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Occupational Wage Survey

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA
APRIL 1962

B u lletin No. 1 3 0 3 - 6 0




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Arthur J. Goldberg, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA




A P R IL 1 9 6 2

B u lle tin N o. 1 3 0 3 -6 0
June 1962

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Arthur J. Goldberg, Secretary
BUREAU O F LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing O ffice, Washington 2 5, D.C.

Price 25 cents




Contents

Preface

Page
The Labor Market Occupational Wage Survey Program
Wage trends fo r se le cte d occupational groups __________________________
The Bureau of Labor Statistics annually conducts
occupational wage surveys in 82 labor markets.
The
studies provide data on occupational earnings and related
supplementary benefits. A preliminary report furnishing
trend data and average earnings is released within a month
of the completion of each study. This bulletin provides
additional data not included in the preliminary report.
Two bulletins, bringing together the results of all
of the area surveys, are issued after completion of the
final area bulletin in the current round of surveys.
The
first of these bulletins will be available late in 1962 and
the other early in 1963. During the survey year, summary
releases presenting areawide occupational earnings data
for 25 to 30 labor markets, are issued as data become
available.
This bulletin was prepared in the Bureau's re­
gional office in Atlanta, Ga., by Cappa C. Kent, under the
direction of Donald M. Cruse. The study was under the
general direction of Louis B. Woytych, Assistant Regional
Director for Wages and Industrial Relations.




4

T a b les:
1.
2.

E stablishm ents and w ork ers within scop e o f su rvey ____________
P e rce n ts o f in cre a se in standard w eek ly sa la rie s and
stra igh t-tim e h ourly earnings fo r selected
occu pation al groups _____________________________________________

3
3

A : Occupational earn in gs:*
A - 1. O ffice occu p ation s— en and w om en _______________________
m
A -2 . P r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ical occu pation s— en _____________
m
A - 3. O ffice , p r o fe ssion a l, and tech n ical
occu pation s— en and w om en com bined __________________
m
A - 4. M aintenance and pow er plant occu pation s ____________ j____
A - 5. Custodial and m aterial m ovem ent occu pation s _____ ______

8
9
10

B: Establishm ent p r a c tic e s and supplem entary wage p rov ision s:*
B - l . Shift d ifferen tia ls ___________________________________________
B -2 . M inimum entrance sa la ries fo r w om en o ffic e w ork ers ___
B -3 . Scheduled w eekly hours ____________________________________
B -4 . P aid holidays _______________________________________________

12
13
14
15

B -6 .

Health, in su ran ce, and pension plans _____________________

5
7

18

Appendixe s :
A. Changes in occu pation al d escrip tion s __________________ *________
B. Occupational d escrip tion s ___________________________

* NOTE: Similar tabulations are available in previous
area reports for Charlotte and for other major areas. A
directory indicating the areas, dates of study, and prices
of these reports is available upon request.
Union scales, indicative of prevailing pay levels,
are also available for the following trades or industries:
Building construction, printing, local-transit operating
employees, and motortruck drivers and helpers.

iii

19
21




Occupational Wage Survey—Charlotte, N.C.

Introduction

to the work schedules (rounded to the nearest half hour) for which
straight-time salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these
occupations have been rounded to the nearest half dollar.

This area is 1 of 82 labor markets in which the U.S. De­
partment of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics has conducted sur­
veys of occupational earnings and related wage benefits on an area­
wide basis.
In this area, data were obtained by personal visits of
Bureau field economists to representative establishments within six
broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation, communica­
tion, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Major industry groups
excluded from these studies are government operations and the con­
struction and extractive industries.
Establishments having fewer
than a prescribed number of workers are omitted also because they
tend to furnish insufficient employment in the occupations studied to
warrant inclusion. Separate tabulations are provided for each of the
broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.

Average earnings of men and women are presented separately
for selected occupations in which both sexes are commonly employed.
Differences in pay levels of men and women in these occupations are
largely due to (1) differences in the distribution of the sexes among
industries and establishments; (2) differences in specific duties per­
formed, although the occupations are appropriately classified within
the same survey job description; and (3) differences in length of serv­
ice or merit review when individual salaries are adjusted on this
basis.
Longer average service of men would result in higher average
pay when both sexes are employed within the same rate range.
Job
descriptions used in classifying employees in these surveys are usu­
ally more generalized than those used in individual establishments to
allow for minor differences among establishments in specific duties
pe rformed.

These surveys are conducted on a sample basis because of the
unnecessary cost involved in surveying all establishments. To obtain
optimum accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large
than of small establishments is studied. In combining the data, how­
ever, all establishments are given their appropriate weight. Estimates
based on the establishments studied are presented, therefore, as re­
lating to all establishments in the industry grouping and area, ex­
cept for those below the minimum size studied.

Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all
establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actu­
ally surveyed. Because of differences in occupational structure among
establishments, the estimates of occupational employment obtained
from the sample of establishments studied serve only to indicate the
relative importance of the jobs studied.
These differences in occu­
pational structure do not materially affect the accuracy of the earn­
ings data.

Occupations and Earnings
The occupations selected for study are common to a variety
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupational clas­
sification is based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to
take account of interestablishment variation in duties within the same
job.
(See appendix for listing of these descriptions.) Earnings data
are presented (in the A -se rie s tables) for the following types of occu­
pations: (a) Office clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) mainte­
nance and power plant; and (d) custodial and material movement.

Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Information is presented (in the B -series tables) on selected
establishment practices and supplementary benefits as they relate to
office and plant workers.
The concept ’’office w ork ers," as used
in this bulletin, includes working supervisors and nonsupervisory
workers performing clerical or related functions, and excludes admin­
istrative, executive, and professional personnel. "Plant workers" in­
clude working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions.
Administrative,
executive, and professional employees, and force-account construction
employees who are utilized as a separate work force are excluded.
Cafeteria workers and route men are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, but are included as plant workers in nonmanufacturing industries.

Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for
full-time workers, i .e . , those hired to work a regular weekly sched­
ule in the given occupational classification. Earnings data exclude
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
Nonproduction bonuses are excluded also, but cost-ofliving bonuses and incentive earnings are included.
Where weekly
hours are reported, as for office clerical occupations, reference is




1

2

Shift differential data (table B - l ) are limited to manufacturing
industries. This information is presented both in terms of (a) estab­
lishment policy,1 presented in terms of total plant worker employ­
ment, and (b) effective practice, presented in terms of workers
actually employed on the specified shift at the time of the survey.
In establishments having varied differentials, the amount applying to
a majority was used or, if no amount applied to a majority, die clas­
sification "other" was used. In establishments in which some lateshift hours are paid at normal rates, a differential was recorded only
if it applied to a majority of the shift hours.
Minimum entrance salaries (table B -2 ) relate only to the
establishments visited.
They are presented in terms of establish­
ments with formal minimum salary policies.
The scheduled hours (table B -3) of a majority of the fir stshift workers in an establishment are tabulated as applying to all of
the plant or office workers of that establishment. Paid holidays; paid
vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans (tables B -4 through
B -6) are treated statistically on the basis that these are applicable
to all plant or office workers if a majority of such workers are eli­
gible or may eventually qualify for the practices listed. Sums of
individual items in tables B -3 through B -6 may not equal totals be­
cause of rounding.
The first part of the paid holidays table (table B -4) presents
the number of whole and half holidays actually provided. The second
part combines whole and half holidays to show total holiday tim e.
The summary of vacation plans (table B -5 ) is limited to for­
mal policies, excluding informal arrangements whereby time off with
pay is granted at the discretion of the employer. Separate estimates
are provided according to employer practice in computing vacation
payments, such as time payments, percent of annual earnings, or
flat-sum amounts. However, in the tabulations of vacation pay, pay­
ments not on a time basis were so converted; for example, a payment
of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as the equivalent of
1 week's pay.

Data are presented for all health, insurance, and pension plans
(table B-6) for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the em ­
ployer, excepting only legal requirements such as workmen's compen­
sation, social' security, and railroad retirement. Such plans include
those underwritten by a commercial insurance company and those pro­
vided through a union fund or paid directly by the employer out of
current operating funds or from a fund set aside for this purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form of life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of in­
surance under which predetermined cash payments are made directly
to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis during illness or accident
disability.
Information is presented for all such plans to which the
employer contributes.
However, in New York and New Jersey, which
have enacted temporary disability insurance laws which require em ­
ployer contributions,2 plans are included only if the employer (1) con­
tributes more than is legally required, or (2) provides the employee
with benefits which exceed the requirements of the law. Tabulation?
of paid sick-leave plans are limited to formal plans3 which provide
full pay or a proportion of the worker's pay during absence from work
because of illness. Separate tabulations are presented according to
(1) plans which provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans
which provide either partial pay or a waiting period. In addition to the
presentation of the proportions of workers who are provided sickness
and accident insurance or paid sick leave, an unduplicated total is
shown of workers who receive either or both types of benefits.
Catastrophe insurance, sometimes referred to as extended
medical insurance, includes those plans which are designed to protect
employees in case of sickness and injury involving expenses beyond
the normal coverage of hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete or partial
payment of doctors' fees. Such plans may be underwritten by commer­
cial insurance companies or nonprofit organizations or they may be
8elf-insured. Tabulations of retirement pension plans are limited to
those plans that provide monthly payments for the remainder of the
worker's life.

2 The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island
do not require employer contributions.
3 An establishment was considered as having a formal plan if
it established at least the minimum number of days of sick leave that
1
An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met
could be expected by each employee. Such a plan need not be written,
either of the following conditions: (1) Operated late shifts at the time
but informal sick-leave allowances, determined on an individual basis,
of the survey, or (2) had formal provisions covering late shifts.
were excluded.




3

T a b le 1.

