9 0 0

1 ,867

4, 8 6 0 , 4 82

5, 209

7, 3 32, 7 7 0

7, 9 79

8, 1 50, 200

2, 6 2 4 , 0 00

1, 223

3, 2 8 1 , 9 5 2

2, 7 85

4, 145 , 2 32

1, 1 24
538
1, 592

1, 6 2 1 , 400
2 79 ,300
1, 5 94, 300

799,000
169,400
3 60, 9 0 0

219
53
130

7 7 8 , 118
39,372
3 2 4 , 531

6 93
268
884

1, 2 72 , 797
1 42, 6 32
1, 126 , 6 63

1, 0 1 4

8 2 4 , 60 0

816, 800

187

3 40 , 8 7 2

512

5 55, 4 1 4

121

1 36,400

9 1,8 00

55

9 5, 637

67

90 , 0 32

1, 039

5, 5 80 , 200

2, 115 , 7 00

577

3, 7 6 4 , 3 4 4

63 7

3, 8 3 2 , 8 2 3

68 5

3, 7 5 8 , 300

1, 2 64, 9 0 0

393

2, 6 0 5 , 75 5

3 44

2, 2 94, 737

1 T h e s t u d y r e l a t e s t o e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in i n d u s t r i e s l i s t e d e m p l o y i n g 250 w o r k e r s o r m o r e in t h e U n i t e d S t a te s e x c e p t
A l a s k a a nd H a w a i i .
2 T h e n a t i o n a l e s t i m a t e s f o r t h e d r a f t i n g a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e d e v e l o p e d f r o m d a t a c o l l e c t e d in th e B u r e a u ' s
o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s a n d d a t a c o l l e c t e d in a s u p p l e m e n t a r y s u r v e y o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o u t s i d e o f
these a rea s.
D a t a w e r e e x c l u d e d f o r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s c o v e r e d in t h e o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s tha t w e r e n ot w i t h i n th e s c o p e
o f t h e s u r v e y a s d e t e r m i n e d f o r t h e s t u d y o f p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s .
3 I n c l u d e s e x e c u t i v e , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , s u p e r v i s o r y , a n d c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s , bu t e x c l u d e s t e c h n i c i a n s and
d r a f t s m e n , a nd s a l e s p e r s o n n e l .
4 L i m i t e d t o r a i l r o a d , l o c a l a n d s u b u r b a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r ( f o r e i g n an d d o m e s t i c ) , a nd a i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n i n ­
d u s t r i e s a s d e f i n e d in t h e 1 9 5 7 e d i t i o n o f t h e S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l .
5 S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a s i n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s , e x c e p t A l a s k a a nd H a w a i i , a s r e v i s e d i n 1 9 6 4 b y t h e
B u r e a u o f th e B u d g e t .




35

N a tu re o f D ata C o l le c t e d and P r e s e n t e d
The a v e r a g e s a la r ie s r e p o r t e d r e la te to the sta n d a rd s a la r ie s
sta n d a rd w o r k s c h e d u le s , i. e.
to the s t r a ig h t -t im e s a la r y c o r r e s p o n d in g
n o r m a l w o r k s c h e d u le e x c lu d in g o v e r t im e h o u r s .
N o n p r o d u c tio n b o n u s e s
c o s t - o f - l i v i n g b o n u s e s and in c e n tiv e e a r n in g s a r e in clu d e d .
The a v e r a g e
r e la t e to f u ll- t i m e e m p lo y e e s f o r w h om s a la r y data w e r e a v a ila b le .

that w e r e p a id fo r
to the e m p lo y e e 's
a r e e x c lu d e d , but
s a la r ie s p r e s e n t e d

A b ou t 9 p e r c e n t o f a ll the e s t a b lis h m e n t s a s k e d to su p p ly data on p r o f e s s io n a l, a d ­
m in is t r a t iv e , and t e c h n ic a l o c c u p a t io n s w o u ld n ot do s o .
T h e s e c o r r e s p o n d e d to an e s t im a te d
to ta l in the u n iv e r s e s tu d ie d to ab ou t 8 2 3 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s , about 5 . 4 p e r c e n t o f 1 5 ,2 6 0 ,0 0 0 .
The n o n c o o p e r a tin g u nits in the s a m p le w e r e r e p la c e d b y o th e r s in the sa m e i n d u s t r y - s iz e lo c a t io n c l a s s e s .
W h e re no s u c h su b s titu te s w e r e a v a ila b le , s in c e a ll s i m il a r units w e r e
a lr e a d y in the s a m p le , the w e ig h t o f the in clu d e d e s t a b lis h m e n t s w as in c r e a s e d to take a c c o u n t
o f the m is s in g u n its.
In the s u r v e y s o f c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s , the sa m e g e n e r a l p r o c e d u r e w as fo llo w e d to take
a c c o u n t o f the n o n c o o p e r a t o r s .
The r e fu s a l ra te w as c o n s id e r a b l y lo w e r h e r e , am oun ting
to le s s than 3 p e r c e n t .
U n der e s t a b lis h e d p o li c ie s o f s o m e c o m p a n ie s , o f f i c i a l s w e r e n ot a u th o r iz e d to p r o ­
v id e in fo r m a t io n r e la t in g to s a la r ie s fo r a ll o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d .
In n e a r ly a ll in s t a n c e s ,
h o w e v e r , in fo r m a t io n w as p r o v id e d on the n u m b e r o f su ch e m p lo y e e s and the a p p r o p r ia te
o c c u p a t io n a l c la s s if i c a t io n .
It w as thus p o s s ib le to e s t im a te the p r o p o r t io n o f e m p lo y e e s
f o r w h om s a la r y data w e r e not a v a ila b le .
A s in d ic a te d b e lo w , th e se p o l i c i e s m o r e often
r e la t e d to the h ig h e r le v e l p o s it io n s , m a in ly b e c a u s e o f p o l i c i e s not to d i s c l o s e p a y data
fo r e m p lo y e e s c o n s id e r e d a p a rt o f the m a n a g e m e n t g ro u p o r c l a s s i f i e d in o c c u p a t io n a l le v e ls
in v o lv in g a s in g le e m p lo y e e .

Number of jo b categories

Percent o f em ployees classified in professional
and administrative occupations surveyed for
whom salary data were not available

2 --------------------------------------------- -

10 percent or more
Attorneys VII (12 percent)
Directors of personnel IV (13 percent)

6 -------------------------------------- ------------

5 to 9. 9 percent
Chief accountants I, III, and IV
Directors of personnel III
Engineers VII and VIII

9

---- -------------------------------------- ------

3 1 ------------------------------

------------------ -

1 to 409 percent
Less than 1 percent

C o m p a r is o n s b e tw e e n e s t a b lis h m e n t s that p r o v id e d s a la r y data f o r e a c h s p e c i f i c o c ­
c u p a tio n a l l e v e l and th o s e n ot doin g so in d ic a te d that the tw o c l a s s e s o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s did
n ot d iffe r m a t e r ia l ly in in d u s tr ie s r e p r e s e n t e d , e m p lo y m e n t , o r p a y s t r u c tu r e f o r o th e r jo b s
in th is s e r i e s f o r w h ich data w e r e a v a ila b le .
O cc u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t e s t im a t e s r e la t e to the to ta l in a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith in
the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y and not the n u m b e r a c tu a lly s u r v e y e d .
E m p lo y e e s fo r w h om s a la r y
data w e r e n ot a v a ila b le w e r e n ot taken in to a c c o u n t in the e s t im a t e s . 21
T h e s e e s t im a t e s
w e r e d e r iv e d b y w e ig h tin g fu ll- t i m e e m p lo y e e s in the o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d in e a c h s a m p le
e s t a b lis h m e n t in p r o p o r t io n to the n u m b e r o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s it r e p r e s e n t e d w ith in the s c o p e
o f the s u r v e y .
F o r e x a m p le , if the s a m p le e s t a b lis h m e n t w as s e l e c t e d fr o m a g ro u p o f fo u r
e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith s i m il a r e m p lo y m e n t in the sa m e in d u s tr y and r e g io n , e a c h f u ll- t i m e e m ­
p lo y e e fou n d in an o c c u p a t io n stu d ie d w as c o u n te d as fo u r e m p lo y e e s in c o m p ilin g the e m ­
p lo y m e n t e s t im a t e s f o r the o c c u p a t io n s .
In a d d ition , the p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is t r a tiv e 2
2* Also not taken into account were a few instances in which salary data were available for em ployees in an occupation, but
where there was no satisfactory basis for classifying the em ployees by the appropriate work levels. The occupations involved in these
cases were accountants, chemists, engineers, and engineering technicians.




36

o c c u p a t io n s w e r e l i m i t e d to e m p l o y e e s m e e t in g the s p e c i f i c c r i t e r i a in e a c h s u r v e y d e f i n i ­
tio n an d w e r e n o t in te n d e d to in c lu d e a l l e m p l o y e e s in e a c h f i e l d o f w o r k . 22
F o r th e se
r e a s o n s , an d b e c a u s e o f d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t io n a l s t r u c t u r e a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , the
e s t i m a t e s o f o c c u p a t io n a l e m p lo y m e n t o b ta in e d f r o m the s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d ie d
s e r v e o n ly to in d ic a t e the r e l a t i v e im p o r t a n c e o f the o c c u p a t io n s an d l e v e l s a s d e fin e d f o r
the s u r v e y .
T h e s e q u a li f ic a t io n s o f th e e m p lo y m e n t e s t i m a t e s do n o t m a t e r i a l l y a f f e c t the
a c c u r a c y o f th e e a r n in g s d a ta .
In th e o c c u p a t io n s s u r v e y e d , b o th m e n and w o m e n w e r e c l a s s i f i e d and in c lu d e d in
the o c c u p a t io n a l e m p lo y m e n t an d e a r n in g s e s t i m a t e s .
In the p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e ,
and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , m e n w e r e s u f f i c i e n t l y p r e d o m in a n t to p r e c l u d e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f
s e p a r a t e d a ta b y s e x .
F o r t h o s e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s in w h ic h b o th m e n an d w o m e n a r e
c o m m o n l y e m p l o y e d , s e p a r a t e d a ta b y s e x a r e a v a ila b le f r o m the o c c u p a t io n a l w a g e s u r v e y
r e p o r t s c o m p i le d b y m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a .
T h e o c c u p a t io n s an d w o r k l e v e l s in c lu d e d in th is
s tu d y , an d in w h ic h w o m e n a c c o u n te d f o r 5 p e r c e n t o r m o r e o f th e e m p l o y m e n t , w e r e d i s ­
t r ib u t e d a c c o r d in g to th e p r o p o r t io n o f w o m e n e m p l o y e e s , a s f o l l o w s :

Women (percent)
90 or m o r e -----------------------------------80—
84
55-59
50-54
40—
44
35-39
20-24
15-19
10— 4 ------------------------------------------1
5— — --------------------------------------------9

S a m p lin g

an d E s t i m a t i n g

Occupation and level
A ll levels of file clerks; keypunch operators;
stenographers; switchboard operators; typists
Clerks, accounting I
Clerks, accounting II
Tabulating-m achine operators I
O ffice boys or girls
Tabulating-m achine operators II
Chemists I; draftsmen—
tracers
Job analysts I; tabulating-m achine
operators III
Accountants I; chemists II; jo b analysts II;
engineering technicians I
Accountants II; chemists III; directors of
personnel I; managers, o ffic e services I;
engineering technicians II

P roced u res

A s i n d ic a t e d e a r l i e r , th is s u r v e y r e l a t e s to a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith in th e in d u s t r i a l
s c o p e in th e U n it e d S ta t e s e x c e p t A l a s k a an d H a w a ii, a lth o u g h p r o v i s i o n w a s m a d e in the
s a m p l in g d e s i g n to p e r m i t p u b lic a t io n o f s e p a r a t e d a ta f o r th e 2 1 8 S ta n d a r d M e t r o p o li t a n
S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a s 23 w ith in t h e s e S t a t e s .
T h e p u b lis h e d e s t i m a t e s f o r th e U n it e d S t a t e s e x ­
c e p t A l a s k a an d H a w a ii w e r e d e v e lo p e d b y c o m b in in g th e d a ta f o r m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s w ith
d a ta f r o m
a s u p p l e m e n t a r y s u r v e y c o v e r i n g n o n m e t r o p o li t a n c o u n t i e s .
In a d d itio n to the
s e p a r a t e s a m p l i n g in n o n m e t r o p o li t a n c o u n t i e s , tw o d i s t i n c t s a m p l i n g m e t h o d s w e r e u s e d in
m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s , o n e f o r th e p r o f e s s i o n a l an d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t io n s an d a n o th e r f o r
the d r a ft in g an d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s .
D e s p it e the d i f f e r e n c e in s a m p l i n g m e t h o d s , th e e s ­
t i m a t e s r e l a t e to th e s a m e p o p u la tio n o f g e o g r a p h i c a l , i n d u s t r y , an d s i z e - o f - e s t a b l i s h m e n t
c h a r a c te r is tic s .
T h e s a m p l in g p r o c e d u r e f o l l o w e d in e a c h i n s t a n c e i s e x p la in e d b e lo w .
M e t r o p o li t a n A r e a D a t a , P r o f e s s i o n a l and A d m i n i s t r a t i v e O c c u p a t i o n s .
The s a m ­
p lin g p r o c e d u r e c a l l e d f o r th e d e t a i l e d s t r a t i f i c a t i o n o f a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith in s c o p e o f
the s u r v e y b y l o c a t i o n , i n d u s t r y , an d e s t a b l i s h m e n t e m p lo y m e n t s i z e . 24
F r o m t h is u n i v e r s e ,

22 Engineers, for exam ple, are defined to permit classification o f em ployees engaged in engineering work within a band o f eight
levels, starting with inexperienced engineering graduates and excluding only those within certain fields o f specialization or in positions
above those covered by lev el VIII. By way of contrast, such occupations as ch ief accountants and directors o f personnel are defined
to include only those with responsibility for a specified program and with duties and responsibilities as indicated for each o f the more
lim ited number of work levels selected for study.
23 Areas as revised b y the Bureau o f the Budget in 1964. The previous survey related to the 212 Standard Metropolitan Sta­
tistical Areas as revised in 1961 by the Bureau o f the Budget.
24 In earlier surveys in this series, the sample was confined largely to the 80 m etropolitan areas in which the Bureau o f Labor
Statistics had been conducting surveys o f clerica l, drafting, maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and m aterial m ovem ent jobs.
Ex­
tension was made in 1962 to unsurveyed areas for larger establishments, and in 1965 the restriction to selected metropolitan areas
was dropped.




37

a s a m p le o f a b ou t 1 ,8 7 5 e s t a b lis h m e n t s (not c o m p a n ie s ) w as s e l e c t e d s y s t e m a t ic a ll y so that
e a c h g e o g r a p h ic unit w as r e p r e s e n t e d , on the a v e r a g e , p r o p o r t io n a t e ly w ith in s i z e - o f e s t a b lis h m e n t and in d u s tr y c l a s s e s . 25
E a c h in d u s tr y w as s a m p le d s e p a r a t e ly , the sa m p lin g r a te s d ep en d en t on the i m ­
p o r ta n c e o f the in d u s tr y as an e m p lo y e r h a v in g the s u r v e y jo b s .
W ith in e a c h in d u s tr y , a
g r e a t e r p r o p o r t io n o f la r g e than o f s m a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s w as in c lu d e d .
In c o m b in in g the
data, e a c h e s t a b lis h m e n t w as w e ig h te d in a c c o r d a n c e w ith its p r o b a b ilit y o f s e le c t io n , s o
that u n b ia s e d e s t im a t e s w e r e g e n e r a t e d .
T o illu s t r a t e the p r o c e s s , w h e r e 1 e s t a b lis h m e n t
ou t o f 4 w a s s e l e c t e d , it w a s g iv e n a w e ig h t o f 4, thus r e p r e s e n t in g it s e l f plu s th r e e o t h e r s .
In in s t a n c e s w h e r e d a ta w e r e n ot a v a ila b le fo r the o r ig in a l s a m p le m e m b e r , an a lte rn a te o f
the s a m e o r ig in a l p r o b a b ilit y o f s e le c t io n w as c h o s e n in the lik e i n d u s t r y - s iz e c l a s s if i c a t io n .
W h ere the p r o b a b ilit y o f s e l e c t io n w a s c e r t a in t y fo r the o r ig in a l unit, the a d d itio n a l w eig h t
w a s a s s ig n e d to e x is t in g s a m p le m e m b e r s as n e a r ly s i m il a r as p o s s ib le to the m is s in g unit.
M e tr o p o lit a n A r e a D ata, C l e r i c a l and D ra ftin g O c c u p a t io n s .
The n a tion w id e e s t i ­
m a te s a r e , in e f f e c t , a b y p r o d u c t o f the B u r e a u 's s u r v e y s o f th e s e o c c u p a t io n s in 80 m e t r o ­
p o lita n a r e a s .
The sa m p lin g o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith in e a c h s u r v e y a r e a w as d e s ig n e d to
y ie ld e s t im a t e s f o r the a r e a as a w h o le , and fo r m a jo r in d u s tr y d iv is io n s w ith in the a r e a .
A s in the p r e c e d in g s e c t io n , the e s t a b lis h m e n t s w e r e s t r a t ifie d b y in d u s tr y and e m p lo y m e n t
s i z e , and a s a m p le m e m b e r s e l e c t e d at ra n d o m fr o m e a c h s u c h stra tu m .
The sa m p lin g
w as m o r e in te n s iv e a m on g the s t r a ta o f la r g e u n its, bu t u nits w e r e w e ig h te d in a c c o r d a n c e
w ith th e ir c h a n c e o f s e l e c t io n , as d e s c r ib e d in the p r e c e d in g s e c t io n .
The 80 a r e a s s u r v e y e d , fr o m w h ich n a tio n a l e s t im a t e s a r e d e v e lo p e d , r e p r e s e n t a
s y s t e m a t ic s a m p lin g o f a ll m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s .
The to ta lity o f 188 a r e a s (as o f 1959) w as
d iv id e d in to 80 s t r a ta , and on e unit c h o s e n fr o m e a c h to r e p r e s e n t the w h o le stra tu m b y a p ­
p r o p r ia t e w e ig h tin g .
The c r i t e r i a o f c o n s tr u c tin g the a r e a s t r a ta w e r e r e g io n , s iz e in
t e r m s o f n o n a g r ic u lt u r a l e m p lo y m e n t , and type o f in d u s tr ia l a c t iv it y , 37 o f the la r g e s t a r e a s
r e p r e s e n t in g t h e m s e lv e s o n ly and 43 a r e a s r e p r e s e n t in g th e m s e lv e s and s im ila r a r e a s .
The
s a m p le s f o r the 80 a r e a s c o m b in e d c o n s is t e d o f 5 ,6 6 7 e s t a b lis h m e n t s .
N o n m e t r o p o lita n A r e a D ata. A ll O cc u p a tio n s S tu d ied .
W ith the e x p a n s io n o f the
c u r r e n t s u r v e y to c o v e r n o n m e tr o p o lit a n c o u n t ie s , the u n iv e r s e o f a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s lo c a t e d
in s u c h c o u n tie s and s a tis fy in g the in d u s tr y and s iz e d e fin itio n s w e r e s t r a t ifie d by lo c a t io n ,
s i z e , and in d u s tr y , and the s a m p le s e l e c t e d to r e p r e s e n t a ll n o n m e tr o p o lit a n c o u n t ie s , u sin g
the s a m e type o f v a r ia b le sa m p lin g r a tio s and w e ig h tin g as d e s c r ib e d fo r p r o f e s s io n a l
and a d m in is t r a tiv e o c c u p a t io n s in m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s .
The s a m p le s e l e c t e d a m ou n ted to
458 e s t a b lis h m e n t s .
C o n v e r s io n o f S a la r y R a tes
S a la r y in fo r m a t io n f o r the s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s w as o b ta in e d in the fo r m in w h ich
it w a s m o s t r e a d ily a v a ila b le fr o m the r e c o r d s , i. e . , on a w e e k ly , b iw e e k ly , s e m im o n th ly ,
m o n th ly , o r annual b a s i s .
S in ce a v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s f o r the c l e r i c a l and d r a ftin g o c c u ­
p a tio n s a re f i r s t p r e s e n t e d in s e p a r a te a r e a r e p o r t s (s e e o r d e r fo r m at the b a c k o f th is b u l­
le t in ), the s a la r y data f o r th e s e o c c u p a t io n s a re o r ig i n a lly c o n v e r t e d to a w e e k ly b a s i s ,
w h e r e a s the s a la r y data f o r the p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is t r a tiv e o c c u p a t io n s and fo r e n g i­
n e e r in g te c h n ic ia n s a re c o n v e r t e d in it ia lly to a m o n th ly b a s i s .
The f a c t o r s u s e d to c o n v e r t
the data b y m a c h in e f o r the tw o g ro u p s o f o c c u p a t io n s a r e as fo llo w s :

Tim e interval
represented by
salary
W e e k ly --------------------------------------------Biweekly -----------------------------------------S em im onthly-----------------------------------M o n th ly ------------------------------------------A n n u a l------------------

Salaries for clerical and
drafting occupations to
weekly basis

Salaries for professional
and administrative occupations and for engineering
technicians to
monthly basis

1.0000
. 5000
. 4602
.2301
.0192

4 .3450
2. 1725
2.0000
1.0000
.0833

A few of the largest employers, together em ploying approximately a m illion, gave data on a companywide basis. These
companies were eliminated from the universe to which the preceding procedure applied. The sample count includes the establishments
o f the|| companies within the scope of the survey.
As the number of defined areas increased, the weighting pattern was m odified accordingly.




