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Occupational Wage Survey

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI-ILLINOIS
O CTO BER 1960

letin No. 1285-10




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. MHchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTIC!




Occupational Wage Survey
S T . L O U IS , M IS S O U R I- IL L IN O IS




OCTOBER 1960

Bulletin No. 1285-10
November I960

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Jomes P. Mitchell, Secretary
BU R EA U O F LA BO R STATISTICS
Ew an C la g u o , Com m issioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.G.

Price 25 cents




Preface

Consents
P age

The B u rea u o f L a b o r S ta tistic s r e g u la r ly con d u cts
a re a w id e w age s u r v e y s in a n u m b er o f im p o rta n t in d u stria l
c e n t e r s . The s tu d ie s , m a d e fr o m la te fa ll to e a r ly s p r in g ,
re la te to o c c u p a tio n a l ea rn in g s and r e la te d s u p p le m e n ta ry
b e n e fit s . A p r e lim in a r y r e p o r t is a v a ila b le on c o m p le tio n
o f the study in e a c h a r e a , u s u a lly in the m on th fo llo w in g
the p a y r o ll p e r io d stu d ied . T h is b u lle tin p r o v id e s a d d ition a l
data n ot in clu d ed in the e a r lie r r e p o r t .
A c o n s o lid a te d
a n a ly tica l b u lle tin s u m m a r iz in g the r e s u lts o f a ll o f the
y e a r 's s u r v e y s is is s u e d a ft e r c o m p le t io n o f the fin a l a r e a
b u lle tin f o r the c u r r e n t roun d o f s u r v e y s .

T h is r e p o r t w as p r e p a r e d in the B u r e a u ’ s r e g io n a l
o ffic e in C h ic a g o , 111. , b y W o o d r o w C . L in n , u n d er the
d ir e c tio n o f G e o r g e E . V ota v a , A s s is ta n t R e g io n a l D ir e c t o r
f o r W ages and In d u stria l R e la tio n s .




In trod u ction -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------W age tren d s fo r s e le c t e d o c cu p a tio n a l g r o u p s ------- ------------------------------------

1
4

T a b le s :
1.
2.

A.

B.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y ------------------In d exes o f stan dard w e e k ly s a la r ie s and s t r a ig h t -tim e
h o u r ly e a rn in g s f o r s e le c t e d o c cu p a tio n a l g r o u p s ,
and p e r c e n ts o f in c r e a s e f o r s e le c t e d p e r io d s ---------------------------O ccu p a tion a l e a r n in g s: *
A - 1. O ffic e occu p a tio n s — -------------------------------A - 2 . P r o fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o c cu p a tio n s A - 3. M ain ten an ce and p ow erp la n t occu p a tio n s
A - 4. C u sto d ia l and m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t o ccu p a tio n s ------------------E s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and su p p le m e n ta ry w age
p r o v is io n s : *
B - l . Shift d iffe r e n t ia ls ---------------------------------------------------------------------B - 2 . M in im u m e n tra n ce s a la r ie s f o r w om en o ffic e
B -3 .
B - 4.
B -5 .
B - 6.

A p p en d ix:

3

3

vO o o un

T h e C om m u n ity W age S u r v e y P r o g r a m

ID

12

S ch ed u led w e e k ly h ou rs ----------------------------------------------------------P a id h o lid a y s -------------------------------------------------------P a id v a c a tio n s --------------------------------------------------------------------------H ealth , in s u r a n ce , and p e n s io n plans —------------------------------

14
15
16
18

O ccu p a tion a l d e s c r i p t i o n s ------------------------------------------------------------

19

* N O T E : S im ila r tabu lation s a r e a v a ila b le in the St. L ou is
a r e a r e p o r t s f o r Janu ary 1952, D e c e m b e r 1952, Jan u ary
1954, F e b r u a r y 1955, F e b r u a r y 1956, F e b r u a r y 1957, N o v ­
e m b e r 1957, O cto b e r 1958, and O cto b e r 1959. The F e b r u a r y
1957 r e p o r t w as lim ite d to o ccu p a tio n a l e a rn in g s o f plant
w o r k e r s in m a n u fa ctu rin g and p u b lic u t ilitie s .
M o st o f the
r e p o r t s in clu d e data on e sta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and su p p le ­
m e n ta ry w age p r o v is io n s .
A d ir e c t o r y in d ica tin g date o f
study and the p r ic e o f the r e p o r t s , as w e ll as r e p o r t s fo r
oth er m a jo r a r e a s , is a v a ila b le upon re q u e s t.
C u r re n t r e p o r t s on o c cu p a tio n a l ea rn in g s and su p ­
p le m e n ta r y w age p r a c t ic e s in the St. L ou is a r e a a r e a ls o
a v a ila b le fo r m a c h in e r y in d u s tr ie s (F e b r u a r y I9 6 0 ), h o te ls
(A p r il I9 6 0 ), p o w e r la u n d ries and d r y c le a n e r s (A p r il I9 6 0 ),
flu id m ilk (M ay I9 6 0 ), and banking (M ay I9 6 0 ).
U nion
s c a l e s , in d ic a tiv e o f p r e v a ilin g pay le v e ls , a r e a v a ila b le
f o r the fo llo w in g tra d e s o r in d u s tr ie s : B u ild in g c o n s tr u c tio n ,
p rin tin g , lo c a l- t r a n s it o p e r a tin g e m p lo y e e s , and m o t o r t r u c k
d r iv e r s and h e lp e r s .




Occupational Wage Survey—St. Louis, Mo.-lll.
Introduction
This area is one o f s e v e ra l im portant industrial cen ters in
which the U .S . Departm ent o f Labor*s Bureau o f L abor S tatistics has
conducted su rveys o f occupational earnings and related wage benefits
on an areaw ide b a sis. In this area, data w ere obtained by p erson a l
v isits o f Bureau fie ld econ om ists to represen tative establishm ents
within six b road industry d iv ision s: M anufacturing; tra n sp o rta tio n ,1
com m unication, and other public u tilities; w holesale trade; retail
trade; finance, insurance, and rea l estate; and s e r v ic e s . M ajor in ­
dustry groups excluded fro m these studies are governm ent operations
and the con stru ction and extractive industries. E stablishm ents having
few er than a p r e s c r ib e d num ber o f w ork ers are om itted a lso becau se
they furnish in su fficien t em ploym ent in the occupations studied to w a r ­
rant in clusion. W h erever p o s s ib le , separate tabulations are p rovided
fo r each o f the broad industry division s.
T hese surveys are conducted on a sam ple basis b ecau se of the
u nn ecessary co s t involved in surveying all establishm ents. To obtain
appropriate a ccu ra cy at m inim um co s t, a g rea ter p rop ortion o f large
than o f sm a ll establishm ents is studied. In com bining the data, how ­
ev er, all establishm ents are given th eir appropriate weight. E stim ates
based on the establishm ents studied are p resen ted, th e re fo re , as r e ­
lating to all establishm ents in the industry grouping and area, e x ­
cept fo r those below the m inim um size studied.
Occupations and Earnings
The occupations se le cte d fo r study are com m on to a va riety
o f m anufacturing and nonmanufacturing in du stries. O ccupational c la s ­
sifica tion is based on a uniform set o f jo b d escrip tion s designed to
take account o f interestablishm ent variation in duties within the sam e
jo b . (See appendix fo r listing o f these d e s c r ip tio n s .) Earnings data are
p resen ted (in the A -s e r ie s tables) fo r the follow ing types o f o ccu p a ­
tions: (a) O ffice c le r ic a l; (b) p ro fe s s io n a l and tech n ical; (c) m ainte­
nance and pow erplant; and (d) custodial and m a teria l m ovem ent.

late shifts.
Nonproduction bonuses are excluded also, but c o s t - o fliving bonuses and incentive earnings are included.
Where weekly
hours are rep orted, as fo r o ffice c le r ic a l occupations, referen ce is
to the w ork schedules (rounded to the n earest half hour) fo r which
straigh t-tim e sa la ries are paid; average weekly earnings fo r these
occupations have been rounded to the n earest half dollar.
A verage earnings of men and women are presented separately
fo r selected occupations in which both sexes are com m only em ployed.
D ifferen ces in pay lev els of men and women in these occupations are
la rg ely due to (1) d ifferen ces in the distribution o f the sexes among
industries and establishm ents; (2) d ifferen ces in s p e cific duties p e r ­
form ed, although the occupations are appropriately cla ssified within
the sam e su rvey jo b d escrip tion ; and (3) d ifferen ces in length of s e r v ­
ic e o r m erit review when individual sa la ries are adjusted on this b a sis.
Longer average se r v ice of men would result in higher average pay
when both sexes are em ployed within the sam e rate range.
Job
d escrip tion s used in cla ssify in g em ployees in these surveys are usu­
ally m ore gen eralized than those used in individual establishm ents to
allow fo r m inor d ifferen ces among establishm ents in s p e cific duties
p erform ed .
Occupational em ploym ent estim ates rep resen t the total in all
establishm ents within the scop e of the study and not the num ber actu­
ally surveyed. B ecause o f d ifferen ces in occupational stru ctu re among
establishm ents, the estim ates of occupational em ploym ent obtained
fro m the sam ple of establishm ents studied serv e only to indicate the
relative im portance o f the jobs studied. These d ifferen ces in o c c u ­
pational structure do not m a teria lly affect the a ccu ra cy of the earn ­
ings data.
Establishm ent P r a ctice s and Supplementary Wage P rov ision s

Inform ation is p resen ted a lso (in the B -s e r ie s tables) on s e ­
lected establishm ent p ra ctice s and supplem entary benefits as they r e ­
late to o ffic e and plant w ork ers. The term " o ffic e w ork ers, " as used
Occupational em ploym ent and earnings data are shown fo r
in this bulletin, includes working su p erv isors and n onsu p ervisory
fu ll-tim e w o rk e rs, i. e. , those h ired to w ork a regu la r weekly sch e d ­
w ork ers p erform in g c le r ic a l o r related functions, and excludes adm in­
ule in the given occupational cla ss ifica tio n .
Earnings data exclude
istra tiv e, execu tive, and p rofession a l person n el. "Plant w o rk e rs" in ­
prem ium pay fo r ov ertim e and fo r w ork on weekends, holidays, and
clude working forem en and all n on su p ervisory w ork ers (including le a d men and trainees) engaged in n onoffice functions.
A dm inistrative,
executive, and p ro fe ssion a l em ployees, and fo rce -a cco u n t con stru ction
1
R a ilroa d s, fo r m e r ly excluded fr o m the scop e o f these studies,
em ployees who are utilized as a separate w ork fo r c e are excluded.
w ere included in a ll o f the areas studied sin ce July 1959, except
C afeteria w ork ers and routem en are excluded in manufacturing indus B altim ore, B uffalo, Cleveland, and Seattle.
R ailroads are now in ­
tr ie s , but are included as plant w ork ers in nonmanufacturing industries.
cluded in the sco p e o f a ll la b o r-m a rk e t wage su rveys.




2
Shift differen tial data (table B - l ) are lim ited to manufacturing
indu stries.
This inform ation is p resen ted both in term s o f (a) esta b ­
lishm ent p o li c y ,2 p resen ted in term s of total plant w ork er em p loy ­
ment, and (b) e ffectiv e p ra c tic e , p resen ted on the basis o f w orkers
actually em ployed on the sp e cifie d shift at the tim e o f the survey.
In establishm ents having varied d ifferen tia ls, the amount applying to
a m a jority was used o r , if no amount applied to a m a jority , the c la s ­
sification "o th e r" was used.
In establishm ents in which som e la te shift hours are paid at norm al rates, a d ifferen tial was re co rd e d only
if it applied to a m a jority o f the shift hours.
Minimum entrance rates (table B -2) relate only to the esta b ­
lishm ents visited .
T h e y 'a re presen ted on an establishm ent, rather
than on an em ploym ent b a sis.
P aid holidays; paid vacations; and
health, insurance, and pension plans are treated sta tistica lly on the
basis that these are applicable to all plant o r o ffic e w ork ers if a m a ­
jo r ity o f such w ork ers are eligib le o r m ay eventually qualify fo r the
p ra ctice s listed . Scheduled hours are treated sta tistica lly on the basis
that these are applicable to all plant o r o ffic e w ork ers if a m a jority
are cov ered . 3 B ecause o f rounding, sums o f individual item s in these
tabulations m ay not equal totals.
The fir s t part of the paid holidays table presen ts the num­
b e r of whole and half holidays actually provid ed .
The secon d part
com bines whole and half holidays to show total holiday tim e .

Data are p resen ted fo r all health, insurance, and pension
plans fo r which at lea st a p art o f the co st is borne by the em p loyer,
excepting only lega l requirem ents such as w ork m en ^ com pensation,
s o c ia l se cu rity , and ra ilroa d retirem en t.
Such plans include those
underwritten by a co m m e rcia l insurance com pany and those p rovid ed
through a union fund o r paid d ire ctly by the em p loyer out o f current
operating funds o r fr o m a fund set aside fo r this p u rpose.
Death
benefits a re included as a fo rm of life insurance.
Sickness and acciden t insurance is lim ited to that type o f in ­
surance under which pred eterm in ed cash payments are made d irectly
to the insured on a w eekly o r monthly basis during illn ess o r acciden t
disability.
Inform ation is p resen ted fo r all such plans to which the
em p loyer contributes.
H ow ever, in New Y ork and New J e rse y , which
have enacted tem p ora ry disability insurance laws which requ ire e m ­
p lo y e r co n trib u tio n s,4 plans are included only if the em p loyer (1) co n ­
tributes m o re than is leg a lly requ ired, o r (2) p rovid es the em ployee
with benefits which exceed the requirem ents o f the law. Tabulations
o f paid s ic k -le a v e plans are lim ited to form a l plans 5 which p rovide
full pay o r a p rop ortion o f the w o rk e r's pay during absence fro m w ork
becau se o f illn e ss.
Separate tabulations are p rovid ed accord in g to
(1) .plans which provid e full pay and no waiting p eriod , and (2) plans
providing either partial pay o r a waiting p eriod .
In addition to the
presentation o f the p rop ortion s o f w ork ers who are p rovid ed sick n ess
and acciden t insurance o r paid sick leave, an unduplicated total is
shown o f w ork ers who r e ce iv e either o r both types o f ben efits.

The sum m ary of vacation plans is lim ited to fo rm a l a rra n g e ­
m ents, excluding in form al plans w hereby tim e o ff with pay is granted
at the d iscre tio n o f the em ployer.
Separate estim ates are p rovided
accord in g to em p loyer p ra ctice in computing vacation paym ents, such
as tim e paym ents, p ercen t o f annual earnings, o r fla t-su m amounts.
H ow ever, in the tabulations of vacation allow an ces, payments not on
a tim e basis w ere converted; fo r exam ple, a payment o f 2 p ercen t of
annual earnings was co n sid ered as the equivalent of 1 w eek’ s pay.

Catastrophe insurance, som etim es re fe r r e d to as extended
m ed ica l insurance, includes those plans which are designed to p ro te ct
em ployees in ca se o f sick n ess and injury involving expenses beyond
the n orm al cov era g e of hospitalization, m ed ica l, and su rg ica l plans.
M edical insurance re fe rs to plans providin g fo r com plete o r p artial
paym ent o f doctors* fe e s . Such plans m ay be underw ritten by co m m e r ­
cia l insurance com panies o r nonprofit organizations o r they m ay be
se lf-in su re d . Tabulations o f retirem en t pension plans are lim ited to
those plans that p rovid e m onthly payments fo r the rem ainder o f the
w orker*s life .

