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National Survey of
Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay




W inter 1960-61

Bulletin N o.

131C

UNITED STA TES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Arthur J. Goldberg, Secretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
Ew an C la g u e , C o m m issio n e r

National Survey of
Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay
Winter 1960-61

Accountants and Auditors
Attorneys
Engineers and Scientists
Personnel Management
Clerical Supervisory
Draftsmen
Office Clerical

Bulletin N o .

1310

October 1961

UNITED STA TES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Arthur J. Goldberg, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, W ashington 25, D.C. - Price 40 cents







Preface

The Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in this bulletin the results of
the second in a series of annual nationwide surveys of compensation for selected
professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in private indus­
try.
The data, which relate to representative establishments in a broad spectrum
of American industry in urban areas, were obtained by personal visits of Bureau
field economists.
For the most part, the data reflect salaries in effect during
the period January-June 1961.

The second survey incorporated some revisions in design developed by
the Bureau of Labor Statistics in conjunction with the Bureau of the Budget and
the Civil Service Commission.
The surveys provide a fund of broadly based
information on salary levels and distributions in private employment— that is,
on the rates of compensation in the dominant sector of the labor market.
As
such, the results are useful for wide, general economic analysis.
In addition,
they provide more information than has hitherto been available on pay in private
industry in a form suitable for use in appraising the compensation of salaried
employees in the Federal civil service. It should be emphasized that these sur­
veys, like any other salary surveys, are in no sense calculated to supply mechani­
cal answers to questions of pay policy.

The list of occupations studied represents a wide range of pay levels.
Individually, the occupations selected were judged to be (a) surveyable in indus­
try within the framework of a broad survey design, and (b) representative of
occupational groups which are numerically important in industry as well as in
the Federal service.

Occupational definitions prepared for use in the collection of the salary
data reflect duties and responsibilities in industry; however, they are designed to
be translatable to specific pay grades in the general schedule applying to Federal
Classification Act employees.
This necessitated limiting some occupations and
work levels to employees with specific job functions that could be classified uni­
formly among establishments. For office clerical and drafting occupations, se ­
lected from among those included in the Bureau’ s program of locality occupa­
tional wage surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics job definitions were used.
Definitions for all other occupations studied were prepared by the Civil Service
Commission staff.
(See appendix C. )

In addition to the collection of salary data for all occupations studied,
information was obtained to permit comparison of supplementary cash bonus pay­
ments in the most recent period with those paid in the 1959—
60 period to em ­
ployees in professional and administrative occupations.
Information on supple­
mentary benefits such as paid vacations and paid holidays, and health, insurance,
and pension plans is not included in this report.
This type of information r e ­
lating to office employees has been incorporated in the BLS bulletins issued
separately for each area in which occupational wage surveys were conducted
during the year ending June 30, 1961.
The areas for which separate reports
were issued are listed in the order form at the back of this bulletin.




i i i

As a result of experience in the first survey, conducted during the
winter of 1959—
60, a number of substitutions and improvements were made in the
list of professional and administrative occupations defined for survey, as well as
in the definitions used in classifying employees and changes in other aspects of
the survey design.
(See appendix B. ) No changes were made in the definitions
for the technical and clerical occupations.
For this reason, the information on
changes in salary levels during the year is based largely upon changes for these
latter classes of occupations.

The survey could not have been accomplished without the wholehearted
cooperation of the many firm s whose salary scales provide the basis for the
statistical data presented in this bulletin.
The Bureau, on its own behalf and
on behalf of the other Federal agencies that collaborated in planning the survey,
wishes to express sincere thanks for the splendid cooperation it has received
in this difficult undertaking.

This bulletin was prepared in the Bureau1s Division of Wages and In­
dustrial Relations under the general supervision of Toivo P. Kanninen. Samuel E.
Cohen devised the sampling procedures and supervised the selection of the sample,
assisted by Theodore J. Golonka, who was responsible for- the preparation of the
estimates.
The analysis was prepared by Louis E. Badenhoop, assisted by
Harry F. Zeman.
Field work for the survey was directed by the Bureau1s
Assistant Regional Directors for Wages and Industrial Relations.




IV

Contents
Page
1
CM 00 00 O '

Introduction________________________________________________________________________
Average salaries _________________________
Average weekly hours ____________________
Salary distributions ______________________
Changes in salary levels during the year
Supplementary cash bonuses ______________________________________________________

11

Tables:
1.
2.
3.

4.

5.

Employment and average salaries for selected professional,
administrative, technical, and clerical occupations
in private industry ______________________________________________________
Distribution of 68 selected job categories studied
by employees1 average weekly hours __________________________________
Percent distribution of employees in selected professional
and administrative occupations by average
monthly salaries ________________________________________________________
Percent distribution of employees in selected technical
and clerical occupations by average weekly s a la r ie s ______ __________
Percent distribution of establishments with supplementary
cash bonus plans applying to professional and
administrative occupations studied by comparison
between bonuses paid in 1959— and 1960—
60
61
survey periods __________________________________________________________

12
14
15
20

23

Charts:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Salaries in professional occupations ________________________
Salaries in administrative, technical, and clerical
occupations ______________________________________________________________
Percent of chemists and engineers in each work
level surveyed __________________________________________________________
Ranges and salaries for selected professional and
clerical occupations ____________________________________________________

3
4
6
10

Appendixes:
A.
B.
C.

Scope and method of survey ____________________________________________
Survey changes in 1960—
61 ______________________________________________
Occupational definitions __________________________________________________




v

25
29
31




National Survey of Professional, Administrative, Technical,
and Clerical Pay, Winter 1 9 6 0 —61
Introduction
The results of the second annual survey of professional, administrative,
technical, and clerical pay are presented in the accompanying tables and charts. 1
Nationwide estimates of salary levels are shown for 68 occupation work level
categories surveyed in the following industries: Manufacturing; transportation,
communication, electric, gas, and sanitary services; wholesale and retail trade;
finance, insurance, and real estate; engineering and architectural services; and
research, development and testing laboratories. 2 The data relate to establish­
ments employing 250 or more workers, located in metropolitan areas.
To meet the primary objective of the survey, it was necessary to estab­
lish definitions for the professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occu­
pations selected for study that would permit classification of employees included
in each occupation according to appropriate work levels (or classes).
Within
each occupation, the work levels surveyed, usually designated by Roman numerals
with class I assigned to the lowest level, are defined in terms of duties and
responsibilities.
Specific job factors determining classification, however, varied
from occupation to occupation.
^
The number of work levels defined for survey in each occupation ranges
from one for office boys or girls to eight for chemists and engineers.
More than
one level of work was defined for survey in m ost of the occupations; however,
some occupations were purposely defined to cover a specific band of work levels
and were not intended to represent all levels or all workers that may be found
in those occupations.
The selected occupations as defined for the study accounted for nearly
900, 000 employees or about 8 percent of the estimated total employment in estab­
lishments within scope of the survey.
Employment in the occupations surveyed
varied widely, reflecting actual differences in employment in the various occupa­
tions as well as differences in the range of duties and responsibilities covered
by each occupational definition. The 8 levels of engineers accounted for nearly
three-fourths of the 333, 000 employees in the professional and administrative
occupations as defined for study. Three occupations (accounting clerks, stenog­
raphers, and typists) included almost three-fifths of the 49 3, 000 employees in
the clerical occupations.
The drafting-room occupations studied had aggregate
employment of 59, 000.
Women accounted for 84 percent of total employment in the clerical oc­
cupations studied, compared with 1 percent in the professional and administra­
tive occupations and 3 percent in drafting-room occupations. More than 95 percent
of the bookkeeping-machine operators, file clerks, keypunch operators, stenog­
raphers, switchboard operators, and typists were women. Among the professional
and administrative occupations, the relatively few women employees were largely
reported in the first few work levels.

1 For the m ost part, the data reflect salaries in effect during the period
January-June 1961. Results of the first survey are presented in National Survey
of Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical Pay. Winter 1959—
60.
BLS Bull. 1286 (I960).
2 For a detailed description of the scope and method of survey, see ap­
pendix A.




2

The time unit in which salary rates were expressed varied among and
within establishments. Although monthly rates were widely reported in the pro­
fessional and administrative occupations, annual rates were not uncommon, par­
ticularly in the higher-salaried positions. Clerical pay rates were commonly on
a weekly basis with other time units found in use in many establishments.
Monthly and annual salaries for all occupations studied are presented in
table 1.
Whereas distributions of employees in professional and administrative
occupations are presented in terms of monthly salaries, technical considerations
dictated the summarization of employee distributions by weekly salaries in the
case of technical and clerical occupations.
The general level of salaries for each occupation or work level is p re­
sented in this study as the arithmetic mean of all of the individual salary rates.
Median salaries, the amount below and above which the salaries for 50 percent
of the employees are found, are also presented in table 1.
Charts 1 and 2 show the salary relationships among work levels in each
occupation, as well as the relative position of the levels studied in each occupa­
tion within the full range of occupations covered in the survey.
Average Salaries
Average (mean) monthly salaries among the 68 occupation work level
categories ranged from $252 for file clerks I to $1, 726 for attorneys V— a level
representing heads of legal staffs with responsibility for making studies and re c ­
ommendations on important technical legal questions, usually reporting to a gen­
eral counsel of the company or his immediate deputy. 3 Within this broad 'range
of defined work levels, monthly salaries averaged less than $500 in 23 levels,
$500 and under $ 1 ,0 0 0 in 32 levels, and $ 1 ,0 0 0 or more in 13 levels.
The
position of the various work levels within these broad monthly salary ranges illu s­
trates the general relationship among levels surveyed.
Under $500 monthly
(Under $6, 000 annually)

$500 and under $1, 000 monthly
($ 6 , 000 and under $12, 000 annually)

A ll clerical levels; tracers and
junior draftsmen; level I of
accountants, auditors, chemists,
and job analysts
Senior draftsmen; attorneys I
through IHA; engineers I
through V; levels II through V
of accountants and chemists;
levels II and above of auditors
and job analysts; levels I and II
of directors of personnel;
managers of office services I
through III; chief accounts I
through III

$1, 000 and under $1, 500 monthly
($1 2, 000 and under $18, 000 annually)

Level IV of chief accountants and
managers of office services;
directors of personnel III and IV;
levels VI and VII of chemists and
engineers; attorneys IV, and IVA

$1, 500 and over monthly
($18, 000 and over annually)

Level VIII of chemists and en­
gineers; attorneys V

3
Classification of employees in the occupations and work levels surveyed
was based on factors detailed in the definitions in appendix C.




3

Chart 1 SALARIES IN PROFESSIONAL OCCUPATIONS, WINTER 1960-61
.

AVERAGE MONTHLY SALARIES

500

Accountants

750

1,000

1,250

~T“

250

OCCUPATION AND CLASS

~r

12,000

15,000

1,500

1,750 $2,000

18,000

21,000 $24,000

I

IL
12
2
Auditors

I

IE

EL
32
Chief Accountants

I

31
3E
12
Attorneys

I

31
mA

32
32A

2
Chemists

32

2
2T
YK
YIK
Engineers

I
31
3E
32

13

2T
YJT
YJK
3,000

6,000

9,000

AVERAGE ANNUAL SALARIES
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




4

C h a rt 2. S A L A R IE S IN A D M IN IS T R A T IV E , T E C H N IC A L , A N D
C L E R IC A L O C C U P A T IO N S , W IN T E R 1960-61
A VERAG E MONTHLY SALARIES
OCCUPATION A N D CLASS

250

500

750

1,000

1,250

1,500

1,750 $2,000

3,000

6,000

9,000

12,000

15,000

18,000

21,000 $24,000

Job A n a ly sts

nr
IV
D ire cto rs of Personnel I

n

nr
IV
M a n a g e rs , O ffic e
Se rv ic e s

I

n
m
iv

Draftsm en, Ju n io r
S e n io r
Tracers
B o o k k e e p in g -M a c h in e I
O p e ra to rs
]j
Clerks, A c c o u n tin g

Clerks, File

K e yp u n ch O p e r a to rs
O ffic e B oys o r G irls
Ste n o g ra p h e rs, G e n e ra l
Technical
Sw itc h b o a rd O p e ra to rs
Sp e cial
T a b u la tin g-M a c h in e
O p e ra to rs

I
n

in
Typists

AVERAGE A N N U A L SALARIES
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




5

Average^ monthly salaries for the five levels of accountants surveyed
ranged from $478 for accountants I to $879 for accountants V.
Among auditors,
average monthly salaries ranged from $433 for auditors I to $790 for auditors IV,
the highest level surveyed in that series. Level I of both accountants and auditors
included trainees with bachelor1s degrees in accounting or the equivalent in educa­
tion and experience combined. More than half the relatively few auditors I and
about a fourth of those in the higher levels were employed in finance industries,
whereas more than four-fifths of the accountants at all levels were employed in
manufacturing and public utilities industries. 4 At level III, which was the largest
group of employees in each of these three series, monthly salaries averaged $600
for accountants and $644 for auditors.
Chief accountants were surveyed separately from accountants, and only
those were included who met quite specific requirements as to the scope and com ­
plexity of the accounting program and as to the subordinate staff they directed.
Those with professional duties and responsibilities as described for level I were
paid monthly salaries averaging $797 and those meeting the much higher require­
ments described for level I V 5 averaged $ 1 ,2 5 1 . Chief accountants who met the
requirements of the definitions for these four levels were largely employed in
manufacturing industries.
Attorneys classified at level I averaiged $531 a month.
These were
trainees with LL. B. degrees and bar membership employed in legal advisory
departments of firm s in which their full professional training could be utilized.
At the highest among seven levels of attorneys surveyed (designated level V as
the series included levels designated IILA and IVA), monthly salaries averaged
$1, 726. Attorneys at that level included those in charge of legal staffs handling
assignments in one or more broad legal areas, with responsibility for recom ­
mendations which could have an important bearing on the company’ s business,
but who are usually subordinate to a general counsel or his immediate deputy in
large firm s.
The spread of $1, 195 in averaige monthly salaries between the
entry level and the highest among seven levels studied was greater for attorneys
than for any of the other occupational series covered.
The finance industries
employed the highest proportion of attorneys, with approximately two-fifths in
the seven levels combined in those industries compared with a fourth in manu­
facturing and a slightly smaller proportion in public utilities.
Chemists and engineers were surveyed in eight levels.
(See chart 3. )
Each series started with a trainee level of professional work, typically requiring
a bachelor of science degree or the equivalent in education and experience com ­
bined.
A level VIII position involved full responsibility over a very broad and
highly diversified engineering or chemical program, such as to require several
subordinates each directing large and importamt segments of the program; or,
for the employing company, individual reseairch and consultation in difficult
problem areas in which the engineer or chemist was a recognized authority and
where solutions would represent major scientific or technological advance.
(it
was recognized in the definition that top positions of some companies with very
extensive and complex engineering or chemical programs were above that level. )
Among the eight levels of engineers, average monthly salaries ranged from
$548 for level I to $1, 588 for level VIII. Chemists at level I averaged $481 a
month and at level VIII, $ 1,523. Although starting salaries for chemists were

4 Establishments primarily engaged in providing accounting and auditing
services were excluded from the survey.
5 Although level V of chief accountant was surveyed, as defined in appen­
dix C, employees meeting requirements for this level were insufficient in number
to warrant presentation of average salary figures.




6




7

below those for engineers, the percentage difference in average salaries tended
to become smaller at the more advanced work levels.
Average monthly salaries
at level IV were $792 for chemists and $832 for engineers.
Level IV repre­
sented the largest group in each series and included professional employees who
were recognized as fully competent in all technical aspects of their assignments,
worked with considerable independence, and in some cases supervised a few pro­
fessional and technical workers in their respective fields. Manufacturing indus­
tries accounted for 80 percent of all engineers and 92 percent of all chemists;
public utilities 11 and 2 percent, respectively; and engineering and scientific
services industries studied employed most of the others.
For both engineers
and chemists, salary levels were about the same in manufacturing and public
utilities industries, and slightly higher in the engineering and scientific serv­
ices industries.
Directors of personnel and job analysts, each representing four levels
of work, 6 were studied in the personnel management field. Job analysts I, de­
fined to include trainees under immediate supervision, averaged $493, compared
with $801 for job analysts IV, who analyze and evaluate a variety of more dif­
ficult jobs under general supervision and who may participate in the development
and installation of evaluation or compensation system s.
Directors of personnel
were limited by definition to those who had programs that included, at a minimum,
responsibility for administering a formal job evaluation system, employment and
placement, and employee relations and services functions.
Those with responsi­
bility for actual contract negotiations with labor unions as the principal company
representative were excluded. Provisions were made in the definition for weighing
various combinations of duties and responsibilities to determine the level c la ssi­
fication. Among personnel directors with job functions as specified for the four
levels of responsibility, average monthly salaries ranged from $723 for level I
to $1 ,2 1 1 for level IV. Manufacturing industries accounted for three-fourths of
both the job analysts and directors of personnel as defined for the survey.
Managers of office services, as defined for the study, included four
levels based on the variety of clerical and other office services supervised and
the size of the organization serviced. Those responsible for additional functions
of a higher level than those enumerated in the definition were excluded. Among
the four levels studied, average monthly salaries ranged from $604 for level I
to $ 1 ,0 0 2 for level IV.
Those at level I were responsible for providing 4 or
5 of the enumerated office service functions. (See appendix C.) For a staff of
300 to 600 employees, compared to 7 or 8 functions for about 1, 500 to 3, 000 em ­
ployees at level IV.
Manufacturing industries accounted for three-fifths of the
employees in the four levels combined, and an additional fifth were employed
in finance industries.
In the drafting field, monthly salaries among three levels of work av­
eraged $530 for senior (fully experienced) draftsmen, $408 for junior draftsmen,
and $327 for the relatively small group of tracers.
Manufacturing industries
accounted for a high proportion of the draftsmen and tracers, with 82 percent
employed in those industries, 9 percent in public utilities, and about 7 percent
in the engineering, architectural, and scientific services industries studied.
General stenographers accounted for almost 1 of every 5 workers in
the 17 clerical occupation work levels studied. Their salaries averaged $341 a
month, which was slightly above the midpoint in the range of average monthly

6
Although level V of director of personnel was surveyed, as defined in ap­
pendix C, employees meeting requirements for this level were insufficient in
number to warrant presentation of average salaries.




8

salaries for all employees in the clerical work levels represented in the study.
Among the clerical jobs studied, monthly salaries ranged from $252 for file
clerks I to $457 for tabulating-machine operators III, who without close super­
vision were required to perform complete reporting assignments by machine,
including difficult wiring.
Office boys or girls, two-fifths of whom were em ­
ployed in manufacturing industries, averaged $7 more a month than file clerks I,
who were more heavily represented in the finance industries. Women accounted
for more than nine-tenths of the employees in 11 work levels and the men a c ­
counted for half or more of the employees in 5 (accounting clerks II, office boys
or girls, tabulating-machine operators I, II, and III).
Although employment in
manufacturing exceeded that in each of the 5 nonmanufacturing industry divisions
within scope of the survey in 15 of the 17 clerical work levels, in only 6 instances
did manufacturing account for as many as half the employees.
Median monthly salaries (the amount below and above which 50 percent
of the employees were found) for nearly all work levels were slightly lower than
the weighted averages (means) cited earlier. The percentage by which the median
differed from the mean was less than 2 percent in 43 of the work levels and as
much as 2 but less than 3 percent in 13 additional levels.
The amounts by which
the weighted average salaries exceeded the medians were largest for attorneys IIIA
(6. 3 percent), followed by chemists VIII (6. 1 percent), chief accountants IV
(5. 5 percent), and attorneys V (5. 1 percent).
Average Weekly Hours
The length of the workweek, upon which the regular straight-time salary
was based, was obtained for individual employees in the occupations studied.
A
distribution of the 68 job categories according to these average weekly hours
(rounded to the nearest half hour) is shown in table 2.
Workweeks averaged
40 hours in 10 of the 68 job categories, and from
to 39 V2 hours in all others.
Differences in average weekly hours among occupations, and among work levels
within occupations, largely reflect variation in the distribution of employment in
the various job categories among industries. 7 In manufacturing and public utilities
industries, a 40-hour workweek was predominant, whereas work schedules of
less than 40 hours were found to a greater extent in trade and finance indus­
tries, particularly in banking and insurance firm s. Average workweeks of 39 or
less hours for all levels of auditors and attorneys, and m ost of the' office clerical
job categories reflect the extent to which they are employed in industries in which
such shorter workweeks are more prevalent.
In comparison, average weekly
hours of 40 or 39. 5 for all levels of chemist and engineers, for example, reflect
the high incidence of the 40-hour workweek in manufacturing, public utilities,
scientific research, and engineering services industries.
Salary Distributions
Percentage distributions of employees by monthly salaries are presented
for the professional and administrative occupations in table 3, and by weekly
salaries for the drafting and clerical occupations in table 4. Within each of the
68 occupation work levels, salary rates for some of the higher paid employees
were twice those of the lowest paid employees. A ll occupations in which two or

7
Studies of scheduled weekly hours of office workers in major labor
markets also indicate that shorter workweeks are more prevalent in large north­
eastern markets (particularly New York City) than in m ost areas in other r e ­
gions.
See Wages and Related Benefits, 60 Labor Markets, 1959—
60, BLS
Bull. 1265-62 (1961).




