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Occupational Wage Survey

SAN BERNARDINO-RIVERSIDEONTARIO, CALIFORNIA
SEPTEM BER

1960

Bulletin N o . 1285-4




U N ITED

STATES D EPARTM EN T O F

LA B O R

Ja m e s P. M itchell, S ecretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clagua, Commissionar




Occupational Wage Survey
SAN BERNARDINO-RIVERSIDEONTARIO, CALIFORNIA




SEPTEMBER 1960

Bulletin No. 1285-4
November I960

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
B U R EA U O F LA BO R STATISTICS
Ew a n C la g u a , Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Document$/ U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C.

Price 20 cents




Contents

Preface

Page
The Community Wage Survey P ro g ra m
The Bureau of L abor Statistics reg u la rly conducts
areaw ide wage su rveys in a num ber of im portant industrial
cen ters. The studies, m ade fr o m late fa ll to ea rly spring,
relate to occupational earnings and related supplem entary
ben efits. A p relim in a ry re p o rt is available on com pletion
of the study in each area, usually in the month follow ing
the p a y roll p e rio d studied. This bulletin p rov id es additional
data not included in the e a r lie r re p o rt.
A consolidated
analytical bulletin sum m arizing the resu lts of a ll of the
y e a r l s su rveys is issued after com pletion of the final area
bulletin fo r the cu rren t round of su rveys.

T ables:
1.
2.

A:

E stablishm ents and w ork ers within scop e of survey --------------P ercen ts of in cre a se in standard w eekly sa la rie s and
stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r selected occu p a ­
tional groups ----------------------------------------------------------------------------Occupational earnings: *
A - l . O ffice occupations ______________________________
A - 2. P r o fe ssio n a l and tech n ical occupations _______
A - 3. Maintenance and pow erplant occupations -------A - 4. Custodial and m aterial m ovem ent occupations

Appendix:

O ccupational

d e scrip tion s ___________________________________

* NOTE: Sim ilar tabulations are available in the San
B ernardino— iver side—
R
Ontario rep ort fo r N ovem ber 1959,
which a lso includes data on establishm ent p ra ctice s and
supplem entary wage p ro v isio n s.
A d ire cto ry indicating
date of study and the p r ic e of the rep orts fo r other m ajor
a rea s is available upon requ est.

iii

2
2

in \D n




1
3

^

This re p o rt was p rep a red in the B ureau1s region al
o ffice in San F ra n cis co , Calif. , by W illiam P. O 'C onnor,
under the d ire ctio n of John L. Dana, A ssista n t R egional
D irector fo r Wages and Industrial R elations.

Introduction ______________________________________________________________
Wage trends fo r selected occupational groups ----------------------------------------

9




Occupational W age Survey—San Bemardino-Riverside-Ontario, Calif.
Introduction
This area is one of se v e r a l im portant industrial cen ters in
which the U .S. Departm ent o f L a b o r's Bureau of L abor Statistics
conducts su rveys of occupational earnings and related wage benefits
on an area b a s is .
The bulletin p resen ts cu rren t occupational em ploym ent and
earnings in form ation obtained la rg e ly by m a il fro m the establishm ents
v isited by Bureau field econ om ists in the last previou s su rvey fo r o c c u ­
pations rep orted in that e a r lie r study.
P erson a l v isits Were made
to nonrespondents and to those respondents reporting unusual changes
sin ce the previou s su rvey.
In each a re a , data are obtained fro m rep resen tative esta b lish ­
m ents within six broad industry d ivision s: M anufacturing; tra n sp or­
ta tio n ,1 com m unication, and other public u tilities; w h olesale trade; r e ­
tail trade; finan ce, in su ran ce, and rea l estate; and s e r v ic e s . M ajor
industry groups excluded fro m these studies a re governm ent operations
and the con stru ction and extra ctive in d u stries. E stablishm ents having
few er than a p r e s c r ib e d num ber of w ork ers are om itted a lso becau se
they furnish in su fficien t em ploym ent in the occupations studied to w a r ­
rant in clusion. W h erever p o s s ib le , separate tabulations a re provided
fo r each of the broad industry d iv ision s.
These su rveys are conducted on a sam ple b a sis b eca u se of the
u n n ecessa ry co st involved in surveying a ll establish m en ts. To obtain
appropriate a c c u ra cy at m inim um co s t, a g rea ter p rop ortion of large
than of sm all establishm ents is studied.
In com bining the data, how ­
e v e r, all establishm ents are given their appropriate weight. E stim ates
based on the establishm ents studied are p resen ted , th e re fo re , as r e ­
lating to all establishm ents in the industry grouping and a re a , e x ­
cept fo r those below the m inim um size studied.
Occupations and Earnings

sifica tio n is b ased on a uniform set of job d escrip tion s designed to
take account of in terestablishm ent variation in duties within the sam e
jo b . (See appendix fo r listing of these d e scrip tio n s.) Earnings data are
presented (in the A -s e r ie s tables) fo r the follow in g types of occu p a­
tions: (a) O ffice c le r ic a l; (b) p ro fe ssio n a l and technical; (c) m ainte­
nance and pow erplant; and (d) cu stodial and m aterial m ovem en t.

O ccupational em ploym ent and earnings data are shown fo r
fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s , i. e . , t h o s e h i r e d t o w o r k a regu lar w eekly sch ed ­
ule in the given occupational cla s s ifica tio n .
Earnings data exclude
prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olidays, and
late sh ifts.
N onproduction bonuses are excluded a ls o , but c o s t - o fliving bonuses and incentive earnings are included.
W here w eekly
hours are re p orted , as fo r o ffice c le r ic a l occu p ation s, refe re n ce is
to the w o rk schedules (rounded to the n ea rest half h our) fo r which
S traight-tim e sa la rie s are paid; average w eekly earnings fo r these
occupations have been rounded to the n ea rest half d olla r.

A vera g e earnings of m en and w om en a re presen ted separately
fo r selected occupations in w hich both sexes are com m only em ployed.
D iffe re n ce s in pay le v e ls of m en and w om en in these occupations are
la rg e ly due to ( l ) d iffe ren ces in the distribution of the sexes among
industries and establish m en ts; (2) d ifferen ces in s p e c ific duties p e r ­
fo rm e d , although the occupations are a p p rop riately cla ss ifie d within
the sam e su rvey jo b d escrip tion ; and (3) d ifferen ces in length of s e r v ­
ice or m e r it review when individual sa la ries are adjusted on this basis.
L onger average s e r v ic e of m en would resu lt in higher average pay
when both sexes are em ployed within the sam e rate range.
Job
d escrip tion s used in cla ssify in g em p loyees in these su rveys are usu­
a lly m o re gen era lized than those used in individual establishm ents to
allow fo r m in o r d iffe ren ces among establishm ents in sp e c ific duties
p e rfo rm e d .

The occupations selected fo r study are com m on to a va riety
of manufacturing and nonm anufacturing in d u stries. O ccupational c la s -

1 R ailroa d s, fo r m e r ly excluded fr o m the scop e o f these studies,
w ere included in all o f the areas studied sin ce July 1959, except
B altim ore, B uffalo, C leveland, and Seattle.
R ailroad s a re now in ­
cluded in the scop e o f all la b o r-m a rk e t wage su rv ey s.




O ccupational em ploym ent estim ates rep resen t the total in all
establishm ents within the scop e of the study and not the num ber actu ­
ally su rveyed. B ecause of d ifferen ces in occupational stru ctu re among
establish m en ts, the estim ates of occupational em ploym ent obtained
fro m the sam ple of establishm ents studied serv e only to indicate the
rela tive im portan ce of the jo b s studied. These d ifferen ces in o c c u ­
pational stru ctu re do not m a teria lly a ffect the a ccu ra cy of the ea rn ­
ings data.




2

Table 1.

E stablishm ents and w orkers within scope of survey and number studied in San Bernardino— iverside—
R
Ontario,
C alif. , 1 by m ajor industry division, 2 September I960
N um ber of establishm ents
Industry division

A ll divisions __________________________________________________

Within scope
of study 3

W orkers in establishm ents
Within scope
of study

Studied

Studied

.

