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Ic Library

Occupational Wage Survey
J n o3
W

BURLINGTON, VERMONT
MARCH 1963

Bulletin No. 1345-50




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
Ew an C lague, Com m issioner




Occupational Wage Survey
BURLINGTON, VERMONT




MARCH 1963

Bulletin No. 1345-50
May 1963

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W . Willard W irtz, Secretary
B U R E A U O F LA B O R S T A T IS T IC S
Ew a n C la g u e , C o m m issio n e r

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C.

Price 25 cents




Contents

Preface

Page
The L a b o r M ark et O ccu p ational W age S u rvey P r o g r a m

Introduction

E ig h ty -t w o la b o r m a r k e t s c u r r e n t ly a r e in cluded
in th e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s p r o g r a m o f ann ua l o c c u ­
p a t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m a j o r l a b o r m a r k e t s .
These
s t u d i e s p r o v i d e da t a on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s and r e l a t e d
su p p lem en ta ry b enefits.
I n f o r m a t i o n on r e l a t e d s u p p l e ­
m e n t a r y b e n e f i t s i s o b t a i n e d b i e n n i a l l y in m o s t o f the l a b o r
m arkets.

T a b les:

_______________________________________________________________________

1

1.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s and w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f s u r v e y ______________

3

A:

O ccu pational ea rn ings: *
A -l.
O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — e n and w o m e n __________________________
m
A - 2 . P r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s —m e n

4

A -3.

A p r e lim in a r y r e p o r t w hich p r e s e n ts earnings
tr e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p s and a v e r a g e e a r n ­
in g s in s e l e c t e d j o b s i s r e l e a s e d w it h i n a m o n t h a f t e r the
c o m p l e t i o n o f the s tu d y in e a c h a r e a .
T h is bu lletin p r o ­
v i d e s a d d i t i o n a l da t a n ot i n c l u d e d in the p r e l i m i n a r y r e p o r t .

O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s —
m e n and w o m e n c o m b i n e d _____________________________________
M a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s ___________________
C u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s _____________

5
6
7

E s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s : *
B -l.
M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s ____
B -2.
Sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a l s ________________________________________________
B -3.
S c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s _________________________________________
B -4.
P a i d h o l i d a y s _____________________________________________________
B -5.
P a i d v a c a t i o n s ____________________________________________________
B -6.
H e a l th , i n s u r a n c e , a nd p e n s i o n p l a n s _______________________

8
9
9
10
11
13

A -4.
A - 5.
B:

A t w o - p a r t s u m m a r y b u l l e t i n i s i s s u e d a f t e r the
c o m p l e t i o n o f a l l o f the a r e a b u l l e t i n s f o r a r o u n d of s u r ­
v e y s ( f o r th e c u r r e n t r o u n d o f s u r v e y s , the f i r s t p a r t of
th is b u l l e t i n w i l l b e a v a i l a b l e l a t e in 1963 and the s e c o n d
p a r t e a r l y in 19 6 4).
T h e f i r s t p a r t p r e s e n t s in d i v i d u a l
l a b o r m a r k e t da ta .
T h e s e c o n d p a r t p r e s e n t s da t a r e l a t i n g
to a ll m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s in the U n ite d S t a te s .

A ppendix:

O c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s ________________________________________

T h i s b u l l e t i n w a s p r e p a r e d in the B u r e a u ' s r e ­
g i o n a l o f f i c e in B o s t o n , M a s s . , b y L e o E p s t e i n , u n d e r the
d i r e c t i o n o f P a u l V. M u l k e r n , A s s i s t a n t R e g i o n a l D i r e c t o r
f o r W a g e s and I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s .




* N O T E ; S im ila r tabu lation s a r e a v a ila b le f o r oth er
m a jor areas.
(S e e i n s i d e b a c k c o v e r . )
U n io n s c a l e s , i n d i c a t i v e of p r e v a i l i n g p a y l e v e l s in
th e B u r l i n g t o n a r e a , a r e a l s o a v a i l a b l e f o r s e v e n s e l e c t e d
b uildin g t r a d e s .

iii

15




O ccu p a tio n a l W age S u rv ey —B u r lin g to n , V t.
Introduction
T h i s a r e a i s 1 o f 82 l a b o r m a r k e t s i n w h i c h the U. S. D e ­
partm en t o f L a b o r 's B ureau of L a b o r Statistics conducts su rv ey s
o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s and r e l a t e d w a g e b e n e f i t s o n an a r e a w i d e
b a sis.
In th is a r e a , da t a w e r e o b t a i n e d b y p e r s o n a l v i s i t s o f B u ­
r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s to r e p r e s e n t a t i v e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith in s i x
b ro a d in du stry div ision s:
M anufacturing; tr an sp orta tion , c o m m u n i c a ­
t i o n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ; w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e ,
in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e sta te; and s e r v i c e s .
M a jor in d u stry grou ps
e x c l u d e d f r o m t h e s e s t u d i e s a r e g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t i o n s a n d the c o n ­
s t r u c t i o n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g f e w e r
than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s
a re o m itte d b e c a u s e they
te n d to f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d to
w arra n t in clu sion .
S e p a r a t e t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h o f the
b r o a d in d u stry d iv is io n s w h ich m e e t p u b lica tion c r it e r ia .

s c h e d u l e s ( r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r ) f o r w h i c h s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r i e s a r e p a id ; a v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s f o r t h e s e o c c u p a t i o n s h av e
b e e n r o u n d e d to th e n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .
D i f f e r e n c e s in p a y l e v e l s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s in w h i c h
b o t h m e n a nd w o m e n a r e c o m m o n l y e m p l o y e d a r e l a r g e l y due to
(1) d i f f e r e n c e s in the d i s t r i b u t i o n o f the s e x e s a m o n g i n d u s t r i e s and
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ; (2) d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c d u tie s p e r f o r m e d , a lth o u g h
the o c c u p a t i o n s a r e a p p r o p r i a t e l y c l a s s i f i e d w ith in th e s a m e s u r v e y
j o b d e s c r i p t i o n ; a n d (3) d i f f e r e n c e s in l e n g t h o f s e r v i c e o r m e r i t
r e v i e w w h e n i n d i v i d u a l s a l a r i e s a r e a d j u s t e d o n th is b a s i s .
Longer
a v e r a g e s e r v i c e o f m e n w o u l d r e s u l t in h i g h e r a v e r a g e pa y w h e n
b o t h s e x e s a r e e m p l o y e d w it h in the s a m e r a t e r a n g e .
J ob d e s c r i p ­
t i o n s u s e d i n c l a s s i f y i n g e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e
g e n e r a l i z e d th an t h o s e u s e d in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s to a l l o w f o r
m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in s p e c i f i c d u t ie s p e r f o r m e d .

T h e se su rv e y s a re con d u cte d on a sa m p le b a s is b e ca u s e of
the u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t i n v o l v e d in s u r v e y i n g a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
To
o b t a i n o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n o f
l a r g e th an o f s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i s s t u d i e d .
In c o m b i n i n g the data,
h o w e v e r , all e s ta b lis h m e n ts a r e g iv e n th e ir a p p r o p r ia t e w eight.
E s­
t i m a t e s b a s e d o n the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
a s r e l a t i n g to a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i n the i n d u s t r y g r o u p i n g and a r e a ,
e x c e p t f o r t h o s e b e l o w the m i n i m u m s i z e s t u d ie d .
O ccupations

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the t o t a l in a ll
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h in the s c o p e o f the s t u d y and n o t the n u m b e r a c ­
tu ally su r v e y e d .
B e c a u s e o f d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , the e s t i m a t e s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b ­
t a i n e d f r o m the s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d s e r v e o n l y to i n d i ­
c a t e the r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e o f the j o b s s t u d ie d .
These d ifferences
in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e do n o t m a t e r i a l l y a f f e c t the a c c u r a c y . o f the
e a r n i n g s da ta .

and E a rn in g s

T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r s t u d y a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y
o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g a n d n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , a n d a r e o f the
follow in g types:
(a) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (b) p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l ;
(c ) m a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t ; a n d (d) c u s t o d i a l a nd m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m ent.
O ccu pa tion a l c l a s s ifi c a t io n is b a s e d on a u n ifo r m set o f jo b
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d to ta k e a c c o u n t o f i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in d u t ie s w it h in the s a m e j o b .
T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r s tu d y
a r e l i s t e d a n d d e s c r i b e d in th e a p p e n d i x .
E a rn in g s data f o r s o m e o f
the o c c u p a t i o n s l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d in the A - s e r i e s
t a b l e s b e c a u s e e i t h e r ( l ) e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a t i o n i s t o o s m a l l
to p r o v i d e e n o u g h da ta to m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e i s p o s s i ­
b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t da ta.

E sta b lish m en t P r a c t ic e s

I n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d ( in the B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) o n s e l e c t e d
e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y b e n e f i t s a s t h e y r e l a t e to
o f f i c e a n d p la n t w o r k e r s .
The c o n c e p t " o f f i c e w o r k e r s , " as u se d
in th is b u l l e t i n , i n c l u d e s w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s and n o n s u p e r v i s o r y
w o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g c l e r i c a l o r r e l a t e d f u n c t i o n s , and e x c l u d e s a d ­
m i n i s t r a t i v e , e x e c u t i v e , a nd p r o f e s s i o n a l p e r s o n n e l .
"P lant w o r k e r s "
in c lu d e w o r k in g f o r e m e n and all n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s (including
l e a d m e n a n d t r a i n e e s ) e n g a g e d in n o n o f f i c e f u n c t i o n s .
A dm in istrative,
e x e c u tiv e , and p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p l o y e e s , and f o r c e - a c c o u n t c o n s t r u c ­
tion e m p lo y e e s who a r e u tiliz e d as a se p a ra te w o r k f o r c e a r e e x ­
clu ded .
C a f e t e r i a w o r k e r s a n d r o u t e m e n a r e e x c l u d e d in m a n u f a c ­
t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , but i n c l u d e d a s p la n t w o r k e r s in n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g
in d u stries.

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t a n d e a r n i n g s da ta a r e s h o w n f o r
f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s , i . e . , t h o s e h i r e d to w o r k a r e g u l a r w e e k l y s c h e d u l e
in the g i v e n o c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
E a r n i n g s da ta e x c l u d e p r e ­
m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , a n d l a t e
s h i f t s . N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d , b ut c o s t - o f - l i v i n g b o n u s e s
and in c e n t iv e e a rn in g s a r e in clu d e d .
W h ere w eek ly hours a re r e ­
p o r t e d , a s f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e i s to the w o r k




and S u p p l e m e n t a r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s

M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s ( t a b l e B - l ) r e l a t e o n l y to the e s ­
tablish m en ts v is ite d .
T h e y a r e p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
w ith f o r m a l m i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r y p o l i c i e s .