2 An establishm ent was con sid ered as having a p o lic y if it m et
either o f the follow ing conditions: (1) Operated late shifts at the tim e
o f the survey, o r (2) had fo rm a l p rov ision s cov erin g late shifts.
3 Scheduled w eekly hours fo r o ffice w ork ers (fir st section of
table B -3) in surveys made p r io r to July 1957 w ere p resen ted in
term s o f the p rop ortion o f women o ffic e w ork ers em ployed in o ffic e s
with the indicated weekly hours fo r wom en w o rk e rs.

4 The tem p ora ry disability laws in C alifornia and Rhode Island
do not requ ire em p loyer contributions.
5 An establishm ent was con sid ered as having a form a l plan if
it establish ed at lea st the m inim um num ber o f days o f sick leave that
could be expected by each em p loyee. Such a plan need not be written,
but in form al sic k -le a v e allow an ces, determ ined on an individual b a sis,
w ere excluded.




3
Table 1.

Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied in St. Louis, M o.—
111. , 1 by major industry division, 2 October I960
Minimum
employment
in establishments in scope
of study

Industry division

All divisions ___

Workers in establishments

Number of establishments

Within scope of study

Within
scope of
study 3

Studied

Studied
Total4

Office

Plant

Total4

959

244

325, 100

55, 500

207, 700

196. 550

100
■

401
558

10 2
142

207, 000
118, 100

25, 700
29, 800

148, 000
59,700

130, 230
66, 320

100
50
100
50
50

93
171
65
115
114

39
37
15
25
26

50, 100
18,500
17, 100
17, 700
14, 700

_

Manufacturing
~ ___ _
Nonmanufacturing___
_ ___________ — __
Transportation, communication, and
other public utilities 5 __________ __________
Wholesale trade ____________________________
Retail trade 8 _______________________________
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ______
Services9 __ _ — __ ------- __ ------ -------

27, 300
8 , 200
(7)
8 900
(7)

9, 900
5, 000
(7)
10, 400
(7)

39,
6,
7,
7,
5,

440
560
420
720
180

1 The St. Louis Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (City of St. Louis, Jefferson, St. Charles, and St. Louis Counties, M o.; and Madison and St. Clair Counties, 111.).
The "workers within
scope of study" estimates shown in this table provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey.
The estimates are not intended, however,
to serve as a basis of comparison with other area employment indexes to measure employment trends or levels since ( 1 ) planning of wage surveys requires the use of establishment data compiled con­
siderably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) small establishments are excluded from the scope of the survey.
2 The 1957 revised edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual was used in classifying establishments by industry division. Major changes from the earlier edition (used in the Bureau's
labor market wage surveys conducted prior to July 1958) are the transfer of milk pasteurization plants and ready-mixed concrete establishments from trade (wholesale or retail) to manufacturing, and
the transfer of radio and television broadcasting from services to the transportation, communication, and other public utilities division.
3 Includes all establishments with total employment at or above the minimum-size limitation.
All outlets (within the area) of companies in such industries as trade, finance, auto repair service,
and motion-picture theaters are considered as 1 . establishment.
4 Includes executive, professional, and other workers excluded from the separate office and plant categories.
5 Taxicabs and services incidental to water transportation were excluded.
,6 Excludes department and limited-price variety stores.
7 This industry division is represented in estimates for "a ll industries" and "nonmanufacturing" in the series A and B tables.
Separate presentation of data for this division is not made for one
or more of the following reasons: (l) Employment in the division is too small to provide enough data to merit separate study, (2) the sample was not designed initially to permit separate presentation,
(3) response was insufficient or inadequate to permit separate presentation, (4) there is possibility of disclosure of individual establishment data.
8 Estimate relates to real estate establishments only.
9 Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; motion pictures; nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.

Table 2.

Indexes of standard weekly salaries and straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupational groups in St. Louis, M o.—
111. ,
October I960 and October 1959, and percents of increase for selected periods
Indexe s
(December 1952 = 100)

Industry and occupational group

All industries:
Office clerical (women)
Industrial nurses (women)
Skilled maintenance (m en)___
Unskilled plant (men)

...............
..................
__ _

Manufacturing:
Office clerical (w om en)__
_
_
Industrial nurses (women)________________________
Skilled maintenance (men)
Unskilled plant (men)




Percent increases from—
Octo’K r 1959
to
October I960

October 1958
to
October 1959

November 1957
to
October 1958

February 1956
to
November 1957

February 1955
to
February 1956

January 1954
to
February 1955

December 1952
to
January 1954

134. 6
142.4
140. 1
136. 9

2. 8
5. 1
2. 8
4 .4

4 .4
4.7
4. 3
4. 1

4. 0
5. 6
4. 2
3.2

8. 1
10. 3
10. 0
9.4

4. 2
6.6
6. 1
4. 4

4.2
3. 0
3. 2
3. 0

5. 7
6.4
7. 1
8. 5

134. 9
142. 4
139. 8
138. 3

3.4
5. 1
2. 6
3. 6

4. 0
4.7
4. 5
4. 8

4. 3
5. 6
4. 1
4 .2

9.
10.
10.
10.

4. 8
6. 6
6.2
4 .6

3.
3.
2.
2.

5. 5
5. 6
7. 0
7 .4

October
I960

October
1959

138.4
149. 6
144. 1
143. 0
139- 5
149. 6
143.4
143. 3

1
3
0
0

1
8
9
6

4
Wage Trends for Selected O ccupational Groups

P resen ted in table 2 a re indexes o f sa la rie s o f o ffic e c le r ic a l
w o rk e rs and industrial n u rses, and* o f average earnings o f selected
plant w ork er grou p s.
In a re a s which w ere not surveyed during the
fis c a l 1953 b a se y ea r (July 1952 to June 1953) this table is lim ited
to p ercen ts o f change betw een se le cte d p e rio d s.
F or o ffic e c le r ic a l w o rk e rs and industrial n u rses, the indexes
rela te to average w eekly sa la rie s fo r n orm a l hours o f w ork, that is,
the standard w ork schedule fo r w hich stra ig h t-tim e sa la rie s a re paid.
F o r plant w ork er groups, they m ea su re changes in stra ig h t-tim e hourly
earnings, excluding prem iu m pay fo r ov ertim e and fo r w ork on w eek­
ends, h olidays, and late shifts.
The indexes a re baBed on. data fo r
selected key occupations and include m o st of the n u m erica lly im portant
jo b s within each group. The o ffic e c le r ic a l data a re b a sed on wom en in
the follow in g 18 jo b s : B ille r s , m achine (billin g m ach in e); book k eepin gm achine op e ra to rs, c la s s A and B ; C om ptom eter o p e ra to rs; c le r k s , file ,
c la s s A and B ; c le r k s , o rd e r; c le r k s , p a y ro ll; keypunch op e ra to rs;
o ffic e g ir ls ; s e c r e ta r ie s ; sten ograph ers, gen eral; sw itchboard op era ­
to r s ; sw itchboard o p e r a to r -r e c e p tio n is ts ; tabulating-m achine op e ra ­
to r s ; tra n scrib in g -m a ch in e o p e ra to rs, gen eral; and typists, c la s s A
and B.
The in du strial n urse data a re b a sed on w om en industrial
n u rses. Men in the follow in g 10 sk ille d m aintenance jo b s and 3 unskilled
jo b s w ere included in the plant w ork er data: Skilled:— ca rp en ters;
e le ctricia n s ; m a ch in ists; m ech a n ics; m ech a n ics, autom otive; m ill­
w righ ts; p ain ters; p ip e fitte rs; sh e e t-m e ta l w o r k e r s ; and to o l and die
m a k ers; unskilled— ja n ito rs , p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs; la b o r e r s , m a­
te ria l handling; and watchm en.
A vera g e w eekly sa la rie s o r average hourly earnings w ere
com puted fo r each o f the se le cte d occu p ation s.
The a verage sa la rie s
o r h ourly earnings w e re then m ultiplied by the a vera ge o f 1953 and
1954 em ploym ent in the jo b . T hese weighted earnings fo r individual
occu pation s w e r e then totaled to obtain an aggregate fo r each occu p a ­
tional group. F in ally, the ra tio o f th ese crou p aggrega tes fo r a given
y e a r to the aggregate fo r the b a se p e r io d (su rv ey month, w inter 1952—
53)
was com puted <and the re su lt m u ltiplied by the b a se y ea r index (100) to
get the index fo r the given y e a r.




S im ilar p ro ce d u re s w ere follow ed in com piling “ p ercen ts o f
change" in ardas not su rveyed during 1953.
Adjustm ents have been m ade where n e ce ssa ry to m aintain
com p arability so that the y e a r -to -y e a r com p arison s a re based on the
sam e industry and occupational cov era g e.
F or exam ple, ra ilroa d s
have been included in the co v era g e o f the su rveys only sin ce July 1959.
In com puting the indexes fo r the fir s t y ea r in which ra ilroa d s w ere
included, data relating to ra ilroa d s w ere excluded. Indexes fo r su b se­
quent y e a rs include data fo r ra ilroa d s.
The indexes m ea su re, p rin cip ally, the effects of (1) general
sa la ry and wage changes; (2) m e rit or other in cre a se s in pay re ce iv e d
by individual w o rk e rs w hile in the sam e jo b ; and (3) changes in the
labor fo r c e such as la b or turnover, fo r c e expansions, fo r c e re d u c­
tions, and changes in the p rop ortion o f w ork ers em ployed by estab­
lishm ents with d ifferen t pay le v e ls .
Changes in the labor fo r c e can
cau se in cre a se s or d e cre a s e s in the occupational a v erages without
actual wage changes. F o r exam ple, a fo r c e expansion m ight in crea se
the p rop ortion o f low er paid w ork ers in a sp e cific occupation and r e ­
sult in a d rop in the average, w h ereas a reduction in the p rop ortion
o f low er paid w o r k e r s would have the opposite effect. The m ovem ent
o f a high-paying establishm ent out o f an area could cause the average
earnings to drop, even though no change in rates o ccu rre d in other
a rea establishm ents.
The u se of constant em ploym ent w eights elim inates the effects
of changes in the p ro p ortion o f w o rk e rs rep resen ted in each job in­
cluded in the data.
N or a re the indexes influenced by changes in
standard w ork schedules or in prem iu m pay fo r overtim e, sin ce they
a re b a sed on pay fo r straig h t-tim e h ours.
Indexes fo r the p e rio d 1953 to I960 fo r w ork ers in 20 m a jor
la b or m ark ets w ill appear in BLS B ull. 1265-62, W ages and Related
B enefits, 60 L abor M arkets, Winter 1959—
60.

A* Occupational Earnings

5

Table A-1. O ffice Occupations
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, St. Louis, M o.—
111., October I960)
Average
Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

$
40. 00 I s . 00 l o . 00 i 5 . 00 l o . 00 i s . 00
75. 00 80. 00 85. 00
Weekly j Under $
earnings $
(Standard) (Standard) 40. 00 under
■
45. 00 50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 8 5. 00 90. 00
0
0
0
sat-

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly ,

$
90. 00 * 9 5 .0 0 100 .00 105 .00 110 .00 *115.00 120 .00 1 2 5.00 1 3 0 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 1 4 0 .0 0
“
95. 00 100 .00 105 .00 110 .00 115 .00 120 .00 125 .00 130.00 1 35.00 140 .00

and
over

Men
Clerks, accounting, class A -----------Manufacturing _ __ __ ______ _ ___
Nonmanufacturing _ ----------- __ ---Public utilities 2 __
_ — _______
Wholesale t r a d e ____ _______________
Clerks, accounting, class B --------------Manufacturing___
_
____________
Nonmanufacturing
___________
Public utilities 2
________________
Clerks, file, class A

----------------- —

528
282
246
70
83
57
417
185
232
103

39. 5
40. 0
39. 5
40. 0
3 9 .5
40. 0
39.
39.
39.
40.

5
5
5
0

$106. 00
1 0 9 .0 0
103. 00
106. 50
102. 50
92. 50

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

86.
90.
83.
97.

50
50
00
50

_

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

23
1
22
-

47
8
39
5

13
13

-

_
_
-

_

3

_

_

7

12
3
1

_
-

_
_
-

21
8
13

10
10

9

_
-

9
9

40. 0

8 8. 00

Clerks, file, class B
------------- ---- Nonmanufacturing
__
-------------- _
Public utilities 2 _________________

84
55
49

40. 0
40. 0
40. 0

75. 50
8 3. 00
87. 50

Clerks, ord e r _______ _____
______
Manufacturing
__ _______ ______ __
Nonmanufacturing __ __ _
--------Wholesale trade -----------------------------

359
173
186
163

40.
40.
40.
40.

0
0
0
0

92.
92.
93.
95.

50
00
00
50

Clerks, payroll _ ________
- ---- —
Manufacturing_________________________
Nonmanufacturing-------------------------------Public utilities 2 ___________________

127
63
64
62

39. 5
3 9 .5
40. 0
40. 0

98.
99.
97.
97.

00
50
00
50

-

-

-

-

2
2

Office b o y s __ _ ------------ - -------Manufacturing — _ — _ — -------- Nonmanufacturing
_ ------ -------

458
193
265
118
92

3 9 .5
39. 5
39. 5
40. 0
38. 5

61.
60.
62.
77.
47.

50
00
50
50
00

_
-

52
5
47
2
40

62
28
34
1
24

78
37
41
4
26

55
24
31
11
2

93
90
90

40. 0
40. 0
40. 0

117. 50
117. 50
1 1 7 .5 0

"
-

-

-

-

-

Tabulating-machine operators, class A —
Manufacturing ---------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing ------ --------------Public utilities 2 ______

132
69
63
38

3 9 .5
39. 5
39. 5
40. 0

108.
105.
112.
112.

50
00
50
50

Tabulating-machine operators, class B —
Manufacturing __ _ __
Nonmanufacturing
----- -------Public utilities 2 _ ------- -------- —

268
123
145
79

39.
39.
39.
40.

90.
8 8.
92.
98.

50
50
00
50

Tabulating-machine operators, class C —
Manufacturing
__ ----------— --------

90
53

40. 0
40. 0

84. 00
8 3. 50

262
107
155
50
87

3 9 .5
40. 0
39. 5
40. 0

72. 50
67. 00
81. 50

40. 0

62 . 00

r n filifi aq ^

Secretaries ---------- ------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------ilflllfl AQ ^

5
5
5
0

-

_
_
_
-

4

_
_
-

2

-

7
5
2

-

-

41
11
30
4
10
16

70
24
46
5
26
13

55
34
21
5
14

43
21
22
4
6
10

74
34
40
30
1
6

56
35
21
9
11
1

35
21
14
3
4

30
21
9
7
2

25
16
9
2
7

26
12
14
_
_

7
5
2

X1

53

5
3
2

35
22
13
1

1

19
18
1
_
1

27
13
14
1

31
19
12
3

53
8
45
43

35
25
10
10

39
13
26
26

32
18
14
1

8
5
3
3

3
3
-

2
1
1
1

3
3
-

3
3
-

I
-

_
_
-

_

_

_

.