205

85

56, 000

4 4 ,7 2 0

M anu facturing___________________________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ____________________________________________ _
Transportation, communication, and
other public u tilitie s4 _____________________________________
W holesale trade 5 ____________________________________________
Retail trade 5 ________________________________________________
Finance, insurance, and real estate 5 ___________________
Services 5 ’ 6 _________________________________________________

78
127

37
48

2 4 ,7 0 0
31, 300

20, 850
23, 870

19
20
42
17
29

13
6
15
6
8

1 4 ,9 0 0
2 ,7 0 0
7, 200
3 ,4 0 0
3, 100

1 4 ,4 3 0
1, 250
4 ,7 1 0
2 ,4 0 0
1, 080

1 The San Bernardino— iverside—
R
Ontario Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea (Riverside and San Bernardino Counties).
The "w o rk ers within scope of study" estim ates shown in this table provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and
com position of the labor force included in the survey. The estim ates are not intended, however, to serve as a ba sis of com ­
parison with other area employment indexes to m easure employment trends or lev els since ( l) planning of wage surveys re ­
quires the use of establishm ent data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) sm all establishm ents
are excluded from the scope of survey.
2 The 1957 revised edition of the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual was used in classifying establishm ents by in­
dustry division. M ajor changes from the ea rlier edition (used in the B ureau 's labor market wage surveys conducted prior to
July 1958) are the transfer of m ilk pasteurization plants and read y-m ixed concrete establishm ents from trade (wholesale or
retail) to m anufacturing, and the transfer of radio and television broadcasting from serv ice s to the transportation, com m uni­
cation, and other public utilities division.
3 Includes all establishm ents with total employment at or above the m in im u m -size lim itation (50 em ployees). A ll outlets
(within the area) of com panies in such industries as trade, finance, auto repair serv ice s, and m otion-picture theaters are con­
sidered as 1 establishm ent.
4 Taxicabs and service s incidental to water transportation were excluded.
5 This industry division is represented in estim ates for "a ll in d u strie s" and "nonm anufacturing" in the se rie s A tables.
Separate presentation of data for this division is not made for one or m ore of the following reasons: (1) Em ploym ent in the
division is too sm all to provide enough data to m erit separate study, (2) the sample was not designed initially to perm it sepa­
rate presentation, (3) response was insufficient or inadequate to perm it separate presentation, and (4) there is possibility of
disclosu re of individual establishm ent data.
6 H otels; personal serv ice s; business serv ice s; automobile repair shops; motion pictures; nonprofit m em bership organi­
zations; and engineering and architectural se rv ic e s.

Table 2. Percents of increase in standard weekly salaries and
straight-tim e hourly earnings for selected occupational
groups in San Bernardino— iverside—
R
Ontario, C alif. ,
N ovem ber 1959 to September I960
Occupational groups

rl < -ri ra 1 (wr»m»»n)
=
»
Industrial nurses (w o m en )-------------Skilled maintenance (m e n ) -------------Unskilled plant (m en )------------------------

A ll industries

3. 3
4 .7
2. 5
2. 8

Manufacturing

2 .4
5. 1
2. 5
3 .4

3

Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
P resen ted in table 2 are p ercen ts of change in sa la ries of
women o ffice c le r ic a l w ork ers and industrial n urses, and in average
earnings of se le cte d plant w ork er groups.
F o r o ffic e c le r ic a l w ork ers and industrial n u rses, the p e r ­
cents of change relate to average weekly sa la rie s fo r n orm al hours
of w ork, that is , the standard w ork schedule fo r which stra igh t-tim e
sa la ries are paid. F o r plant w ork er groups, they m easu re changes
in straig h t-tim e hourly earnings, excluding prem ium pay fo r o v e r ­
tim e and fo r w ork on weekends, h olidays, and late shifts. The p e r ­
centages are based on data fo r selected key occupations and include
m ost of the n u m erica lly im portant job s within each group.
The o f ­
fice c le r ic a l data are based on women in the follow ing 18 jo b s: B ille r s,
m achine (billing m ach in e); bookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to rs, c la ss A
and B; C om ptom eter o p e ra to rs; c le r k s , file , cla ss A and B; cle rk s,
o r d e r ; c le rk s , p a y ro ll; keypunch o p e ra to rs; o ffic e g ir ls ; s e c r e ta r ie s ;
sten ograph ers, gen eral; sw itchboard o p e ra to rs; sw itchboard o p e r a to r recep tion ists; tabulating-m achine op e ra to rs; tra n scrib in g -m a ch in e o p ­
e ra to rs, gen eral; and typ ists, cla ss A and B. The industrial nurse
data are based on wom en industrial n u rses.
Men in the follow ing
10 sk illed maintenance job s and 3 unskilled job s w ere included in the
plant w ork er data: Skilled— ca rp en ters; e le ctricia n s; m ach in ists; m e ­
chanics; m ech a n ics, autom otive; m illw righ ts; pain ters; p ip efitters;
sh eet-m etal w o rk e rs; and tool and die m ak ers; unskilled— ja n itors,
p o rte rs, and c le a n e rs; la b o r e r s , m a teria l handling; and watchmen.
A verage weekly sa la ries or average hourly earnings w ere
com puted fo r each o f the selected occu pation s.
The average s a l­
aries o r hourly earnings w ere then m ultiplied by the average e m p lo y ­
ment in the jo b during the months indicated in the title of table 2.




These weighted earnings fo r individual occupations w ere then totaled
to obtain an aggregate fo r each occupational group. F in ally, the ratio
of these group aggregates fo r the one y ea r to the aggregate fo r the
other yea r was com puted and the d ifferen ce between the resu lt and
100 is the p ercen t o f change fro m the one p eriod to the other.
The p ercen t of change m ea su res, p rin cip a lly , the effects of
(1) gen eral sa la ry and wage changes; (2) m e rit o r other in crea ses
in pay re ce iv e d by individual w ork ers while in the sam e jo b ; and
(3) changes in the la b o r fo r c e such as la b or tu rn over, fo r c e expan­
sion s, fo r c e reductions, and changes in the p rop ortion s of w ork ers
em ployed by establishm ents with differen t pay le v e ls. Changes in the
la b or fo r c e can cause in crea ses o r d e cre a se s in the occupational
averages without actual wage changes. F o r exam ple, a fo r c e expansion
might in cre a se the p rop ortion o f low er paid w ork ers in a sp e cific
occupation and resu lt in a drop in the a verage, w hereas a reduction
in the p rop ortion o f lo w er paid w ork ers would have the opposite effect.
The m ovem ent o f a high-paying establishm ent out o f an area could
cause the average earnings to drop, even though no change in rates
o c c u r r e d in other area establishm ents.
The use of constant em ploym ent weights elim inates the effects
of changes in the p ro p ortion of w ork ers rep resen ted in each job in ­
cluded in the data.
Nor are the p ercen ts of change influenced by
changes in standard w ork schedules o r in prem ium pay fo r ov ertim e,
sin ce they are based on pay fo r straig h t-tim e hours.
Indexes fo r the p eriod 1953 to I960 fo r w ork ers in 20 m a jor
la b or m arkets w ill appear in BLS Bull. 1265-62, Wages and Related
B enefits, 60 L abor M arkets, W inter 1959-60.

A- Occupational Earnings

4

Table A-l. Office Occupations
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Bernardino—
Riverside—
Ontario, Calif. , September I960)
Avekage
of
w
orkers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
Weekly
(Standard;

Weekly
earnings ,
(Standard)

$

$

$

$

50. 00

55. 00

60. 00

65. 00

$
70. 00

$
75. 00

$

45. 00

80. 00

$
8 5 .0 0

$
90. 00

$
95.00

so . on

Sex, occupation, and industry division

5 5 .0 0

60. 00

65. 00

70. 00

75. 00

80. 00

85. 00

90 . 00

95. 00

100.00

-

$
$
$
$
$
$
100.00 105.00 1 1 0 . 0 0 115.00 120.0 0 125.00 130.00

S

105.00 11 0 .0 0

115.00

-

12 0.00

125.00 130.00

and
over

Men
$101. 50
TTTZ7W

■

"

4 1 .5
4 1 .5

91. 00
90 . 00

-

-

-

34

40. 0

1 0 1 .5 0

-

-

29

40. 0

64. 00

2

9

65. 00

5

_

58
42

4 1 .0
41. 0

C le r k s, order ---------------------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ----------------------------------------------------------

40
37

Tabulating-m achine op erators, class B ------------------------

-

-

"

C le r k s, accounting, class A ------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------------- ------------------

"

"

4
4

-

2

■

3

2

2
2

6
2

2
2

4
3

-

1
1

3
3

-

_

17

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

7

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

"

'

-

1
'

-

-

-

-

4

“

~

"

~

“

2
2

4
4

~

-

-

'

~

-

-

-

-

-

9
7

7
7

9
7

_

5
5

12
l2

1

2
1

1

2

1

1

1

8

7

-

-

-

1

1

1

_

_

1

3

-

_

_

_

'

"

"
5
3

4

"

"

4
4

4
4

-

-

1

-

6

2

-

-

8
6

2
2

4

“

5
4

1

1
-

W omen
B ille r s , machine (billing m achine) -------------------------------B ille r s , machine (bookkeeping m achine) ----------------------

30

3 9 .5

4

4

10

3

2

_

6

_

_

5

_

6

_

96
96

92
92

60
— 37

49
37

14

11

10

_

12

9

9

Bookkeeping-m achine op erators, class A --------------------

28

38. 5

83. 50

_

Bookkeeping-m achine op erators, class B -------------------Nonmanufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------

341
321

40. 0
40. 0

60 . 00
59. 00

9
9

C le r k s, accounting, class A ------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ----------------------------------------------------------

59

3 9 .5
39. 5

85. 00
85. 50

-

-

-

-

“

-

1

17
14

5
3

2

"

13
7

4

-

5
3

3

T?