E sta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ithin s c o p e o f s u r v e y and n u m ber stu d ied in C h h rlo tte , N .C .,

M in im um
em p loym en t
in e s t a b lis h ­
m ents in s c o p e
o f study

In d u stry d iv is io n

A ll d iv is io n s

_

b y m a jo r in d u s try d iv is io n , 2 A p r il 1962

N um ber o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts
W ithin
scope of
study 3

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts
W ithin s c o p e o f study

Studied

Studied
T o ta l4

O ffic e

Plant

T o ta l4

50

120

51, 500

9, 500

31, 700

31, 890

110
194

48
72

2 2 ,0 0 0
29, 500

2, 100
7 ,4 0 0

1 6 ,0 0 0
1 5 ,7 0 0

14, 350
17, 540

50
50
50
50
50

M a n u fa ctu rin g
__
. . . . .
----- —
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g _____________________________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r
p u b lic u t i l i t i e s 5
____ _____ .
.
.
.
W h o le s a le tr a d e . . __ . .
.. ..
______
R e t a il tr a d e
_ - .. _ .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te __ , ________________
_
S e r v i c e s 7 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

304

50
50

_ __

39
58
44
26
27

20
12
16
11
13

10, 300
5, 700
7, 700
3, 200
2 ,6 0 0

2 ,4 0 0
(? )
(?)
(M
(6 )

4, 400
(*)
(?)
(?)
(6 )

8, 010
1 ,4 7 0
4, 930
1, 790
1, 340

1 T h e C h a r lo tte Stan d ard M e tro p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f M e ck le n b u rg County. T he " w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f stu dy" e s t im a t e s show n in th is table p r o v id e a r e a s o n a b ly a c c u r a te
d e s c r ip t io n o f the s iz e and c o m p o s it io n o f the la b o r f o r c e in clu d ed in the s u r v e y . T h e e s tim a te s a r e not intended, h o w e v e r , to s e r v e as a b a s is o f c o m p a r is o n w ith oth er a r e a em p loym en t in d exes
to m e a s u r e e m p lo y m e n t tr e n d s o r l e v e ls s in c e (1) planning o f w age s u r v e y s r e q u ir e s the u se o f e s ta b lis h m e n t data c o m p ile d c o n s id e r a b ly in adva n ce o f the p a y r o ll p e r io d studied, and (2) s m a ll
e s ta b lis h m e n ts a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m the s c o p e o f the su rvey.
2 T h e 1957 r e v i s e d e d itio n o f the Standard In du strial C la s s ific a t io n M anual w a s u s e d in c la s s ify in g e sta b lis h m e n ts b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n . M a jo r ch a n ges f r o m the e a r l ie r ed ition (u sed in the
B u r e a u 's la b o r m a r k e t w a g e s u r v e y s c o n d u cte d p r io r to Ju ly 1958) a r e the tr a n s fe r o f m ilk p a s te u r iz a tio n plants and r e a d y -m ix e d c o n c r e te esta b lis h m e n ts fr o m tra d e (w h olesa le o r r e ta il) to
m a n u fa ctu rin g , and the t r a n s fe r o f r a d io and t e le v is io n b r o a d c a s tin g fr o m s e r v ic e s to the tr a n s p o r ta tio n , co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilit ie s d iv isio n .
3 I n clu d e s a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith to ta l em p lo ym e n t at o r above the m in im u m -s iz e lim ita tio n .
A ll o u tle ts (w ithin the a r e a ) o f c o m p a n ie s in su ch in d u s tr ie s as tr a d e , fin a n ce, auto r e p a ir
s e r v ic e , and m o t io n -p ic t u r e th e a te r s a r e c o n s id e r e d as 1 e sta b lish m e n t.
4 In clu d e s e x e c u t iv e , p r o f e s s io n a l, and o th e r w o r k e r s e x c lu d e d f r o m the se p a ra te o f fi c e and plant c a t e g o r ie s .
5 T a x ic a b s and s e r v i c e s in c id e n ta l to w a te r tra n s p o rta tio n w e r e e x clu d e d .
6 T h is in d u s tr y d iv is io n is r e p r e s e n t e d in e s tim a te s fo r " a l l in d u s t r ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa ctu rin g " in the S e r ie s A and B ta b le s .
S ep a ra te p r e s e n ta tio n o f data f o r th is d iv isio n is not m ade
f o r on e o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g r e a s o n s : (1) E m p loym en t in the d iv is io n is to o s m a ll to p r o v id e enough data to m e r it s e p a ra te study, (2) the s a m p le w as not d es ig n e d in it ia lly to p e r m it s e p a ­
ra te p r e s e n t a t io n , (3) r e s p o n s e w a s in s u ffic ie n t o r inadequate to p e r m it se p a r a te p r e s e n ta tio n , and (4) th e re is p o s s ib ilit y o f d is c lo s u r e o f in divid u al e s ta b lis h m e n t data.
7 H o te ls ; p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v ic e s ; a u to m o b ile r e p a ir s h o p s ; m o tio n p ic tu r e s ; n o n p ro fit m e m b e r s h ip o r g a n iz a tio n s ; and en g in e e r in g and a r c h ite c t u r a l s e r v ic e s .




T a b le 2.

P e r c e n t s o f i n c r e a s e in stan dard w e e k ly s a la r ie s and s t r a ig h t-t im e h o u r ly
e a rn in g s f o r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n a l gro u p s in C h a r lo tte , N. C . ,
A p r il 1961 to A p r il 1962, and A p r il I960 to A p r il 1961
A p r il 1961
to
A p r il 1962

A p r il I960
to
A p r il 1961

A ll in d u s tr ie s :
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m en and w o m e n ) --------------------------------------—
In d u strial n u r s e s (m en and w o m e n ) ------------------ ------- --------S k illed m aintenance ( m e n ) --------------------------------------------------U n sk illed plant (m en) ---------- - . ------ - . .

3 .4
(*)
7 .9
3 .6

2 .6
0)
4. 1
2. 7

M a n u fa ctu rin g:
O ffic e c le r i c a l (m en and w om en ) --------------- -— ------— --------In d u strial n u r s e s (m e n and w o m e n ) ----------------------- —--------S k illed m aintenance ( m e n ) ---------------------------------------- -- -----—
U n sk illed plant (m en) ----------- ------- — --------. . . . ------ — -----------

3 .4
n
3 .7
5 .2

2 .6
(>)
3 .0
2 .9

Industry and o c c u p a tio n a l gro u p

In su fficie n t data to m e e t p u b lica tio n c r it e r i a .

4
Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups

Presented in table 2 are percents of change in salaries of
office clerical workers and industrial nurses, and in average earnings
of selected plant worker groups.
For office clerical workers and industrial nurses, the per­
cents of change relate to average weekly salaries for normal hours
of work, that is, the standard work schedule for which straight-time
salaries are paid.
For plant worker groups, they measure changes
in straight-time hourly earnings, excluding premium pay for over­
time and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
The per­
centages are based on data for selected key occupations and include
most of the numerically important jobs within each group.
The of­
fice clerical data are based on men and women in the following 19 jobs:
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B; clerks, accounting, class A
and B; clerks, file, class A, B, and C; clerks, order; clerks, pay­
roll; Comptometer operators; keypunch operators, class A and B;
office boys and girls; secretaries; stenographers, general; stenogra­
phers, senior; switchboard operators; tabulating-machine operators,
class B; and typists, class A and B.
The industrial nurse data are
based on men and women industrial nurses.
Men in the following
8 skilled maintenance jobs and 2 unskilled jobs were included in the
plant worker data: Skilled— carpenters; electricians; machinists; m e­
chanics; mechanics, autom otive; painters; pipefitters; and tool and
die makers; unskilled— janitors, porters, and cleaners; and laborers,
material handling.
Average weekly salaries or average hourly earnings were
computed for each of the selected occupations.
The average sal­




aries or hourly earnings were then multiplied by the average employ­
ment in the job during the period surveyed in 1961.
These weighted
earnings for individual occupations were then totaled to obtain an ag­
gregate for each occupational group.
Finally, the ratio of these group
aggregates for the one year to the aggregate for the other year was
computed and the difference between the result and 100 is the percent
of change from the one period to the other.
The percent of change measures, principally, the effects of
(1) general salary and wage changes; (2) m erit or other increases
in pay received by individual workers while in the same job; and
(3) changes in the labor force such as labor turnover, force expan­
sions, force reductions, and changes in the proportions of workers
employed by establishments with different pay levels.
Changes in the
labor force can cause increases or decreases in the occupational
averages without actual wage changes. For example, a force expansion
might increase the proportion of lower paid workers in a specific
occupation and result in a drop in the average, whereas a reduction
in the proportion of lower paid workers would have the opposite effect.
The movement of a high-paying establishment out of an area could
cause the average earnings to drop, even though no change in rates
occurred in other area establishments.
The use of constant employment weights eliminates the effects
of changes in the proportion of workers represented in each job in­
cluded in the data.
Nor are the percents of change influenced by
changes in standard work schedules or in premium pay for overtime,
since they are based on pay for straight-time hours.

The above text represents the method used in computing a new trend
series.
The expansion of the labor market wage survey program in 1961 made
data available in 82 areas for the computation of wage trends for selected job
groupings.
Sixty-one areas were surveyed in I960; prior to I960, coverage was
limited to 20 areas.
Therefore, it was decided to compute a new trend series in
which 1961 will be the base year since this is the first year in which data were
collected in all 82 areas.
The percents of change shown in table 2 are not comparable with similar
data shown for this area in last year's Bulletin 1285-58.
The new series intro­
duces changes in the job groupings for which trends are shown and changes in
jobs included in the computations.

A: Occupational Earnings

5

Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area basis
by industry div isio n , C h arlotte, N. C. , A p ril 1962)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

A verage

Sex, occu pation , and industry d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

$

Weekly
Weekly,
hours 1 earnings 1
(Standard) (Standard)

$

4 0.00 ^ 5 .00 50 . 00 $55 . 00 $6 0 .0 0 $ . 00 70 . 00 7 5 .0 0 80 . 00 8 5.00 90 . 00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 f 35.00 140.00 f 45.00
65
and
and
under
4 5 . 00 50.00 55.00 6 0.00 65.00 70.00 75.0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5.00 90.00 95 . 00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 over

M en
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

-

100.00
101.50
89.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
10
1

3
2
2

2
2
2

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

77.00
76.50

-

16
16

5
5

8
8

4
4

11
8

9
8

1
1
1
5
4

18

4 0 .0

91.00

.

_

_

-

1

1

O ffice boys ________ ______
____ __
N onm anufacturing ___________________

41
36

38 . 5
3 9.0

56 . 50
56.50

3
2

12

T a bulating-m achine o p e r a to r s ,
c la s s A ___________________ __ __

C le r k s , accounting, c la s s A ____ _________
N onm anufacturing ____________ _____
P u blic u tilitie s 3 __________________

52
43
20

39 . 5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

C le r k s , accounting, cla s s B ___________
N onm anufacturing ___________________
P u blic u tilities 3 __________________

85
79
24

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

C le r k s . o r d e r
N onm anufacturing ___________________

137
127

C le r k s , p a y r o ll _________________________

$

107.50
1 1 1 .50
101.50

1
1

14
13

-

10
7

-

-

-

2
2
1

2
2
2

1
1
1

3
2
2

6
5
5

3
3
3

-

2
2
1

-

2
2

-

29
9

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

4
4
4

6
4
4

6
6
4

3
3

3
3

7
7

4
4

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

10
9

4
4

12
12

12
12

11
11
2
-

5
5

38
37

4
4
-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

1.

4

7

1

-

1

_

_

_

_

.

.

.