38

A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r ie s p r e s e n t e d in ta b le s 1, 2, and 3 and annual s a la r ie s p r e s e n t e d in
ta b le s 1 and 2 fo r the c l e r i c a l and d r a ftin g o c c u p a t io n s a r e d e r iv e d fr o m the a v e r a g e w e e k ly
s a la r ie s (to the n e a r e s t p en n y ) b y u se o f f a c t o r s 4. 345 and 52. 14, r e s p e c t iv e ly , and rou n d in g
r e s u lt s to the n e a r e s t d o lla r .
A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s f o r th e s e o c c u p a t io n s , p r e s e n t e d in
ta b le 6, a r e r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o lla r .
A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r ie s p r e s e n t e d in
ta b le s 1, 2, and 3 f o r the p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is t r a tiv e o c c u p a t io n s and f o r e n g in e e r in g
t e c h n ic ia n s a r e ro u n d e d to the n e a r e s t d o ll a r ; th e se a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r ie s a r e th en m u lt i­
p lie d b y 12 to ob ta in the a v e r a g e annual s a la r ie s p r e s e n t e d .

E s t im a t e s o f S am plin g. E r r o r
The s u r v e y p r o c e d u r e y ie ld s e s t im a t e s w ith w id e ly v a r y in g s a m p lin g e r r o r s , d e ­
p en d in g on the fr e q u e n c y w ith w h ich the jo b o c c u r s , and the d is p e r s io n o f s a la r ie s .
Thus
f o r the p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is t r a tiv e o c c u p a t io n w o r k l e v e l s , the r e la t iv e sta n d a r d e r r o r s
o f the a v e r a g e s a la r ie s w e r e d is tr ib u te d as f o llo w s : 27 w e r e u n d er 2 p e r c e n t ; 7 w e r e 2 and
u n d er 3 p e r c e n t ; 6 w e r e 3 and u n d er 4 p e r c e n t ; 4 w e r e 4 and u n d er 5 p e r c e n t ; and 4 w e r e
5 p e r c e n t and o v e r . 27 The n a tion w id e e s t im a t e s f o r the c l e r i c a l and d r a ftin g r o o m o c c u p a ­
t io n s , b a s e d on the m u c h la r g e r s a m p le , a r e s u b je c t to s m a ll e r s a m p lin g e r r o r — l e s s than
0 .7 5 p e r c e n t in a ll c a s e s (e x c e p t d r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s ) and in m a n y c a s e s l e s s than 0 .2 5 p e r ­
ce n t.
T h e s e s a m p lin g e r r o r s m e a s u r e the v a lid ity o f the ba n d w ith in w h ich the tru e a v e r a g e
is lik e l y to fa ll.
T h u s , f o r an o c c u p a t io n w ith a s a m p le a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r y o f $ 1 , 0 0 0
and a s a m p lin g e r r o r o f 4 p e r c e n t , the c h a n c e s a r e 19 ou t o f 20 that the tru e a v e r a g e lie s
w ith in the b a n d f r o m $ 9 6 0 to $ 1 ,0 4 0 .

The 5 percent and over group included chief accountants l, attorneys VII, chemists VIII, and directors o f personnel III,




Appendix B. Survey Changes in 1965

C h an g es in the F e b r u a r y - M a r c h 1965 n a tio n a l s u r v e y o f p r o f e s s io n a l, a d m in is t r a t iv e ,
t e c h n ic a l, and c l e r i c a l p a y r e la t e d to an e x p a n sio n in the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y and r e v is io n s
in the le v e l d e fin it io n s f o r s w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s and d r a fts m e n . B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a ­
t o r s , in clu d e d p r e v i o u s ly , h ave b een d r o p p e d fr o m the s u r v e y .
A lth ou g h the s c o p e o f the
s u r v e y w as ex p a n d ed , data c o u ld b e ta b u la ted on a c o m p a r a b le b a s is w ith the F e b r u a r y —
M a r c h 1964 s u r v e y f o r y e a r - t o - y e a r c o m p a r is o n s .
C h a n g es fr o m the p r e v io u s s u r v e y a r e
e x p la in e d b e lo w .

C h an g es in S c o p e o f S u r v e y
T h e F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1964 s u r v e y r e la t e d to the 212 S tan dard M e tr o p o lita n S t a t is t ic a l
A r e a s in the U nited S ta te s, as r e v is e d b y the B u r e a u o f the B u d g et in 1961.
T he g e o g r a p h ic
c o v e r a g e o f the F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1965 s u r v e y w as ex p an d ed to r e p r e s e n t a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s
(w ith in the in d u s tr ia l s c o p e ) in the U nited S tates e x c e p t A la s k a and H aw aii.
P r o v is io n w as
m a d e in the s u r v e y d e s ig n to p e r m it s e p a r a te ta b u la tion o f data r e la tin g to the 218 Stan dard
M e tr o p o lita n
t a t is t ic a l A r e a s (w ith in th e s e S ta te s ), as r e v is e d b y the B u r e a u o f the B u d g et
in 1964,
N o c h a n g e s w e r e m a d e in the in d u s tr ia l c o v e r a g e and, in both s u r v e y p e r io d s ,
e s t a b lis h m e n t s e m p lo y in g 250 w o r k e r s o r m o r e w e r e in clu d e d .

C h an g es in O c c u p a tio n a l D e fin itio n s
D r a ft s m a n .
The d e f i n i t i o n s w e r e r e v is e d to in c lu d e fo u r le v e ls o f d r a fts m e n
( d r a f t s m a n - t r a c e r ; and d r a fts m a n I, II, and III).
D ata w e r e p r e s e n t e d in the p r e v io u s r e p o r t
fo r th r e e d e fin e d le v e ls ( t r a c e r ; and d r a fts m a n , ju n io r , and d r a fts m a n , s e n io r ).
The r e v is e d
d e fin itio n s d e s c r i b e the d r a ftin g r e q u ir e m e n t s at e a c h le v e l m o r e s p e c i f i c a l l y and in g r e a t e r
d e t a il, and e x p la in the ex ten t to w h ich r e s p o n s ib ili t ie s fo r d e s ig n m a y b e in v o lv e d .
B e­
c a u s e o f the ch a n g e s in the d e fin itio n at e a ch le v e l, data a r e n ot c o m p a r a b le to th o s e p r e ­
v io u s ly p u b lis h e d .

S w itch b o a rd O p e r a to r ,
The p r e v io u s d e fin itio n s s e p a r a te d th e s e e m p lo y e e s in to
tw o lev el's— -sw itch b o a rd o p e r a t o r and s w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r , s p e c ia l.
T h e le v e l d e fin itio n s
w e r e r e v is e d to c l a r i f y the r e q u ir e m e n t s at e a ch le v e l as to ty p es o f c a lls h an d led and
n a tu re o f in fo r m a t io n s e r v i c e p r o v id e d .
B e c a u s e the le v e l d e s ig n a tio n , s w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r ,
s p e c ia l, u se d p r e v io u s ly w as so m e w h a t m is le a d in g , the r e v is e d le v e ls w e r e d e s ig n a te d as
s w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r I and s w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r II.
A lth ou g h the r e v is e d le v e ls do n ot c o r ­
r e s p o n d w ith th o s e p r e v i o u s ly s u r v e y e d , y e a r - t o - y e a r ch a n g es in s a la r ie s co u ld b e c o m p a r e d
b y c o m b in in g the data fo r the tw o le v e ls s u r v e y e d in e a c h p e r io d .




39




Appendix C. Occupational Definitions

T h e p r i m a r y p u r p o s e o f p r e p a r i n g j o b d e f in it io n s f o r the
B u r e a u ’ s w a g e s u r v e y s i s to a s s i s t it s f i e l d s t a f f in c l a s s i f y i n g in to
a p p r o p r ia t e o c c u p a t io n s , o r l e v e l s w ith in o c c u p a t io n s , w o r k e r s w h o
a r e e m p lo y e d u n d e r a v a r i e t y o f p a y r o l l t i t l e s and d if f e r e n t w o r k
a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m e s t a b li s h m e n t to e s t a b l i s h m e n t an d f r o m a r e a to
area.
T h i s p e r m i t s th e g r o u p in g o f o c c u p a t io n a l w a g e r a t e s r e p r e ­
s e n t in g
c o m p a r a b le jo b
c o n te n t.
T o secu re
c o m p a r a b i l i t y o f jo b
c o n te n t, s o m e o c c u p a t io n s an d w o r k l e v e l s a r e d e fin e d to in c lu d e
o n ly t h o s e w o r k e r s
m e e tin g
s p e c ific c r ite r ia
a s to t r a in i n g , jo b
f u n c t io n s , an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
B e c a u s e o f th is e m p h a s i s on in t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t an d i n t e r a r e a c o m p a r a b i l i t y o f o c c u p a t io n a l c o n te n t,
th e B u r e a u 's o c c u p a t io n a l d e f in it io n s m a y d i f f e r s i g n i f i c a n t ly f r o m
th o s e in u s e in in d iv id u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o r t h o s e p r e p a r e d f o r o th e r
p u rp oses.
A l s o s e e n o te r e f e r r i n g to th e d e f in it io n s f o r the d r a ft in g
an d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s on p a g e 6 4 .

A C C O U N T A N T S A N D A U D IT O R S

ACCOUNTANT

P e r f o r m s a c c o u n tin g w o r k r e q u i r in g p r o f e s s i o n a l k n o w le d g e o f th e t h e o r y an d p r a c ­
t i c e o f r e c o r d i n g , c l a s s i f y i n g , e x a m in in g , an d a n a ly z in g th e d a ta an d r e c o r d s o f f in a n c ia l
tr a n s a c tio n s .
P e r s o n a l l y o r b y s u p e r v i s i n g o t h e r s p r o v i d e s a c c o u n tin g s e r v i c e to m a n a g e m e n t
b y m a in t a in in g th e b o o k s o f a c c o u n t, a c c u m u la t in g c o s t o r o t h e r s i m i l a r d a ta , p r e p a r i n g
r e p o r t s an d s t a t e m e n t s , an d m a in t a in in g th e a c c o u n tin g s y s t e m b y in t e r p r e t i n g , s u p p le m e n t in g ,
an d r e v i s i n g th e s y s t e m a s n e c e s s a r y .
T h e w o r k r e q u i r e s a p r o f e s s i o n a l k n o w le d g e o f a c ­
c o u n tin g an d a b a c h e l o r 's d e g r e e in a c c o u n tin g o r e q u iv a le n t
e x p e r i e n c e an d e d u c a tio n
c o m b in e d .
(S e e a l s o c h ie f a c c o u n ta n t .)

A cco u n ta n t I

G e n e ra l c h a r a c te r is tic s .
A t th is b e g in n in g p r o f e s s i o n a l l e v e l , p o s i t i o n is d i s t i n ­
g u is h e d f r o m n o n p r o f e s s i o n a l p o s it io n s b y th e v a r i e t y o f a s s i g n m e n t s ; r a t e an d s c o p e o f
d e v e lo p m e n t e x p e c t e d o f th e in c u m b e n t ; a ^ d th e e x i s t e n c e , i m p l i c i t o r e x p l i c i t , o f a p la n n e d
t r a in i n g p r o g r a m d e s ig n e d to g iv e th e b e g in n in g a c c o u n ta n t p r a c t i c a l e x p e r i e n c e in th e o p e r a ­
t io n s o f a n e s t a b l i s h e d a c c o u n tin g s y s t e m .
L e a r n s to a p p ly th e p r i n c i p l e s , t h e o r i e s , an d
c o n c e p t s o f a c c o u n t in g to a p a r t i c u l a r a c c o u n tin g s y s t e m .
D ir e c tio n r e c e iv e d .
W o r k s u n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n o f a n e x p e r i e n c e d a c c o u n ta n t .
T h e g u id a n c e an d s u p e r v i s i o n r e c e i v e d a r e d i r e c t e d p r i m a r i l y to the d e v e lo p m e n t o f the
a c c o u n t a n t 's p r o f e s s i o n a l a b i l i t y an d to th e e v a lu a t io n o f h is p o t e n t ia l f o r a d v a n c e m e n t .
L i m i t s o f a s s i g n m e n t s a r e c l e a r l y d e f in e d , m e t h o d s o f p r o c e d u r e a r e s p e c i f i e d , k in d s o f
i t e m s to b e n o te d an d r e f e r r e d to s u p e r v i s o r a r e d e t a ile d .
T y p i c a l d u tie s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
M a n y o f th e a s s i g n m e n t s w i l l in c lu d e d u tie s
s o m e o f w h ic h m a y b e n o n p r o f e s s i o n a l in n a t u r e s u c h a s p r o v in g a r i t h m e t i c a l a c c u r a c y ;
e x a m in in g s t a n d a r d a c c o u n tin g d o c u m e n t s f o r c o m p l e t e n e s s , in t e r n a l a c c u r a c y , and c o n ­
f o r m a n c e w ith s p e c i f i c a c c o u n tin g r e q u i r e m e n t s ; t r a c i n g an d r e c o n c i l i n g r e c o r d s o f f in a n c ia l
t r a n s a c t i o n s ; an d p r e p a r i n g d e t a il e d s t a t e m e n t s an d s c h e d u l e s f o r r e p o r t s .
The p resen ce
o f s u c h n o n p r o f e s s i o n a l t a s k s , p r o v id e d th e y a r e p a r t o f th e t r a in i n g an d d e v e lo p m e n t p r o ­
c e s s , d o n o t p r e v e n t th e m a t c h in g o f a j o b i f it o t h e r w is e m e e t s t h is d e f in it io n .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r




d ir e c tio n

of oth ers.

41

U s u a lly n on e.

42

ACCOUNTANT— Continued

Accountant II
G eneral c h a r a c te r istic s . At this continuing developm ental level the p ro fe ssio n a l
accountant m akes p ra c tic a l applications of technical accounting p ra c tic e s and concepts b e ­
yond the m ere application of detailed ru les and in struction s. A ssign m en ts are designed
to expand his p r a c tic a l experience and to develop his p ro fe ssio n a l judgm ent in the application
of b a sic accounting techniques to sim ple p ro fe ssio n a l p rob lem s. He is expected to be com ­
petent in the application of standard p ro ced u res and requ irem en ts to routine tran sactio n s,
and to r a is e questions about unusual or questionable item s and su g ge st solutions.
D irection re ce iv e d . Work is review ed clo sely to ve rify its gen eral a ccu racy and
coverage of unusual p rob lem s, to in su re conform ance with requ ired p ro ced u res and sp e cial
in stru ctio n s, and to in sure his p ro fe ssio n a l growth. His p r o g r e s s is evaluated in te rm s
of his ability to apply his p ro fe ssio n a l knowledge to b a sic accounting prob lem s in the
day-to-day operations of an e stab lish ed accounting sy stem .
T ypical duties and r e sp o n sib ilitie s. P r e p a re s routine w orking p a p e rs, sch edu les,
exhibits, and su m m a rie s indicating the extent of his exam ination and developing and sup­
porting his findings and recom m endations. This includes the exam ination of a varie ty of
accounting docum ents to v e rify accu racy of computations and to a sc e rta in that all tr a n s ­
actions are p ro p erly supported, a re in accordan ce with pertinent regu lation s, and are
c la ssifie d and record ed according to acceptable accounting stan dards.
R esp on sib ility for direction of oth ers.
few clerk s.

U sually none, although m ay su p e rv ise a

Accountant III
G eneral c h a r a c te r istic s. P e rfo rm s p ro fe ssio n a l operating or cost accounting work
requirin g the stan dardized application of w ell-estab lish ed accounting p rin cip les, th eories,
concepts, and p r a c tic e s. R eceiv es detailed in struction s concerning the o v erall accounting
sy stem and its ob jectives, the p o licies and p roced u res under which it is operated, and the
nature of changes in the sy stem or its operation.
D irection received . A p ro fe ssio n a l accountant at higher level n orm ally is availab le
to furnish advice and a ssista n c e as needed. Work is exam ined for technical accu racy ,
adequacy of p ro fe ssio n a l judgm ent, and com pliance with in struction s through spot checks,
a p p ra isa l of r e su lts , subsequent p ro c e ssin g , an aly sis of re p o rts and statem en ts, and other
appropriate m ean s.
T ypical duties and re sp o n sib ilitie s. The p rim a ry resp o n sib ility of m ost position s
at this level is to in sure that the d ay-to-day operations of the segm ent or sy stem are
c a rrie d out in accordan ce with accounting p rin cip les and the p o licies and ob jectives of the
accounting system . Within lim its of delegated resp o n sib ility , the accountant m akes the
day-to-day d ecisio n s concerning the accounting treatm en t of finan cial tran sactio n s. He is
expected to recom m end solutions to com plex problem s and propo se changes in the accounting
sy stem , but he has no authority to effectuate th ese solutions or changes. His solutions are
derived from his own knowledge of the application of w ell-estab lish ed p rin cip les and p ra c tic e s
or by re fe rrin g the problem to his superior for solution.
R esp on sibility for the direction of o th e rs.
a subordinate n on profession al staff.




In m ost in stan ces d ire cts the work of

43
ACCOUNTANT— Continued

Accountant IV
G en eral c h a r a c te r istic s. P e rfo rm s p ro fe ssio n a l operating or co st accounting work
which re q u ire s the application of w ell estab lish ed accounting p rin cip le s, th e o rie s, concepts
and p r a c tic e s to a wide v arie ty of difficult p ro b lem s. R eceiv es in struction s concerning the
ob jectives and operation s of the ov erall accounting sy stem . At this level, com pared with
lev el III, the technical accounting p rob lem s a re m ore difficult and a g rea te r degree of
coordination among m ore num erous types of accounting re c o rd s and operations m ay be
e sse n tia l.
D irection received . An accountant at higher level n orm ally is availab le to furnish
advice and a ss is ta n c e a s needed. Work is review ed for adequacy of p ro fe ssio n a l judgm ent,
com pliance with in stru ctio n s, and ov erall a c cu ra cy and quality by spot checks and a p p ra isa l
of re su lts.
T ypical duties and re sp o n sib ilitie s. As at level III, a p rim a ry c h a ra c te ristic of
m ost p osition s at this lev el is the re sp o n sib ility of operating an accounting sy stem or s e g ­
ment in the intended m anner. M akes day-to-day d ecisio n s concerning the accounting tr e a t­
ment of finan cial tran sactio n s. He is expected to recom m end solutions to com plex prob lem s
beyond the scope of his re sp o n sib ility and to propose changes in the accounting sy stem , but
he has no authority to act independently on th ese prob lem s.
R esp on sib ility for direction of oth ers.
include p ro fe ssio n a l accountants.

Accounting sta ff su p erv ised , if any, m ay

Accountant V

G eneral c h a r a c te r istic s. P e rfo rm s p ro fe ssio n a l operating or co st accounting work
requ irin g the application of accounting p rin cip les and p ra c tic e s to the solution of very d if­
ficult p rob lem s for which no clea r preced en ts e x ist, or to the development or extension
of th eories and p ra c tic e s to p rob lem s to which they have not been applied p rev io u sly. A lso
at this lev el a re position s having m ore than a v e rag e re sp o n sib ility becau se of the nature,
m agnitude, or im pact of the a ssig n e d work.
Is m ore d ire ctly concerned with what the sy stem or segm ent should be* what
operating accounting p o licies and p ro ced u res should be estab lish ed or re v ise d , and the
m eaning of the data in the re p o rts and statem en ts for which he is resp o n sib le .
D irection received . An accountant at higher lev el n orm ally is availab le to furnish
advice and a ss is ta n c e a s needed. Work is review ed for adequacy of p ro fe ssio n a l judgm ent,
com pliance with in stru ctio n s, and o v erall quality.
T ypical duties and re sp o n sib ilitie s. In addition to insuring that the sy stem or s e g ­
ment is operated a s intended, is deeply involved in the fundam ental and com plex technical
and m an ag erial p rob lem s.
R esp on sib ility for d irection of oth ers.
p ro fe ssio n a l accountants.