2

~

40. 0
40 . 0
40. 0

2
2

19
9

19

34

14

15

13

4

20

11

14

3

5

2
1

6
1

13

8
7

1

10

19
15
4

3

6

67. 50

3

5

7

6
2

6

-

1

4

1

-

-

“

2
2

-

-

3
3

18

4
4

11
1
10

3

4

1
2

2
2

2
2

12
8

"

18

23
13

18

6

1

-

10

17

6
33
2T

C lerk s, accounting, class B --------------------------------------Manufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing -----------------------------------------------------

154

C le r k s, file , class B ---------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------

40

87
67

70. 00

72. Oo
62 . 00

27

40. 0
3 9 .5

58. 00

10
10

C le r k s, payroll -------------------------------------------------------------------Manufacturing --------------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ----------------------------------------------------------

92
-------5T
41

40. 5
40 . 0
4 1 .0

74. 50
73. SO
76. 00

"

8
10

Keypunch operators ----------------------------------------------------------Manufacturing --------------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ----------------------------------------------------------

107
49
58

40. 0
40. 0
40. 0

85. 50
82. 50
88 . 00

-

-

Secretaries -------------------------------------------------------------------------Manufacturing ----------------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------Public u tilities 2 -------------------------------------------------------

435
FF7
238
57

40.
40.
40.
40.

0
0

89. 00
94. 00
85. 00
9 6 .5 0

-

"

-

Stenographers, g e n e r a l-----------------------------------------------------Manufacturing ----------------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------Public utilities 2 -------------------------------------------------------

320

0
0
0
0

78. 50

-

5
5
-

17
16

70

40.
40.
40.
40.

-

1

-

79
39

40 . 5
4 1 .0

10
10

7
7

11
11

13

3

11

1

Switchboard operators ------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table,




12 2
198

0

0

85. Oo
74. 50
89 . 00
71. 50
66 . 00

7

3

8

"

4

-

-

"

-

-

-

“

-

17
io
7

42
37
5

14

1

5

3

2

5

-

59

"

-

-

-

5

5

2

1

1

2

3

4

4
3

9

8

2

7

1

7

1

11
1
10

7
3
4

16
2

14
14
-

18
18
-

34

66

36

Z7

61
26
35
7

47

12
22
1

21

17

27
7

30

2 (T
16

6

15

32

32
5
27

25

9

10
8

25
13

11"

6

37

5

14
14

3

10

12
6

2

22
22

5
4

7

3

2

2

6
6

4
4

1

-

-

1

1

45
_ n —
34

53
T7----36

11
21
10
1
1

39
4

48

18
'

-

-

-

8
5
3

2

-

-

16
14

2

_

_
-

-

4
3

3
------ 3—
"

_

_

-

12

9

6
8

1
-

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
Table A-l. O ffice Occupations-Continued
(Average stra igh t-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area b asis
by industry division, San Bernardino—R iversid e—Ontario, C alif. , September I960)
N U M B ER OF W O RK ERS R E CE IVIN G S T R A IG H T-TIM E W E E K L Y EA RN IN G S OF—

A verage
$
Weekly
Weekly
earnings .
hours ,
(Standard)1 (Standard)

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

45. 00
and

50. 00

55. 00

60. 00

65. 00

70. 00

75. 00

80. 00

85. 00

$

60. 00

65. 00

70. 00

75. 00

80. 00

85. 00

90 . 00

100.00

110.00

115.00

120.00

$

105.00

125.00

130.00

100.00

95. 00

$

$

95.00

90. 00

5 0 .0 0 . 55. 00

Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

105.00

110.00

115.00

120.00

125.00

130.00

and
over

$

$

$

$

$

$

Women — Continued
Switchboard o p e r a to r -r e c e p tio n ists -------------------------------Manufacturing ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------------------------------------------------

75
41
34

40. 0
40. 0
39. 5

$ 6 6 . 50
. 50
• 6 4 .5 0

7

-

T yp ists, class A ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Manufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------------------------------------------------

74

40. 0
40. 0
40. 0

73. 50

-

-

78'. 50

-

-

T yp ists, class B ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Manufacturing -------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------Nonmanufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------Public utilities 2 -------------------------------------------------------

45
29

89

190

26

67. 50

9

8

9
5
4

8

8

14

5
3

5
3

44

53

6

8

5

3

18

5
7
82

4

1
1
0
1
0

2

4

5
4

5

6

2
"

3

-

2
1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

"

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
8

"

-

6
6

53

22
31
1

-

3

67. 50

8
1
2

20
1

0

24

73

6

-

8

"

"

1
1

45

8
2

1
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

5
3

"

1

2
2

"

17

"

1
2

2
2

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

'

3

61.00

14

3

6
1
2

-

63. 00

9

13
7

5
5

-

65. 00

40. 0
■ 40.7)
“
40. 0
40. 0

2 79

7

68

'

"

"

'

'

"

"

“

“

-

-

"

-

Standard hours reflect the workweek for which em ployees receive their regular stra igh t-tim e salarie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation, communication, and other public u tilities.

Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations
(A verage straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area b asis
by industry division, San Bernardino—Riverside—Ontario, C alif. , September I960)
NUM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVING STR AIGH T-TIM E W EEKLY EARN INGS OF

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number

o
f

Weekly

y

(Standard)

]
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
105.00 no .oo 115.00 $
120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 155.00
65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 85. 00 90. 00 95.00
165.00
and
under
105.00
115.00
125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 155.00 160.00 165.00 170.00
70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 85. 00 90. 00 95. 00

100.00

1

Weekly j
earnings
(Standard)

100.00

160.00

110.00

120.00

j

Men
_

-

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
40. 0
40. 0

$1 31 . 00
13 6 .0 0

Draftsm en, junior

46

40. 0

10 0 .5 0

_

2

28
25

40. 0
40 . 0

101

1

-

_________________________

|
-

12 0 .5 0

1
1
1

.

-

85
59
26
25

120.00

-

-

D raftsm en senior __________________________
Manufacturing __________________________
Nonmanufacturing -------------- ---------------______ _______
Public utilities 2 __

-

"

-

-

3

3

3

4

1

_

4
4

4
3

7
5

2
2
|

3

14

3
3
3

4

-

3
3
-

6
2
2

6
6
6

1
0
2
8
8

1

6

5

_

_

9
9

-

-

4

3

1

6

4
2
2
2

6
5
1
1
"

_

2
2

1
1

9
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

.

_

_

1
1
1
1

.

9
9
-

Women
N u rses, industrial (registered ) . ..
Manufacturing __________________________

. 00
TO4 .0 0
i
1

J

2
2

6
6

1
1

-

-

-

j

Standard hours reflect the workweek for which em ployees receive their regular stra igh t-tim e sa la rie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation, communication, and other public u tilities.




6
Table A-3. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(A verage stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings for men in selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry d ivision, San Bernardino— iversid e— ntario, Calif. , Septem ber I960)
R
O
NUMBER OF WORKEBS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

Average
hourly 1 Under
earnin
gs $
2. 00

C arpen ters, m ain tenan ce---------------------------------------Manufacturing----------------------------------------------------- —

120
74

$ 2 . 74
2 .8 3

E le ctricia n s, m a in te n a n c e -----------------------------------M anufacturing------------------------------------------------------N onm an ufactu ring----------------------------------------------Public utilities 2 --------------------- ------------------------

300
2 65
35
35

E ngin eers, sta tio n a ry ----------------------------------------------

$

2. 00
and
under
2. 10

$ 2. 10

$ 2. 20

$ 2. 30

$ 2 .4 0

$ 2. 50

$ 2. 60

$ 2. 70

$ 2. 80

* 2 .9 0

$3. 00

*3. 10

$ 3. 20

* 3. 30

$ 3 .4 0

*3. 50

$ 3. 60

2. 20

2. 30

2 .4 0

2. 50

2. 60

2. 70

2. 80

2. 90

3. 00

3. 10

3. 20

3. 30

3 .4 0

3. 50

_ 3 , 60

and
over

-

-

3
-

-

-

-

■

45
5

3
2

2
2

19
19

14
14

-

4
4
-

3
3
-

10
3
7
7

-

7
6
1
1

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

8

8

-

-

1
1

4
4

5
1

13
9

-

-

16
16

_

■

34

23

78

102

213

4

-

-

-

.