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
4
3

-

13
10
3
2

42
31

-

29
3
26
2

-

14
8
6
6

_

_

3

18

5

2

2

7

1

8

1

3

3

14

-

_
-

_
-

25
25
25

6

-

6
6

8
8
8

6
6
6

_
-

_
-

3
3
3

_
-

13
7
6
5

29
15
14
12

29
18
11
10

31
16
15
15

32
7
25
25

34
34

17
10
7
1

8

2

1

3
5
5

-

1
1

2

37
74
74

-

-

2
2

-

2
2

1
1

5
4
1
1

5
12
3 — 6
2
6
2
6

7

13

24
16
8
8

20
3
17
17

10
3

-

8
8

6
6

7
7

1

5
2
2

7
7

1
1

-

2
1
1
1

2
2
-

-

3
3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10
10

14
14
14

8
8
8

22
21
21

12
12
12

8
8
8

7
7
7

4
4

4

4

3

9
9
-

15
3
12
2

4

5
2
3
3

2
2

9
6
3
3
_

1
1
1
_

10
10
5
_

2
2
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

.
-

_
-

-

-

6

-

2
2

5
2
3
2

53
45
8

25
25
-

11

16
9
7

4

15
11
4
3

.
-

.
-

-

88
88

6
1
5
5

.
-

4

95

.
-

1
-

7

7

_
-

-

6

-

1
1
-

.
-

3
3
3

3

1
1
-

_

-

-

1
1

9

8

6
1

7

7

2

1

17
16
1
1

24
13
11
9

15

12

5

5

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

4

4

2
2
-

18
9
9
1

18

-

25
13
12
-

20
13

7
7

7
7

14

2
0

4

4
10
-

18

4

5
5

2
2

-

-

7

_

_

3

6

9

3

4

-

-

-

-

4

6

1

4

-

_
-

18
1

25

13

-

53
19
34
13

39
18

19

29
14
15

20
7

17

21
6

15

20

-

7

-

1
3
3

_

11
1

7
2

Ill

35
19
16
15

19

67
26
41
19

41
8
33
28

10
6

12

4
4

8
8

2
1

16
12

1
1

5

22
10
12
12

13

7
12
10

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine)______
Manufacturing
Public utilities 2
W
hnloaol A

A

69. 00

-

-

9

6
2

9

3
10

15

9

1
12
12

See footnotes at end of table.




_

NOTE: Estimates for all industries, nonmanufacturing, and public utilities include data for railroads (SIC 40), omitted
from the scope of all labor market wage surveys made before July 1959. Where significant, the effect of the
inclusion of railroads is greatest on the data shown separately for the public utilities division.

4

-

-

1
3
2

-

-

_
-

1
1

3

-

-

-

.
-

_
-

6
Table A-]. O ffice Occupations-Continued
(Average straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, St. L ou is, M o .—
111. , O ctober I960)
A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N m er
u b
o
f
w rk rs
o e

NUM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVING STR AIGH T-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
s
W lyx W ly Under 40. 00 45. 00 50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 85. 00 90. 00 95.00 100.00 105.00 1 1 0 . 0 0 115.00
eek
eek
120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00
ta d rd
(S n a ) (S n a ) $
ta d rd
and
40. 00
50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65.00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 85. 00 90. 00 95. 00 100.00 105.00 1 1 0 . 0 0 115.00 120. 00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 over

Women— Continued
Billers, machine (bookkeeping
m achine)-------------------------------------------------Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class A --------------------------------------------------Manufacturing---------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing--------------------------------Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class B ---------------------------------------------------Manufacturing--------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing--------------------------------Public utilities 2 -------------------------------Wholesale trade-------------------------------Finance 3-------------------------------------------Clerks, accounting, class A -------------------Manufacturing--------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing--------------------------------Public utilities 2 -------------------------------Wholesale trade-------------------------------Finance 3 ------------------------------------------Clerks, accounting, class B -------------------Manufacturing--------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing--------------------------------Public utilities 2 -------------------------------c

70

39.5

$73. 50

-

-

-

5

10

15

15

-

2

-

2

3

18

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

216
69
147
89

39.5
39.5
39.5
jy . u

73. 50
81.00
69. 50
63. 50

-

-

3
3

16
16
16

19
19
19

29
29
25

20
8
12
1

14
10
4

59
9
50
23

18
13
5

21
19
2

6
6
-

1
1
-

3
3
-

-

7
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

wr
706
33
129
474

39.5
40. 0
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5

62 . 00
7 l . 50
58.00
79.00
69. 00
52. 50

27
27
27

176
9
167
164

137
19
118
9
109

194
21
173
36
112

138
54
84
11
53

69
47
22
6
5
6

56
40
16
2
13
1

90
39
51
7
30
2

48
6
42
14
23

35
31
4
2
2

16
16
-

15
13
2
2
-

2
2
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

_

585
Z7TT
307
72
61
98

39.5
39. 5
39.0
40. 0
39.5
38. 0

86. 00
87. 00
85. 00
92. 50
89. 00
77. 00

_
-

-

-

1
1
1
-

1
1
1
-

31
17
14
3
9

30
6
24
4
2
12

42
9
33
3
25

77
28
49
4
13
26

87
51
36
7
7
3

128
69
59
5
23
11

66
52
14
6
8

33
10
23
10
4

32
6
26
20
2
-

22
15
7
3
3
-

23
8
15
11
2
-

4
3
1
-

6
4
2
2
-

-

1
1
1
-

1
1
-

_
-

39.5
39.5
39. 0
39. 5
40. 0
38. 0

65. 00
67. 50
63. 00
75. 50
66. 50
54. 50

-

59
5
54
-

146
57
89
2

266
TUB
158
15
52
42

174
94
80
6
20
10

144
75
69
30
g
10

110
35
75
42

42
25
17
13
3
1

12
7
5
4

11
9
2
2

4
3
1
1

1
1
-

1
1
-

1
1" '
-

-

-

-

3

43
15
27
15
10
1

19
16
3
3

58

186
58
128
13
21
60

88
37
51
8
20

44

179
76
103
18
12
36

39. 5
40 0
39. 0

10
10

15
9
6

29
12
17

52
25
27

26
13
13

63
53
10

75
52
23

25
15
10

6
5
1

13
2
11

11

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

11

1

2

39.5
40. 0
39.5
39.5

6
6
-

189
84
105
6

171
52
119
12
58
41

133
43
90
34
10
31

104
52
52
10
8
25

86
62
24
4

13
9
4
1

13
5
8
7

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23
8

15
13
2
-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

"

-

-

8

3
2
1

10
id
-

“

-

1
1
1

13
5 "'

4
3
1
-

2

5

-

3
3
-

-

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

1,003

1,486
624
862
172
2 69

-

124
43
81
10
63

14

20
4
16
16
-

50
50
00
00

3
3
-

7
4
3
-

46
27
19
-

63
16
47
31

72
15
57
48

48
29
19
15

39
9
30
25

58
28
30
25

37
8
29
25

4
2
2
"

73. 50
71.50
77. 50
82. 50
81.50

-

35
35
-

12
11
1
1
-

47
44
3
-

23
16
7

89
57
32
13
5

95
62
33

81
54
27
3
1

118
71
47
7

70
56
14
7
-

37
23
14
7
7

50
37
13
4
3

26
12
14

73. 50
74. 50
73. 00
88. 00

-

5
— 5—

2
1
1
0
1
1

6
6

-

94
36
58

130
80
50
3
23

157
63
94
4
55

118
96

93
64
29
3
16

78
34
44

53
43"

155
77
78
74

45
33

Clerks, file, class A -------------------------------Manufacturing--------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing---------------------------------

328

Y~
W

71.00
71. 50
71.00

Clerks, file, class B --------------------------------Manufacturing--------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing--------------------------------Public utilities 2 -------------------------------Finance 3 -------------------------------------------

898
367
531
83
114
259

39. 5

56.00
57. 50
55. 00
63. 00
56. 50
50. 50

Clerks, order -------------------------------------------Manufacturing--------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------Wholesale trade--------------------------------

438
181
257
182

40.
39.
40.
40.

65.
69.
63.
65.

Clerks, payroll------------------------------------------Manufacturing--------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing--------------------------------Public utilities 2 ................-........... - —
Wholesale trade--------------------------------

730
5UU230
81
50

39.5
39. 5
39.5
39. 0
39.5

142

0
5
0
0

Comptometer operators----------------------------1,031
39.5
Manufacturing --------------------------------------- -----5UT“ T07U—
Nonmanufacturing--------------------------------428
39.5
Public utilities 2 -------------------------------1 0 40.0
2
Wholesale tra d e -----------------------------159
39. 5




2

68.00

-

-

-

85

“

49
17
3

6
-

2

35

6
5

2
2
2
9

-

20

2
2
4

23

28
9
8" ' 15
13
1
10
-

1
0
3
4

2

6
2
2

8
6

1
2
7
5

21
10
11

8
1

7
7
"

8
8
-

8
2
2
6

-

-

■

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

2
2
-

-

-

3
1

-

-

1
-----1-----

2
2
-

-

7
Table A-l. O ffice Occupatbns-Continued
(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, St. L ou is, M o .—
111., October I960)
NUM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
W
eekly . Under 4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0
(Standard) (Standard) $
4 0 .0 0 4 5 .8 5 5 0 .0 0 55. 00 6 0 .0 0 65. 00 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0
W
eekly.

%

$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
s
9 0 .0 0 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00
and
9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100 .00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 over
8 5 .0 0

Women— Continued
Duplicating-machine operators
(Mimeograph or ditto) _ __
----- —

95
50

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

$ 7 2 .0 0
6 7 .5 0

-

1
1

2

2

10

11
g

29
10

4
4

8
g

7
6

16
2

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Keypunch operators _ --------M an ufactu ring___________________________
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities 2__ ___
— ----W holesale trade _
__
----F in a n c e3 _____ _______

1, 120
561
559
252
93
166

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

7 1 .5 0
69750
7 3 .5 0
8 3 .5 0
7 5 .0 0
59. 50

_
_
-

10
10
_
10

60
32
28
_
_
28

123
63
60
19
_
40

113
73
40
3
17
11

108
49
59
10
6
28

121
72
49
19
7
10

no
83
27
14
1
9

138
60
78
24
32
18

81
41
40
16
11
12

59
30
29
9
18
-

80
28
52
51
1
-

106
21
85
85
-

8
6
2
2
-

2
2
-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Office g i r l s __
__ _____ ___
__ ___
Manufacturing _ _____________ _____
Nonmanufacturing ______________________
___ __________
Finance 3_ _ —

301
142
159
77

3 9 -0
.3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .0

60
23
37
24

67
49
18
9

47
19
28
20

27
T3
12
4

8
4
4
-

11
n
-

30
30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

S e c r e t a r ie s __
___
__ __
3 ,0 3 7
M an ufactu ring_________________________
1, 702
Nonmanufacturing ______________________ 1 ,3 3 5
403
Public utilities 2 ________ _
257
W holesale trade _ —
_____
__ __
363
Finance 3__ __ ____ _ __

3 9 .5
39- 5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

8 7 .0 0
8 8 . 50
8 5 .0 0
96. 50
83. 50
7 4 .5 0

33
T5'
18
8
_
_
_
_
_
-

11
_
11
_
3

38
10
28
_
10
18

58
10
48
_
10
19

148
78
70
8
8
40

240
107
133
10
23
69

201
98
103
12
29
37

408
281
127
15
26
40

425
232
193
33
54
76

254
153
101
45
19
21

283
174
109
43
18
25

291
172
119
61
10
6

245
100
145
69
24
5

178
109
69
50
14
4

75
54
21
13
7
-

80
54
26
24
-

44
21
23
13
3
-

28
23
5
5
-

3 ,2 5 7
1 ,6 9 9
1, 558
497
419
436

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
38. 5

7 2 .5 0
~~TT W
7 0 .0 0
8 3 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
6 1 .0 0

7
_
7
_
_
7

61
2
59
_
14
36

196
59
137
2
19
79

306
489
T l 3 H 260
193
229
28
25
70
84
77
79

537
274
263
57
63
83

481
278....
203
77
45
61

328
218
110
35
59
g

250
166
84
54
24
5

188
101
87
48
26
1

153
84
69
59
10

112
76
36
32
4

82
40
42
42
-

37
16
21
21
-

8
2
6
5
1

13
2
11
11
-

3
3
_

6
5
1
1
-

14
12
2
2
_
-

8
8
-

8
6
2
2
_
-

Stenographers, technical
M an ufactu ring__
________________

205
151

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

74. 50
77.00"

35
----- j j —

14
12

37
34

7
6

1
1

1
-

1
T

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

Switchboard o p erators. _
Manufacturing _ ___
__ __
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities 2 ____ ___ _______
Finance 3-----------------------------------------------

472
145
327
77
74

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

6 7 .5 0
7 8 .5 0
6 2 .5 0
8 3 .5 0
6 2 .0 0

30
23
7
4

25
—15 "
10
8

53
29
24
22

31
18"
13
11

15
1
14
14

4
4
-

l
1
-

_
-

"
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
_

Switchboard o p e ra to r-rec ep tio n ists______
Manufacturing __________________
Nonmanufacturing _______ _____
___ _____
Public utilities 2
Wlinlpaalp I ts Hp
Finance 3_ __ _ _
__ ___

576
265
311
55
124
57

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
39. 5
3 8 .0

3
1
2
2

1
1
-

l
l
-

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

253
85
168
50

_

Stenographers, general __ --- ---------M an ufactu ring___________________________
Nonmanufacturing.
_ __
___
Public utilities 2 ________
Wholesale tra d e ______________________
lTinanre ^

Tabulating-m achine op erators,
c la ss B ______ __
. . .
Manufacturing _
---------- -------Nonmanufacturing____
Tabulating-m achine op erators,
c la ss C_ ___ __ __
__ _ _
Tran scribin g-m achin e op erators,
gen eral.
___________ _ __
___
Manufacturing _ ___
___
__ _
Nonmanufacturing_______ __ ___
Public utilities 2 ___
_____
W holesale tra d e -----------_ __
T 4nanrp ^
T




5 6 .0 0
9
5 4 :5 0 — r ~
5 7 .0 0
8
5 0 .5 0
8
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

9
------- 54
4

27
------r -

27
21

43
35

50
11
39
_
23

30
5
25
4
12

37
13
24
1
18

49

~ 1 T ...