Accounting sta ff su p erv ised , if any, includes

44

A U D IT O R

Audits the financial re c o rd s of a company or division s or components of the com ­
pany, to a p p raise sy ste m a tica lly and v erify the accounting a ccu ra cy of the re co rd s and
re p o rts. To the extent determ ined n e c e ssa ry , exam ines the tran sactio n s entering into
the balance sheet and the tran sactio n s entering into incom e, expen se, and cost accounts.
D eterm in es (1) the existen ce of record ed a s s e t s (including the observation of the taking of
ph ysical inventories) and the all in clu siv en ess of reco rd ed lia b ilitie s; (2) the accu racy of
financial statem en ts or re p o rts and the fa irn e ss of p resen tation of facts therein; (3) the
prop riety or leg ality of tra n sactio n s; and (4) the degree of com pliance with estab lish ed
p o licies and p ro ced u res concerning financial tran sactio n s. E v alu ates the adequacy of the
accounting sy stem and internal finan cial control. M akes appropriate recom m endations for
im provem ent as n e c e ssa ry . (Work typically re q u ire s a b a ch e lo r's degree in accounting or
equivalent experien ce and education combined.)
Excluded from the definition are position s which call for auditing duties which m ay
req u ire detailed knowledge of the operations of a p a rtic u la r company, but do not requ ire
full p ro fe ssio n a l accounting training. F o r exam ple, when the p rim a ry resp o n sib ility of the
position is to check tran sactio n s to determ ine whether or not they conform to p re sc rib e d
routines or p ro c ed u re s, it is excluded.
Auditor I

As a train ee auditor at the entering p ro fe ssio n a l lev el, p e rfo rm s a v arie ty of ro u ­
tine assign m en ts under the close su p erv isio n of an experien ced auditor.

Auditor II
This is the continuing developm ental level for the p ro fe ssio n a l auditor. As a junior
m em ber of an audit team , independently p e rfo rm s assig n e d portions of the audit exam ination
which are lim ited in scope and com plexity, such as p h ysically counting to ve rify inventory
item s, checking assig n e d su b sid iary led ger accounts again st supporting b ills or vouch ers,
checking and balancing vario u s su b sid iary le d g e rs again st control accounts, or other sim ila r
duties designed to help the team lead er check, verify , or prove the accounting en tries.
R espon sibility extends only to the verificatio n of a ccu racy of com putations arid the d e te r­
m ination that all tran sactio n s are p ro p e rly supported. Any technical problem s not covered
by in struction s are brought to the attention of a su p erio r.
Auditor III
(l)
As auditor in charge of an audit team or in charge of individual audits, inde­
pendently conducts re g u la r re cu rrin g audits in accordan ce with a p re sc rib e d audit policy of
the accounts of sm a lle r or l e s s com plex com panies having g r o s s income up to approxim ately
$ 3 m illion per year, or sim ila r siz e branch or su b sid iary organ ization s of la rg e r com panies.
Under minimum su p erv isio n , either working alone, or with the a ssista n c e of one or two
subordinate au d itors, exam ines tran sactio n s and v e rifie s accoun ts; o b se rv e s and evalu ates
local accounting p ro ced u res and internal con trols; p re p a re s audit working p ap ers and subm its
an audit repo rt in the requ ired pattern containing recom m endations for needed changes or
im provem ents, or (2) a s a m em ber of an audit team auditing a la r g e r and m ore com plex
organization (approxim ately $ 4 to $ 2 5 m illion g r o s s income per year), independently p e r ­
fo rm s the audit exam ination of a m ajo r segm ent of the audit such a s the Checking, verification ,
and balancing of all accounts receiv ab le and accounts payable, the an aly sis and v erification
of a s s e t s and r e s e r v e s , or the inspection and the evaluation of con trols and p ro ced u res.




45
AUDITOR— Continued

Auditor IV
(1)
As auditor in charge of an audit team or of individual audits under m inimum
su p erv isio n with the a ss is ta n c e of approxim ately five subordinate au d itors, independently
conducts re g u la r re cu rrin g audits of a company having g r o s s income of approxim ately $ 4
to $ 25 m illion p er year or^ in com panies with much la r g e r g r o s s in com es, audits of a c ­
counts of branch or su b sid iary organ ization s of those com panies each of which have g ro ss
income of $ 4 to $ 2 5 m illion per year. P lan s and conducts the audit and p re p a re s an audit
re po rt containing recom m endations for changes or im provem ents in accounting p ra c tic e s,
p ro c ed u re s, or p o lic ie s; or (2) a s a m em ber of an audit team auditing the accounts of a
la r g e r and m ore com plex organization (over $ 30 m illion g r o s s incom e per year), is assig n ed
re la tiv e ly independent re sp o n sib ility for a m ajor segm ent of the audit such a s the checking,
verification , and balancing of all accounts receiv ab le and accounts payable, the an aly sis
and verificatio n of a s s e t s and r e s e r v e s , or the inspection and evaluation of controls and
p ro ced u res.
CH IEF ACCOUNTANT
R esp on sible for directin g the accounting p ro g ram for a company or for an e sta b lish ­
ment of a company. The m inim um accounting p ro g ram in cludes: (1) G eneral accounting
( a s s e t s , lia b ilitie s, incom e, expense, a.ud capital accounts, including re sp o n sib ility for
profit and lo s s and balance sheet statem en ts); and (2) with at le a st one other m ajo r a c ­
counting activity, typically tax accounting, co st accounting, p rop erty accounting, or s a le s
accounting. It m ay a lso include such other a ctiv itie s a s p ayroll and tim ekeeping, tabulating
m achine operation, etc. (R esp on sibility for an internal audit p ro g ra m is typically not
included.)
The re sp o n sib ilitie s of the chief accountant include a ll of the following:
(1) Developing, adapting, or re v isin g an accounting sy stem to m eet the needs of
the organization.
(2) Su p erv isin g, either d ire ctly or through subordinate su p e rv iso rs, the operation
of the sy stem with full m anagem ent re sp o n sib ility for the quality and quantity of work
p erform ed , training and developm ent of subordin ates, work scheduling and review , co­
ordination with other p a rts of the organ ization serv ed , etc.
(3) Providing a d v iso ry se r v ic e s to the top m anagem ent o fficials of the organization
serv ed a s to:
(a) The statu s of finan cial r e so u rc e s and the finan cial tren ds or r e su lts of
operation s in a m anner that is m eaningful to m anagem ent.
(b) Methods for im proving operation s a s su ggested by his expert knowledge
of the finan cial situation, e .g ., p ro p o sa ls for im proving co st control, p roperty
m anagem ent, cred it and collection, tax reduction, or s im ila r p ro g ra m s.
Definition does not cover position s with re sp o n sib ility for the accounting p ro g ram
if they a lso include (as a m ajo r p art of the job) re sp o n sib ility for budgeting; work m e a s ­
urem ent; organization, m ethods, or p roced u res stu d ies, or sim ila r functions. Such work
is typical of p osition s som etim es titled a s co m p troller, budget and accounting m an ager,
finan cial m an ager, etc.
Chief accountant jo b s which m eet the above definition a re c la s s ifie d by le v e l28 of
work in accord an ce with the following:
28 Insufficient data were obtained for level V to warrant presentation of average salaries.




46

CHIEF ACCOUNTANT— Continued

C la ss

Authority
and
re sp o n sib ility
(*)_.
..

Technical
com plexity

(*)

Subordinate staff of p ro fe ssio n a l accountants in
the sy stem for which he is re sp o n sib le .2

I

A R -l

TC-1

Only one or two p ro fe ssio n a l accountants, who
do> not exceed the accountant III job definition.

II

A R -l

T C -2

About 5 to 10 p ro fe ssio n a l accountants, with at
le a st one or two m atching the accountant IV
job definition.

AR-Z

TC-1

About 5 to 10 p ro fe ssio n a l accountants. M ost
of these m atch the accountant III job definition,
but one or two m ay m atch the accountant IV
job definition.

AR-3

TC-1

Only one or two p ro fe ssio n a l accountants, who
do not exceed the accountant IV job definition.

A R -l

T C-3

About 15 to 20 p ro fe ssio n a l accountants. At
le a st one or two m atch the accountant V job
definition.

AR-2

T C -2

About 15 to 20 p ro fe ssio n a l accountants. Many
of these m atch the accountant IV job definition,
but som e m ay m atch the accountant V job
definition.

AR-3

TC-1

About 5 to 10 p ro fe ssio n a l accountants. M ost
of these m atch the accountant III job definition,
but one or two m ay m atch a s high as a c ­
countant V.

AR-2

T C -3

About 25 to 40 p ro fe ssio n a l accountants. Many
of these m atch the accountant V job definition,
but se v e ra l m ay exceed that level.

AR-3

T C -2

About 15 to 20 p ro fe ssio n a l accountants. M ost
of these m atch the accountant IV job definition,
but se v e ra l m ay m atch accountant V and one
or two m ay exceed that level.

AR-3

T C-3

About 25 to 40 p ro fe ssio n a l accountants. Many
of these m atch the accountant V job definition,
but se v e ra l m ay exceed that level.

or

or

III

or

or

IV
or

V

1 A R - l , 2, and 3 and T C -1 , 2, and 3 are explained on the follow ing page.
2 The number o f professional accountants supervised, as shown above, is recognized to be a relatively crude criterion for
distinguishing between the various classes.
It is to be considered as less important in the matching process than the other criteria.
In addition to the staff o f professional accountants in the system for which the ch ief accountant is responsible, there are clerica l,
machine operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel.




47
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT— Continued

A R-1. D irects the accounting p ro g ram for an estab lish m en t of a company. The
accounting sy stem h as been e stab lish ed in con siderable detail at higher organ ization al lev els
in the company, i.e ., accoun ts, p ro c ed u re s, and re p o rts to be u sed have been p re sc rib e d .
The chief accountant h as authority, within this p re sc rib e d sy stem , to adapt and expand it to
fit the p a rtic u la r needs of the organization serv ed , e .g ., to provide g re a te r detail; to e stab lish
additional accounting co n trols; to provide sp e c ial or in terim re p o rts and statem en ts needed
by the estab lish m en t m an ager for d ay-to-d ay operation s, etc.

A R-2. D ire cts the accounting p ro g ram for an estab lish m en t of a company when the
delegated authority to m odify the b a sic accounting sy stem estab lish e d at higher organ ization al
lev els within the company c le a rly exceed s that d escrib e d in A R-1. The b a sic accounting
sy stem is p r e sc r ib e d only in broad outlines rath er than in sp e cific detail, e .g ., while certain
m ajo r fin an cial re p o rts, ov erall accoun ts, gen eral p o lic ie s, e tc., a re requ ired by the b a sic
sy stem , the chief accountant has broad latitude to decide what sp e cific m ethods, p ro ced u re s,
accounts, r e p o rts, e tc., a re to be used within the organ ization al segm ent he s e r v e s . He
has authority to evaluate and take fin al action on recom m endations for changes in that portion
of the sy stem for which he is re sp o n sib le , but he m ust secu re p rio r approval fro m higher
organ ization al lev els for any changes which would affect the b a sic sy stem p re sc rib e d by such
higher le v e ls. Accounting re p o rts and statem en ts p rep are d re fle c t the events and p r o g r e s s
of the entire organ ization al segm ent of the company for which he is re sp o n sib le , and usu ally
these re p o rts re p re sen t consolidations of accounting data subm itted by subordinate segm en ts
of the organ ization which have accounting re sp o n sib ilitie s. (This degree of authority is m ost
c h a ra c te ristic a lly found at an organ ization al level in the company which is interm ediate
between the company h ead q u arters lev el (see AR-3) and the plant lev el (see A R-1). How­
ever, if a s im ila r d egree of authority has been delegated to the plant lev el, the chief a c ­
countant at such a p lace should be m atched with this definition.)

A R-3. D irects the accounting p ro g ra m for an « tire company with or without su b ­
.
ordinate estab lish m en ts. Has com plete re sp o n sib ility for e stab lish in g and m aintaining the
fram ew ork for the b a sic accounting sy stem u sed in the company, subject only to gen eral
policy guidance and control u su ally from a company o fficial re sp o n sib le for gen eral finan cial
m anagem ent, frequently an officer of the company. The chief accountant evalu ates and takes
final action on recom m endations for b a sic changes in the accounting sy stem , originating from
subordinate units within the sy stem . Accounting re p o rts and statem en ts p rep a re d re fle c t the
events and p r o g r e s s of the entire company, and to the extent that subordinate accounting
segm en ts e x ist, they re p re se n t consolidations of accounting data subm itted by th ese segm en ts.
T C -1. The organization which the accounting p ro g ra m s e r v e s has re la tiv e ly few
functions, p rod u cts, w ork p r o c e s s e s , etc., and these tend to be stable and unchanging. The
accounting sy stem o p erates in accordan ce with w ell-estab lish ed p rin cip le s and p ra c tic e s or
those of equivalent difficulty which a re typical of that industry.
T C -2. The organ ization which the accounting p ro g ram se r v e s has a re la tiv e ly larg e
number of functions, p rod u cts, work p r o c e s s e s , etc., requ irin g substan tial adaptations of
the b a sic sy stem to m eet m anagem ent needs.
T C -3. The organ ization which the accounting p ro g ra m s e r v e s has functions, p ro d ­
u cts, work p r o c e s s e s , e tc., which a re v ery num erous, varied , unique, sp e cializ e d or which,
for s im ila r re a so n s, puts a heavy demand on the accounting organ ization for sp ecializ e d
and exten sive adaptations of the b a sic sy stem to m eet m anagem ent needs. The accounting
sy stem , to a co n sid erable d egree, is developed well beyond the estab lish e d p rin cip le s and
p ra c tic e s in ord er to provide m ethods for the solution of prob lem s for which no cle a r p r e c ­
edents e x ist or to provide for the developm ent or extension of th eories and p ra c tic e s to
prob lem s to which they have not been p rev io u sly applied.




48

ATTORNEYS
ATTORNEY
P e rfo rm s w ork involved in providing consultation and advice to operating o fficials
of the company with re sp e c t to its le g a l rig h ts, p riv ile g e s, and obligation s. P e rfo rm s such
duties a s anticipating any leg al p rob lem s or r is k s involving the company and advising com ­
pany o ffic ia ls; p rep arin g and review ing v ario u s leg a l in strum en ts and docum ents, such a s
co n tracts for le a s e s , lic e n se s, s a le s , p u rc h a se s, r e a l e sta te , e tc.; keeping inform ed of
p ropo sed le g isla tio n which m ight affect the company and advisin g the appropriate company
o ffic ia ls; exam ining and checking for le g a l im plication s, public statem en ts or advertisin g
m a te ria l; advisin g company whether to p ro secu te or defend law su its; acting a s agent of the
company in its tra n sactio n s; and applying for paten ts, copyrigh ts, or re g istra tio n of the
com pany’ s p rod u cts, p r o c e s s e s , d e v ic es, and tra d e m a rk s. (Patent work which re q u ire s
train ing in a tech n ical field, e .g ., engineering in addition to leg a l training, is excluded.
C laim s exam ining, claim s in vestigatin g, or sim ila r work a re excluded even though the work
is p erfo rm ed by p e rso n s with a LL..B. d egree, u n less there is c le a r evidence that the job
actu ally re q u ire s u se of full p ro fe ssio n a l le g a l training such a s that of an attorney who p e r ­
fo rm s in v estigative duties a s a p relim in a ry ph ase of his total re sp o n sib ility for prep arin g
a c a se for tr ia l or actu ally trying a c a se in court.)
Attorney I
As a train ee (L L .B . with m em bersh ip in b a r), p e rfo rm s routine leg a l w ork, such
a s p rep arin g b rie fs or drawing up co n tracts for review and evaluation by attorneys of higher
grade. R ece iv es im m ediate su p erv isio n in assig n m en ts design ed to provide train ing in the
application of estab lish e d m ethods and techniques of le g a l r e se a r c h , drafting of le g a l in­
stru m en ts, etc.
Attorney II
P e rfo rm s a v a rie ty of le g a l a ssig n m en ts, e .g ., (1) drawing up co n tracts which
req u ire som e ingenuity and an ability to evaluate the le g a l sufficien cy of contract te rm s;
(2) p rep arin g d raft opinions on le g a l questions involved in such a r e a s a s c laim s, g riev an ces,
labor law s, e tc., when the leg a l question can be re so lv e d re la tiv e ly e a s ily in the light of
w e ll-esta b lish ed fa c ts and c le a rly applicable p reced en ts. R ece iv es gen eral su p erv isio n during
assig n m en ts, with m o st work review ed by an attorney of higher grade. R espon sibility for
final action is u su ally lim ited to m a tte rs which a re covered by in struction s and p rio r approval
of a su p e rio r.
Attorney III
P e rfo rm s a v a rie ty of leg al assig n m en ts, p rim a rily in the study and a n aly sis of
leg a l question s, p ro b lem s, or c a s e s . P r e p a r e s d raft opinions or other kinds of leg al work
on le g a l question s involved in such a r e a s a s c la im s, g rie v a n ce s, lab or law s, etc., when
the questions a re com plicated by the absen ce of le g a l p receden ts c le a rly and d irectly ap p li­
cable to the c a se , or by the different p o ssib le con struction s which m ight be placed on either
the fa c ts or the law s and p reced en ts involved. T ypically sp e c ia liz e s in one leg a l field, e .g .,
labor law, r e a l e sta te , co n tracts, etc. R eceiv es gen eral su p erv isio n during in itial and final
sta g e s of a ssig n m en ts, but is expected to conduct work with re la tiv e independence. R espon ­
sib ility for final action is u su ally lim ited to m atte rs covered by le g a l preceden ts and in
which little deviation fro m stan dard fo rm s and p ra c tic e s is involved. Any d e cisio n s or
actions having a bearin g on the com pany’ s b u sin e ss a re review ed by a su p e rio r. May su p e r­
v ise or review the work of a few a s s is ta n ts , n orm ally not attorn ey s.
Attorney IV
S im ila r to attorney III but the work is p erform ed under co n siderably l e s s close
su p erv isio n and direction . The attorney is expected to independently in vestigate the fa c ts,
se a rc h out p reced en ts, define the le g a l and factu al is s u e s , d raft a ll n e c e ssa ry docum ents,
opinions, e tc., and p rese n t conclusions and recom m endations for review . Guidance from
su p e rio rs during this p r o c e s s o ccu rs only if the problem is c le a rly m ore difficult than
norm al for this lev el. The final product is review ed carefu lly , but p rim a rily for ov erall
soundness of le g a l reason in g and co n sisten cy with company policy, rath er than for accu racy
of technical detail.




49
ATTORNEY— Continued

A tto rn e y V
R e s p o n s i b l e f o r a b r o a d l e g a l a r e a in w h ic h a s s i g n m e n t s c o v e r a w id e r a n g e o f
d if f ic u l t a n d c o m p l e x l e g a l q u e s t io n s an d p r o b l e m s .
P r i m a r i l y s e r v e s in a n a d v i s o r y c a p a c it y ,
m a k in g s t u d ie s a n d d e v e lo p in g o p in io n s w h ic h m a y h a v e a n im p o r t a n t b e a r i n g on th e c o n d u c t
o f th e c o m p a n y 's b u s i n e s s ( e . g . , r e c o m m e n d i n g a c t io n to p r o t e c t th e q p m p a n y 's t r a d e m a r k s
an d c o p y r ig h t s in f o r e i g n c o u n t r i e s ) .
R e c e iv e s a m in im u m o f te c h n ic a l le g a l s u p e r v is io n .
M a y s u p e r v is e a s m a ll s ta ff of a tto rn e y s .

A tto rn e y V I
S i m i l a r to a t t o r n e y V b u t th e l e g a l q u e s t io n s an d p r o b l e m s a r e o f o u ts ta n d in g d i f f i ­
c u lt y an d c o m p le x i t y o r o f c r u c i a l im p o r t a n c e to th e w e l f a r e o f th e c o m p a n y .
F o r e x a m p le ,
(1) c o m p l e x f a c t u a l a n d p o l i c y i s s u e s w h ic h r e q u i r e e x t e n s i v e r e s e a r c h , a n a l y s i s , a n d o b ­
t a in in g an d e v a lu a t in g e x p e r t t e s t i m o n y in c o n t r o v e r s i a l a r e a s o f s c i e n c e , f i n a n c e , c o r p o r a t e
s t r u c t u r e , e n g in e e r in g , e t c .; o r (2 ) c a s e s in v o lv e v e r y l a r g e s u m s o f m o n e y ( e . g . , a b o u t
$ 1 m i l l i o n ) o r , f o r o th e r r e a s o n s , a r e v e r y v i g o r o u s l y c o n t e s t e d .

A tto r n e y V II
P l a n s , c o n d u c t s , an d s u p e r v i s e s l e g a l a s s i g n m e n t s w ith in on e o r m o r e , b r o a d l e g a l
areas.
S u p e r v i s e s a s t a f f o f a t t o r n e y s , an d h a s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r e v a lu a tin g t h e ir p e r f o r m ­
a n c e an d a p p r o v in g r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s w h ic h m a y h a v e a n im p o r t a n t b e a r in g o n th e c o n d u c t
o f th e c o m p a n y 's b u s i n e s s .
R e c e i v e s g u id a n c e a s to c o m p a n y p o l i c y b u t no t e c h n i c a l s u p e r ­
v i s i o n o r a s s i s t a n c e e x c e p t w h e n h e m ig h t r e q u e s t a d v ic e on th e m o s t d i f f i c u l t , n o v e l, o r
im p o r t a n t t e c h n i c a l l e g a l q u e s t i o n s .
U s u a l l y r e p o r t s to the g e n e r a l c o u n s e l o r c h ie f a t t o r n e y
o f th e c o m p a n y o r h is i m m e d i a t e d e p u ty .