_

-

■

1
1

_

■

_

6
6

18
11

4
4

1
1

-

5
5
-

9
1
8
8

8
4
4
4

2

29
28 '

~

■

3. 09
3. 10
3 .0 8
3. 08

-

-

"

26

3 .0 4

-

-

F ire m en , stationary b o i le r -----------------------------------M an u factu rin g ------------------------------------------------------

44
...... '31

2 .4 5
2 . 58

5

H elp e rs, tra des, m ain tenan ce-------------------------------

463

2 .4 3

7

M achin ists, m ain tenan ce---------------------------------------Manuf a cturing-------------------------------------------------------

282

3. 06
3. 06

_

TE1

M ech anics, automotive (m ain tenan ce)----------------Manufa cturing------------------------------------------------------N onm an ufactu ring----------------------------------------------Public utilities 2 ----------------------------------------------

180
129
51
50

2 . 87
2 .9 ?
2. 63
2. 63

-

-

M echanics, m a in te n a n ce ---------------------------------------M anufacturing-------------------------------------------------------

408
390

2 .9 5
2 .9 8

9
■

■

O i l e r s --------------------------------------------------------------------------Manufa cturing--------------------------------------------------------

38
31

2. 42
2 . 4Z

-

-

■

P ain ters, m ain tenan ce--------------------------------------------Manufa cturing-------------------------------------------------------

56
43

2. 71
2 . 74

-

-

-

"

P ip efitte rs, m ain ten an ce---------------------------------------M an u factu rin g------------------------------------------------------

81
81

2 .9 4
2 .9 4

-

-

"

Tool and die m a k e r s -------------------------------------------------

44
44

3. 15
3. 15

M a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------------------------------------------

1
2
3

~

-

2

“

18
18
17

3
1
2
2

-

-

-

9
9

24
24

9
9

6
6

2
1

14
14

14
14

-

-

-

15
5

10
9

-

-

-

2
2
-

~

-

-

-

"

“

_

5
5

-

-

-

-

Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on w eekends, holidays, and late sh ifts.
Transportation, com m unication, and other public u tilities.
W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s:
3 at $ 3 .8 0 to $ 3 .9 0 ; 3 at $4 to $ 4 . 10.




4
4

37

37
37
-

175
173
2
2

25
1
24
24

1
1
-

-

“

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

36

_

_

_

36
1
1

“

_

_

_

_

_

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

39
39

73
73

134
131

5
-

1
1

_

_

-

28
22
6
6

20
18
2
2

86
78
8
8

3
3
3

-

-

55
54

12
12

105
98

152
152

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

“

■

-

2

30
Z8

-

"

-

7
7

17
16

6
6

-

-

-

-

"

"

-

"

3
3

9
9

46
46

18
18

-

-

-

1
1

-

8
8

2
2

20
ZO

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

“

1
“

7
7

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

-

7
Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(A verage stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry d ivision, San Bernardino— iversid e—
R
Ontario, C a lif ., September I960)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
N ber
um
of
w
orkers

Occupation1 and industry division

Average $
$
hourly 2 0 .9 0
1 .0 0
earnings
and
under
1 .1 0
1 .0 0

Guards ______________________________________________
Manufacturing

135
124

$ 2 .4 5
2 .4 4

Janitors, p o r te r s, and clean ers ________________
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing ______________________________
Public u tilitie s3

349
188
161
42

L a b o r e rs, m aterial handling ____________________
Manufacturing __________________________________
Nonmanufacturing ______________________________
Order fille r s
P a c k e r s, shipping
Manufacturing

$
1 .1 0

$
1 .2 0

$
1 .3 0

$
1 .4 0

$
1 .5 0

$
1 .6 0

$
1 .7 0

$
1 .8 0

$
1 .9 0

$
2 . 00

$
2 .1 0

$2 .2 0

$
2 .3 0

$
2 .4 0

$
2 .5 0

*2.6 0

*2.7 0

$
2 .8 0

*2.90

$
3 .0 0

1 .2 0

1 .3 0

1 .4 0

1 .5 0

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

2. 10

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2. 80

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3. 10

1
1

8
8

2
2

10
10

13
13

11
7

13
13

23
16

54
54

.

......

-

-

-

-

1 .8 8
2. 05
1 .6 8
2 . 10

1
1
-

24
24

5
5

18
4
14
"

21

177
Io5
71

2 .0 2
2 . 12
1 .8 8

_

_

-

-

-

-

6
6

92

. _

"

1 .8 0

_

_

2 .3 1
2 .3 1

-

64
------54—

-

_

-

-

-

-

12
10
2
-

12
10
2
'

30
26
4
2

42
13
29
9

31
23
8
7

51
17
34
14

78
68
10
10

14
14
"

3
1
2
"

_
"

_
"

_
-

_
“

_
-

_
"

20
----- 8
12

3
3

_
-

6
6

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

21

-

7
2
5
-

2
2

6
6

3
3

9
9

24
15
9

4
4

24
22
2

3
1
2

7
7

11
4
7

4
4

"

-

45
45
"

-

-

_

_

12

20

12

8

9

6

_

2

1

_

5

3

_

5

9

_

_

_

-

-

"

-

5
5

"

-

-

4
4

1
1

"

22
22

14
14

-

-

-

-

6
6

6
6

-

6
6

8
5

1
1

_

7
6

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

12
3

Receiving clerk s __________
___________________
Nonmanufacturing __________ _________________

42
37

2 . 06
2 . 07

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

"

-

-

-

-

5
5

Shipping and receiving clerk s ___________________

30

2 .4 8

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

T ru ck d rivers4_______________________________________
M an u fac tu rin g ___________________________________
Nonmanufacturing
_
_
Public u tilities3

811
572
239
38

2 .5 6
2 .6 7
2 .3 2
2 .3 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

6
1

21
10
11
1

28
1
27
2

31
12
19
1

49

1 .9 3

_

_

1

_

10

_

5

5

_

5

T ru ck d rivers, m edium (IV 2 to and
including 4 tons) . _
. .
... .
Manufacturing ______________________________
______________
Nonmanufacturing ________

127
76
51

2 . 14
2 . 14
2 . 14

_
_

_
_

_
_
-

1
_
1

16
10
6

2
_
2

16
12
4

11
_
11

6
6

-

T ru ck d rivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
tra iler type) ___________________________ _____
Manufacturing _______________________________

210
150

2 .7 7
2 .7 3

1
-

T ru ck ers, power (forklift)
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing ______________________________

284
205
79

2 .4 1
2 .3 9
2 .4 5

4
4

T ru ck d rivers, light (under 1 V? tons) _

1
2
3
4

.

1

_

_

_

6

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

_

-

1

1

10

5

-

-

i

1

1

4

11
6
5

-

-

-

Data lim ited to men w o rk ers.
Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on w eekends, h olidays,
Transportation, com m unication, and other public u tilities.
Includes all d rivers regard le ss of size and type of truck operated.




10

-

-

and late sh ifts.

■

-

5

-

6
-------6“

_

-

4
4

2
1

3
3

2
2

-

-

4
4

-

-

_

_

3

_

3

7

16

_

1

_

_

.

12

6
6
-

27
17
10
1

19
12
7
2

29
19
10
10

7
6
1
1

85
77
8
6

109
60
49
1

159
151
8
8

61
41
20
1

199
159
40
"

5

13

_

5

_

_

_

21
16
5

8
6
2

12
9
3

3
2
1

17
12
5

14
3
11

_

_
-

_
-

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

1
1

2
-

3
3

14
14

-

21
21

26
26

12
1
11

48
45
3

1
1

3

-

_

_

-

1

1

-

3

_

_

102
92
10

-

86
86
2 _
2

58
41
37
1
36

M .

4

1
1
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-




9

Appendix:

Occupational Descriptions

T h e primary p u rp ose o f preparin g jo b d e s c r ip tio n s for the B u reau ’ s w age su r v e y s is to a s s i s t its
fie ld s t a ff in c la s s if y in g in to ap propria te o c c u p a t io n s w ork ers w ho are e m p loy ed under a v a r ie ty o f p a y ro ll
t itle s and d iffe r e n t w ork arrangem ents from e sta b lis h m e n t to e sta b lis h m e n t and from area to a rea . T h is is
e s s e n t ia l in order to perm it the grou pin g o f o c c u p a t io n a l w a g e ra tes re p resen tin g com p a ra b le jo b c o n te n t.
B e c a u s e o f th is e m p h a sis on in te re sta b lish m e n t and in terarea c o m p a ra b ility o f o c c u p a t io n a l c o n te n t, the
B u reau ’ s jo b d e s c r ip t io n s may d iffe r s ig n ific a n t ly from th o s e in u se in in d iv id u a l e s ta b lis h m e n ts or th o s e
prepared for oth er p u r p o s e s .
In a p p ly in g th e s e jo b d e s c r ip t io n s , the B u r e a u 's fie ld e c o n o m is t s are
in stru cte d to e x c lu d e w ork in g s u p e r v is o r s , a p p r e n tic e s , le a rn e rs , b e g in n e r s, tr a in e e s , h a n d ica p p e d w ork ers,
part-tim e, tem porary, and p rob a tion a ry w ork ers.

O F F IC E

BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

P rep a res sta te m e n ts, b i lls , and in v o i c e s on a m ach in e other
than an ordin ary or e le c tr o m a tic ty p ew riter. May a ls o k e e p r e c o r d s as
to b illin g s or sh ip p in g c h a rg e s or perform oth er c l e r i c a l w ork in c id e n ta l
to b illin g o p e r a tio n s . F or w ag e stu d y p u r p o s e s , b ille r s , m a ch in e, are
c l a s s i f i e d by type o f m a ch in e, a s fo llo w s :

O p era tes a b o o k k e e p in g m a ch in e (R em in g ton R a n d , E llio t t
F is h e r , Sundstrand, B u rrou gh s, N a tion a l C a sh R e g is te r , w ith or w ith ou t
a typ ew riter k ey b oa rd ) to k e e p a r e co r d o f b u s in e s s t r a n s a c t io n s .