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

1
1

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

3

9

-

3

3

-

-

-

-

10
9
1

12
7
5

1
1

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
7
1
ii

10
3

___

22

38 . 5

109.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T a bulating-m achine o p e r a to r s ,
c la s s B __________
____
______ __
M anufacturing ______
__
__ —
Nonm anufacturing __ __
__ __ —

45
19
26

39.0
38 . 5
39 . 5

83.00
87.00
80.00

-

-

-

-

10

1

3

-

-

T y p is ts , c la s s B ________________________
Nonm anufacturing ____ _____ __ ___
P u blic u t ilit ie s 3 ____ _ _____ __

24
24
21

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

67 . 50
67 . 50
69.00

-

-

-

-

-

B ille r s , m achine (b illin g m achine) ____
N onm anufacturing ___________ __________

54
43

39 . 0
38 . 5

62 . 50
62.00

B ille r s , m achine (bookkeeping
m achine) __ ________
__ —
N onm anufacturing ______ ___

___

21
21

3 9.0
39 . 0

B ook keeping-m a ch ine o p e r a to r s ,
cla s s A
___________ _________
____
N onm anufacturing __ ____
_______

62
50

B ook keeping-m a ch ine o p e r a to r s ,
cla s s B _________________________ _____
M anufacturing _____________ ____ —
N onm anufacturing _________ __ _____

__

-

6
5
2

-

!
|
j

|

-

-

-

-

2
1
1

-

10

-

3
3

-

-

-

7
7
7

4
4
4

6
6
6

2
1
1
3
3
3

2
2

3
3

8
8

11
7

14
8

3
3

1
1

9
9

2
2

_

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

53.00
53.00

2
2

2
2

10
10

3
3

-

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

39 . 5
40. 0

68.50
67.00

-

-

3
3

19
18

15
11

7
4

1
1

2
2

9
6

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

-

*

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

221
28
193

39 . 5
39.0
39 . 5

58 . 50
61 . 50
58 . 50

1

34

64

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

64

19
7
12

2

34

12
3
9

10

1

28
8
20

11

-

40
10
30

11

10

2

C le r k s , accounting, c la s s A _______________
M anufacturing „
____
____ —
N onm anufacturing _________ _________
P u blic u t ilit ie s 3 _______
__ __

133
26
107
23

38 . 5
39.0
38 . 5
3 8.0

74.00
75 . 50
73 . 50
81.00

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

31
1
30
1

23
7
16
3

29
11
18
-

16
16
7

3
1
2
-

12
12
11

14
4
10
1

3
2
1

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

C le r k s , accounting, c la s s B _______ __
M anufacturing ____
____
_____
N onm anufacturing ------------------------------

457
63
394

39.0
39.0
3 9.0

66.00
64 . 50
66.00

4
4

45
45

51
4
47

67
9
58

77
21
56

53
13
40

32
8
24

87
4
83

11
4
7

5

1

2

10

4

4

1

2

-

1

-

-

-

5

1

2

10

4

4

1

2

-

1

-

-

*

C lerk s , f ile , c la s s A 4 _ __ ______ _______
N onm anufacturing ___________________

29
27

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

_

_

3
3

5
4

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

"

_
-

-

-

1
1

_

"

7
7

_

-

12
11

_

-

1
1

_

j

67.00
66.50

-

“

-

-

C lerks , file , c la s s B 4 _______ __
____
N onm anufacturing ___________ ___ __

66
53

39 . 5 j
39 . 5 i

54.50
54 . 50

8
8

14 ' 14
10 ! 8

8
8

10
9

11
9

1
1

“

■

“

■

~

"

“

■

"

“

"

1

-

3
1
1
1

|

1

_

-

-

;

-

-

-

1

-

W om en

_____
______

See footn otes at end o f table.




•

“

~

6
Table A-l.

Office Occupations—Men and W om en— Continued

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division , C harlotte, N. C. , A p ril 1962)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

Number
of
workers

$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
S
$
S
$
$
W
eekly
W
eekly *40.00 45.00 *50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00
hours* earnings1 and
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 -25.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 ov er

W om en— Continued

1

19
18
2

5
5
3

10
10
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

1

1

4

1

22

_

4

12
7
5
-

27
16
11
5

25
13
12
4

25
9
16
2

22
19
3
2

19
8
11
8

7
1
6
4

4
4
-

11

8
8

25
17

15
15

17
14

5
5

3
3

9
9

3
3

16
15

10
9

23
23

4
4

4
4

3
1

30
5
25
15

72
27
45
22

4
1
3
3

-

io

1

1
1
1
_

7
1
6
6 !

18

35
15
20
9
_

-

-

10
10
-

49
8
41
4

73
16
57

40
6
i 34
| 21
i

64
13
51
24

5
74
12
62
33

70
27
43
10

2
2

4
14
4 j 13
4
26
- ! 9
4
17

C lerk s, file , c la s s C 4 --------------------------Nonmanufacturing ------------------------------Pu blic utilities 3 ----------------------------

122
ii6
17

38. 5
5 8 .5
4 0 .0

$51. 50
51. 50
52. 00

2
2
-

66
65
9

20
16

C lerks, o r d e r ___________________________

38

4 0 .0

68. 00

3

_

C lerk s, p a yroll __________________________
M anufacturing ------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ------------------------------Pu blic u tilities 3 ----------------------------

163
80
83
29

3 9 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

66.
65.
67.
73.

C om ptom eter op era tors _________________
No'nmanufacturing -------------------------------

108
93

39. 0
38. 5

65. 50
66. 00

Keypunch o p era tors , c la s s A 4 -------------Nonmanufacturing ____________________

68
63

3 9 .5
39. 5

7 1.00
70. 00

2
2
8
8
_

10
2
8
4
4
_

Keypunch o p era tors , c la s s B 4 ___ ____
M anufacturing ________________________
Nonmanufacturing ____________________
Pu blic u tilities 3 __________________

167
59
108
59

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

59. 50
6 3 .0 0
58.0 0
59. 00

8
8
3

______________________________

35

38. 5

50. 50

.
_

15

S ecreta ries
Manufacturing ________________________
Nonmanufacturing --------- --------------------P ublic utilities 3 __________________

642
246
396
141

39 .0
38. 5
3 9 .0
39 .0

7 9 .0 0
83. 00
76. 50
84. 50

Stenographers, g e n e r a l4 ________ ____
Manufacturing ________________________
Nonmanufacturing ____________________
P ublic utilities 3 ----------------------------

396
86
310
157

39. 0
39 .5
38. 5
39. 0

64. 50
7 1 .0 0
62. 50
67. 00

Stenographers, s e n io r 4 -------------------------Nonmanufacturing -------------------------------

52
34

39 .0
38. 5

82. 50
80. 00

Switchboard op erators --------------- ----------Nonmanufacturing ------------------------------P ublic u tilities 3 ----------------------------

4 1 .0
4 1 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

60. 50
58. 50
76. 00

Sw itchboard o p e r a to r -r e c e p tio n ists ____
Manufacturing ------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ____________________

77
66
21
88
22
66

61. 50
58. 50
62. 50

_
_
5 14
14
_
-

Tabulating-m achine op e ra to rs ,
cla ss B _____________________________

O ffice g ir ls

50
50
00
50

7
1
1

1

j
!
j
i

.
_

i

|

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
“

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

i
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

.

.

_

4
1
3

2
2
2

2 :
j
!

1
1
_

.
_

1
1
_

.
_

_

1
1
_

_

_

_

-

.

_

_

_

_

_

.

_
_

_

.
_

_
.

_
_
_
_

2
1
1
1
_
1
1
.
_
-

4
4
4
_
_
_
_
-

j
j----_
_
.
_
-

2
1
1
_
_
.
_
-

.
_
_
.
_
.
-

_

_

48 i 34
22
18
12
30
18
3

44
17
27
22

I 32
'! 25
7
3

;

10 !
-

;

_

_

2
2

_
_
"

1
1
_
_
■

_
-

2
2
2

4
2

7
6

2
1

9
8

6
6

1
-

10
9
3
11
7
4

8
7
1
12
1
11

2
1
21
4
17

11
10
9
10
10

1
1
1
2
2

3
1
1
2
1
1

9
5
5
_
-

18
6
_
_
-

4
4
3
_
_
_
-

2

12

7

19

-

1

2

5
1
5
4
1

2
2
2
1
.

_
_

1
1
_
_

-

-

-

-

1

■

97
76

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

62. 50
62. 50

6
5

3
3

39. 5
3 9 .5

67. 00
65. 50

_
7
7

30
26

33
29

_
1
1

47
35

Typists, c la s s A ________________________
Nonmanufacturing ____________________

_
_
-

5
5

4
4

3
3

3
1

T ypists, c la s s B ------------------------------------Manufacturing ________________________
Nonmanufacturing -------------------------------

206
36
170

39.5
3 9 .0
39 .5

56. 50
56. 00
! 56. 50

3

29
4
25

51
' 16
35

52
5
47

38
6
32

1 18
3
15

14
2
12

■

_

.

25
21
4
4

_

;
:
'
i

_

19
5
14
11

_

_

.

3
3
3
_
.
_
-

36
5
31
23

7 1.00

.
i
!
!
|

1
1
.
_

; 10
! 3
7
7
_
-

32
14
18
9

!

j
|

20
9
11
3
_
_
_
_
-

44
10
34
20

3 8.0

_

2
3
2
.
•

1
!
1
i

-

_
-

89
31
58
21

54

1
2
3
4
5

2
2
2

i

i

68
33
35
11

__

3

2

_
-

73
27
46
27

T ran scribin g-m ach in e op e ra to rs ,
general _________________________________
Nonmanufacturing -------------------------------

-

|

.
-

11

-

53
53
4
.
-

...

_
-

2
2
.
-

Standard hours r e fle c t the w orkw eek fo r w hich em ployees re c e iv e their regular straigh t-tim e s a la rie s and the earnings corresp on d to these w eekly h ou rs.
W orkers w ere distributed as fo llo w s: 1 at $ 145 to $ 150; 2 at $ 150 to $ 155; 2 at $ 155 to $ 160; 1 at $ 160 to $ 165; 1 at $ 165 to $ 170; 2 at $ 170 to $ 175.
Tran sportation, com m u nication, and other public u tilitie s.
D escrip tion fo r this jo b has been r e v ise d sin ce the last su rvey in this a rea. See appendix A.
Includes 8 w ork ers at $35 to $40 .




2
2
_
_
-

1
1
.
-

“

_
!
I
|
j...
!
i
i
1
'

13
7
6
2
_
.
1
1
1
_
-

;

!
-

i

:
!

_

_
_
“

_
.
.
_
_
_
_
.
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
.
_

-

_
-

-

_
-

.
-

_
_
_
_

-

-

"

■

"

-

’

-

7
Table A-2.

Professional and Technical Occupations—Men

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division ,' C harlotte, N .C ., A p ril 1962)
Average
O ccupation and industry d ivision

D ra ftsm en, se n io r
M anufacturing
N onm anufacturing

of

$
55.00 1 0 .00 *65.00 *70.00 *75.00 *80.00 *85.00 *90.00 *95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 f 45.00
and
and
under
60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 over

workers

71
35
36

_ - —

D ra ftsm en , ju n io r ____ —
M anufacturing
__
—

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Weekly
Weekly .
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

Number

—_ - - —

40.0
40.0
40.0

61
34

40.0
40.0

|$107.50
j 106.00
j 109.00
i
!

80.50
79.50

-

1

"

■

■

5
3

5
4

10
4

-

-

5
2

1

2
2

16
8
8

5
4
1

8
3

11
10
1

4
4

6
6

1
-

9
7

20
13

2

_

3

!

_

_

_

1

i
1---------1 Standard hours r e fle c t the w orkweek fo r w hich em ployees r e c e iv e their regular straigh t-tim e s a la rie s and the earnings c o rre sp on d to these w eekly hours.




2

9
4
5

2
2

-

-

”

2

.

_

.

1
1

8
Table A-3.

Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area basis
by industry d ivision , Charlotte, N .C ., A p ril 1962)

Num
ber
of

O ccupation and industry d ivision

Average
w
eekly
earnings1
(Standard)

54
43

$62 .50
62.00

B ille r s , m achine (bookkeeping m achine) ----------------

21
21

53.00
53.00

B ookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to rs , cla ss A __________
jVJrm
m
. .
____ ____

63
50

69.00
67.00

Bookkeeping m achine op e ra to rs cla s s B
M anufacturing ------------------------------------------------------Nnnmaniifprtnrir»g
. ......