61
22
39
9
12
10

34
24
10
1

92
59
33
5
11
12

80
45
35
6
27

38
6
32
21
4

29
9
20
7
g

45
19
26
15
4

19
10
9
9

9

158
67
91
2
33
22

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

8
8
8

8
2
6
4

25
3
22
18

8
17
----3
10
5
4
3

28
— r r
n
7

72
18
54
2

17
------10

31
17
14
4

10
7
3

5
1
4

2
2
-

3
1
2

12
12

7
7

-

-

-

-

4

_

_

3

13

-

2

3

4

1

2

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

104

157

90
58
22
2
8
11

18
15
3
3

28
8
20
20

15
1
14
14

1
1
1

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

67

119
71
48

-

33

-

-

-

-

-

_

2

_

-

-

-

_

-

_

_
_
_
-

-

-

9
-

3
3

3
_
3
.
-

113
_
113
_
5

31
3
28
6
6

6 8 .0 0
6 8 . 00
6 8 .0 0
77. 50
6 7 .0 0
6 2 .5 0

-

_

14
14
9

-

-

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5

8 3 .0 0
8 4 .0 0
8 2 .5 0
6 6 . 50

_
-

_
_
-

69

3 9 .5

78. 50

-

_

705
" ill
294
40
83
149

3 9 -0
3 9 .6
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

6 9 .0 0
6 8 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
9 4 .0 0
6 8 .5 0
6 4 .0 0

_
-

2
2
-

_

_

—

15
r~
14

30
14
16

-

_

1
10

7
9

— TT ~W ~
_

_

8
25

11
44

27
7
10

1

32

70
54
" 475" ” — 3t r
30
24
-

14
33

-

22
3

10
14

T~

_

_

-

8
Table A-1. O ffice Occupations-Continued
(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, St. L ou is, M o .—
111., October I960)
NUM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVING STR AIGH T-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

$
S
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
S
I
W
eekly lender 4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00
W
eekly,
140.00
gs
h
ours 1 earnin 1
(Standard) (Standard)
and
4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120 .00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 over

Women— Continued
T yp ists, c la ss A _
__ ----Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing.. ___
__
Public u tilities 2_ _ _
Fi nartra ^
T yp ists, c la ss B _ _
_ _
Manufacturing _
_____ __
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities 2_
__ __

823
519
304
78
153

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 -0
3 9 -5
3 8 .5
3 9 -5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 -5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

.
-

$ 7 2 .0 0
7 4 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
7 6 .0 0
61. 50

2,1 74
884
1,290
138
372
Dtt 7

___

5 9 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
5 6 .0 0
7 3 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
5 0 .5 0

-

6
6
6

8
8
8

31
11
20
20

77
35
42
4
28

120
51
69
12
39

101
49
52
16
27

170
135
35
15
16

109
95
14
5
8

98
68
30
6

53
49
4
-

32
18
14
12

14
6
8
8

2
2
-

104
1
103

339
40
299

429
122
307
17
72
161

366
132
234
19
108
76

334
230
104
16
38
18

291
221
70
3
38
11

107
36
71
12
9
6

100
49
51
27
19

43
30
13
8
5

25
12
13
11
2

25
8
17
17

9
2
7
7

2
1
1
1

-

-

-

35
52

46
205

l

_
.
-

2
2
-

_
_
_

.
_
_
_

-

-

-

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

-

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

1 Standard hours refle ct the workweek for which em ployees receive their regular straight-tim e salarie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 Transportation, communication, and other public u tilities.
J Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations
(A verage straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, St. L ou is, M o .—
111. , October i96 0)
NUM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVING STR AIGH T-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly j
hours
(Standard)

Weekly x
earnings
(Standard)

S
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
S
Under 70. 00 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 90. 00 95. 00 1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 2 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 1 4 0 .0 0 1 4 5 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 5 5 .0 0 1 6 0 .0 0 1 6 5 .0 0 1 7 0 .0 0
and
and
under
7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 10 0.00 10 5 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 2 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 1 4 0 .0 0 1 4 5 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 5 5 .0 0 1 6 0 .0 0 1 6 5 .0 0 1 7 0 .0 0 over

Men

-

-

1
1

2
2

-

12
12

56
51
5

-

65
52
13
1

61
56
5
4

50
49
1
-

94
92
2
2

71
53
18
12

82
77
5
5

18
13
5

32
21
11

51
46
5

32
3o i
2

23
12
11

6
4
2

4
1
3

7

18

_

7

33
32

23
22

10
6

39
36

5
5

7
5

2

D raftsm en , leader ________ ________________
M an u factu rin g___________________________

124
112

40. 0
40. 0

$ 1 5 9 .5 0
1 5 9 .5 0

D raftsm en, s e n i o r _________________________
M an u fac tu rin g___________________________
N on m an ufactu ring______________________
Public u tilities3 _____________________

886
763
123
67

40. 0
40. 0
3 9 .5
40. 0

1 2 3 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0
1 2 1 .0 0
1 4 0 .5 0

-

-

4
-

-

-

D raftsm en , junior _________________________
M an u factu rin g___________________________
N on m an ufactu ring______________________

379
282
97

4 0 .0
40. 0
3 9 .5

9 5 .5 0
36
93 . 50 *34
1 0 1 .5 0
2

19
14
5

56
39
17

22
22
-

27
16
11

T ra c e r s ______________________________________

129

4 0 .0

7 7 .0 0 5 25

12

51

9

195
176

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

9 3 .5 0
9 3 .5 0

2
2

24
19

28
26

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

4

28
23
5

21
14
7

32
19 "
13

-

1
1

-

1
1

50
50

_

_

102
3
2

_

-

33
7
26
26

_

_

1
1

1
-

9
4

28
28

46
40
6
5

39
32
7
7

85
84
1
1

105
4
2
2

-

-

10
2
8

43
28
15

_

.
_

_

_
_

_

_

_
_

_

_

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

2
2

"

~

"

~

'

'

'

'

'

218
12

1
1

7
7

_

_

Women
N u r se s, industrial (registered)
M an u fac tu rin g_______________

1
2
3
4
5

Standard hours reflect theworkweek for which em ployees
W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s: 11 at $1 70 to $1 75 ;
Transportation, communication, and other public u tilities.
W orkers w ere distributed as follow s: 19 at $50 to $ 6 0 ;
W orkers w ere distributed as follow s: 7 at $40 to $ 5 0 ; 4

NO TE :

See note




mm p .

§,

2
2

18
18

1

receive their regular straight-tim e salarie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
7 at $1 75 and over.
15 at $6 0 to $ 7 0 .
at $50 to $ 6 0 ; 14 at

relative to the inclusion of railroad s.

$6 0 to $ 7 0 .

9
Table A-3. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(Average straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r m en in selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, St. L ouis, M o .—
III. , O ctober I960)
NUM BER OF W O RK ERS RE CE IVIN G ST R A IG H T-TIM E H OURLY EARN ING S OF—

Occupation and industry division

Num
ber
ef
w
orkers

Average
hourly
earningsl

C arpenters, m a in te n a n ce ---------------------------------M anufacturing------------------------------------------------

492
453

$ 2.93

E lectricia n s, m aintenance--------------------------------M anufacturin g---------------------------------------- -------

1,550
1,363

3.11

E ngineers, station ary---------------------------------------M anufacturin g-----------------------------------------------N onm anufacturing-----------------------------------------

382
ZB2

F irem en , stationary b o i l e r -------------------------------M anufacturin g-----------------------------------------------N onm anufacturing-----------------------------------------

$
Under 1.80
and
$
1.80

$
1.90

$
2 .0 0

$
2. 10

$
2 .2 0

$
2 .3 0

$
2. 40

$
2. 50

$
2. 60

$
$
2. 70 2.8 0

2. 00

2. 10

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2. 50

2. 60

2. 70

2. 80

17
7

24

43
43

29

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

■

~

~

"

"

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

6
l

_
-

17

21

3 . 10

13

21

100

2.92
3. 14
2 .30

12
3 12

-

"

-

44
44

12
12

3
3

2
-

386
2 72
114

2. 75

24
4 24

4
2
2

_
-

3
3

10

2. 77

8
8
-

9
7
2

29
21

4

3
3

9
9

13
13

72
70

77
71

3
3

_
-

_

-

2 .9 3

2 . 74

10

H elpers, trades, m aintenance--------------------------- 1,048
M anufacturin g------------------------------------------------ 1,000

2 .6 2

M achine-tool op era to rs, t o o lr o o m ------------------M an ufacturin g------------------------------------------------

615

2 .9 7

_

-

_

_

614

2 . 97

-

-

"

-

M achinists, m aintenance----------------------------------- 1, 177
M anufacturin g------------------------------------------------ 1,066

3. 11
3.10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

M echanics, autom otive (m aintenance)-------------M anufacturin g-----------------------------------------------N onm anufacturing----------------------------------------Public utilities 5 ---------------------------------------

2.
2.
2.
2.

17
17

-

5

1

_

67

1
-

-

64

-

3

2. 61

4

193

743
688

81
86
79
82

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 83

936

_

_

-

-

60
24
36
36

18

2

23
8

92

71

212

81

69

210

125
125

8
5
3

26
14

45
44
1

13
13
-

7
3
4

12

49
39

31

61
58

29
28

153

128
126

161
72

-

25
21

186

-

-

186

-

-

62
62
62

30
12
18
18

29

33
33

432
37
395
378

84
36
48
37

137
41
96
96

20
5
15
15

8
-

47

55

128

198

246

118

28

55
-

118

183
182

184

-

219
213
6

rr

34
1

31

2

17

-

2

17

37

-

-

24
21
3
22

37

2'2

37~




-

16
16

3.3
23
10

131

14

15
13

'

2 78
T78

6

-

14
8

3
3

95

109

1

151

i
-

29

i

29

-

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

-

-

“
-

8

114

15

16
13

4
4

13
13

36
36

46
46

12

19

95

TU9

121
12 1

11

45

28

16

-

20

118

11

45

31
27

Z8~

16

-

20

5

34

22

29

n

31
3l

56
56

-

15
15

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

22
16
6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

3

-

_

a 34
34

-

-

-

35

-

19

38

15

35

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

■

-

35

-

8

-

9

-

35

-

-

-

9

"

17

3
3

-

-

-

8

-

-

20
20

-

69
69

7

.

-

7

-

10
10

29
29

-

~

_

■

9

57

-

-

-

-

-

43
40
3

8
5

29
28

181
1 81

175
175

478

127
127

7

5
5

14

50
50

37
37

6

7

-

-

1?

6

7

"

1

-

70

24
24

35
35

549

28

562
562

57

fV

_
-

15

5

17

~

478

_
-

38

6

1

-

-

19

5

'

-

-

35

3
5

-

114

4

-

-

230

-

9
9

-

See note on p. 5, relative to the inclusion of railroad s.

_
-

25
25

37

NOTE:

-

_
-

4

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays, and late shifts.
a A ll w ork ers w ere at $ 3 .8 0 to $ 3 .9 0 .
3 A ll w ork ers w ere at $ 1 .7 0 to $ 1 .8 0 .4 W orkers w ere distributed as follow s: 9 at $ 1 .3 0 to $ 1 .4 0 ; 15 at $ 1 .5 0 to $ 1 .6 0 .
5 Transportation, com m unication, and other public u tilities.

_
-

-

-

-

■

9

-

_

_
“

9

-

-

_
"

28

-

.

■

28

14
14

_

“

_
-

228

"

_

-

_
-

228

8
8

3 .26
3 .2 6

10
10

-

44

1

Tool and die m a k e r s ------------------------------------------- 1,326
Mainuia cturing « — " — ——---- --— --------------- T 32 5
——

36
36

-

44

-

-

_
-

6
6

51
51

-

-

14
14

1

'1 3 1 '

411

“

4
4
-

115
111

1

101
101

O ile r s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------M anufacturin g ------------------------------------------------------------------

-

67
24
43

17

-

-

6
5

14

19

■

12
4
8

-

14

-

-

23
15
8

24

-

17

"

-

46
46
-

24

1

17

13
13

-

-

30
29

_
“

4l

_

3. 11
3. 12

19

91

252

-

169
165

40
40
“

19

6

44
38

95

214

-

Sheet-m etal w ork e rs, m a in te n a n ce ------------------------M anufacturin g------------------------------------------------

12
-

29

-

_

122
53

2 25
17

170

-

3. 03
3. 02

36

-

-

~

1,271
1,214

91

ZBB~

“

41

_

P ipefitters, m aintenance ------------------------------------------------M anufacturin g ------------------------------------------------------------------

287

over

_

252

“

-

244
242

"

3. 80

46
44

-

4

40

$
$
3. 70
3. 80
and

_

-

-

-

3. 70

22
22

238

-

2. 80
2 .9 5
2. 34

3. 60

_

33

-

96

3. 50

6
4

172

-

377

3.40

8
6

8

“

281

3. 30

40

8

-

P ainters, m aintenance -----------------------------------------------------M anufacturin g -----------------------------------------------------------------N onm anufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------

3.20

98
95

3

3. 11
TTTZ

48

3. 10

91

587
58z

r ~

3. 60

94

M illw rig h ts -------------------------------------------------------------------------------M anufacturing ------------------------------------------------------------------

—

$
3. 50

4

10
4

1

$
3.40

19

1

391

$
3.30

23

4

48

$
3.20

27

-

49
49

$
3. 10

27

-

-

3.00

$

5
5
-

48

-

13

61
6l

58

-

2. 60
2.62

60

26

2. 89
3. 06
—

3. 00

2 .9 0

59
56

M echanics, m a in te n a n ce----------------------------------- 1,350
M anufacturin g------------------------------------------------ 1,266
84
Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------------------------------54
Public utilities 5 ------------------------------------------------------

2 . 83

2 .9 0

3

-

51

$

28

104
51

549

9

10
Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(Average straight-tim e hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, St. L ou is, M o .—
111. , October I960)
N UM BER OF W O RK ERS RE CE IVIN G S T R A IG H T-TIM E H OURLY EARN ING S OF—

Occupation1 and industry division

Number
of
workers

hourly "
earnings

$
$
$
1. 10
1. 20
Under 1 .0 0
$
under
1 .0 0
1 .2 0
1. 10
1. 30

117

$ 1 .2 4
T . 17' '
1 .2 4

218
T9§
38
103

1.34
1 .2 8
1 . 82
1.24

_

896
710
186
66
112

2. 27
2. 37
1 .90
2.48
1.59

_
_
_

4, 782
2, 874
1, 908
384
172
385

1. 76
I7T7
1.44
2 . 02
1.71
1.2 2

Janitors, p o r te r s, and clean ers (women)
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Public u tilitie s4
.. . .. .
Finance 3

1,057
231
826
106
438

1. 33
1 .6 8
1.23
1.56
1 .2 0

L ab ore rs, m aterial handling _
Manufacturing
. ........................
Nonmanufacturing
Puhlir. u tilitie s4
.
. .
W holesale trade ____________________________

7, 154
4, 5l2
2,642
1,604
802

2 . 18
”2 . 13
2.26
2. 35
2 . 12

Order fille r s
Manufacturing
..
Nonmanufacturing
Public u tilitie s4
W holesale trade

2, 237
— 9T7----1 ,2 9 0
54
986

2. 31
2724' ■
2. 36
2. 50
2. 35

1,224
“ 857------ “
367
235

2. 17
2 . 1$
2 . 12
2 . 28

Elevator op erators, p assen ger (men)
Nonm anufacturing______________________________

Elevator op erators, passen ger (w om en)_______
Public u tilitie s4 _________________ ___________

Guards ...... .

_ .

Janitors, p o rte rs, and clean ers (men)
Nonmanufacturing
......
.....
Public u tilitie s4 ..
_
..... .
W holesale trade ____________________________
Fin ance3
....
__
.

P ac k e rs, shipping (men)
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
,
W holesale trade

_ ....

. . .
___

_ .........
.......................

P ac k e rs, shipping (women) ______________________
Manufacturing
.
Receiving clerk s _ _____ __ __ _____ __ _____
Manufacturing
_
Nonmanufacturing
Public, utilities 4
. .................
W holesale trade __ __ „ _______________

See footnotes at end of table.




229

ZT7

506
472
722
402
320
140
118

1.97
I7T8
2. 38
2. 34
2.43
2.49
2.41

4

3
3

37
37
7

48
48

17
17
8

$
1 .6 0

$
1 .7 0
1 .8 0

$
1. 80
1 .9 0

1 .6 0

2
2
2

1
1

-

-

-

22
21
5
16

3
2
1
1

3
2
2

10
10
10
_

_

7

_
_

-

11
8
3

-

75

3

$
1. 50

1. 50

76
75

76
. . 71 .