O F F IC E S E R V IC E S

M ANAGER,

O F F IC E S E R V IC E S

R e s p o n s i b l e f o r p la n n in g , d i r e c t i n g , an d c o n t r o l l in g o f o f f i c e s e r v i c e s , s u b j e c t o n ly
to th e m o s t g e n e r a l p o l i c y s u p e r v i s i o n .
P l a y s a n a c t iv e r o l e in a n t ic ip a t in g and p la n n in g to
m e e t o f f i c e s e r v i c e s n e e d s o f th e o p e r a t in g o r g a n iz a t i o n s e r v e d .
S u p e r v is e s a grou p o f e m ­
p lo y e e s e n g a g e d in p r o v id in g o f f i c e s e r v i c e s o f a s u p p o r t in g o r h o u s e k e e p i n g 1 n a t u r e to the
1
p r i m a r y o p e r a t io n o f a c o m p a n y , an e s t a b l i s h m e n t , o r a n o r g a n iz a t i o n a l u n it o f a c o m p a n y
or e s ta b lis h m e n t .
( M a y p e r s o n a l l y p e r f o r m s o m e o f th e f u n c t i o n s .)
O f f i c e s e r v i c e s in c lu d e :
(a)
R e c e i p t , d is t r ib u t i o n , a n d d is p a t c h o f m a i l .
(b)
M a in t e n a n c e o f c e n t r a l f i l e s .
(c)
P r in t in g o r d u p lic a t i o n an d d is t r ib u t i o n o f f o r m s , p u b l i c a t i o n s , e t c .
(M a y be
l i m i t e d to o r d e r i n g th e p r in t in g o r d u p lic a t io n o f i t e m s .
D o e s not n e c e s s a r ily have
c h a r g e o f a p r in t s h o p o r d u p lic a t io n f a c i l i t i e s , e s p e c i a l l y in l a r g e o p e r a t i o n s , b u t c o ­
o r d in a t e s th e f lo w to a n d f r o m th e r e p r o d u c t io n u n it s .)
(d)
P u r c h a s i n g o f f i c e s u p p lie s an d e q u ip m e n t.
(M a k e s d ir e c t p u r c h a se s o f r u n -o f t h e -m i ll o ffic e s u p p lie s .
M a y b e r e s p o n s i b l e f o r d i r e c t p u r c h a s e o f o th e r i t e m s f r o m
o u t s id e s u p p l i e r s o r m a y r e q u i s i t i o n th r o u g h e s t a b li s h m e n t p u r c h a s in g d e p a r t m e n t s .)
(e)
R e c o r d s c o n t r o l an d d i s p o s a l .
(f)
C o m m u n ic a t io n s (te le p h o n e s w it c h b o a r d a n d /o r t e le t y p e s e r v i c e ) .
(g)
T y p in g o r s t e n o g r a p h ic p o o l.
(h)
O f f i c e e q u ip m e n t m a in t e n a n c e an d r e p a i r . ( M a y h a v e d i r e c t s u p e r v i s i o n o f m a i n ­
te n a n c e an d r e p a i r p e r s o n n e l o r m a y c o o r d in a t e th e o r d e r i n g o f s u c h s e r v i c e s f r o m
o u t s id e s e r v i c e s u p p l i e r s o r f r o m a c e n t r a l s e r v i c e u n it w ith in th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t .)
(i)
S p a c e c o n t r o l o v e r o f f i c e f a c i l i t i e s — la y o u t an d a r r a n g e m e n t o f o f f i c e s .
(T y p i­
c a l l y s e r v e s a s a s t a f f a s s i s t a n t to m a n a g e m e n t o f f i c i a l s in p e r f o r m i n g th is fu n c t io n .)




50
MANAGER, OFFICE SERVICES— Continued
M anager,

O ffic e S e r v ic e s I

S u p e r v i s is s a s t a f f o f e m p l o y e e s e n g a g e d in p e r f o r m i n g a fe w ( e . g . , fo u r o r f iv e ) o f
th e a b o v e f u n c t io n s a s a s e r v i c e to a s m a l l o r g a n i z a t i o n ( e . g . , 3 0 0 to 6 0 0 e m p l o y e e s , e x c lu d in g
n o n s u p e r v i s o r y p la n t w o r k e r s ) .
M anager,

O f f i c e S e r v i c e s II

4S

A.
S u p e r v is e s
a s ta ff of
e m p l o y e e s e n g a g e d in
p e r fo r m in g
a fe w
f iv e ) o f th e a b o v e f u n c tio n s a s a s e r v i c e to a m o d e r a t e l y l a r g e o r g a n iz a t i o n
1, 5 0 0 e m p l o y e e s , e x c lu d in g n o n s u p e r v i s o r y p la n t w o r k e r s ) .

( e .g .,
( e .g .,

fo u r o r
6 0 0 to

OR
B.
S u p e r v is e s
a s ta ff of
e m p l o y e e s e n g a g e d in
p e r fo r m in g m o s t ( e .g ., s e v e n or
e ig h t) o f th e a b o v e fu n c tio n s a s a s e r v i c e to a s m a l l o r g a n i z a t i o n ( e . g . , 3 0 0 to 6 0 0 e m p l o y e e s ,
e x c lu d in g n o n s u p e r v i s o r y p la n t w o r k e r s ) .
M an ager,

O f f i c e S e r v i c e s III

A.
S u p e r v is e s
a s ta ff of
e m p l o y e e s e n g a g e d in
p e r fo r m in g
f iv e ) o f th e f u n c t io n s a s a s e r v i c e to a l a r g e o r g a n iz a t i o n ( e . g . , 1 ,5 0 0
e x c lu d in g n o n s u p e r v i s o r y p la n t w o r k e r s ) .

a f e w ( e . g . , fo u r o r
to 3 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s ,

OR

e ig h t)
1, 5 0 0

B.
S u p e r v i s e s a s t a f f o f e m p l o y e e s e n g a g e d in p e r f o r m i n g m o s t ( e . g . , s e v e n o r
o f th e a b o v e f u n c tio n s a s a s e r v i c e to a m o d e r a t e l y l a r g e o r g a n iz a t i o n ( e . g . , 6 0 0 to
e m p l o y e e s , e x c lu d in g n o n s u p e r v i s o r y p la n t w o r k e r s ) .

M anager,

O f f i c e S e r v i c e s IV

S u p e r v i s e s a s t a f f o f e m p l o y e e s e n g a g e d in p e r f o r m i n g m o s t ( e . g . , s e v e n o r e ig h t)
o f th e a b o v e fu n c tio n s a s a s e r v i c e to a l a r g e o r g a n iz a t i o n ( e . g . , 1 ,5 0 0 to 3 ,0 0 0 e m p l o y e e s ,
e x c lu d in g n o n s u p e r v i s o r y p la n t w o r k e r s ) .

PERSONNEL M ANAGEM ENT
JO B A N A L Y S T
P e r f o r m s w o r k in v o lv e d in c o l l e c t i n g , a n a l y z in g , an d d e v e lo p in g o c c u p a t io n a l d a ta
r e l a t i v e to j o b s , j o b q u a li f i c a t i o n s , a n d w o r k e r c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s a s a b a s i s f o r c o m p e n s a t in g
e m p l o y e e s in a f a i r , e q u it a b le , an d u n i f o r m m a n n e r .
P e r f o r m s s u c h d u t ie s a s s tu d y in g an d
a n a ly z in g j o b s an d p r e p a r i n g d e s c r i p t i o n s o f d u tie s a n d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s an d o f th e p h y s i c a l
an d m e n t a l r e q u i r e m e n t s n e e d e d b y w o r k e r s ; e v a lu a t in g j o b s an d d e t e r m in in g a p p r o p r ia t e
w a g e o r s a l a r y l e v e l s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith t h e ir d i f f i c u l t y an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t y ; in d e p e n d e n t ly
c o n d u c tin g o r p a r t ic ip a t in g w ith r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s o f o t h e r c o m p a n ie s in c o n d u c tin g c o m p e n ­
s a t io n s u r v e y s w ith in a l o c a l i t y o r l a b o r m a r k e t a r e a ; a s s i s t i n g in a d m i n i s t e r i n g m e r i t r a t in g
p r o g r a m ; r e v i e w i n g c h a n g e s in w a g e s an d s a l a r i e s in d ic a t e d b y s u r v e y s a n d r e c o m m e n d i n g
c h a n g e s in p a y s c a l e s ; an d a u d itin g in d iv id u a l j o b s to c h e c k th e p r o p r i e t y o f e v a lu a t io n s an d
to a p p ly c u r r e n t j o b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s .
Job A n a l y s t I
A s a t r a i n e e , p e r f o r m s w o r k in d e s ig n a t e d a r e a s an d o f l i m i t e d o c c u p a t io n a l s c o p e .
R e c e i v e s i m m e d i a t e s u p e r v i s i o n in a s s i g n m e n t s d e s ig n e d to p r o v id e t r a in i n g in th e a p p lic a t io n
o f e s t a b l i s h e d m e t h o d s an d t e c h n iq u e s o f j o b a n a l y s i s .
S tu d ie s th e l e a s t d iff ic u lt j o b s and
p r e p a r e s r e p o r t s f o r r e v i e w b y a j o b a n a l y s t o f h ig h e r l e v e l .
J o b A n a l y s t II
S t u d ie s , d e s c r i b e s , a n d e v a l u a t e s j o b s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith e s t a b l i s h e d p r o c e d u r e s .
Is u s u a l l y a s s i g n e d to th e s i m p l e r k in d s o f b o th w a g e a n d s a l a r i e d j o b s in th e e s t a b li s h m e n t .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o n s u c h a s s i g n m e n t s b u t i s l i m i t e d b y i n s t r u c t i o n s o f h is s u p e r i o r and
b y d e fin e d a r e a




of a ssig n m e n t.

51
JOB ANALYST— Continued
Jo b A n a l y s t III
A n a l y z e s a n d e v a lu a t e s a v a r i e t y o f w a g e and s a l a r i e d j o b s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith
e s t a b l i s h e d e v a lu a t io n s y s t e m s an d p r o c e d u r e s .
M a y c o n d u c t w a g e s u r v e y s w ith in the l o c a l i t y
o r p a r t i c i p a t e in c o n d u c tin g s u r v e y s o f b r o a d c o m p e n s a t io n a r e a s .
M a y a s s i s t in d e v e lo p in g
s u r v e y m e t h o d s an d p la n s .
R e c e i v e s g e n e r a l s u p e r v i s i o n b u t r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r f in a l a c t io n
is l i m i t e d .
J o b A n a l y s t IV
A n a l y z e s an d e v a lu a t e s a v a r i e t y o f j o b s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith e s t a b l i s h e d e v a lu a t io n
s y s t e m s an d p r o c e d u r e s , an d is g iv e n a s s i g n m e n t w h ic h r e g u l a r l y in c lu d e s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r
th e m o r e d i f f i c u l t k in d s o f j o b s .
( " M o r e d i f f ic u l t ” m e a n s j o b s w h ic h c o n s i s t o f h a r d - t o u n d e r sta n d w o r k p r o c e s s e s ; e .g ., p r o fe s s io n a l, s c ie n t ific , a d m in is tr a tiv e , o r te c h n ic a l; or
j o b s in n e w o r e m e r g i n g o c c u p a t io n a l f i e l d s ; o r j o b s w h ic h a r e b e in g e s t a b l i s h e d a s p a r t o f
th e c r e a t i o n o f n e w o r g a n i z a t i o n s ; o r w h e r e o t h e r s p e c i a l c o n s i d e r a t i o n s o f t h e s e t y p e s a p p ly .)
R e c e i v e s g e n e r a l s u p e r v i s i o n , bu t r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r f in a l a c t io n i s l i m i t e d .
M a y p a r t ic ip a t e
in th e d e v e lo p m e n t an d in s t a l la t i o n o f e v a lu a t io n o r c o m p e n s a t io n s y s t e m s , w h ic h m a y in c lu d e
t h o s e f o r m e r i t r a t in g p r o g r a m s .
M a y p la n s u r v e y m e t h o d s an d c o n d u c t o r d i r e c t w a g e
s u r v e y s w ith in a b r o a d c o m p e n s a t io n a r e a .
D IR E C T O R O F P E R S O N N E L
D i r e c t s a p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t p r o g r a m f o r a c o m p a n y o r f o r a p la n t o r e s t a b ­
lish m e n t of a co m p a n y .
F o r a j o b to b e c o v e r e d b y th is d e f in it io n , th e p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e ­
m e n t p r o g r a m m u s t in c lu d e r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r a l l t h r e e o f th e f o llo w in g f u n c t io n s :
(1)
A d m i n i s t e r i n g a f o r m a l j o b e v a lu a t io n s y s t e m ; i . e . , a s y s t e m in w h ic h t h e r e
a r e e s t a b l i s h e d p r o c e d u r e s b y w h ic h j o b s a r e a n a ly z e d an d e v a lu a t e d o n th e b a s i s o f
t h e ir d u t ie s ,
r e s p o n s ib ilitie s ,
an d q u a li f ic a t io n r e q u i r e m e n t s in o r d e r to p r o v id e a
fo u n d a tio n f o r e q u ita b le c o m p e n s a t io n .
T y p i c a l l y , s u c h a s y s t e m in c lu d e s th e u s e o f one
o r m o r e s e t s o f j o b e v a lu a t io n f a c t o r s an d th e p r e p a r a t i o n o f f o r m a l jo b d e s c r i p t i o n s .
It m a y a l s o in c lu d e s u c h r e l a t e d fu n c tio n s a s w a g e a n d s a l a r y s u r v e y s o r m e r i t r a t in g
s y s t e m a d m in istr a tio n .
T h e j o b e v a lu a t io n s y s t e m ( s ) d o e s n o t n e c e s s a r i l y c o v e r a l l j o b s
in th e o r g a n iz a t i o n , bu t d o e s c o v e r a s u b s t a n t i a l p o r t io n o f th e o r g a n iz a t i o n .
(2)
E m p lo y m e n t an d p la c e m e n t f u n c t io n s ; i . e . , r e c r u i t i n g a c t i v e l y f o r at l e a s t s o m e
k in d s o f w o r k e r s th r o u g h a v a r i e t y o f s o u r c e s ( e . g . , s c h o o l s o r c o l l e g e s , e m p lo y m e n t
a g e n c i e s , p r o f e s s i o n a l s o c i e t i e s , e t c .) ; e v a lu a tin g a p p lic a n t s a g a in s t d e m a n d s o f p a r t i c ­
u la r j o b s b y u s e o f s u c h t e c h n iq u e s a s j o b a n a l y s i s to d e t e r m i n e r e q u i r e m e n t s , i n t e r ­
v ie w s , w r itte n te s ts
o f a p titu d e , k n o w le d g e , o r s k i l l , r e f e r e n c e c h e c k s , e x p e r i e n c e
e v a l u a t io n s , e t c . ; r e c o m m e n d i n g s e l e c t i o n s an d jo b
p la c e m e n t s to m a n a g e m e n t , e t c .
(3)
E m p l o y e e r e l a t i o n s an d s e r v i c e s f u n c t io n s ; i . e . , fu n c tio n s d e s ig n e d to m a in t a in
e m p l o y e e s ’ m o r a l e an d p r o d u c t iv it y a t a h ig h l e v e l (fo r e x a m p l e , a d m i n i s t e r i n g a f o r m a l
o r i n f o r m a l g r i e v a n c e p r o c e d u r e ; id e n tify in g an d r e c o m m e n d i n g s o lu t io n s f o r p e r s o n n e l
p r o b l e m s s u c h a s a b s e n t e e i s m , h ig h t u r n o v e r , lo w p r o d u c t iv it y , e t c .; a d m i n i s t r a t i o n o f
b e n e f i c i a l s u g g e s t i o n s s y s t e m , r e t i r e m e n t , p e n s i o n , o r in s u r a n c e p la n s , m e r i t r a tin g
s y s t e m , e t c . ; o v e r s e e i n g c a f e t e r i a o p e r a t i o n s , r e c r e a t i o n a l p r o g r a m s , i n d u s t r i a l h e a lt h
o r s a f e t y p r o g r a m s , e t c .) .
E m p lo y e e tr a in i n g an d d e v e lo p m e n t fu n c tio n s m a y o r m a y n ot b e p a r t
s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t p r o g r a m f o r p u r p o s e s o f m a t c h in g t h is d e fin it io n .

o f th e p e r ­

L a b o r r e l a t i o n a c t i v i t i e s , i f a n y , a r e c o n fin e d m a i n l y to the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , i n t e r ­
p r e t a t io n , an d a p p lic a t io n o f la b o r u n io n c o n t r a c t s an d a r e e s s e n t i a l l y s i m i l a r to t h o s e d e ­
s c r i b e d u n d e r (3) a b o v e .
If r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r a c t u a l c o n t r a c t n e g o t ia t io n w ith la b o r u n io n s
a s th e p r i n c i p a l c o m p a n y r e p r e s e n t a t i v e i s c o n s i d e r e d a s i g n if ic a n t on e in th e j o b , i . e . , the
on e w h ic h s e r v e s a s th e p r i m a r y b a s i s f o r q u a li f ic a t io n r e q u i r e m e n t s an d c o m p e n s a t io n , the
j o b i s e x c lu d e d f r o m b e in g m a t c h e d w ith th is d e f in it io n .
P a r t i c i p a t i o n in b a r g a in in g o f a
l e s s s ig n if ic a n t n a t u r e , e . g . , to n e g o t ia t e d e t a ile d s e t t l e m e n t o f s u c h m a t t e r s a s s p e c i f i c
r a t e s , j o b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s , w o r k r u l e s , h ir in g o r l a y o f f p r o c e d u r e s , e t c . , w ith in th e b r o a d
t e r m s o f a g e n e r a l a g r e e m e n t r e a c h e d at h ig h e r l e v e l s , o r to s u p p ly a d v ic e a n d in f o r m a t io n
o n t e c h n i c a l p o in t s to th e c o m p a n y ’ s p r in c ip a l r e p r e s e n t a t i v e , w i l l n o t h a v e th e e f f e c t o f e x ­
c lu d in g th e j o b f r o m c o v e r a g e .




52
DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL— Continued
T h e d i r e c t o r o f p e r s o n n e l n o t o n ly d i r e c t s a p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t p r o g r a m o f the
i n t e n s it y an d s c o p e o u tlin e d p r e v i o u s l y , b u t (to b e a p r o p e r m a t c h ) h e i s r e c o g n i z e d b y th e
to p m a n a g e m e n t o f f i c i a l s o f th e o r g a n iz a t i o n h e s e r v e s a s th e s o u r c e o f a d v ic e an d a s s i s t a n c e
on p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t m a t t e r s a n d p r o b l e m s g e n e r a l l y .
F o r e x a m p le , he is ty p ic a lly
c o n s u lt e d o n th e p e r s o n n e l i m p l i c a t i o n s o f p la n n e d c h a n g e s in m a n a g e m e n t p o l i c y o r p r o ­
g r a m , th e e f f e c t s o n th e o r g a n iz a t i o n o f e c o n o m i c o r m a r k e t t r e n d s , p r o d u c t o r p r o d u c t io n
m e th o d c h a n g e s , e t c . ; h e r e p r e s e n t s m a n a g e m e n t in e x t e r n a l c o n t a c t s w ith o th e r c o m p a n i e s ,
tr a d e a s s o c i a t i o n s , g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c i e s , e t c . , w h e n th e p r i m a r y s u b j e c t m a t t e r o f the c o n ­
t a c t i s on p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t m a t t e r s .
T y p i c a l l y , th e d i r e c t o r o f p e r s o n n e l r e p o r t s to a c o m p a n y o f f i c e r o r a h ig h m a n a g e ­
m e n t o f f i c i a l w h o h a s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r th e o p e r a t io n o f a p la n t o r e s t a b li s h m e n t o f a c o m ­
p a n y ; o r , a t c o m p a n y h e a d q u a r t e r s l e v e l , h e m a y r e p o r t to a c o m p a n y o f f i c e r in c h a r g e o f
i n d u s t r i a l r e l a t i o n s an d p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t a c t i v i t i e s o r a s i m i l a r o f f i c i a l .
D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l j o b s w h ic h m e e t th e a b o v e
l e v e l 29 o f w o r k in a c c o r d a n c e w ith th e f o llo w in g ta b u la t io n :

Personnel program
operations l e v e l 1
______
Number o f em ployees in
work force serviced

250-750----1.000-5,000—

Organization
serviced—
type A 3

I

Organization
serviced—
type B 4
II

d e f in it io n

c la s s ifie d

Personnel program
developm ent le v e l2
Organization
serviced—
type A 3
II

n

m

6 000 12 000

m

m

15,000-25,000-

IV

IV
V

IV
V

. - , -

are

Organization
serviced—
type B 4

m
IV
V
-

1 Personnel program operations lev el— director o f personnel servicing an organizational segment ( e . g . , a plant)
o f a com pany, where the basic personnel program p olicies, plans, objectives, e t c . , are established at com pany head­
quarters or at some other higher lev el between the plant and the com pany headquarters le v e l.
The personnel di­
rector's responsibility is to put these into operation at the lo ca l le v e l, in such a manner as to most effectively seive
the lo ca l management needs.
2 Personnel program developm ent le v e l— director o f personnel servicing an entire com pany (with or without
subordinate establishments) where the personnel director plays an important role in establishment o f basic personnel
p olicies, plans, objectives, e t c . , for the com pany, subject to p o licy direction and control from com pany officers.
There may be instances in which there is such relatively com plete delegation o f personnel program planning and
developm ent responsibility below the com pany lev el to an intermediate organization, e. g . , a subsidiary or a division,
that a jo b o f personnel director for such an organization should be m atched as though it were a com pany le v e l job.
3 Organization serviced— type A— jobs serviced are (alm ost exclusively) types which are com m on in the labor
market generally, and consist o f relatively easy-to-understand work processes, or for sim ilar reasons do not present
particularly difficult recruitment, jo b evaluation, or training problems. Work force, organizational structure, and
other organizational characteristics are relatively stable.
4 Organization serviced— type B— jobs serviced include a substantial number o f types which are largely peculiar
to the organization serviced, consist o f hard-to-understand work processes ( e . g . , professional, scientific, administra­
tiv e, or techn ical), are jobs in new or em erging occupational fields, are in extrem ely short supply, have hard-tomatch skill requirements, or for similar reasons present difficult recruitment, job evaluation, or training problems.
Woik force, oiganizational structure, or other organizational characteristics are com p licated , unstable, subject to wide
seasonal fluctuations, etc.
NOTE: There are gaps between different degrees o f all three elements used to determine jo b le ve l matches.
These gaps have been provided purposely to allow room for judgment in getting the best overall jo b le v e l match for
each" job .
Thus, a jo b which services a work force o f 850 em ployees should be m atched with le v e l II if it is a
personnel program operations lev el jo b where the nature o f the organization serviced seems to fa ll slightly below the
definition for the type B degree. However, the same job should be m atched with le v e l I if the nature o f the organi­
zation serviced clearly falls w ell within the definition for the type A degree.