Biller, machine (billing machine)— U s e s a s p e c ia l b illin g ma­
ch in e (M oon H o p k in s, E llio t t F is h e r , B u rrou gh s, e t c . , w h ich are
co m b in a tio n ty p in g and a d din g m a ch in e s ) to prepare b ills and in ­
v o i c e s from c u s to m e r s ’ p u rch a se o rd e rs , in tern a lly prepared ord ers,
sh ip p in g m em orandum s, e t c . U s u a lly in v o lv e s a p p lic a t io n o f p red e­
term ined d is c o u n ts and sh ip p in g c h a r g e s and entry ot n e c e s s a r y
e x t e n s io n s , w h ich may or may n ot be com p u ted on the b illin g ma­
c h in e , and to ta ls w h ich are a u to m a tica lly a ccu m u la ted by m a ch in e.
T h e o p e ra tio n u su a lly in v o lv e s a la rg e number o f ca rb on c o p ie s o f
the b i ll b e in g prepared and is often d on e on a fa n fo ld m a ch in e.

Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine)— U s e s a b o o k k e e p in g
m ach in e (Sundstraiid, E llio t t F is h e r , R em in gton R a n d , e t c . , w h ich
may or may not have ty p ew riter k e y b o a rd ) to prepare c u s t o m e r s ’
b ills a s part o f the a c c o u n ts r e c e iv a b le o p e r a tio n . G e n e r a lly in ­
v o lv e s the sim u lta n eou s en try o f fig u re s on c u s to m e r s ’ le d g e r r e c ­
ord. T h e m ach in e a u to m a tic a lly a c c u m u la te s fig u r e s on a num ber
o f v e r t ic a l colu m n s and c o m p u te s and u s u a lly p rin ts a u to m a tica lly
the d e b it or c re d it b a la n c e s . D o e s n ot in v o lv e a k n o w le d g e o f b o o k ­
k e e p in g .
Works from uniform and stan dard ty p e s o f s a le s and
c re d it s l ip s .




Class A — K e e p s a s e t o f r e co r d s req u irin g a k n o w le d g e o f
and e x p e r ie n c e in b a s i c b o o k k e e p in g p r in c ip le s and fa m ilia rity w ith
the structure o f the p a rticu la r a c c o u n tin g sy ste m u s e d . D eterm in es
proper re co r d s and d is trib u tio n o f d e b it an d c r e d it item s to be u se d
in e a c h p h a se o f the w ork . May prepare c o n s o lid a t e d r e p o r t s , b a la n c e
s h e e t s , and oth er r e c o r d s by hand.
Class B — K e e p s a r e c o r d o f on e or m ore p h a s e s o r s e c t i o n s o f
a s e t o f re co r d s u s u a lly req u irin g lit tle k n o w le d g e o f b a s i c b o o k ­
k e e p in g P h a s e s or s e c t io n s in clu d e a c c o u n t s p a y a b le , p a y r o ll,
c u s to m e r s ’ a c c o u n ts (n ot in clu d in g a sim p le type o f b illin g d e s c r ib e d
under b ille r , m a ch in e), c o s t d is tr ib u tio n , e x p e n s e d is tr ib u tio n , in ­
v en tory c o n tro l, e t c .
May c h e c k or a s s i s t in p reparation o f tr ia l
b a la n c e s and prepare c o n t r o l s h e e ts for the a c c o u n tin g departm en t.

CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A — Under g e n e ra l d ir e c tio n o f a b o o k k e e p e r or a c c o u n t ­
an t, h as r e s p o n s ib ilit y for k e e p in g on e or more s e c t i o n s o f a c o m ­
p le te s e t o f b o o k s or r e c o r d s r e la tin g to on e p h a s e o f an e s t a b lis h ­
m en t's b u s in e s s tr a n s a c t io n s . Work in v o lv e s p o s tin g and b a la n c in g
su b s id ia r y le d g e r or le d g e r s s u c h as a c c o u n ts r e c e iv a b le or a c c o u n ts

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CLERK, ACCOUNTING— Continued
p a y a b le ; ex a m in in g and c o d in g in v o i c e s or v o u c h e r s w ith p ro p e r a c ­
c o u n tin g d is tr ib u tio n ; r e q u ire s ju dgm en t and e x p e r ie n c e in m aking
proper a s s ig n a t io n s and a l lo c a t i o n s . May a s s i s t in p rep a rin g , a d ­
ju stin g and c lo s in g jou rn a l e n tr ie s ; may d ir e c t c l a s s B a c c o u n t in g
c le r k s .

Class B — Under s u p e r v is io n , perform s on e or more ro u tin e a c ­
co u n tin g o p e r a tio n s s u c h a s p o s tin g sim p le jou rn a l v o u c h e r s o r a c ­
c o u n ts p a y a b le v o u c h e r s , en terin g v o u c h e r s in v o u c h e r r e g is t e r s ;
r e c o n c ilin g bank a c c o u n t s ; p o s tin g s u b s id ia r y le d g e r s c o n t r o lle d
by g e n e r a l le d g e r s , or p o s tin g sim p le c o s t a c c o u n tin g d a ta . T h is
jo b d o e s not requ ire a k n o w le d g e o f a c c o u n tin g and b o o k k e e p in g
p r in c ip le s but is fou nd in o f f i c e s in w h ich the m ore rou tin e a c c o u n t ­
in g w ork is s u b d iv id e d on a fu n c tio n a l b a s is am ong s e v e r a l w o r k e r s .

CLERK, PAYROLL
C om p u tes w a g e s o f com p a n y e m p lo y e e s and e n te rs the n e c e s ­
sa ry data on the p a y r o ll s h e e t s . D u tie s in v o lv e : C a lc u la tin g w o r k e r s '
ea rn in g s b a s e d on tim e or p r o d u c tio n r e c o r d s ; p o s tin g c a lc u la t e d data
on p a y r o ll s h e e t, sh o w in g in form ation su ch a s w o r k e r 's nam e, w ork in g
d a y s , tim e, ra te, d e d u c tio n s for in s u r a n ce , and to ta l w a g e s d u e . May
m ake ou t p a y c h e c k s and a s s i s t p a ym a ster in m aking up and d is tr ib u t­
in g p a y e n v e lo p e s . May u se a c a lc u la t in g m a ch in e.

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
Prim ary duty is to o p e ra te a C om ptom eter to perform m athem a­
t i c a l co m p u ta tio n s. T h is jo b is n ot to be c o n fu s e d w ith th at o f s t a t is ­
t i c a l or oth er type o f c le r k , w h ich may in v o lv e freq u en t u s e o f a C om p ­
tom eter but, in w h ich , u se o f th is m a ch in e is in c id e n t a l to p erform a n ce
o f oth er d u tie s .

CLERK, FILE
Class A — In an e s t a b lis h e d filin g s y s te m c o n ta in in g a num­
ber o f v a rie d s u b je c t m atter f i l e s , c l a s s i f i e s and in d e x e s c o r r e s ­
p o n d e n c e or oth er m a teria l; may a ls o file th is m a teria l. May k e e p
r e c o r d s o f v a rio u s ty p e s in c o n ju n c t io n w ith f i l e s or may su p e r ­
v is e oth ers in filin g and lo c a t in g m a terial in the f i l e s . M ay p e r ­
form in c id e n t a l c le r i c a l d u tie s .
Class B — P erform s rou tin e f ilin g , u s u a lly o f m a terial th at h a s
a lre a d y b een c l a s s i f i e d or w h ich i s e a s ily id e n t ifia b le , o r lo c a t e s
or a s s i s t s in lo c a t in g m a teria l in f i l e s .
May perform in c id e n t a l
c l e r i c a l d u tie s .

CLERK, ORDER
R e c e iv e s c u s t o m e r s 'o r d e r s for m a terial or m erch a n d ise b y m a il,
p h on e, or p e r s o n a lly . D u tie s in v o lv e any combination o f the following:
Q u otin g p r ic e s to c u s to m e r s ; m akin g ou t an order s h e e t lis t in g the item s
to make up the order; c h e c k in g p r ic e s and q u a n titie s o f ite m s on order
s h e e t; d istrib u tin g order s h e e t s to r e s p e c t iv e departm en ts to b e f i l l e d .
May c h e c k w ith c r e d it departm en t to determ in e c r e d it ratin g o f c u s to m e r ,
a c k n o w le d g e r e c e ip t o f ord ers from c u s to m e r s , fo llo w up o rd e rs to s e e
that th ey h ave been f ill e d , k e e p f i l e o f ord ers r e c e iv e d , and c h e c k s h ip ­
p in g in v o i c e s w ith o r ig in a l o r d e rs .




DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
U nder g e n e ra l s u p e r v is io n and w ith no s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s i­
b i l i t i e s , r e p ro d u c e s m u ltip le c o p i e s o f ty p ew ritten or h an dw ritten matter,
u s in g a M im eograph or D itto m a ch in e. M akes n e c e s s a r y a d ju stm en t su ch
a s fo r in k and p a p er fe e d c o u n te r and c y lin d e r s p e e d . Is n ot req u ired to
prepare s t e n c il or D itto m a ster. May k e e p f ile o f u se d s t e n c ils or D itto
m a ste rs . May so r t, c o lla t e , and s ta p le c o m p le te d m a teria l.