S
1 .4 0

1 .4 0

103

-

-

$ „
1 .3 0

103

163

1. 70

_

10

6

13

10

18

21

12

5

6

13

10

18

21

12

$
1. 90
2 .0 0

$
2. 00
2. 10

$
$
2. 10 2. 20
2. 20

10
-

-

-

_

14
5
5
_

14
14
14
_

1
1
1
_

22
14
8

79
68
11

51
47
4

93
88
5

-

5

6

9

8

18

21

12

2

8

11

3

5

74

202
34
168
5
69

632
36
596
6
29
154

105
29
76
3

_
_

421
111
310
6

112
38
74
15
19
19

149
68
81
16
15
8

179
147
32
2
10

382
280
102
65
10
_

311
250
61
11
33
2

594
$60
34
4
28

494
435
59
42
3

359
241
118
112
3

370

26
9
17
8
3

72
60
12

44
8
36
36

59
14
45
39

39
38
1
1

15
13
2
2

28
27
1

_

1
_

_
_
_

488
256
44$ T 7 9
77
40
17
50
40

919
759
160
1
156

761
722
39
6
30

35
6
29

132
10 1
31

133
“ 22“
111

74

24

50

24

41
6
4

9
_
.
_
_
_
_

9

96

1

_

39
25
14

44
36
8

53
40
13

126
16
no

32
9
23

154

-

8

-

94

10

-

_

_
-

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

282
1
281

_

54

361
8
334

-

_

79

5

_
_
_

T iqT t
- t

22
-----

22

—

_
5
------- T "
_

_
13

. -13-

16
28
-----22“ — T r ­
io
6

_
38
38

_

_

_
_

_
_

34
24
10

_

36
26
10
10

34
_
34

48
_
48

_

_

79
64
15

_

_

27
27

.

_

_

_

_
_

193
172
21
21

114
81
33
33

199
192
7

34
24
10

33
33

4

10

_
_

1
1

T
~

16
29
9 — Z
5
7
3
5
4
112
75
37
34
3

_

_

5
5

9

3. 00
and
over

-

-

2
2

6
6

3
3

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_
_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

75
119
— ITT" — T5
4
4

4
4

_

.

.

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

581
“ 771
*
no
78
5

1,215
234
981
874
63

432
346
86
28
58

686
" '554
132
129
3

816
177
669
399
177

219
128
91
46
45

64
bO
14
14

29

—
ir

208
"63"
145
8
89

10 1
18
83
26
54

547
286
261

491
149
342

_
_

_
_

10

_

_

159

304

33
3
30
16
14

10

98
4
83

10

_

261
239
22
18

24
14
10
8

2 12
...202
10
10

22
17
5
5

83
-----8l ~

88

5

88
88

5
5

4

168
166

87
60
27

161
89
72
69
3

26
6
20

47
11
36

20

28

185
158
27

113

24

103

20

_

_

23
18

15
15

_

_

20
11
9

148
88
60
40

40
33
7

1
1

5

.

22
22

213
213

7

11

18
16

4
1
3

.

5
5

15
_
_

15

14
3
11

27
11
16

123
99
24

59
49
10

15

10

15

5

3

_

$

1

23

_

2. 90

$
2. 90
“
3. 00

1
_
_
_

96
52
44
9

_

-

~

5
5

10

_

379
310
69
68

14

59
19
40

_

2. 80

_
_
_

27
13
14
14

_

$

2. 70
■
2. 80

.

_

48

_

-

_

34

_

-

2. 70

_

80
70
10

_
_
_

-

-

_

2. 60

$

2 .6 0

_

5

5
5

2 .5 0

$

2. 50

_

15

1
T„

$

2 .4 0

2 .4 0

-

1

,

$

2. 30

_

23

5
11
11

T~
Z
U

_

2 .3 0

$

_

_

_

11

95
16
79
71
8

_

46
39
' 7

_

_

58
— ZT~
29

_

_

_

T~
7
T
175

—

2
2

-

_
5

_
_
_

5
5

6
6

2
2

_

_

_

11
Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations-Continued
(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, St. Louis, M o.—
111. , October I960)
NUM BER OF W O RK ERS RE CE IVIN G ST R A IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARN ING S OF—

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

Occupation 1 and industry division

Average,
$
$
1. 10
hourly * Under 1. op
earnin
gs
and
$
under
1. 00
1. 10
1 .2 0

Shipping c l e r k s __ _____ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
Manufacturing _ __ „ __ ________ _________
Nonmanufacturing .
W holesale trade __ __ __ _____ __ __ __

372
246
126
93

$ 2 . 30
2. 28
2. 32
2 .4 2

Shipping and receiving clerks
Manufacturing _______ __ _____ ________ __
Nonmanufacturing __ _______________ ______
W holesale trade

426
216
210
92

2. 33
2. 32
2. 33
2 .4 1

Truckdrivers 5
Manufacturing
. .
Nonmanufacturing __ __ ____________________
Public u tilitie s4
_ _ . _
W holesale trade

4, 354
..1", 117
3 ,2 3 7
2, 150
797

2 .6 6
2. 87
2 .5 9
2 .6 2
2. 56

Tru ck d rivers, light (under l l t o n s ) _______
/z
Manufacturing ___ __ __ _____ __ __ __
N onm anufacturing_________________________

266
119
147

Tru ck d rivers, medium ( l l to and
/z
.......
including 4 tons)
Manufacturing _ __ __ __ __ __ _________
Nonmanufacturing
Public u tilitie s4
Tru ck d rivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
tra iler type)
Nonmanufacturing
Public u tilitie s4
W holesale trade

T ru ck ers, power (other than f o r k lift)_________
Manufacturing
............

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

$
1. 30

$
1.4 0

$
1. 50

$
1.6 0

$
1. 70

$
1.8 0

$
1. 90

$
2. 00

%

2. 10

$
2. 20

$
2. 30

$
2 .4 0

$
2. 50

$
2. 60

$
2. 70

$
2. 80

$
2. 90

$
3 .0 0

1. 30

1.4 0

1 .5 0

1. 60

1. 70

1. 80

1 .9 0

2. 00

2. 10

2. 20

2. 30

2 .4 0

2. 50

2 .6 0

2. 70

2. 80

2. 90

3. 00

and
over

-

5
5
5

16
16
-

-

-

43
23
20
-

39
29
10
10

56
48
8
5

11
11
-

-

10
1
9
5

-

52
33
19
19

20
13
7
2

43
37
6
5

28
5
23
23

16
' 'll
5

4
4
"

14
4
10
10

41
21
20

18
1
17
15

32
8
24
15

14
3
11
-

10
5
5
3

98
41
57
2

83
?9
4
2

12
n~ “

_____

__

-

13
13
_
-

6
3
3
3

33
IS™
18
18

20
20
20

12
_
12
4

2
1
1
1

-

"

-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

15
15
-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

31
16
15
-

49
1
48
-

_
-

3
1
2
2

3
3
-

23
15
8
1

166
16
150
10
140

79
9
70
15
55

217
47
170
104
66

2. 37
2. 75
2. 06

-

-

"

-

-

"

15
15

48
48

-

"

-

19
12
7

-

45
45

30
29
1

1
1

3
3
-

18
18

11
11
"

1 ,9 9 8
582
1 ,4 1 6
970

2 .6 6
2 .9 3
2. 55
2. 56

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
16

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
3
1
1

166
16
150
10

34
9
25
15

122
18
104
104

162
23
139
139

258
'12
246
194

543
48
495
476

228
19
209
26

2 .6 8
2. 67
2 .6 7
2 .6 6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

725

283

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 ,0 6 3
1 ,7 51
312
92
132

2 .4 3
2 .4 0
2. 59
2 .4 9
2. 67

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

325
277

2 .4 2

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

2. 44

-

-

"

-

-

3

1 ,4 5 0
560

1 .5 4
2. 03

22

13

676

56

32
10

16

42
24

61
56

100
93

14
10

See note on p. 5, relative to the inclusion of railroads.




21
7
14
14

-

2

-

-

-

2

3

-

-

2
2

3

415
179
42
------2F~
151
373
151
271
98
-

-

1

-

_

65

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

65

21
~2T

39
39

23
23

28
28

-

-

-

117
102
15

219
219

-

169
133
36
18
-

153
142
11
11
-

362
306
56

-

Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
Includes all drivers regardless of size and type of truck operated.
Workers were distributed as follows: 136 at $3 to $3.10; 363 at $3.10 to $3.20; 18 at $3.20 and over.
Workers were distributed as follows: 34 at $3 to $3. 10; 363 at $3. 10 to $3. 20.
Workers were distributed as follows: 171 at $3 to $3. 10; 16 at $3. 10 and over.

NOTE:

9
7
2
2

-

1 ,2 6 9
1 ,2 0 0
708
297

T ru ck ers, power (forklift)
Manufacturing
,
__
Nonmanufacturing
. ....
.... .
Public u tilitie s4
_
.
W holesale trade ___________________ ________

W atch m en __ __ __ __ __ __ ________
Manufacturing

$i 20
1. ™

12
11 '
11
-

57
30
_

50

-

15

-

383
368
15
15
-

2

32
16

118
116

51

34

2

3
3

2'1

34

11
11

77
53

65
57

115

21
16

76
61

3
3

27
27

-

-

112

—

-

1 ,7 3 2
610
” 146 ~T23
1 ,5 8 6
487
1 ,5 6 7
26
1
266

S Y r ~~2T8
697
-

202
128
— ZF~ 1 1 8
_
174
_
3
171
17
------- 5~
12

■

6 517
517
_
_
-

50
50 ” —
-

9
r
-

62
20
42
3

_

7397

_
_

~~w r

99

18

-

9

_

_

_

_
_

83

99

-

-

3
3

8 187

W~

146
21
125

10

194
140
54
48
“

107

-

-

-

23
23

1
1

20

_

27

15
15

14

5
-------5

_

_

1 4

15
— TT~
_

_
_

_

----- T T

26
_

_




12
B : Establishment Practices and Supplementary W age Provisions

Table B-1. Shift Differentials
(Shift differentials of manufacturing plant w orkers, by type and amount of differential, St. Louis, M o .—
111. , October I960)
Percent of manufacturing plant worker 8 —
>In establishments having form al
provisions 1 for—

Shift differential

Second shift
work

T o t a l__

Third or other
shift

9 1 .6

8 9 .3

1 8 .9

6 .6

With shift pay d iffe re n tia l____________________________________

9 1 .6

89 . 3

18. 9

6 .6

4 9 .6

45. 0

9. 8

5. 1

6

1. 9
1. 2
3. 1

6 cen ts
8 cen ts
9 cen ts
10 c en ts
11 c en ts
12 c en ts
_
12Y2 cents _

__

^

14 c e n t s

.

__

_____

Second shift

______________________

__

________

Third or other
shift work

Actually working on—

__

_

13. 1
5. 0
1 1 .6

................
____ ___
..............
_ ...

.

10. 7

_ _ _ _ _ _ _
__
_

__

__

__

__

.

_
__

__

.

__

_

_________

_

3
3. 0

2. 7
.4

.

O v e r 16 cen ts

.

.

1. 8
1. 4

.

.............

Uniform p e rce n ta g e ______________________________________________________
_

8 p ercen t
1 f) p ercen t
...................
12 y z , 13, or 15 percen t

.

.

_ _

1
.4

.

39 .
10.
8.
1.
6.
12.

0
1
7
8
2
2

24. 0

_
.2

.

3

.4
. 6

2. 8
3. 9

_

. 2
. 5
1. 5
. 1
1 .4
(2 )

.

15 c en ts
1 5 ^ 0 cen ts

7 p ercen t
7 yz p ercen t

5. 0
.8

.

1. 4
2. 2
17. 1
. 5
13. 4

8 .3
1. 8
2. 8
.3
1. 2

. 5
_

18. 1
5. 6

2. 2

. 5
. 1

4 .4

.6

. 1

-

.7

.2

. 1

-

-

Full day's pay for reduced hours, plus cents
1 .9

Full day's pay for reduced hours plus percentage
differential __ _
„ __ __ __
_
__ _____ _

-

1 3 .7

Other form al paid differential ____________________________

1 .2

2 .2

No shift pay differential

__ __ _____

_____ ___________

-

1 Includes establishments currently; operating late shifts, and establishments with form al provisions covering late shifts
even though they were not currently operating late shifts.
2 L e ss than 0. 05 percent.

13
Table B-2. Minimum Entrance Salaries for Women O ffice W orkers
(Distribution of establishments studied in all industries and in industry divisions by minimum entrance salary for selected categories
of inexperienced women office w orkers, St. Louis, M o .—
111. , October I960)
Other inexperienced clerical workers 2

Inexperienced typists
Manufacturing
M in im u m

w e e k ly

s a la r y

1

A ll
in d u s t r ie s

B a se d
A ll
s c h e d u le s

E s ta b lis h m e n ts

s t u d i e d ___

E s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g

4 0
0 0
4
2.50
4 0
5 0
4 5
7 0
5 0
0 0
5 5
2 0
5 0
5 0
5 5
7 0
6 0
0 0
6 5
2 0
6 0
5 0
6 0
7.5
$ 00
7 0
7 5
2 0
7 0
5 0
7 5
7 0
8 0
0 0
8 5
2 0
8 0
5 0
$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$
$

.

an d
an d

u n d er
u n d er

$
$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

a

4 5
2 0
45.00
47.50
5 0
0 0
5 5
2 0
5 0
5 0
57.5
0
6 0
0 0
6 5
2 0
65.0
0
6
7.50
70.00
7 5
2 0
7 0
5 0
77.50
8 0
0 0
8 5
2 0
8 0
5 0
.

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

u n d er

$

$

.

an d

w h ic h

m i n i m u m _________

5
6

2
1

XXX

3
5

XXX

5
5

1
3

XXX

4
2

XXX

__

__

_

__
__

__
__

__
__

_
_

__

__

__

__

_ _ _ _ _

__

__

_______

__

_

__

__

_

__

__

__

__

__

__

_

__

__

__

__

__

__

__

__
_
_

_

__

_______

__

__

__

__

__

__

__

—

—

_____

__

__

_______

__

__

__

_

______

__

__

_______

__

__

__

_

__

___________

__

__

__

__

__

______

_____

__

__

_______

no

d id
__

__

_

__

------------------

s p e c if ie d

n o t e m p lo y
__

_______

_

__

_

__

__

__

_

__

_______

_

___________
__

_____

_______

__

.

_

____________________________________

__

.

h a v in g

c a t e g o r y ___

_

5
1
1
9
2
7
6
5
3
2
3
2
1
4
1
1
2
1

__

__
__

o v e r ____ ___

th is

3
6
2
8
5
6
6
6
2
2
4

__

__

.

$
$

$

in

3
1
7
4
1
0
7
6
6
6
3
3
4

__

__
_

.

u n d er
u n d er

y

8
1
2
1
6
6
1
7
1
3
1
1
9
8
6
5
5
4
4
2
1
4
2

m i n i m u m ___________

_

.

an d

3 2
7

6
5

_

.

an d

o f—

5
8

__

.

.

s c h e d u le s

__

_

_

__________

—

_______

w o rk e rs
_

__

__

__

—

_

-

-

3
1
1
2
1

XXX

_

-

3
1
1
2
1

12
4

-

-

Manufa ctur ing

3

6
8

__

.

.

A ll

h o u rs

13
3

__

__

__

4
0

w e e k ly

12
0

__

__
__

.

s t a r id a r d

24
4

__

.