225
29
196

59.00
62.00
58,50

Clprkfi, arrm inting, cla s s A

185
35
150
43

83.50
79.00
84.50
90.50

542
69
473
195

71.50
66.00
72.00
73.00

30
28

68.00
68.00

66
53

54.50
54.50

122
116
17

51.50
51.50
52.00

175
24
151

75.50
78.50
75.00

C

]

R

C lerks, file, cla s s A 3
C lerks file c la s s R^
Nonm a nil f a c hi r ing
C lerks, file , c la s s C 3
Nonmanufacturing
PnHIir
C le r k s ,

order

______
____ _- .

__ ____ _____ ______
.

Nnnmamifac.tiiring
‘PnHlir'

__ ____ ______
.
_
______
________________
_

_________________

Nonm anufacturing

Average
w
eekly
earnings1
(Standard)

___________________

Number
of

Average
w
eekly
earnings1
(Standard)

$69 .00
68.00
69.50
78.00

108
93

71.00
70.00

169
59
no
61

59.50
63.00
58.00
59.50

76
61
15

53.50
54.00
63.00

. _ ____
_ ------- ---- ---------------

643
247
396
141

79.00
83.00
76.50
84.50

Stenographers, g e n e r a l3 __________ ____ -_-____ - _
---------------- --- ----------------M anufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
____ _____
P u blic u tilit ie s 2
-----------

397
86
311
158

64.50
71.00
63.00
67.50

52
34

82.50
80.00

77
66
21

60.50
58.50
76.00

88
22
66

$6 1 .5 0
58.50
62.50

25

107.00

Tabulating-m achine o p e r a to r s , c la s s B ____________
Manufacturing
____ ________ _______ _________
Nonmanufacturing _______________
______________

99
27
72

76.50
82.00
74.50

Tabulating-m achine o p e r a to r s , c la s s C ----------- ---Nonmanufacturing _______________ _______________

29
16

65.50
63.00

T ra n scribin g-m ach in e o p e r a to r s , gen eral ------------Nonmanufacturing _________________________________

99
78

62.50
63.00

Typists, cla ss A _________________________________ —
Nonmanufacturing _________________________________

33
29

67.00
65.50

230
36
194
28

57.50
56.00
58.00
65.50

D raftsm en, sen ior ___________________________________
Mcinufsicturing
__
Nonmanufacturing _________________________________

72
35
37

107.50
106.00
109.00

_ --------- -------------------- --- _ --------_

62
35

80.50
80.00

65.50
66.00

68
63

Switchboard o p e r a to r -r e c e p tio n is ts ________________
Manufacturing
__ ____________________ _________
Nonmanufacturing _________________________________
Tabulating-m achine o p e r a to r s , c la s s A ------------------

181
89
92
38

C lerk s, p a yroll _____________

_____

_______ ___ _

P u blic u t ilit ie s 2 _______________________________
Nonmanufacturing ____

______________

Keypunch op e ra to rs, c la s s A 3
N onm anufacturing _____

__ --------

....

Keypunch o p e ra to rs, cla s s B 3 ________ ________ —
Nonmanufacturing -----------------------------------------------P u blic utilities 2 ----------------------------------------------O ffice hoys and g irls

_

P u blic utilities 2 __

________

______________ __________

S e cre ta rie s T
.
.
■___—
M anufacturing
_ ____ __________
Nnnm ann f a rtn r i ng
P u blic u tilit ie s 2

_ _ _ --------

-___ ____
------ --- — —
Stenographers, s e n io r 3 __ ______ __ ___ Nonmanufacturing ____ ______ _____ _
___
Sw itchboard o p e ra to rs _ _ -- --------------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
_
_ ______________ _ _
_
P u blic utilities 2 ---------------------

T yp ists, cla ss B
Manufacturing

__■

____________ __

Public u tilities 2 _______________________________

Earnings are fo r a regular w orkw eek fo r w hich em ployees re ce iv e their straigh t-tim e w eekly s a la r ie s , e x clu sive o f any prem ium pay.
Tran sportation, com m unication, and other public utilities.
D escrip tion for this jo b has been re v ise d since the last survey in this area. See appendix A.




O ccupation and industry d ivision

O ffice occu pation s— Continued

O ffice occupations— Continued

O ffice occupations

Nonmanufa ctu ring
PuKli r nfilitiiae ^

N ber
um
of

O ccupation and industry division

P r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ica l occupations

^

D raftsm en, junior
Manufacturing

- -mT

9
Table A -4. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r m en in se le cte d occupations studied on an a rea basis
by industry d ivision , C harlotte, N .C ., A p ril 1962)
NUMBER OP WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O ccupation and industry d ivision

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly ,
earnings

$
*
$
$
1.10 1.20 1.30 *1.40 1.50 *1.60 *1.70 *1.80 *1.90 *2.00 *2.10 *2.20 *2.30 *2.40 *2.50 *2.60 *2.70 *2.80 *2.90 *3.00 *3.10 *3.20 *3.30
and
and
under
1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2r30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 over

C a rp en te rs, m aintenance _____________ _
M anufacturing _______________________
N onm anufacturing ___________________

32
17
15

$2.27
2.22
2.32

~

1
1

“

-

E le c tr ic ia n s , m aintenance ____________
M anufacturing _______________________

29
29

2.50
2.50

~

"

"

-

"

E n gin eers, station ary __________________
M anufacturing _______________________
Nonm anufacturing ___________________

30
15
15

2.39
2.62
2.16

.
"

.
-

_
“

"

2
2

4
2
2

-

F irem en , station ary b o ile r ____________
M anufacturing _______________________

27
23

1.54
1.58

_

4
4

10
6

5
5

.

.

-

H elp ers, m aintenance trades __________
M anufacturing _______________________

70
57

1.55
1.52

16
16

6
---- 5 ~

13
8

9
8

.

.

~

-

M achinists, m aintenance _______________
M anufacturing _______________________

20
20

.

.

1

2.32
2.32

_

• .
~

.
"

4
4
"

.
■
1
1

"

M ech an ics, autom otive (m a intena nce)__
M anufacturing _______________________
N onm anufacturing ___________________
P ublic u tilitie s 2 _________________

229
36
193
185

2.51
1.92
2.62
2.64

.
"

M ech an ics, m aintenance _______________
Manuf a c tu r i ng _______________________
N onm anufacturing ___________________

101
80
21

2.16
2.15
2.18

■

■

.
■

7
7

O ile r s ____________________________________
M anufacturing _______________________

34
34

1.46
1.46

6
6

3
3

8
8

12
12




_

■

"

2
2

2
2
■

3
3
■

j

_

1
-

1

-

6
3
3

3
2
1

1

3
2
1

4
4

1
1

4
3

3
3

4
4

2
2

3
3

2
2

3
3

2
2

1

.
“

2
1
1

1
1
"

"

1
1

3
1
2

1
1

.
-

4
4

1
1

.

i

“

1

3
3

5
1

2

1
~

-

.

.

1

-

-

-

3
3

1
1

3
3

"

“

-

-

1

1
1

-

-

_
1
1

4
4

11
11

.

1
6
1 — T"

-

10
10

-

-

1
1

i
1

5
5
~

13
12
1
1

8
5
3
3

13
4
9
9

4
4
“

20
2
18
18

1
1
1

2
1
1
1

16
16
15

19
19
19

42
3
39
39

33
1
32
32

22
22
22

4
4
3

7
7
6

1
1

4
4

17
17

8
8

21
21

2
2

-

7
7

15
9
6

4
4

■

5
3
2

1
1
~

-

7
7
-

_

1 E x clu des prem iu m pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.
2 T ran sp ortation , com m unication, and other public u tilities.

_

_

_

6
6

_
-

1
1

1
1

2
2

4
4

1
1

1
1

2
2

1
1

1
1

.

3
3

-

"

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10
10

6
6
6

-

1
1

-

10
Table A-5.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations

(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division , C h arlotte, N. C. , A p ril 1962)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Guards -----------------------------------------------------------------

44
668
328
340
83

1.27
1.33
1.2 2
1.26

Janitors, p o r te r s , and clea n ers
(w o r n ft n) ________________________________________
M a n u fa ctu rin g __ _____________ __ _____ __________
Nonmanufacturing _________________________ _

75
18
57

1. 16
1.23
1. 14

L a b orers , m a teria l handling ---------------------------M anufacturing _____ _______ __________ ______
Nonmanufacturing ___________________________
Public u tilities 3 __________________________

1. 108
284
824
415

O rder fille r s _______________ __________________
M anufacturing _____ __________________ _______
Nonmanufacturing ___________________________

$
1.00

$
1. 10

$
1.20

$
1.30

1.00

1. 10

1.20

1. 30

1.40

.9 0

$ 1 .9 6

Janitors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs (men) -----------M anufacturing ______ __ ___________ __ _________
Nonmanufacturing ___________________________
Pu blic u tilities 3 _______________________________

$
$
0. 80 0. 90

©

Average
$
hourly , $0. 60 0 .7 0
earnings
and
under
.7 0
.8 0

o

O ccu p a tion 1 and industry d ivision

2

18

6

-

-

18

6
■

_
-

_

37

■

_
-

298
140
158
39

58
25
33
16

49
15
34

-

-

13

-

8

37
'

13

8

$
1. 60

_1i_6Q _ 1.-70
__

6

1

2
■

$
1.50

$
1.70

$
1.80

$
1.90

$
2. 00

7

56
28
28
14

109
93
16
13

20
18
2
l

29
12
17
"

2

1
1
■

_
-

2

"

2
2
■

32
26
6
5

46
12
34
3
8

$
2. 20

$
2. 30

$
2. 40

$
2. 50

. -la 80. ._ L 90- Z .Q S L 2. 1-0- _2a.2Q_ -£,3.Q_ _iaAQ_ _ 2 .5 0 -

$
2 .6 0

$
2. 70

_jL_7.CL ■2. 8J .

26
2

12

2

12
-

1
~

•

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

•

"

•

28
2
26
14

17
17
10

37

24

1

12
12

8

-

8

_
-

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

.

_

-

-

_
-

•

"

-

"

-

37
_
37
34

113
113
112

18
_
18
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

193
193

3

20

2

_

_
-

_
-

"

•

■

1.66
1.29
1.78
2. 27

"

_
-

_
-

-

4
4
-

382
119
263
1

113
47
66
21

60
35
25
1

45
43
2
1

289
49
240

1. 57
1.47
1.59

-

-

•

4
4

57
9
48

21
10
11

54
17
37

16

•

-

-

-

-

-

16

-

8

37

24

25
4
21

18
9
9

P a ck ers, shipping (men) _______________________
M anufacturing ------------------------------------------------

120
55

1.39
1.43

-

-

-

-

-

44
14

22
12

9
9

6
6

5
4

24
-

1
1

-

-

P a ck ers, shipping (women) ____________________
Manufacturing ________________________ _____

60
60

1. 18
1. 18

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

1
l

-

-

4
4

_

-

19
19

_

-

36
36

-

-

.
■

.
■

.
■

8
8

3
3
’

1
1
"

6
1
5

10
9
l

20
10
10

.