9

more levels of work were surveyed showed a substantial degree of overlapping
of individual salaries between work levels in the same occupation.
Salary ranges
established for pay grades or work levels within salary structures of individual
firm s also exhibited substantial overlap.
The absolute spread between highest and lowest paid workers within work
levels, and to a lesser extent the relative spread, tended to widen at the higher
work levels for most occupations in which several work levels were surveyed.
It is apparent from chart 4 that the relative spread varied considerably among
occupations and in many cases was not greater for professional occupation work
levels than for clerical levels studied. Thus, when excluding the extreme salaries
and expressing the range as a percent of the median salary (chart 4), the relative
spread in salaries was greater for m ost levels of attorneys than for engineers; in
each of these occupations, the spread was smallest at the lowest levels. When
compared with file clerks I and II and general stenographers, however, the rela­
tive spread in salaries was smaller for the two lowest levels of attorneys and for
all levels of engineers, except for about the same relative spread in salaries for
engineers VIII and general stenographers.
Differences in the range of salaries paid individuals within work levels
surveyed undoubtedly reflect a variety of factors other than differences in the
work level definitions. As pointed out earlier, employment in the various indus­
tries within the scope of the survey may vary considerably from occupation to
occupation.
Salaries of individual employees in the same occupation and grade
level also may vary considerably within establishments.
This pattern is particu­
larly apparent in the professional and administrative occupations.
Salaries are
generally determined on an individual basis or under formalized pay plans which
characteristically provide for a wide range in salary rates for each occupation
and grade level within the pay structure.

Changes in Salary __Leve 1s During the Year
Between the initial (winter 1959—
60) and the present survey, various
changes were made in the professional and administrative occupations and levels
selected for survey, and in the definitions used in classifying employees. 8 A l­
though most of the changes in these definitions were clarifications and refine­
ments, or improvements in organization, the extent to which differences in salary
levels reflect changes in classification of employees could not be measured.
No changes were made in the definitions for the 20 drafting and clerical
job categories surveyed in the 2 periods, and it was possible to adjust the 1959—
60
data to correspond (as to scope of survey) to the 1960— data.
61
Using the 1960—
61
occupational employment as constant employment weights, to eliminate the effect
of changes in the proportion of workers represented in each level, the increase
in average salaries for all employees in the drafting and clerical occupations as
a group amounted to 3 percent. Among the 20 occupations and levels, increases
in average salaries during the year ranged from 1. 9 to 7. 7 percent, with most of
the increases within a range of 2 to 4 percent. Although similar precise com ­
parisons could not be made for the professional and administrative occupations,
increases in average salaries for those occupations did not appear to vary ap­
preciably from the increases shown for the drafting and clerical jobs.

8

For a summary of changes made in the 1960—
61 survey,




see appendix B.

10

Chart 4. RANGES A N D SALARIES FOR SELECTED PROFESSIONAL A N D
CLERICAL OCCUPATIONS, WINTER 1960-61
MEDIAN MONTHLY SALARIES WITH INTERQUARTILE AND INTERDECILE RANGES1
EXPRESSED AS A PERCENT OF THE MEDIAN
PERCENT

80
..... “I
First
Decile

90
i
First
Quartile

100
i

Median
Monthly
Salary
i
|

110
1
Third
Quartile

120
1
Ninth
Decile

130
1

140
1

150
1

155
1

. /

^'The interquartile range it the central pert at the array at employees
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




b > so la 'T ' e* cludi"9
'
«PP«r ° nd low« ' fourtht. The interdecile
range excludes the upper and lower tenths of the array.

11

Supplementary Cash Bonuses
In the 1959- 60 survey, information was obtained on the extent to which
employees in professional and administrative occupations studied were paid cash
bonuses during the year preceding the survey period, and the amount of such
payments. 9
In the 1960—
61 survey, informaition was collected to determine
whether bonus payments made by establishments to employees in the professional
and administrative occupations tended to be about the same, higher, or lower in
the period covered by the current survey as compared with a year earlier (table 5).
Among the 56 professional and administrative job categories covered by
the bonus inquiry in the 1959—
60 survey, the proportion of employees receiving
cash bonuses ranged from 11 to 50 percent; in four-fifths of the jobs, from 15 to
40 percent of the employees received such bonuses. When bonus payments were
added to salaries relating to all employees in each category, including those who
did not receive bonuses, the average pay for the 56 job categories was increased
as follows:

Percent bonus pay­
ments added to
average salaries
8.7-10.9
5. 2-5 . 7
3. 0-4 . 8
Less than 3. 0

Number of
job
categories
3
2
8
43

It was found that the impact of bonus payments
in the higher work levels.

tended to be greatest

Cash bonus payments during the year preceding the 1960—
61 survey
period, compared with a year earlier, added about the same proportion to average
salaries in nearly three-fifths of the establishments that paid bonuses in both
periods to one or more employees in the professional and administrative occupa­
tions studied.
Among the other establishments paying bonuses in both periods,
approximately a third paid proportionately more and two-thirds paid less in the
1960—
61 period.
In addition to data permitting comparison of cash bonus payments to
employees in the professional and administrative occupations studied, information
was obtained on the incidence of such bonus plans among all establishments within
the scope of the 1960—
61 survey.
Slightly less than half of the establishments
had such plans that were in effect in both survey periods; approximately 1 percent
of the establishments had discontinued plans that were in effect in the previous
year and less than 1 percent had initiated plans during the 1960— period.
61

9
Bonus data are presented in greater detail in BLS Bull. 1286, National Sur­
vey of Professional, Administrative, Technical, and Clerical Pay, Winter 1959—
60.




12
T a b le 1. E m p lo y m e n t and a v e r a g e s a la r ie s fo r s e le c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m in is tr a t iv e ,
te c h n ic a l, and c le r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s in p r iv a te in d u s tr y , 1 w in te r 1960—
61
M onthly s a la r ie s 2
O ccu p a tio n and c la s s
(See d e s c r ip tio n s
in ap p en d ix C)

N u m ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

A nnual s a la r ie s 2

M id dle ra n g e 3
M ean

M edian

F ir s t
q u a rtile

T h ird
q u a rtile

M id d le ran ge 3
M ean

M edian

F ir s t
q u a rtile

T h ird
. q u a rtile

A cco u n ta n ts and A u d ito r s

__ __ __ __ __ ___
__ __ __ __ __ ___
__ __ _____ _______

4 ,4 3 3
7, 790
1 5 ,9 3 2
1 0 ,9 6 0
4 ,4 5 3

$478
527
600
727
879

$473
519
593
718
851

$437
475
542
654
766

$520
570
651
797
972

$ 5 , 736
6, 324
7, 200
8, 724
1 0 ,5 4 8

I _ _ _ _ _ __ __ __ __ ___
II __ _ __ __ __ ______
III _________________________
IV _________________________

393
1, 847
3, 397
1, 780

433
539
644
790

423
533
643
768

3 87
477
565
673

486
597
718
876

5, 196
6, 468
7, 728
9 ,4 8 0

I _ _ _ _ _ __ ___
II _______________
III
IV _______________

532
544
1, 125
226

797
957
994
1, 251

774
921
973
1, 186

692
850
849
1, 069

872
1 ,0 4 8
1 ,0 9 8
1 ,3 7 9

297
823
929
1, 169
1 ,0 6 1
503
413

531
678
817
967
1 ,2 2 2
1 ,2 7 8
1, 726

520
666
794
910
1 ,2 1 5
1,2 4 1
1 ,6 4 2

491
591
675
780
1, 027
1, 022
1, 358

I
II
____ ___
HI ________________________
IV _________________________
V
VI
VII
VIII

1, 340
3 ,6 1 9
6, 943
7, 133
4, 256
2 ,0 6 3
696
230

481
557
643
792
952
1, 113
1, 288
1,5 2 3

485
547
632
779
935
1,091
1, 233
1 ,4 3 5

I
II ________________________
III _ _
_ __ __ _
IV _
_ ____
V
__
V I __ _ _____ __ _
VII
VIII

9, 828
3 0 ,8 7 3
64, 671
7 1 ,6 3 7
3 9 ,0 5 6
18, 669
5, 424
1 ,2 1 7

548
609
705
832
960
1, 114
1, 373
1, 588

145
498
796
524

A ccou n ta n ts
A ccou n ta n ts
A ccou n ta n ts
A ccou n ta n ts
A ccou n ta n ts
A u d ito r s
A u d ito r s
A u d ito r s
A u d ito r s
C h ief
C h ief
C h ief
C h ief

I _
II
III
IV
V

_____ ______________

a ccou n ta n ts
a ccou n ta n ts
a ccou n ta n ts
a ccou n ta n ts

$ 5 ,6 7 6
6, 228
7, 116
8, 616
1 0 ,2 1 2

244
700
504
848
192

$6, 240
6, 840
7, 812
9, 564
1 1 ,6 6 4

076
396
716
216

4, 644
5, 724
6, 780
8 ,0 7 6

5, 832
7, 164
8 ,6 1 6
1 0 ,5 1 2

9, 564
1 1 ,4 8 4
1 1 ,9 2 8
15, 012

9, 288
1 1 ,0 5 2
1 1 ,6 7 6
1 4 ,2 3 2

8, 304
10 ,2 0 0
10, 188
1 2 ,8 2 8

1 0 ,4 6 4
12, 576
13, 176
16, 548

557
748
930
1, 130
1, 356
1 ,4 4 5
2, 061

6, 372
8, 136
9, 804
1 1 ,6 0 4
1 4 ,6 6 4
1 5 ,3 3 6
2 0 ,7 1 2

6, 240
7 ,9 9 2
9, 528
1 0 ,9 2 0
14, 580
1 4 ,8 9 2
1 9 ,7 0 4

5, 892
7, 092
8, 100
9 ,3 6 0
1 2 ,3 2 4
1 2 ,2 6 4
1 6 ,2 9 6

6, 684
8, 976
11, 160
13 ,5 6 0
16 ,2 7 2
17, 340
2 4 ,7 3 2

443
512
577
702
838
970
1, 097
1, 300

524
592
699
878
1 ,0 5 3
1 ,2 4 1
1 ,4 5 3
1, 700

5, 772
6, 684
7, 716
9, 504
1 1 ,4 2 4
1 3 ,3 5 6
1 5 ,4 5 6
18, 276

5, 820
6, 564
7, 584
9, 348
1 1 ,2 2 0
1 3 ,0 9 2
1 4 ,7 9 6
17, 220

5, 316
6, 134
6, 924
8 ,4 2 4
1 0 ,0 5 6
11, 640
13, 164
1 5 ,6 0 0

6, 288
7, 104
8, 388
1 0 ,5 3 6
1 2 ,6 3 6
14, 892
17 ,4 3 6
2 0 ,4 0 0

549
604
700
822
948
1, 102
1, 352
1 ,5 6 3

525
566
644
744
843
974
1, 193
1, 371

574
649
762
911
1 ,0 5 7
1 ,2 4 1
1, 522
1, 770

6, 576
7, 308
8 ,4 6 0
9 ,9 8 4
1 1 ,5 2 0
13, 368
1 6 ,4 7 6
1 9 ,0 5 6

6, 588
7, 248
8, 400
9, 864
11, 3 76
1 3 ,2 2 4
1 6 ,2 2 4
18, 756

6, 300
6, 792
7, 728
8, 928
10, 116
11, 688
14, 316
1 6 ,4 5 2

6, 888
7, 78$
9, 144
1 0 ,932
12, 684
1 4 ,892
18, 264
21, 240

493
561
662
801

506
546
644
787

457
488
574
722

547
633
738
863

5, 916
6, 732
7, 944
9 ,6 1 2

072
552
728
444

5 ,4 8 4
5, 856
6, 888
8, 664

6, 564
7, 596
8, 856
1 0 ,356

642
1, 819
872
302

723
833
1 ,0 3 7
1 ,211

722
820
996
1, 159

651
708
884
1. 041

789
911
1, 174
1 ,3 5 9

8 ,6 7 6
9 ,9 9 6
1 2 ,4 4 2
1 4 ,5 3 2

8, 664
9, 840
1 1 ,9 5 2
1 3 ,9 0 8

7, 812
8 ,4 9 6
10, 608
1 2 ,4 9 2

9 ,4 6 8
10 ,9 3 2
14, 088
16, 308

427
613
246
68

604
707
814
1, 002

601
706
817
1 ,0 0 0

549
623
726
846

653
774
892
1, 135

7, 248
8 ,4 8 4
9, 768
1 2 ,0 2 4

7, 212
8, 472
9, 804
1 2 ,0 0 0

6, 588
7 ,4 7 6
8, 712
1 0 ,1 5 2

7, 836
9, 288
1 0 ,7 0 4
1 3,620

5,
6,
7,
9,

$5,
5,
6,
7,
9,

A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s

I
_
__ _ _
II __ _
_ _ __
_
III ________________________
IIIA ______________________
IV __ _____ _ _ _ _ _
IV A ______________________
V _________________________

C h e m is ts and E n g in e e rs
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs

P e r s o n n e l M anagem ent
Job
Job
Job
Job

a n a ly s ts
a n a ly s ts
a n a ly s ts
a n a ly s ts

D ir e c t o r s
D ir e c t o r s
D ir e c t o r s
D ir e c t o r s

of
of
of
of

I ______________________
II
_ _ _____
III
______
IV __ ________
personnel
p erson n el
person n el
personnel

I --------- ----II — ______
I I I --------------IV
______

6,
6,
7,
9,

O ffic e S e r v ic e s
M an agers,
M an agers,
M an agers,
M an agers,

o f fi c e
o f fi c e
o f fi c e
o f fi c e

s e r v ic e s
s e r v ic e s
s e r v ic e s
s e r v ic e s

I
I I ______
III _____
IV _____

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table




13
T a b le 1. E m p lo y m e n t and a v e r a g e s a la r ie s f o r s e le c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l, a d m in is tr a t iv e ,
te c h n ic a l, and c le r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s in p r iv a te in d u s tr y , ' w in te r 1960— 1 — Con tinued
6
Annual s a l a r i e s 2

M onthly s a la r ie s 1
2
O ccu p a tion and c la s s
(S ee d e s c r ip tio n s
in ap p en d ix C)

N u m ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

M ean

M edian

1 9 ,4 0 2
37, 254
2 ,6 3 5

$ 40 8
530
327

2 5 ,5 6 2
5, 341
5 2 ,3 5 9
38, 393
3 6 ,1 2 1
1 1 ,2 6 0
4 5 ,0 6 1
2 4 ,3 5 5
9 0 ,9 0 6
7, 371
1 6 ,3 9 4

M id dle ra n g e 3

M id dle ra n g e 3
M ean

M edian

F ir s t
q u a rtile

T h ird
q u a rtile

$ 4 ,8 2 2
6, 276
3 ,9 1 2

$ 4 , 286
5, 593
3 ,4 0 2

$ 5 ,4 3 8
7 ,0 8 7
4 ,4 2 7

3, 278

3, 203

2, 857

3, 609

4, 121
3, 829
5, 117
3, 026
3, 871
3, 822
3, 119
4, 102
4, 584
3 ,9 5 1

4 ,0 9 8
3, 720
5, 075
2 ,9 4 2
3, 779
3, 782
3 ,0 0 4
4, 070
4, 597
3 ,9 8 9

3, 559
3, 185
4, 337
2, 602
3, 246
3, 266
2, 684
3, 516
4, 134
3 ,4 1 4

4, 671
4, 376
5, 813
3, 365
4, 369
4, 370
3, 453
4 ,6 6 7
4, 977
4, 576

4, 381

4 ,4 6 4

4, 041

4, 828

3, 774

3, 730

3, 254

4, 269

429

4, 586

4, 583

4 ,0 4 5

5, 157

507
306
368

5, 500
3, 315
3, 921

5 ,4 8 7
3, 265
3, 871

4, 917
2, 897
3 ,4 0 3

6, 099
3 ,6 8 7
4 ,4 2 2

F ir s t
q u a rtile

T h ird
q u a rtile

$401
522
325

$356
465
283

$452
589
368

272

266

237

300

343
318
425
252
322
318
259
341
381
328

341
309
422
244
314
314
250
338
382
332

296
265
360
216
270
271
223
292
344
2 84

388
364
483
2 80
363
363
287
388
414
3 80

1 ,0 4 4

364

371

336

401

1 2 ,0 9 0

314

310

270

355

18, 541

381

381

336

8, 567
61, 855
38, 131

457
275
326

456
271
322

409
241
283

D ra fts m e n
D ra fts m e n , ju n io r —
__ __ ----D ra fts m e n , s e n io r __ __ __ __ —
T racers
_____ — —
-------- —

$ 4 ,9 0 8
6, 382
3, 931

C l e r ic a l
B o o k k e e p in g -m a ch in e
o p e r a t o r s I __ _ __ _____
___
B ook k e eping - m a c hine
o p e r a t o r s II _______________________
C le r k s , a cc o u n tin g I __ ___ __ ___
C le r k s , a cc o u n tin g I I ---------------------C le r k s , file I _
— ___
___
C le r k s , file II
__ _____ __ —
K eypu n ch o p e r a t o r s _
__ __ —
O ffic e b o y s o r g i r ls »
S te n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ______ __
___
S te n o g r a p h e r s , t e c h n ica l _
S w itch b oa rd o p e r a t o r s _ __ _____
S w itch b oa rd o p e r a t o r s ,
s p e c ia l
— — __ __ — __
----T a b u la tin g - m a ch in e
o p e r a t o r s I ----__ „ __
------T a b u la tin g - m a ch in e
o p e r a t o r s II _ __ __
__ __ ___
T a b u la tin g - m a ch in e
o p e r a t o r s III ______________________
T y p is ts I _
__
__
----T y p is ts II — __ __ __
-------------

1 F o r s c o p e o f study, se e table in ap p en d ix A.
2 S a la r ie s r e p o r t e d r e la te to the stan d ard s a la r ie s that w e r e p a id f o r sta n d a rd w o r k s c h e d u le s ; i. e . , to the s t r a ig h t-t im e
s a la r y c o r r e s p o n d in g to the e m p l o y e e 's n o r m a l w o r k s c h e d u le e x clu d in g o v e r t im e h o u r s .
3 The m id d le ran ge (in te r q u a rtile ) u se d h e r e i s the c e n t r a l p a rt o f the a r r a y e x clu d in g the upp er and lo w e r fo u rth s
o f the e m p lo y e e s .




14




T a b le 2. D is tr ib u tio n o f 68 s e le c t e d jo b c a t e g o r ie s stu d ied
by e m p l o y e e s ' a v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s , 1 w in te r 1960—
61
N u m b er o f jo b c a t e g o r ie s
A v e ra g e
w e e k ly
h ou rs 1

P r o f e s s io n a l
and
a d m in i s tr a tiv e

Job c a t e g o r y
D ra ftin g

48

3

3 7 .5

1

-

3 8 .5

7

4 0 .0

17
-

A u d ito r s I
A u d ito r s II
A tto r n e y s I, II, IIIA, IV , and IVA
M a n a g e r s , o f f i c e s e r v ic e s IV
C le r k s , file I and II
O ffic e b o y s o r g i r ls
T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s I

12

26

A ll c a t e g o r ie s

4

3 9 .0

3 9 .5

C l e r ic a l

2

A u d ito r s III and IV
A t to r n e y s III and V
Job a n a ly s ts II
B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s I and II
C le r k s , a c c o u n tin g I and II
K eypu n ch o p e r a t o r s
S te n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l
S w itch b o a rd o p e r a t o r s
S w itch b o a rd o p e r a t o r s , s p e c ia l
T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s II and III
T y p is ts I and II
A cco u n ta n ts I, II, III, IV , and V
C h ie f a cc o u n ta n ts II and IV
C h e m is ts I, III, IV, V , VI, V II, and VIII
E n g in e e rs IV , V I, and VII
Job a n a ly s ts I, III, and IV
D ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l I, II, III, and IV
M a n a g e r s , o f fic e s e r v ic e s II and III
D ra fts m e n , ju n io r
T racers
S te n o g r a p h e r s , te c h n ica l
C h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts I and III
C h e m is ts II
E n g in e e rs I, II, III, V , and VIII
M a n a g e r s , o f f i c e s e r v ic e s I
D ra fts m e n , s e n io r

1 The s ch e d u le d w o rk w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t-t im e
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s f o r e a c h jo b c a t e g o r y w e r e r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf-h o u r .

s a la r y .