1

2
Sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a l da ta ( t a b l e B - 2 ) a r e l i m i t e d to m a n u f a c t u r i n g
in d u stries.
T h i s i n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d b o t h in t e r m s o f (a) e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t p o l i c y , 1 p r e s e n t e d i n t e r m s o f to t a l pla n t w o r k e r e m p l o y ­
m e n t , and (b) e f f e c t i v e p r a c t i c e , p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f w o r k e r s a c ­
t u a l l y e m p l o y e d o n the s p e c i f i e d s h if t at the t i m e o f th e s u r v e y .
In
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g v a r i e d d i f f e r e n t i a l s , the a m o u n t a p p l y i n g to a
m a j o r i t y w a s u s e d o r , i f no a m o u n t a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y , the c l a s ­
s ifica tio n " o t h e r " was u sed .
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i n w h i c h s o m e l a t e s h if t h o u r s a r e p a id at n o r m a l r a t e s , a d i f f e r e n t i a l w a s r e c o r d e d
o n l y i f it a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y o f the s h if t h o u r s .
T h e s c h e d u l e d h o u r s ( t a b l e B - 3 ) o f a m a j o r i t y o f th e f i r s t s h if t w o r k e r s in a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t a r e t a b u l a t e d a s a p p l y i n g to a l l o f
the pla nt o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s o f th at e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
P a id h olidays;
p a id v a c a t i o n s ; a n d h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , a n d p e n s i o n p la n s ( t a b l e s B - 4
t h r o u g h B - 6 ) a r e t r e a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l l y o n the b a s i s that t h e s e a r e
a p p l i c a b l e to a l l pla n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s i f a m a j o r i t y o f s u c h w o r k e r s
a r e e l i g i b l e o r m a y e v e n t u a l l y q u a l i f y f o r the p r a c t i c e s l i s t e d .
Sums
o f i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s in t a b l e s B - 2 t h r o u g h B - 6 m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s
b e c a u s e o f rou nding.
D a ta o n p a id h o l i d a y s ( t a b l e B - 4 ) a r e l i m i t e d to data o n
h o l i d a y s g r a n t e d a n n u a lly o n a f o r m a l b a s i s ; i . e . , ( l ) a r e p r o v i d e d
f o r in w r i t t e n f o r m , o r (2) h a v e b e e n e s t a b l i s h e d b y c u s t o m .
H oli­
d a y s o r d i n a r i l y g r a n t e d a r e i n c l u d e d e v e n th o u g h t h e y m a y f a l l o n a
n o n w o r k d a y , e v e n i f the w o r k e r i s n o t g r a n t e d a n o t h e r d a y o f f .
The
f i r s t p a r t o f the p a id h o l i d a y s t a b l e p r e s e n t s th e n u m b e r o f w h o l e
a nd h a l f h o l i d a y s a c t u a l l y g r a n t e d .
The s e c o n d part c o m b in e s whole
a nd h a l f h o l i d a y s to s h o w t o t a l h o l i d a y t i m e .
T h e s u m m a r y o f v a c a t i o n p la n s ( t a b l e B - 5 ) i s l i m i t e d to
fo rm a l p o licie s,
exclu din g in fo r m a l a r r a n g e m e n ts w h e r e b y tim e off
w ith p a y i s g r a n t e d at the d i s c r e t i o n o f the e m p l o y e r .
Separate e s ­
t i m a t e s a r e p r o v i d e d a c c o r d i n g to e m p l o y e r p r a c t i c e in c o m p u t i n g
v a c a t io n p a y m e n t s , such as tim e p a y m e n t s , p e r c e n t o f annual e a r n ­
in gs, o r fla t-s u m am ounts.
H o w e v e r , i n the t a b u l a t i o n s o f v a c a t i o n
p a y , p a y m e n t s not o n a t i m e b a s i s w e r e c o n v e r t e d to a t i m e b a s i s ;
f o r e x a m p l e , a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t o f a nn ua l e a r n i n g s w a s c o n ­
s i d e r e d a s the e q u i v a l e n t o f 1 w e e k ' s p a y .

D a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , a n d p e n s i o n
p la n s ( t a b l e B - 6 ) f o r w h i c h at l e a s t a p a r t o f the c o s t i s b o r n e b y
the e m p l o y e r , e x c e p t i n g o n l y l e g a l r e q u i r e m e n t s s u c h a s w o r k m e n ' s
c o m p e n s a t io n , s o c i a l s e c u r i t y , and r a i l r o a d r e t i r e m e n t .
S u c h p la n s
i n c l u d e t h o s e u n d e r w r i t t e n b y a c o m m e r c i a l i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n y and
t h o s e p r o v i d e d t h r o u g h a u n i o n fun d o r p a i d d i r e c t l y b y the e m p l o y e r
o u t o f c u r r e n t o p e r a t i n g f u n d s o r f r o m a fun d s e t a s i d e f o r th is p u r ­
pose.
D eath b e n e fits a r e in c lu d e d as a f o r m o f life i n s u r a n c e .
S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e i s l i m i t e d to th at ty p e o f i n ­
suran ce under w hich p r e d e te r m in e d ca sh paym ents a re m ade d ir e ctly
to the i n s u r e d o n a w e e k l y o r m o n t h l y b a s i s d u r i n g i l l n e s s o r a c ­
cident disa b ility.
I n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l s u c h p la n s to
w h i c h the e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t e s .
H o w e v e r , in N e w Y o r k and N e w
J e r s e y , w h ich have e n a c te d t e m p o r a r y d is a b ilit y in s u r a n c e law s w h ich
r e q u i r e e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t i o n s , 2 p la n s a r e i n c l u d e d o n l y i f the e m ­
p l o y e r (1) c o n t r i b u t e s m o r e than i s l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d , o r (2) p r o v i d e s
the e m p l o y e e w ith b e n e f i t s w h i c h e x c e e d the r e q u i r e m e n t s o f the la w .
T a b u l a t i o n s o f p a i d s i c k - l e a v e p la n s a r e l i m i t e d to f o r m a l pla n s 3
w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y o r a p r o p o r t i o n o f the w o r k e r ' s p a y d u r in g
absence fr o m w ork because of illn e ss.
Sep arate tabu lation s a re p r e ­
s e n t e d a c c o r d i n g to (1) p la n s w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y a n d no w a itin g
p e r i o d , and (2) p la n s w h i c h p r o v i d e e i t h e r p a r t i a l p a y o r a w a itin g
p eriod .
In a d d i t i o n to the p r e s e n t a t i o n o f the p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k e r s
who a r e p r o v id e d s i c k n e s s and a c c id e n t i n s u r a n c e o r paid s i c k le a v e ,
a n u n d u p l i c a t e d t o t a l i s s h o w n o f w o r k e r s w h o r e c e i v e e i t h e r o r b o th
types of ben efits.
C a t a s t r o p h e i n s u r a n c e , s o m e t i m e s r e f e r r e d to a s e x t e n d e d
m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e , i n c l u d e s t h o s e p la n s w h i c h a r e d e s i g n e d to p r o t e c t
e m p l o y e e s in c a s e o f s i c k n e s s a n d i n j u r y i n v o l v i n g e x p e n s e s b e y o n d
the n o r m a l c o v e r a g e o f h o s p i t a l i z a t i o n , m e d i c a l , a n d s u r g i c a l p l a n s .
M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e r e f e r s to p la n s p r o v i d i n g f o r c o m p l e t e o r p a r t i a l
paym ent o f d o c to r s ' fe e s .
S u ch p la n s m a y b e u n d e r w r i t t e n b y c o m ­
m e r c i a l i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s o r n o n p r o fit o r g a n iz a tio n s o r they m a y
be s e lf -in s u r e d .
T a b u l a t i o n s o f r e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n p la n s a r e l i m i t e d
to t h o s e p la n s th at p r o v i d e m o n t h l y p a y m e n t s f o r th e r e m a i n d e r o f
the w o r k e r ' s l i f e .

2 T h e t e m p o r a r y d i s a b i l i t y l a w s in C a l i f o r n i a a n d R h o d e I s l a n d
A n e s t a b l i s h m e n t w a s c o n s i d e r e d a s h a v in g a p o l i c y i f it m edo n ot r e q u i r e e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t i o n s .
t
e i t h e r o f the f o l l o w i n g c o n d i t i o n s : (1) O p e r a t e d l a t e s h if t s at the t i m e
3 A n e s t a b l i s h m e n t w a s c o n s i d e r e d a s h a v in g a f o r m a l p la n i f
o f the s u r v e y , o r (2) h ad f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s c o v e r i n g l a t e s h i f t s .
An
it e s t a b l i s h e d at l e a s t the m i n i m u m n u m b e r o f d a y s o f s i c k l e a v e
e s t a b l i s h m e n t w a s c o n s i d e r e d as h a v in g f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s i f it ( l ) h a d
th at c o u l d b e e x p e c t e d b y e a c h e m p l o y e e .
S u c h a p l a n n e e d not be
o p e r a t e d la te s h if t s d u r in g the 12 m o n t h s p r i o r to the s u r v e y , o r
w r i t t e n , but i n f o r m a l s i c k - l e a v e a l l o w a n c e s , d e t e r m i n e d o n an i n d i ­
(2) had p r o v i s i o n s in w r i t t e n f o r m f o r o p e r a t i n g la te s h i f t s .
vid u al b a s is , w e r e e x clu d e d .
1




3

T a b le 1.

E sta b lish m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ithin s c o p e o f s u r v e y and num ber studied in B u rlin gton , V t., 1 b y m a jo r in d u stry d iv is io n , 2 M a rch 1963

M inim um
em ploym en t
in e s ta b lis h ­
m ents in s co p e
o f study

Industry d iv isio n

W o r k e r s in esta b lish m en ts

N um ber o f esta b lish m e n ts

W ithin s c o p e o f study

W ithin
s co p e o f
study 1
3
2

Studied

Studied
T o t a l4

O ffice

Plant

T o t a l4

________________

.