-

$
2. 10

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

■

■

193

20
20
20

-

-

-

-

-

3

20

2

-

-

“

-

-

9
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6
■

13
13

-

"

3
1
2

5
1
4

3
3
"

3
3

1
1

6
6

1
1

41
1
-

-

R eceiving c le r k s -----------------------------------------------Manufacturing _______________________________
Nonmanufacturing ___________________________

90
36
54

1.77
1.69
1.81

Shipping c le r k s --------------------------------------------------M a n u fa ctu rin g ------------------------------------------------

57
45

1.98
1.97

.

.

’

■

-

-

"

-

-

4
4

•

2
2

6
6

5
5

3
3

10
2

4
■

9
9

3
3

3
3

5
5

3
3

-

-

Shipping and receiv in g cle r k s _________________
M a n u fa ctu rin g ------------------------------------------------

44
33

1.89
1.88

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

2
2

-

-

5
2

8
8

5
5

3
3

4
4

9
2

6
6

1
1

-

-

-

-

T ru ck d rivers 5 __________________________________
M anufacturing _____________________________ __
Nonmanufacturing ___________________________
Public u tilities 3 __________________________

826
80
746
382

2. 05
1.42
2. 12
2. 60

6

6

12

30

114
22
92
-

35
9
26
-

20
11
9
-

34
6
28
20

19
12
7
-

29
7
22

40
10
30
-

10
1
9
-

2

-

-

-

2

-

2
2

151
1
150
79

3
3
2

22

-

4
-

22
20

9
1
8
-

278
259

T ru ck d riv ers, light (under l 1lz tons) ______
M anufacturing __________________________________
Nonmanufacturing _____________________________

236
26
210

1.60
1.33
1.63

36
6
30

18
4
14

15
10
5

2
2

4

8
4
4

28

7

_

_

_

_

70

-

-

-

-

-

-

28

7

See footn otes at end o f table,




-

-

’
.

-

-

-

-

-

6
-

6
-

12
-

30
-

_

6

6

12

24

-

-

-

-

-

6

6

12

24

-

-

4

4

2

-

70

-

278
-

_

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

11
Table A-5.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations— Continued

(Average straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an a rea basis
by industry division , C h arlotte, N .C ., A p ril 1962)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O ccup ation 1 and industry d ivision

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly 2 *0.60 *0.70
earnings
and
under
.80
.70

T r u ck d riv e rs 5— Continued
T r u c k d riv e r s , m edium (I V 2 to and
including 4 tons) _____________ — -----— . . . . .
M anufacturing ____________________________
Nonm anufacturing __ ___ ____ ____ —— -----—
Pu blic u tilitie s 14 ______________________
3
2

349
42
307
238

$2.21_
1.35
2.33
2.52

T r u c k d riv e r s , heavy (o v e r 4 tons,
tr a ile r type) ________________ __ ______ ______
N onm anufacturing -----------------------------------P u blic u tilitie s 3 ______________________

166
156
136

2.68
2.74
2.74

T ru c k e r s , pow er (fo rk lift) -------------------------------M anufacturing
____________ ___________
N onm anufacturing ___________________________

187
55
132

2.03
1.64
2.20

_
■

-

W atchm en ---------- ----- ------ - -----------------------------M anufacturing . . . ____________________ ____
Nonm anufacturing __________________________

1
2
3
4
5

84
58
26

1.21
L IT H
1.10

*0.80

*0.90

*1.00

•1 .1 0

* 1 .2 0

*1.30

*1.40

*1.50

*1.60

*1.70

*1.80

*1.90

*2.00

*3.10

*2.20

*2.30

*2.40

*3.50

*2.60

*2.70

.90

1.00

1.10

1.20

1.30

1.40

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.90

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

7
S
2
“

5
1
4

32
4
28
20

81
i
80
79

3
3
2

2
2
"

7
7
~

135
135
135

-

-

20
20
20

1
1
■

135
135
116

24
7
17

6
4
2

2
2
”

"

-

72
72

“

“

“

6
6
”

23
16
7
”

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
“

_
■

.
“

15
4

“

_
-

_
-

2
2

_
-

18
18

Data lim ited to m en w o rk e rs except w here otherw ise indicated.
E x clu des prem iu m pay fo r ov e rtim e and fo r w ork on weekends, holid ays, and late shifts.
T ran sp ortation , com m u n ication , and other public u tilities.
One w ork e r at $ 2 .8 0 to $2.90.
Includes a ll d r iv e r s r e g a r d le s s o f size and type o f truck operated.




-

11
27
27

7
6

15
14

15
12
3
“

21
3
18
"

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
-

3
3
“

20
8
12

10
9

2
2

2
2

2
2
“

2
2
“

4
4
“

2
2
“

"

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

22
20
2

4
4

6
5

-

5
2
3

_
"

_
“

j

_

_

.

_

1

_

1

1
_

B: Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions

12




Table B-l. Shift Differentials
(Shift d iffe r e n t ia ls o f m a n u fa ctu rin g plant w o r k e r s b y type and am ount o f d iffe r e n t ia l,
C h a r lo tte , N . C . , A p r il 1962)
P e r c e n t o f m an u factu rin g plant w o r k e r s —
In e s ta b lis h m e n ts having fo r m a l
p r o v is io n s 1 f o r —

Shift d iffe r e n t ia l

A c tu a lly w ork in g on—
T h ir d o r o th e r
sh ift

S e co n d sh ift
w o rk

T o ta l

______________________________

______

T h ir d o r o th e r
sh ift w o rk

S econ d shift

____

82. 2

6 5 .3

2 0 .6

9. 1

______

4 0 .3

4 3 .8

9 .6

5 .9

U n ifo r m ce n ts (p e r h ou r) ____________________

29. 1

30. 5

6 .4

5 .2

4 ce n ts __ __ _ __________ __ ---------5 ce n ts __________ ________ ________
___
7 c e n t s _________ ____________ _______________
8 ce n ts _______
________ __________
____ ________
__ ___
____
10 c e n ts
12 c e n ts ____________________________________
13V3 ce n ts _ _____ ______
______ ____
1 5 re n ts
.........
2 1 V3 ce n ts _______ ________________________

2 .6
1 2 .6
1 .8
3 .4
5 .0
2. 0
1 .7
-

_
1 4 .6
1 .8
7 .6
1 .0
3 .4
2. 0

.8
2 .9
.2
1. 1
.3
1. 1
-

_
3 .7
1 .0
.3
.2

U n ifo r m p e r c e n ta g e -----------------------------------------

6 .0

4. 5

1 .7

.2

2 p e r c e n t _________ __________ __________
4 p e r c e n t ------ ----- ----- ------------------7 p e r c e n t __ ________ __ ________
____
9 p e r c e n t ___________________________________
10 p e r c e n t _______ _________________ ___

.9
3. 5
1. 5

.9
3. 5

.2
1. 1
.4

. 2
■

3 .8

3 .8

1 .0

.4

W ith sh ift pay d iffe r e n t ia l _____ ______

F u ll d a y ’ s p a y fo r r e d u c e d h o u rs

___________

F u ll d a y 's p a y fo r re d u c e d h o u rs plus
c e n ts p e r h o u r _______________
______
N o sh ift p a y d iffe r e n t ia l

__

1 .4

5 .0

.5

. 1

__ ___________________

41. 9

21. 5

1 1 .0

3. 2

1
In clu d es e s ta b lis h m e n ts c u r r e n t ly o p e r a tin g late s h ift s ,
e v e n though th ey w e r e not c u r r e n t ly o p e r a tin g la te s h ifts .

and e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s c o v e r in g la te s h ifts

13
Table B-2. Minimum Entrance Salaries for Women Office Workers
(D is trib u tio n o f e sta b lis h m e n ts studied in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y m in im u m e n tra n ce s a la r y f o r s e le c t e d c a t e g o r ie s
o f in e x p e r ie n c e d w o m e n o f fic e w o r k e r s , C h a rlo tte , N. C . , A p r il 1962)
I n e x p e r ie n c e d ty p is ts

M in im u m w e e k ly s a la r y

1

A ll
in d u strie s

M an u factu rin g

B a s e d on standard w e e k ly h o u r s 3 o f —
A ll
sch e d u le s

— ----- — — — — —

O th er in e x p e r ie n c e d c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s 1
2

N onm an u factu rin g

M anufacturin g

40

A ll
sch e d u le s

37 V
2

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

A ll
s c h e d u le s

40

N onm anufacturing

B a s e d on stan dard w eek ly h ou rs 3 of—
40

A ll
sch e d u le s

37 V
2

40

120

48

XXX

72

X XX

X XX

120

48

X XX

72

XXX

XXX

28

9

7

19

4

14

54

17

13

37

7

27

_

_

1

3
_
1
_
1
1
1

-

-

_

3
_
2
_
1
1
_
1
1

6
3
4
2
1
1
1
-

1
1
2
-

4
2
4
2
2
1
1
1

3
1
3
2
1
1
1
1

3
2
16
5
3
2
1
2
1
2
-

1
1
3
1
1
_
_
_
_
_

-

3
2
20
7
7
4
3
2
2
3
1

_

9
3
6
2
1
2
1
2
1

1
5
1
2
2
1
1
1
-

-

12
3
2
2
1
2
1
2
-

E s ta b lis h m e n ts havin g n o s p e c ifie d m in im u m -------------------

10

3

X XX

7

X XX

XXX

14

7

X XX

7

XXX

XXX

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w h ich d id n ot e m p lo y w o r k e r s
in th is c a t e g o r y ---------------------------------------------------------------------

82

36

X XX

46

X XX

X XX

52

24

X XX

28

X XX

XXX

E s ta b lis h m e n ts stu d ie d

— — —

E sta b lis h m e n ts havin g a s p e c ifie d m in im u m

_____________

$ 4 0 .0 0 and u n d e r $ 4 2 .5 0 --------- — --- — — — —
_
_ _
_ _
$ 42. 50 and u n d e r $ 4 5 .0 0 _ -------- _ ----$ 4 5 . 00 and u n d e r $ 4 7 . 50
.......................................................
_
—_ _
_ _
$ 4 7. 50 and u n d e r $ 5 0 .0 0 ---- — — _ —
$ 5 0 .0 0 and u n d e r $ 52. 50 ----------------- __ ------- __ __
$ 5 2 .5 0 and u n d e r $ 5 5 .0 0 --------------------------------------------------------------$ 55. 00 and u n d er $ 57. 50 ------------ __ — __
$ 57. 50 and u n d e r $ 60. 00 _______ __ __ __ __ __ _____
$ 60. 00 and u n d e r $ 62. 50 ------------- --------------------- __
$ 6 2 .5 0 and u n d er $ 6 5 .0 0 _ . . ________ _____ — ------O v e r $ 65. 00 -----------------------------------------------------------------------

1
-

2

_

1 L o w e s t s a la r y r a te f o r m a lly e s ta b lis h e d f o r h irin g in e x p e r ie n c e d w o r k e r s f o r typing o r o th e r c l e r i c a l j o b s .
2 R a te s a p p lic a b le to m e s s e n g e r s , o f fic e g ir ls , o r s im ila r s u b c le r ic a l jo b s a r e not c o n s id e r e d .
3 H ou rs r e f l e c t the w o rk w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t-t im e s a la r ie s . D ata a r e p r e s e n te d f o r a ll w o rk w eek s c o m b in e d , and f o r the m o s t c o m m o n w ork w eek s r e p o r te d .