15
T a ble 3.

P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s 2
by a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r ie s , w in te r 1960—
61
C h ie f acco u n ta n ts

A u d ito r s

A cco u n ta n ts
A v e ra g e m on th ly s a la r ie s
H

1
U nder $325
$325 and u nd er
$ 3 5 0 and under
$375 and under

__ _
$ 35 0
$375
$ 40 0

III

IV

II

I

V

III

IV

II

I

III

IV

1 .4
2 .3
3 .6
4 .4

_ _

_
( 0 .6 )
2 .2

_
-

_
-

_
-

2. 5
4. 3
8 .4
2 0 .4

_
(0 .6 )
1 .6

-

_
-

-

-

-

“

_
-

-

1 5 .8
8 .7
9 .7
1 2 .5

6 .2
7 .5
8. 3
1 0 .7

0. 5
1 .6
3 .2
3 .3

-

-

-

~

-

9 .9
3 .3
1 .8
1 .3

1 1 .5
1 1 .3
8 .7
9 .8

6. 2
4 .5
9 .3
7 .9

(2 .1 )
1 .0
1 .9
2 .9

1 .5
1 .9

-

-

_

8. 7
6 .9
1 0 .9
7. 3

3 .8
6 .2
8. 0
4 .2

4 .7
1 .7
9 .2
9 .0

1 .7
1 .7

2 .7

-

6 .7
6 .8
5 .2
2. 3

6 .6
8. 3
7. 1
6 .5

7 .7
2 .4
12. 2
4 .5

1.1
2 .0
4 .4
3 .7

3 .7
.5
4 .4
3 .2

-

4 .4
7 .8
4 .2
2 .4

.8
6 .8
14. 5
8 .8

3. 1
7 .2
10. 1
4 .0

1 .2
9 .4
4. 3
1 .8

2 .7
1 .3
3 .5
3 .5

$ 40 0
$425
$ 45 0
$475

and
and
and
and

u nd er
und er
u nd er
u nd er

$425
$4 5 0 -------------------$475 ----$50 0

7 .1
13 .1
1 9 .7
1 4 .8

4 .6
6. 3
1 1 .3
1 1 .9

.
( 1 .8 )
3 .7
4 .6

$ 50 0
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

und er
und er
und er
u nd er

$525 _
$ 5 5 0 _____________
$575
$ 60 0 _

1 0 .6
6 .5
6 .2
3 .4

1 6 .9
1 2 .7
10. 5
7 .3

6 .9
1 1 .7
1 1 .7
1 3 .3

(2..0)
1 .6
2 .9
3 .5

_
-

$ 60 0
$625
$ 65 0
$675

and
and
and
and

und er
under
und er
und er

$625
$ 65 0
$675
$700

2 .0
2 .0
1 .7
1.1

4 .5
3. 1
3 .6
1 .1

1 4 .3
6 .9
7 .3
4. 3

6 .5
7. 0
1 0 .4
8 .4

( 1 .3 )
2 .2
3 .2
3 .2

(1 .5 )
- I

8 .4
2 .5
5 .0
2 .3

$ 70 0
$725
$75 0
$775

and
and
and
and

under
und er
un d er
u nd er

$725
$ 7 5 0 -------------------$77 5 __
$ 80 0 _

1 .2
( 2 .2 )
-

4. 6
3. 1
2. 0
.9

1 0 .4
10 .1
6. 8
6 .0

4 .9
5 .5
7 .2
6 .6

_
-

1 .6
1 .6
1 .4
( .9 )

$ 80 0
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

un d er
und er
u nd er
un d er

$825
$85 0
$875 „
$900 _

1 .0
( 2 .0 )
-

5 .6
5 .3
3 .8
2. 1

7 .1
8 .5
5 .8
4 .4

_
-

_
"

2 .5
2 .2
1 .4
L. 1

$90 0
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

und er
u nd er
u nd er
und er

$925 _____________
$95 0 ------------------$975
$ 1 ,0 0 0 __

1 .9
1 .7
1 .4
.9

7 .4
4. 0
4 .4
2. 8

_
-

_
-

( 1 .5 )
-

4. 3
2 .8
2 .4
2 .2

3 .8
.2
1 .5

13. 1
4 .8
1 .3
5 .3

8. 1
3. 0
8 .2
2. 0

.9
4 .9
2. 7

_
-

_
-

_
-

4 .8
2 .2
1 .8
1 .2
( 1 .0 )

5 .3
.6
3 .0

1 1 .9
5 .7
4. 0
4 .4
3 .9

15. 0
7 .6
4 .6
1 .2
4 .9

.4
1 4 .2
1 1 .5
6 .2
4. 0

___

__

( .1 )
-

;

-

■

_ -

_
-

_
_
-

.

-

1

_
- ■

,

_
- .

-

-

-

:

-

-

-

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

u nd er
und er
u n d er
un d er
u nd er

$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1, 1 5 0 ----------$ 1 ,2 0 0 _______
$ 1 ,2 5 0
__

_
_
_

_
- '
_ .
_ ;

_
_
-

1 .0
( .6 )

-

-

-

-

7 .5
4 .6
3 .9
2. 0
.8

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
un d er
u nd er
u nd er
u nd er

$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1, 350
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0 _______
$ 1 ,5 0 0 _______

_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

1 .2
(1 .8 )
-

_
-

_
-

_
*

_
-

_
-

1 .7
3 .7
(1 .3 )
~

7 .7
3. 5
1 .8
(i.o )
-

8 .4
9 .3
3. 1
1 .3
8. 8

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 , S50
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

u nd er
nttripr
u nd er
under
u n d er

$ 1 ,5 5 0 ___
---$ 1, 600
$ 1 ,6 5 0
_ _ _
$ 1 , 700 ________
$ 1 ,7 5 0 _______

_
-

_
-

_
- ;
- ;

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

.9
.9
3 .5
.9
-

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

u nd er $ 1 ,8 0 0 _______
u nd er $ 1, 850 _______
u nd er $ 1 ,9 0 0
__ __
u nd er $ 1 ,9 5 0
o v e r ---------------------------

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

.9
1 .8
4 .4

T o t a l _______________________
N u m ber o f e m p l o y e e s __
A v e r a g e m on th ly s a l a r i e s ______

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




■

:

100. 0

100. 0

4, 433

7, 790 15, 932 10, 960

$47 8

$527

100. 0

_

$60 0

100. 0

$727

j
_
-

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

4 ,4 5 3

393

1 ,8 4 7

3, 397

1 ,7 6 0

532

544

1, 125

226

$879

$433

$539

$644

$ 79 0

$797

$957

100. 0

$994 $1,251

16
T a b le 3.

P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s 2
by a v e r a g e m on th ly s a l a r ie s , w in te r 1960—
61— C on tinued

A tto r n e y s
A v e ra g e m o n th ly s a la r ie s
II

I

IIIA

IV A

IV
_
-

_
-

V
_
-

U nder $425 ...........................................
$425 and u nd er $45 0 — ------------$45 0 and u nd er $475
$475 and u nd er $ 50 0 --------------------

1 .3
5 .7
9. 1
1 3 .5

0 .2
1 .0
3. 3

_
2 .5

_
"

$ 50 0
$525
$55 0
$575

and
and
and
and

und er
under
under
under

$525
$550
$575
$ 60 0

__
__ —
-------------------------------------_____ __ __

2 5 .9
1 6 .8
9 .8
6 .4

2. 1
2 .7
1 1 .5
6 .6

.6
2 .0
1 .9

-

-

-

-

(0 .2 )
1 .5
3 .9

-

-

-

$ 60 0
$625
$ 65 0
$675

and
and
and
and

und er
under
under
under

$625 _____________
$65 0 _____________
$675
__ __ __
$ 70 0 _____________

2 .4
2 .4
.7
2. 0

11. 1
7 .2
7 .0
1 0 .2

3 .9
6 .6
7. 3
7. 0

_
.9
.9
3 .5

_
-

-

"

$ 70 0
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$750
$775
$8 0 0

------------------_____________
_____________
_____________

_
.3
2. 0
-

6 .6
6 .2
2 .7
7 .8

3. 1
4 .2
5 .7
6 .8

4 .3
2 .5
6 .9
2. 3

_
( 0 .6 )
2 .4
.5

_

_
-

$ 80 0
$825
$85 0
$875

and
and
and
and

u nd er
under
under
un d er

$825
$ 85 0
$875
$ 90 0

___ __ __
_____________
_____ ______
____ _______

1 .0
.7

4. 1
2. 3
.6
1 .9

4 .4
6 .2
4 .3
4 .2

4. 3
7. 1
5 .2
4. 6

2 .7
1 .6
1 .6
1 .3

$900
$925
$ 95 0
$975

and
and
and
and

u nd er
u nd er
u nd er
under

$925 — __ __
$ 95 0 _____________
$975 __ _____ __
$ 1 ,0 0 0 __________

-

1 .7
.5
.4
1. 1

3 .7
2 .7
2 .4
3 .0

4. 7
2 .5
2 .8
1 .5

3 .5
.9
1 .2
5 .6

5 .6
6 .4

_

( 1 .3 )

3 .6
8. 0
2 .4
1 .4
.4

8 .2
3 .0
7. 1
4 .4
3 .8

5 .8
8. 7
8 .4
3 .2
7. 0

1 3 .7
•5.2
5 .2
2. 0
6 .4

6 .1
.5
1 .0
1 .5
8 .2

2. 1
4. 0
1 .7
1 .4
1 .6

9 .6
9 .8
5 .9
1 .6
4. 1

6 .2
7. 0
6 .6
4 .4
4 .2

2 .9
2 .7
4 .6
2 .9
8. 7

2 .2
.7
2 .5
1 .3
1 .8

4 .4
3 .6
.8
.8
3 .2

4. 1
2 .9
3. 1
5. 1
5 .8

.8
.4
.6
.4
-

1 .7
2 .4
2 .2
2 .4
3 .6
.2
4 .4
3 .4
2 .7
1 ,0

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
u nd er
u nd er
under
und er

$ 1 ,0 5 0 _______
$ 1, 1 0 0 _______
$ 1, 1 5 0 ____ :__
$ 1 ,2 0 0 _______
$ 1 ,2 5 0 _______

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1, 300
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
u nd er
und er
und er
un d er

$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 , 350
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0
$ 1 ,5 0 0

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

-

_
-

.

III

-

-

-

.
0 .4
1 .2
4 .6
.8
-

-

-

_

_

-

-

__ _
__ __
—______
_______
_______

_
_
-

_
_
-

.6
1 .0
.1
-

-

-

-

under
u nd er
u nd er
und er
und er

____
$ 1 , 550
$ 1 ,6 0 0 _______
$ 1 ,6 5 0 _______
$ 1 , 7 0 0 _______
$ 1 ,7 5 0 _______

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

.7
1 .5
(1 .0 )

-

-

-

-

and
and
and
and
and

under
und er
under
under
und er

$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0
$ 2 , 000

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

2 .8
(2 .7 )

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2 , 000
$ 2 ,0 5 0
$ 2 , 1 00
$ 2 ,1 5 0
$ 2 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

und er
under
und er
under
und er

$ 2 , 050 _______
$ 2 , 1 0 0 _______
$ 2 ,1 5 0
__ _
$ 2 ,2 0 0 _______
$ 2 ,2 5 0

_
-

_
_

_
.
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

2 .2
_
3 .4
-

$ 2 , 250
$ 2 ,3 0 0
$ 2 ,3 5 0
$ 2 ,4 0 0

and
and
and
and

und er $ 2 ,3 0 0
_ __
und er $ 2 ,3 5 0 _______
und er $ 2 ,4 0 0 _______
o v e r ___ __ __ ______

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_______
_______
_______
_______
_______

T o t a l _______________________
N u m ber o f e m p lo y e e s
A v e ra g e m on th ly s a la r ie s

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




-

-

_

_
-

_
(0 .2 )
1 .2

3 .4
.2
3 1 0 .9

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

297

823

929

1, 169

1, 061

503

413

$531

$67 8

$817

$967

$ 1 ,2 2 2

$ 1 ,2 7 8

$ 1 ,7 2 6

100. 0

17
T a ble 3.

P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s 2
b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r ie s , w in te r I960—61— Con tinued
Chem is ts

A v e r a g e m on th ly s a la r ie s
IV

VI

V

II

I

in

_
( 1 .2 )
2. 5
5. 6
9 .6

( 0 .8 )
1 .5
2. 0

“
“

8
6
8
1

4. 8
5. 6
9 .3
10. 8

(0 .7 )
1 .2
2. 1

“

1 2 .3
10. 1
10. 1
8. 1

3. 1
3 .8
5 .9
7. 6

( 2 .5 )

"
■

-

■
“
"

VII

VIII

“

"
“
_
-

U nder $350 ------------------------------------$35 0 and u n d er $375 ------------------$37 5 and u n d er $40 0 ------------------$40 0 and u n d er $425 ------------------$42 5 and u n d er $45 0 ------------------$45 0 and u n d er $475 ------------------$475 and u n d er $50 0 -------------------

4. 7
1 .3
3. 0
8. 1
1 1 .0
15. 8
15. 8

$500
$52 5
$55 0
$57 5

and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
un d er
un d er

$52 5
$550
$575
$600

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

16. 0
1 1 .9
7. 0
2 .2

$60 0
$ 62 5
$650
$67 5

and
and
and
and

u n d er
un d er
u n d er
u n d er

$625
$65 0
$67 5
$700

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

~

7. 7
4. 3
3 .2
1 .4

$ 70 0
$ 72 5
$75 0
$77 5

and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
un d er

$72 5
$750
$77 5
$800

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

-

1 .6
1 .5
( 2 .2 )
-

6. 0
5. 3
4 .0
2. 5

9 .0
6. 7
8. 7
7. 0

2. 1
2 .3
4 .2
5. 1

( 0 .5 )

$ 80 0
$825
$85 0
$87 5

and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$82 5
$85 0
$875
$900

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

-

1 .6
1. 1
1 .0
1 .2

5 .8
7. 6
5. 1
5 .0

5. 8
5 .9
6. 4
6 .2

1 .6
3. 7
.9
3. 8

2. 7
■

-

-

( 1 .9 )
-

4. 8
4 .4
3 .4
1 .8

7 .4
5. 6
6. 3
4. 7

4. 0
4. 8
7 .2
3. 6

1. 7
1 .7
1 .6
1 .0

10. 0
7 .9
4. 8
4. 7
3. 6

1 1 .8
9. 8
7. 5
7. 6
9. 8

6.
10.
10.
7.
9.

3
2
3
9
1

1 .3
1 .3
7. 4
6. 5

7
8
2
0
7

8. 7
8. 7
7. 8
1 1 .7
7. 8

$900
$92 5
$950
$97 5

and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
un d er
un d er

$925 -------------------$950 ------------------$97 5 ------------------$ 1 ,0 0 0 ---------------

1 .2
1 .3
(. 6 )

12.
20.
15.
10.

-

-

■

"
“
-

-

■
"

“
“

-

“
“

-

■
”

“
■

-

~

'

'

'
“
.4

'
■
-

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 , 100
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 , 150
$ 1 ,2 0 0
$ 1 ,2 5 0

---------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

_
-

2. 7
2. 1
( 1 .3 )
“

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0
$ 1 ,5 0 0

---------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

-

“

2. 7
1 .3
( .5 )
"

5. 3
6 .9
4 .2
2 .5
1 .5

4.
7.
4
5.
5.

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0
$ 1 ,7 5 0

---------------------------------------------------

_
-

-

“

■

-

1 .0
1 .0
( .9 )
-

2. 3
3 .4
3 .4
2 .0
1 .6

3.
5.
2.
3.
3.

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0
$ 2 ,0 0 0

---------------------------------------------------

_
-

-

"

-

"

"

-

-

■

.7
2 .4
1 .0
•1
1 .0

1 .3
6. 1
1 .7
.9
1 .7

$ 2 ,0 0 0
$ 2 ,0 5 0
$ 2 ,1 0 0
$ 2 ,1 5 0
$ 2 ,2 0 0
$ 2 ,2 5 0

and
and
and
and
and
and

u n d er $ 2 ,0 5 0 ----------u n d er $ 2 ,1 0 0 ----------u n d er $ 2 ,1 5 0 ----------u n d er $ 2 ,2 0 0 ----------u n d er $ 2 ,2 5 0 ----------o v e r ----------------------------

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

( 1 .4 )
-

.9
1 .3
1 .3
~
2. 6
3. 5

"

_

~

-

~

•
-

0
2
6
0
5

100. 0

T ota l -------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m ber o f e m p lo y e e s ------------------

1 ,3 4 0

3 ,6 1 9

6 ,9 4 3

7, 133

4 ,2 5 6

2 ,0 6 3

696

230

$643

$792

$952

$ 1 , 113

$ 1 ,2 8 8

$ 1 ,5 2 3

A v e r a g e m on th ly s a l a r i e s -----------

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




$481

$55 7

18
T a ble 3.

P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s 2
b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r ie s , w in te r 1960—61----Con tinued

E n g in e e rs
A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a la r ie s

U nder $350 -----------------------------------$ 35 0 and u n d e r $3 75 ------------------$37 5 and u n d er $400 -------------------$40 0 and un d er $425 ------------------$ 42 5 and u n d e r $450 ------------------$450 and un d er $475 ------------------$47 5 and u n d e r $500 -------------------

III

II

I
_
( 0 .6 )
1 .2
3. 0
4. 8

_

V

IV

_

_

-

-

3
6
3
6

( 0 .9 )
1 .4
2. 8
5 .4

( 1 .0 )

16. 5
1 1 .9
9 .5
5 .9

7. 8
9. 1
1 1 .7
10. 8

3. 8
2. 7
1 .7
( .9 )

1 1 .3
9. 7
9. 0
5. 6
4. 7
3. 8
2. 1
1 .6

( 0 .9 )
* 1 .3
3.
9.
15.
16.

VII

VI

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

1 .4
2. 5
3. 6
4 .4

( 1 .9 )

-

-

-

6. 1
7 .8
8. 1
8. 1

1 .3
1 .9
5. 7
5. 8

_
( 1 .7 )
I- 1

_
-

"

7.
7.
7.
5.

6
8
6
8

4 .4
5. 7
5. 8
5 .4

2 .8
2 .9
2. 6
2. 7

-

-

_
-

_
-

_

VIII

$50 0
$ 52 5
$55 0
$57 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
u n d er
under

$52 5
$550
$575
$600

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

15. 6
25. 5
25. 6
1 1 .3

$60 0
$ 62 5
$65 0
$675

and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
u n d er
un d er

$625
$650
$675
$700

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7. 1
3. 2
1 .4
( .7 )

$ 70 0
$ 72 5
$75 0
$77 5

and
and
and
and

un d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$725
$750
$77 5
$800

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

$80 0
$82 5
$85 0
$8 7 5

and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
under
u n d er

$825
$85 0
$ 87 5
$900

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

$90 0
$925
$95 0
$ 97 5

and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
u n d er
under

$925 -------------------$95 0 -------------------$975 -------------------$ 1 ,0 0 0 ----------------

_
-

_
-

( 2 .5 )
-

6. 7
4 .2
3. 8
3 .2

6 .5
6. 1
5 .9
7 .2

3. 8
3. 5
4. 0
3 .9

_
(3 .5 )

-

-

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,0 5 0
$1 , 100
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0
$ 1 ,2 5 0

---------------------------------------------------

_
-

-

"

5. 0
2. 6
1 .7
( .9 )
-

10. 3
7 .8
5. 3
4. 3
3. 3

1 0 .9
9 .6
9. 3
9 .2
8 .4

3. 6
5 .2
6 .2
7. 6
6. 5

0 .2
1 .0
1 .7
4. 8
5. 0

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0
$ 1 ,5 0 0

----------------------------------------------------

_

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

2. 3
1 .5
( 1 .5 )
-

5 .8
5 .4
3 .2
3. 0
2. 1

8. 5
8. 6
8. 4
7. 8
5 .9

5 .3
4 .9
5 .2
5. 8
7. 1

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
u nder
under
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0
$ 1 ,7 5 0

---------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1 .6
( 2 .4 )
"

7 .2
3. 4
3. 7
2 .7
2 .2

7. 5
5. 8
5. 1
6. 1
7 .4

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
u n d er

$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0
$ 2 ,0 0 0

----------------------------------------------------

-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

1 .6
1 .9
3 .2
.4
.2

5 .4
5 .9
2. 0
2. 5
1 .2

$ 2 ,0 0 0
$ 2 ,0 5 0
$ 2 ,1 0 0
$ 2 ,1 5 0
$ 2 ,2 0 0
$ 2 ,2 5 0

and
and
and
and
and
and

u n d e r $ 2 ,0 5 0 ----------u n d e r $ 2 ,1 0 0 -----------u n d e r $ 2 ,1 5 0 -----------u n d e r $ 2 ,2 0 0 -----------u n d e r $ 2 ,2 5 0 ----------o v e r ----------------------------

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

.1
1 .3
( .4 )
-

2. 7
1 .6
2 :1
.8
.4
2 .5

-

-

_

-

T o t a l -------------------------------------

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

N u m b er of e m p l o y e e s --------------------

9, 828

3 0 ,8 7 3

64, 671

7 1 ,6 3 7

3 9 ,0 5 6

1 8 ,6 6 9

5 ,4 2 4

1 ,2 1 7

A v e r a g e m on th ly s a l a r i e s -----------

$548

$609

$705

$832

$960

$ 1 , 114

$ 1 ,3 7 3

$ 1 ,5 8 8

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




19
T a ble 3.

P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s 2
b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r ie s , w in te r 1960—61— C on tinued
M an agers,
o f fi c e s e r v ic e s

D ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l

Job a n a ly sts
A v e ra g e m on th ly s a la r ie s
I
$325 and u nd er $350 ------------------$35 0 and un d er $37 5 -------------------$375 and u nd er $400 -------------------

9 .0
.7

II

IV

( 1 .6 )
3. 6

_
-

"

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
"

_
“

_
-

_

III

IV

IV

-

_
-

_

I

III

II

I

III

II

$400
$42 5
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

u nd er
u nd er
un d er
un d er

$425
$450
$475
$500

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6 .2
5. 5
1 1 .7
13. 8

2 .2
3. 8
5. 6
15. 3

_
1 .4
3. 6

_
-

_
( 0 .8 )

_
-

_
-

-

( 1 .9 )
5 .9
9 .6

_
4. 1

-

-

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

u n d er
un d er
un d er
u nd er

$525
$550
$575
$600

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

14. 5
1 5 .9
1 1 .7
6 .2

7. 0
12. 7
7. 6
5 .4

5. 3
7. 5
7. 4
6 .4

_
0 .4
1 .3
.6

3. 6
5. 0
7. 8
-

_
(1. 1)
1 .5
2. 5

-

_
-

2. 8
5 .2
7. 5
1 6 .9

1. 1
2. 3
6. 5
5 .4

2. 0
"

-

$600
$625
$650
$67 5

and
and
and
and

un d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$625
$650
$675
$700

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

3 .4
( 1 .4 )

8. 0
6. 8
1 0 .2
1 .0

9. 0
1 2 .2
7. 0
7. 0

1 .9
4 .4
5. 7
4. 8

0
5
4
8

4. 6
2. 5
5 .2
4. 6

_
2. 6
1 .4

_
-

15. 7
8. 7
8 .9
3. 5

6.
7.
8.
6.