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
U nder g e n e ra l s u p e r v is io n and w ith n o s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s i­
b i l i t i e s , r e c o r d s a c c o u n tin g and s t a t is t ic a l data on ta b u la tin g c a r d s by
p u n ch in g a s e r ie s o f h o le s in the c a r d s in a s p e c i f i e d s e q u e n c e , u s in g
an a lp h a b e t ic a l or a n u m erica l k eyp u n ch m a ch in e , fo llo w in g w ritten in ­
form ation on r e c o r d s . May d u p lic a t e c a r d s by u sin g th e d u p lic a tin g d e ­
v i c e a tta ch e d to m a ch in e. May k e e p f i l e s o f p u n ch c a r d s . May v e r ify
own w ork or w ork o f o th e r s .

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
P erform s v a riou s rou tin e d u tie s s u c h as running e rra n d s, o p ­
era tin g m inor o f f i c e m a ch in es s u c h a s s e a le r s or m a ile r s , o p e n in g and
d is trib u tin g m a il, and oth er m inor c l e r i c a l w ork.

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SECRETARY
P erform s s e c r e ta r ia l and c le r i c a l d u tie s fo r a su p erior in an a d ­
m in istrative or e x e c u tiv e p o s it io n . D u tie s in clu d e m aking ap p oin tm en ts
for su p e rio r; r e c e iv in g p e o p le co m in g in to o f f i c e ; a n sw erin g and m aking
phone c a l l s ; h an dlin g p e r s o n a l and im portant or c o n fid e n t ia l m a il, and
w ritin g rou tin e c o rr e s p o n d e n c e on ow n in itia t iv e ; takin g d ic ta tio n (w h ere
tra n scrib in g m ach in e is not u s e d ) eith er in shorthand or by S ten oty p e or
sim ila r m a ch in e, and tra n scrib in g d ic ta tio n or the r e co r d e d in form ation
re p ro d u ce d on a tr a n scrib in g m a ch in e. May prepare s p e c ia l re p o rts or
m em orandum s for in form a tion o f s u p e r io r .

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
Prim ary duty is to take d ic ta tio n from on e or more p e r s o n s ,
eith er in sh orth an d or by S ten oty p e or sim ila r m a ch in e, in v o lv in g a n or­
mal rou tin e v o c a b u la r y , and to tra n scrib e th is d ic ta tio n on a ty p ew riter.
May a l s o ty p e from w ritten c o p y . May a l s o s e t up and k e e p f i l e s in or­
der, k e e p sim p le r e c o r d s , e t c . Does not include transcribing-machine
work ( s e e tra n scrib in g -m a ch in e o p e ra to r).

STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
Prim ary duty is to take d ic ta tio n from on e or more p e r s o n s
eith er in shorthand or by S ten oty p e or sim ila r m a ch in e, in v o lv in g a v a r ie d
t e c h n ic a l or s p e c ia liz e d v o ca b u la r y su ch a s in le g a l b r ie fs or rep orts on
s c ie n t if i c r e se a r c h and to tra n scrib e th is d ic ta tio n on a ty p ew riter. May
a ls o ty p e from w ritten c o p y . May a ls o s e t up and k e e p f i l e s in ord er,
k eep sim p le r e c o r d s , e t c . Does not include transcribing-machine work.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
O p era tes a s in g le - or m u ltip le -p o s itio n te le p h o n e s w itc h b o a r d .
D u ties in v o lv e h an d lin g in co m in g , o u tg o in g , and in traplan t or o f f i c e c a l l s .
May r e co rd t o ll c a l l s and take m e s s a g e s . May g iv e in form ation to p e r­
s o n s w ho c a l l in , or o c c a s io n a l ly take te le p h o n e o r d e rs . F o r w ork ers
w ho a ls o a c t a s r e c e p t io n is t s s e e s w itch b o a rd o p e r a to r -r e c e p t io n is t .

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
In a d d ition to perform ing d u tie s o f op e ra to r, on a s in g le p o s i ­
tion or m on itor-type sw itch b o a rd , a c t s a s r e c e p t io n is t and may a l s o ty p e
or perform rou tin e c le r i c a l w ork a s part o f regu lar d u tie s . T h is ty p in g
or c l e r i c a l w ork may take the m ajor part o f th is w o r k e r 's tim e w h ile at
sw itch b o a rd .




TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Class A — O p era tes a v a riety o f ta bu la tin g or e le c t r ic a l a c ­
co u n tin g m a ch in e s, ty p ic a lly in clu d in g su ch m a ch in es a s the ta b u ­
la tor, c a lc u la to r , in terpreter, c o lla t o r and o th e rs. P erform s c o m ­
p le te rep ortin g a s sig n m e n ts w ith ou t c l o s e s u p e r v is io n , and perform s
d iffic u lt w iring as req u ired . T h e c o m p le te rep ortin g and ta b u la tin g
a s sig n m e n ts t y p ic a lly in v o lv e a v a rie ty o f lon g and c o m p le x r e ­
p orts w h ich often are o f irregu lar or n onrecu rrin g type requ irin g
som e p la n n in g and s e q u e n c in g o f s t e p s to be ta k en . A s a more
e x p e r ie n c e d op erator, is ty p ic a lly in v o lv e d in trainin g new o p e r a ­
tors in m a ch in e o p e r a tio n s , or p a rtia lly trained o p e ra to rs in w irin g
from diagram s and op era tin g s e q u e n c e s o f lo n g and c o m p le x r ep orts.
Does not include w orkin g su p e r v is o r s perform in g ta b u la tin g -m a ch in e
o p e r a tio n s a n d d a y -to -d a y s u p e r v is io n o f the w ork and p ro d u ctio n o f
a grou p o f ta b u la tin g-m a ch in e o p e r a to rs .
Class B — O p era tes more d iffic u lt ta b u la tin g or e le c t r ic a l a c ­
co u n tin g m a ch in es su c h as the ta b u la tor and c a lc u la t o r , in ad d ition
to the so r te r ,,r e p r o d u c e r , and c o lla t o r . T h is w ork is perform ed under
s p e c i f i c in stru ctio n s and may in clu d e the p erform a n ce o f som e w ir­
ing from d ia gra m s. T h e w ork t y p ic a lly in v o l v e s , for e x a m p le , ta bu ­
la tio n s in v o lv in g a r e p e titiv e a c c o u n tin g e x e r c is e , a c o m p le te but
sm a ll ta bu la tin g stu d y, or parts o f a lo n g e r and more c o m p le x report.
Such rep orts and stu d ie s are u s u a lly o f a recu rrin g nature w here
the p r o ce d u r e s are w e ll e s t a b lis h e d . May a l s o in clu d e the train in g
o f new e m p lo y e e s in the b a s ic op era tion o f the m a ch in e.
Class C— O p era tes sim p le ta bu la tin g or e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t­
in g m a ch in es su ch as the sorter, r e p ro d u c in g p u n ch , c o lla t o r , e tc .,
w ith s p e c i f i c in s tr u c tio n s . May in clu d e sim p le w irin g from diagram s
and som e filin g w ork. T h e w ork t y p ic a lly in v o lv e s p o rtio n s o f a
w ork unit, for ex a m p le , in d iv id u a l s o rtin g or c o lla t in g run s, or r e ­
p e t itiv e o p e r a tio n s .

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
Prim ary duty is to tra n scrib e d ic ta tio n in v o lv in g a norm al routine
v o ca b u la r y from tra n scrib in g -m a ch in e r e c o r d s . May a l s o ty p e from w ritten
c o p y and do sim p le c le r i c a l w ork. W orkers tra n scrib in g d ic ta tio n in ­
v o lv in g a v a r ie d t e c h n ic a l or s p e c ia liz e d v o ca b u la r y s u c h a s le g a l b r ie fs
or reports on s c i e n t i f i c r e se a r c h are not in c lu d e d . A w orker w ho ta k es
d ic ta tio n in sh orth an d or by S ten otyp e or sim ila r m a ch in e is c l a s s i f i e d
a s a sten og ra p h er, g e n e ra l.

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TYPIST

T Y P I S T — .C o n tin u e d

U s e s a ty p ew riter to m ake c o p ie s o f v a rio u s m a teria l or to make
out b ills a fter c a lc u la t io n s h a v e b e e n m ade by an oth er p e r s o n . May in ­
c lu d e ty p in g o f s t e n c i l s , m a ts, or sim ila r m a teria ls fo r u s e in d u p lic a t­
in g p r o c e s s e s . May d o c l e r i c a l w ork in v o lv in g lit t le s p e c i a l tra in in g ,
su ch a s k e e p in g sim p le r e c o r d s , filin g r e c o r d s and r e p o rts , or s o rtin g
and d istrib u tin g in co m in g m a il.

Class A — P erform s one or more o f the following: T y p in g ma­
teria l in fin a l form w hen it in v o lv e s co m b in in g m a teria l from s e v e r a l
s o u r c e s or r e s p o n s ib ilit y fo r c o r r e c t s p e llin g , s y lla b i c a t io n , p u n c-

tu a tion , e t c . , o f t e c h n ic a l or u n u su al w ords or fo r e ig n la n g u a ge m a­
te r ia l; p la n n in g la y o u t and ty p in g o f c o m p lic a te d s t a t is t ic a l ta b le s
to m aintain u n iform ity and b a la n c e in s p a c in g . May ty p e rou tin e
form le tte r s v a ry in g d e t a ils to s u it c ir c u m s t a n c e s .