14
Tabic B-3.

Scheduled W eekly Hours

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f o f fi c e and plant w o 'rk e rs in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y s ch e d u led w e e k ly h o u r s
o f f ir s t - s h if t w o r k e r s , C h a r lo tte , N .C ., A p r il 1962)
OFFICE WORKERS

PLANT WORKERS

W eek ly h ou rs
All industries1

Manufacturing

____________________ _____ ____________

100

100

U nder 37V2 h o u r s ---------------------— -----------------37^2 h ou rs _
----— ------------- - — --------O v er 3 7 V2 and under 40 h o u r s ____ ___ _________
40 h ou rs
________
___ ______
__ __
__
O ver 40 and u nd er 45 h o u rs .
___
___
45 h ou rs _
__ _
—
47 hour s
_________ ________________________
48 h ou rs ___________ T
_________________________ ____
O v er 48 h o u r s _ __

2
22
6

21
12

69

65

1
1

2
1

-

-

A ll w o r k e r s

1
2
3
4

<
4)

Public utilities13
2

100

33
_
67
(4)
(4 )
_

All industries9

Manufacturing

100

(4 )
4
_
68
6
6
(4 )
11

4

In clu d es data fo r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v ic e s in a d d ition to those in d u s try d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a t e ly .
T r a n s p o rta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilitie s .
In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s in add ition to th o se in d u s try d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.




Public utilities2

100

100

3
_
78
4
6

78

1

8

_
_
12

6

_
_

4

15
Table B-4.

Paid Holidays

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f o f f i c e and p lant w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u s try d iv is io n s b y n u m b er o f p a id h o lid a y s
p r o v id e d ann ually, C h a rlo tte , N .C ., A p r il 1962)
PLANT WORKERS

OFFICE WORKERS

Ite m
All Industrie*1

A ll w o r k e r s

...

______

...

« ...

------—

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
p a id h o l i d a y s ------------------ ------------- -------------- -----W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
no p a id h o l i d a y s -------------------------------------------------

Manufacturing

Public utilities?

All industries1
3
2

Manufacturing

PubUe utilities2

100

100

100

100

100

100

98

99

100

72

63

100

2

1

28

37
'

Number of days

L e s s than 4 h o l i d a y s -------------------------------------------4 h o l i d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------5 h o l i d a y s _________________________________________
5 h o lid a y s plu s 1 h a lf d a y ______________________
...—
. ...
. . -----6 h o lid a y s
7 h o lid a y s ._______________ _______________________
8 h o lid a y s
. . .
— . . .
. . .
8 h o lid a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y ______________________
9 h o l i d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------

3
2
37
1
15
33
6
2
1

2
4
33
4
20
24
12
-

1
2
3
16
78
-

8
4
24
1
16
16
4
-

12
36
56
60
93
97
97
98
98
99

78
94
94
97
99
100
100
100
100

4
19
35
37
60
65
65
69
70
72

6
3
19
2
16
12
5
-

6
1
5
36
52
-

5
16
32
34
54
57
57
58
58
63

52
88
88
93
94
100
100
100
100

Total holiday time4

9 o r m o r e d a y s ___________________________________
8 V2 o r m ojre d a y s ________________________________
8 o r m o r e d ays _____________________________t. -----7 o r m o r e d a ys _ __ — . .
— _
— ----6 o r m ore days
.
_
5 V2 o r m o r e d a ys . .
_
.....
. . .
5 o r m o re days .
_
--------- -----4 o r m o r e d ays
____________
3V2 o r m o r e d a y s
_
. . . . .
3 o r m o r e d a y s __________ ______^ ________________
2 o r m o r e d a y s ________________________________ __
1 o r m ore days
—

1
2
3
4
no h a lf

1
2
8
41
56
57
94
95
96
97
98
98

.

In c lu d e s data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tra d e ; fin a n ce , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v ic e s in ad d ition to th ose in d u s try d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s .
I n clu d e s data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e , r e t a il tra d e , r e a l estate, and s e r v ic e s in a dd ition to th ose in d u s tr y d iv is io n s show n se p a r a te ly .
A ll co m b in a tio n s o f fu ll and h a lf days that add to the sa m e am ount a re c o m b in e d ; fo r e x a m p le , the p r o p o r t io n o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g a tota l o f 7 days in c lu d e s th ose w ith 7 fu ll days and
d a y s , 6 fu ll d a ys and 2 h a lf d a y s, 5 fu ll days and 4 half d a y s, and so on.
P r o p o r t io n s w e r e then cum ulated.




16
Table B-5.

Paid Vacations

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f o f fi c e and plant w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in du stry d iv is io n s by v a c a tio n p a y
p r o v is io n s , C h a r lo tte , N. C . , A p r il 1962)
PLANT WORKERS

OFFICE WORKERS

V a ca tio n p o lic y
All industries1

A ll w o r k e r s

----------------------------------------------------------

Manufacturing

Public utilities2

All industries3

Manufacturing

Public utilities2

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
95
5
-

99
80
20
-

100
100
-

90
74
16
-

86
55
32
-

100
100
"
-

(4)

(4)

10

14

5
47
4
1

10
58
10
-

_
37
-

13
15
1
-

19
13
2
~

30
~

_
43
1
53
2

_
22
78
-

_
85
15
-

1
72
3
14
~

66
3
17
“

_
80
20
“

13
4
81
2

16
2
83
-

19
13
69
-

54
4
31
-

58
6
23

51
2
47
"

10
1
87
2

12
3
85
-

14
2
84
-

36
8
46
-

49
14
24
~

11
1
88
-

10
1
* 87
2

12
3
85

14
2
84

35
8
47

46
14
27

11
1
88

"

"

4
1
92
1
(4)
2

5
2
94
-

5
2
93
-

18
2
65
3
2

25
1
57
3
-

6
1
93
-

Method of payment
W o rk e rs in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s --------------------------------------------------L e n g th -o f-tim e paym en t -------------------------------P e r c e n ta g e p aym en t -------------------------------------F la t -s u m paym en t -----------------------------------------O ther --------------------- — — — ------------- — —
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid v a c a tio n s ------- — ------------------------------

Amount of vacation p a y 5
A ft e r 6 m on th s o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w eek ------------------------------------------------------1 w eek __________________________________ _
O ver 1 and u n d er 2 w eek s ---------------------------------2 w eeks ___________________________________________
A ft e r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w eek ------ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ —
1 wfifik
___
.......
_ _ ____ __________
_
_
O ver 1 and un d er 2 w eek s ----------------- -------------2 w eeks -----------------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w eek s ______________________

-

A ft e r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1
O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w eek s ------ __ ------- — —
2 w eeks -----------------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w eek s ---------------------------------A ft e r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek ------------------------------------------------------------------O v er 1 and un d er 2 w eek s __— ------------------ —
2 w eeks ----------------- — — — — ------- — --------O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w eek s ______________________
A ft e r 4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek --------------------------- __ — ------------- —
O v er 1 and un d er 2 w eek s _ __ __ __ __ _____
......
2 weftlcs
O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s _ __ ________________
A ft e r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek - --------------------------------------------------------------O v er 1 and un d er 2 w eek s ---------------------------------2 w eeks ------ __ __ __ __ __ __ _____ __ ______
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w eek s ---------------------------------3 w eeks ________________________________________ ____
O v er 4 w eek s _________________________________ __

-

'
S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f table,




17
Table B-5.

Paid Vacations— Continued

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f o f fi c e and plant w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in in d u s try d iv is io n s by v a c a tio n pay
p r o v is io n s , C h a rlo tte , N. C . , A p r il 1962)
OFFICE WORKERS

PLANT WORKER8

V a c a tio n p o l ic y
All industries1

A m ou n t o f v a c a tio n

p a y 5—

Manufacturing

Public utilities2

All industries3

Manufacturing

Public utilities2

-C o n tin u e d

A ft e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek ------------- — — -------- — ------------- — —
O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ---------------------------------2 w eek s ----------------------------------------------------— -----—
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ---------------------------------3 w eek s -------- ---------- — — -------- -------- --------O v e r 4 w eek s --------------------------------------------------------

25

12
2

5
74
21
-

5
94
1
-

18
1
59
2
10
~

49
3
8
-

90
4
-

4
_
69
_
25
2

5
53
42
-

5
64
31
"

18
1
48
2
21
"

25
41
3
17
-

6
49
45
“

4
33
1
59
2

5
34

5
22
-

61
-

73
-

18
33
3
36
-

25
35
3
23
“

6
13

-

81
-

4
33
_
56
4
2

5
34
_
60
1
-

5
22
70
3
"

18
33
2
28
9
“

25
35
3
19
4
-

6
13
49
32
-

4
31
_
42
20
2

5
34
50
12

22
42
31

18

25
35
21
5

6
13
31
50

4
81
-

6

-

-

A ft e r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek ____________________________________________
O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s --------------------- ---------2 w e e k s --------------- -------------- -----------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ______________________
3 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O v e r 4 w eek s -------------------------------------------------------A ft e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k -------------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ---------------------------------3 w e e k s _______________ r __ ___ _________________
___
O v e r 4 w e e k s -----------— — -------------------------

-

A ft e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek -------------------------------------------------------------------?. w p a Ith
_____________________ ___ ______
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ---------------------------------3 w eek s ---------------- ------------------------------------- ------4 w ppks
____
O v e r 4 w eek s -------------------------------------------------------A ft e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek

____________________________________________

7.

O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ______________________
3 w eek s ----------------- — — . . — ___ ________ —
4 w eek s --------------------------------------------------- ----------

1
2
3
4
5
in clu d e

5

33
1
25
13

I n clu d e s data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v ic e s in a d d itio n to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
T r a n s p o rta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s .
In c lu d e s da ta f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e , r e t a il tra d e , r e a l e sta te , and s e r v ic e s in ad d ition to th o s e in d u s tr y d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .
P e r io d s o f s e r v ic e w e r e a r b it r a r ily c h o s e n and do not n e c e s s a r ily r e fl e c t the in d iv id u a l p r o v is io n s f o r p r o g r e s s io n s .
F o r e x a m p le, the ch a n g es in p r o p o r t io n s in d ica te d at 10 y e a r s '
ch a n g es in p r o v is io n s o c c u r r i n g betw een 5 and 10 y e a r s .