0
2
5
0

4 .9
2 .8
9 -3
2. 8

2 .9
-

$70 0
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

un d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$725
$750
$775
$800

-----------------—
-------------------------------------------------------

_
-

3 .2
1. 0
1 .4
.4

5. 3
5 .4
6. 3
1 .9

6. 7
5 .5
13. 5
10. 7

8. 1
7 .9
10. 4
1 0 .4

9 .0
4. 3
5. 3
1. 8

1. 3
.6
4 .6

_
-

3. 0
4. 0
3. 0
1 .2

1 2 .2
12. 1
3. 8
4. 6

2. 8
9 .3
1 .6
6 .9

1 .5
2 .9
7. 4
-

$800
$825
$850
$87 5

and
and
and
and

un d er
u n d er
un d er
un d er

$825
$850
$87 5
$900

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

1 .6
1 .4
-

4.
2.
.
2.

1
8
5
3

9 .4
8. 0
4 .2
6. 1

.
.
4.
1.

9 .4
9 .2
7. 6
5. 1

2. 8
9 .3
1 .8
1 .8

( 0 .3 )
2. 0
4. 6
-

_
.9
-

3 .9
4. 7
3. 4
1. 0

1 1 .0
10. 6
4. 5
9 .3

1. 5
10. 3
1 .5
1 .5

$900
$925
$950
$97 5

and
and
and
and

un d er
un d er
un d er
un d er

$925 ------------------$950 ------------------$975 ------------------$ 1 ,0 0 0 ---------------

_
-

_
-

.8
2. 6
(l.D

1 .7
2. 1
3. 1
3. 1

5. 0
2. 8
3. 1

3.
.
5.
3.

1
3
1
1

1 0 .2
2 .8
5. 3
6. 8

1 .3
1. 7
3. 0
4. 3

.2
1.2
"

4. 1
2. 0
( 1 .1 )
-

6. 1
2 .4
2. 8
3. 3

1. 5
5 .9
11. 8
1. 5

1 1 .8
2 .4
6 .9
5. 8
4. 7

9. 6
6. 0
1 5 .2
1 1 .3
6. 3

_
-

_
-

2. 0
2. 8
1 .2
( 1 .2 )
-

1 1 .8
19. 1
8. 8
1 .5

5. 6
3. 3
3. 6
6 .6
3. 3

_
-

_
-

_
-

2 .9
2 .9
-

-

-

-

-

2 .9

.3
3 .6
2 .3
1 .0

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

5.
2.
13.
4.

8
5
0
7

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
un d er

$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0
$ 1 ,2 5 0

---------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

_
-

1 .9
2. 1
1. 1
1. 7
-

1. 7
( .6 )
-

4 .9
.5
3. 0
1 .0
2. 8

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
un d er
un d er
un d er
un d er

$ 1 ,3 0 0 ----------$ 1 ,3 5 0 ----------$ 1 ,4 0 0 ----------$ 1 , 4 5 0 ----------$ 1 ,5 0 0 -----------

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
1 .4
( 1 .2 )
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

4. 7
5. 7
.1
1 .0
2. 8

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
und er
un d er
u n d er
u nd er

$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0
$ 1 ,7 5 0

---------------------------------------------------

_

_

_

_

_

_

( 2 .9 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

u nd er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
un d er

$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0
$ 2 ,0 0 0

---------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

.3
3. 3
( 1 .0 )

-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2 ,0 0 0 and und er $ 2 ,0 5 0 ----------$ 2 ,0 5 0 and u nd er $ 2 ,1 0 0 ----------$ 2 , 100 and o v e r ---------------------------T otal -------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1 ,8 1 9

872

302

427

613

246

68

$833 $1,037

$ 1 ,2 1 1

$60 4

$ 70 7

$814

$1,002

N u m ber of e m p lo y e e s ------------------

145

498

796

524

642

A v e ra g e m on th ly s a l a r i e s -----------

$493

$561

$662

$801

$723

100. 0

_

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

\ In o r d e r to a v oid show in g s m a ll p r o p o r t io n s o f e m p lo y e e s s c a t t e r e d at o r n e a r the e x t r e m e s o f the d is trib u tio n s f o r
s o m e o c c u p a t io n s , the p e r c e n t a g e s o f e m p lo y e e s in th e se in te rv a ls have b e e n a cc u m u la te d and a r e show n, in m o s t c a s e s , in
the in te rv a l a b ov e o r b e lo w the e x tr e m e in te r v a l con tain in g at le a s t 1 p e r c e n t . The p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n t in g th e se e m p lo y e e s
a r e show n in p a r e n t h e s e s .
2 F o r s c o p e o f study, s e e table in a pp en dix A .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u te d as fo llo w s : 0 .2 p e r c e n t at $ 2 ,4 0 0 to $ 2 ,4 5 0 ; 0 .2 p e r c e n t at $ 2 ,4 5 0 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 ; 1 .0 p e r c e n t
at $ 2 ,5 0 0 to $ 2 ,5 5 0 ; 2 . 4 p e r c e n t at $ 2 ,6 0 0 to $ 2 ,6 5 0 ; 0 .5 p e r c e n t at $ 2 ,6 5 0 to $ 2 ,7 0 0 ; 1 .5 p e r c e n t at $ 2 ,7 0 0 to $ 2 ,7 5 0 ;
5 .1 p e r c e n t at $ 2 ,9 0 0 to $ 2 ,9 5 0 .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g,




sum o f in d ivid u al ite m s m a y not equ a l t o ta ls .

20




T a b le 4.

P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d te c h n ic a l and c l e r i c a l
o c c u p a tio n s 2 by a v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s , w in ter 1960—
61
D ra fts m e n ,
ju n io r

A v e ra g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s

D ra fts m e n ,
s e n io r

T racers

0 .4
6 .3
6. 1
1 1 .5
12. 5
1 3 .0

U nder $50 ________________________________
$5 0 and under $ 5 5 ------------------------------------$55 and under $ 6 0 ------------------------------------$60 and under $65 _ --------------------------------$65 and under $ 7 0 ------------------------------------$ 7 0 and under $75

-

-

( 0 .9 )
1 .7
3 .5
5 .3

-

$75
$80
$85
$90
$95

$ 8 0 -------------------------------- —
$ 8 5 -----------------------------$ 9 0 ------------------------------------$ 9 5 ---------------------- _ ------$ 1 0 0 _______________________

9 .0
10. 3
12. 6
13. 3
1 0 .4

( 1 .5 )
.1.5
4 .2
5 .6

1 5 .6
9 .7
7 .8
6. 8
4 .9

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

-

$1 0 0
$ 1 05
$ 11 0
$115
$ 12 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
u nd er
under
u nd er
under

$ 1 0 5 ------------ __ ---- ----$ 1 1 0 _____________________
$ 1 1 5 _____________________
$ 1 2 0 --------------------------------$ 1 2 5 ---------------------------------

9 .3
5 .7
4 .2
3 .8
3 .8

8. 0
8 .9
9 .7
9 .7
9 .4

3 .9
(1 .6 )
-

$125
$13 0
$135
$ 14 0
$145

and
and
and
and
and

u nd er
under
under
under
under

$ 1 3 0 --------------------------------$ 1 3 5 -------------------------- _
$ 1 4 0 ----------------------------- $145 ------------------ -----------$ 1 5 0 ---------------------------------

2 .3
1 .5
1 .2
(1 .3 )
-

8. 1
7. 1
6. 0
5 .3
3 .3

-

$ 15 0
$ 16 0
$17 0
$ 1 80

and
and
and
and

und er $ 1 6 0 --------------------------------under $ 1 7 0 ----------------- --------- ,,
under $ 1 8 0 --------------------------------o v e r _______________________ ____

_

5 .3
3 .9
1 .6
. .7

T o ta l

— -----------

A v e ra g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s -

_

_

-

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

---------

1 9 ,4 0 2

3 7 ,2 5 4

2, 635

------------- —

$ 9 4 .0 0

$ 1 2 2 .5 0

$ 7 5 .5 0

-----------------

N u m ber o f e m p l o y e e s ------

-

.
-

-----

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .

—

21
T a b le 4. P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d te c h n ic a l and c le r i c a l
o c c u p a tio n s 2 b y a v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s , w in te r 1960—
61— C on tinued
B o o k k e e p in g m a ch in e
o p era tors

A v e ra g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s

I

U nder $35 ______________________________
$35 and under $ 4 0 _____________________
$ 4 0 and under $ 4 5 ____________________
$45 and under $ 5 0 _ __ _
_ ___

I

II

C le r k s ,
file

C le r k s ,
a cco u n tin g
II

K ey­
punch
opera­
tors

II

I

O ffic e S te n o g r a ­ S te n o g r a ­
b oys or
ph ers,
ph ers ,
g ir ls
g e n e r a l te c h n ic a l

-

( 0 .2 )
1 .0
8. 3
1 5 .6

$50
$55
$60
$65
$70

and
and
and
and
and

under
nnd#>r
under
under
under

$55 __
___
__ _ __
$60 _
$ 6 5 ____________________
$ 7 0 __
_____
$75
_ _ _ _ _ _ __ ____

1 4 .5
1 8 .6
2 0 .2
1 2 .6
7 .8

1 .8
4 .6
9 .3
1 2 .5
12. 3

7. 3
9 .8
13. 0
1 2 .1
1 0.1

( 0 .5 )
1 .0
2 .0
3 .5
5 .3

20. 0
1 6 .8
14. 3
8. 0
5 .0

6 .1
1 0 .3
1 2 .7
12. 3
1 1 .6

6 .5
8 .7
1 2 .5
13. 1
1 1 .7

2 0 .5
20. 1
1 3 .6
8. 0
5 .0

3 .2
5. 3
9 .7
1 1 .3
1 1 .3

( 0 .6 )
2 .3
5 .5
7 .9

$7 5
$80
$85
$90
$95

and
and
and
and
and

u nd er
u nd er
u nd er
u nd er
u nd er

___ _____ _
$80 _
$ 8 5 ____________________
$ 9 0 ____________________
$95 _
___
_ _
$ 1 0 0 __ _ _ _ _ _ _
__

5 .6
3 .7
2 .3
1 .7
1 .2

1 1 .6
1 2 .0
1 0 .6
10. 0
6 .2

1 1 .5
7 .8
5 .2
4 .9
4 .3

7 .4
8 .2
8 .7
9 .0
9 .2

4 .4
2 .8
1 .9
( 1 .8 )

1 0 .9
1 0 .8
5 .7
4 .4
5 .3

12. 0
9 .5
6 .5
8 .4
4 .6

4 .2
5 .0
2 .5
1 .5
(-9 )

1 2 .9
1 1 .9
9 .0
8. 8
6 .6

10. 0
1 1 .0
1 9 .6
1 7 .2
8 .6

( .9 )
_
_
_

3 .5
2 .7
( 1 .8 )

3. 1
2 .7
1 .5
( 1 .7 )

8 .5
9 .5
7 .0
5 .4
4 .6

4. 1
2 .4
(2 .3 )

5 .6
6 .2
2. 5
1 .3
1 .2

$100
$ 1 05
$110
$115
$ 12 0

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
u nd er
un d er
und er
un d er

$125
$ 13 0
$135
$ 14 0
$145

and
and
and
and
and

und er $ 1 3 0 __________________
u nd er $135 __ _
_ __ _
under $ 1 4 0 __________________
u nd er $ 1 4 5 _____
o v e r __________________________

T o t a l __

$ 1 0 5 __________________
$110
$ 1 1 5 __________________
$ 1 2 0 __________________
$125 __ ____ __

_____ _ __

N u m ber o f e m p lo y e e s

__

__ _

______ _ __ __

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s

__ _

See footn otes at end o f ta b le .




0 .2
2. 1
8 .6

_
0 .9

0. 1
1 .3
3 .6

-

-

_

.

_
-

_
_
_

100. 0

100. 0

_
_
100. 0

-

2 .5
2 .3
2 .1
1 .6
1 .8
100. 0

_
_
_
_

0. 3
2 .5

0. 6
2 .5

0 .3
6. 0
1 2 .6

( 0 .2 )
1 .0

2 .5
1 .8
1 .3
( 1 .5 )

_
_
-

_
-

-

.

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
-

100. 0

2. 0
1. 1
( .3 )

100. 0

-

-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
.
_
_
_

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

-

-

_

( .6 )
.
_
_
100. 0

2 5 ,5 6 2

5, 341

5 2 ,3 5 9

38, 393

36 ,1 2 1

1 1 ,2 6 0

4 5 ,0 6 1

2 4 ,3 5 5

90, 906

7, 371

$ 6 3 .0 0

$ 7 9 . 00

$ 7 3 .5 0

$ 9 8 . 00

$ 5 8 . 00

$ 7 4 .5 0

$ 7 3 .5 0

$ 6 0 .0 0

$ 7 8 .5 0

$ 8 8 . 00

22
T a ble 4. P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d t e c h n ic a l and c le r i c a l
o c c u p a tio n s 2 b y a v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r ie s , w in te r 1960—61----C on tin u ed

S w itch b o a rd
op era tors

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s

0. 4
1. 1
2. 3

U nder $40 ---------------------------------------------------$4 0 and un d er $ 4 5 ------------------------------------$4 5 and under $50 -------------------------------------

S w itch b o a rd
op era tors,
s p e c ia l

-

( 0 .8 )

T a b u la tin g -m a chine
o p era tors
L

T y p ists
in

II

I

II

-

( 0 .2 )
1 .9
a. 0

( 0 .9 )

0 .4
1 .6

-

-

0. 1

-

$50
$55
$60
$6 5
$70

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$5 5 ------------------------------------$60 ------------------------------------$65 ------------------------------------$ 7 0 ------------------------------------$75 -------------------------------------

5. 1
6 .2
8. 7
10. 8
1 1 .3

1.
2.
3.
6.
6.

1
6
1
7
1

7. a
9 .8
1 0 .9
1 4 .9
14. 1

1.02. 6
3. 6
5. 1
7. 0

_
( 0 .8 )
1 .7

12.8
17. 0
1 8 .9
14. 7
9 .8

3 .5
7 .4
1 2 .3
14. 0
13. 8

$75
$80
$85
$90
$95

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 8 0 ------------------------------------$ 8 5 ------------------------------------$ 9 0 ------------------------------------$95 ------------------------------------$ 1 0 0 ------------------------------------

12. 7
9 .6
1 1 .9
10. 1
5 .9

9 .0
18. 6
1 5 .2
22. 3
7. 1

11.2.
10. 6
6. 6
4. 6
2. 5

10. 8
13. 6
10. 7
1 1 .0
12. 1

3 .9
5 .2
6 .2
8 .2
IT. 7

6. 5
4. 5
2. 8
1 .7
( 1 .2 )

13. 3
9 .9
8 .9
6. 1
6. 5

$ 1 0 5 --------------------------------$110 --------------------------------$ 11 5 --------------------------------$120 --------------------------------$ 1 2 5 ---------------------------------

2. 3
( 1 .5 )

3. 3
1 .8
1 .6
( .7 )

3. 3
1 .3
( .2 )

8. 1
6 .9
3. 0
2 .4
1 .3

1 1 .5
1 1.1
11. 1
8. 5
6 .9

( .8 )

4 .9
2 .5
3 .2
2 .4

$10 0
$105
$ 110
$11 5
$120

and
and
and
and
and

under
und er
u n d er
u n d er
un d er

$125
$130
$ 13 5
$140

and
and
and
and

u n d er $130 --------------------------------und er $ 13 5 --------------------------------u nd er $140 --------------------------------o v e r ---------------------------------------------

T otal

-------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

'

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

_
-

1 .8
1 .0
( .5 )

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

1 0 0 .0

10ft. 0
6 1 ,8 5 5

3 8 ,1 3 1

$ 6 3 . 50

$ 7 5 . 50

N u m ber o f e m p lo y e e s --------------------------------

1 6 ,3 9 4

1 ,0 4 4

1 2 ,0 9 0

1 8 ,5 4 1

8, 567

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s --------------------------

$ 7 6 .0 0

$ 8 4 . 00

$ 7 2 . 50

$ 8 8 .0 0

$ 1 0 5 .5 0

100. 0

1 In o r d e r to a v o id show in g s m a ll p r o p o r t io n s o f e m p lo y e e s s c a t t e r e d at o r n e a r the e x t r e m e s o f the d is trib u tio n s f o r
s o m e o c c u p a t io n s , the p e r c e n t a g e s o f e m p lo y e e s in th e se in te r v a ls have b e e n a c c u m u la te d and a r e show n, in m o s t c a s e s , in
the in te rv a l a b o v e o r b e lo w the e x t r e m e in te rv a l co n ta in in g a t le a s t 1 p e r c e n t.. T he p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n t in g th ese e m p lo y e e s
a r e show n in p a r e n t h e s e s .
2 F o r s c o p e o f study, s e e table in ap p en d ix A .
N OTE:




B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g, s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not to ta l 100.

23
T a b le 5. P e r q e n t d is trib u tio n o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts 1 w ith supplem entaryc a s h bon d s plan s a p p lyin g to p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e
o c c u p a tio n s stu d ied
by c o m p a r is o n b e tw e e n b o n u se s
p a id in 1959— and J.960— s u r v e y p e r io d s
60
61
P ercen t of
esta b ­
lis h m e n ts

Item

E sta b lis h m e n ts w ith e m p lo y e e s in p r o f e s s io n a l
and a d m in is tr a t iv e o c c u p a tio n s studied:
9, 680
P ercen t

_

..

.

100
44

C ash bon u s p la n s ap p ly in g in both 1959— and 1960— s u r v e y p e r i o d s . __
60
61
B on u ses
B on uses
B on uses
B on u ses

41
1
1
1

pa id in both p e r io d s
p a id in 1960— p e r io d o n ly _ __
61
__ _____ ________
_______
p a id in 1959—
60, but not in 1960— p e r io d __ __
61
__ ___ ___
not pa id in e ith e r p e r io d

1

C a sh b on u s plan d is c o n tin u e d in 1960— p e r io d
61
C a sh b on u s plan in itia te d in 1960— p e r io d
61

_

_ _

(3)
53

No c a s h b on u s plan a p p ly in g in e ith e r 1959— o r 196 0-6 1 p e r io d _________
60

2

In fo rm a tio n not a v a ila b le
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith e m p lo y e e s in p r o f e s s i o n a l and
a d m in is tr a t iv e o c c u p a tio n s stu died w ho w e r e
e lig ib le to p a r t ic ip a t e in c a s h b o n u s e s p a id in
both 1959— and 1960—
60
61 s u r v e y p e r io d s :
N n m h sr
P ercen t
B on us
B on us
B on u s
B on us

_
...

_

..........

3, 927
___

add ed abou t the s a m e to e m p l o y e e 's pay in both p e r io d s _______
ad d ed m o r e to e m p lo y e e 's pay in 1960— p e r i o d ______
61
______
ad d ed l e s s to e m p l o y e e 's pay in 196 0-6 1 p e r i o d __ __________ __
pa id in both p e r io d s , y e a r - t o - y e a r c o m p a r is o n not a v a i l a b l e ___

100
56
13
28
3

1 F o r s c o p e o f study, se e table in a p p e n d ix A.
2 C o v e r a g e in this table is lim it e d to the 9 ,6 8 0 e s ta b lis h m e n ts in the 1960—
61 s u r v e y
w h ich had e m p lo y e e s in the p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d .
An e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t w as c o n s id e r e d as having a c a s h bonus plan if 1 o r m o r e o f its e m p lo y e e s in
the p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a t io n s stu d ied w e r e e lig ib le to p a r t ic ip a t e .
B onus
in fo r m a tio n r e la t e s to the y e a r p r e c e e d in g the 1959—
60 and 1960—
61 s u r v e y p e r io d s .
3 L e s s than 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:




B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g,

su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u a l t o ta ls .