29 Ibid.




by

53
CHEMISTS AND ENGINEERS

C H E M IS T
P e r f o r m s r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t , i n t e r p r e t i v e , an d a n a l y t i c a l w o r k to d e t e r m i n e the
c o m p o s i t i o n , m o l e c u l a r s t r u c t u r e , an d p r o p e r t i e s o f s u b s t a n c e s , to d e v e lo p o r in v e s t ig a t e
n e w m a t e r i a l s an d p r o c e s s e s , an d to i n v e s t ig a t e th e t r a n s f o r m a t i o n w h ic h s u b s t a n c e s u n d e r g o .
W o r k t y p i c a l l y r e q u i r e s a B .S . d e g r e e in c h e m i s t r y o r e q u iv a le n t in e d u c a tio n and e x p e r i e n c e
c o m b in e d .

C h e m is t I
G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . A s th e b e g in n in g l e v e l o f p r o f e s s i o n a l w o r k in c h e m i s t r y ,
a b a c h e l o r 's d e g r e e w ith m a j o r s tu d y in c h e m i s t r y , o r e q u iv a le n t i s r e q u i r e d .
T y p ic a lly
r e c e i v e s f o r m a l c l a s s r o o m o r o n - t h e - j o b t r a in i n g .

t a il e d

D ir e c tio n r e c e iv e d .
P e r f o r m s w o r k u n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n w ith
in s t r u c t i o n s a s to r e q u i r e d t a s k s an d r e s u l t s e x p e c t e d .

s p e c ific

an d d e ­

T y p i c a l d u tie s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s . A s s i g n m e n t s a r e p la n n e d to p r o v id e e x p e r ie n c e
in th e a p p lic a t io n o f c o m m o n l a b o r a t o r y t e c h n iq u e s an d f a m i l i a r i z a t i o n w ith m e t h o d s and
p r a c t i c e s in th e l a b o r a t o r y .
P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f r o u tin e a n a l y s e s , t e s t s , and o p e r a t i o n s ,
an d a s s i s t s e x p e r i e n c e d c h e m i s t s b y c a r r y i n g ou t d e t a ile d s t e p s o f e x p e r i m e n t s .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r

th e

d ir e c tio n

of o th ers.

N one.

C h e m i s t II
G en era l c h a r a c te r is tic s .
A t th is c o n tin u in g d e v e l o p m e n t a l l e v e l f o r p r o f e s s i o n a l
c h e m i s t s , w o r k is c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y s e l e c t i o n and a p p lic a t io n o f g e n e r a l a n d s p e c i a l i z e d
m e t h o d s , t e c h n i q u e s , an d i n s t r u m e n t s c o m m o n ly u s e d in th e l a b o r a t o r y .
M a y re c e iv e a d ­
v a n c e d o n - t h e - j o b tr a in i n g o r f o r m a l c l a s s r o o m in s t r u c t io n .
D ir e c tio n r e c e iv e d .
S u p e r v i s o r s e s t a b l i s h th e n a t u r e an d e x te n t o f a n a l y s i s r e q u i r e d ,
s p e c i f y m e t h o d s an d c r i t e r i a on n e w t y p e s o f a s s i g n m e n t s , an d r e v i e w w o r k f o r t h o r o u g h n e s s
o f a p p lic a t io n o f m e t h o d s an d a c c u r a c y o f r e s u l t s .
T y p i c a l d u tie s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
A n a l y z e s a w id e v a r i e t y o f s a m p l e s f o r w h ic h
t h e r e a r e s ta n d a r d o r e s t a b li s h e d m e t h o d s o f a n a l y s i s o r f o r w h ic h th e a d a p ta tio n o f s ta n d a r d
m e t h o d s is o b v io u s o r d e t e r m in e d b y o t h e r s .
C o n d u c ts s p e c i f i e d p h a s e s o f r e s e a r c h p r o j ­
e c t s a s a n a s s i s t a n t to a n e x p e r i e n c e d c h e m i s t .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r

th e

d ir e c tio n

of o th ers.

M a y s u p e r v i s e a fe w t e c h n i c ia n s o r a i d s .

C h e m i s t III
G e n e ra l c h a r a c te r is tic s .
P e r f o r m s w o r k r e q u i r in g a p p lic a t io n o f k n o w le d g e o f a
s p e c i a l i z e d f i e l d o f c h e m i s t r y an d in g e n u it y in th e in d e p e n d e n t e v a lu a t io n , s e l e c t i o n , an d
a d a p t a tio n o f s ta n d a r d m e t h o d s an d t e c h n i q u e s .
D ir e c tio n r e c e iv e d .
O n r o u tin e w o r k , s u p e r v i s i o n is v e r y g e n e r a l ; u n u s u a l p r o b l e m s
a r e r e s o l v e d w ith c l o s e c o ll a b o r a t i o n o f s u p e r v i s o r .
C o m p le te d w o rk is r e v ie w e d fo r a p p li­
c a tio n o f s o u n d ju d g m e n t in c h o ic e o f m e t h o d s an d a d e q u a c y o f r e s u l t s .
T y p i c a l d u tie s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
D e v e l o p s d e t a i l s o f r e s e a r c h and d e v e l o p m e n t
a s s i g n m e n t s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith a lin e o f a p p r o a c h s u g g e s t e d b y th e s u p e r v i s o r an d a d a p ts
m e t h o d s to th e s p e c i f i c r e q u i r e m e n t s o f a s s i g n m e n t s . A n a l y z e s s a m p l e s th a t r e q u i r e s p e c i a l ­
i z e d t r a in i n g b e c a u s e s t a n d a r d m e t h o d s a r e u n a p p lic a b le , b e c a u s e o f r e q u i r e d i n t e r p r e t i v e
j u d g m e n t o f q u a li t y o f s u b s t a n c e s , o r b e c a u s e o f r e q u i r e d s p e c i a l i z e d s k i l l in a d a p tin g t e c h ­
n iq u e s s u c h a s m i c r o a n a l y s i s .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r




th e

d ir e c tio n

of o th e r s.

M a y s u p e r v i s e a fe w t e c h n i c ia n s o r a i d s .

54
CHEMIST— Continued
C h e m i s t IV
G e n e ra l c h a r a c te r is tic s .
P la n s an d c o n d u c ts w o r k in c h e m i s t r y r e q u i r in g m a s t e r y
o f s p e c i a l i z e d te c h n i q u e s o r c o n s i d e r a b l e in g e n u it y in s e l e c t i n g an d e v a lu a t in g a p p r o a c h e s to
u n fo r e s e e n or n ov el p r o b le m s .
D i r e c t i o n r e c e i v e d . G e n e r a l l y w o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o f t e c h n i c a l s u p e r v i s i o n b u t r e ­
f e r s p r o p o s e d p la n s an d u n u s u a lly im p o r t a n t o r c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s to s u p e r v i s o r f o r g u id a n c e .
T y p i c a l d u tie s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
C o n d u c ts r e s e a r c h a s s i g n m e n t s r e q u i r i n g the
e v a lu a t io n o f a l t e r n a t e m e t h o d s o f a p p r o a c h .
U n d e r t a k e s th e m o r e c o m p le x , an d e x a c t in g ,
o r e s o t e r i c a n a l y t i c a l a s s i g n m e n t s r e q u i r i n g a s p e c i a l i s t in te c h n iq u e o r p r o d u c t .
P repares
i n t e r p r e t i v e r e p o r t s o f r e s u l t s an d m a y p r o v id e t e c h n i c a l a d v ic e o n s ig n i f i c a n c e o f r e s u l t s .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r
and te c h n ic ia n s .

th e

d ir e c tio n of o th e r s .

M a y s u p e r v is e a s m a ll

s ta ff of c h e m is ts

C h e m is t V
G e n e ra l c h a r a c te r is tic s .
P a r t i c i p a t e s in p la n n in g r e s e a r c h p r o g r a m s o n th e b a s i s
o f s p e c i a l i z e d k n o w le d g e o f p r o b l e m s a n d m e t h o d s an d p r o b a b l e v a lu e o f r e s u l t s .
M ay serv e
a s a n e x p e r t in a n a r r o w s p e c i a l t y m a k in g r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s a n d c o n c l u s io n s w h ic h s e r v e a s
th e b a s i s f o r u n d e r ta k in g o r r e j e c t i n g im p o r t a n t p r o j e c t s .
D ir e c tio n r e c e iv e d .
S u p e r v is io n r e c e iv e d r e la t e s

U s u a l l y d i s c u s s e s im p o r t a n t d e v e l o p m e n t s w ith
su p e r v is o r .
l a r g e l y to w o r k o b j e c t i v e s an d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e a s p e c t s .

T y p i c a l d u t ie s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
F r o m b r o a d p r o g r a m o b j e c t i v e s , p la n s , o r g a n ­
i z e s , an d s u p e r v i s e s o r c o n d u c ts r e s e a r c h i n v e s t i g a t i o n s w ith r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r d e fin in g
p r o j e c t s a n d s c o p e an d in d e p e n d e n t ly s e l e c t i n g l i n e s o f a p p r o a c h .
A s in d iv id u a l w o r k e r , c a r r i e s ou t r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t r e q u i r i n g o r ig i n a t io n o f
s c i e n t i f i c t e c h n i q u e s an d m a t u r e b a c k g r o u n d o f k n o w le d g e o f r e l a t e d f i e l d s o f s c i e n c e .

new

R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r th e d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s .
M a y s u p e r v is e a s m a ll grou p of c h e m is ts
e n g a g e d in v a r i e d r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t s o r a l a r g e r g r o u p o n r o u tin e a n a l y t i c a l w o r k .
C h e m is t V I
G e n e ra l c h a r a c te r is tic s .
P e r f o r m s w o r k r e q u i r i n g l e a d e r s h i p an d e x p e r t k n o w le d g e
in a s p e c i a l i z e d f i e l d o f c h e m i s t r y .
C o n c e i v e s , p la n s , an d d i r e c t s p r o j e c t s o f a p io n e e r in g
n a tu r e to c r e a t e n e w m e t h o d s an d t e c h n iq u e s o r to r e s o l v e p r o b l e m s w h ic h h a v e p r o v e d u n ­
u s u a lly r e f r a c t o r y .

m e n ts

D ir e c tio n r e c e iv e d .
S u p e r v is io n r e c e iv e d
b r o a d l y in d ic a t e d in t e r m s o f o b j e c t i v e s .

i s e s s e n t i a l l y a d m i n i s t r a t i v e w ith a s s i g n ­

T y p i c a l d u t ie s a n d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
D e t e r m i n e s th e k in d s o f p r o j e c t s an d d a ta
n e e d e d to m e e t o b j e c t i v e s o f p r o g r a m s .
M a in t a in s l i a i s o n w ith r e l a t e d o r g a n iz a t i o n s and
r e p r e s e n t s th e l a b o r a t o r y in im p o r t a n t c o n f e r e n c e s w ith a u t h o r it y to c o m m i t th e o r g a n i z a ­
tio n .
M a y s e r v e a s a c o n s u lta n t to o t h e r c h e m i s t s in th e s p e c i a l t y f i e l d .

th e w o r k

R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r th e d i r e c t i o n
o f a grou p of c h e m is ts .

of o th ers.

M a y p la n ,

o r g a n iz e ,

d ir e c t,

an d e v a lu a t e

C h e m is t V II
G e n e ra l c h a r a c te r is tic s .
S u p e r v i s o r — p r o v i d e s l e a d e r s h i p an d s c i e n t i f i c g u id a n c e
f o r a b r o a d an d d i v e r s i f i e d p r o g r a m in c h e m i s t r y an d r e l a t e d s u p p o r t in g a c t i v i t i e s s u c h a s
to r e q u i r e s e v e r a l s u b o r d in a t e s u p e r v i s o r s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r p r o g r a m s t y p i c a l l y id e n t if ie d w ith
le v e l V I.
R e c o m m e n d s th e f a c i l i t i e s , p e r s o n n e l , a n d fu n d s r e q u i r e d to c a r r y ou t p r o g r a m s
and e v a lu a te s a c c o m p lis h m e n ts .




55
CHEMIST— C ontinue d
I n d iv id u a l r e s e a r c h e r an d c o n s u lta n t— i s a n o n s u p e r v i s o r y c h e m i s t o f r e c o g n i z e d
l e a d e r s h i p s ta tu s an d a u t h o r it a t iv e n e s s in h is c o m p a n y , in a b r o a d a r e a o f s p e c i a l i z a ­
tio n .
Is c o n s u lt e d e x t e n s i v e l y b y a s s o c i a t e s an d o t h e r s w ith a h ig h d e g r e e o f r e l i a n c e
p la c e d on h is s c i e n t i f i c in t e r p r e t a t io n s an d a d v ic e .
D ir e c tio n

r e c e iv e d .

U nder

g e n e r a l a d m in is tr a tiv e

d ir e c tio n .

T y p i c a l d u tie s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
S u p e r v i s o r — is r e s p o n s i b l e f o r a n im p o r t a n t
s e g m e n t o f a c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y w ith e x t e n s iv e and d i v e r s i f i e d s c i e n t i f i c r e ­
q u i r e m e n t s o r th e e n t ir e c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y w h e r e th e p r o g r a m i s l i m i t e d in
sco p e.
M a k e s a u t h o r it a t iv e t e c h n i c a l r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s c o n c e r n in g th e s c i e n t i f i c o b je c t i v e s
and l e v e l s o f w o r k w h ic h w i l l b e m o s t p r o f it a b l e in th e lig h t o f c o m p a n y r e q u i r e m e n t s and
s c i e n t i f i c an d in d u s t r i a l t r e n d s an d d e v e l o p m e n t s .
I n d iv id u a l r e s e a r c h e r an d c o n s u lt a n t — s e l e c t s p r o b l e m s f o r r e s e a r c h an d c o n c e i v e s
an d p la n s i n v e s t ig a t io n s in w h ic h th e p h e n o m e n a an d p r i n c i p l e s a r e n ot a d e q u a t e ly u n d e r ­
s t o o d , s o th a t o u ts ta n d in g c r e a t i v i t y an d m a t u r e j u d g m e n t a r e r e q u i r e d to d e v is e h y p o th ­
e s e s an d t e c h n iq u e s o f e x p e r im e n t a t io n an d to i n t e r p r e t r e s u l t s .
A d v i s e s th e h e a d o f a
l a r g e l a b o r a t o r y on c o m p l e x a s p e c t s o f e x t r e m e l y b r o a d an d im p o r t a n t p r o g r a m s w ith
r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r e x p l o r i n g , j u s t i f y i n g , an d e v a lu a tin g p r o p o s e d an d c u r r e n t p r o g r a m s
an d p r o j e c t s an d f u r n is h in g a d v ic e o n u n u s u a lly c o m p le x and n o v e l p r o b l e m s in th e s p e ­
c ia lty fie ld .

istic s"

R e s p o n s ib ility
above.

fo r

th e

d ir e c tio n

of

o th ers.

S u p e r v is o r — s e e

"g e n e r a l

ch a ra c te r­

C h e m is t V III
G e n e ra l c h a r a c te r is tic s .
S u p e r v i s o r — p r o v i d e s l e a d e r s h i p an d s c i e n t i f i c g u id a n c e
f o r a v e r y b r o a d an d h ig h ly d i v e r s i f i e d p r o g r a m in c h e m i s t r y an d r e l a t e d s u p p o r t in g a c t i v ­
i t i e s r e q u i r in g s e v e r a l s u b o r d in a t e s u p e r v i s o r s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r p r o g r a m s t y p i c a l l y id e n t if ie d
w ith l e v e l V I I , o r a l a r g e n u m b e r o f s u p e r v i s o r s o f l o w e r l e v e l s .
R e c o m m e n d s th e f a c i l ­
i t i e s , p e r s o n n e l , an d fu n d s r e q u i r e d f o r p r o g r a m s an d e v a l u a t e s a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s .
I n d iv id u a l r e s e a r c h e r an d c o n s u lt a n t — s e r v e s a s a c o n s u lta n t to t o p - l e v e l m a n a g e m e n t
on s c i e n t i f i c q u e s t io n s o f f a r - r e a c h i n g s i g n i f i c a n c e .
I s so u g h t a s a c o n s u lta n t b y c h e m ­
i s t s w h o a r e t h e m s e l v e s s p e c i a l i s t s in th e f i e l d .
Is a n a t io n a l ly r e c o g n i z e d r e s e a r c h
l e a d e r an d c o n s u lta n t f o r h is c o m p a n y .
D ir e c tio n

r e c e iv e d .

R e c e iv e s

g e n e r a l a d m in is tr a tiv e

d ir e c tio n .

T y p i c a l d u tie s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
S u p e r v i s o r — is r e s p o n s i b l e f o r a n im p o r t a n t
s e g m e n t o f a c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y w ith v e r y e x t e n s i v e an d h ig h ly d i v e r s i f i e d
s c i e n t i f i c r e q u i r e m e n t s o r th e e n t ir e c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y w h e r e th e p r o g r a m is
of m o d e ra te sc o p e .
Is r e s p o n s i b l e f o r d e c id in g th e k in d an d e x te n t o f c h e m i c a l an d r e l a t e d
p r o g r a m n e e d e d to a c c o m p l i s h th e o b je c t i v e s o f th e c o m p a n y , f o r c h o o s in g th e s c i e n t i f i c a p ­
p r o a c h e s , f o r p la n n in g an d o r g a n iz in g f a c i l i t i e s an d p r o g r a m s , and f o r i n t e r p r e t in g r e s u l t s .
I n d iv id u a l r e s e a r c h e r an d c o n s u lt a n t — f o r m u l a t e s and g u id e s th e a t ta c k o n e x c e p t i o n ­
a l l y d if f ic u l t an d im p o r t a n t p r o b l e m s w h o s e s o lu t io n w o u ld r e p r e s e n t a m a j o r s c i e n t i f i c
or te c h n o lo g ic a l a d v a n c e .
R e s p o n s ib ility
is tic s "

fo r

th e

d ir e c tio n

of

o th ers.

S u p e r v is o r — se e

"g e n e r a l

above.

T h is l e v e l d o e s n o t in c lu d e th e c h ie f c h e m i s t o f a c o m p a n y w ith a
v e r y e x t e n s i v e an d h ig h ly d i v e r s i f i e d p r o g r a m ; o r th e a s s i s t a n t c h ie f
c h e m i s t o f a c o m p a n y w ith a n u n u s u a lly e x t e n s i v e an d n o v e l c h e m i c a l
p rogram .




c h a ra c te r­

56
ENGINEER
P e r fo r m s w o rk in r e s e a r c h , develop m en t, design , testin g, a n a ly sis, p rod u ction , c o n ­
stru ction , m aintenan ce, op era tion , planning, su rv ey , estim a tin g, application , or sta n d a rd iza ­
tion o f en g in eerin g fa c ilit ie s , s y s te m s , s tru ctu re s, p r o c e s s e s , equipm ent d e v ic e s , o r m a ­
te r ia ls req u irin g know ledge o f the s c ie n c e and art b y w h ich m a te r ia ls , natural r e s o u r c e s ,
and p ow er a re m ade u sefu l.
W ork ty p ic a lly r e q u ir e s a B.S. d e g re e in en gin eerin g or the
equivalent in e x p e r ie n c e and edu cation com b in ed . (Safety e n g in e e rs, in d u stria l en g in e e rs,
quality co n tro l e n g in e e rs, and sa le s en g in eers a re to be ex clu d ed .)
E n gin eer I
G en era l c h a r a c te r is t ic s . A s the beginning le v e l o f en gin eerin g w ork , a b a c h e lo r 's
d e g re e in en g in eerin g o r equivalent is re q u ire d .
T y p ic a lly r e c e iv e s fo r m a l c la s s r o o m or
o n -th e -jo b trainin g.
D ire ctio n r e c e iv e d . P e r fo r m s w o rk under c lo s e s u p e rv isio n with s p e c ific and d e ­
ta iled in stru ction s as to re q u ire d tasks and r e su lts e x p ected . W ork is ch eck ed during p r o g ­
r e s s , and upon co m p le tio n is re v ie w e d fo r a c c u r a c y .
T y p ica l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . P e r fo r m s sim p le tasks that are planned to p r o ­
vid e e x p e rie n ce and fa m ilia r iz a tio n with m ethods and p r a c tic e s o f the com pan y in the s p e cia lty
fie ld and to a s c e r ta in the in te re sts and aptitudes of the beginning en gin eer.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n o f o th e r s .