Class B — P erform s one or more o f the following: C o p y ty p in g
from rough or c le a r d r a fts ; rou tin e ty p in g o f form s, in su ra n ce p o l i c i e s ,
e t c . ; s e ttin g up sim p le stan dard ta b u la tio n s , or c o p y in g more co m ­
p le x ta b le s a lre a d y s e t up and s p a c e d p r o p e rly .

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N I C A L

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR
(A s s is t a n t draftsm a n )
D raw s to s c a l e u n its or parts o f draw in gs prepared by d r a fts ­
man or oth ers for e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n , or m anu factu ring p u r p o s e s .
U s e s v a rio u s ty p e s o f d ra ftin g t o o l s a s req u ired . May prepare d ra w in gs
from sim p le p la n s or s k e t c h e s , or perform oth er d u tie s under d ir e c tio n
o f a draftsm an.

DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR— Continued
in v o lv e d in stren gth o f m a te ria ls, bea m s and t r u s s e s ; v e r ify in g c o m ­
p le te d w ork, c h e c k in g d im e n s io n s , m a teria ls to be u s e d , and q u a n titie s ;
w ritin g s p e c if i c a t io n s ; m aking a d ju stm en ts or c h a n g e s in dra w in gs or
s p e c if i c a t io n s . May ink in lin e s and le tte r s on p e n c il d ra w in g s , prepare
d e ta il u nits o f c o m p le te d ra w in g s , or tra ce d ra w in g s. Work is freq u en tly
in a s p e c ia liz e d fie ld su ch a s a r c h ite ctu r a l, e le c t r ic a l, m e c h a n ic a l, or
stru ctu ra l draftin g .

DRAFTSMAN, LEADER

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

P la n s and d ir e c t s a c t i v it ie s o f on e or more draftsm en in p rep ­
aration o f w orkin g p la n s and d e t a il d raw in gs from rough or prelim in ary
s k e t c h e s for e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n , or m anu factu ring p u r p o s e s . D u tie s
in v o lv e a combination o f the following: In terpretin g b lu e p r in ts , s k e t c h e s ,

A r e g is te r e d n urse w ho g iv e s n u rsin g s e r v ic e to i l l or in ju red
e m p lo y e e s or oth er p e r s o n s w ho b e c o m e i l l or s u ffe r an a c c id e n t on the
p r e m is e s o f a fa c to r y or oth er e s ta b lis h m e n t. D u tie s in v o lv e a combination o f the following: G iv in g fir s t aid to the i l l or in ju re d ; a tten d in g to
su b s e q u e n t d r e s s in g o f e m p lo y e e s ' in ju r ie s ; k e e p in g r e c o r d s o f p a tie n ts
trea ted ; preparin g a c c id e n t rep orts for c o m p e n sa tio n or oth er p u r p o s e s ;

and w ritten or v e rb a l o r d e r s ; d eterm in in g w ork p r o c e d u r e s ; a s s ig n in g
d u tie s to su b o rd in a te s and in s p e c t in g th eir w ork; perform ing m ore d if­
fic u lt p rob lem s. May a s s i s t s u b o r d in a te s during e m e r g e n c ie s or a s a
regu lar a s sig n m e n t, or perform r e la te d d u tie s o f a s u p e r v is o r y or a d ­
m in istra tive nature.

DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
P rep a res w ork in g p la n s and d e t a il d ra w in gs from n o t e s , rough
or d e ta ile d s k e t c h e s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n , or m an u factu rin g pur­
p o s e s . D u ties in v o lv e a combination o f the following: P rep a rin g w ork ­
in g p la n s , d e ta il d ra w in g s , m a p s, c r o s s - s e c t i o n s , e t c . , to s c a l e b y u se
o f draftin g in stru m en ts; m aking e n g in e e r in g com p u ta tion s s u c h a s th o s e




c o n d u c tin g p h y s ic a l ex a m in a tion s and h ealth e v a lu a tio n s o f a p p lic a n ts
and e m p lo y e e s ; and p la n n in g and carry in g out program s in v o lv in g h ealth
e d u c a tio n , a c c id e n t p r e v e n tio n , e v a lu a tio n o f plan t en v iron m en t, or oth er
a c t iv it ie s a ffe c tin g the h ea lth , w e lfa r e , and s a fe ty o f a l l p e r s o n n e l.

TRACER
C o p ie s p la n s and d ra w in g s p repared by o th e r s , by p la c in g tr a c ­
in g c lo th or pa per o v e r draw in g and tra cin g w ith pen or p e n c i l. U s e s
T -s q u a r e , c o m p a s s , and oth er draftin g t o o l s . May prepare s im p le draw ­
in g s and d o sim p le le tte r in g .

13

MAINTENANCE

D PO W E R PL A N T

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and main­
tain in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs,
counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim
made of wood in an establishment. Work involves most o f the following:
Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or
verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenter’ s handtools, portable
power tools, and standard measuring instruments; making standard shop
computations relating to dimensions of work; selecting materials n ec­
essary for the work. In general, the work of the maintenance carpenter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a for­
mal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which
employed with heat, power, or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; checks water and safety
valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom equipment.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the
installation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generating, d is­
tribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment. Work
involves most o f the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety
of electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards,
controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems,
or other transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, lay­
out, or other specification s; locating and diagnosing trouble in the e le c ­
trical system or equipment; working standard computations relating to
load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; using a variety of
electrician’ s handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In gen­
eral, the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded training
and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training-and experience.

ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and may a lso supervise the operation
of stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to sup­
ply the establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrigera­
tion, or air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining
equipment such as steam engines, air com pressors, generators, m otors»
turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and
boiler-fed water pumps; making equipment repairs; keeping a record of
operation of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May also
supervise these operations. Head or chief engineers in establishments
employing more than one engineer are excluded.




HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE
A ssists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades,
by performing sp e cific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping
a worker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning working area, ma­
chine, and equipment; assisting worker by holding materials or tools;
performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind of
work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding ma­
terials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he is per­
mitted to perform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade
that are a lso performed by workers on a full-time basis.

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or more types of machine
tools, such as jig borers, cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or milling machines in the construction of machine-shop tools, gauges,
jigs, fixtures, or dies. Work involves most o f the following: Planning
and performing difficult machining operations; processing items reauiring
complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety or pre­
cision measuring instruments; selecting feeds, speeds, tooling and op­
eration sequence; making necessary adjustments during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions. May be required to recog­
nize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to select proper
coolants and cutting and lubricating oils. For cross-industry wage study
purposes, machine-tool operators, toolroom, in tool and die jobbing shops
are excluded from this classification .

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of
metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work
involves most o f the following: Interpreting written instructions and
specification s; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of ma­
chinist’ s handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and

14

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE— Continued

MILLWRIGHT— Continued

operating standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to clo se toler­
ances; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work,
tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working prop­
erties of the common metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and
equipment required for his work; fitting and assembling parts into me­
chanical equipment. In general, the machinist’ s work normally requires
a rounded training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a
formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

are required. Work involves most o f the following: Planning and laying
out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specification s; using a
variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations re­
lating to stresses, strength of materials, and centers of gravity; alining
and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment, and parts
to be used; installing and maintaining in good order power transmission
equipment such as drives and speed reducers. In general, the mill­
wright's work normally requires a rounded training and experience in the
trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an e s ­
tablishment. Work involves most o f the following: Examining automotive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling equipment and
performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches,
gauges, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassembling and installing the various assem blies in the vehicle
and making necessary adjustments; alining wheels, adjusting brakes and
lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the automotive
mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment.
Work involves most o f the following: Examining machines and mechan­
ica l equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling or partly d is­
mantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of
handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective
parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replace­
ment part by a machine shop or sending of the machine to a machine shop
for major repairs; preparing written specification s for major repairs or
for the production of parts ordered from machine shop; reassembling ma­
chines; and making all necessary adjustments for operation. In general,
the work of a maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and ex­
perience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. Excluded from this classification are workers
whose primary duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.

MILLWRIGHT
Installs new machines or heavy equipment and dismantles and
installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout




OILER
Lubricates, with oil or grease, the moving parts or wearing sur­
faces of mechanical equipment of an establishment.

PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates w alls, woodwork, and fixtures of an es­
tablishment. Work involves the following: Knowledge of surface pecu­
liarities and types of paint required for different applications; preparing
surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler in
nail holes and interstices; applying paint with spray gun or brush. May
mix colors, o ils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper
color or consistency. In general, the work of the maintenance painter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a for­
mal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves most o f the following:
Laying out of work and measuring to locate position of pipe from drawings
or other written specification s; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct
lengths with ch isel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting ma­
chine; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven
or power-driven machines; assembling pipe with couplings and fastening
pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to pressures,
flow , and size of pipe required; making standard tests to determine
whether finished pipes meet specification s. In general, the work of the
maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience. Workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building
sanitation or heating system s are excluded.