36

36

6, 300

1, 000

4, 000

6, 300

M anufacturin g ___
__
_ ___ _ _____ __ ___ _
N onm anufacturing
_____ __
. . . . ___
__________
T ra n sp o rta tio n , co m m u n ica tio n , and other
p u b lic u tilitie s 5
_
. . . . .
___ . .
W h olesa le trade __________________________________________
R eta il trade
F in a n ce, in su ra n ce , and r e a l estate _________________ _
S e r v ic e s 8
_ _______ __
_ __________ ___________ ___

50
-

18
18

18
18

4, 460
1, 840

500
500

3, 000
1,0 0 0

4, 460
1, 840

50
50
50
50
50

5
1
8
3
1

5
1
8
3
1

860
50
560
280
90

A ll d iv is io n s

_______________________________

200
(‘ )
( )
(6)
(6)

500
(‘ )
(6)
(7)
(6)

860
50
560
280
90

1 The B u rlin gton A r e a c o n s is ts o f B u rlin gton , E s s e x Junction, South B u rlington, and W in oosk i.
The " w o r k e r s w ithin s c o p e o f study" e s tim a te s show n in this table prov id e a re a s o n a b ly
a ccu ra te d e s c r ip tio n o f the s iz e and c o m p o s itio n o f the la b o r f o r c e in clu d ed in the su rve y. The e s tim a te s a re not intended, h o w e v e r , to s e r v e as a b a s is of c o m p a r is o n w ith other em ploym en t
in d exes fo r the a r e a to m e a s u r e e m p lo y m e n t tren d s or le v e ls sin ce (1) planning o f w age su r v e y s r e q u ir e s the u se o f e sta b lish m e n t data c o m p ile d c o n s id e r a b ly in advance of the p a y r o ll p e r io d
studied, and (2) s m a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts a re e x clu d e d fr o m the s c o p e o f the su rvey.
2 The 1957 r e v is e d ed ition o f the Standard In du strial C la s s ific a t io n M anual w as u se d in c la s s ify in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts by in du stry d iv isio n .
3 Inclu des all e sta b lish m e n ts w ith total e m p lo y m e n t at o r above the m in im u m lim ita tio n . A ll ou tlets (w ithin the a re a ) of c o m p a n ies in such in d u s trie s as tr a d e , fin a n ce, auto r e p a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion p ictu re th e a te rs a re c o n s id e r e d as 1 esta b lish m e n t.
4 In clu des e x e c u tiv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and other w o r k e r s e xclu d e d fr o m the sep arate o ffic e and plant c a t e g o r ie s .
5 T a x ic a b s and s e r v ic e s in cid e n ta l to w a ter tr a n s p o r ta tio n w e re exclu d ed .
6 T h is in du stry d iv is io n is r e p r e s e n te d in e s tim a te s fo r " a l l in d u s tr ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa ctu rin g " in the S e r ie s A ta b le s , and fo r " a l l in d u s tr ie s " in the S e r ie s B ta b les . Separate p r e s e n ­
tation of data fo r this d iv is io n is not m ade fo r one or m o r e o f the fo llo w in g r e a s o n s : (1) E m p loym en t in the d iv is io n is to o s m a ll to p ro v id e enough data to m e r it sep a ra te study, (2) the sam ple
w as not d esig n ed in itia lly to p e rm it se p a ra te p re se n ta tio n , (3) r e s p o n s e w as in s u fficie n t o r inadequate to p e r m it se p a ra te p re se n ta tion , and (4) th ere is p o s s ib ilit y o f d is c lo s u r e o f individual
esta b lish m en t data.
7 W o r k e r s fr o m this en tire in d u stry d iv is io n a re r e p r e s e n te d in e s tim a te s fo r " a l l in d u s tr ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa ctu rin g " in the S e r ie s A t a b le s , but fr o m the r e a l estate p o r tio n on ly in
e s tim a te s fo r " a l l in d u s trie s " in the S e r ie s B ta b le s.
S eparate p re s e n ta tio n of data fo r th is d iv is io n is not m ade fo r one o r m o r e of the r e a s o n s given in footn ote 6 above.
8 H otels; p e r s o n a l s e r v ic e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v ic e s ; au to m o b ile r e p a ir sh op s; m o tio n p ic tu r e s ; n o n p ro fit m e m b e r s h ip o rg a n iz a tio n s ; and en gin eerin g and a r c h ite c tu r a l s e r v ic e s .




A: Occupational Earnings
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women

4

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly h ou rs and earn in gs f o r s e le c t e d o ccu p a tio n s stu died on an a r e a b a s is
by in d u stry d iv isio n , B u rlin gton , Vt. , M a rch 1963)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
Number
of
workers

Sex, o ccu p a tio n , and in d u stry d iv isio n

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly
Weekly 45. 00 50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 85. 00 90. 00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00
hours 1 earnings 1 and
“
(Standard) (Standard) under
“
”
“
■
”
"
"
“
“
50. 00 5 5 ,0 0 6 0 .0 0 65. 00 70. 00 7 5 ,0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 90. 00 _25^<2<L 1QQ.Q.Q 1Q5.QQ 11Q.QQ 115.00 ■
Ufl.QQ 125.00 n s L flfl 135.0Q 140.00 145.00

M en
12
9

39. 0
39. 0

$100. 50
107. 00

-

-

-

*

-

-

8
6

39. 5
40. 5

79. 50
73. 50

-

_

-

_

-

-

6

39. 0

85. 50

_

--------------------

7

39. 0

58. 50

T a b u la tin g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s B ___________________________________

10

40. 0

106. 50

31
7
24

39. 0
39. 5
39. 0

12
7
6

C le r k s , accou n tin g, c la s s B ----------

C le r k s , p a y r o ll
O ffic e b oys

_________________ — —

-------

---------------

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

1
1

-

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

1

_

_

-

_

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

1
1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

4
1
3
1

4
1
3
1

8
7
1

2
2

1
1

_

3
2
1
1

_

_

_

-

1
1
-

-

_

_

_

_

_

.

.

.

1

2
1 .

2
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

_

2
2

_

2
_

-

.
_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

1

-

2

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

3

2

-

-

1
1

1
1

i
i

1
1

_

_

_

2

1
1
1

5
2
1

2
1
1

1
_

_

-

_

_
2

2
2
1

i

5
2
3
2

_

i
_

1

.

1
-

-

_

1
1

1
1

2
2

_

-

-

-

-

1

1

4

1

-

-

-

-

-

62. 00
74. 50
58. 50

1
_
1

3
1
2

15
_
15

2
_
2

3
1
2

3
1
2

40. 5
40. 5
40. 0

87. 50
86. 50'
86. 50

_

_

_

_

_

_

51
8
43

38. 5
40. 0
38. 0

70. 50
69. 50
70. 50

4

2

6
1
5

8
1
7

6
2
4

9

9

2

_

_

2

4
2
2

3

4

3

7

9

14
8
6

39. 0
39. 0
39. 0

77. 00
76. 50
75. 00

_

1
_

1
1

_

2
2

1
1
1

1
_

4
2
2

6

C le r k s , a ccou n tin g, c la s s A ____________
M anufacturin g ____________ —-----------------

39. 5

57. 00

1

2

39.
40.
38.
39.

89.
95.
82.
85.

_

-

8
3
5

5
3
2
1

4
2
2

8
2
6

_

"

1
1

-

1

____ L _

W om en
B o o k k e e p in g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s R _
_ _____________
_

C le r k s , a ccou n tin g, c la s s A

____________

C le r k s , a ccou n tin g , c la s s B -------------------

C le r k s , p a y r o ll

___________________________

K eypunch o p e r a t o r s , c la s s B ___________

S e c r e t a r ie s _____

_____ __ — -------

N onm anufacturing

S w itch boa rd o p e r a t o r s

-

--------------------------------

------------------------------

56
29
27
8
8

0
0
0
5

42. 0
42. 5

00
00
50
5C

60. 50
5573c

2

2

1

3

_
-

3
3

1

1
_
1
1

1
1

S w itch boa rd o p e r a t o r -r e c e p t io n is t s _____

9

39. 0

70. 50

1

1

T y p is ts , c la s s A __________________________

6

39. 5

72. 00

1

T y p is ts , c la s s B __________________________

16

39. 5

57. 50

5

5

2
1
1

1
1
1

1

3

1

3

2

_

"

3

1

Standard h ou rs r e fle c t the w ork w e e k fo r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir re g u la r s tr a ig h t-tim e s a la r ie s and the e a rn in gs c o r r e s p o n d to th ese w eek ly h ou rs .
T ra n sp o rta tio n , co m m u n ica tio n , and o th e r pu b lic u tilitie s .




_

-

2

— r~

_
-

_
-

-

_

_

5
Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations—Men and Women
S alaries of p ro fe ssio n a l and tech n ica l w o rk e rs are om itted
fro m this report. Data do not m eet publication cr ite r ia .

Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations1-Men and Women Combined
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings fo r s elected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, Burlington, Vt., M arch 1963)

O ccupation and industry division

N u m b er

of

w orkers

e a rn in g s23
(S ta n d a rd )

O ffice occupations
31
7
24

$62.00
74.50
58.50

C lerk s, accounting, cla s s A _______ ______________

24
14
10
8

94.00
100.50
85.00
83.50

59
10
49

71.50
75.00
71.00

C lerks, p a y r o l l ___

_ _

_______ __ ____

O ffice boys and g irls
S e cre ta rie s

20
9
7

$79.50
76.50
75.50

________

6

57.00

_

_____

__ ______________ ______

7

__ __ __

O ccupation and industry division

58.50

56
29
27
8

89.00
95.00
82.50
85.50

___

__ _

____

_

1 S alaries of p ro fe ssio n a l and technical w ork ers are om itted fro m this report. Data do not m eet publication c rite ria .
2 Earnings relate to regular straigh t-tim e w eekly sa la rie s that are paid fo r standard w orkw eeks.
3 T ransportation, com m unication, and other public utilities.