None.

E ngineer II
G en eral c h a r a c te r is t ic s .
At this continuing develop m en tal le v e l, p e r fo r m s routine
en gin eerin g w ork re q u irin g ap p lica tion of standard tech n iq u es, p r o c e d u r e s , and c r it e r ia in
ca rry in g out a sequ en ce of re la te d en gin eerin g ta sk s. L im ited e x e r c is e o f judgm ent is r e ­
q u ired on d etails of w ork . M ay r e c e iv e advanced o n -th e -jo b or c la s s r o o m in stru ction s.
D ire ctio n r e c e iv e d . S u p e rv iso r s c r e e n s a ssign m en ts to elim in a te d ifficu lt p ro b le m s
and s e le c t s tech n iqu es and p r o c e d u r e s to be applied. R e c e iv e s c lo s e su p e rv isio n on new
a sp e cts o f assign m en ts.
T y p ica l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .
U sing p r e s c r ib e d m eth od s, p e r fo r m s s p e c ific
and lim ite d p o rtion s o f a b r o a d e r a ssign m en t o f an e x p e r ie n c e d en g in eer. A p p lies standard
p r a c tic e s and tech n iqu es in s p e c ific situation s, adju sts and c o r r e la t e s data, r e c o g n iz e s d is ­
cre p a n c ie s in re s u lts , and fo llo w s op era tion s through a s e r ie s o f re la te d d eta iled steps or
processes.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n o f o th e rs.

M ay su p e rv ise a few aids Or tech n icia n s.

E n gin eer III
G en eral c h a r a c te r is t ic s . W ork r e q u ir e s independent evaluation, s e le ctio n , and a p ­
p lica tio n o f standard en gin eerin g tech n iq u es, p r o c e d u r e s , and c r it e r ia , using judgm ent and
ingenuity in m aking m in or adaptations and m o d ifica tio n s.
D ir e c tio n r e c e iv e d .
R e c e iv e s in stru ctio n on s p e c ific a ssign m en t o b je c tiv e s , points
o f em p h a sis, r e fe r e n c e and in form a tion s o u r c e s , and p o s s ib le solu tion s. Unusual p r o b le m s
a re so lv e d jo in tly with s u p e r v is o r , and w o rk is re v ie w e d fo r a p p lica tion of sound en gin eerin g
judgm ent.
T y p ica l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilit ie s . A ssig n m en ts include equipm ent d esig n and d e ­
velop m en t, test o f m a te r ia ls , p re p a ra tio n o f sp e c ific a tio n s , p r o c e s s study, r e s e a r c h in v e s ­
tiga tion s, re p o r t p re p a ra tio n , and other a c tiv itie s o f lim ite d sco p e re q u irin g know ledge o f
p r in c ip le s , p r a c t ic e s , and tech n iqu es co m m o n ly e m p loyed in the s p e c ific n a rrow a re a o f
a ssign m en ts. P e r fo r m s w ork w h ich in v o lv e s con vention al types o f plan s, in v estig a tion s,
su rv e y s, s tru ctu re s , o r equipm ent with r e la tiv e ly few c o m p le x fe a tu re s fo r w hich th ere are
p re ce d e n ts.
R e sp o n sib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n o f o th e rs.
M ay su p e rv ise the w o rk
in s p e c to r s , and other tech n icia n s a ssig n e d to a s s is t in the w ork .




o f d ra ftsm en ,

57
ENGINEER— ont inue d
-C
E ngineer IV
G en eral c h a r a c te r is t ic s . W ork r e q u ir e s o rig in a lity and judgm ent in the independent
evaluation, s e le ctio n , and substantial adaptation and m o d ifica tio n o f standard tech n iq u es,
p r o c e d u r e s , and c r it e r ia .
Is re c o g n iz e d as fu lly com petent in a ll con vention al a s p e cts of
the su b je ct-m a tte r or functional a re a o f a ssign m en ts.
D ire ctio n r e c e iv e d . R e c e iv e s d ir e c t su p e rv isio n and guidance p r im a r ily on n ovel
or c o n tr o v e r s ia l p r o b le m s or q u estion s. M akes independent te ch n ica l d e c is io n s on details
o f w ork c o v e r e d b y p re ce d e n ts.
T y p ica l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .
P la n s, sch e d u le s, and co o rd in a te s detailed
ph ases o f the en gin eerin g w ork in a p a rt o f a m a jo r p r o je c t or in a total p r o je c t of m od era te
sco p e . D e v ise s new a p p roa ch es to p r o b le m s en coun tered. P e r fo r m s w ork w h ich in v olv es
conventional en gin eerin g p r a c tic e but in clu d es a v a r ie ty o f co m p le x fea tu res such as c o n flic t ­
ing d esig n req u ire m e n ts , u n suitability of standard m a te r ia ls , and d ifficu lt co o rd in a tio n r e ­
q u irem en ts.
W ork r e q u ir e s a b ro a d know ledge of p re ce d e n ts in the sp e cia lty a re a and a
good know ledge of p r in c ip le s and p r a c tic e s o f re la te d sp e c ia ltie s .
R e sp o n sib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n o f o th ers.
n icians on routine w ork .

M ay su p e rv ise a few en g in eers o r te c h ­

E ngineer V
G en eral c h a r a c te r is t ic s .
W ork r e q u ir e s a p p lica tion o f in ten sive a n d d iv e r s ifie d
know ledge of en gin eerin g p r in c ip le s and p r a c tic e s in b ro a d a re a s of a ssign m en ts and r e la te d
fie ld s .
M akes d e c is io n s independently on en gin eerin g p r o b le m s and m eth od s, and r e p ­
resen ts the org a n iza tion in c o n fe r e n c e s to r e s o lv e im portan t q u estion s and to plan and c o ­
ordinate w ork .
P o s itio n s m ay be s u p e r v is o r y or n o n su p e rv iso ry .
D ire ctio n r e c e iv e d .
R e c e iv e s s u p e rv isio n and guidance
w ork o b je c tiv e s and c r it ic a l is s u e s .

on ly in te rm s o f s p e c ific

T y p ica l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . S u p e r v is o r — p lan s, d e v e lo p s, co o rd in a te s, and
d ir e c ts a la rg e and im portant en gin eerin g p r o je c t or a num ber of sm a ll p r o je c t s with m any
co m p le x fea tu res.
N on su p e rv is o ry r e s e a r c h e r — c a r r ie s out co m p le x or n ovel r e s e a r c h a ssign m en ts
req u irin g the develop m en t o f new o r im p ro v e d techniques and p r o c e d u r e s .
N o n su p e rv is o ry sta ff s p e c ia lis t — d ev elop s and evalu ates plans
v a rie ty o f p r o je c t s and a ctiv itie s to be c a r r ie d out by oth e rs.

and c r it e r ia

fo r a

R e sp o n sib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n of o th e rs. S u pervisor-— s u p e r v is e s , c o o rd in a te s, and
rev iew s the w ork o f a s m a ll staff o f e n g in eers and tech n icia n s. E stim a tes m anpow er needs
and sch ed u les and a ssign s w ork to m e e t com p letion date.
E ngineer VI
G en eral c h a r a c te r is t ic s . W ork is c h a r a c te r iz e d b y fu ll te ch n ica l r e s p o n s ib ility fo r
in terp retin g , org a n izin g , execu tin g, and coord in a tin g a ssign m en ts. M aintains lia is o n with
other org an ization s or com p a n ies. P o s itio n s m ay be s u p e r v is o r y o r n o n su p e rv iso ry .
D ire ctio n r e c e iv e d . A ssig n m en ts a re r e c e iv e d in te r m s o f b ro a d g en era l o b je c tiv e s
and lim its . S u p erv ision co n ce rn s a d m in istra tiv e fea tu res o f the w ork .
T y p ica l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .
C o n ce iv e s and plans en gin eerin g p r o je c t s in ­
volvin g e x p lora tion of su b ject a re a , d efin ition o f sco p e and s e le c tio n of p r o b le m s fo r in v e s ­
tigation , and develop m en t of n ovel con cep ts and a p p roa ch es.
S u p e r v is o r — plan s, d e v e lo p s, co o rd in a te s, and d ir e c ts a num ber o f la r g e and im ­
portant p r o je c t s or a p r o je c t o f m a jo r s co p e and im p orta n ce.
N o n su p e rv is o ry r e s e a r c h e r — plans and conducts r e s e a r c h or other w ork re q u irin g
p ion eerin g in a re a s in w hich la r g e b lo ck s o f data a re c o n tr o v e r s ia l o r unknown.




58
ENGINEER— Continued
N o n su p e rv is o ry staff s p e c ia lis t — as an e x p ert in a s p e c ific fie ld , p e r fo r m s a d v iso ry ,
con su lting, and re v ie w w ork .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r d ir e c tio n o f o th ers. S u p e r v is o r — d ir e c ts a sta ff o f p r o je c t e n g i­
n e e rs and a ssista n ts. E valuates p r o g r e s s of the staff and re su lts obtained, and re co m m e n d s
m a jo r changes to a ch iev e o v e r a ll o b je c tiv e s .
E ngineer VII
G en eral c h a r a c te r is t ic s . W ork is c h a r a c te r iz e d b y d e c is io n s and recom m en d a tion s
w h ich a re r e c o g n iz e d as authoritative and have an im portant im p a ct on exten sive en gin eerin g
a ctiv itie s.
Initiates and m aintains ex ten siv e con ta cts with k e y en g in eers and o ffic ia ls o f
other org a n iza tion s and com p a n ies; this r e q u ir e s sk ill in p e r su a sio n and negotiation s o f
c r it ic a l is s u e s .
P o s itio n s m ay be s u p e r v is o r y or n o n su p e rv iso ry .
D ire ctio n r e c e iv e d .

R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l a d m in istra tive d ire ctio n .

T y p ica l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . D em on stra tes c re a tiv ity , fo r e sig h t, and m ature
en gin eerin g judgm ent in anticipating and solv in g u np reced en ted en gin eerin g p r o b le m s , d e ­
term in in g p ro g ra m o b je c tiv e s and re q u ire m e n ts, org a n izin g p r o g r a m s and p r o je c t s , and d e ­
velop in g standards and guides fo r d iv e r s e en gin eerin g a c tiv itie s .
S u p e r v is o r — plans, d e v e lo p s, co o rd in a te s, and d ir e c ts an en gin eerin g p r o g r a m c o n ­
sistin g of m any la rg e and im portant p r o je c t s .
N on su p e rv is o ry — p e r fo r m s a d v is o ry , con su lting,
s p e c ia lis t or ex p ert in b ro a d p r o g r a m a re a s.

and re v ie w w ork

as authoritative

R e sp o n sib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n of o th ers. S u p e r v is o r — d ir e c ts a la r g e staff of p r o j­
ect en g in eers, and en g in eers and s c ie n tis ts in supporting fu n ction s. S e v e ra l subordinate
s u p e rv is o rs a re r e s p o n s ib le fo r p r o je c t s o r a ctiv itie s ty p ic a lly id en tified with le v e l VI.
E ngineer VIII
G en eral c h a r a c te r is t ic s . W ork is c h a r a c te r iz e d b y auth oritative d e c is io n s and r e c ­
om m endations w hich have a fa r -r e a c h in g im p a ct on ex ten siv e en g in eerin g and re la te d a c ­
tiv itie s o f the com pany. N egotiates c r it ic a l and c o n tr o v e r s ia l is s u e s with top le v e l e n g in eers
and o ffic e r s of other org a n iza tion s and com p a n ies. P o sitio n s m ay be su p e r v is o r y or
n on su p erv isory .
D ire ctio n r e c e iv e d .

R e c e iv e s g en era l a d m in istra tiv e d ire ctio n .

T y p ica l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . D em on stra tes a high d e g re e o f cre a tiv ity , f o r e ­
sight, and m ature en gin eerin g judgm ent in planning, org a n izin g , and guiding ex ten sive e n g i­
n eerin g p ro g ra m s and a ctiv itie s o f outstanding n ovelty and im p orta n ce.
S u p e r v is o r — p lan s, d e v e lo p s, co o rd in a te s, and d ir e c ts a high ly co m p le x and d iv e r ­
s ifie d en g in eerin g p r o g r a m co n sistin g of m any la rg e and im portan t p r o je c t s and su p p o rt­
ing a ctiv itie s.
N o n su p e rv is o ry — p e r fo r m s a d v is o r y and con su lting w o rk fo r his com pany as a na­
tion ally r e c o g n iz e d authority fo r b ro a d p r o g r a m a re a s o f c o n sid e ra b le n ov elty and
im p orta n ce.
R e sp o n sib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n of oth e rs. D ir e c ts a v e r y la rg e staff o f p r o je c t
en g in eers, and en g in eers and scie n tis ts in supporting fu n ction s. S e v e ra l subordinate su p e r ­
v is o r s a re re s p o n s ib le fo r p r o g r a m s , p r o je c t s , or a ctiv itie s ty p ic a lly id en tified with le v e l VII.

T his le v e l d oes not include p o s itio n s of ch ie f en g in eers of com p a n ies
with la r g e en gin eerin g org a n iza tio n s; e .g ., th ose engaged in r e s e a r c h
and develop m en t on a v a r ie ty o f co m p le x w eapons sy ste m s with nu­
m e ro u s n ov el com p on en ts, or of ch ie fs o f p r im a r y org a n iza tion a l s e g ­
m ents o f com p a n ies with v e r y la r g e en gin eerin g org a n iza tion s engaged
in unusually exten siv e and d iv e r s ifie d r e s e a r c h and d evelopm en t.




59
ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS
ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN
T o be c o v e r e d b y these d efin ition s, e m p lo y e e s m ust m eet a ll o f the fo llo w in g c r it e r ia :
as

(1) P r o v id e s s e m ip r o fe s s io n a l te ch n ica l support fo r e n g in eers w ork in g in such a re a s
r e s e a r c h , d esign , develop m en t, testin g or m anufacturing p r o c e s s im p rovem en t.
(2)

W ork p erta in s to e le c t r ic a l, e le c t r o n ic , or m e ch a n ica l com ponents or equipm ent.

(3)

R eq u ire d to have som e know ledge of s c ie n c e or en gin eerin g.

(E x clu d es p ro d u ctio n or m aintenance w o r k e r s ,
d ra ftsm en , d e s ig n e r s , and e n g in e e rs.)

quality c o n tro l te s te r s ,

cra ftsm e n ,

E ngin eerin g T ech n icia n I
P e r fo r m s sim p le routine tasks under c lo s e su p e rv isio n or fr o m deta iled p r o c e d u r e s .
W ork is ch eck ed in p r o c e s s or on com p letion . P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one or a c o m b i­
nation of such ty p ica l duties a s:
A s s e m b le s or
con nectin g.

in sta lls equipm ent or p a rts re q u irin g

sim p le w irin g ,

so ld e rin g ,

or

P e r fo r m s sim p le or routine tasks or tests such as te n sile or h ard n ess te s ts ; o p ­
e ra te s , and adjusts sim p le test equipm ent; r e c o r d s test data.
G athers and m aintains s p e c ifie d r e c o r d s o f en gin eerin g data such as te s ts , and
draw in gs; p e r fo r m s com putations b y substituting n um bers in s p e c ifie d fo r m u la s ; p lots
data and draw s sim p le cu rv e s and graphs.
E ngin eerin g T ech n icia n II
P e r fo r m s sta n dardized or p r e s c r ib e d a ssign m en ts, in volvin g a sequ en ce o f rela ted
op era tion s. F o llo w s standard w ork m ethods or e x p licit in stru ctio n s; te ch n ica l adequacy o f
routine w ork is re v ie w e d on com p letion ; nonroutine w ork m ay a lso be re v ie w e d in p r o c e s s .
P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one or a com bination o f such ty p ica l duties a s:
A s s e m b le s or co n stru cts sim p le or standard equipm ent or p a rts.
re p a ir sim p le instru m en ts or equipm ent.

M ay s e r v ic e or

C onducts a v a r ie ty of stan d ard ized te sts; m ay p re p a re test sp e c im e n s; sets up and
op era tes standard test equipm ent; r e c o r d s test data.
E x tra cts en gin eerin g data fr o m v a riou s p r e s c r ib e d s o u r c e s ; p r o c e s s e s
follow in g w e ll defined m eth od s; p re se n ts the data in p r e s c r ib e d fo r m .

the data

E n gin eerin g T e ch n icia n III
P e r fo r m s a ssign m en ts that a re not co m p le te ly sta n dardized or p r e s c r ib e d . S e le cts
or adapts standard p r o c e d u r e s or equipm ent. R e c e iv e s in itial in stru ctio n s, equipm ent r e ­
qu irem en ts and a d v ice fr o m s u p e r v is o r or e n g in eer; te ch n ica l adequ acy o f com p leted w ork
is ch eck ed. P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one or a com bin ation o f such ty p ica l duties a s:
C on stru cts com p on en ts, subunits or sim p le m o d e ls or adapts standard equipm ent.
M ay trou b lesh o o t and c o r r e c t m alfu n ction s.
C onducts v a rio u s tests or e x p erim en ts w hich m ay r e q u ire m in or m o d ifica tio n s in
test setups or p r o c e d u r e s ; s e le c t s , sets up and o p era tes standard test equipm ent and
r e c o r d s test data.
E x tra cts and co m p ile s a v a r ie ty o f en gin eerin g data; p r o c e s s e s or com pu tes data
using sp e c ifie d fo rm u la s and p r o c e d u r e s . P e r fo r m s routine a n a ly sis to ch eck a p p li­
ca b ility , a ccu r a c y , and re a so n a b le n e ss of data.




60
ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN— Continued
E n gin eerin g T e ch n icia n IV
P e r fo r m s nonroutine a ssign m en ts o f substantial v a r ie ty and com p lexity . R e c e iv e s
o b je c tiv e s and tech n ica l a d v ice fr o m s u p e r v is o r or en g in e e r; w ork is re v ie w e d fo r te ch n ica l
adequacy. M ay be a s s is te d b y lo w e r le v e l tech n icia n s.
P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one or a
com bin ation o f su ch ty p ica l duties a s:
Works on lim ite d segm en t o f develop m en t p r o je c t ; co n stru cts e x p erim en ta l or p r o ­
totype m od els to m e e t en gin eerin g re q u ire m e n ts; con ducts te sts o r e x p e rim e n ts; r e c o r d s
and evalu ates data and r e p o r ts findings.
C onducts te sts or e x p erim en ts re q u irin g s e le c tio n and adaptation or m o d ifica tio n o f
test equipm ent and test p r o c e d u r e s ; sets up and o p e ra te s equipm ent; r e c o r d s data; an a­
ly z e s data and p r e p a r e s test r e p o r ts .
C om p iles and com pu tes a v a r ie ty o f en gin eerin g data; m a y analyze test and d esig n
data; d ev elop s or p r e p a r e s s c h e m a tic s , designs* s p e c ific a tio n s , p a rts lis ts or m akes
recom m en d a tio n s re g a rd in g th ese ite m s.
M ay re v ie w d esign s or sp e c ific a tio n s fo r
adequacy.
E n g in eerin g T e ch n icia n V
P e r fo r m s nonroutine and c o m p le x a ssign m en ts in volvin g r e s p o n s ib ility fo r planning
and conducting a co m p le te p r o je c t o f r e la tiv e ly lim ite d s co p e o r a p o rtio n o f a la r g e r and
m o r e d iv e r s e p r o je c t . S e le cts and adapts p lan s, tech n iqu es, d esig n s or layou ts. M ay c o ­
ord in ate p ortion s of o v e r a ll a ssign m en t; r e v ie w s , a n a ly zes and in tegra tes the te ch n ica l w ork
o f oth ers. S u p erv iso r o r p r o fe s s io n a l en gin eer outlines o b je c tiv e s , re q u ire m e n ts and d esig n
a p p roa ch es; com p le te d w o rk is re v ie w e d fo r te ch n ica l ad equ acy and s a tisfa ctio n o f r e q u ir e ­
m en ts. M ay be a s s is te d b y lo w e r le v e l tech n icia n s.
P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one or a
com bin ation o f such ty p ica l duties a s:
D esig n s, d e v elop s and co n stru cts m a jo r units, d e v ic e s or equipm ent; conducts tests
o r e x p e rim e n ts ; an alyzes r e s u lts and re d e sig n s or m o d ifie s equipm ent to im p ro v e p e r ­
fo r m a n c e ; r e p o r ts re su lts .
P lan s or a s s is ts in planning te sts to evaluate equipm ent p e r fo r m a n c e . D eterm in es
test re q u ire m e n ts , equipm ent m o d ifica tio n and test p r o c e d u r e s ; con ducts te sts, an alyzes
and evalu ates data and p r e p a r e s r e p o r ts on findings and re co m m e n d a tio n s.
R eview s and an a lyzes a v a r ie ty o f en gin eerin g data to d eterm in e re q u ire m e n ts to
m eet en gin eerin g o b je c t iv e s ; m a y ca lcu la te d esig n data; p r e p a r e s la you ts, d eta iled s p e c ­
ifica tio n s , p a rts lis t s , e stim a te s , p r o c e d u r e s , etc. M ay ch eck and analyze draw ings
o r equipm ent to d eterm in e adequ acy o f draw ings and d esign .
D R AFTSM EN
D ra fts m a n -tr a c e r
C op ies plans and draw ings p re p a re d b y oth ers b y p la cin g tra cin g cloth or paper
ov er draw ings and tra cin g with pen or p e n cil.
(D oes not include tra cin g lim ite d to plans
p r im a r ily con sistin g o f straight lin e s and a la rg e sc a le not re q u irin g c lo s e delin eation .)
and/ or
P r e p a r e s sim p le or re p e titiv e draw ings o f e a s ily v isu a liz e d ite m s.
v is e d during p r o g r e s s .