15

TOOL AND DIE MAKER

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
Keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installation of
vents and traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and
fixtures; opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber’ s snake. In
general, the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded training
and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiv­
alent training and experience.

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheetmetal equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans,
shelves, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an
establishment. Work involves most o f the following: Planning and lay­
ing out all types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints, models,
or other specification s; setting up and operating all available types of
sheet-metal-working machines; using a variety of handtools in cutting,
bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assembling; installing sheetmetal articles as required. In general, the work of the maintenance
sheet-metal worker requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

(Diemaker; jig maker; toolmaker; fixture maker; gauge maker)
Constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gauges, jigs, fix­
tures or dies for forgings, punching and other metal-forming work. Work
involves most o f the following: Planning and laying out of work from
models, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specification s;
using a variety of tool and die maker’ s handtools and precision meas­
uring instruments, understanding of the working properties of common
metals and alloys; setting up and operating of machine tools and related
equipment; making necessary shop computations relating to dimensions
of work, speeds, feeds, and tooling of machines; heattreating of metal
parts during fabrication as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve
required qualities; working to clo s e tolerances; fitting and assembling
of parts to prescribed tolerances and allow ances; selecting appropriate
materials, tools, and p rocesses. In general, the tool and die maker’ s
work requires a rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom practice
usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die makers
in tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this cla ssifica tion .

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T

ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER— Continued

Transports passengers between floors of an office building,
apartment house, department store, hotel or similar establishment.
Workers who operate elevators in conjunction with other duties such as
those of starters and janitors are excluded.

or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following:
Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips,
trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures;polish­
ing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor mainte­
nance services; cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers
who specialize in window washing are excluded.

GUARD
Performs routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour,
maintaining order, using arms or force where necessary. Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate and check on identity o f employees and
other persons entering.

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
(Sweeper; charwoman; janitress)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas
and washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial




LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store,
or other establishment whose duties involve one or more o f the follow­
ing: Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or

16

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING—-Continued
from freight cars, trucks, or other transporting d ev ic es; unpacking, shelv­
ing, or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage location; trans­
porting materials or merchandise by hand truck, car, or wheelbarrow.

Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are excluded .

ORDER FILLER

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK— Continued
For wage study purposes, workers are cla ssifie d as follow s:

Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk

TRUCKDRIVER

(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
F ills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
merchandise in accordance with specifications on sa le s slip s, customers9
orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to filling orders and indi­
cating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requisi­
tion additional stock, or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform
other related duties.

Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport ma­
terials, merchandise, equipment, or men between various types of estab­
lishments such a s : Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses,
wholesale and retail establishm ents, or between retail establishments
and customers9 houses or places of bu sin ess. May a lso load or unload
truck with or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep
truck in good working order. Driver-salesmen and over-the-road drivers

are excluded .

PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing
them in shipping containers, the sp ecific operations performed being
dependent upon the type, s iz e , and number of units to be packed, the
type of container employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the
placing of items in shipping containers and may involve one or more o f
the following: Knowledge of various items of stock in order to verify
content; selection of appropriate type and size of container; inserting
enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to prevent
breakage or damage; closin g and sealing container; applying lab els or
entering identifying data on container. Packers who also make wooden

For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are c la ssified by size
and type of equipment, as follow s: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on
the basis of trailer capacity.)

Truckdriver (combination o f sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under lV2 ton s)
Truckdriver, medium ( l l2 to and including 4 tons)
/
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)

TRUCKER, POWER

boxes or crates are excluded .

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is respon­
sible for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials. Shipping
work involves: A knowledge of shipping procedures, practices, routes,
available means of transportation and rates; and preparing records of the
goods shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping
charges, and keeping a file of shipping records. May direct or a s s is t in
preparing the merchandise for shipment. Receiving work involves: Veri­
fying or directing others in verifying the correctness of shipments against
b ills of lading, in v o ices, or other records; checking for shortages and
rejecting damaged goods; routing merchandise or materials to proper de­
partments; maintaining necessary records and file s .




Operates a manually controlled g a so lin e- or electric-powered
truck or tractor to transport goods and materials of a ll kinds about a
warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishm ent.
For wage study purposes, workers are cla ssifie d
truck, as follow s:

by type of

Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)

WATCHMAN
Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property
against fire, theft, and illeg a l entry.
☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : I960 O - 573817

Occupational Wage Surveys
Occupational wage surveys will be conducted in the 82 major labor markets listed below during late I960 and early 1961. Bulletins, when available, may be
purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D .C ., or from any of the BLS regional sales offices shown on the
inside front cover.
A summary bulletin containing data for 80 labor markets, combined with additional analysis, will be issued early in 1962.

Akron, Ohio— Bull. 1285Albany—Schenectady—Troy, N .Y .— Bull. 1285Albuquerque, N. M ex.— Bull. 1285Allentown—Bethlehem—Easton,
P a .- N .J .— Bull. 1285Atlanta, G a .— Bull. 1285Baltimore, Md.— Bull. 1285Beaumont—Port Arthur, T e x .— Bull. 1285Birmingham, A la .— Bull. 1285B o ise, Idaho— Bull. 1285Boston, M a ss.— Bull. 1285Buffalo, N .Y .— Bull. 1285Burlington, V t .— Bull. 1285Canton, Ohio— Bull. 1285Charleston, W. V a .— Bull. 1285Charlotte, N .C .— Bull. 1285Chattanooga, Ten n .—G a .— Bull. 1285Chic ago, 111.— B ull. 1285Cincinnati, Ohio—K y .— Bull. 1285Cleveland, Ohio— Bull. 1285Columbus, Ohio— Bull. 1285D a lla s, T e x .— Bull. 1285Davenport—Rock Island—Moline, Iowa—111.—
Bull. 1285Dayton, Ohio— Bull. 1285Denver, C o lo .— Bull. 1285Des M oines, Iowa— Bull. 1285Detroit, M ich.— Bull. 1285Fort Worth, T e x .— Buil. 1285-




Green Bay, W is.— Bull. 1285-2
G r e e n v ille , S .C .— B u ll. 1285Houston, T ex.-— Bull. 1285Indianapolis, Ind.— Buil. 1285Jackson, M iss.— Bull. 1285Jacksonville, F la .— Bull. 1285Kansas City, Mo.—Kans.— Bull. 1285L a w r e n c e —H a v e r h ill, M a s s .—N .H .— B u ll. 1285Little Rock—North Little Rock,Ark.— Bull. 1285-6

Pittsburgh, Pa.— Bull. 1285“
Portland, Maine— Bull. 1285Portland, Oreg.—Wash.— Bull. 1285Providence—Pawtucket, R .I.— ass.— Bull. 1285M
Raleigh, N .C .— Bull. 1285-5
Richmond, V a .— Bull. 1285Rockford, 111.— Bull. 1285St. Louis, Mo.—111.— Bull. 1285Salt Lake City, Utah— Bull. 1285-

Los Angeles—Long Beach, C alif.— Bull. 1285Louisville, Ky.—Ind.— Bull. 1285L u b b o c k , T ex.— B u ll. 1285Manchester, N .H .— Bull. 1285-1
Memphis, Tenn.— Bull. 1285M iam i, F l a .— B u ll. 1285Milwaukee, Wis.— Bull. 1285Minneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn.— Bull. 1285Muskegon—Muskegon Heights, Mich.— Bull. 1285-

San Antonio, T ex .— Bull. 1285San Bernardino—Riverside—Ontario,
C alif.— Bull. 1285-4
San Francisco—Oakland, C alif.— Bull. 1285Savannah, G a . — Bull. 1285S cranton, P a .— B u ll. 1285Seattle, Wash.— Bull. 1285-7
Sioux Falls, S. Dak.— Bull. 1285South Bend, Ind.— Bull. 1285-

Newark and Jersey City, N .J.— Bull. 1285N ew H a ven , C o n n .— Bull. 1285-

Spokane, Wash.— Bull. 1285Toledo, Ohio— Bull. 1285Trenton, N .J.— Bull. 1285Washington, D .C .—
Md.—V a .— Bull. 1285Waterbury, Conn.— Bull. 1285Waterloo, Iowa— Bull. 1285Wichita, Kans.— Bull. 1285Wilmington, D e l.-N .J .— Bull. 1285Worcester, M ass.— Bull. 1285York, P a.— Bull. 1285-

N ew O r le a n s , L a . — B u ll. 1285N ew York, N .Y .— Bull. 1285N o r fo lk —P ortsm ou th and N ew port N e w s —

Hampton, V a.— Bull. 1285Oklahoma City, Okla.— Bull. 1285-3
Omaha, Nebr.—Iowa— Bull. 1285Paterson—Clifton—Passaic, N .J.— Bull. 1285*
Philadelphia, P a.— Bull. 1285Phoenix, Ariz.— Bull. 1285-

An a sterisk preceding a labor market in d ica tes the a v a ila b ility and
p rice o f the bu lletin .
P le a s e do not order c o p ie s in ad vance.





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102