A verage
weekly
e arnings
(S ta n d a rd )

N um ber

of

w orkers

A verage
weekly
earnings e
(S ta n d a rd )

O ffice occupations— Continued

__________ ______ _____________

Keypunch o p erators, cla s s B
_

of

O ffice occupations----Continued

B ookkeeping-m achine op e ra to rs, cla ss B ___ _____

Nonmanufacturing

N um ber

O ccupation and industry division

Sw itchboard, op era tors

____ ___ __

8

$60.50
56.50

__ ____________

9

70.50

13

Sw itchboard, o p e r a to r -r e c e p tio n ists

______________

101.50

6

72.00

16

57.50

T ypists, cla s s A ______________________________________

6

Table A-4. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r m en in se le cte d occupations studied on an area b asis
by industry division , Burlington, Vt., M arch 1963)
NUM B ER OF W O RK ER S R E CE IVIN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E HOURLY E A RN IN G S OF—
Number
of
worker*

O ccupation and industry division

7
6

C a rp enters, m aintenance ______________________
M anufacturing
__
_
_ _ _ _ _ __ __ _
E le c tr ic ia n s , m a in te n a n c e ______________________
M a n u fa c tu r in g -----------------------------------------------F irem en , stationary b o i l e r _____________________
M anufacturing -----------------------------------------------M achinists, m a in te n a n c e _______________________
M anufacturing -------------------------------------------------

$2.27
2.30

$
1.40 *1.50
and
under
1.50
1.60

“

8
8
18

2.05
2.05

1.70

“

__ _

P a in ters, m aintenance _ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _

2
2

$
2.00

$
2,10

$
2.20

$
2.30

$
2.40

$
2.50

$
2.60

1.80

1.90

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

"

“

"

”

"

3
3

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

3
3

3
3

2
2

_

1
1

1
1

1

.

.

4

1
1

"

1
1

1
1

1
1

_

.
"

~

.
“

"

2.41

.

.

.

13

ll

2.86
2.86

"

*

“

6

2.05

.

1

.

1 E xcludes prem ium pay fo r o v ertim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays,




$
1.90

1

"

2.52

— rs— — Z75T"

*1.70

$
1.80

.

2.67
2.67

n
n

$
1.60

21

M echanics, autom otive (maintenance)
M echanics, m aintenance _ _ _ _ _ _
M anufacturing

Average
hourly
earning*1

.

.
“

1

.

and late shifts.

1

1
1

S

2.70

$
2.80

$
2.90

2.80

2.90

3.00

~

3.00
3.10

S

3.10

$
3.20

$
3.30

3.20

3.30

3.40

-

-

5
5

-

-

-

"

"

"

"

1
1

-

4

6

3

2
2

_

1
1

$

3.40

*3.50
and

3.50

over

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

i

10
10

3

S

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

2
2

1
1

2
2

-

3
1
“

“

Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, Burlington, V t . , M arch 1963)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Average . $1.00 $1. 10 $1.20 $1.30 $1 .40 *1. 50 *1.6Q $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2. 00 *2. 10 *2. 20 ®2. 30 $2. 40 h . 50 h . 60 *2. 70 *2. 80 *2. 90 *3. 00
hourly
earnings c and
under
1. 10 1.20 1. 30 1.40 1. 50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2. 00 2. 10 2. 20 2. 30 2. 40 2. 50 2. 60 2. 70 2. 80 2. 90 3. 00 3. 10

O ccupation12 and in d u stry divisio n

Number
of
worker*

Ja n ito rs , p o rte rs , and c le a n e rs --------------------M anufacturing __
__
___ —
N onm anufacturing __________________________

63
41
22

$ 1 .6 9
l. 63
1.43

i
i

4
2
2

3
1
2

8
1
7

2
2

10
7
3

2
2

4
3
1

3
1
2

5
5

L a b o re rs, m a te ria l handling __________________
M anufacturing ____
— __ _
N onm anufacturing ___

55
36
19

1.81
T 752
1.80

_
-

“

4
4

1
1
“

2
1
1

5
1
4

8
6
2

12
11
1

_
“

1
i
'

P a c k e rs , shipping ____________

25

2. 04

.

.

.

1

.

4

1

1

i

R eceiving c le rk s
M anufacturing _____
__ ____ ___
N onm anufacturing __________________________

19
10
9

2. 04
2.41
1.62

“

2
2

-■

“

-

4
4

“

~

Shipping c le rk s ___________ ____________ _____
M anufacturing ___ __ —
___

17
15

2. 17
2. 21

T ru c k d riv e rs 3
M anufacturing ___ ____ __ ____ — ___
N onm anufacturing ____________________

29
11
18

2. 33
2. 11
2.46

8

2. 21

6
6

2.

__ ___ __

T ru c k d riv e rs, m edium ( \ l h to and
including 4 tons) ________
__________
T ru c k e rs, pow er (forklift) ____
M anufacturing ----------

— __

2.07
07

“

“

“

-

2
1
1

1
1
“

11
11
“

_
"

1
1
~

_

_

15

.

_

1
1

3
1
2

4
3
1

“
1
1

“

_

_
"

1
1
“

6
6

.
-

-

.

.

.

.

1

“

1
1
"

1
1
“

_

-

-

~

.
_

2
2

-

-

-

-

1
~

.
“

.
“

2
2

3
3

2
2

3
2

2
2

.
"

1
1

.

.

.
“

1
1

.
"

1
1

1
1

_
-

1
1
"

_
-

1
1
"

_
~

4
4
“

_
2
3
- — 3— ----- 2
"

_

-

“

_
“

15
15

.
-

.
-

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

1

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

1
1

2
2

1

1
1

.
“

4

“

1
1

.
-

-

-

_

-

.

1

-

“

.
“

-

-

“

1
1
“

.

1 Data lim ited to m en w o rk e rs.
2 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 Includes all d riv e rs re g a rd le s s o f size and type of truck operated.




21
2l
“

.
_

B:

8

Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
T able B-l.

M inim um Entrance Salaries for W o m e n O ffice W o rk e rs

(D is trib u tio n of e sta b lish m e n ts studied in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y m in im u m en tran ce s a la r y f o r s e le c t e d c a t e g o r ie s
of in e x p e r ie n c e d w om en o f fic e w o r k e r s , B u rlin gton , V t., M arch 1963)
In e x p e rie n ce d ty p ists
M anufacturing
M in im um w e e k ly s tr a ig h t-tim e s a l a r y 1

A ll
in d u s trie s

B a sed on standard w e e k ly h ou rs 3 of—
A ll
sch ed u les

E sta b lish m en ts studied

_

— —

_ — — — — —

O th er in e x p e r ie n c e d c le r i c a l w o r k e r s 2
N onm anuf actu r ing

40

M anufacturin g
A ll
in d u s trie s

N onm anufacturing

B a sed on standard w e e k ly h o u r s 3 of—
A ll
sch ed u les

A ll
sch e d u le s

40

A ll
sch ed u les

40

XXX

36

18

XXX

18

36

18

XXX

18

— — — —

10

6

6

4

13

7

6

6

3

u nd er $ 4 7 .5 0 _ _____ __ __ __ _ — — —
under $50 .0 0 ____ ___ — — — ______ — —
under $52 .5 0
___
_ — _ — — _—
under $ 5 5 .0 0 _ __ . .
_ -- - -- — —
under $ 5 7 .5 0 _____ __ ____ ___ __ ____ __ — __
o v e r ------------------------------------------------------------------

_
6
1

3
1
2

3
1
-

1
8
1
1
2

4
1
2

3
2

1
4
1
-

3
-

2

3
1
2

E sta b lish m en ts having no s p e c ifie d m in im u m _____________

9

4

XXX

5

19

9

XXX

10

XXX

E sta b lish m en ts w hich did not e m p lo y w o r k e r s
in this c a t e g o r y
____ ___ __ __ ___ ______ ___ ___ ___ ___ ____

17

8

XXX

9

4

2

XXX

2

XXX

E sta b lish m en ts having a s p e c ifie d m in im u m
$ 4 5 .0 0
$ 4 7 .5 0
$ 5 0 .0 0
$52 .5 0
$ 5 5 .0 0
$ 5 7 .5 0

and
and
and
and
and
and

1

1 T h ese s a la r ie s re la te to fo r m a lly e s ta b lis h e d m in im um startin g (h irin g) re g u la r s tr a ig h t-tim e s a la r ie s that a r e paid fo r standard w ork w eek s.
2 E x clu d es w o r k e r s in s u b c le r ic a l jo b s such as m e s s e n g e r o r o ffic e g ir l.
3 Data a re p r e s e n te d fo r a ll standard w o rk w e e k s co m b in e d , and fo r the m o s t co m m o n standard w ork w e e k r e p o r te d .




1

-

9
Table B-2. Shift Differentials
(Shift d iffe r e n tia ls o f m an u factu rin g plant w o r k e r s by type and am ount o f d iffe r e n tia l,
B u rlin gton , V t . , M a r c h 1963)
P e r c e n t o f m an u factu rin g plant w o r k e r s —
In e sta b lish m e n ts having fo r m a l
p r o v is io n s 1 fo r —

Shift d iffe r e n tia l

Secon d shift
w ork
T o ta l _____________

— _____

__

85. 8

78. 0

W ith sh ift pay d iffe r e n tia l ______________________

74. 6

76. 6

U n ifo rm cen ts (p e r hour) ___________________

23. 6

5 ce n ts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ _
7 ce n ts _________ . . ______________________
10 ce n ts _________________ ________________
20 cen ts ____________________ __ _________
30 ce n ts ______ ________ ___ __ _____ __

8. 3
.5
4. 3
10. 4
5 1 .0

U n ifo rm p e rce n ta g e _______

_

„

_

T h ird o r oth er
sh ift w o rk

______

V 2 p e r c e n t _________
. . _____ _____
10 p e r c e n t _______________ _______________
15 p e r c e n t ____ „ „ . . . . .

3. 3
47. 7

W ith no sh ift pay d iffe r e n tia l __________________

S econd shift

T h ird o r oth er
shift
4 .4

1 2 .9

8. 4

4 .1

25. 6

3. 2

2 .4

2. 4
.5
12. 2
10. 4

2. 6
. 2

-

-

1 .9

5 1 .0

5. 2

1 .7

. 2
5. 0

1 .7

4. 4

.

11. 2

7

A ctu a lly wo rking on—

-

47. 7
3. 3
1 .4

.

5

-

. 5
-

-

-

3

1
In clu d es e sta b lish m e n ts c u r r e n tly op e ra tin g late sh ifts , and e sta b lish m e n ts w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s c o v e r in g
e ven though they w e re not c u r r e n tly op e ra tin g late s h ifts.

late shifts

Table B-3. Scheduled Weekly Hours
(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f o ffic e and plant w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y s ch ed u led w eek ly hou rs
o f f ir s t -s h if t w o r k e r s , B u rlin gton , Vt. , M a rch 1963)
PLANT WORKERS

OFFICE WORKERS
W eekly hou rs
All industries 1

A ll w o rk e rs

Public utilities 2
3

All industries 2

_____

100

100

100

1

3
-

.