25

Appendix A:

Scope and Method of Survey

Scope of Survey
This survey relates to all 188 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the United
States, excluding Hawaii, as revised through 1959 by the Bureau of the Budget. Coverage
within those areas was limited to establishments in the following industries: Manufacturing;
transportation, communication, electric, gas, and sanitary services; wholesale trade; retail
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; engineering and architectural services; and re­
search, development, and testing laboratories. Establishments with fewer than 250 workers
at the time of reference of the universe data (in general, first quarter of I960) were ex­
cluded. The estimated number of establishments and the total employment within the scope
of the survey, and within the sample actually studied, are listed separately for each major
industry division in the accompanying table. As indicated in the table, and explained later
in detail, the scope of the study was the same for all occupations; however, the survey
consisted of two separate parts, with one sample of establishments studied for the profes­
sional and administrative occupations, and another larger sample for drafting and clerical
occupations.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ithin s c o p e o f s u r v e y 1 and n u m b e r s tu d ie d by in d u s try d iv is io n , w in te r 1 96 0-6 1
W ithin s c o p e
of stu d y 1
In du stry d iv is io n

A ll d iv is io n s s u r v e y e d

____________________

M a n u fa c t u r in g _______
_____________________
N onm anuf ac tur in g :
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , 3 c o m m u n ic a t io n ,
e l e c t r i c , g a s , and s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s ______
W h o le s a le tra d e _______________________________
R e t a il tra d e _
_
„ _____ ___ _
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l esta te
S e r v ic e s :
E n g in e e rin g and a r c h it e c t u r a l
s e r v i c e s ; and r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p ­
m en t, and te s tin g la b o r a t o r ie s o n l y ------

N um ber o f
e s t a b lis h ­
m en ts

W o r k e r s in
e s t a b lis h ­
m e n ts

S tu d ie d f o r p r o f e s s i o n a l
and ad mi n is t r a tiv e
o c c u i nations
N u m b e r o f ; W o r k e r s in
e s t a b lis h ­
e s t a b l is h ­
m en ts
m e n ts

S tu d ied f o r te c h n ica l
and c l e r i c a l
o c c u p a tio n s 2
N um ber o f
W o r k e r s in
e s t a b lis h ­
e s t a b lis h ­
m ents
m en ts

1 1 ,6 9 1

1 1 ,2 8 8 ,0 0 0

1 ,7 2 2

4 ,1 3 7 ,2 7 2

4 , 63 7

6, 698, 569

7 ,4 0 0

7, 299, 700

1 ,1 7 9

2 , 80 7, 981

2 , 571

3, 933, 573

1, 150
52 6
1 , 580
940

1, 625, 000
2 3 7 ,3 0 0
1, 315, 700
716, 600

209
35
161
90

6 9 5 ,9 9 4
2 0 ,8 6 6
32 6 ,1 9 4
22 6, 764

624
235
713
445

1 ,2 1 3 , 194
126, 748
8 8 5 ,1 1 2
4 8 0 ,1 5 4

95

93,7 0 0

48

59, 473

49

59, 788

1 T h e stu dy r e la te s to e s ta b lis h m e n t s in in d u s t r ie s lis t e d e m p lo y in g 250 o r m o r e w o r k e r s in the 188 S tand ard M e t r o ­
p o lita n S t a t is tic a l A r e a s in the U nited S tates (e x c lu d in g H a w a ii) as r e v i s e d throu gh 1959 by the B u re a u o f the B u d get.
2 T h e n ation a l e s t im a t e s f o r the d r a ftin g and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s w e r e d e v e lo p e d f r o m data c o ll e c t e d in the B u r e a u ’ s
o c c u p a tio n a l w age s u r v e y s in m a jo r la b o r m a r k e t s , e x c lu d in g data f o r e s ta b lis h m e n t s not w ithin the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y as
d e t e r m in e d f o r the stu dy o f p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m in is tr a tiv e o c c u p a t io n s .
3 L im it e d to r a i lr o a d , l o c a l and su b u rb a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a te r (fo r e ig n and d o m e s t ic ) , and a ir tr a n s p o r ta tio n
in d u s t r ie s as d e fin e d in the 1957 e d it io n o f the S tan d ard In d u s tr ia l C l a s s i fi c a t io n M an u a l.

Timing of Survey
Salary and related data for the professional and administrative occupations were col­
lected by personal visits to sample establishments during the first half of 1961, largely
between February 1 and May 31. The most recent information available at the time of the
visit was obtained. For the drafting and clerical occupations, the survey was designed to
develop nationwide estimates from data collected in the Bureau's occupational wage surveys
by labor market, conducted between August I960 and June 1961. Although some of the
areas were surveyed in I960, those surveyed in the first half of 1961 (with the areas they
represented in the nationwide estimates) accounted for two-thirds of the office employment
within the scope of the survey in all metropolitan areas combined.




26

Method of Collection
Data were obtained by personal visits of Bureau field economists to representative
establishments within the scope of the su rvey.1
0 Employees were classified according to
occupation and level, with the assistance of company officials, on the basis of uniform job
descriptions.
In comparing actual duties and responsibilities of employees with those in the
survey descriptions, extensive use was made of company occupational descriptions, organi­
zation charts, and other personnel records.
The occupational descriptions used in c la s ­
sifying employees appear in appendix C.
Nature of Data Collected and Presented
The average salaries reported relate to the standard salaries that were paid for
standard work schedules; i . e . , to the straight-time salary corresponding to the em ployee^
normal work schedule excluding overtime hours.
The average salaries presented relate to
employees for whom salary data were available.
Under established policies of some companies, officials were not authorized to pro­
vide information relating to salaries for all occupations studied.
In nearly all instances,
however, information was provided on the nurpber of such employees and the appropriate
occupational classification.
It was thus possible to estimate the proportion of employees
for whom salary data were not available.
As indicated below, these policies more often
related to the higher level positions, mainly because of policies not to disclose pay data
for employees considered a part of the management group or classified in occupational levels
involving a single employee.

Number of
job
categories
6

______________________________

Percent of employees classified in professional
and administrative occupations surveyed for
whom salary data were not available
10 or more percent
Directors of personnel IV (2 7 percent)
Engineers VIII (21 percent)

Chief accountants IV (19 percent)
Attorneys V (17 percent)
Directors of personnel III (11 percent)
E ngineers VII (10 percent)

9 ----------------------------------------

5 to 9. 9 percent
Chief accountants I, II, and III
Attorneys IV and iVA
Chemists VIII
Directors of personnel I and II
Managers, office services IV

33

-------------------- -------------------------

Less than 5 percent

Comparisons between establishments that provided salary data for each specific o c­
cupational level and those not doing so indicated that the two classes of establishments did
not differ materially in industries represented, employment, or pay structure for other jobs
in this series for which data were available.

1
0
The surveys in major labor markets, from which nationwide estimates were
veloped for the drafting and clerical occupations, provide for collection of data for some
areas by a combination of mail and personal visits in alternate years.
For establishments
reporting by m ail, the occupational classifications are based on those made on personal
visits in the previous year.




de­

27

Occupational employment estimates relate to the total in all establishments within
the scope of the study and not the number actually surveyed.
Employees for whom salary
data were not available were not taken into account in the estimates. In addition, the pro­
fessional and administrative occupations were limited to employees meeting the specific
criteria in each survey definition and were not intended to include all employees in each
field of w ork.1
1 For these reasons, and because of differences in occupational structure
among establishments, the estimates of occupational employment obtained from the sample
of establishments studied serve only to indicate the relative importance of the occupations
and levels as defined for the survey.
These qualifications of the employment estimates do
not materially affect the accuracy of the earnings data.
In the occupations surveyed, both men and women were classified and included in
the occupational employment and earnings estimates.
In the professional, administrative,
and drafting occupations, one or the other sex was sufficiently predominant to preclude
presentation of separate data by sex.
For those clerical occupations in which both men and
women are commonly employed, separate data by sex are available from the occupational
wage survey reports by labor market area.
Sampling and Estimating Procedures
Although the published estimates relate to 188 Standard Metropolitan Statistical
Areas, as revised by the Bureau of the Budget through 1959, the survey was conducted
almost entirely within a sample of 80 a r e a s .1
Within these 80 areas, a sample of estab­
lishments was chosen, so that the sampling plan can be described as a two-stage design.
The sample of 80 areas was based upon the selection of 1 area from a stratum of
similar areas.
The criteria of stratification were region and type of industrial activity.
Each area had a chance of selection roughly proportionate to its total nonagricultural em ­
ployment.
Each of the 35 largest areas formed a stratum by itself, and was certain of
inclusion in the sample.
Each of these areas represented only itself, but each of the 45 other
areas represented itself and similar units.
The design used in the selection of the establishments studied for the professional
and administrative occupations differed from that used in the drafting and clerical occupa­
tions.
As explained earlier, data for the latter occupations were collected in the Bureau’ s
program of occupational wage surveys conducted in the 80 areas.
The establishments in
those surveys were chosen to provide separate area estimates, with industry division detail,
while the design for the survey of professional and administrative occupations was intended
to yield only nationwide data with no industrial breakdown, and hence required fewer
establishments.
In the case of drafting and clerical occupations, each establishment sample within
the area was selected independently to permit the presentation of separate data for that
area.
These samples were selected from a list of establishments stratified by size (em­
ployment) and industry.
A greater proportion of the large establishments was selected, but
in combining the data each establishment was given its appropriate weight— i e . , where an
establishment was chosen as one of four, it was given a weight of four.
Nationwide estimates for the drafting and clerical occupations in 4, 600 establish­
ments were formed by applying to each set of data the weights needed to expand these into
estimates for the stratum represented by the sample area, and then combining these stratum
estimates.
In the case of the 3 5 large self-representing areas, these weights were one.
In each of the 45 smaller areas, the weight was the ratio of the total nonagricultural em ­
ployment in the stratum to that in the sample area.1
2

1 Engineers, for example, are defined to permit classification of employees engaged
1
in engineering work within a band of eight levels, starting with inexperienced engineering
graduates and excluding only those within certain fields of specialization or in positions
above those covered by level VIII.
By way of contrast, such occupations as chief account­
ants and directors of personnel are defined to include only those with responsibility for a
specified program and with duties and responsibilities as indicated for each level of work
included.
12 In a few instances, establishments outside the 80 areas but within the 188 areas
were added to the sample in certain industries when it was not possible to obtain within
the sampled area a representative establishment for the stratum.




28
In the study of professional and administrative occupations, the sampling procedure
called for the detailed stratification of the universe of 188 areas by industry and size of
establishment.
Where one of several areas was selected for study to represent a stratum
of several areas, an estimate of the universe for that stratum was derived by weighting
the industry and size-of-establishm ent employment totals in the sample area by the weight
used in the larger survey described in the preceding paragraph. From this estimated uni­
verse, a sample of approximately 1,700 establishments was selected systematically so that
each geographic unit was represented proportionately within the size-of-establishm ent and
industry c la s s e s .13 Although no conscious effort was made to control the representation
for each area through all the industries, a count shows that each area contributes nearly
its proportionate share to the whole sample.
Each industry was sampled separately, the sampling rates depending on the im ­
portance of the industry as an employer of the jobs surveyed, particularly in the scientific
and engineering series.
Within each industry, a greater proportion of large establishments
was selected, but as in the clerical surveys, each establishment was weighted to represent
all other units of the same cla ss.
Estimates of Sampling Error
The survey procedure yields estimates with widely varying sampling errors, de­
pending on the frequency with which the job occurs, and the dispersion of salary scales.
Thus, for engineers III, the relative standard error of the average salary is 0 .5 percent,
whereas for chemists VIII, it is 3 .8 percent.
Most of the relative errors are less than
1.75 percent for the professional and administrative occupations.
The nationwide estimates
for the clerical and drafting room occupations, based on the much larger sample, are sub­
ject to much smaller sampling error.

13
A few of the largest employers, together employing nearly 900, 000, gave data on
a companywide basis.
These companies were eliminated from the universe to which the
preceding sampling procedure applied.
The sample count includes the establishments of
these companies within the 188 metropolitan areas.




29

Appendix B: Survey Changes in 1960—61
In initiating an annual nationwide salary survey of professional, administrative,
technical, and clerical occupations by defined levels of work, it was expected that improve­
ments could be made in at least some aspects of the survey in the first few years.
The
1959—
60 survey was designed, in part, to provide supplementary information that would be
useful in reexamining the industrial and occupational coverage.
Changes in Scope of Survey
The industrial and geographic scope of the survey was the same in both periods,
with the exception of the minimum size of establishment included.
The 1960— survey was
61
limited to establishments employing 250 or more workers, whereas the 1959-^60 survey in­
cluded establishments employing 100 or more workers.
Although the establishment sample
in the most recent study was selected almost entirely from 80 areas as compared with a
sample selected largely from 60 areas in the earlier period, the data were appropriately
weighted so that both surveys relate to all 188 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in
the United States, excluding Hawaii, as revised through 1959 by the Bureau of the Budget.
The effect of the change in the minimum size of establishment covered was eliminated from
data used in the analysis of salary changes during the year, by excluding data for establish­
ments with fewer than 250 workers from the 1959—
60 survey tabulations.
This change in the
1959—
60 survey results reduced the number of workers in some occupations, mainly in the
clerical and drafting groups, but had comparatively little effect upon average salaries for
most occupations studied.
Changes in Occupational Definitions
A number of changes were suggested as a result of the experience of Bureau field
economists and employers in applying the occupational definitions in the 1959—
60 survey.
As indicated below, most of the changes in definitions were clarifications and refinements,
or improvements in organization, to obtain uniformity in interpretation.
For the professional and administrative occupations in which changes were made in
the definitions, the corresponding level designations in the 1959—
60 survey are shown
Dif­
ferences in average salaries for equivalent levels of work may reflect reclassification of
employees in accordance with changes in definitions, in addition to actual changes in salary
rates.
No changes were made in the definitions for drafting and clerical occupations.
Accountant.— A general description of the accounting series was added which spec­
ifies the minimum accounting program responsibilities and professional background require­
ments that are included. To assist in distinguishing levels of responsibility, factors to be
considered were explained in more detail, and separate definitions were established for
accountants and chief accountants.
The addition of a beginning professional accounting level,
which was specifically excluded previously, changed the Roman numeral relationships.
The
approximate relationship among levels is indicated below.
1960— level designations:
61
Accountant ________________
Chief accountant __________
1959— corresponding
60
levels:
Accountant ________________

I
-

II

-

III
-

IVV I II III

I

II

IIIIV

V

IV V
-

-

Auditor.— Minor changes were made to exclude more clearly employees in positions
not requiring full professional accounting training.
This change eliminated some employees
previously included, but had little effect upon comparability of the survey data for the various
levels surveyed in the two periods.
I960 level designations ---------------------------1959— corresponding levels -----------------60




I
I

II
II

III
III

IV
IV

30
Attorney. — The introduction to the level definitions was revised to exclude employees
in patent work requiring professional competence in another field such as engineering in
addition to law, and to exclude specialists such as those examining or investigating claims
which did not require use of full professional legal training.
Intermediate levels IIIA and
IVA were added which resulted in the inclusion of a few employees previously omitted and
in the transfer of some of the employees previously classified in levels III, IV, or V .
Level
VI was excluded from the 1960—
61 survey.
The approximate relationship among levels is
as follows:
1960-61 level designations
1959— corresponding
60
levels _______________________

I II III IIIA IV IVA V
I II III

IV

-

-

V VI

Chemist. — To facilitate classification of employees by level of work, the factors
to be considered in determining levels were arranged in the same order under uniform sub­
headings within each level definition.
Levels I and II were revised to more clearly exclude
technicians in terminal positions, by greater emphasis upon professional background and
level of development toward full professional competence rather than upon level of productive
work performed.
The number of levels surveyed was increased by adding two higher levels,
VII and VIII.
In applying the definitions for levels VII and VIII, it was necessary to review
previous classifications in levels V and VI, which resulted in some reclassification to
higher levels.
1960-61 level designations ___ I II III IV V VI VII VIII
1959— corresponding
60
levels ________________________ I II III IV V VI
Engineer. — Changes and the relationship among levels covered in the two survey
periods are the same as indicated above for chemist.
Job Analyst. ----Changes were limited to clarifications in the definition for level IV to
identify more clearly the kinds of jobs analyzed and evaluated, and the nature of supervision
received at that level.
No changes were made in the level designations.
1960— level designations ------------- ------------ I
61
1959—
60 corresponding levels ------------------ I

II
II

III
III

IV
IV

Director of Personnel. — For more uniform application of the level definitions, this
category was revised to include only directors of personnel with responsibility for specific
personnel functions as defined in the introduction.
The level definitions also were revised
and reorganized to permit taking into account more combinations of job factors in deter­
mining appropriate level classifications.
These changes had considerable influence upon
comparability with corresponding levels surveyed previously, but resulted in more accurate
classification of employees with equivalent responsibilities into the same level of work.
Manager, Office Services. — Statements were added to indicate more clearly the
types of office services responsibilities to be considered in determining appropriate level
classifications.
No changes were made in the level designations or definitions.
1960— level designations ------------------------- I
61
1959— corresponding levels -------------------- I
60

II
II

III
III

IV
IV

Draftsm en. — No changes were made in the definitions for junior draftsman, senior
draftsman, or tracer.




C lerical.— No changes were made in any of the definitions for the clerical occupations.

31

Appendix C: Occupational D efinitions
The primary purpose of preparing job definitions for the Bu­
reau’ s wage surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into ap­
propriate occupations or levels within occupations, workers who are
employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrange­
ments from establishment to establishment and from area to area.
This is essential in order to permit the grouping of occupational wage
rates representing comparable job content. To secure comparability
of job content, some occupations and work levels are defined to in­
clude only those workers meeting specific criteria as to training, job
functions, and responsibilities.
Because of this emphasis on inter­
establishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the
Bureau’ s occupational definitions may differ significantly from those in
use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes.

ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS

ACCOUNTANT
Performs accounting work requiring professional knowledge of the theory and prac­
tice of recording, classifying, examining, and analyzing the data and records of financial
transactions. Personally or by supervising others provides accounting service to management
by maintaining the books of account, accumulating cost or other similar data, preparing
reports and statements, and maintaining the accounting system by interpreting, supplementing,
and revising the system as necessary. The work requires a professional knowledge of ac­
counting and a bachelor*s degree in accounting or equivalent experience and education com­
bined.
(See also chief accountant.)
Accountant (

General characteristics. ----At this beginning professional level, position is distinquished from nonprofessional positions by the variety of assignments; rate and scope of
development expected of the incumbent; and the existence, implicit or explicit, of a planned
training program designed to give the beginning accountant practical experience in the opera­
tions of an established accounting system .
Learns to apply the principles, theories, and
concepts of accounting to a particular accounting system .
Direction received. — Works under close supervision of an experienced accountant.
The guidance and supervision received are directed primarily to the development of the
accountants professional ability and to the evaluation of his potential for advancement.
Limits of assignments are clearly defined, methods of procedure are specified, kinds of
items to be noted and referred to supervisor are detailed.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Many of the assignments will include duties
some of which may be nonprofessional in nature such as proving arithmetical accuracy;
examining standard accounting documents for completeness, internal accuracy, and con­
formance with specific accounting requirements; tracing and reconciling records of financial
transactions; and preparing detailed statements and schedules for reports.
The presence
of such nonprofessional tasks, provided they are part of the training and development pro­
ce ss, do not prevent the matching of a job if it otherwise meets this definition.
Responsibility for direction of others. — Usually none.
Accountant R

General characteristics. — At this continuing developmental level the professional
accountant makes practical applications of technical accounting practices and concepts beyond
the mere application of detailed rules and instructions. Assignments are designed to expand
his practical experience and to develop his professional judgment in the application of basic
accounting techniques to simple professional problems* He is expected to be competent in
the application of standard procedures and requirements to routine transactions, and to raise
questions about unusual or questionable items and suggest solutions.




32

ACCOUNTANT— Continued

Direction received. — Work is reviewed closely to verify its general accuracy and
coverage of unusual problems, to insure conformance with required procedures and special
instructions, and to insure his professional growth. His progress is evaluated in terms of
his ability to apply his professional knowledge to basic accounting problems in the day-to-day
operations of an established accounting system.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Prepares routine working papers, schedules,
exhibits, and summaries indicating the extent of his examination and developing and sup­
porting his findings and recommendations.
This includes the examination of a variety of
accounting documents to verify accuracy of computations and to ascertain that all transactions
are properly supported, are in accordance with pertinent regulations, and are classified and
recorded according to acceptable accounting standards.
Responsibility
few clerks.

for

direction

of others. — Usually none,

although may supervise a

Accountant HI

General characteristics. ----Performs professional operating or cost accounting work
requiring the standardized application of well established accounting principles, theories,
concepts, and practices.
Receives detailed instructions concerning the overall accounting
system and its objectives, the policies and procedures under which it is operated, and the
nature of changes in the system or its operation.
Direction received. — A professional accountant at higher level normally is available
to furnish advice and assistance as needed. Work is examined for technical accuracy, ade­
quacy of professional judgment, and compliance with instructions through spot checks, ap­
praisal of results, subsequent processing, analysis of reports and statements, and other
appropriate means.
Typical duties and responsibilities-----The primary responsibility of most positions
at this level is to insure that the day-to-day operations of the segment or system are
carried out in accordance with accounting principles and the policies and objectives of the
accounting system .
Within limits of delegated responsibility, the accountant makes the
day-to-day decisions concerning the accounting treatment of financial transactions.
He is
expected to recommend solutions to complex problems and propose changes in the account­
ing system, but he has no authority to effectuate these solutions or changes. His solutions
are derived from his own knowledge of the application of well established principles and
p r a c t i c e s or by r e fe r r in g the p r o b le m to his su p e rior for solution.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — In most instances directs the work of
a subordinate nonprofessional staff.
Accountant IV

General characteristics. — Performs professional operating or cost accounting work
which requires the application of well established accounting principles, theories, concepts
and practices to a wide variety of difficult problems. Receives instructions concerning the
objectives and operations of the overall accounting system.
At this level, compared with
level III, the technical accounting problems are more difficult and a greater degree of co­
ordination among more numerous types of accounting records and operations may be essential.
Direction received. — An accountant at higher level normally is available to furnish
advice and assistance as needed. Work is reviewed for adequacy of professional judgment,
compliance with instructions, and overall accuracy and quality by spot checks and appraisal
of results.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — As at level III, a primary characteristic of
most positions at this level is the responsibility of operating an accounting system or seg­
ment in the intended manner. Makes day-to-day decisions concerning the accounting treat­
ment of financial transactions. He is expected to recommend solutions to complex problems
beyond the scope of his responsibility and to propose changes in the accounting system.
But he has no authority to act independently on these problems.