W ork is c lo s e ly su p e r ­

D raftsm an I
P r e p a r e s d eta il draw ings o f sin gle units or p a rts fo r en g in eerin g , con stru ction ,
m an u factu rin g, or re p a ir p u rp o s e s . T yp es o f draw ings p r e p a r e d include is o m e tr ic p r o je c ­
tions (d ep ictin g th ree d im en sion s in a ccu ra te s ca le ) and s e ctio n a l v iew s to c la r ify p osition in g
o f com pon en ts and co n v e y needed in form a tion . C on solid a tes d eta ils fr o m a num ber o f s o u r c e s
and adju sts or tra n s p o s e s s c a le as r e q u ire d .




61
DRAFTSMEN— Continued
D raftsm an II
P e r fo r m s nonroutine and co m p le x drafting assign m en ts that re q u ir e the a p p lica tion
of m o st of the sta n d a rd ized draw ing tech n iqu es r e g u la r ly u sed. D uties ty p ic a lly in volve such
w ork a s: P re p a re s w ork in g draw ings of s u b a sse m b lie s with ir r e g u la r sh apes, m ultiple
fu n ction s, and p r e c is e p o sitio n a l rela tion sh ip s betw een com p on en ts; p r e p a re s a rch ite ctu ra l
draw ings fo r con stru ctio n of a building including detail draw ings o f foundations, w a ll s e ctio n s ,
flo o r plan s, and r o o f.
U ses a cce p te d fo rm u la s and m anuals in m aking n e c e s s a r y com p u ­
tations to d eterm in e quantities of m a te ria ls to be u sed, load ca p a c itie s, stren gth s, s tr e s s e s ,
etc. R e c e iv e s in itia l in stru ctio n s, r e q u ire m e n ts, and a d v ice fr o m su p e r v iso r .
C om p leted
w ork is ch eck ed fo r te ch n ica l adequacy.
D raftsm an III
P lan s the gra p h ic p re se n ta tio n o f co m p le x item s having d istin ctiv e d esig n fea tu res
that d iffe r sig n ifica n tly fr o m e sta b lish ed drafting p re ce d e n ts.
W orks in c lo s e support with
the d esign o rig in a to r, and m ay re co m m e n d m in or d esig n changes. A n a lyzes the e ffe c t of
each change on the details o f fo r m , function, and p o sitio n a l re la tio n sh ip s o f com ponents
and p a rts. W orks with a m inim um o f s u p e r v is o r y a ssista n c e . C om p leted w ork is re v ie w e d
by d esig n o rig in a to r fo r c o n s is te n c y with p r io r en gin eerin g d eterm in a tion s. M ay either p r e ­
p are d raw ings, or d ir e c t th eir p re p a ra tio n b y low er le v e l d raftsm en .
C L E R IC A L
C LE RK , ACCOUNTING
C lerk , A ccoun ting I
Under su p e rv isio n , p e r fo r m s one or m o r e routine accou ntin g op era tion s such as
posting sim p le jou rn a l v o u ch e rs or accou n ts payable v o u ch e rs , en terin g v o u ch e rs in vou ch er
r e g is t e r s ; r e c o n c ilin g bank a ccou n ts; and postin g su b sid ia r y le d g e r s c o n tro lle d b y gen era l
le d g e r s , or postin g sim p le c o s t accou ntin g data. T his jo b d oes not r e q u ire a know ledge of
accou ntin g and bookkeepin g p r in c ip le s , but is found in o ffic e s in w hich the m o re routine a c ­
counting w ork is subdivided on a functional b a sis am ong s e v e r a l w o r k e r s .
C lerk , A ccoun ting II
Under g en e ra l d ir e c tio n of a book k eep er or accountant, has r e s p o n s ib ility fo r keeping
one or m o re sectio n s o f a com p lete aet o f book s or r e c o r d s rela tin g to one phase o f an
esta b lish m en t’ s b u sin e ss tra n sa ctio n s . W ork in v olv es p osting and balan cin g su b sid ia r y le d g e r
or le d g e rs such as accou n ts r e c e iv a b le or accou nts payable; exam ining and coding in v o ice s
or v ou ch ers with p r o p e r accou ntin g d istrib u tion ; re q u ire s judgm ent and e x p e rie n ce in m aking
p ro p e r a ssign ation s and a llo ca tio n s . M ay a s s is t in p re p a rin g , adjusting, and clo sin g jou rn a l
e n trie s; m ay d ir e c t accou ntin g c le r k s I.
C LE RK , F IL E
C lerk , F ile I
P e r fo r m s routine filin g of m a te ria l that has a lre a d y been c la s s ifie d o r w h ich is
e a s ily c la s s ifie d in a sim p le s e r ia l c la s s ific a tio n sy ste m (e .g ., alp h abetical, ch r o n o lo g ic a l,
or n u m erica l). A s req u ested , lo c a te s re a d ily a vailable m a te ria l in file s and fo rw a rd s m a ­
te r ia l; m ay fill out w ithdraw al ch a rge. P e r fo r m s sim p le c le r ic a l and manual tasks re q u ire d
to m aintain and s e r v ic e file s .
C lerk , F ile II
S o rts, c o d e s , and file s u n c la s s ifie d m a te ria l b y sim p le (su b je ct m atter) headings
or p a rtly c la s s ifie d m a te r ia l b y fin e r subheadings. P r e p a r e s sim p le rela ted in dex and
c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e aid s. A s req u ested , lo c a te s c le a r ly id en tified m a te ria l in file s and fo rw a rd s
m a teria l. M ay p e r fo r m re la te d c le r ic a l tasks r e q u ire d to m aintain and s e r v ic e file s .




62

CLE RK , F IL E — Continued
C lerk , F ile III
In an esta b lish e d filin g sy ste m containing a num ber of v a r ie d su b je ct m atter file s ,
c la s s ifie s and in d exes file m a te ria l such as c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , r e p o r ts , te ch n ica l docu m en ts,
etc. M ay a ls o file this m a te ria l. M ay k eep r e c o r d s of v a rio u s types in con ju n ction with
the file s .
M ay lea d a sm a ll group o f lo w e r le v e l file c le r k s .
KEYPU NCH O P E R A T O R
K eypunch O p era tor I
Under c lo s e s u p e rv isio n or fo llo w in g s p e c ific p r o c e d u r e s o r in stru ctio n s, tr a n s c r ib e s
data fr o m s o u rce docum ents to punched ca rd s . O p erates a n u m e rica l a n d /o r a lph abetical or
com bin ation keypunch m achine to keypunch tabulating ca r d s . M ay v e r ify c a rd s. W orking
fr o m v a riou s stan d ard ized s o u r c e docu m en ts, fo llo w s sp e c ifie d seq u en ces w hich have b een
cod ed or p r e s c r ib e d in detail and r e q u ire little or no s e le ctin g , cod in g , o r in terp retin g o f
data to be punched. P r o b le m s a ris in g fr o m e rro n e o u s item s or c o d e s , m issin g in form a tion ,
e tc ., a re r e fe r r e d to s u p e r v is o r .
Keypunch O p era tor II
O p erates a n u m e rica l a n d /o r alp h a b etica l or com b in a tion keypunch m achine to tra n ­
s c r ib e data fr o m v a rio u s so u r c e docu m en ts to keypunch tabulating ca r d s. P e r fo r m s sam e
tasks as lo w e r le v e l keypunch o p e ra to r but in addition, w o rk r e q u ir e s a p p lica tion o f coding
sk ills and the m aking of som e d eterm in a tion s, fo r exa m p le, lo c a te s on the s o u r c e docum ent
the item s to be punched; e x tra cts in form a tion fr o m se v e r a l d ocu m en ts; se a r c h e s fo r and
in terp rets in form a tion on the docum ent to d eterm in e in form a tion to be punched. M ay tra in
in ex p erien ced o p e r a to r s .
O F F IC E BOY OR GIRL
P e r fo r m s v a rio u s routine duties such as running e r ra n d s; operating m in or o ffic e
m a ch in es, such as s e a le r s or m a ile r s ; opening and distribu tin g m a il; and other m in or
c le r ic a l w ork .
STEN O GRAPH ER, G E N ERAL
P r im a r y duty is to take and tr a n s c r ib e d icta tion fr o m one or m o r e p e r so n s either
in shorthand or by Stenotype or s im ila r m ach in e, involvin g a n o rm a l routine v o ca b u la ry .
M ay a ls o type fr o m w ritten copy. M ay m aintain file s , keep sim p le r e c o r d s or p e r fo r m other
re la tiv e ly routine c le r ic a l ta sk s. M ay op era te fr o m a sten og ra p h ic p o o l. D oes not include
tra n scrib in g -m a ch in e w ork .
STENO GRAPH ER, SENIOR
P r im a r y duty is to
in shorthand or b y Stenotype
v oca b u la ry such as in le g a l
w ritten cop y. M ay a ls o set

take and tr a n s c r ib e d icta tion fr o m one or m o r e p e rso n s either
or s im ila r m a ch in e, in volvin g a v a r ie d te ch n ica l or s p e c ia liz e d
b r ie fs or r e p o r ts on s c ie n tific r e s e a r c h . M ay a lso type fr o m
up and m aintain file s , keep r e c o r d s , etc.
OR

P e r fo r m s sten og ra p h ic duties re q u irin g sig n ifica n tly g re a te r independence and r e ­
sp on sib ility than sten og ra p h er, g en era l as ev id en ced b y the fo llo w in g : W ork r e q u ir e s high
d eg ree o f sten og ra p h ic speed and a c c u r a c y ; a thorough w ork in g know ledge o f gen era l b u sin ess
and o ffic e p ro ce d u r e and o f the s p e c ific b u sin e ss o p e ra tio n s, org a n iza tion , p o lic ie s , p r o ­
ce d u re s, file s , w o rk flo w , etc.
U ses this know ledge in p e r fo r m in g sten ogra p h ic duties and
re sp o n sib le c le r ic a l tasks such as m aintaining follow u p file s ; a sse m b lin g m a te ria l fo r
re p o r ts , m em oran d u m s, and le tte r s ; co m p o sin g sim p le le tte r s fr o m g en era l in stru ctio n s;
readin g and routing in com in g m a il; an sw ering routine qu estion s, etc. D oes not include
tra n scrib in g -m a ch in e w ork .
N O TE: T his jo b is distin gu ish ed fr o m that o f a s e c r e t a r y in that the s e c r e ta r y
n o rm a lly w o rk s in a con fid en tial rela tion sh ip to on ly one m an ager o r execu tiv e and p e r fo r m s
m o re re s p o n s ib le and d is c r e tio n a r y tasks as d e s c r ib e d in that jo b definition .




63

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Sw itchboard O perator I
O perates a sin gle- or m ultiple-position telephone sw itchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office c a lls. May handle routine long distan ce c a lls and re co rd to lls.
May p e rfo rm lim ited telephone inform ation se rv ice . ("L im ited " telephone inform ation s e r v ­
ice o ccu rs if the functions of the estab lish m en t serv ice d a re re ad ily understandable for
telephone inform ation p u rp o se s, or if the re q u ests a re routine, e .g ., giving extension num bers
when sp ecific nam es a re furnished, or if com plex c a lls a re r e fe rre d to another operator.)
Sw itchboard O perator II
O perates a sin gle- or m ultiple-position telephone sw itchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office c a lls. P e rfo rm s full telephone inform ation se rv ic e or handles
com plex c a lls , such a s conference, collect, o v e rse a s, or sim ila r c a lls, either in addition
to doing routine work a s d escrib e d fo r sw itchboard operator I, or a s a fu ll-tim e a s s ig n ­
m ent. ("F u ll" telephone inform ation se r v ic e o ccu rs when the estab lish m en t has varied
functions that a re not re ad ily understandable for telephone inform ation p u rp o se s, e .g ., because
of overlapping or in terre late d functions, and consequently p rese n t frequent prob lem s a s to
which extensions a re appropriate for c a lls.)
TABULATING-M ACHINE OPERATOR
Tabulating-M achine O perator I
O perates sim ple tabulating or e le c tric a l accounting m achin es, such a s the so rte r,
reproducing punch, co llator, etc., with sp ecific in struction s. May include the perform an ce
of som e sim ple w iring from d ia g ram s and som e filing work. The work typically involves
portions of a work unit, for exam ple, individual sortin g or collating runs, or repetitive
operations.
Tabulating-M achine O perator II
O perates m ore difficult tabulating or e le c tric a l accounting m achin es, such a s the
tabulator and calcu lato r, in addition to the so rte r, repro d u cer, and co llator. This work is
p erform ed under sp ecific in struction s and m ay include the perform an ce of som e w iring from
d ia g ram s. The work typically involves, for exam ple, tabulations involving a repetitive a c ­
counting e x e r c ise , a com plete but sm a ll tabulating study, or p a rts of a longer and m ore
com plex repo rt. Such re p o rts and stud ies a re u su ally of a re cu rrin g nature where the p ro ­
cedures a re w ell estab lish ed . May a lso include the training of new em ployees in the b a sic
operation of the m achine.
Tabulating-M achine O perator III
O perates a v arie ty of tabulating or e le c tric a l accounting m achin es, typically in ­
cluding such m achines a s the tabulator, calcu lator, in terp re te r, co llator, and oth ers. P e r ­
fo rm s com plete reporting assig n m en ts without close su pervision , and p e rfo rm s difficult
w iring a s requ ired . The com plete reporting and tabulating assig n m en ts ty pically involve a
v ariety of long and com plex re p o rts which often a re of irre g u la r or nonrecurrin g type r e ­
quiring som e planning and sequencing of step s to be taken. As a m ore experien ced operator,
is typically involved in train ing new o p e rato rs in m achine operation s, or p a rtia lly train ed
op e rato rs in w iring from d ia g ram s and operating sequences of long and com plex re p o rts.
Does not include w orking su p e rv iso rs perform in g tabulating-m achine operations and day-today su p erv isio n of the work and production of a group of tabulating-m achine o p e rato rs.




64

TYPIST
U ses a typew riter to m ake copies of vario u s m a te ria ls or to m ake out b ills after
calculation s have been m ade by another p erson . May include typing of ste n c ils, m ats, or
sim ila r m a te ria ls for use in duplicating p r o c e s se s . May do c le ric a l work involving little
sp e c ia l training, such as keeping sim ple r e c o rd s, filing re c o rd s and re p o rts, or sorting
and distributing incom ing m ail.
T ypist I
P e rfo rm s one or m ore of the follow ing: Copy typing from rough or clear d ra fts;
routine typing of fo rm s, insurance p o lic ie s, e tc.; setting up sim ple standard tabulations,
or copying m ore com plex tab les alre ad y set up and spaced properly .
T ypist II
P e rfo rm s one or m ore of the follow ing: Typing m a te ria l in final form when it in­
volves combining m a te ria l from se v e ra l so u rc es or re sp o n sib ility for co rre c t spelling, s y l­
labication, punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual w ords or foreign language m ate rial;
planning layout and typing of com plicated sta tistic a l tab les to m aintain uniform ity and balance
in spacin g. May type routine form le tte rs, varying d etails to suit circu m stan ces.
N O TE: The definitions for the drafting and c le ric a l occupations shown in this bu l­
letin a re the sam e a s those used in the B u rea u 's p ro g ram of occupational wage su rvey s in
m etropolitan a r e a s . (See the lis t of a r e a s in the order form at the back of this bulletin.)
The lev el designations used in this bulletin, however, differ from those used in the a re a
bulletins. The equivalent level designations for the occupations concerned are a s follow s:

Occupation

National Survey of
P ro fe ssio n a l, Administra tiv e , T echnical, and
C le ric a l P ay

Occupational
Wage Surveys in
M etropolitan
A reas

c

D raftsm an ________________

I
II
III

B
A

C lerk, accounting________

I
II

B
A

C lerk, f i l e _______________

I
II
III

C
B
A

Keypunch o p e rato r________

I
II

B
A

Switchboard o p e r a to r------

I
II

B
A

I
II
III

C
B
A

I
II

B
A

T abulating-m achine
o p e r a to r ---------------------

T ypist




Appendix D. Comparison of Average Annual Salaries in Private Industry,
February—March 1965, with Corresponding Salary Rates
in Federal Classification Act General Schedule
The survey was designed, among other u se s, to provide a b a sis for com paring
F e d e ra l s a la r ie s under the C la ssifica tio n Act with gen eral pay lev els in priv ate industry.
In ord er to a ss u r e com pilation of pay data for work lev els that would be equivalent to the
C la ssifica tio n Act g ra d e s, the C ivil S erv ice C om m ission collaborated with the Bureau of
Labor S ta tistic s in the p rep aration of the occupation work level definitions used in the survey.
A ll definitions w ere graded by the C om m ission in accordan ce with the stan dards estab lish ed
for each grade under the C la ssifica tio n Act.
F o r each of the occupation work lev els s u r ­
veyed by the B ureau of Labor S ta tistic s, the equivalent C la ssifica tio n Act grade, a s determ ined
by the C om m ission , is identified in the following table.