Manufacturing

100

35 h ours _____________
_____ __ _____ ______
36 hou rs __________
______ _____ — — — __
.. .. .. .. — —
3 7 V 2 h ou rs _____________
40 h ou rs ___________________________ ________ __
O ver 40 and under 42*/2 h ours _________________
421/2 h ou rs _____________________ — . . _____ —
O ver 42V 2 and under 44 h ou rs _________________
44 h ou rs _________________ _____________ ___ —
45 h ou rs ______ ___________ _____ . . _____ __
48 h ou rs
________________________________ ______

5
-

1
2
3
4

______________________________

Manufacturing

16
16
63
(4 )
2
1
1
-

1
95
-

1

-

-

65
35
-

-

-

-

'

"

-

84
1
3
1
(4)
1
5

In clu des data fo r w h o le s a le tra d e ; r e t a il tra d e ; fin a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l estate; and s e r v ic e s in add ition to th ose in d u stry d iv is io n s show n se p a r a te ly .
T ra n sp o rta tio n , co m m u n ica tio n , and oth er p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
In clu des data fo r w h o le s a le tra d e , r e t a il tra d e , r e a l esta te , and s e r v ic e s in add ition to th ose in d u stry d iv isio n s show n se p a r a te ly .
L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t.




100

Public utilities2

100

6
-

-

-

-

92

74
-

-

-

1

16
10

10
Table B-4. Paid Holidays
( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f o f f i c e a n d p la n t w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y n u m b e r o f p a id h o l id a y s
p r o v i d e d a n n u a lly , B u r lin g t o n , V t . , M a r c h 1 96 3)

PLANT WORKERS

OFFICE WORKERS
Item
All industries 1

Manufacturing

Public utilities 2

All industries 3

Manufacturing

Public utilities 2

100

W o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid h olid ays
W o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
no paid h olid a ys ------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

97

96

100

“

“

-

3

4

“

N um ber o f days
3

1

.

6

7

9

4

12

7

(*)

(*)

-

5
54
4
-

6

h o l i d a y s ________________________________________
h olid a y s
.
_ ____ _
6 h olid a y s plus 1 h alf d a y ______________________
7 h olid a y s
_ _
8 h olid a y s .
_ _ _ ....
- 8 h olid a y s plus 1 h alf day .
. . . .
9 h o l i d a y s _____________ ___ _______ _______ ___ ____
1 1 h o lid a y s ______________________________________
1 2 h olid a y s -----------------------------------------------------------

36
8

70
7

1

1

7

14
-

21

5

12

65

21

_

20

12

21

.

20

11

42
48
49
57
93
93
99
100

10

5
3

16

66

5
12

-

8
-

10

44
23

T ota l h o lid a y t i m e 5
days _ _____ _____
_____ ____________ __
o r m o r e days _
------- ---------- ------------------- — ___
9 o r m o r e d a y s __ — _— _
8 * / 2 o r m o r e days __ . .
8 o r m o r e days
_ __ _ __ __
7 o r m o r e d a y s __________________________________
- _ __
— __ _ 6 V 2 o r m o r e days __
6 o r m o r e d a y s __ ___ ___ ___ ___ ____ _____
3 o r m o r e d a y s __ — - __ _________ - ____

1
2
3
4
5
no h alf

-

14
15
21

91
91
100
100

84
84
84
96
96
96
100
100

3
8

-

18
18

12

22

17
83
90
96
96

76
81
92
97

12

23
67
77
77
77
77
77
84
100

Inclu des data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in su ra n ce , and r e a l e sta te ; and s e r v ic e s in add ition to th o s e in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s ep a ra tely .
T r a n sp o rta tio n , co m m u n ica tio n , and o th er p u b lic u tilitie s .
Inclu des data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e sta te , and s e r v ic e s in addition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra tely .
L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.
A ll c om b in a tio n s o f fu ll and h alf days that add to the sa m e am ount a re co m b in e d ; f o r e x a m p le , the p r o p o r tio n of w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g a total o f 7 days in clu d es th ose w ith 7 fu ll days and
d a y s, 6 fu ll days and 2 h a lf d a y s, 5 fu ll days and 4 h a lf d ays, and s o on. P r o p o r t io n s w e re then cum ulated.




11
Table B-5. Paid Vacations
( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f o f f i c e a n d p la n t w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r ie s and in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t i o n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , B u r lin g t o n , V t ., M a r c h 1 96 3)

OFFICE WORKERS

PLANT WORKERS

V a ca tio n p o lic y
All industries *

A ll w o r k e r s

__

__ __ __ _____ __

_____ __ __

Manufacturing

Public utilities2

All industries^

Manufacturing

Public utilities 2

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
95
5
-

100
94
6
-

100
100
-

"

"

"

"

•

(5)
29
6
15

25
-

11
16

_
-

(5)

65

9
13
2
5

-

44

11
89

15
85

5
95

75
25

84
16

26
74

9
(5)
91

12
1
87

5
95

30
40
30

27
54
19

26
74

7
(5)
92

11
1
88

5

21
37
42

20
49
30

26

95

7
(5)
92

11
1
88

95

21
37
42

20
49
30

(5)
( 5)
98
1

1
97
2

6
1
90
3

6
2
88
4

M ethod o f paym ent

W o r k e r s in e sta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a ca tion s _ __ __ __ — ____ __ ____ __
L e n g th -o f-tim e p a y m e n t ____________________
P e r c e n ta g e paym ent
_______ ___ ___ _______
F la t -s u m p a y m e n t _ _
____ ___ ___ ____
O ther
W o r k e r s in e sta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid v a c a t i o n s ____ ___ ___ ___ ___ ______ __

A m ount o f v a ca tio n p a y 4

A fte r 6 m onths o f s e r v ic e
Under 1 w eek ____ ___ ___ __ _____ _____ ___ ____
1 w eek ___________________________________________
____ ______
O v er 1 and under 2 w e e k s _
2 w eek s _ _ __ ___ ___ ___ __ ____ __ ____ ___ — ____

_

_
-

-

A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ____ __ ____ ___ __ _____ __ ________ _
2 w eek s ____ __ __ ________ __ __ __ _____ __

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek _____ ________ ________ ______ _____ ____
____ ____
O v er 1 and under 2 w e e k s ____ ___
2 w eek s ____ ___ ___ __ __ ___ ___ — ______ __ __
A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek _ _
____ ___ __________ ___ ___ ___ ____
O v er 1 and under 2 w e e k s _ ________ ___ ___ ____
2 w eek s _ __ ____ ___ __________ ________ _______

-

-

74

A ft e r 4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k _______ _____ __ _____ ________________
O v er 1 and under 2 w eek s _ __ __ __ __ __ __
2 w eek s ____ ___ __ ____ ___ __ ____ ___ __ _ __

5
-

26
_

74

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _ __ _____ ___ ___ ____
2 w eek s ____ ______ ___ ___ ___ ______ _____ _____

See fo o tn o te s at end of table.




_

_
-

100

_

100

12

Table B-5. Paid Vacations— Continued
( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f o f f i c e a n d p la n t w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r ie s a n d in i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t i o n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , B u r lin g t o n , V t. , M a r c h 1963)

PLANT WORKERS

OFFICE WORKERS
V a ca tio n p o lic y
All

Public utilities1
2

industries 1

Manufacturing

( 5)
61
( 5)
38

_
84
1
16

_
74

( 5)
33
29
38

All industries 3

Manufacturing

Public utilities2

A m ount o f v a c a tio n p a y 4— Continued

A fte r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek __ __ ______
—
----- ------- --------2 w eeks __________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks ---------------------------- —
3 w eeks -----------------------------------------------------------------

26

6
72
1
20

6
77
2
15

_
24
59
16

_
74
26

6
30
38
26

6
19
52
23

.
61

( 5)
13
87

_
14
86

_
9
91

6
17
77

6
9
85

.
18
83

(5)
13
74
13

14
73
13

9
84
6

6
17
67
10

6
9
74
11

18
67
16

( 5)
13
52
35

14
72
14

6
17
53
24

6
9
67
18

61
-

39

A fte r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e

1 w eek ______________________
__________________
2 w eeks _______________________________________ —
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks ___________
— —
3 w eeks ___________________________________________

-

39

A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek ________ _____ ______ _______ _____ —
2 w eeks ___________ — _________________
3 w eeks ____ — —
—
— — —
A fte r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e

1
2
3
4

w eek
w eek s
w eeks
w eeks

___________________________________________
__ ----- --------- ------------------ — -- --------___________________________________________
------------------- --------------------------—

.

A fte r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e

1
2
3
4

w eek
w eek s
w eeks
w eek s

__ __
------— ------------------ ------------_____ — ------__________________________________________
__________________________________________

_

_
9
-

91

_

18
-

83

1 In clu d es data fo r w h o le s a le tra d e ; r e t a il tra d e ; fin a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l estate; and s e r v ic e s in add ition to th ose in d u stry d iv is io n s show n se p a r a te ly .
z T r a n sp o rta tio n , co m m u n ica tio n , and o th e r pub lic u t ilit ie s .
3 In clu d es data fo r w h o le s a le tra d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s in add ition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n se p a r a te ly .
4 In clu d es paym ents o th er than "len gth o f t i m e , " such as p e rce n ta g e o f annual e a rn in gs o r fla t -s u m paym en ts, c o n v e r t e d to an equ ivalent tim e b a s is ; fo r e x a m p le, a paym ent o f 2 p e rce n t
o f annual ea rn in gs w as c o n s id e r e d as 1 w e e k 's pay.
P e r io d s o f s e r v ic e w e re a r b it r a r ily c h o s e n and do not n e c e s s a r ily r e fle c t the individ ual p r o v is io n s f o r p r o g r e s s io n s .
F o r exam p le, the
ch an ges in p ro p o r tio n s in d ica te d at 10 y e a r s ' s e r v ic e in clu d e ch an ges in p r o v is io n s o c c u r r in g betw een 5 and 10 y e a r s .
E s tim a te s a r e cu m u la tiv e.
Th us, the p r o p o r t io n r e c e iv in g 3 w eek s ' pay
o r m o r e a fte r 5 y e a r s in clu d e s th ose who r e c e iv e 3 w e e k s ' pay o r m o r e a fte r fe w e r y e a r s o f s e r v ic e .
5 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t.