33

ACCOUNTANT— Continued

Responsibility for direction of others. — Accounting
include professional accountants.

staff supervised, if any, may

Accountant V

General characteristics. — Performs professional operating or cost accounting work
requiring the application of accounting principles and practices to the solution of very dif­
ficult problems for which no clear precedents exist, or to the development or extension of
theories and practices to problems to which they have not been applied previously. Also at
this level are positions having more than average responsibility because of the nature,
magnitude, or impact of the assigned work0
Is more directly concerned with what the system or segment should be, what op­
erating accounting policies and procedures should be established or revised, and the mean­
ing of the data in the reports and statements for which he is responsible.
Direction received. — An accountant at higher level normally is available to furnish
advice and assistance as needed. Work is reviewed for adequacy of professional judgment,
compliance with instructions, and overall quality.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — In addition to insuring that the system or seg­
ment is operated as intended, is deeply involved in the fundamental and complex technical
and managerial problems.
Responsibility for direction of others. — Accounting staff supervised, if any, includes
professional accountants.
AUDITOR

Audits the financial records of various companies or divisions or components of
companies, to appraise systematically and verify the accounting accuracy of the records
and reports. To the extent determined necessary, examines the transactions entering into
the balance sheet and the transactions entering into income, expense, and cost accounts.
Determines (l) the existence of recorded assets (including the observation of the taking of
physical inventories) and the all inclusiveness of recorded liabilities; (Z) the accuracy of
financial statements or reports and the fairness of presentation of facts therein; (3) the pro­
priety or legality of transactions; and (4) the degree of compliance with established policies
and procedures concerning financial transactions. Evaluates the adequacy of the accounting
system and internal financial control. Makes appropriate recommendations for improvement
as necessary. (Work typically requires a bachelor*s degree in accounting or equivalent ex­
perience and education combined.)
Excluded from the definition are positions which call for auditing duties which may
require detailed knowledge of the operations of a particular company, but do not require full
professional accounting training. For example, when the primary responsibility of the posi­
tion is to check transactions to determine whether or not they conform to prescribed routines
or procedures, it is excluded.
Auditor I

As a trainee auditor at the entering professional level, performs a variety of rou­
tine assignments under the close supervision of an experienced auditor.
Auditor II

This is the continuing developmental level for the professional auditor. As a junior
member of an audit team, independently performs assigned portions of the audit examination
which are limited in scope and complexity, such as physically counting to verify inventory
items, checking assigned subsidiary ledger accounts against supporting bills or vouchers,
checking and balancing various subsidiary ledgers against control accounts, or other similar
duties designed to help the team leader check, verify, or prove the accounting entries.
Responsibility extends only to the verification of accuracy of computations and the deter­
mination that all transactions are properly supported. Any technical problems not covered
by instructions are brought to the attention of a superior.




34

AUDITOR— Continued

Auditor III

(1)
As auditor in charge of an audit team or in charge of individual audits,
pendently conducts regular r e cu rrin g audits in a cco rd a n ce with a p r e s c r i b e d audit p o licy of
the accounts of sm a ller or le s s co m p le x com panies having g r o s s in com e up to a p p r o x i­
m a tely $3 m illio n per y ea r, or s im ila r size branch or su bsidiary organizations of la rg e r
co m p a n ie s. Under m inim um su p erv ision , either working alone, or with the a ssista n ce of one
or two subordinate auditors, examines transactions and v e r if ie s accounts; o b s e r v e s and evalu ­
ates lo c a l accounting p r o c e d u r e s and internal co n trols; p r e p a r e s audit working papers and
submits an audit rep ort in the re q u ire d pattern containing recom m e n d a tion s for needed changes
or im p r o v e m e n t s , or (Z) as a m e m b e r of an audit team auditing a la r g e r and m o r e com p lex
organization (approxim ately $4 to $Z5 m illio n g r o s s in com e per y ea r), independently p e r fo r m s
the audit examination o f a m a jo r segment of the audit such as the checking, v e rifica tio n , and
balancing o f all accounts r e c e iv a b le and accounts payable, the analysis and v e rifica tio n of
a sse ts and r e s e r v e s , or the in sp ection and the evaluation of con tro ls and p r o c e d u r e s .
Auditor IV

(1) As auditor in charge of an audit team or of individual audits under minim um
su p erv isio n with the a ssista n ce of approxim ately five subordinate auditors, independently
conducts regu la r r e c u r r in g audits of com panies having g r o s s in com e of approxim ately $4 to
$24 m illion per year err in com panies with much la r g e r g r o s s in c o m e s , audits of a c ­
counts o f branch or su bsidiary organizations of those com pan ies each of which have g r o s s
in com e of $4 to $25 m illio n per y e a r . Plans and conducts the audit and p re p a re s an audit
r e p o r t containing re com m e n d a tio n s for changes or im p rove m en ts in accounting p r a c t i c e s ,
p r o c e d u r e s , or p o li c ie s ; or (2) as a m e m b e r of an audit team auditing the accounts of a
la r g e r and m o r e c o m p le x organization (over $30 m illion g r o s s in com e per y e a r), is assigned
re la t iv e ly independent re sp o n sib ility for a m a jo r segment of the audit such as the checking,
v e r if ic a tio n , and balancing of all accounts re ce iv a b le and accounts payable, the analysis
and v e r ific a tio n of a sse ts and r e s e r v e s , or the inspection and evaluation of con trols and
procedures.
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT

R e sp on sib le for directing a total accounting p r o g r a m for a company or for an esta b ­
lishm ent o f a com pany. The m inim um accounting p r o g r a m includes: (l ) G eneral accounting
(maintaining r e c o r d s of a s s e ts , lia b ilities, in co m e , expense, and capital accounts, including
re sp o n sib ilit y for profit and lo s s and balance sheet statements); and (2) with at least one
other m a j o r accounting activity, typically tax accounting, cost accounting, p rop erty accounting,
or sales accounting. It may a lso include such other activities as p a y roll and timekeeping,
tabulating machine operation, e tc. (R espon sibility for an internal audit p ro g ra m is typically
not included. )




The r e sp o n sib ilitie s of the ch ief accountant include all of the following:
(1) Developing, adapting,
the organization.

or

rev isin g an accounting

sy stem to m eet the needs of

(2) Supervising, either d ire ctly or through subordinate s u p e r v is o r s , the operation
o f the sy stem with full management r e sp o n sib ility for the quality and quantity
of w ork p e r fo r m e d , training and development of subordinates, w ork scheduling
and re v ie w , coordination with other parts of the organization serv e d , etc.
(3) Providing a d v iso ry s e r v i c e s to the top management o fficia ls of the organization
s e r v e d as to:
(a) The status o f financial r e s o u r c e s and the financial trends or resu lts of o p ­
erations in a manner that is meaningful to management.
(b) Methods for im proving operations as suggested by his expert knowledge of
the financial situation, e . g . , p ro p o sa ls for im provin g co st con trol, p rop erty
management, and cred it and collectio n , tax reduction, or sim ilar p r o g r a m s .

in d e ­

35

CHIEF ACCOUNTANT— Continued

Definition does not cover positions with responsibility for the accounting program
if they also include (as a major part of the job) responsibility for budgeting; work m easure­
ment; organization, methods, or procedures studies, or similar functions.
Such work is
typical of positions sometimes titled as comptroller, budget and accounting manager, finan­
cial manager, etc.
The number of professional accountants supervised, as used in the fol­
lowing definitions, is recognized to be a relatively crude criterion for
distinguishing between the various definitions. It is to be considered
as less important in the matching process than the other criteria.

Chief Accountant I

Authority and responsibility. ----Directs the accounting program for an establishment
of a company. The accounting system has been established in considerable detail at higher
organizational levels in the company, i . e . , accounts, procedures, and reports to be used
have been prescribed.
The chief accountant has authority, within this prescribed system,
to adapt and expand it to fit the particular needs of the organization served, e .g ., to pro­
vide greater detail; to establish additional accounting controls; to provide special or interim
reports and statements needed by the establishment manager for day-to-day operations, etc.
Technical complexity. — The level of technical complexity of the accounting program
is indicated by the fact that the organization which it serves has relatively few functions,
products, work processes, e tc ., and these tend to be stable and unchanging. The account­
ing system operates in accordance with well established principles and practices or those
of equivalent difficulty which are typical of that industry.
Subordinate staff.----Typically, the subordinate staff in the system for which he is
responsible includes only one or two professional accountants, in addition to clerical, m a­
chine operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel. The subordinate professional account­
ant jobs do not exceed the accountant III job definitions.
Chief Accountant II

Authority and responsibility. — Directs the accounting program for an establishment
of a company. The accounting system has been established in considerable detail at higher
organizational levels in the company, i . e . , accounts, procedures, and reports to be used
have been prescribed.
The chief accountant has authority, within this prescribed system,
to adapt and expand it to fit the particular needs of the organization served, e .g ., to pro­
vide greater detail; to establish additional accounting controls; to provide special or interim
reports and statements needed by the establishment manager for day-to-day operations, etc.
Technical complexity.----The level of technical complexity of the accounting program
is indicated by the fact that the organization which it serves has a relatively large number
of functions, products, work processes, e tc ., requiring substantial adaptations of the basic
system to meet local management needs. (The level of technical complexity of the account­
ing program falls between that described for chief accountant I and chief accountant III. )
Subordinate staff.-— Typically, the subordinate staff in the system for which he is
responsible includes about 5 to 10 professional accountants in addition to clerical, machine
operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel. At least one or two of the subordinate pro­
fessional accountant jobs match the. accountant IV job definition.
or
Authority and responsibility. — Directs the accounting program for an establishment
of a company when the delegated authority to modify the basic accounting system established
at higher organizational levels within the company clearly exceeds that described as typical
of chief accountant I.
The basic accounting system is prescribed only in broad outlines
rather than in specific detail, e .g ., while certain major financial reports, overall accounts,
general policies, e tc ., are required by the basic system, the chief accountant has broad




36
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT— Continued

latitude to decide what specific methods, procedures, accounts, reports, e tc ., are to be
used within the organizational segment he serves.
He has authority to evaluate and take
final action on recommendations for changes in that portion of the system for which he is
responsible, but he must secure prior approval from higher organizational levels for any
changes which would affect the basic system prescribed by such higher levels. Accounting
reports and statements prepared reflect the events and progress of the entire organizational
segment of the company for which he is responsible, and usually these reports represent
consolidations of accounting data submitted by subordinate segments of the organization which
have accounting responsibilities. (This degree of authority is most charateristically found at
an organizational level (see chief accountant III) and the plant level (see chief accountant I).
However, if a similar degree of authority has been delegated to the plant level, the chief
accountant at such a place should be matched with this definition. )
Technical complexity. — The level of technical complexity of the accounting program
is indicated by the fact that the organization which it serves has relatively few functions,
products, work processes, e tc ., and these tend to be stable and unchanging. The account­
ing system operates in accordance with well established principles and practices or those of
equivalent difficulty which are typical of that industry.
Subordinate staff.— Typically, the subordinate staff in the system for which he is
responsible includes about 5 to 10 professional accountants, in addition to clerical, machine
operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel. Most of the subordinate professional account­
ant jobs match the accountant III job definition, but one or two may match accountant IV.
Chief Accountant HI

Authority and responsibility.— Directs the accounting program for an establishment
of a company. The accounting system has been established in considerable detail at higher
organizational levels in the company, i . e . , accounts, procedures, and reports to be used
have been prescribed. The chief accountant has authority, within this prescribed system, to
adapt and expand it to fit the particular needs of the organization served, e .g . , to provide
greater detail; to establish additional accounting controls; to provide special or interim r e ­
ports and statements needed by the establishment manager for day-to-day operations, etc.
Technical complexity. — The degree of technical complexity of the accounting program
is caused by the fact that it serves an organization whose functions, products, work processes,
etc., are very numerous, varied, unique, specialized or which, for similar reasons, puts a
heavy demand on the accounting organization for specialized and extensive adaptations of the
basic system to meet management needs. The accounting system, to a considerable degree,
is developed well beyond the established principles and practices in order to provide methods
for the solution of problems for which no clear precedents exist or to provide for the devel­
opment or extension of theories and practices to problems to which they have not been pre­
viously applied.
Subordinate staff.— Typically, the subordinate staff includes about 15 to ZO profes­
sional accountants, in addition to clerical, machine operation, bookkeeping, and related per­
sonnel. At least one or two of the subordinate professional accountant jobs match the account­
ant V job definition.
or
Authority and responsibility. — Directs the accounting program for an establishment
of a company when the delegated authority to modify the basic accounting system established
at higher organizational levels within the company clearly exceeds that described as typical
of chief accountant I.
The basic accounting system is prescribed only in broad outlines
rather than in specific detail, e .g ., while certain major financial reports, overall accounts,
general policies, e tc ., are required by the basic system, the chief accountant has broad
latitude to decide what specific methods, procedures, accounts, reports, e tc ., are to be
used within the organizational segment he serves.
He has authority to evaluate and take
final action on recommendations for changes in that portion of the system for which he is
responsible, but he must secure prior approval from higher organizational levels for any
changes which would affect the basic system prescribed by such higher levels. Accounting
reports and statements prepared reflect the events and progress of the entire organizational




37

CHIEF ACCOUNTANT'— Continued

segment of the company for which he is responsible, and usually these reports represent
consolidations of accounting data submitted by subordinate segments of the organization which
have accounting responsibilities. (This degree of authority is most characteristically found
at an organizational level in the company which is intermediate between the company head­
quarters level (see chief accountant III) and the plant level (see chief accountant I).
How­
ever, if a similar degree of authority has been delegated to the plant level, the chief ac­
countant at such a place should be matched with this definition.)
Technical complexity. — The level of technical complexity of the accounting program
is indicated by the fact that the organization which it serves has a relatively large number
of functions, products, work processes, etc., requiring substantial adaptations of the basic
system to meet management needs. (The level of technical complexity of the accounting pro­
gram falls between that described for chief accountant I and chief accountant III.)
Subordinate staff.— The subordinate staff in the system for which he is responsible
includes about 15 to 20 professional accountants, in addition to clerical, machine operation,
bookkeeping, and related personnel.
Many of the subordinate professional accountant jobs
match the accountant IV job definition, but some may match accountant V .
or
Authority and responsibility. — Directs the accounting program for an entire company
with or without subordinate establishments. Has complete responsibility for establishing and
maintaining the framework for the basic accounting system used in the company, subject only
to general policy guidance and control usually from a company official responsible for general
financial management, frequently an officer of the company. The chief accountant evaluates
and takes final action on recommendations for basic changes in the accounting system, origi­
nating from subordinate units within the system. Accounting reports and statements prepared
reflect the events and progress of the entire company, and to the extent that subordinate
accounting segments exist, they represent consolidations of accounting data submitted by
these segments.
Technical complexity. — The level of technical complexity of the accounting program
is indicated by the fact that the organization which it serves has relatively few functions,
products, work processes, e tc ., and these tend to be stable and unchanging. The account­
ing system operates in accordance with well established principles and practices or those of
equivalent difficulty which are typical of that industry.
Subordinate staff.— Typically, the subordinate staff in the system for which he is
responsible includes about 5 to 10 professional accountants, in addition to c le r ic a l,‘ machine
operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel. Most of the subordinate professional account­
ant jobs match the accountant III job definition, but one or two may match as high as ac­
countant V .
Chief Accountant IV

Authority and responsibility.— Directs the accounting program for an establishment
of a company when the delegated authority to modify the basic accounting system established
at higher organizational levels within the company clearly exceeds that described as typical
of chief accountant I.
The basic accounting system is prescribed only in broad outlines
rather than in a specific detail, e .g ., while certain major financial reports, overall accounts,
general policies, e tc ., are required by the basic system, the chief accountant has broad
latitude to decide what specific methods, procedures, accounts, reports, e tc ., are to be used
within the organizational segment he serves.
He has authority to evaluate and take final
action on recommendations for changes in that portion of the system for which he is r e ­
sponsible, but he must secure prior approval from higher organizational levels for any changes
which would affect the basic system prescribed by such higher levels. Accounting reports
and statements prepared reflect the events and progress of the entire organizational segment
of the company for which he is responsible, and usually these reports represent consoli­
dations of accounting responsibilities. (This degree of authority is most characteristically
found at an organizational level in the company which is intermediate between the company
headquarters level (see chief accountant III) and the plant level (see chief accountant I. )
However, if a similar degree of authority has been delegated to the plant level, the chief
accountant at such a place should be matched with this definition.)




38

CHIEF ACCOUNTANT— Continued
—

Technical complexity. — The degree of technical complexity of the accounting program
is caused by the fact that it serves an organization whose functions, products, work proc­
e sse s, etc. , are very numerous, varied, unique, specialized or which, for similar reasons,
puts a heavy demand on the accounting organization for specialized and extensive adaptations
of the basic system to meet management needs. The accounting system, to a considerable
degree, is developed well beyond the established principles and practices in order to pro­
vide methods for the solution of problems for which no clear precedents exist or to provide
for the development or extension of theories and practices to problems to which they have
not been previously applied.
Subordinate staff. — Typically, the subordinate staff in the system for which he is
responsible includes about 25 to 40 professional accountants, in addition to clerical, m a­
chine operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel.
Many of the subordinate professional
accountant jobs match the accountant V job definition, but several may exceed that level.
or
Authority and responsibility. — Directs the accounting program for an entire company
with or without subordinate establishments. Has complete responsibility for establishing and
maintaining the framework for the basic accounting system used in the company, subject only
to general policy guidance and control usually from a company official responsible for general
financial management, frequently an officer of the company.
The chief accountant evaluates
and takes final action on recommendations for basic changes in the accounting system," orig­
inating from subordinate units within the system.
Accounting reports and statements pre­
pared reflect the events and progress of the entire company and, to the extent that subor­
dinate accounting segments exist, they represent consolidations of accounting data submitted
by these segments.
Technical complexity. — The level of technical complexity of the accounting program
is indicated by the fact that the organization which it serves has a relatively large number of
functions, products, work p rocesses, etc. , requiring substantial adaptations of the basic
system to meet management needs.
(The level of technical complexity of the accounting pro­
gram falls between that described for chief accountant I and chief accountant III. )
Subordinate sta ff. ----T y p ically, the subordinate staff in the sy stem fo r which he is
responsible includes about 15 to 20 professional accountants, in addition to clerical, ma­
chine operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel.
Most of the subordinate professional
accountant jobs match the accountant IV job definition, but several may match accountant V,
and one or two may even exceed that level.

Chief Accountant V

Authority and responsibility. 14— Directs the accounting program for an entire com­
pany with or without subordinate establishments.
Has complete responsibility for establish­
ing and maintaining the framework for the basic accounting system used in the company,
subject only to general policy guidance and control usually from a company official respon­
sible for general financial management, frequently an officer of the company.
The chief
accountant evaluates and takes final action on recommendations for basic changes in the
accounting system, originating from subordinate units within the system.
Accounting reports
and statements prepared reflect the events and progress of the entire company and, to the
extent that subordinate accounting segments exist, they represent consolidations of accounting
data submitted by these segments.

14
salaries.




Insufficient data were obtained for this level to warrant presentation of average

39

CHIEF ACCOUNTANT— Continued

Technical com plexity.— The degree of technical complexity of the accounting program
is caused by the fact that it serves an organization whose functions, products, work proc­
e sse s, etc. , are very numerous, varied, unique, specialized or which, for similar reasons,
puts a heavy demand on the accounting organization for specialized and extensive adaptations
of the basic system to meet management needs. The accounting system, to a considerable
degree, is developed well beyond the established principles and practices in order to provide
methods for the solution of problems for which no clear precedents exist or to provide for
the development or extension of theories and practices to problems to which they have not
been previously applied.
Subordinate staff. — Typically, the subordinate staff in the system for which he is
responsible includes about 25 to 40 professional accountants, in addition to clerical, machine
operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel.
Many of the* subordinate professional ac­
countant jobs match the accountant V job definition, but several may exceed that level.

ATTORNEYS
ATTORNEY

Perform s work involved in providing consultation and advice to operating officials
of the company with respect to its legal rights, privileges, and obligations. Perform s such
duties as anticipating any legal problems or risks involving the company and advising company
officials; preparing and reviewing various legal instruments and documents, such as contracts
for leases, licenses, sales, purchases, real estate, e tc .; keeping informed of proposed
legislation which might affect the company and advising the appropriate company officials;
examining and checking for legal implications public statements or advertising material;
advising company whether to prosecute or defend law suits; acting as agent of the company
in its transactions; and applying for patents, copyrights, or registration of the company*s
products, processes, devices, and trademarks.
(Patent work which requires training in
a technical field, e . g . , engineering in addition to legal training, is excluded.
Claims ex­
amining, claims investigating, or similar work are excluded even though the work is per­
formed by persons with a L.L. B. degree, unless there is clear evidence that the job actually
requires use of full professional legal training such as that of an attorney who performs
investigative duties as a .preliminary phase of his total responsibility for preparing a case
for trial or actually trying a case in co u rt.)

Attorney I

As a trainee (LJL. B.with membership in bar), performs routine legal work, such
as preparing briefs or drawing up contracts for review and evaluation by attorneys of higher
grade.
Receives immediate supervision in assignments designed to provide training in the
application of established methods and techniques of legal research, drafting of legal in­
struments, etc.
Attorney II

Perform s a variety of legal assignments, e . g . , (l) drawing up contracts which
require some ingenuity and an ability to evaluate the legal sufficiency of contract terms;
(2) preparing draft opinions on legal questions involved in such areas as claim s, grievances,
labor laws, etc. , when the legal question can be resolved relatively easily in the light of
well established facts and clearly applicable precedents. Receives general supervision during
assignments, with most of work reviewed by an attorney of higher grade.
Responsibility for
final action is usually limited to matters which are covered by instructions and prior approval
of a superior.