$

E s t a b lis h m e n t s

__

s p e c if ie d

$

E s ta b lis h m e n ts

__

Nonmanufacturing

on

XXX

6
_
-

2
1
1
2
-

B a se d

A ll
in d u s t r ie s

4
0

A ll
s c h e d u le s

on

Nonmanufacturing
s t a r id a r d

4
0

w e e k ly
A ll

s c h e d u le s

h o u rs

3

o f—

3 2
7
y

4
0

XXX

XXX

24
4

12
0

4
9

19
4

6
9

5
8

8
0

3
1
0
5
1
7
5
2
2
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
2
1

1
7
1
2
1
7
1
0
1
9
1
3
1
4
7
1
0
1
3
5
5
1
3
2
3
5
2

3
1
1
1
7
9
6
7
3
6
1
2
4

3
8
3
9
4
7
3
6
1
1
4

1
4
1
1
6
3
1
0
7
7
4
4
1
1
5
1
1
2
2
1

XXX

6
2

2
2

XXX

4
0

XXX

XXX

XXX

3
3

1
1

XXX

2
2

XXX

XXX

XXX

-

-

-

3
1
3
1
I

XXX

-

-

3
1
1
3
1

12
4

-

-

6

6
1

1

1
1
1
0
1
1
8
5
5
3
3
1
1
5
1
1
2
2
1

-

1
2
1
1
-

-

-

1 Lowest salary rate form ally established for hiring inexperienced workers for typing or other clerical jobs.
2 Rates applicable to m essen gers, office g irls, or sim ilar subclerical jobs are not considered.
3 Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-tim e salaries. Data are presented for all workweeks combined, and for the m ost common workweeks reported.
NOTE:

See note on p.




14,

relative to the inclusion of railroads.

14
Table B-3. Scheduled W eekly Hours
(Percent distribution of office and plant workers in all industries and in industry divisions by scheduled weekly hours
of first-sh ift w orkers, St. Louis, M o .—
111. , October I960)
O F F IC E W O R K E R S

P L A N T W O RK ER S

Weekly hours
All
industries1

A ll w o r k e r s ___ ___

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

Under 35 hours _________________________________
35 hours
__ _____ __ __ __ __ _____ _____ __
Over 35 and under 3 7 % hours __ ______
37
h o u r s ___ __________________________________
Over
and under 383 4 h o u r s ______________
/
3834 hours _ __ — ________ __ __ __ __ __ __
/
Over 38% and under 40 hours __ ________ __
40 hours _________________________________________
Over 40 hours _ ____________ __ _____ __
__

* Sz
/ lY
z

1
2
3
4
5

10 0

3
2
7
2
5
(5 )
81
(5 )

M anufacturing

10 0

(*)
1
7
6
-

85

P u b lic ,
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Finance 3

10 0

10 0

10 0

4

-

-

-

9
5
3
8
11

1
1
(5 )
94

11
1
-

64

10 0

(5 )
1
1
4
(5 )
(5 )

-

88

All
industries

M anufacturing

Public 2
utilities

10 0

10 0

10 0

1
1
6
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_

-

_

98
2

98
2

-

90
3

90
2

Includes data for retail trade (except department and lim ited-price variety stores), and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Includes data for retail trade (except department and lim ited-price variety stores), real estate, and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
L ess than 0. 5 percent.




NOTE:

Wholesale
trade

Estim ates for all industries and public utilities include data for railroads (SIC 40), omitted from the scope of all labor market
wage surveys made before July 1959.
Where significant, the effect of the inclusion of railroads is greatest on the data shown
separately for the public utilities division.

15
Table B-4. Paid Holidays
(Percent distribution of office and plant workers in all industries and in industry divisions by number of paid holidays
provided annually, St. Louis, M o .—
111. , October I960)
PLANT W
ORKERS

OFFICE WORKERS
Item

All workers

All
in u
d stries 1

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ ________

M
anufacturing

P blic
u
u
tilities *

W olesale
h
trad
e

F an 3
in ce

A
ll
in u
d stries 4

M ufactu g
an
rin

P blic
u
u
tilities2

W olesale
h
trad
e

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

99

Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays
Workers in establishments providing
no paid holidays

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

99

99

100

10 0

(5)

-

-

.

_
30
5
52
4
9
-

1

( 5)

-

N um ber o f d a y s
5 holidays __ _____ __ __ _____ __ __
__ __
5 holidays plus 1 half day __ __ _____ _____ „
6 holidays __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ ___
6 holidays plus 1 half day __ __ __ ________ __
6 holidays plus 2 half days
__ __ __
____
7 holidays _
_ _ _ _ _ __
7 holidays plus 1 half day
7 holidays plus 2 half days
7 holidays plus 4 half days ___ __ ________
8 holidays __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _____
8 holidays plus 1 half day __ _____ _ __
8 holidays plus 2 half days
__ __
9 holidays __ __ __ _____ ________ __
9 holidays plus 1 half day __ __ __
__ ___
10 holidays
_. ............- ......
1 1 holidays
__ __ __ __ __
___ __
__ __

(5)
14
2
3
47
( 5)
1
(5)
25
1
1
1
1
(5)
2

1
12
1
4
59
1
1
14
1
2

2
3
3
6
7
32
33
84
85
99
99
99

3
4
4
7
7
21
22
86
87
99
99
10 0

-

( 5)
3

12
(5)
64
19
4
"

-

.

1

3
3
2
7
75
3
4
-

-

-

"

4

_

4
4
4
8
11
85
85
94
97
10 0
10 0
10 0

2
1
18
(5)
6
54
(5)
2
12
(5)
1
1
2

2
1
8
9
59
1
3
13
1
1
3

24
6
-

2
3
4
4
4
18
19
79
79
97
97
99

3
4
4
4
4
20
20
88
88
97
97
99

.
_
6
6
6
30
30
82
82
100
100
10 0

-

18
52
-

32
(5)
3
57
1
7
“

Total h o lid a y t i m e 6
1 1 days __ __ __ __
10 or more days __
9
or more days
9 or m ore days
8 y2 or more days
8 or m ore d a y s __
or more days
7 or more days
6 y?. or more days
6 or more days
5 1, or more days
/
5 or more days

lz
/

l1
/
?
,

1
2
3
4
5
6
no half

__ __ __ __
__ __ __
__ __ __ __

__
__ __
___
___ __
__ __ __ __

__ __ __ _____ __ __ __ __
__ __ __ __ __ __ __

.......
__ _
_

_
4
4
4
24
24
88
88
100
10 0
10 0

13
13
65
70
10 0
10 0
10 0

_
_
_
_
8
8
68
68
100
100
10 0

Includes data for retail trade (except department and lim ited-price variety stores), and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Includes data for retail trade (except department and lim ited-price variety stores), real estate, and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Less than 0. 5 percent.
All combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for example, the proportion of workers receiving a total of 7 days includes those with 7 full days and
days, 6 full days and 2 half days, 5 full days and 4 half days, and so on.
Proportions were then cumulated.

NOTE:




See note on p. 14,

relative to the inclusion of railroads.

16
Table B-5. Pdid Vacations
(Percent distribution of office and plant workers in all industries and in industry divisions by vacation pay
provisions, St. Louis, M o .—
111., October I960)
O F F IC E W O R K E R S

PLAN T W O RK ERS

Vacation policy
A ll
.
industries 1

A ll workers

—

Manufacturing

Public
utilities

,

Wholesale
trade

Finance

3

All
.
industries

M anufacturing

Public
utilities

2

Wholesale
trade

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0

10 0
99

__

10 0
10 0

10 0
99

10 0
10 0

10 0
10 0

99
88
11

10 0
10 0

_

99
91
8

10 0
99

_

-

-

1

-

(5 )

_

7
10
2

8
8
1

(5 )

-

M ethod o l paym ent
W orkers in establishments providing
paid vacations —
Length-of-tim e payment
Percentage payment
F lat-su m payment
Other
W orkers in establishments providing
no paid vacations
_

(5 )

_

(5 )

-

-

-

4
45
5
3

____

5
51
3
4

2
33
2

32
1
67

22
2
76

85

-

-

55
3

-

-

-

9
4
86
_
2

5
39
56
-

-

-

-

1

(5 )
_

_

(5 )

-

-

2

18
18
8

Amount of vacatio n p a y 6
After 6 months of service
Under 1 week _
1 w e e k ___
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks

13
40
11

-

45
8
5

-

22
1
1

-

After 1 year of service
1 week
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 w eek s_____________ ___ ______________
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
_ _
3 weeks ______

,
_

(5 )

42

_

(5 )

-

15

99

85
2
10

85
3
10

88
.

11

75
_

-

(5 )

-

_

20
5

-

1

1

1

-

-

53
12
31

18
30
51
1

After 2 years of service
1 week
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 w eek s _________________ __________________________________________
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks
-_________

7
9
82
(5 )

1

20

-

-

3

61
11
23
4

99
-

13
16
65
2
3

15
21
56
3
4

6
_
93
.
1

1
90
2
5
(5 )

1
88
3
8
-

99
_
_
1

.
95
5

1
(5 )
53
14
29
2

1
48
19
28
3

_
71
28
1

_
65
8
27
~

-

-

76
3

10 0
.

-

(5)

44
3
48
5
-

After 3 years of service
1 week
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks

1
1
97
(5)

1

1
1
96
_
2

1
95
3

(5 )

10 0
-

(5 )

-

-

6

3
86
5
-

After 5 years of service
1 week
Over 1 and under 2 ^
weeks
2 weeks
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
. _
3 weeks _____________________________ _____________
4 weeks

_

_
91
2
7
-

_

_

91
(5)
9
-

98
_
2
-

97
3
-

_

_

_
52
3
42
3

_
77
_
23

75
4
21
”

-

87
7
6
-

(5 )

_

-

After 10 years of service
1 week _
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks
4 weeks
___

See footnotes at end of table




_

_
61
3
34
2

70
7
23

_

17
Table B-5. Paid Vacations-Continued
(Percent distribution of office and plant workers in all industries and in industry divisions by vacation pay
provisions, St. Louis, M o .—
111., October I960)
O F FIC E W O R K E R S

Vacation policy

AU
!
industries

Manufacturing

Public ,
utilities

PLAN T WO RK ERS
Wholesale
trade

Finance 3

All
4
industries

Manufacturing

Public 2
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Amount of vo cation p a y 6— Continued
After 15 years of service
1 week _ _ _
__
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks
_____
__
3 weeks
Over 3 and tinder 4 w e e k s _____________________________
4 weeks
_
Over 4 w eeks.
__ __

.

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

10
86
(5)
4
-

4
91

5
95

31
69

13
80

_

_

_

_

5
"

_

_

-

-

7
-

1
(5 )
9
85
2
2
(5)

1

_

-

-

-

3
89
3
3
-

2
97

31
69

_

_

.

(5)
(5)

.

-

After 20 years of service
1 week
Over 1 and under 2 weeks _
2 weeks
3 weeks
Over 3 and under 4 weeks _ __ __ __
4 weeks
Over 4 w eeks. _

_

.

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

9
74
(5 )
17
(5)

4
78
1
18
(5)

5
72

27
66

13
72

_

.

23

_

_

7
-

15
-

1

_

_

.

1
(5)
9
74
2
11
2

3
80
3
8
3

1
(5 )
8
58
7
21
4

3
59
9
21
5

2
59

_
.

25
71

_

.

38
(5 )

4

After 25 years of service
1 week
Over 1 and tinder 2 weeks
2 weeks
3 weeks
Over 3 and under 4 weeks
4 weeks . . .
Over 4 weeks

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

7
64
2
27
(5)

4
59
3
34
(5)

5
71

_

_

_

_

27
63

3
69

_

_

-

24

11

28

1
.

_
_

_

2
58

25
66

_

.

39
(*)

8
'

1 Includes data for retail trade (except department and lim ited-price variety stores), and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
3 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Includes data for retail trade (except department and lim ited-price variety stores), real estate, and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
5 L ess than 0 .5 percent.
Periods of service were arbitrarily chosen and do not n ecessarily reflect the individual provisions for progressions.
For example, the changes in proportions indicated at 10 yea rs'
service include changes in provisions occurring between 5 and 10 yea rs.

4
6

NOTE: See note on p. 14, relative to the inclusion of railroads.
In the tabulations of vacation allowances by years of service, payments other than "length of time" such as percentage
of annual earnings or flat-su m payments, were converted to an equivalent time basis; for example, a payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 w eek 's pay.




18
Table B-6. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
(Percent of office and plant workers in all industries and in industry divisions employed in establishments providing
health, insurance, or pension benefits, St. Louis, M o .—
111., October i960)
O F F IC E W O R K E R S

PL A N T WO RK ERS

Type of benefit
All
,
industries

A ll workers

__

__

_

_

____ __

__

Workers in establishments providing:
Life insurance__ __
___
__________ __
Accidental death and dismemberment
insurance __________ __ __________________ _
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both 5 _ __ _
____

Manufacturing

Public 2
utilities

Wholesale
trade

Finance 3

100

100

100

100

100

93

95

87

93

54

69

46

65

74

80

88

76

55

All
4
industries

Wholesale
trade

M anufacturing

Public g
utilities

100

100

100

100

99

91

95

79

87

28

65

68

49

61

88

96

69

75

Sickness and accident insurance Sick leave (full pay and no
waiting period)____
Sick leave (partial pay or
____
waiting period) ___ — __ __ _

46

64

21

62

26

76

88

31

61

50

57

48

48

42

16

14

20

55

(4)

27

6

21

7

Hospitalization insurance _ _________ __ ___
Surgical in su ran ce_____ —
__________
Medical insurance __
Catastrophe insurance
_ — _____
Retirement pension __
__
___ ___
No health, insurance, or pension p la n ____

76
77
71
40
75

91
90
82
38

79
79
65
54
59

81
81
55

3

3

73
73
67
61
51
(4)

7

86

7

7

8

79
79
71

44
53
51
46

88
86

26
59
5

86

74
19
72
4

92
90
79
15
83

2

1
0

65
13

1
2
3
4
5

Includes data for retail trade (except department and lim ited-price variety stores), and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Includes data for retail trade (except department and lim ited-price variety stores), real estate, and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Unduplicated total of workers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below.
Sick-leave plans are lim ited to those which definitely establish at least
the minimum number of days’ pay that can be expected by each employee.
Informal sick-leave allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.
6 L ess than 0 .5 percent.
NOTE: See note on p. 14, relative to the inclusion of railroads.
Adjusted estimates for the October 1959 survey (appearing in Bull. No. 1265-5) are: L ife— office, all
industries,
92 percent, public utilities, 84; plant, all industries, 89, public utilities, 77; Sick leave, full— office, public utilities, 54; Catastrophe------ office,
all industries, 39, public utilities,
61;
plant, all industries, 18; public utilities, 54.




19

Appendix:

Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose o f preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’ s wage surveys is to a ssist its
field staff in classifyin g into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll
titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This is
essential in order to permit the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the
Bureau’ s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those
prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are
instructed to exclude working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped workers,
part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

O F F IC E
BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPINGrMACHINE OPERATOR

Prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other
than an ordinary or electromatic typewriter. May also keep records as
to billings or shipping charges or perform other cle rica l work incidental
to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, machine, are
cla ssified by type of machine, as follow s:

Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, E lliott
Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register, with or without
a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions.

B iller

, machine (billing machine)— U ses a special billing ma­

chine (Moon Hopkins, E lliott Fisher, Burroughs, e tc., which are
combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and in­
voices from customers’ purchase orders, internally prepared orders,
shipping memorandums, etc. Usually involves application of prede­
termined discounts and shipping charges and entry of necessary
extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing ma­
chine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine.
The operation usually involves a large number of carbon copies of
the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine)— U s e s a bookkeeping
machine (Sundstraiid, E lliott Fisher, Remington Rand, e tc ., which
may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare customers*
bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally in­
volves the simultaneous entry of figures on customers ’ ledger rec­
ord. The machine automatically accumulates figures on a number
of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically
the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of book­
keeping.
Works from uniform and standard types o f sales and
credit slip s.