13
Table B-6. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
(P e r c e n t o f o ffic e and plant w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s trie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s em p lo y e d in e sta b lish m en ts p rov id in g
health, in s u ra n ce , o r p e n sio n b e n e fits , 1 B u rlin gton , Vt. , M a rch 1963)

OFFICE WORKERS
Type o f be n e fit

PLANT WORKERS

Manufacturing

Public utilities3

All industries 4

Manufacturing

Public utilities3

100

100

100

100

100

100

L ife in su ra n ce ----- ------- — — ------------ —
A c c id e n ta l death and d is m e m b e rm e n t
in s u ra n ce ---- — — — — — ------- — —
S ick n es s and a ccid e n t in s u ra n ce o r
s ic k lea v e o r b o th 5 _____ — ____________

99

.99

100

96

100

100

73

71

88

67

70

84

91

97

100

94

98

100

S ick n ess and a c c id e n t in s u ra n ce ----------S ick le a v e (fu ll pay and no
w aiting p e r io d ) ------ — ------------ — —
S ick lea v e (p a r tia l pay o r
w aiting p e r io d ) ----------- — ------------ —

67

84

35

76

87

56

73

76

100

23

14

56

1

-

-

6

-

44

H osp ita liz a tion in s u ra n ce ------ ------- — —
S u rg ica l in s u ra n ce ------------ — ------------ —
M ed ica l in su ra n ce ----------------------------------------C a ta strop h e in su ra n ce ______________________
R e tirem en t p en s io n _______ — — — — —
No health, in s u ra n ce , o r p e n s io n plan ------

83
77
65

99
87
78
85

35
35

99

56
56
33
90
93

A ll w o r k e r s

_____________________________________

All industries2

W ork ers in esta b lish m e n ts p r o v id in g :

88
86
1

88

(6)

10

68

87
79

88

95
91

69
72

78
72
78

2

1 Inclu des th ose plans fo r w h ich at le a s t a p a rt o f the c o s t is b o r n e by the e m p lo y e r , ex ce p tin g only le g a l re q u ir e m e n ts su ch as w o rk m e n 's com p en sa tion , s o c ia l s e c u r ity , and r a ilr o a d
r e tir e m e n t.
2 Inclu des data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e ta il tr a d e ; fin a n ce , in su ra n ce , and r e a l e sta te ; and s e r v ic e s in addition to th ose industry d iv is io n s show n s ep a ra tely .
3 T ra n sp orta tio n , co m m u n ica tio n , and o th er p u b lic u tilitie s .
4 Inclu des data fo r w h o le s a le tra d e , r e t a il trade, r e a l esta te, and s e r v ic e s in addition to th ose in du stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a ra te ly .
5 U nduplicated total o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k le a v e o r s ick n e s s and a c c id e n t in su ra n ce show n s e p a ra te ly be lo w .
S ick le a v e plans a re lim ite d to th ose w hich d efin itely esta b lish at least
the m in im u m num ber o f d a y s ' pay that can be e x p e cte d by ea ch e m p lo y e e . In fo rm a l s ick le a v e a llo w a n ce s d e te rm in e d on an individ ual b a s is a r e exclu d ed .
6 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t.







Appendix: Occupational Descriptions
The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’ s wage surveys is to assist its
field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll
titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This is
essential in order to permit the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the
Bureau’ s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those
prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’ s field economists are in­
structed to exclude working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped, part-time,
temporary, and probationary workers.

OFFICE
BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other
than an ordinary or electromatic typewriter. May also keep records as
to billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work incidental
to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, machine, are
classified by type of machine, as follows:

Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott
Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register, with or without
a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions.
C la ss A—
Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of
and experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with
the structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines
proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used
in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, bal­
ance sheets, and other records by hand.

B i lle r , m a c h in e (b illin g m a c h in e )—Uses a special billing ma­
chine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott Fisher, Burroughs, etc., which are
combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and in­
voices from customers’ purchase orders, internally prepared orders,
shipping memorandums, etc. Usually involves application of prede­
termined discounts and shipping charges and entry of necessary
extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing ma­
chine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine.
The operation usually involves a large number of carbon copies of
the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.

C l a s s B —Keeps a record of one or more phases or sections of
a set of records usually requiring little knowledge of basic book­
keeping.
Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll,
customers’ accounts (not including a simple type of billing described
under biller, machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc. May check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

B i ll e r , m a c h in e (b o o k k e e p i n g m a c h in e )—U s e s a bookkeeping
machine (Sundstrand, Elliott Fisher, Remington Rand, etc., which
may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare customers’
bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally in­
volves the simultaneous entry of figures on customers’ ledger rec­
ord. The machine automatically accumulates figures on a number
of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically
the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of book­
keeping.
Works from uniform and standard types of sales and
credit slips.




CLERK, ACCOUNTING
C l a s s A—
Under general direction of a bookkeeper or account­
ant, has responsibility for keeping one or more sections of a com­
plete set of books or records relating to one phase of an establish­
ment’ s business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing
subsidiary ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts

15

16

CLERK , A C C O U N T IN G -C ontinued
payable; examining and coding invoices or vouchers with proper ac­
counting distribution; and requires judgment and experience in
making proper assignations and allocations. May assist in preparing,
adjusting and closing journal entries; and may direct class B ac­
counting clerks.
C l a s s B —Under supervision, performs one or more routine ac­
counting operations such as posting simple journal vouchers or ac­
counts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher registers;
reconciling bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers con­
trolled by general ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data.
This job does not require a knowledge of accounting and book­
keeping principles but is found in offices in which the more routine
accounting work is subdivided on a functional basis among several
workers.

CLERK, FILE
C lass A—
In an established filing system containing a number
of varied subject matter files, classifies and indexes file material
such as correspondence, reports, technical documents, etc. May
also file this material. May keep records of various types in con­
junction with the files. May lead a small group of lower level file
clerks.

C l a s s B —Sorts,

codes, and files unclassified material by sim­
ple (subject matter) headings or partly classified material by finer
subheadings.
Prepares simple related index and cross-reference
aids.
As requested locates clearly identified material in files
and forwards material. May perform related clerical tasks required
to maintain and service files.

CLERK, ORDER
Receives customers’ orders for material or merchandise by mail,
phone, or personally. Duties involve a n y c o m b i n a t i o n o f t h e f o l l o w i n g :
Quoting prices to customers; making out an order sheet listing the items
to make up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be
filled. May check with credit department to determine credit rating of
customer, acknowledge receipt of orders from customers, follow up orders
to see that they have been filled, keep file of orders received, and check
shipping invoices with original orders.

CLERK, PAYROLL
Computes wages of company employees and enters the neces­
sary data on the payroll sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers’
earnings based on time or production records; and posting calculated
data on payroll sheet, showing information such as worker’ s name, work­
ing days, time, rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due.
May make out paychecks and assist paymaster in making up and dis­
tributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
Primary duty is to operate a Comptometer to perform mathema­
tical computations. This job is not to be confused with that of statis­
tical or other type of clerk, which may involve frequent use of a Comp­
tometer but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to performance
of other duties.

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
routine filing of material that has already
been classified or which is easily classified in a simple serial
classification system (e .g., alphabetical, chronological, or numer­
ical).
As requested, locates readily available material in files
and forwards material; and may fill out withdrawal charge. Per­
forms simple clerical and manual tasks required to maintain and
service files.
C lass




C —Performs

Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsi­
bilities, reproduces multiple copies of typewritten or handwritten matter,
using a Mimeograph or Ditto machine. Makes necessary adjustment such
as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed. Is not required to
prepare stencil or Ditto master. May keep file of used stencils or Ditto
masters. May sort, collate, and staple completed material.

17
SECRETARY— Continued

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
C l a s s A —Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combina­

tion keypunch machine to transcribe data from various source docu­
ments to keypunch tabulating cards. Performs same tasks as lower
level keypunch operator but in addition, work requires application of
coding skills and the making of some determinations, for example,

making phone calls; handling personal and important or confidential
mail, and writing routine correspondence on own initiative; and taking
dictation (where transcribing machine is not used) either in shorthand
or by Stenotype or similar machine, and transcribing dictation or the
recorded information reproduced on a transcribing machine. May prepare
special reports or memorandums for information of superior.

locates on the source document the items to be punched; extracts
information from several documents; and searches for and interprets
information on the document to determine information to be punched.
May train inexperienced operators.

C l a s s B —Under close supervision or following specific proce­

dures or instructions,

transcribes data from source documents to

punched cards. Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or com­
bination keypunch machine to keypunch
verify cards.

tabulating cards.

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more persons
either in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine, involving a
normal routine vocabulary; and transcribe dictation. May also type from
written copy. May maintain files, keep simple records, or perform other
relatively routine clerical tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool.
Does not include transcribing-machine work. (See transcribing-machine
operator.)

May

Working from various standardized source documents,

follows specified sequences which have been coded or prescribed
in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting
data to be punched. Problems arising from erroneous items or codes,
missing information, etc., are referred to supervisor.

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL

STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more persons,
either in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine, involving a var­
ied technical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or
reports on scientific research and transcribe dictation. May also type
from written copy. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.

OR

Performs various routine duties such as running errands, opera­
ting minor office machines such as sealers or mailers, opening and dis­
tributing mail, and other minor clerical work.

SECRETARY
Performs secretarial and clerical duties for a superior in an
administrative or executive position.

Duties include making appoint­

ments for superior; receiving people coming into office; answering and




Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly greater
independence and responsibility than stenographers, general as evi­
denced by the following: Work requires high degree of stenographic
speed and accuracy; and a thorough working knowledge of general busi­
ness and office procedures and of the specific business operations,
organization, policies, procedures, files, workflow, etc.
Uses this
knowledge in performing stenographic duties and responsible clerical
tasks such as, maintaining followup files; assembling material for
reports, memorandums, letters, etc.; composing simple letters from general
instructions; reading and routing incoming mail; and answering routine
questions, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine work.

18
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard.
Duties involve handling incoming, outgoing, and intraplant or office
calls. May record toll calls and take messages. May give information
to persons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders. For
workers who also act as receptionists see switchboard operatorreceptionist.

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR-Continued
C l a s s C —Operates simple tabulating or electrical account­
ing machines such as the sorter, reproducing punch, collator, etc.,
with specific instructions. May include simple wiring from diagrams
and some filing work. The work typically involves portions of a
work unit, for example, individual sorting or collating runs or re
petitive operations.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
In addition to performing duties of operator, on a single posi­
tion or monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and may also type
or perform routine clerical work as part of regular duties. This typing
or clerical work may take the major part of this worker’ s time while at
switchboard.
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
C la s s A—
Operates a variety of tabulating or electrical ac­
counting machines, typically including such machines as the tabu­
lator, calculator, interpreter, collator, and others. Performs com­
plete reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs
difficult wiring as required. The complete reporting and tabulating
assignments typically involve a variety of long and complex re­
ports which often are of irregular or nonrecurring type requiring
some planning and sequencing of steps to be taken. As a more
experienced operator, is typically involved in training new opera­
tors in machine operations, or partially trained operators in wiring
from diagrams and operating sequences of long and complex reports,
D o e s not in c lu d e working supervisors performing tabulating-machine
operations a n d day-to-day supervision of the work and production
of a group of tabulating-machine operators.
C l a s s B —Operates more difficult tabulating or electrical ac­
counting machines such as the tabulator and calculator, in addition
to the sorter, reproducer, and collator. This work is performed under
specific instructions and may include the performance of some wir­
ing from diagrams. The work typically involves, for example, tabu­
lations involving a repetitive a-ccounting exercise, a complete but
small tabulating study, or parts of a longer and more complex report.
Such reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where
the procedures are well established. May also include the training
of new employees in the basic operation of the machine.




TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
Primary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal rou­
tine vocabulary from transcribing-machine records. May also type from
written copy and do simple clerical work. Workers transcribing dictation
involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal
briefs or reports on scientific research are not included. A worker who
takes dictation in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine is
classified as a stenographer, general.

TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies of various material or to
make out bills after calculations have been made by another person.
May include typing of stencils, mats, or similar materials for use in
duplicating processes. May do clerical work involving little special
training, such as keeping simple records., filing records and reports, or
sorting and distributing incoming mail.

C l a s s A —Performs o n e or m ore o f the f o l l o w in g : Typing ma­
terial in final form when it involves combining material from several
sources err responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication, punc­
tuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language ma­
terial; and planning layout and typing of complicated statistical
tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing. May type
routine form letters varying details to suit circumstances.

C l a s s B —Performs o n e or m ore o f the f o l l o w in g : Copy typing
from rough or clear drafts; routine typing of forms, insurance pol­
icies, etc.; and setting up simple standard tabulations, or copying
more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.

19
PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR-Continued

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR
(Assistant draftsman)
Draws to scale units or parts of drawings prepared by drafts­
man or others for engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes.
Uses various types of drafting tools as required. May prepare drawings
from simple plans or sketches, or perform other duties under direction
of a draftsman.

completed work, checking dimensions, materials to be used, and quan­
tities; writing specifications; and making adjustments or changes in
drawings or specifications.
May ink in lines and letters on pencil
drawings, prepare detail units of complete drawings, or trace drawings.
Work is frequently in a specialized field such as architectural, elec­
trical, mechanical, or structural drafting.

DRAFTSMAN, LEADER
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
Plans and directs activities of one or more draftsmen in prep­
aration of working plans and detail drawings from rough or preliminary
sketches for engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes.
Duties involve a c o m b in a tio n o f th e f o llo w in g : Interpreting blueprints,
sketches, and written or verbal orders; determining work procedures;
assigning duties to subordinates and inspecting their work; and per­
forming more difficult problems. May assist subordinates during emer­
gencies or as a regular assignment, or perform related duties of a
supervisory or administrative nature.
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
Prepares working plans and detail drawings from notes, rough
or detailed sketches for engineering, construction, or manufacturing
purposes. Duties involve a c o m b in a tio n o f th e fo llo w in g : Preparing
working plans, detail drawings, maps, cross-sections, etc., to scale by
use of drafting instruments; making engineering computations such as
those involved in strength of materials, beams and trusses; verifying

A registered nurse who gives nursing service to ill or injured
employees or other persons who become ill or suffer an accident on the
premises of a factory or other establishment. Duties involve a c o m b in a ­
tion o f the f o llo w in g : Giving first aid to the ill or injured; attending to
subsequent dressing of employees’ injuries; keeping records of patients
treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or other purposes;
conducting physical examinations and health evaluations of applicants
and employees; and planning and carrying out programs involving health
education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment, or other
activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety of all personnel.
TRACER
Copies
plans and drawings prepared by others, by placing
tracing cloth or paper over drawing and tracing with pen or pencil. Uses
T-square, compass, and other drafting tools. May prepare simple draw­
ings and do simple lettering.

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE-Continued

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and main­
tain in goodrepair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs,
counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim
made of wood in an establishment. Work involves m o st o f the f o llo w in g :
Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or
verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenter’ s handtools, portable

power tools, and standard measuring instruments; making standard shop
computations relating to dimensions of work; and selecting materials
necessary for the work. In general, the work of the maintenance car­
penter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.




20
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE

HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES

Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the
installation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generating, dis­
tribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment. Work
involves m o st o f the fo llo w in g : Installing or repairing any of a variety
of electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards,
controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems,
or other transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, lay­
out, or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the elec­
trical system or equipment; working standard computations relating to
load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety
of electrician’ s handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In
general, the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded train­
ing and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.

A ssists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades,
by performing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping
a worker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning working area, ma­
chine, and equipment; assisting worker by holding materials or tools;
and performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The
kind of work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade:
In some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding
materials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he is per­
mitted to perform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade
that are also performed by workers on a full-time basis.

ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation
of stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to sup­
ply the establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrigera­
tion, or air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining
equipment such as steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors,
turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and
boiler-fed water pumps; making equipment repairs; and keeping a record
of operation of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May
a ls o supervise these operations. H e a d or c h i e f e n g in e e r s in e s t a b l i s h ­

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or more types of machine
tools, such as jig borers, cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or milling machines in the construction of machine-shop tools, gages,
jigs, fixtures, or dies. Work involves m o st o f th e f o llo w in g : Planning
and performing difficult machining operations; processing items requiring
complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision measuring instruments; selecting feeds, speeds, tooling and
operation sequence; and making necessary adjustments during operation
to achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions. May be required to rec­
ognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to select proper
coolants and cutting and lubricating oils. For cross-industry wage study
purposes, machine-tool operators, toolroom, in tool and die jobbing
shops are excluded from this classification.

m e n ts e m p lo y in g m ore than o n e e n g in e e r are e x c lu d e d .

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
Fire stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which
employed with heat, power, or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; and checks water
and safety valve.
May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom
equipment.




Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of
metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work
involves m o st o f the f o l l o w in g : Interpreting written instructions and
specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of ma­
chinist’ s handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and
operating standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close toler­
ances; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of
work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working

21
MACHINIST, M A INTEN ANC E-Continued

MILLWRIGHT

properties of the common metals; selecting standard materials, parts,
and equipment required for his work; and fitting and assembling parts
into mechanical equipment. In general, the machinist’ s work normally
requires a rounded training in machine-shop practice usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Installs new machines or heavy equipment and dismantles and
installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout
are required. Work involves m o st o f the f o llo w in g : Planning and laying
out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a
variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations re­
lating to stresses, strength of materials, and centers of gravity; alining
and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment and
parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order power
transmission equipment such as drives and speed reducers. In general,
the millwright’ s work normally requires a rounded training and experi­
ence in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an es­
tablishment. Work involves m o st o f the f o llo w in g : Examining automotive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling equipment and
performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches,
gages, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassembling and installing the various assemblies in the vehicle
and making necessary adjustments; and alining wheels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the auto­
motive mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually ac­
quired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment.
Work involves m o st o f the f o l l o w in g : Examining machines and mechan­
ical equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling or partly dis­
mantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of
handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective
parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the production of a re­
placement part by a machine shop or sending of the machine to a machine
shop for major repairs; preparing written specifications for major repairs
or for the production of parts ordered from machine shop; reassembling
machines; and making all necessary adjustments for operation. In gen­
eral, the work of a maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiva­
lent training and experience.
Excluded from this classification are
workers whose p rim a ry d u t ie s involve setting up or adjusting machines.




OILER
Lubricates, with oil or grease, the moving parts or wearing sur­
faces of. mechanical equipment of an establishment.

PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an e s­
tablishment. Work i n v o l v e s the f o llo w in g : Knowledge of surface pecu­
liarities and types of paint required for different applications; preparing
surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler
in nail holes and interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush.
May mix colors, oils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain
proper color or consistency. In general, the work of the maintenance
painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves m o st o f th e f o llo w in g :
Laying out of work and measuring to locate position of pipe from draw­
ings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to
correct lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe­
cutting machine; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by
hand-driven or power-driven machines; assembling pipe with couplings

22
P IP E F IT T E R , M A IN T EN A N C E-C ontinued

SHEET-M ETAL WORKER, M A IN T EN A N C E-C ontinued

and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relat­
ing to pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard
tests to determine whether finished pipes meet specifications. In general
the work of the maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiva­
lent training and experience. W orkers p r im a r ily e n g a g e d in in s t a l l in g a n d

types of sheet-metal-working machines; using a variety of handtools in
cutting, bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assembling; and installing
sheet-metal articles as required. In general, the work of the maintenance
sheet-metal worker requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

r e p a ir in g b u ild in g s a n it a t io n or h e a tin g s y s t e m s a re e x c lu d e d .

TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(Die maker; jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker; gage maker)

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
Keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installation of
vents and traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and
fixtures; and opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber’ s snake.
In general, the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded train­
ing and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheetmetal equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans,
shelves, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an
establishment. Work involves m o st o f the f o l l o w in g : Planning and lay­
ing out all types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints,
models, or other specifications; setting up and operating all available

Constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gages, jigs, fix­
tures or dies for forgings, punching, and other metal-forming work. Work
involves m o st o f the f o l l o w in g : Planning and laying out of work from
models, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifications;
using a variety of tool and die maker’ s handtools and precision meas­
uring instruments, understanding of the working properties of common
metals and alloys; setting up and operating of machine tools and related
equipment; making necessary shop computations relating to dimensions
of work, speeds, feeds, and tooling of machines; heattreating of metal
parts during fabrication as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve
required qualities; working to close tolerances; fitting and assembling
of parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances; and selecting appro­
priate materials, tools, and processes. In general, the tool and die
maker’ s work requires a rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom
practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die makers
in tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classification.

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER

GUARD

Transports passengers between floors of an office building
apartment house, department store, hotel, or similar establishment.
Workers who operate elevators in conjunction with other duties such as
those of starters and janitors are excluded.

Performs routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour,
maintaining order, using arms or force where necessary. I n c l u d e s g a t e -




men w h o are s t a t i o n e d a t g a t e a n d c h e c k on id e n t it y o f e m p lo y e e s a n d
o th er p e r s o n s e n te r in g .

23
PACKER, SHIPPING

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
(Sweeper; charwomen; janitress)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas
and washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial
or other establishment.