40

ATTORNEY— Continued

Attorney III

Perform s a variety of legal assignments, primarily in the study and analysis of
legal questions, problems, or cases.
Prepares draft opinions or other kinds of legal work
on legal questions involved in such areas as claim s, grievances, labor laws, etc. , when
the questions are complicated by the absence of legal precedents clearly and directly appli­
cable to the case, or by the different possible constructions which might be placed on either
the facts or the laws and precedents involved. Typically specializes in one legal field, e. g. ,
labor law, real estate, contracts, etc. Receives general supervision during initial and final
stages of assignments, but is expected to conduct work with relative independence.
Respon­
sibility for final action is usually limited to matters covered by legal precedents and in
which little deviation from stahdard forms and practices is involved.
Any decisions or ac­
tions having a bearing on the company's business are reviewed by a superior.
May super­
vise or review the work of a few assistants, normally not attorneys.

Attorney HIA

Similar to attorney III but the work is performed under considerably less close super­
vision and direction.
The attorney is expected to independently investigate the facts, search
out precedents, define the legal and factual issues, draft all necessary documents, opinions,
etc. , and present conclusions and recommendations for review.
Guidance from superiors
during this process occurs only if the problem is clearly more difficult than normal for this
level.
The final product is reviewed carefully, but primarily for overall soundness of legal
reasoning and consistency with company policy, rather than for accuracy of technical detail.

Attorney IV

Responsible for a broad legal area in which assignments cover a wide range of
difficult and complex legal questions and problems. Primarily serves in an advisory capacity,
making studies and developing opinions which may have an important bearing on the conduct
of the company^ business (e. g.., recommending action to protect the company's trademarks
and copyrights in foreign countries).
Receives a minimum of technical legal supervision.
May supervise a small staff of attorneys.

Attorney IVA

Similar to attorney IV but the legal questions and problems are of outstanding diffi­
culty and complexity or of crucial importance to the welfare of the company.
For example,
(1) complex factual and policy issues which require extensive research, analysis, and obtain­
ing and evaluating expert testimony in controversial areas of science, finance, corporate
structure, engineering, e tc .; or (2) cases involve very large sums of money (e .g . , about
$1 million) or, for other reasons, are very vigorously contested.

Attorney V

Plans, conducts, and supervises legal assignments within one or more broad legal
areas.
Supervises a staff of attorneys, and has responsibility for evaluating their perform ­
ance and approving recommendations which may have an important bearing on the conduct of
the company's business. Receives guidance as to company policy but no technical supervision
or assistance except when he might request advice on the most difficult, novel, or important
technical legal questions.
Usually reports to the general counsel or chief attorney of the
company or his immediate deputy.




41

CHEMISTS AND ENGINEERS

CHEMIST

Performs research, development, interpretive, and analytical work to determine the
composition, molecular structure, and properties of substances, to develop or investigate
new materials and p rocesses, and to investigate the transformation which substances undergo.
Work typically requires a B .S . degree in chemistry or equivalent in education and ex­
perience combined.

Chemist I

General characteristics. — As the beginning level of professional work in chemistry,
a bachelor*s degree with major study in chemistry, or equivalent is required.
Typically
receives formal classroom or on-the-job training.
Direction received. — Performs work under close supervision with specific and de­
tailed instructions as to required tasks and results expected.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Assignments are planned to provide experience
in the application of common laboratory techniques and familiarization with methods and
practices in the laboratory. Performs a variety of routine analyses, tests, and operations,
and assists experienced chemists by carrying out detailed steps of experiments.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — None.

Chemist II

General characteristics. — At this continuing developmental level for professional
chemist, work is characterized by selection and application of general and specialized meth­
ods, techniques, and instruments commonly used in the laboratory. May receive advanced
on-the-job training or formal classroom instruction.
Direction received. — Supervisors establish the nature and extent of analysis re ­
quired, specify methods and criteria on new types of assignments, and review work for thor­
oughness of application of methods and accuracy of results.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Analyzes a wide variety of samples for which
there are standard or established methods of analysis or for which the adaptation of standard
methods is obvious or determined by others. Conducts specified phases of research projects
as an assistant to an experienced chemist.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — May supervise a few technicians or aids.

Chemist III

General characteristics. — Performs work requiring application of knowledge of a
specialized field of chemistry and ingenuity in the independent evaluation, selection, and
adaptation of standard methods and techniques.
Direction received. — On routine work, supervision is very general; unusual problems
are resolved with close collaboration of supervisor. Completed work is reviewed for appli­
cation of sound judgment in choice of methods and adequacy of results.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Develops details of research and development
assignments in accordance with a line of approach suggested by the supervisor and adapts
methods to the specific requirements of assignments. Analyzes samples that require special­
ized training because standard methods are unapplicable, because of required interpretive
judgment of quality of substances, or because of required specialized skill in adapting tech­
niques such as microanalysis.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — May supervise a few technicians or aids.




42
CHEMIST— Continued

Chemist IV

General characteristics. — Plans and conducts work in chemistry requiring mastery
of specialized techniques or considerable ingenuity in selecting and evaluating approaches to
unforeseen or novel problems.
Direction received. — Generally works independently of technical supervision but r e ­
fers proposed plans and unusually important or complex problems to supervisor for guidance.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Conducts research assignments requiring the
evaluation of alternate methods of approach.
Undertakes the more complex, and exacting,
or esoteric analytical assignments requiring a specialist in technique or product. Prepares
interpretive reports of results and may provide technical advice on significance of results.
Responsibility for the direction of others.-:—May supervise a small staff of chemists
and technicians.
Chemist V

General characteristics.— Participates in planning research programs on the basis
of specialized knowledge of problems and methods and probable value of results. May serve
as an expert in a narrow specialty making recommendations and conclusions which serve as
the basis for undertaking or rejecting important projects.
Direction received. — Usually discusses important developments with supervisor.
Supervision received relates largely to work objectives and administrative aspects.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — From broad program objectives, plans, organ­
izes, and supervises or conducts research investigations with responsibility for defining
projects and scope and independently selecting lines of approach.
As individual worker, carries out research project requiring origination of new
scientific techniques and mature background of knowledge of related fields of science.
Responsibility for the direction of others. ----May supervise a small group of chemists
engaged in varied research projects or a larger group on routine analytical work.
Chemist VI

General characteristics. — Performs work requiring leadership and expert knowledge
in a specialized field of chemistry. Conceives, plans, and directs projects of a pioneering
nature to create new methods and techniques or to resolve problems which have proved
unusually refractory.
Direction received. — Supervision received is essentially administrative with assign­
ments broadly indicated in terms of objectives.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Determines the kinds of projects and data
needed to meet objectives of programs.
Maintains liaison with related organizations and
represents the laboratory in important conferences with authority to commit the organiza­
tion.
May serve as a consultant to other chemists in the specialty field.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — May plan, organize, direct, and evaluate
the work of a group of chemists.
Chemist VII

General characteristics.— -Supervisor— provides leadership and scientific guidance
for a broad and diversified program in chemistry and related supporting activities such as
to require several subordinate supervisors responsible for programs typically identified with
level VI.
Recommends the facilities, personnel, and funds required to carry out programs
and evaluates accomplishments.




43

CHEMIST— Continued

Individual researcher and consultant— is a nonsupervisory chemist of recognized
leadership status and authoritativeness in his company, in a broad area of specializa­
tion.
Is consulted extensively by associates and others with a high degree of reliance
placed on his scientific interpretations and advice.
Direction received.— Under general administrative direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — -Supervisor----is responsible for an important
segment of a chemical program of a company with extensive and diversified scientific re ­
quirements or the entire chemical program of a company where the program is limited in
scope.
Makes authoritative technical recommendations concerning the scientific objectives
and levels of work which will be most profitable in the light of company requirements and
scientific and industrial trends and developments.
Individual researcher and consultant— selects problems for research and conceives
and plans investigations in which the phenomena and principles are not adequately under­
stood, so that outstanding creativity and mature judgment are required to devise hypoth­
eses and techniques of experimentation and to interpret results. Advises the head of a
large laboratory on complex aspects of extremely broad and important programs with
responsibility for exploring, justifying, and evaluating proposed and current programs
and projects and furnishing advice on unusually complex and novel problems in the spe­
cialty field.
Responsibility for the direction of others.— -Supervisor— see
istics" above.

"general character­

Chemist VIII

General characteristics. — Supervisor— provides leadership and scientific guidance
for a very broad and highly diversified program in chemistry and related supporting activ­
ities requiring several subordinate supervisors responsible for programs typically identified
with level VII, or a large number of supervisors of lower levels.
Recommends the facil­
ities, personnel, and funds required for programs and evaluates accomplishments.
Individual researcher
on scientific questions of
ists who are themselves
leader and consultant for

and consultant— serves as a consultant to top-level management
far-reaching significance. Is sought as a consultant by chem­
specialists in the field.
Is a nationally recognized research
his company.

Direction received. — Receives general administrative direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities. ----Supervisor----is responsible for an important
segment of a chemical program of a company with very extensive and highly diversified scien­
tific requirements or the entire chemical program of a company where the program is of
moderate scope.
Is responsible for deciding the kind and extent of chemical and related
program needed to accomplish the objectives of the company, for choosing the scientific ap­
proaches, for planning and organizing facilities and programs, and for interpreting results.
Individual researcher and consultant-— formulates and guides the attack on exception­
ally difficult and important problems whose solution would represent a major scien­
tific or technological advance.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — Supervisor— see
istic s" above.

"general character­

This level does not include the chief chemist of a company with a
very extensive and highly diversified program; or the assistant chief
chemist of a company with an unusually extensive and novel chemical
program.




ENGINEER

P e r f o r m s w ork in r e s e a r c h , development:, design, testing, analysis, production, c o n ­
struction, maintenance, operation, planning, survey, estimating, application, or sta n d a rd iza ­
tion of engineering fa cilitie s, sy stem s, stru ctu res, p r o c e s s e s , equipment d e v ic e s , or m a ­
teria ls requiring knowledge of the scien ce and art by which m a t e r ia ls , natural r e s o u r c e s and
power are made useful.
W ork typically re q u ire s a B .S . d eg ree in engineering or the
equivalent in e x p erie n ce and education com bined.
(Safety en gin eers, industrial en g in e ers,
quality control e n g in ee rs, and sales engineers are to be e x c lu d e d .)
Engineer i
General^ c h a r a c t e r is t ic s . — As the beginning lev el of engineering work, a b a c h e l o r ’ s
d egree in engineering or equivalent is re q u ire d .
T ypically r e c e i v e s fo rm a l c l a s s r o o m or
on - th e - j ob tr ni n ing .
D irection r e c e i v e d . — P e r f o r m s w ork under c lo s e s u p erv ision with sp e c ific and d e ­
tailed instructions as to required tasks and resu lts expected. Work is ch ecked during p r o g ­
r e s s , and upon com p le tion is re v iew e d for a c c u r a c y .
Typical duties and r e s p o n s ib ilities . — P e r f o r m s sim ple tasks that are planned to p r o ­
vide e x p e rie n ce anc iunnJiarization with, methods and p r a c t i c e s of the company in the specialty
field and to a scertain the in terests and aptitudes of the beginning engineer.
R e sp o n sib i 1it;y ior the dir ecjtion of other s . — N on e .

Engineer If
Gene ra j c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . — At this continuing developmental le v e l, p e r fo r m s routine
en gineering w ork requiring application of standard techniques, p r o c e d u r e s , and c r it e r ia in
ca rry in g out a sequence of related engineering tasks. Lim ited e x e r c i s e of judgment is r e ­
quired on details of w ork . May re ce iv e advanced o n -t h e -jo b or c l a s s r o o m in stru ction s.
D i r e ction r e ce iv e d . — Supervisor s cre e n s assignm ents to eliminate difficult p ro b le m s
and s ele cts techniques and p r o c e d u r e s to be applied.
R e c e iv e s c lo s e su pervision on new
asp ects of assignm ents.
T y pical, duties and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s . — Using p r e s c r i b e d m ethods, p e r fo r m s s p ecific
and lim ited portions of a b road er a ssignm ent of an e x p e rie n ce d en gin eer. Applies standard
p r a c t i c e s and techniques in sp e c ific situations, adjusts and c o r r e la t e s data, r e c o g n iz e s d i s ­
cre p a n cie s in resu lts , and follow s operations through a s e r ie s of rela ted detailed steps
or p r o c e s s e s .
R e s p o n s ib i l ity for the d irection of o t h e r s . ----May su p erv ise a few aids or technicians.
Engineer HI

General c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . —-Work req u ires independent evaluation, selection , and a p ­
plication of standard engineering techniques, p r o c e d u r e s , and cr it e r ia , using judgment and
ingenuity in making m in o r adaptations and m od ifica tio n s.
D ire ctio n r e c e i v e d . — R e ce iv e s instruction on s p e c if ic assignment o b j e c t i v e s , points
of em phasis, r e fe r e n c e and inform ation s o u r c e s , and p o s s ib l e solutions. Unusual p ro b le m s
are solv ed jointly with s u p e rv is o r, and work is rev iew ed fo r application of sound e n g in eering judgment.
Typic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib i lit ie s . — A ssig n m en ts include equipment design and d e ­
velopment, test of m a t e r ia ls , p rep a ra tion of sp e cifica tio n s, p r o c e s s study, r e s e a r c h i n v e s ­
tigations, re p o rt preparation, and oth er activities of lim ited s c o p e requiring knowledge of
p r in c ip le s , p r a c t i c e s , and techniques com m on ly em p loyed in the s p e c if ic n a rrow a rea of
assign m en ts.
P e r f o r m s work which involves conventional types of plans, investigations,
su rv ey s, s tru ctu re s, o r equipment with re la tiv ely few co m p le x features fo r which there
are p re ce d e n ts.
R espo n sib ility fo r the d ire ct io n of o t h e r s . — May su p e rv ise the work of draftsm en,
in s p e c to r s , and oth er technicians a ssigned to a s s i s t in the work.




ENGINEER— Continued

Engineer IV

General characteristics. — Work requires originality and judgment in the independent
evaluation, selection, and substantial adaptation and modification of standard techniques,
procedures, and criteria.
Is recognized as fully competent in all conventional aspects of
the subject-matter or functional area of assignments.
Direction received. — Receives direct supervision and guidance primarily on novel
or controversial problems or questions.
Makes independent technical decisions on details
of work covered by precedents.
Typical duties and responsibilities.— Plans, schedules, and coordinates detailed
phases of the engineering work in a part of a major project or in a total project of moderate
scope.
Devises new approaches to problems encountered.
Performs work which involves
conventional engineering practice but includes a variety of complex features such as conflict­
ing design requirements, unsuitability of standard materials, and difficult coordination r e ­
quirements.
Work requires a broad knowledge of precedents in the specialty area and a
good knowledge of principles and practices of related specialties.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — May supervise a few engineers or tech­
nicians on routine work.
Engineer V

General characteristics.— Work requires application of intensive and diversified
knowledge of engineering principles and practices in broad areas of assignments and r e ­
lated fields. Makes decisions independently on engineering problems and methods, and rep­
resents the organization in conferences to resolve important questions and to plan and co­
ordinate work.
Positions may be supervisory or nonsupervisory.
Direction received. — Receives
work objectives and critical issu es.

supervision and guidance only in terms of specific

Typical duties and responsibilities. — Supervisor— plans, develops, coordinates, and
directs a large and important engineering project or a number of small projects with many
c omplex f eatur e s .
Nonsupervisory researcher— carries out cornplex or novel research assignments
acquiring the development of new or improved techniques and procedures.
Nonsupervisory staff specialist— develops and evaluates plans
variety of projects and activities to be carried out by others.

and criteria for a

Responsibility for the direction of others. — Supervisor— supervises, coordinates, and
reviews the work of a small staff of engineers and technicians. Estimates manpower needs
and schedules and assigns work to meet completion date.
Engineer VI

General characteristics. — Work is characterized by full technical responsibility for
interpreting, organizing, executing, and coordinating assignments.
Maintains liaison with
other organizations or companies.
Positions may be supervisory or nonsupervisory.
Direction received. — Assignments are received in terms of broad general objectives
and limits.
Supervision concerns administrative features of the work.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Conceives and plans engineering projects in­
volving exploration of subject area, definition of scope and selection of problems for inves­
tigation, and development of novel concepts and approaches.
Supervisor— plans, develops, coordinates, and directs a number of large and im ­
portant projects or a project of major scope and importance.
Nonsupervisory researcher— plans and conducts research or other work requiring
pioneering in areas in which large blocks of data are controversial or unknown.




46

ENGINEER— Continued

Nonsupervisory staff specialist— as an expert in a specific field, performs advisory,
consulting, and review work.
Responsibility for direction of others.— Supervisor— directs a staff of project engi­
neers and assistants. Evaluates progress of the staff and results obtained, and recommends
major changes to achieve overall objectives.
Engineer VII

General characteristics. — Work is characterized by decisions and recommendations
which are recognized as authoritative and have an important impact on extensive engineering
activities.
Initiates and maintains extensive contacts with key engineers and officials of
other organizations and companies; this requires skill in persuasion and negotiations of criti­
cal issu es.
Positions may be supervisory or nonsupervisory.
Direction received. — Receives general administrative direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Demonstrates creativity, foresight, and mature
engineering judgment in anticipating and solving unprecedented engineering problems, de­
termining program objectives and requirements, organizing programs and projects, and de­
veloping standards and guides for diverse engineering activities.
Supervisor— plans, develops, coordinates, and directs an engineering program con­
sisting of many large and important projects.
Nonsupervisory— performs advisory, consulting, and review work as authoritative
specialist or expert in broad program areas.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — Supervisor— directs a large staff of pro­
ject engineers, and engineers and scientists in supporting functions.
Several subordinate
supervisors are responsible for projects or activities typically identified with level IV.
Engineer VIII

General characteristics. ----Work is characterized by authoritative decisions and re c­
ommendations which have a far-reaching impact on extensive engineering and related ac­
tivities of the company.
Negotiates critical and controversial issues with top level en­
gineers and officers of other organizations and companies.
Positions may be supervisory
or nonsupervisory.
Direction received. — Receives general administrative direction.
Typical duties and responsibilities. — Demonstrates a high degree of creativity, fore­
sight, and mature engineering judgment in planning, organizing, and guiding extensive engi­
neering programs and activities of outstanding novelty and importance.
Supervisor— plans develops, coordinates, and directs a highly complex and diver­
sified engineering program consisting of many large and important projects and support­
ing activities.
Nonsupervisory— performs advisory and consulting work for his company as a na­
tionally recognized authority for broad program areas of considerable novelty and
importance.
Responsibility for the direction of others. — Directs a very large staff of project
engineers, and engineers and scientists in supporting functions. Several subordinate super­
visors are responsible for programs, projects, or activities typically identified with level VII.




This level does not include positions of chief engineers of companies
with large engineering organization; e .g ., those engaged in research
and development on a variety of complex weapons systems with nu­
merous novel components, or of chiefs of primary organizational seg­
ments of companies with very large engineering organizations engaged
in unusually extensive and diversified research and development.

47
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

JOB ANALYST

Performs work involved in collecting, analyzing, and developing occupational data
relative to jobs, job qualifications, and worker characteristics as a basis for compensating
employees in a fair, equitable, and uniform manner.
Performs such duties as studying
and analyzing jobs and preparing descriptions of duties and responsibilities and of the physical
and mental requirements needed by workers; evaluating jobs and determining appropriate
wage or salary levels in accordance with their difficulty and responsibility; independently
conducting or participating with representatives of other companies in conducting compensation
surveys within a locality or labor market area; assisting in administering merit rating pro­
gram; reviewing changes in wages and salaries indicated by surveys and recommending
changes in pay scales; and auditing individual jobs to check the propriety of evaluations and
to apply current job classifications.
Job Analyst F

As a trainee, performs work in designated areas and of limited occupational scope.
Receives immediate supervision in assignments designed to provide training in the application
of established methods and techniques of job analysis.
Studies the least difficult jobs and
prepares reports for review by a job analyst of higher level.
Job Analyst H

Studies, describes, and evaluates jobs in accordance with established procedures.
Is usually assigned to the simpler kinds of both wage and salaried jobs in the establishment.
Works independently on such assignments but is limited by instructions of his superior and
by defined area of assignment.
Job Analyst III

Analyzes and evaluates a variety of wage and salaried jobs in accordance with estab­
lished evaluation systems and procedures.
May conduct wage surveys within the locality or
participate in conducting surveys of broad compensation areas.
May assist in developing
survey methods and plans. Receives general supervision but responsibility for final action
is limited.
Job Analyst IV

Analyzes and evaluates a variety of jobs in accordance with established evaluation
systems and procedures, and is given assignment which regularly includes responsibility for
the more difficult kinds of jobs.
("M ore difficult" means jobs which consist of hard-tounderstand work processes; e. g. , professional, scientific, administrative, or technical; or
jobs in new or emerging occupational fields; or jobs which are being established as part of
the creation of new organizations; or where other special considerations of these types apply. )
Receives general supervision, but responsibility for final action is limited.
May partic­
ipate in the development and installation of evaluation or compensation system s, which may
include those for merit rating programs.
May plan survey methods and conduct or direct
wage surveys within a broad compensation area.
DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL

Directs a personnel management program for a company or for a plant or estab­
lishment of a company.
For a job to be covered by this definition, the personnel manage­
ment program must include responsibility for all three of the following functions:
(l)

Administering a formal job evaluation system; i. e. , a system in which there
are established procedures by which jobs are analyzed and evaluated on the
basis of their duties, responsibilities, and qualification requirements in order
to provide a foundation for equitable compensation. Typically, such a system
includes the use of one or more sets of job evaluation factors and the prepa­
ration of formal job descriptions.
It may also include such related functions
as wage and salary surveys or merit rating system administration.
The job
evaluation system(s) does not necessarily cover all jobs in the organization,
but does cover a substantial portion of the organization.