C lass A — Keeps a set o f records requiring a knowledge o f
and experience in b asic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with
the structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines
proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used
in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance
sheets, and other records by hand.
C la ss B — Keeps a record o f one or more phases or section s of
a set of records usually requiring little knowledge of b asic book­
keeping*
Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll,
customers’ accounts (not including a simple type o f billing described
under biller, machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc. May check or a ssist in preparation o f trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

CLERK, ACCOUNTING
C la ss A — Under general direction o f a bookkeeper or account­
ant, has responsibility for keeping one or more section s o f a com ­
plete set of books or records relating to one phase o f an establish­
ment’ s business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing
subsidiary ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts

20

CLERK, ACCOUNTING— Continued

CLERK, PAYROLL

p a y a b l e ; e x a m in in g a n d c o d in g i n v o i c e s or v o u c h e r s w ith p ro p e r a c ­

C o m p u te s w a g e s

o f c o m p a n y e m p lo y e e s a n d e n t e r s th e n e c e s ­

c o u n tin g d is t r ib u t io n ; r e q u ir e s ju d g m e n t and e x p e r ie n c e in m a k in g

s a r y d a ta on th e p a y r o ll s h e e t s .

p ro p er a s s i g n a t i o n s a n d a l l o c a t i o n s .

e a r n in g s

M ay a s s i s t in p r e p a r in g , a d ­

b ased

D u tie s in v o lv e :

ju s t in g an d c l o s i n g jo u rn a l e n t r i e s ; m ay d ir e c t c l a s s B a c c o u n t in g

on p a y r o ll s h e e t , s h o w in g in fo rm a tio n s u c h

c le r k s .

d a y s , t im e , r a t e , d e d u c t io n s
m ake out p a y c h e c k s

C la ss B — U n d e r s u p e r v i s io n , p e rfo r m s o n e or m ore r o u t in e a c ­

in g

C a lc u la tin g w o rk e rs9

on tim e or p r o d u c tio n r e c o r d s ; p o s t in g c a l c u l a t e d d a ta

p a y e n v e lo p e s .

a s w o rk er’ s n a m e , w o r k in g

fo r i n s u r a n c e , a n d t o t a l w a g e s d u e .

M ay

a n d a s s i s t p a y m a s te r in m a k in g u p and d is t r ib u t ­
M a y u s e a c a l c u l a t i n g m a c h in e .

c o u n tin g o p e r a t io n s s u c h a s p o s t in g s im p le jo u r n a l v o u c h e r s o r a c ­
cou n ts

p a y a b le

r e c o n c ilin g

vou ch ers,

bank

e n te r in g

a cc o u n ts;

v ou ch ers in

p o s t in g

v o u ch er r e g is te r s ;

s u b s id ia r y

l e d g e r s c o n t r o ll e d

b y g e n e r a l l e d g e r s , or p o s t in g s im p le c o s t a c c o u n t in g d a t a .
jo b

does

n ot re q u ire

a k n o w le d g e

o f a c c o u n tin g

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR

T h is

a n d b o o k k e e p in g

p r in c ip le s but i s fo u n d in o f f i c e s in w h ic h th e m ore r o u tin e a c c o u n t ­
in g w ork i s s u b d iv id e d on a f u n c t io n a l b a s i s a m o n g s e v e r a l w o r k e r s .

P rim ary d u ty i s t o o p e r a te a C o m p to m e te r t o p e rform m a th e m a ­
t i c a l c o m p u t a tio n s .

T h is

jo b i s n o t to b e c o n f u s e d w ith th a t o f s t a t i s ­

t i c a l or o th e r ty p e o f c le r k , w h ic h m ay i n v o lv e fr e q u e n t u s e o f a C o m p ­
to m e te r b u t, in w h ic h , u s e o f t h is m a c h in e i s i n c id e n t a l to p e r fo r m a n c e
o f o th e r d u t i e s .

CLERK, FILE
C la ss A — In an e s t a b l i s h e d fi l in g s y s t e m c o n t a in in g a num ­
b er o f v a r ie d s u b j e c t m a tte r f i l e s , c l a s s i f i e s

p o n d e n c e or o th e r m a t e r ia l; m a y a l s o f i l e t h is m a t e r ia l.
records
v is e

o f v a r io u s

ty p es

in c o n ju n c t io n

o th e r s in f i l in g a n d lo c a t i n g

DUPUCATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)

a nd i n d e x e s c o r r e s ­

w ith f i l e s

m a te r ia l in th e f i l e s .

U n d er g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n

M ay k e ep

o r m a y su p e r*
M ay per­

u s in g a M im eo g ra p h or D it t o m a c h in e .
p r e p a r e s t e n c i l or D it t o m a s t e r .

C la ss B — P e r fo r m s r o u tin e f i l i n g , u s u a l ly o f m a t e r ia l t h a t h a s
or

M a k e s n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s u c h

a s fo r in k a n d p a p e r f e e d c o u n te r a n d c y lin d e r s p e e d .

form in c id e n t a l c l e r i c a l d u t i e s .

a lr e a d y

a n d w ith n o s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s i ­

b i l i t i e s , r e p r o d u c e s m u ltip le c o p i e s o f ty p e w r itte n or h a n d w r itte n m a tte r,

m a sters.

I s n o t r e q u ir e d to

M a y k e e p f i l e o f u s e d s t e n c i l s or D it t o

M ay s o r t , c o l l a t e , a n d s t a p le c o m p le t e d m a t e r ia l.

b e e n c l a s s i f i e d or w h ic h i s e a s i l y i d e n t i f i a b l e , o r l o c a t e s

a s s is ts

in

lo c a t i n g m a t e r ia l in

file s .

M ay p erform in c id e n t a l

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR

c le r ic a l d u tie s .

U n d er g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n

a n d w ith n o s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s i ­

b i l i t i e s , r e c o r d s a c c o u n tin g a n d s t a t i s t i c a l d a ta o n t a b u la tin g c a r d s b y

CLERK, ORDER

p u n c h in g a s e r i e s o f h o l e s in th e c a r d s

in a s p e c ifie d s e q u e n c e , u s in g

an a lp h a b e t ic a l or a n u m e r ic a l k e y p u n c h .m a c h in e , f o ll o w in g w r itte n in ­
R e c e i v e s c u s t o m e r s 9 o r d e r s fo r m a te r ia l or m e r c h a n d is e b y m a i l ,
p h o n e , or p e r s o n a l l y .

D u tie s

i n v o lv e a ny com bination o f th e fo llo w in g :

Q u o tin g p r ic e s to c u s t o m e r s ; m a k in g o u t a n ord er s h e e t l i s t i n g th e ite m s

fo rm a tio n o n r e c o r d s .

M a y d u p lic a t e c a r d s b y u s in g t h e d u p lic a t in g d e ­

v i c e a tt a c h e d to m a c h in e .

M ay k e ep f i l e s

o f punch c a r d s .

M a y v e r if y

ow n w ork or w o rk o f o t h e r s .

to m ak e up th e o rd e r; c h e c k in g p r i c e s a n d q u a n t it ie s o f it e m s on ord er
s h e e t ; d is t r ib u t in g ord er s h e e t s to r e s p e c t i v e d e p a rtm e n ts t o b e f i l l e d .

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL

M ay c h e c k w ith c r e d it d e p a rtm e n t to d e te r m in e c r e d it r a tin g o f c u s to m e r ,
a c k n o w le d g e r e c e ip t o f o rd e r s from c u s t o m e r s , fo l l o w u p o rd e r s t o s e e

P e r fo r m s v a r io u s

r o u tin e d u t ie s

su ch

th a t th e y h a v e b e e n f i l l e d , k e e p f i l e o f o rd e r s r e c e i v e d , a n d c h e c k s h ip ­

e r a tin g m inor o f f i c e

p in g i n v o i c e s w ith o r ig in a l o r d e r s .

d is t r ib u t in g m a il, and o th e r m inor c l e r i c a l w o rk .




a s ru n n in g e r r a n d s , o p ­

m a c h in e s s u c h a s s e a l e r s or m a i le r s , o p e n in g a n d

21

SECRETARY

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR

P e rfo rm s s e c r e t a r i a l a n d c l e r i c a l d u t ie s fo r a s u p e rio r in a n a d ­
m in is tr a tiv e or e x e c u t iv e p o s i t i o n .

D u t i e s in c lu d e m a k in g a p p o in tm e n ts

C la ss A — O p e r a te s a v a r ie t y o f ta b u la tin g or e l e c t r i c a l a c ­
c o u n tin g m a c h in e s , t y p ic a lly in c lu d in g s u c h m a c h in e s a s th e ta b u ­

for s u p e r io r ; r e c e iv in g p e o p le c o m in g in to o f f i c e ; a n s w e r in g a nd m a k in g

la to r ,

p h on e c a l l s ; h a n d lin g p e r s o n a l a n d im p o rtan t or c o n f id e n t ia l m a il, a n d

p le t e re p o rtin g a s s ig n m e n t s w ith o u t c l o s e s u p e r v is io n , a n d p e rform s

c a l c u l a t o r , in te rp re te r, c o l la t o r a n d o th e r s .

w ritin g r o u tin e c o r r e s p o n d e n c e on o w n i n i t i a t i v e ; ta k in g d ic t a t io n (w h e r e

d i f f i c u lt w irin g a s r e q u ir e d .

tr a n s c r ib in g m a c h in e i s n ot u s e d ) e ith e r in sh o rth a n d or b y S t e n o ty p e or

a s s ig n m e n t s

t y p ic a lly

s im ila r m a c h in e , an d tr a n s c r ib in g d ic t a t io n or the r e c o r d e d in fo rm a tio n

p o r ts w h ic h

o fte n

r e p r o d u c e d on a tr a n s c r ib in g m a c h in e .

s o m e p la n n in g a n d s e q u e n c in g

M ay p rep are s p e c i a l r e p o r ts or

m em oran d u m s fo r in fo rm a tio n o f s u p e r io r .

e x p e r ie n c e d

com ­

T h e c o m p le t e r e p o r tin g a nd ta b u la tin g

i n v o lv e

a v a r ie t y o f lo n g and c o m p le x r e ­

are o f irre g u la r or

o p e r a to r, i s

P e rfo r m s

n o n recu rrin g ty p e r e q u ir in g

of step s

t y p ic a lly

to b e t a k e n .

in v o lv e d

As

a m ore

in tra in in g n e w o p e r a ­

to r s in m a c h in e o p e r a t io n s , or p a r tia lly tra in e d o p e r a to r s in w ir in g

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL

from d ia g r a m s and o p e r a tin g s e q u e n c e s o f lo n g a n d c o m p le x r e p o r ts .

D o es not include w o rk in g s u p e r v is o r s p e rfo rm in g t a b u la tin g -m a c h in e
P rim ary du ty i s

to ta k e d ic t a t io n

from o n e or m ore p e r s o n s ,

e ith e r in s h o r th a n d or by S te n o ty p e or s im ila r m a c h in e , in v o lv in g a n o r­

o p e r a t io n s a n d d a y -t o -d a y s u p e r v is io n o f th e w ork and p r o d u c tio n o f
a gro u p o f ta b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s .

m a l r o u tin e v o c a b u la r y , and to t r a n s c r ib e t h is d ic t a t io n on a ty p e w r ite r .
M ay a l s o

ty p e from w ritte n c o p y .

M a y a l s o s e t u p a n d k e e p f i l e s in or­

C la ss B — O p e r a te s m ore d i f f i c u lt ta b u la tin g or e l e c t r i c a l a c ­

D o e s not include transcribing-machine

d e r, k e e p s im p le r e c o r d s , e t c .

c o u n tin g m a c h in e s s u c h a s th e ta b u la to r a nd c a l c u l a t o r , in a d d itio n

work ( s e e t r a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r ).

to th e s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c e r , and c o l la t o r . T h i s w ork i s p e rfo rm ed under
s p e c i f i c in s tr u c tio n s a nd m ay in c lu d e th e p e rfo r m a n c e o f s o m e f i r ­

STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL

in g from d ia g r a m s .

T h e w ork t y p ic a l l y i n v o l v e s , fo r e x a m p le , ta b u ­

la t io n s in v o lv in g a r e p e tit iv e
P rim ary d u ty i s

to ta k e

d ic t a t io n

from o n e or m ore p e r s o n s

a c c o u n tin g e x e r c i s e , a c o m p le t e but

s m a l l ta b u la tin g s t u d y , or p a rts o f a lo n g e r a n d m ore c o m p le x r e p o r t.

e ith e r in s h o rth a n d or b y S te n o ty p e or s im ila r m a c h in e , in v o lv in g a v a r ie d

S u ch re p o r ts

t e c h n ic a l or s p e c i a l i z e d v o c a b u la r y s u c h a s in l e g a l b r ie fs or r e p o r ts on

th e p r o c e d u r e s a re w e l l e s t a b l i s h e d .

s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h an d to t r a n s c r ib e t h is d ic t a t io n on a ty p e w r ite r .

o f n e w e m p lo y e e s in th e b a s i c o p e r a tio n o f th e m a c h in e .

a ls o
keep

ty p e from w ritte n c o p y .
s im p le r e c o r d s , e t c .

M ay a l s o

M ay

D oes not include transcribing-machine work

.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR

C la ss C — O p e r a te s

D u t ie s i n v o lv e h a n d lin g in c o m in g , o u t g o in g , a n d in tr a p la n t or o f f i c e c a l l s .
M ay r e c o r d t o l l c a l l s a n d ta k e m e s s a g e s .
w h o c a l l in , or o c c a s i o n a l l y
a c t a s r e c e p t i o n is t s

su ch

s im p le

t a b u la tin g or e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t ­

a s th e s o r te r , r e p r o d u c in g p u n c h , c o l l a t o r , e t c .,

w ith s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t io n s . M ay in c lu d e s im p le w ir in g from d ia g r a m s

O p e r a te s a s i n g l e - or m u lt ip le -p o s it io n t e le p h o n e s w it c h b o a r d .

so n s

o f a r e c u rrin g n atu re w h e re

M a y a l s o in c lu d e th e tr a in in g

s e t up a n d k e e p f i l e s in o rd e r ,

in g m a c h in e s

w ho a ls o

a nd s t u d i e s are u s u a l ly

see

and s o m e f i l in g w o r k .

T h e w ork t y p ic a l l y

in v o lv e s

p o r tio n s o f a

w ork u n it, for e x a m p le , in d iv id u a l so r tin g or c o l l a t i n g r u n s , or r e ­
p e t it iv e o p e r a t io n s .

M ay g iv e in fo rm a tio n to p e r ­

ta k e t e le p h o n e o r d e r s .

F or w orkers

s w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r -r e c e p t io n is t .

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
P rim ary d u ty i s to t r a n s c r ib e d ic t a t io n i n v o lv in g a n o rm a l ro u tin e
v o c a b u la r y from tr a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e r e c o r d s . M a y a l s o ty p e from w ritte n

In a d d itio n to p e rfo rm in g d u t ie s o f o p e r a to r , on a s i n g l e p o s i ­
tio n or m o n ito r -ty p e s w it c h b o a r d , a c t s a s r e c e p t io n is t a n d m ay a l s o ty p e
or perform r o u tin e c l e r i c a l w ork a s p art o f re g u la r d u t i e s .

T h i s ty p in g

or c l e r i c a l w ork m ay ta k e th e m a jo r p a rt o f t h is w o rk er’ s tim e w h ile a t
s w itc h b o a r d .




c o p y a nd d o s im p le

c l e r i c a l w o rk .

W o rk ers t r a n s c r ib in g d ic t a t io n

in ­

v o lv in g a v a r ie d t e c h n ic a l or s p e c i a l i z e d v o c a b u la r y s u c h a s l e g a l b r ie fs
or r e p o rts on s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h are n ot in c lu d e d .
d ic t a t io n in sh o rth a n d or b y S te n o ty p e
a s a s te n o g r a p h e r , g e n e r a l.