Duties involve a co m b in a tio n o f the fo llo w in g :

Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips,
trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polish­
ing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor mainte­
nance services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Work­
ers who specialize in window washing are excluded.

Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing
them in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being
dependent upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the
type of container employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the
placing of items in shipping containers and m ay in v o lv e on e or more o f
the fo llo w in g : Knowledge of various items of stock in order to verify
content; selection of appropriate type and size of container; inserting
enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to prevent
breakage or damage; closing and sealing container; and applying labels
or entering identifying data on container.
P a c k e r s w h o a ls o m ake
w o o d e n b o x e s or c r a t e s a re e x c lu d e d .

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is respon­

A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store,
or other establishment whose duties involve o n e 'o r more o f the f o l l o w ­
in g :

Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or

from freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelv­
ing, or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage location;
and transporting materials or merchandise by hand truck, car, or wheel­
barrow.

L o n g s h o r e m e n , w ho lo a d a n d u n lo a d s h ip s are e x c lu d e d .

sible for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials.
p in g

w ork i n v o l v e s :

routes,

S h ip ­

A knowledge of shipping procedures, practices,

available means of transportation and rates;

and preparing

records of the goods shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight
and shipping charges, and keeping a file of shipping records.
direct or assist in preparing the merchandise for shipment.
w ork

in v o lv e s :

May

R e c e iv in g

Verifying or directing others in verifying the correct­

ness of shipments against bills of lading, invoices, or other records;
checking for shortages and rejecting damaged goods; routing merchan­
ORDER FILLER

dise

(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)

or materials to proper departments; and maintaining necessary

records and files.

Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips, cus­
tomers’ orders, or other instructions.
and indicating items filled or omitted,

May, in addition to filling orders
keep records of outgoing orders

requisition additional stock, or report short supplies to supervisor, and
perform Other related duties.




For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows;
R e c e i v i n g c le r k
S h ip p in g c le r k
S h ip p in g a n d r e c e iv in g c le r k

24
TRUCKDRIVER

TRUCKER, POWER

Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport ma­
terials, merchandise, equipment, or men between various types of estab­
lishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses,
wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail establishments
and customers’ houses or places of business. May also load or unload
truck with or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep
truck in good working order. D r iv e r -s a le s m e n a n d o v e r -t h e -r o a d d r iv e r s

Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered
truck or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a
warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment.

are e x c lu d e d .

For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size
and type of equipment, as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on
the basis of trailer capacity.)

For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of
truck, as follows:

T r u c k e r , p o w e r (f o r k lif t )
T r u c k e r , p o w e r (o th e r than fo r k lif t )

T r u c k d r iv e r ( co m b in a tio n o f s i z e s l i s t e d s e p a r a t e l y )
T r u c k d r iv e r , lig h t (u n d e r iy 2 to n s)
T r u c k d r iv e r , m ediu m ( 1% to a n d in c lu d in g 4 to n s )
T r u c k d r iv e r , h e a v y ( o v e r 4 to n s, tr a ile r ty p e )
T r u c k d r iv e r , h e a v y ( o v e r 4 to n s, oth er than tr a ile r t y p e )




WATCHMAN
Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property
against fire, theft, and illegal entry.

Occupational W age Su rveys
A l i s t o f the la t e s t a v a ila b le b u ll e t in s is p r e s e n t e d b e l o w .
A d i r e c t o r y in d ica t in g d a t e s o f e a r l i e r s t u d i e s , and the p r i c e s o f the b u lle tin s
is a v a ila b le u po n r e q u e s t . B u lle tin s m a y be p u r c h a s e d f r o m the S u p e rin te n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s , U. S. G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W a s h in g t o n 25, D. C. ,
o r f r o m any o f the BLS r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s show n on the in s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .

A rea

B u lle tin
num ber

P rice

A k r o n , O h io ________________________________
A lb a n y — ch e n e cta d y —T r o y , N. Y. _______
S
A lb u q u e r q u e , N. M e x . ____________________
A lle n to w n — e th le h e m — a s to n , P a .— . J.
B
E
N
A tla n ta , G a. _________________________________
B a lt im o r e , M d . ____________________________
B e a u m o n t— o r t A r t h u r , T e x . ____________
P
B ir m in g h a m , A la . _________________________
B o i s e , Idaho ________________________________
B o s to n , M a s s . _____________________________

1 303-81
1 3 0 3 -5 6
13 0 3-6 7
1 3 4 5-4 5
1 3 0 3-6 5
1 3 4 5 -2 3
1 3 0 3 -7 8
1 3 0 3-5 9
130 3-7 7
1 3 4 5 -1 5

25
25
25
20
30
25
25
30
25
25

ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
cents
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts

B u ffa lo , N. Y .............................................................
B u r lin g to n , V t. ____________________________
C a n to n , O h io _______________________________
C h a r le s to n , W . V a . _______________________
C h a r lo tt e , N. C . ____________________________
C h a tta n o o g a , T en n . — a. __________________
G
C h ic a g o , 111. ________________________________
C in c in n a ti, O hio— y. ______________________
K
C le v e la n d , O hio ____________________________
C o lu m b u s , O h io ____________________________

1 3 4 5 -3 0
1 3 4 5-5 0
1 3 0 3 -6 2
1 303-61
1 3 0 3-6 0
1 3 4 5 -8
1 3 0 3 -6 4
1 3 0 3 -5 5
1 3 4 5 -1 4
1 3 4 5 -2 8

25
25
25
25
25
25
30
25
25
25

ce n ts
cents
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts

D a lla s , T e x . ________________________________
D a v e n p o rt— o c k Is land— o lin e , Iow a—
R
M
111.
D a y to n , O h io ________________________________
D e n v e r , C o lo . ______________________________
D es M o in e s , Iow a __________________________
D e t r o it , M ich . _____________________________
F o r t W o r th , T e x . __________________________
G r e e n B a y , W is . _________________ __________
G r e e n v ille , S. C . __________________________
H o u sto n , T e x . ______________________________

1345-21
1 3 4 5 -1 8
1 3 4 5 -3 5
1 3 4 5 -3 2
1 3 4 5 -4 2
1 3 4 5-4 7
13 4 5-2 7
1 3 4 5 -3
1 3 0 3-7 0
1 3 0 3-7 9

25
25
20
25
20
25
25
25
25
25

ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts

I n d i a n a p o l i s , Ind. _______________________
J a c k s o n , M i s s . ___________________________
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . ______________________
K a n s a s C i t y , M o . — a ns . _______________
K
L a w r e n c e — a v e r h i l l , M a s s . — H. __ _
H
N.
L it tle R o c k — o r t h L it tle R o c k , A r k .
N
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h , C a lif . ______
L ou isville, K y .—
Ind. ____________________
L u b b o c k , T e x . ____________________________
M a n c h e s t e r , N. H. __________ ____________
M e m p h i s , T e n n. _________________________

1 3 4 5 -2 6
1345-43
13 4 5-3 9
1 3 4 5-2 2
1 3 0 3-7 6
1345-7
1 3 0 3 -5 3
1 3 4 5-4 8
1 3 0 3-7 4
1 3 45-2
1 3 4 5-3 6

25
20
25
25
25
25
30
25
25
25
25

ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
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A rea

B u lle tin
num ber

P rice

M i a m i , F la .
M ilw aukee, W is.
M in neap olis—
St. P a u l , Min n. __________________
M u s k e g o n — u s k e g o n H e ig h t s , M ic h . _________
M
N e w a r k and J e r s e y C it y , N. J. _________________
New H av e n , Con n. ________________________________
New O r l e a n s , L a . ________________________________
New Y o r k . N. Y. _________________________________
N o r f o l k — o r t s m o u t h and N e w p o r t N e w s —
P
H a m p t o n , V a . ____________________________________
O k la h o m a C it y . Okla.

1 3 4 5 -3 3
13 0 3-5 7
1 3 4 5 -3 8
1 3 0 3 -6 8
1 3 4 5 -4 6
134 5-3 7
1345-44
1 3 0 3-5 8

20
25
25
25
25
20
25
30

1 3 0 3-7 5
1 3 4 5 -6

20 ce n ts
25 ce n ts

Omaha. N e b r .-I o w a
P a t e r so n — lif t o n — a s s a i c . N. ,T
C
P
.
P h i l a d e l p h i a . P a . - N . .T
.
Phoenix. A riz.
P ittsbu rgh . Pa.
P o r t l a n d . M a in e
Portland. O r e g .-W a s h .
P r o v i d e n c e — a w t u c k e t . R. I. — a s s .
P
M
R a l e i g h . N. C.
R ich m on d. Va.

1 3 4 5 -1 2
1 303-71
1 345-31
1 3 0 3 -5 4
1 3 4 5-4 0
1 3 4 5 -2 4
1 3 0 3-7 2
1 3 0 3 -6 6
1345-1
1 3 4 5-1 9

20
25
30
25
25
20
25
25
20
20

ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts

R o c k f o r d . 111.
St. L o u i s , M o . —111. ______________________________
Salt L a ke C it y . Utah
San A n t o n io , T e x . ________________________________
San B e r n a r d i n o —R i v e r s i d e — n t a r i o , C a lif . ___
O
San D i e g o . C a lif .
San F r a n c i s c o —O a k l a n d , C a lif .
Savannah, G a. ____________________________________
S cran ton . Pa.
S e a t t le , W a s h .
.... . _

1 3 0 3-6 9
13 4 5-1 7
1 3 4 5 -2 5
1 3 0 3 -6 3
1 3 45-9
1 3 4 5 -1 0
1345-34
1 3 0 3 -8 0
1 3 4 5 -5
1 3 4 5 -4

30
25
25
25
20
25
25
25
15
25

ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
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ce n ts

S io u x F a l l s . S. Dak.
South B e n d . Ind.
Spokane. W ash.
.... ._ _ ... .
T o l e d o , O hio
. .. . . . . .
T r e n t o n . N. J. _
W a s h in g t o n . D . C . —M d . — a .
V
_ .. __ ___ .
W a t e r b u r y . Conn.
W a t e r l o o . Iow a
_ _. __ ...
W i c h i t a . K a ns .
....... .............
W orcester. M ass.
....... ....
_________________________
Y ork. Pa. -

1345-13
1345-52
1 3 0 3 -7 3
1 3 0 3 -4 7
1 3 4 5-2 9
1 3 4 5 -1 6
1 3 4 5-4 9
1 3 4 5 -2 0
134 5-1 1
1 3 0 3 -8 2
1 345-41

20
20
20
25
25
25
20
25
25
25
20

ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
cents
c e n ts
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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102