N O T E : In the ta b u la tio n s o f v a c a tio n a llo w a n ce s by y e a r s o f s e r v ic e , paym en ts o th e r than "le n g th o f t i m e , " su ch as p e r c e n ta g e o f annual ea rn in g s o r f la t -s u m paym en ts,
to an e q u iv a len t t im e b a s i s ; f o r e x a m p le , a p aym ent o f 2 p e r c e n t o f annual e a rn in g s w as c o n s id e r e d as 1 w e e k 's pay.




w e re

co n v e r te d

18
Table B-6.

Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans

( P e r c e n t o f o f fi c e and plant w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u s tr y d iv is io n s e m p lo y e d in e sta b lish m en ts p r o v id in g
h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n b e n e f it s . C h a r lo tte . N .C . , A p r il 1962)
OFFICE WORKERS

PLANT WORKERS

T y p e o f b e n e fit
AU industries1

Manufacturing

100

100

Public utilities 1
2

All industries 3

100

100

Manufacturing

Publio utilities 2

100

100

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g :
L ife in s u r a n c e
_____
— _ ___
■
__
A c c id e n ta l death and d is m e m b e rm e n t
in s u r a n c e —
__ __
—__
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s ic k le a v e o r b o th 4 _________________________

97

95

98

89

93

100

62

79

47

55

61

72
91

76

76

98

66

57

S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e _______
S ick le a v e (fu ll p a y and no
w aitin g p e r io d ) __ __ _
__ ___
__ __
S ick le a v e (p a r t ia l p a y o r
w a itin g p e r io d ) __ __ ______
__ _____

27

35

20

44

48

51

54

59

66

21

12

31

10

-

29

6

-

27

H os p ita liz a tio n in s u r a n c e ___________________
S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e __________________________
M e d ica l in s u r a n c e ___________________________
C a ta strop h e in s u r a n c e ____ __________ ____
R e tir e m e n t p e n s io n __________________________
N o h ealth , in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n plan ____

89
89
50
66
74
2

94
94
50
62
72
4

73
73
54
77
71

85
85
42
32
46
9

90
90
47
32
34
6

82
82
40
54
89

1 In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v ic e s in ad d ition to th ose in d u stry d iv isio n s show n s e p a r a t e ly .
2 T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
3 In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , and s e r v ic e s in ad d ition to t h o s e in d u s try d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
4 U n du plica ted tota l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e show n s e p a r a t e ly b e lo w . S ic k -le a v e plans a r e lim ite d to th o s e w h ich d e fin it e ly e s t a b lis h at le a s t the
m in im u m n u m ber o f d a y s ' p a y that ca n b e e x p e c te d by e a c h e m p lo y e e . In fo rm a l s i c k -l e a v e a llo w a n c e s d e te r m in e d on an individual b a s is a r e e xclu d ed .




Appendix A: Changes in Occupational Descriptions

Since the Bureau’ s last survey in this area, occupational
descriptions for three office jobs were revised in order to obtain salary
information for more specific categories. Therefore, data presented
for these jobs in table A -l are not comparable to data presented in last
year’ s bulletin.

Revisions were made in the descriptions for file clerks, key­
punch operators, and stenographers. The revised description for file
clerk groups these workers into three levels (class A, B, and C) in­




stead of two (class A and B). The revised description for keypunch
operator groups these workers into two defined classes (A and B)
instead of a single category. Previously data were presented separately
for general stenographers and technical stenographers. The revision
combines general stenographers, with more responsible duties, and
technical stenographers to form a new senior stenographer category;
other general stenographers are maintained in that classification.
The revised occupational descriptions used this year are in­
cluded in appendix B.

19




Appendix B: Occupational Descriptions
The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’ s wage surveys is to assist its
field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll
titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This is
essential in order to permit the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the
Bureau’ s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those
prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’ s field economists are in­
structed to exclude working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped, part-time,
temporary, and probationary workers.

OFFICE
BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other
than an ordinary or electromatic typewriter. May also keep records as
to billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work incidental
to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, machine, are
classified by type of machine, as follows:

Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott
Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register, with or without
a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions.
Class A—
Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of
and experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with
the structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines
proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used
in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, bal­
ance sheets, and other records by hand.

Biller, machine (billing machine)—
Uses a special billing ma­
chine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott Fisher, Burroughs, etc., which are
combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and in­
voices from customers’ purchase orders, internally prepared orders,
shipping memorandums, etc. Usually involves application of prede­
termined discounts and shipping charges and entry of necessary
extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing ma­
chine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine.
The operation usually involves a large number of carbon copies of
the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.

Class B—
Keeps a record of one or more phases or sections of
a set of records usually requiring little knowledge of basic book­
keeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll,
customers’ accounts (not including a simple type of billing described
under biller, machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc. May check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine)— ses a bookkeeping
U
machine (Sundstrand, Elliott Fisher, Remington Rand, etc., which
may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare customers’
bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally in­
volves the simultaneous entry of figures on customers’ ledger rec­
ord. The machine automatically accumulates figures on a number
of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically
the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of book­
keeping.
Works from uniform and standard types of sales and
credit slips.



CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A—
Under general direction of a bookkeeper or account­
ant, has responsibility for keeping one or more sections of a com­
plete set of books or records relating to one phase of an establish­
ment’ s business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing
subsidiary ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts
21

22

CLERK, ACCOUNTING—
Continued
payable; examining and coding invoices or vouchers with proper ac­
counting distribution; and requires judgment and experience in
making proper assignations and allocations. May assist in preparing,
adjusting and closing journal entries; and may direct class B ac­
counting clerks.
Class B—
Under supervision, performs one or more routine ac­
counting operations such as posting simple journal vouchers or ac­
counts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher registers;
reconciling bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers con­
trolled by general ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data.
This job does not require a knowledge of accounting and book­
keeping principles but is found in offices in which the more routine
accounting work is subdivided on a functional basis among several
workers.

CLERK, FILE
Class A— an established filing system containing a number
In
of varied subject matter files, classifies and indexes file material
such as correspondence, reports, technical documents, etc. May
also file this material. May keep records of various types in con­
junction with the files. May lead a small group of lower level file
clerks.
Class B—
Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by sim­
ple (subject matter) headings or partly classified material by finer
subheadings. Prepares simple related index and cross-reference
aids.
As requested locates clearly identified material in files
and forwards material. May perform related clerical tasks required
to maintain and service files.

Class C—
Performs routine filing of material that has already
been classified or which is easily classified in a simple serial
classification system (e.g., alphabetical, chronological, or numer­
ical). As requested, locates readily available material in files
and forwards material; and may fill out withdrawal charge. Per­
forms simple clerical and manual tasks required to maintain and
service files.



CLERK, ORDER
Receives customers* orders for material or merchandise by mail,
phone, or personally. Duties involve any combination of the following:
Quoting prices to customers; making out an order sheet listing the items
to make up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be
filled. May check with credit department to determine credit rating of
customer, acknowledge receipt of orders from customers, follow up orders
to see that they have been filled, keep file o f orders received, and check
shipping invoices with original orders.

CLERK, PAYROLL
Computes wages of company employees and enters the neces­
sary data on the payroll sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers’
earnings based on time or production records; and posting calculated
data on payroll sheet, showing information such as worker’ s name, work­
ing days, time, rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due.
May make out paychecks and assist paymaster in making up and dis­
tributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
Primary duty is to operate a Comptometer to perform mathema­
tical computations. This job is not to be confused with that o f statis­
tical or other type of clerk, which may involve frequent use o f a Comp­
tometer but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to performance
of other duties.

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsi­
bilities, reproduces multiple copies of typewritten or handwritten matter,
using a Mimeograph or Ditto machine. Makes necessary adjustment such
as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed. Is not required to
prepare stencil or Ditto master. May keep file of used stencils or Ditto
masters. May sort, collate, and staple completed material.

23

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Class A—
Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combina­
tion keypunch machine to transcribe data from various source docu­
ments to keypunch tabulating cards. Performs same tasks as lower
level keypunch operator but in addition, work requires application of
coding skills and the making of some determinations, for example,
locates on the source document the items to be punched; extracts
information from several documents; and searches for and interprets
information on the document to determine information to be punched.
May train inexperienced operators.

Class B—
Under close supervision or following specific proce­
dures or instructions, transcribes data from source documents to
punched cards. Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or com­
bination keypunch machine to keypunch tabulating cards. May
verify cards. Working from various standardized source documents,
follows specified sequences which have been coded or prescribed
in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting
data to be punched. Problems arising from erroneous items or codes,
missing information, etc., are referred to supervisor.

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
Performs various routine duties such as running errands, opera­
ting minor office machines such as sealers or mailers, opening and dis­
tributing mail, and other minor clerical work.

SECRETARY
Performs secretarial and clerical duties for a superior in an
administrative or executive position. Duties include making appoint­
ments for superior; receiving people coming into office; answering and



SECRETARY— Continued
making phone calls; handling personal and important or confidential
mail, and writing routine correspondence on own initiative; and taking
dictation (where transcribing machine is not used) either in shorthand
or by Stenotype or similar machine, and transcribing dictation or the
recorded information reproduced on a transcribing machine. May prepare
special reports or memorandums for information of superior.

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more persons
either in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine, involving a
normal routine vocabulary; and transcribe dictation. May also type from
written copy. May maintain files, keep simple records, or perform other
relatively routine clerical tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool.
Does not include transcribing-machine work. (See transcribing-machine
operator.)

STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more persons,
either in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine, involving a var­
ied technical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or
reports on scientific research and transcribe dictation. May also type
from written copy. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.

OR

Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly greater
independence and responsibility than stenographers, general as evi­
denced by the following: Work requires high degree of stenographer
speed and accuracy; and a thorough working knowledge of general busi­
ness and office procedures and of the specific business operations,
organization, policies, procedures, files, workflow, etc. Uses this
knowledge in performing stenographic duties and responsible clerical
tasks such as, maintaining followup files; assembling material for
reports, memorandums, letters, etc.; composing simple letters from general
instructions; reading and routing incoming mail; and answering routine
questions, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine work.

24

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard.
Duties involve handling incoming, outgoing, and intraplant or office
calls. May record toll calls and take messages. May give information
to persons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders. For
workers who also act as receptionists see switchboard operatorreceptionist.

TABULA TING-MACHINE OPERATOR-Continued
Class C—
Operates simple tabulating or electrical account­
ing machines such as the sorter, reproducing punch, collator, etc.,
with specific instructions. May include simple wiring from diagrams
and some filing work. The work typically involves portions of a
work unit, for example, individual sorting or collating runs or re­
petitive operations.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
In addition to performing duties of operator, on a single posi­
tion or monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and may also type
or perform routine clerical work as part of regular duties. This typing
or clerical work may take the major part of this worker’ s time while at
switchboard.
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Class A—
Operates a variety of tabulating or electrical ac­
counting machines, typically including such machines as the tabu­
lator, calculator, interpreter, collator, and others. Performs com­
plete reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs
difficult wiring as required. The complete reporting and tabulating
assignments typically involve a variety of long and complex re­
ports which often are o f irregular or nonrecurring type requiring
some planning and sequencing of steps to be taken. As a more
experienced operator, is typically involved in training new opera­
tors in machine operations, or partially trained operators in wiring
from diagrams and operating sequences of long and complex reports,
Does not include working supervisors performing tabulating-machine
operations and day-to-day supervision o f the work and production
of a group o f tabulating-machine operators.
Class B—
Operates more difficult tabulating or electrical ac­
counting machines such as the tabulator and calculator, in addition
to the sorter, reproducer, and collator. This work is performed under
specific instructions and may include the performance of some wir­
ing from diagrams. The work typically involves, for example, tabu­
lations involving a repetitive accounting exercise, a complete but
small tabulating study, or parts o f a longer and more complex report.
Such reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where
the procedures are well established. May also include the training
of new employees in the basic operation of the machine.



TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
Primary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal rou­
tine vocabulary from transcribing-machine records. May also type from
written copy and do simple clerical work. Workers transcribing dictation
involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal
briefs or reports on scientific research are not included. A worker who
takes dictation in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine is
classified as a stenographer, general.
TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies o f various material or to
make out bills after calculations have been made by another person.
May include typing of stencils, mats, or similar materials for use in
duplicating processes. May do clerical work involving little special
training, such as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or
sorting and distributing incoming mail.

Class A—
Performs one or more o f the following: Typing ma­
terial in final form when it involves combining material from several
sources or responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication, punc­
tuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language ma­
terial; and planning layout and typing of complicated statistical
tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing. May type
routine form letters varying details to suit circumstances.
Class B—
Performs one or more o f the following: Copy typing
from rough or clear drafts; routine typing o f forms, insurance pol­
icies, etc.; and setting up simple standard tabulations, or copying
more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.

25

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR-Continued

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR
(Assistant draftsman)
Draws to scale units or parts of drawings prepared by drafts­
man or others for engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes.
Uses various types of drafting tools as required. May prepare drawings
from simple plans or sketches, or perform other duties under direction
of a draftsman.

completed work, checking dimensions, materials to be used, and quan­
tities; writing specifications; and making adjustments or changes in
drawings or specifications. May ink in lines and letters on pencil
drawings, prepare detail units of complete drawings, or trace drawings.
Work is frequently in a specialized field such as architectural, elec­
trical, mechanical, or structural drafting.

DRAFTSMAN, LEADER
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
Plans and directs activities of one or more draftsmen in prep­
aration o f working plans and detail drawings from rough or preliminary
sketches for engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes.
Duties involve a combination o f the following: Interpreting blueprints,
sketches, and written or verbal orders; determining work procedures;
assigning duties to subordinates and inspecting their work; and per­
forming more difficult problems. May assist subordinates during emer­
gencies or as a regular assignment, or perform related duties of a
supervisory or administrative nature.
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
Prepares working plans and detail drawings from notes, rough
or detailed sketches for engineering, construction, or manufacturing
purposes. Duties involve a combination of the following: Preparing
working plans, detail drawings, maps, cross-sections, etc., to scale by
use of drafting instruments; making engineering computations such as
those involved in strength of materials, beams and trusses; verifying

A registered nurse who gives nursing service to ill or injured
employees or other persons who become ill or suffer an accident on the
premises of a factory or other establishment. Duties involve a combina­
tion o f the following: Giving first aid to the ill or injured; attending to
subsequent dressing of employees’ injuries; keeping records of patients
treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or other purposes;
conducting physical examinations and health evaluations of applicants
and employees; and planning and carrying out programs involving health
education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment, or other
activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety of all personnel.
TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others, by placing
tracing cloth or paper over drawing and tracing with pen or pencil. Uses
T-square, compass, and other drafting tools. May prepare simple draw­
ings and do simple lettering.

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE—
Continued

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and main­
tain in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs,
counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim
made of wood in an establishment. Work involves most of the following:
Planning and laying out o f work from blueprints, drawings, models, or
verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenter*s handtools, portable

power tools, and standard measuring instruments; making standard shop
computations relating to dimensions of work; and selecting materials
necessary for the work. In general, the work of the maintenance car­
penter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.




26

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE

HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES

Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the
installation, maintenance, or repair o f equipment for the generating, dis­
tribution, or utilization o f electric energy in an establishment. Work
involves most o f the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety
of electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards,
controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems,
or other transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, lay­
out, or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the elec­
trical system or equipment; working standard computations relating to
load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety
of electrician’ s handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In
general, the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded train­
ing and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.

Assists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades,
by performing specific or general duties o f lesser skill, such as keeping
a worker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning working area, ma­
chine, and equipment; assisting worker by holding materials or tools;
and performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The
kind of work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade:
In some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding
materials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he is per­
mitted to perform specialized machine operations, or parts o f a trade
that are also performed by workers on a full-time basis.

ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation
of stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to sup­
ply the establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrigera­
tion, or air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining
equipment such as steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors,
turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and
boiler-fed water pumps; making equipment repairs; and keeping a record
of operation of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May
also supervise these operations. Head or ch ief engineers in establish•
ments employing more than one engineer are excluded.

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation o f one or more types of machine
tools, such as jig borers, cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or milling machines in the construction o f machine-shop tools, gages,
jigs, fixtures, or dies. Work involves most o f the following: Planning
and performing difficult machining operations; processing items requiring
complicated setups or a high degree o f accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision measuring instruments; selecting feeds, speeds, tooling and
operation sequence; and making necessary adjustments during operation
to achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions. May be required to rec­
ognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to select proper
coolants and cutting and lubricating oils. For cross-industry wage study
purposes, machine-tool operators, toolroom, in tool and die jobbing
shops are excluded from this classification.

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
Fire stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which
employed with heat, power, or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; and checks water
and safety valve.
May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom
equipment.




Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of
metal parts o f mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work
involves most o f the following: Interpreting written instructions and
specifications; planning and laying out o f work; using a variety o f ma­
chinist’ s handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and
operating standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close toler­
ances; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of
work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working

27

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE—
Continued

MILLWRIGHT

properties o f the common metals; selecting standard materials, parts,
and equipment required for his work; and fitting and assembling parts
into mechanical equipment. In general, the machinist’ s work normally
requires a rounded training in machine-shop practice usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Installs new machines or heavy equipment and dismantles and
installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout
are required. Work involves most o f the following: Planning and laying
out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a
variety o f handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations re­
lating to stresses, strength of materials, and centers of gravity; alining
and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment and
parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order power
transmission equipment such as drives and speed reducers. In general,
the millwright’ s work normally requires a rounded training and experi­
ence in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an es­
tablishment. Work involves most o f the following: Examining automotive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling equipment and
performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches,
gages, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassembling and installing the various assemblies in the vehicle
and making necessary adjustments; and alining wheels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the auto­
motive mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually ac­
quired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment.
Work involves most o f the following: Examining machines and mechan­
ical equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling or partly dis­
mantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of
handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective
parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the production of a re­
placement part by a machine shop or sending of the machine to a machine
shop for major repairs; preparing written specifications for major repairs
or for die production o f parts ordered from machine shop; reassembling
machines; and making all necessary adjustments for operation. In gen­
eral, the work of a maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiva­
lent training and experience. Excluded from this classification are
workers whose primary duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.



OILER
Lubricates, with oil or grease, the moving parts or wearing sur­
faces o f mechanical equipment of an establishment.

PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an es­
tablishment. Work involves the following: Knowledge of surface pecu­
liarities and types of paint required for different applications; preparing
surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty .or filler
in nail holes and interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush.
May mix colors, oils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain
proper color or consistency. In general, the work o f the maintenance
painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves most o f the following:
Laying out of work and measuring to locate position of pipe from draw­
ings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to
correct lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe­
cutting machine; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by
hand-driven or power-driven machines; assembling pipe with couplings

28

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE—
Continued

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE-Continued

and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relat­
ing to pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard
tests to determine whether finished pipes meet specifications. In general
the work of the maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiva­
lent training and experience. Workers primarily engaged in installing and
repairing building sanitation or beating systems are excluded.

types of sheet-metal-working machines; using a variety of handtools in
cutting, bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assembling; and installing
sheet-metal articles as required. In general, the work o f the maintenance
sheet-metal worker requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.
TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(Die maker; jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker; gage maker)

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
Keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installation of
vents and traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and
fixtures; and opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber’ s snake.
In general, the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded train­
ing and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheetmetal equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans,
shelves, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) o f an
establishment. Work involves most o f the following: Planning and lay­
ing out all types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints,
models, or other specifications; setting up and operating all available

Constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gages, jigs, fix­
tures or dies for forgings, punching, and other metal-forming work. Work
involves most of the following: Planning and laying out o f work from
models, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifications;
using a variety of tool and die maker’ s handtools and precision meas­
uring instruments, understanding o f the working properties o f common
metals and alloys; setting up and operating of machine tools and related
equipment; making necessary shop computations relating to dimensions
of work, speeds, feeds, and tooling of machines; heattreating o f metal
parts during fabrication as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve
required qualities; working to close tolerances; fitting and assembling
of parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances; and selecting appro­
priate materials, tools, and processes. In general, the tool and die
maker’ s work requires a rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom
practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die makers
in tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classification.

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER

GUARD

Transports passengers between floors of an office building
apartment house, department store, hotel, or similar establishment.
Workers who operate elevators in conjunction with other duties such as
those of starters and janitors are excluded.

Performs routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour,
maintaining order, using arms or force where necessary. Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate and check on identity o f employees and
other persons entering.




29

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER

PACKER, SHIPPING

(Sweeper; charwomen; janitre'ss)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas
and washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial
or other establishment. Duties involve a combination o f the following:
Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips,
trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polish­
ing metal fixtures oi trimmings; providing supplies and minor mainte­
nance services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Work­
ers who specialize in window washing are excluded.

Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing
them in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being
dependent upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the
type of container employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the
placing of items in shipping containers and may involve one or more of
the following: Knowledge o f various items of stock in order to verify
content; selection o f appropriate type and size o f container; inserting
enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to prevent
breakage or damage; closing and sealing container; and applying labels
or entering identifying data on container. Packers who also make
wooden boxes or crates are excluded.

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store,
or other establishment whose duties involve one or more o f the follow•
ing: Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or
from freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelv­
ing, or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage location;
and transporting materials or merchandise by hand truck, car, or wheel­
barrow. Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are excluded.

ORDER FILLER
(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
F ills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips, cus­
tomers9 orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to filling orders
and indicating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders
requisition additional stock, or report short supplies to supervisor, and
perform dther related duties.




SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is respon­
sible for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials. Shipping work involves: A knowledge of shipping procedures, practices,
routes, available means of transportation and rates; and preparing
records of the goods shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight
and shipping charges, and keeping a file of shipping records. May
direct or assist in preparing the merchandise for shipment. Receiving
work involves: Verifying or directing others in verifying the correct­
ness of shipments against bills of lading, invoices, or other records;
checking for shortages and rejecting damaged goods; routing merchan­
dise or materials to proper departments; and maintaining necessary
records and files.

For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk

30

TRUCKDRIVER

TRUCKER, POWER

Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport ma­
terials, merchandise, equipment, or men between various types of estab­
lishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses,
wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail establishments
and customers’ houses or places of business. May also load or unload
truck with or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep
truck in good working order. Driver*salesmen and over^the-road drivers
are excluded.

Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered
truck or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a
warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment.

For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size
and type of equipment, as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on
the basis of trailer capacity.)
Truckdriver (combination o f sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under V 2 tons)
/
Truckdriver, medium (1% to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, heavy {over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)




For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type o f
truck, as follows:
Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)

WATCHMAN
Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property
against fire, theft, and illegal entry.

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U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1 9 6 2

O — 647278


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102