48

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL— Continued

(2)

Employment and placement functions; i. e. , recruiting actively for at least some
kinds of workers through a variety of sources (e. g. , schools or colleges, em ­
ployment agencies, professional societies, e tc .); evaluating applicants against
demands of particular jobs by use of such techniques as job analysis to deter­
mine requirements, interviews, written tests of aptitude, knowledge, or skill,
reference checks, experience evaluations, etc. ; recommending selections and
job placements to management, etc.

(3)

Employee relations and services functions; i. e. , functions designed to main­
tain employees morale and productivity at a high level (for example, admin­
istering a formal or informal grievance procedure; identifying and recommend­
ing solutions for personnel problems such as absenteeism, high turnover, low
productivity, etc. ; administration of beneficial suggestions system, retirement,
pension, or insurance plans, merit rating system, etc. ; overseeing cafeteria
operations, recreational programs, industrial health or safety programs, e tc .).

Employees training and development functions may or may not be part of the person­
nel management program for purposes of matching this definition.
Labor relation activities, if any, are confined mainly to the administration, inter­
pretation, and application of labor union contracts and are essentially similar to those de­
scribed under (3) above.
If responsibility for actual contract negotiation with labor unions
as the principal company representative is considered a significant one in the job, i. e. , the
one which serves as the primary basis for qualification requirements and compensation, the
job is excluded from being matched with this definition.
Participation in bargaining of a less
significant nature, e. g. , to negotiate detailed settlement of such matters as specific rates,
job classifications, work rules, hiring or layoff procedures, etc. , within the broad terms
of a general agreement reached at higher levels, or to supply advice and information on
technical points to the company^ principal representative, will not have the effect of exclud­
ing the job from coverage.
The director of personnel not only directs a personnel management program of the
intensity and scope outlined above, but (to be a proper match) he is recognized by the top
management officials of the organization he serves as the source of advice and assistance
on personnel management matters and problems generally.
For example, he is typically
consulted on the personnel implications of planned changes in management policy or pro­
gram, the effects on the organization of economic or market trends, product or production
method changes, etc. ; he represents management in external contacts with other companies,
trade associations, government agencies, etc. , when the primary subject matter of the con­
tact is on personnel management matters.
Typically, the director of personnel reports to a company officer or a high manage­
ment official who has responsibility for the operation of a plant or establishment of a com­
pany; or, at company headquarters level, he may report to a company officer in charge of
industrial relations and personnel management activities or a similar official.
Directors of personnel jobs which meet the above definition are classified by level 1
5
of work in accordance with the following tabulation:

15
salarie s.




Insufficient data

were

obtained

for level V to warrant

presentation of average

49

Number of employees in
work force serviced

250-750 _________________________________________
I, 000-5, 000 _____________________________________
6 ,0 00-12,000 ___________________________________
15,000-25,000 __________________________________

Personnel program
operations level 1
Organization
Organization
serviced—
serviced—
type A 3
type B 4
I
II
III
IV

1
1
III
IV
V

Personnel program
development level 2
Organization
Organization
serviced—
serviced—
type A 3
type B 4
II
III
IV
V

III
IV
V
-

1 Personnel program operations level—-director of personnel servicing an organizational segment ( e .g ., a plant) of a
company, where the basic personnel program policies, plans, objectives, e tc ., are established at company headquarters or
at some other higher level between the plant and the company headquarters level.
The personnel director's responsibility
is to gut these into operation at the local level, in such a manner as to most effectively serve the local management needs.
Personnel program development level director of personnel servicing an entire company (with or without subordi­
nate establishments) where the personnel director plays an important role in establishment of basic personnel policies, plans,
objectives, etc ., for the company, subject to policy direction and control from company officers.
There may be instances
in which there is such relatively complete delegation of personnel program planning and development responsibility below the
company level to an intermediate organization, e .g ., a subsidiary or a division, that a job of personnel director for such
an organization should be matched as though it were a company level job.
Organization serviced— type A— jobs serviced are (almost exclusively) types which are common in the labor market
generally, and consist of relatively easy-to-understand work processes, or for similar reasons do not present particularly
difficult recruitment, job evaluation, or training problems.
Work force, organizational structure, and other organizational
characteristics are relatively stable.
4 Organization serviced— type B— jobs serviced include a substantial number of types which are largely peculiar to the
organization serviced, consist of hard-to-understand work processes ( e .g ., professional, scientific, administrative, or tech­
nical), are jobs in new or emerging occupational fields, are in extremely short supply, have hard-to-match skill require­
ments, or for similar reasons present difficult recruitment, job evaluation, or training problems.
Work force, organiza­
tional structure, or other organizational characteristics are complicated, unstable, subjectvto wide seasonal fluctuation, etc.
NOTE: There are gaps between different degrees of all 3 elements used to determine job level matches.
These gaps
have been provided purposely to allow room for judgment in getting the best overall job level match for each job.
Thus,
a job which services a work force of 850 employees should be matched with level II if it is a personnel program operations
level job where the nature of the organization serviced seems to fall slightly below the definition for the type B degree.
How­
ever, the same job should be matched with level I if the nature of the organization serviced clearly falls well within the
definition for the type A degree.

OFFICE SERVICES

MANAGER, OFFICE SERVICES

Responsible for planning, directing, and controlling of office services, subject only
to the most general policy supervision.
Plays an active role in anticipating and planning to
meet office services needs of the operating organization served.
Supervises a group of
employees engaged in providing office services of a supporting or "housekeeping" nature to
the primary operation of a company, an establishment, or an organizational unit of a com ­
pany or establishment.
(May personally perform some of the functions.) Office services
include:
(a)
(b)
(c)

(d)

(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)

(i)

Receipt, distribution, and dispatch of mail.
Maintenance of central files.
Printing or duplication and distribution of form s, publications, etc.
(May be limited to ordering the printing or duplication of items.
Does not
necessarily have charge of a print shop or duplication facilities, especially in
large operations, but coordinates the flow to and from the reproduction units.)
Purchasing office supplies and equipment. (Makes direct purchases of run-ofthe-m ill office supplies. May be responsible for direct purchase of other items
from outside suppliers or may requisition through establishment purchasing
departments. )
Records control and disposal.
Communications (telephone switchboard and/or teletype service).
Typing or stenographic pool.
Office equipment maintenance and repair.
(May have direct supervision of
maintenance and repair personnel or may coordinate the ordering of such serv­
ices from outside service suppliers or from a central service unit within the
establishm ent.)
Space control over office facilities-layout and arrangement of offices.
(Typ­
ically serves as a staff assistant to management officials in performing this
function.)

Manager, Office Services l

Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing a few ( e .g ., 4 or 5) of the
above functions as a service to a small organization (e. g. , 300 to 600 employees, excluding
nonsupervisory plant workers).




50

MANAGER, OFFICE SERVICES— Continued

Manager, Office Services II

Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing a few ( e .g ., 4 or 5) of the
above functions as a service to a moderately large organization ( e . g . , 600 to 1, 500 employees,
excluding nonsupervisory plant workers).
or
Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing most ( e .g ., 7 or 8) of the
above functions as a service to a small organization ( e .g ., 300 to 600 employees, excluding
nonsupervisory plant workers).
Manager, Officer Services III

Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing a few ( e .g ., 4 or 5) of the
functions as a service to a large organization ( e .g ., 1, 500 to 3,0 0 0 employees, excluding
nonsupervisory plant workers).
or
Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing most ( e .g ., 7 or 8) of the
above functions as a service to a moderately large organization ( e .g ., 600 to 1, 500 employees,
excluding nonsupervisory plant workers).
Manager, Office Services IV

Supervises a staff of employees engaged in performing most (e. g. , 7 or 8) of the
above functions as a service to a large organization (e. g. , 1, 500 to 3, 000 employees, exclud­
ing nonsupervisory plant workers).

DRAFTSMEN

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR (Assistant Draftsman)

Draws to scale units or parts of drawings prepared by draftsman or others for
engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes.
Uses various types of drafting tools
as required.
May prepare drawings from simple plans or sketches, or perform other duties
under direction of a draftsman.
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR

Prepares working plans and detail drawings from notes, rough or detailed sketches
for engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes.
Duties involve a combination of
the following: Preparing working plans, detail drawings, maps, cross-section s, e tc ., to
scale by use of drafting instruments; making engineering computations such as those involved
in strength of m aterials, beams and trusses; verifying completed work, checking dimensions,
materials to be used, and quantities; writing specifications; and making adjustments or
changes in drawings or specifications.
May ink in lines and letters on pencil drawings,
prepare detail units of complete drawings, or trace drawings.
Work is frequently in a
specialized field such as architectural, electrical, mechanical, or structural drafting.
TRACER

Copies plans and drawings prepared by others, by placing tracing cloth or paper
over drawing and tracing with pen or pencil.
Uses T-square, compass, and other drafting
tools.
May prepare simple drawings and do simple lettering.




51

CLERICAL

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher, Sundstrand, Bur­
roughs, and National Cash Register, with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record
of business transactions.
Bookkeeping-Machine Operator I

Keeps a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping.
Phases or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, custom ers' accounts (not including simple type of billing described under biller,
machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. May check or assist
in preparation of trial balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.
Bookkeeping-Machine Operator II

Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic bookkeeping
principles and familiarity with the structure of the particular accounting system used. Deter­
mines proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each phase of
the work.
May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records by hand.

CLERK, ACCOUNTING

Clerk, Accounting I

Under supervision, performs one or more routine accounting operations such as
posting simple journal vouchers or accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher
registers; reconciling bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by general
ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data. This job does not require a knowledge
of accounting and bookkeeping principles, but is found in offices in which the more routine
accounting work is subdivided on a functional basis among several workers.
Clerk, Accounting II

Under general direction of a bookkeeper or accountant, has responsibility for keeping
one or more sections of a complete set of books or records relating to one phase of an
establishment's business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing subsidiary ledger
or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable; examining and coding invoices
or vouchers with proper accounting distribution; requires judgment and experience in making
proper assignations and allocations.
May assist in preparing, adjusting, and closing journal
entries; may direct accounting clerks I.

CLERK, FILE

Clerk, File I

Perform s routine filing, usually of material that has already been classified or
which is easily identifiable, or locates or assists in locating material in files.
May perform
incidental clerical duties.
Clerk, File II

In an established filing system containing a number of varied subject-matter files,
classifies and indexes correspondence or other material; may also file this material.
May
keep records of various types in conjunction with files or may supervise others in filing
and locating material in the file s.
May perform incidental clerical duties.




52

K YP N H O
E U C PER
ATO
R
Under general su p e rv isio n and with no su p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s ib ilit ie s , r e c o r d s a c ­
counting and statistical data on tabulating ca rd s by punching a s e r ie s of h oles in the ca rd s
in a sp e cifie d seq u en ce, using an alphabetical o r a n u m e rica l keypunch m ach in e, follow ing
written in form a tion on r e c o r d s .
May duplicate ca rd s by using the duplicating d ev ice attached
to m ach in e. May k eep file s o f punch c a r d s . May v e rify own w ork or work of oth e rs.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL

P e r f o r m s various routine duties such as running e rra n d s ; operating m in o r office
m a ch in es, such as s e a le r s or m a i le r s ; opening and distributing mail; and other m in o r
c l e r i c a l work.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL

P r i m a r y duty is to take dictation f r o m one o r m o r e p e r s o n s , either in shorthand or
by Stenotype o r sim ila r m achine, involving a n orm a l routine v o ca b u la ry , and to tra n scrib e
this dictation on a ty p e w rite r.
May also type f r o m written co p y .
May a lso set up and keep
file s in o r d e r , keep sim ple r e c o r d s , e tc. Does not include tra n s crib in g -m a ch in e w ork.
STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL

P r i m a r y duty is to take dictation f r o m one or m o r e p e rs o n s , either in shorthand or
by Stenotype o r s im ila r machine, involving a v a ried technical or s p e c ia liz e d vo ca b u la ry , such
as in legal b r ie f s o r re p o rts on scie n tific r e s e a r c h , and to tr a n s c r ib e this dictation on a
typew riter. May a lso type f r o m written copy. May a lso set up and keep files in o rd e r, keep
sim ple r e c o r d s , etc. D oe s not include tra n s crib in g -m a ch in e work.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR

Operates a sin g le - o r m u lt ip le -p o s itio n telephone sw itch board .
Duties involve han­
dling in com in g, outgoing, intraplant, or o ffice c a ll s .
May handle routine long distance calls
and r e c o r d s toll c a l l s .
May p e r f o r m lim ited in form ation w o rk , fo r ex a m p le, furnishing
telephone extension num bers when a s p e c if ic name is fu rnished.
May o c c a s io n a lly take
telephone o r d e r s .
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR, SPECIAL

In addition to the work d e s c r ib e d above fo r sw itchboard o p e ra to r o r as a fu ll-tim e
assignm ent, s e r v e s as a '’s p e c i a l ” o p e ra to r who handles the m o r e c o m p le x lon g -d ista n ce
c a lls ( e . g . , c o n fe r e n c e , c o ll e c t , o v e r s e a s , or sim ila r c a ll s ) o r p e r fo r m s full telephone
in form ation s e r v ic e ( e . g . , where a knowledge of the w ork done in d ifferent parts of the
organization is re q u ire d ).
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Tabulating-Maehine Operator I

Operates sim ple tabulating o r e le c t r i c a l accounting m a ch in es, such as the s o r t e r , r e ­
producing punch, c o ll a t o r , e t c . , with sp e c ific in stru ctio n s.
May include the p erform a n ce of
som e sim ple wiring f r o m diagrams and som e filing w ork . The w ork typically involves portions
of a w ork unit, fo r e x a m p le, individual sorting or collating runs, or repetitive op era tions.
Tabulating-Maehine Operator II

Operates m o r e difficult tabulating or e l e c t r i c a l accounting m a ch in es, such as the
tabulator and ca lc u la to r , in addition to the s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c e r , and c o ll a t o r .
This w ork is
p e r fo r m e d under sp e c ific instructions and may include the p e r fo r m a n c e of som e wiring f r o m
d ia g ra m s .
The w ork typically in v o lv es, fo r ex a m p le, tabulations involving a repetitive a c ­
counting e x e r c i s e , a com p lete but sm a ll tabulating study, or parts of a lon g er and m o re c o m ­
plex re p o rt. Such rep orts and studies are usually of a r e c u r r in g nature where the p roced u re s
are well established.
May a lso include the training of new e m p lo y e e s in the b a s ic operation
of the m a c h in e .




53
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR— Continued

Tabulating-Machine Operator III

Operates a variety of tabulating or electrical accounting machines, typically including
such machines as the tabulator, calculator, interpreter, collator, and others.
Performs
complete reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs difficult wiring as
required.
The complete reporting and tabulating assignments typically involve a variety of
long and complex reports which often are of irregular or nonrecurring type requiring some
planning and sequencing of steps to be taken.
As a more experienced operator, is typically
involved in training new operators in machine operations, or partially trained operators in
wiring from diagrams and operating sequences of long and complex reports. Does not include
working supervisors performing tabulating-machine operations and day-to-day supervision
of the work and production of a group of tabulating-machine operators.
TYPIST

Uses a typewriter to make copies of various materials or to make out bills after
calculations have been made by another person.
May include typing of stencils, mats, or
similar materials for use in duplicating processes.
May do clerical work involving little
special training, such as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting
and distributing incoming mail.
Typist I

Performs one or more of the following: Copy typing from rough or clear drafts;
routine typing of form s, insurance policies, e tc .; and setting up simple standard tabulations,
or copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.
Typist II

Performs one or more of the following: Typing material in final form when it
involves combining material from several sources or responsibility for correct spelling,
syllabication, punctuation, e tc ., of technical or unusual words or foreign language material;
and planning layout and typing of complicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity and
balance in spacing.
May type routine form letters, varying details to suit circumstances.




☆ U .S . G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F I C E : 1961 O -616241




ORDER FORM
To:
S u p erin ten d en t o f D oc u m e n ts
U. S. G o v e rn m e n t P r in tin g O ffic e
W ash in g ton 25, D. C.

B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta t is t ic s ---18 O liv e r S tre e t, B o s t o n 10, M a s s .
341 N inth A v e n u e , N ew Y o r k 1, N. Y.
1371 P e a c h t r e e S tre e t, N E. , A tla n ta 9, Ga.
105 W e st A d a m s S tr e e t, C h ic a g o 3, 111.
630 S a n so m e S tr e e t, San F r a n c is c o 11, C a lif.

or

E n c lo s e d fin d $ ____________ in |
j ch eck , |
1m on ey o rd e r, o r 1
| c a s h (c a s h a t s e n d e r 's r i s k ) .
M ake
( T w e n t y -fiv e p e r c e n t d is c o u n t f o r bu n d le
c h e c k s o r m o n e y o r d e r s p a y a b le to the S u p erin ten d en t o f D o c u m e n ts.
o r d e r o f 100 o r m o r e c o p ie s o f any 1 b u lle t in .)
P le a s e sen d m e c o p i e s o f O c cu p a tio n a l W ag e S u rv e y b u lle tin s a s in d ica te d .

N o.
of
c o p ie s

No.
of
c o p ie s
♦ A k ron, B u ll. 1 28 5 -8 1
♦A lbany— c h e n e c ta d y — r o y , B u ll. 1 28 5 -5 1
S
T
♦ A lb u q u erqu e, B u ll. 1 28 5 -6 1
♦ A llen tow n — e th le h e n r— a ston , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 7
B
E
♦Atlanta, B u ll. 1 28 5 -7 3
♦ B a ltim o r e , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3 4
♦ B eaum ont—P o r t A rth u r, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7 5
♦ B irm in g h a m , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -5 3

♦ M ia m i, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3 3
♦ ♦ M ilw au kee, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6 4
♦ ♦ M in n ea p olis—St. P a u l, B u ll. 1 28 5 -3 9
♦ M u skegon — u sk e g o n H eigh ts, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6 9
M
♦ N ew ark and J e r s e y C ity , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 0
♦New H aven, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 6
♦♦New O r le a n s , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 8
♦♦New Y o r k , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6 5

♦ B o is e , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6 2
♦ ♦ B oston , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -1 5
♦ ♦ B uffalo, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3 1
♦ B u rlin gton , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -5 7
♦Canton, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 9
♦ C h a r le sto n ( W .V a .) , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6 0
♦ C h a rlotte, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -5 8
♦ ♦ C hattan ooga, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -1 4

♦ ♦ N orfolk— o r t s m o u th and N e w p o rt N ew s—
P
H am pton, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -8 2
♦ ♦O klahom a C ity , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3
♦♦Om aha, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -1 3
♦ P a te rs o n — lift o n — a s s a ic , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7 4
C
P
♦ ♦ P h ila d elp h ia , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 4
♦ P h oen ix , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -5 5
♦ ♦ P ittsb u rgh , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 4

♦ ♦ C h icag o, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6 6
♦ C in cin n a ti, B u ll. 1 28 5 -5 9
♦ ♦ C levela n d , B u ll. 1 28 5 -1 1
♦ ♦ C olu m b u s, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3 8
♦ ♦ D a lla s, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 1
♦ ♦ D a ven p ort— o c k Isla n d —M o lin e , B u ll.
R
♦Dayton, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 1
♦ D en v er, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 7

♦ P o rtla n d (M a in e ), B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -1 9
♦ P o rtla n d ( O r e g . ), B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7 2
♦ ♦ P r o v id e n c e — a w tu ck e t, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7 0
P
♦ ♦ R aleigh, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -5
♦ R ich m on d , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 6
♦ R o c k fo rd , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6 8
♦♦St. L o u is , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -1 0
♦♦Salt L a k e C ity , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3 2
♦♦San A n to n io , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7 1

1 2 8 5 -1 6

♦ D es M o in e s , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 3
♦ ♦ D etroit, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3 7
♦ ♦ F ort W orth , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 3
♦ G reen B ay , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2
♦ G r e e n v ille , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6 3
♦ H ouston, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7 8
♦ In d ian ap olis, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 8
♦ J a ck son , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 2

♦San B e r n a r d in o — iv e r s i d e — n ta rio , B u ll.
R
O
♦♦San F r a n c is c o — akland, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3 6
O
♦Savannah, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7 6
♦ ♦ Scranton, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -8
♦♦Seattle, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7
♦♦♦Sioux F a lls , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -1 7
♦South B end, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -5 4
♦♦Spokane, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7 7

♦ ♦ J a ck s o n v ille , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3 0
♦ K ansas C ity, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -1 8
♦ L a w r e n c e — a v e rh ill, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -7 9
H
♦ ♦ L ittle R o ck — orth L ittle R o c k , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6
N
♦ ♦ L os A n g e le s —L on g B e a c h , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -5 2
♦ ♦ L o u is v ille , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 9
♦ L u b b ock , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -6 7
♦ M a n ch e ste r, B u ll. 1 28 5 -1
♦ M em p h is, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -3 5

♦ ♦ T o le d o , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -5 0
♦ ♦ T renton, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 5
* * W ash in gton , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 2
♦ ♦ ♦ W aterbu ry, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -5 6
♦ W a te rlo o , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -2 0
♦♦ W ichita, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -9
♦ ♦ W ilm in gton, B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -1 2
♦ W o r c e s te r , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -8 0
♦ Y ork , B u ll. 1 2 8 5 -4 5

Price—

* 20 cents;

*♦ 25 cents; * * * 15 cents

N a m e ________________________________________________________________________________________________________
A d d r e s s ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
C ity ________________________________________________________________ Z o n e _________________________ State




1 2 8 5 -4







Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional Offices


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102