65

66
C o m p a r i s o n o f A v e r a g e A n n u a l S a l a r i e s in P r i v a t e I n d u s t r y , 1 F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 9 6 5 , w it h S a la r y
R a t e s in F e d e r a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n A c t G e n e r a l S c h e d u le 2

O c c u p a t io n an d c la s s
su rveyed by B L S 3

C l e r k s , f i l e I -----------O ffic e b o y s o r g ir ls -

C l e r k s , f i l e II — ..................
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I ____
S w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I .
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e
o p e r a t o r s I ----------------------T y p i s t s I ------------------------------

C le r k s , a cco u n tin g I
C l e r k s , f i l e III .
D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s _________
E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s I .
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I I _____
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ----S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s II —
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e
o p e r a t o r s I I ________________
T y p i s t s II______________________

C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g II --------D r a f t s m e n I ---------------------------E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s II •
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ------T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e
o p e r a t o r s I I I -----------------------

A vera ge
annual
s a la r ie s
in p r i v a t e
in d u s t r y 4

S a l a r y r a t e s in F e d e r a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n A c t G e n e r a l S c h e d u le 2
P e r annum r a te s and s t e p s 6

$ 3, 176
3, 4 7 2

3, 5 9 9
3, 947
4 , 140

$ 3, 3 85 $ 3 , 5 0 0 $ 3 , 6 1 5 $ 3 , 7 3 0 $ 3 , 8 4 5 $ 3 , 9 6 0 $ 4 , 0 7 5 $ 4 , 190 $ 4, 3 0 5 $ 4 , 4 2 0

3, 8 0 5

3, 9 3 0

4 , 140

4 , 275

4 , 6 30

4 , 780

5, 000

5 , 165

6, 050

6 , 250

7, 220

7, 465

7, 900

2

3, 6 80

4 , 005

GS

8 , 170

8, 4 4 0

8, 710

8 , 980

8, 6 5 0

8 ,9 4 5

9 , 240

9, 535

4, 0 5 5

4 , 305

4 , 6 80

4 , 8 05

4, 105
3, 6 4 6

4,
4,
4,
4,
4,
4,
4,

2 35
512
345
932
5 90
3 38
774

4 , 545

4 , 6 80

4 , 930

5, 080

5 , 2 30

5 , 3 30

5, 495

6, 450

6, 6 5 0

4 , 950

5 , 2 20

5, 0 5 4
4 , 336

5,
5,
5,
4,

589
424
892
946

GS

4

5, 3 8 0

5, 680

5 , 8 30

5, 660

5, 990

6, 3 2 0

6 ,4 8 5

6, 850

7, 250

7 ,4 5 0

7, 6 5 0

8 , 690

8, 935

9 , 180

9 ,4 2 5

9, 520

9 , 7 90

10 , 060

1 0 ,3 3 0

9 , 8 3 0 1 0 , 125 1 0 , 4 2 0 1 0 , 7 1 5

11,010

1 1 ,3 0 5

6 , 0 97

A c c o u n t a n t s I --------------------------A u d i t o r s I ----------------------------------C h e m i s t s I --------------------------------D r a f t s m e n I I ----------------------------E n g i n e e r s I -------------------------------E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s III .
J o b a n a l y s t s I ---------------------------

6,
7,
6,
6,

875
512
828
636

A c c o u n t a n t s II .
A u d i t o r s I I -------A t t o r n e y s I—
C h e m i s t s I I ------------------------------D r a f t s m e n I I I --------------------------E n g i n e e r s I I -----------------------------E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s I V J o b a n a l y s t s I I -------------------------

7,
7,
7,
7,
8,
8,
7,
7,

044
440
3 68
584
038
292
680
668

A c c o u n t a n t s III ■
A u d i t o r s I I I -----A t t o r n e y s I I -----C h e m i s t s I I I -----E n g i n e e r s I I I --------------------------------E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s V -----J o b a n a l y s t s I I I ----------------------------M a n a g e rs, o ffic e s e r v ic e s I —

8,
8,
8,
8,
9,
8,

1 24
748
940
808
468
676

M an agers,

9, 6 2 4

o f f i c e s e r v i c e s II —

A c c o u n t a n t s IV ------------------A u d i t o r s I V -------------------------A t t o r n e y s I I I ----------------------C h e m i s t s I V ------------------------C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s I ----------D ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I E n g in e e r s IV J o b a n a l y s t s I V ----------------------------M a n a g e r s , o f f i c e s e r v i c e s III —

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




6, 312
6, 204

6 , 61-2

GS

9

7, 9 5 5

8 , 892
7, 752

9 ,7 9 2
10, 7 2 8
10, 5 1 2

10,980
1 0 ,7 4 0
9, 576
11, 376

10,668
11, 4 1 2

G S 11

9 , 250

67
C o m p a r i s o n o f A v e r a g e A n n u a l S a l a r i e s in P r i v a t e I n d u s t r y , 1 F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 9 6 5 ,
R a t e s in F e d e r a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n A c t G e n e r a l S c h e d u l e 2---- C o n t in u e d

O c c u p a t io n and c la s s
su rveyed by B L S 3

A vera ge
annual
s a la r ie s
in p r i v a t e
in d u stry 4

S a l a r y r a t e s in F e d e r a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n A c t G e n e r a l S c h e d u le 2
P e r annum ra te s and step s 6
G ra d e5
1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

$ 1 0 ,2 5 0 $ 1 0 ,6 0 5 $ 1 0 ,9 6 0 $11,315 $ 1 1 ,6 7 0 $ 1 2 ,0 2 5 $ 1 2 ,3 8 0 $ 1 2 ,7 3 5 $ 1 3 ,0 9 0 $ 1 3 ,4 4 5

9 40
644
068
5 88
352
272
824

G S 12

A t t o r n e y s V -------------------------------------------C h e m i s t s V I -----------------------------------------C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s I I I -------------------------D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I I I ---------------E n g i n e e r s V I -----------------------------------------

1 6 ,5 0 0
1 5 ,1 6 8
14, 6 0 4
1 4, 5 2 0
1 5 ,3 3 6

G S 13

1 2 ,0 7 5

1 2 ,4 9 5

1 2 ,9 1 5

1 3 ,3 3 5

1 3 ,7 5 5

1 4 ,1 7 5

1 4 ,5 9 5

1 5 ,0 1 5

1 5 ,4 3 5

1 5 ,8 5 5

A t t o r n e y s V I ----------------------------------------C h e m i s t s V I I ----------------- -----------------------C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s I V -------------------------D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I V ---------------E n g i n e e r s V I I ---------------------------------------

2 0 ,0 4 0
1 7 ,9 2 8
1 7, 0 2 8
1 6 ,9 5 6
18, 0 1 2

G S 14

1 4 ,1 7 0

1 4 ,6 6 0

1 5 ,1 5 0

1 5 ,6 4 0

1 6 ,1 3 0

1 6 ,6 2 0

1 7 ,1 1 0

1 7 ,6 0 0

1 8 ,0 9 0

1 8 ,5 8 0

A t t o r n e y s V I I --------------------------------------C h e m i s t s V I I I --------------------------------------E n g i n e e r s V I I I --------------------------------------

24, 804
22, 212
2 1 , 108

G S 15

1 6 ,4 6 0

1 7 ,0 3 0

1 7 ,6 0 0

1 8 ,1 7 0

1 8 ,7 4 0

1 9 ,3 1 0

1 9 ,8 8 0

2 0 ,4 5 0

2 1 ,0 2 0

2 1 ,5 9 0

A c c o u n t a n t s V -------------------------------------A t t o r n e y s I V ----------------------------------------C h e m i s t s V -------------------------------------------C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s I I ---------------------------D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I I ----------------E n g i n e e r s V -----------------------------------------M a n a g e r s , o f f i c e s e r v i c e s I V --------

$ 11,
13,
13,
12,
11,
13,
13,

w it h S a l a r y

1 F o r s c o p e o f s u r v e y , s e e t a b l e in a p p e n d ix A .
2 S a l a r y r a t e s u n d e r th e F e d e r a l E m p l o y e e s S a l a r y A c t o f 1 9 6 4 , w h ic h b e c a m e e f f e c t i v e o n th e f i r s t d a y o f th e f i r s t p a y
p e r i o d b e g i n n in g o n o r a f t e r J u l y l , 1 96 4, a n d w e r e in e f f e c t in F e b r u a r y —M a r c h 1 9 6 5 , th e r e f e r e n c e d a t e f o r th e B L S s a l a r y s u r v e y .
3 F o r d e f i n i t i o n s , s e e a p p e n d ix C .
4 S u r v e y f i n d i n g s a s s u m m a r i z e d in t a b l e 1 o f t h is r e p o r t .
5 C o r r e s p o n d i n g g r a d e s in t h e G e n e r a l S c h e d u le w e r e s u p p l ie d b y th e U . S. C i v i l S e r v i c e C o m m i s s i o n .
6 T h e F e d e r a l S a l a r y R e f o r m A c t o f 1 9 6 2 p r o v i d e s f o r w i t h i n - g r a d e i n c r e a s e s o n c o n d i t i o n th a t th e e m p l o y e e ’ s " w o r k
is o f a n a c c e p t a b l e l e v e l o f c o m p e t e n c e a s d e f i n e d b y th e h e a d o f th e d e p a r t m e n t . "
F o r e m p l o y e e s w h o m e e t t h is c o n d i t i o n ,
th e s e r v i c e r e q u i r e m e n t s a r e 5 2 c a l e n d a r w e e k s e a c h f o r s a l a r y r a t e s 1, 2, a n d 3 ; 1 0 4 w e e k s e a c h f o r s a l a r y r a t e s 4 , 5 , a n d
6; a n d 1 56 w e e k s e a c h f o r s a l a r y r a t e s 7 , 8 , a n d 9 .
A n a d d i t i o n a l w i t h i n - g r a d e i n c r e a s e m a y b e g r a n t e d w it h in a n y p e r i o d
o f 52 w e e k s in r e c o g n i t i o n o f h ig h q u a l it y p e r f o r m a n c e a b o v e th a t o r d i n a r i l y fo u n d in th e t y p e o f p o s i t i o n c o n c e r n e d .

U n d e r s e c t i o n 5 0 4 o f t h e F e d e r a l S a l a r y R e f o r m A c t o f 1 9 6 2 ( P u b l i c L a w 8 7 - 7 9 3 , P t . II),
h i g h e r m in i m u m r a t e s (b u t n o t e x c e e d i n g th e s e v e n t h s a l a r y r a t e p r e s c r i b e d in th e G e n e r a l S c h e d u le
f o r th e g r a d e o r le v e l ) and a c o r r e s p o n d i n g n e w s a la r y ra n g e m a y b e e s t a b lis h e d f o r p o s it i o n s o r
o c c u p a t io n s u n d e r c e r t a in co n d it io n s .
T h e c o n d i t i o n s i n c l u d e a fi n d i n g t h a t th e s a l a r y r a t e s in p r i v a t e
i n d u s t r y a r e s o s u b s t a n t i a l l y a b o v e t h e s a l a r y r a t e s o f th e s t a t u t o r y p a y s c h e d u l e s a s to h a n d i c a p
s i g n ifi c a n t ly th e G o v e r n m e n t ’ s r e c r u i t m e n t o r r e t e n t io n o f w e ll - q u a l if ie d p e r s o n s .
S u ch s p e c ia l p a y
s c a l e s h a v e b e e n e s t a b lis h e d f o r s p e c i f ic g r a d e s o r le v e ls o f c e r t a in o c c u p a t io n s (in c lu d in g e n g in e e r s
and s c ie n t is t s ).
I n f o r m a t i o n o n th e s p e c i a l h i g h e r p a y s c a l e s c u r r e n t l y in e f f e c t , a n d th e o c c u p a t i o n s
a n d a r e a s to w h ic h t h e y a p p l y , m a y b e o b t a i n e d f r o m t h e U . S. C i v i l S e r v i c e C o m m i s s i o n , W a s h ­
in g t o n , D . C ., 2 0 4 1 5 , o r i t s r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s .







Order Form
TO:
S u p erin ten d en t o f D o c u m e n ts
U . S. G ov e rn m e n t Printing O ffi c e
W ash in g ton , D . C . 2 0 4 0 2

or

Bureau o f Labor Statistics—
18 O liv e r S t ., Boston, M ass. 0 2 1 1 0
341 N inth A v e . , N ew Y o r k , N . Y . 10001
1371 P e a ch tre e S t ., N E ., A tla n ta , G a . 3 0309
1365 O n ta rio S t ., C le v e la n d , O h io 4 4 1 1 4
219 South D ea rb orn S t . , C h ic a g o , 111. 606 0 4
450 G o ld e n G a te A v e . , Box 3 6 0 1 7 ,
San F ra n c is co , C a lif . 9 4 1 0 2

E n closed fin d $_____ in |
|c h e c k or f
1 m o n e y ord e r. M ake ch e ck s or m o n e y orders p a y a b le t o the S u p er­
in ten d en t o f D o c u m e n ts.
(T w e n t y -fi v e p e rce n t d iscou n t fo r b u n d le ord er o f 100 c o p ie s or m o re . )

P lease send m e c o p ie s o f b u lletin s as in d ic a te d .

N um ber
of
c o p ie s

B u lletin 141 7 .

S alary S tructure C h a ra cte ristics in Large Firm s, 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).

Presents fin d in g s o f a d e t a ile d study o f salary structures h a v in g a series o f pay grades w ith e sta b lish ed
salary ranges for w h it e -c o l l a r o c c u p a t io n s . Broad areas c o v e r e d in clu d e g e n e ra l ch a r a c te r is tic s, d esig n
and use o f salary s ch ed u les , provision s fo r re v isin g rates in sch e d u le s, hiring rate p r a c t ic e s , and p r o ­
vision s fo r a d v a n ce m e n t w ith in grad es. P rice 30 cen ts.

1 9 6 3 -6 4 O C C U P A T IO N A L W AGE SU R V EY S U M M A R Y BULLETINS
B u lletin 1385—82 (Part I).

W ages and R e la t e d B en efits, Part I: 80 M e tro p o lita n A reas, 1963^-64 (1 9 6 4 ).

C o n s o lid a te s in fo r m a tio n fr o m the in d iv id u a l area b u lle tin s fo r surveys m a d e during th e p e rio d July 1963
t o July 196 4 .
C on tain s a v era g e w e e k ly earnings for o f f i c e o cc u p a tio n s , a v e ra g e h o u rly earnings for
p la n t o c c u p a t io n s , and esta b lish m en t p ra ctice s and s u p p lem en ta ry w a g e provision s b y industry d iv is io n
and a rea .
P rice $1.

B u lletin 1 3 8 5 -8 2 (Part II). W ag es and R e la t e d B enefits,
and R e g io n a l S u m m a ries. 1 9 6 3 -6 4 (1 9 6 5 ).

Part II:

M e tro p o lita n A rea s, U n ite d States

Presents in fo rm a tio n o n o c c u p a t io n a l earnings, e sta b lish m en t p r a c t ic e s , and su p p le m e n ta ry w a g e p r o ­
v ision s fo r a ll m e tr o p o lita n areas c o m b in e d and sep a ra tely b y industry d iv is io n and r e g io n .
A ls o
p ro v id e s ana lyses o f w a g e d iffe r e n c e s and trends o f o c c u p a t io n a l earnings. P rice 70 ce n ts.




(O v e r)

1 9 6 4 -6 5 O C C U P A T IO N A L

,, AGE SURVEY BULLETINS: *

A rea and p a y ro ll p e rio d

BLS
P rice
b u lle tin
(in
nu m ber cen ts)

N um ber
of
co p ie s

A re a and p a y ro ll p e r io d

1 4 3 0 -2 9
1 4 3 0 -5 8

25
25

1 4 3 0 -3 9

30

1 4 3 0 -6 8

20

1 4 3 0 -4 5
1 4 3 0 -3 4
1 4 3 0 -5 3
1 4 3 0 -8 0

25
25
30
40

1 4 3 0 -7 7
1 4 3 0 -5
1 4 3 0 -1 7

25
25
25

1 4 3 0 -7 1
1 4 3 0 -2 8
1 4 3 0 -5 6
1 4 3 0 -4 1

25
35
20
3u

Portland (M a in e ) (N o v . 196 4 ) Portland ( O r e g .) (M a y 1 9 6 5 )----P ro v id e n ce —P aw tuck et
(M a y 1 9 6 5 ) -------------------------------R a le ig h (S e p t. 1 9 6 4 ) ---------------R ic h m o n d (N o v . 1 9 6 4 )----- -------R o c k fo r d (M a y 1 9 6 5 ) ----- ---------St. Louis (O c t . 1 9 6 4 )------- -S alt Lake C ity ( D e c . 1 9 6 4 ) - -----

1 4 3 0 -2 1
1 4 3 0 -7 0

25
25

1 4 3 0 -6 7
1 4 3 0 -6
1 4 3 0 -1 9
1 4 3 0 -6 3
1 4 3 0 -2 2
1 4 3 0 -3 3

30
20
25
20
30
25

San A n to n io (June 1 9 6 5 ) --------San B e rn a rd in o -R iv e rs id e —
O n ta rio (S e p t. 1 9 6 4 ) --------- -San D ie g o (S e p t. 1 9 6 4 ) -----------San F rancis c o -O a k la n d
(Jan. 1965) --------------------- — —
Savannah (May 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------S cra n ton (A u g . 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------S e a ttle (S e p t. 1 9 6 4 ) -----------------S iou x F alls (O c t . 1964) - ---------

1 4 3 0 -8 1

25

1 4 3 0 -8
1 4 3 0 -1 2

20
25

1 4 3 0 -3 7
1 4 3 0 -6 4
1 4 6 5 -3
1 4 3 0 -9
1 4 3 0 -1 5

25
20
25
25
20

South Bend (M a r. 1 96 5 ) --------S pok an e (June 1 9 6 5 ) ----------------T o l e d o (F e b . 1965) -----------------T re n to n (D e c . 1 9 6 4 ) ---------------W ash in gton (O c t. 196 4 ) -----------W aterb u ry (M a r. 1 9 6 5 ) ----------W a te rlo o (N o v . 1 9 6 4 ) ------------W ic h ita (S e p t. 1 9 6 4 ) ---------------W o rce s te r (June 1 9 6 5 ) ----- -------Y o rk (F e b . 1965) — .................. ..

1 4 3 0 -5 4
1 4 3 0 -7 9
1 4 3 0 -5 0
1 4 3 0 -3 5
1 4 3 0 -1 4
1 4 3 0 -4 9
1 4 3 0 -2 3
1 4 3 0 -1 1
1 4 3 0 -7 6
1 4 3 0 -4 6

20
25
25
25
30
20
25
25
25
20

A k ron (June 1 9 6 5 )-------------------A lb a n y — ch e n e c ta d y — roy
S
T
(A p r. 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------------------A lb u q u erq u e (A p r. 1 9 6 5 ) ------A lle n to w n — eth leh em —
B
Easton
(F eb . 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------------------A tla n ta (M a y 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------B a ltim ore (N o v . 1 9 6 4 )----------B eau m on t—Port Arthur
(M a y 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------------------B irm in gham (A p r. 1 9 6 5 ) -------

1 4 3 0 -7 8

25

M ia m i ( D e c . 1 9 6 4 )--------- - - - - M ilw a u k e e (A p r. 1 9 6 5 )-------------

1 4 3 0 -5 2
1 4 3 0 -6 2

25
20

1 4 3 0 -4 8
1 4 3 0 -7 4
1 4 3 0 -2 7

20
25
30

1 4 3 0 -6 6
1 4 3 0 -6 0

20
25

M in n e a p o lis —
St. Paul
(Jan. 1 9 6 5 )------------------------------ -M uskegon-JM uskegon H eigh ts
(M a y 1 9 6 5 )-------------------------------N ew ark and Jersey C it y
(F e b . 1 9 6 5 ) --------------- — ............
N ew H a v e n (Jan. 1 9 6 5 ) ----------N ew O rleans (F e b . 1 9 6 5 )----- N ew Y o rk (A p r. 1 9 6 5 )----------------

B oise C it y (July 1 9 6 5 ) ----------Boston (O c t . 1 9 6 4 ) -----------------B u ffa lo ( D e c . 1 9 6 4 ) ---------------B urlington (M a r. 1 9 6 5 ) --------C a n ton (A p r. 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------C h a rleston (A p r. 1 9 6 5 ) --------C h a rlotte (A p r. 1 9 6 5 ) ------------C h a tta n oog a (S ep t. 1 9 6 4 ) ----C h ic a g o (A p r. 1 9 6 5 ) -------------

1 4 6 5 -1
1 4 3 0 -1 6
1 4 3 0 -3 6
1 4 3 0 -5 1
1 4 3 0 -5 9
1 4 3 0 -6 5
1 4 3 0 -6 1
1 4 3 0 -1 0
1 4 3 0 -7 2

20
30
30
25
20
20
25
25
30

N o rfo lk —Portsm outh and
N ew p ort N ews— a m p to n
H
(June 1 9 6 5 )-------------------------------O k la h o m a C it y (A u g . 1 9 6 4 )------O m aha (O c t . 1 9 6 4 ) -------------------P a te r s o n -C lifto n — assaic
P
(M a y 1 9 6 5 )............. ...................
P h ila d e lp h ia (N o v . 1 9 6 4 ) --------P h oen ix (M a r. 1 9 6 5 )-----------------Pittsburgh (Jan. 1 9 6 5 )------------------

C in c in n a ti (M a r. 1 9 6 5 ) --------C le v e la n d (S e p t. 1 9 6 4 ) --------C o lu m b u s (O c t . 1 9 6 4 ) ----------D a lla s (N o v . 1 9 6 4 )-----------------D a v e n p o r t -R o c k Island— o lin e
M

1 4 3 0 -5 5
1 4 3 0 -1 3
1 4 3 0 -1 8
1 4 3 0 -2 5

25
30
30
30

(O c t. 1 9 6 4 ) ---------------------------D a y ton (Jan. 1 9 6 5 )-----------------D e n ver (D e c . 1 9 6 4 ) ----------------

1 4 3 0 -2 0
1 4 3 0 -3 1
1 4 3 0 -3 2

25
25
25

Des M oin es (F eb . 1 9 6 5 ) ------D e tro it (Jan. 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------Fort W orth (N o v . 1 9 6 4 ) ------G re en Bay (A u g . 1 9 6 4 ) --------G r e e n v ille (M a y 1 9 6 5 ) --------H ouston (June 1 9 6 5 ) --------------In d ia n a p olis ( D e c . 1 9 6 4 ) ----Jackson (F e b . 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------

1 4 3 0 -4 7
1 4 3 0 -4 3
1 4 3 0 -2 4
1 4 3 0 -3
1 4 3 0 -6 9
1 4 3 0 -8 2
1 4 3 0 -3 0
1 4 3 0 -4 4

20
30
30
25
20
25
25
20

J a c k so n v ille (Jan. 1 9 6 5 ) ------Kansas C it y (N o v . 1 9 6 4 )------L a w re n ce -H a v e rh ill
(June 1 9 6 5 ) ---------------------------L ittle R o c k — orth L ittle R o c k
N
(A u g . 1 9 6 4 ) -------------------------Los A n g e le s —
Long B each
(M a r. 1965) - .................. .........
L o u is v ille (F eb . 1 9 6 5 ) ----------L u b b ock (June 1965) ------------M a n ch ester (A u g . 1 9 6 5 ) ------M em p h is (Jan. 1 9 6 5 ) -------------

1 4 3 0 -3 8
1 4 3 0 -2 6

25
25

1 4 3 0 -7 5

20

1 4 3 0 -7

25

1 4 3 0 -5 7
1 4 3 0 -4 2
1 4 3 0 -7 3
1 4 6 5 -2
1 4 3 0 -4 0

30
25
20
20
25

*

BLS
P rice N um ber
b u lle tin
(in
of
nu m ber ce n ts ) c o p ie s

B ulletins d a te d July 1965 or la ter w ill b e e n title d 'A re a W a g e Surveys. "

N a m e _________________________________________________________________________
A ddress
C it y _______________________________________ S tate ______________________ Z ip C o d e




☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1965 O

791-771




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102