A w o rk er w h o

ta k es

or s im ila r m a c h in e i s c l a s s i f i e d

22

TYPIST

TYPIST— Continued
U s e s a ty p e w r ite r to m a k e c o p i e s o f v a r io u s m a t e r ia l or to m ak e

o u t b i l l s a fte r c a l c u l a t i o n s h a v e b e e n m ad e b y a n o th e r p e r s o n .

t u a tio n , e t c . , o f t e c h n ic a l or u n u s u a l w o rd s or fo r e ig n la n g u a g e m a ­

M a y in ­

t e r ia l ; p la n n in g la y o u t a nd ty p in g o f c o m p lic a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l t a b l e s

c lu d e ty p in g o f s t e n c i l s , m a t s , or s im il a r m a t e r ia ls fo r u s e in d u p lic a t ­

to m a in ta in u n ifo rm ity

in g p r o c e s s e s .

form le t t e r s v a r y in g d e t a i l s to s u it c i r c u m s t a n c e s .

su ch a s

M a y d o c l e r i c a l w ork i n v o lv in g l i t t l e s p e c i a l t r a in in g ,

a nd b a l a n c e

in s p a c i n g .

M a y ty p e ro u tin e

k e e p in g s im p le r e c o r d s , f i l in g r e c o r d s a nd r e p o r ts , or s o r tin g

and d is tr ib u tin g in c o m in g m a il.

C la ss B — P e r fo r m s one or more o f the follow ing: C o p y ty p in g
from rough or c l e a r d r a f t s ; r o u tin e ty p in g o f fo r m s , in s u r a n c e p o l i c i e s ,

C lass A — P e rfo r m s one or more o f the follow ing: T y p in g m a­

e t c . ; s e t t in g u p s im p le s ta n d a r d t a b u la t i o n s , or c o p y in g m ore c o m ­

te r ia l in f in a l form w h e n it i n v o l v e s c o m b in in g m a t e r ia l from s e v e r a l
sources

P R O F E S S IO N A L

( A s s i s t a n t d r a fts m a n )
D ra w s to s c a l e

T E C H N IC A L

in v o lv e d in str e n g th o f
u n its or p a r ts

o f d r a w in g s p r e p a r e d b y d r a ft s ­

m an or o th e r s for e n g in e e r in g , c o n s t r u c t io n , or m a n u fa c tu rin g p u r p o s e s .
v a r io u s t y p e s o f d r a ftin g t o o l s a s r e q u ir e d .

from s im p le p la n s

AND

DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR— Continued

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR

U ses

p l e x t a b le s a lr e a d y s e t up a nd s p a c e d p r o p e r ly .

or r e s p o n s i b i l i t y fo r c o r r e c t s p e l l i n g , s y l l a b i c a t i o n , p u n c -

M ay p r e p a r e d r a w in g s

or s k e t c h e s , or perform oth er d u t ie s u nder d ir e c t io n

a nd t r u s s e s ; v e r if y in g c o m ­

w r itin g s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; m a k in g a d ju s t m e n ts

or c h a n g e s

in d r a w in g s or

s p e c i f i c a t i o n s . M ay in k in l i n e s a n d le t t e r s on p e n c il d r a w in g s ,

p re p a re

d e t a i l u n its o f c o m p le t e d r a w in g s , or t r a c e d r a w in g s . W ork i s fr e q u e n tly
in a s p e c i a l i z e d

o f a d r a fts m a n .

m a t e r ia l s , b e a m s

p l e t e d w o rk , c h e c k in g d im e n s i o n s , m a t e r ia ls to b e u s e d , a n d q u a n t it i e s ;

fie ld

su ch

a s a r c h ite c tu r a l, e l e c t r i c a l , m e c h a n i c a l, or

str u c tu r a l d r a ftin g .

DRAFTSMAN, LEADER
P la n s

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

a n d d ir e c t s

a ra tio n o f w o rk in g p la n s

a c t i v i t i e s o f o n e or m ore d r a ftsm e n in p r e p ­

a n d d e t a i l d r a w in g s from rou g h or p r e lim in a ry

s k e t c h e s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s t r u c t io n , or m a n u fa c tu rin g p u r p o s e s . D u t i e s
in v o lv e a combination o f the follow ing: In te rp re tin g b lu e p r in t s , s k e t c h e s ,*
a n d w ritte n or

verbal

o r d e r s ; d e te rm in in g w ork p r o c e d u r e s ; a s s i g n i n g

d u t ie s to s u b o r d in a t e s a n d i n s p e c t i n g th e ir w o r k ; p e rfo rm in g m ore d if­
f i c u l t p r o b le m s .

M a y a s s i s t s u b o r d in a t e s du rin g e m e r g e n c ie s

re g u la r a s s ig n m e n t , or p e rfo rm r e la t e d d u t ie s

or a s

o f a s u p e r v is o r y

a

or a d ­

m in is t r a t iv e n a tu r e .

A r e g is t e r e d n u r s e w h o g i v e s n u r s in g s e r v i c e to i l l or in ju r e d
e m p lo y e e s or o th er p e r s o n s w h o b e c o m e i l l or s u ff e r an a c c i d e n t on th e
p r e m is e s o f a fa c to r y or o th e r e s t a b l is h m e n t .

D u t ie s in v o lv e a c o m b i n e

tion o f the follow ing: G iv in g f i r s t a id to th e i l l or in ju r e d ; a tt e n d in g to
s u b s e q u e n t d r e s s i n g o f e m p lo y e e s * i n j u r ie s ; k e e p in g r e c o r d s o f p a t ie n t s
t r e a t e d ; p re p a rin g a c c i d e n t r e p o r ts fo r c o m p e n s a t io n or o th e r p u r p o s e s ;
c o n d u c tin g p h y s i c a l e x a m in a t io n s a nd h e a lt h e v a l u a t io n s o f a p p l ic a n t s
a nd e m p l o y e e s ; and p la n n in g and c a r r y in g o u t p ro g ra m s in v o lv in g h e a lth
e d u c a t io n , a c c id e n t p r e v e n t io n , e v a lu a t io n o f p la n t e n v ir o n m e n t, or o th e r
a c tiv itie s

a f f e c t in g

th e h e a lt h , w e lf a r e , a n d s a f e t y

of

a ll

p e r s o n n e l.

DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
TRACER
P r e p a r e s w o r k in g p l a n s a n d d e t a i l d r a w in g s from n o t e s , rou g h
C o p i e s p l a n s a n d d r a w in g s p re p a r e d b y o t h e r s , b y p l a c i n g tr a c ­

or d e t a ile d s k e t c h e s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s t r u c t io n , or m a n u fa c tu rin g pur­
p oses.

D u t ie s i n v o lv e

a combination o f the follow ing:

P r e p a r in g w o rk ­

in g p l a n s , d e t a i l d r a w in g s , m a p s , c r o s s - s e c t i o n s , e t c . , to

s c a le by u se

o f d r a ftin g in s tr u m e n t s ; m a k in g e n g in e e r in g c o m p u ta tio n s s u c h a s t h o s e




in g c lo t h

or p a p e r o v e r d r a w in g a n d t r a c in g w ith p e n or p e n c i l .

T - s q u a r e , c o m p a s s , a nd o th e r d r a ftin g t o o l s .
in g s a n d d o s im p le le t t e r in g .

U ses

M a y p re p a re s im p le d ra w ­

23
M A IN T E N A N C E

D POW ERPLANT
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

F ir e s

P e rfo r m s th e ca rp e n try d u t ie s n e c e s s a r y to c o n s t r u c t a nd m a in ­

s t a t io n a r y b o ile r s to fu r n ish

th e e s t a b lis h m e n t in w h ic h

ta in in g o o d r e p a ir b u ild in g w o o d w o rk and e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s b i n s , c r i b s ,

e m p lo y e d w ith h e a t , p o w e r , or s t e a m .

c o u n t e r s , b e n c h e s , p a r tit io n s , d o o r s , f l o o r s ,

o p e r a t e s a m e c h a n ic a l s t o k e r , g a s , or o i l b u rn e r; c h e c k s w a te r a n d s a f e t y

s t a i r s , c a s i n g s , a nd trim

m ade o f w o o d in an e s t a b l is h m e n t . Work i n v o l v e s m ost o f the follow ing:

v a lv e s .

M ay c le a n ,

o il,

or a s s i s t

F eeds

fu e ls

in r e p a ir in g

to fir e b y h an d or

b o ile rr o o m e q u ip m e n t.

P la n n in g a n d la y in g o u t o f w ork from b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , m o d e ls , or
v e r b a l in s t r u c t i o n s ; u s in g a v a r ie ty o f c a r p e n te r ’ s h a n d t o o l s , p o r ta b le

HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE

p o w e r t o o l s , and s ta n d a r d m e a s u rin g in s tr u m e n t s ; m a k in g s ta n d a r d s h o p
o f w o rk ; s e l e c t i n g m a t e r ia ls n e c ­

A s s i s t s o n e or m ore w o r k e r s in th e s k i l l e d m a in te n a n c e t r a d e s ,

In g e n e r a l, th e w ork o f th e m a in te n a n c e c a r p e n te r

b y p e rfo rm in g s p e c i f i c or g e n e r a l d u t ie s o f l e s s e r s k i l l , s u c h a s k e e p in g

c o m p u ta tio n s r e la tin g to d im e n s io n s
essary

fo r th e w o rk .

re q u ir e s rou n d e d tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u s u a l ly a c q u ir e d through a fo r ­

a w o rk er s u p p lie d w ith m a te r ia ls

m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

c h in e , a n d e q u ip m e n t; a s s i s t i n g w o rk er b y h o ld in g m a t e r ia ls

a nd t o o l s ; c le a n i n g w o rk in g a r e a , m a ­
or t o o l s ;

p e rfo rm in g o th e r u n s k ill e d t a s k s a s d ir e c t e d b y jo u r n e y m a n . T h e k in d o f

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE

w ork th e h e lp e r i s

p e rm itte d to p erform v a r i e s from tra d e to t r a d e :

In

s o m e t r a d e s th e h e lp e r i s c o n fin e d to s u p p ly in g , l i f t i n g , a n d h o ld in g m a ­
P e rfo r m s a v a r ie ty o f e l e c t r i c a l trad e fu n c t io n s s u c h

a s th e

i n s t a l l a t io n , m a in te n a n c e , or rep a ir o f e q u ip m e n t fo r th e g e n e r a t in g , d i s ­
trib u tio n , or u t il iz a t io n

o f e le c tr ic

in v o lv e s m ost o f the following:

e n e r g y in an e s t a b l is h m e n t .

Work

t e r ia ls a n d t o o l s

a n d c le a n in g w o rk in g a r e a s ; a n d in o th e r s

he is per­

m itte d to p e rform s p e c i a l i z e d m a c h in e o p e r a t i o n s , or p a r ts
th a t are a l s o p e rfo rm ed b y w o rk e rs on a f u l l-t im e b a s i s .

o f a tra d e

I n s t a ll in g or re p a irin g a n y o f a v a r ie t y

o f e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s g e n e r a t o r s , tr a n s fo r m e r s , s w it c h b o a r d s ,

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM

c o n t r o ll e r s , c ir c u it b r e a k e r s , m o to r s , h e a tin g u n it s , c o n d u it s y s t e m s ,
or o th er t r a n s m is s io n e q u ip m e n t; w o rk in g from b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , la y ­
o u t, or o th e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; lo c a t in g an d d ia g n o s in g tro u b le in th e e l e c ­

t o o l s , s u c h a s j i g b o r e r s , c y l in d r ic a l or s u r fa c e g r in d e r s , e n g in e l a t h e s ,

t r ic a l s y s t e m

or m illin g

or e q u ip m e n t; w o rk in g s ta n d a r d c o m p u ta tio n s r e la tin g

lo a d r e q u ir e m e n ts

to

o f w irin g or e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t; u s in g a v a r ie t y o f

e l e c t r i c i a n ’ s h a n d to o ls and m e a s u rin g a n d t e s t in g in s tr u m e n t s .

S p e c ia liz e s
m a c h in e s

in th e o p e r a tio n

of one

in th e c o n s tr u c tio n

j i g s , fi x t u r e s , or d i e s .

Work i n v o lv e s

or m ore t y p e s o f m a c h in e

o f m a c h in e -s h o p t o o l s , g a u g e s ,

m ost o f the following:

P la n n in g

In g e n ­

a n d p e rfo rm in g d i f f i c u l t m a c h in in g o p e r a t io n s ; p r o c e s s i n g ite m s r e q u ir in g

e r a l, th e w ork o f th e m a in te n a n c e e l e c t r ic ia n r e q u ir e s rou n d e d tra in in g

c o m p lic a t e d s e t u p s or a h igh d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ; u s in g a v a r ie t y o f p r e ­

and e x p e r ie n c e

e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

c i s i o n m e a s u r in g in s tr u m e n t s ; s e l e c t i n g f e e d s , s p e e d s , t o o lin g and o p ­
e r a tio n s e q u e n c e ; m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n ts d u rin g o p e r a tio n to

ENGINEER, STATIONARY

n iz e w hen t o o ls n e e d

u s u a l ly

a c q u ire d

through a fo r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip

or

a c h ie v e r e q u is it e
c o o la n t s
O p e r a te s a n d m a in ta in s a n d m ay a l s o s u p e r v is e th e o p e r a tio n
o f s t a t io n a r y e n g in e s a n d e q u ip m e n t ( m e c h a n ic a l or e l e c t r i c a l ) to s u p ­

t o le r a n c e s

or d i m e n s i o n s .

d r e s s i n g , to d r e s s

a n d c u tt in g a n d lu b r ic a tin g o i l s .

M a y b e re q u ire d to r e c o g ­

to o ls ,

and to s e l e c t

proper

F o r c r o s s -in d u s t r y w a g e stu d y

p u r p o s e s , m a c h in e -t o o l o p e r a t o r s , to o lr o o m , in t o o l and d ie jo b b in g s h o p s
a re e x c lu d e d from t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .

p ly th e e s t a b l is h m e n t in w h ic h e m p lo y e d w ith p o w e r , h e a t , r e fr ig e r a ­
tio n , or a ir -c o n d it io n in g .

Work

in v o lv e s :

O p e r a tin g and m a in ta in in g

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

e q u ip m e n t s u c h a s s te a m e n g i n e s , a ir c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o t o r s ,
t u r b in e s , v e n t il a t in g a n d r e fr ig e r a tin g e q u ip m e n t, s t e a m

b o ile r s

and

b o ile r -fe d w a te r p u m p s ; m a k in g e q u ip m e n t r e p a ir s ; k e e p in g a r e c o r d o f
M ay also
Head or c h ie f engineers in establishm ents
employing more than one engineer are excluded

o p e r a tio n o f m a c h in e r y , te m p e ra tu r e , a n d f u e l c o n s u m p tio n .
s u p e r v is e t h e s e o p e r a t io n s .




.

P r o d u c e s r e p la c e m e n t p a r ts a n d n e w p a r ts in m a k in g r e p a ir s o f
m e t a l p a r ts o f m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t o p e r a te d in an e s t a b l is h m e n t . Work
in v o l v e s m ost o f the follow ing: In te r p r e tin g w ritte n in s tr u c tio n s and
s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; p la n n in g a nd la y in g o ut o f w o r k ; u s in g a v a r ie t y o f m a­
c h i n i s t ’ s h a n d to o ls a n d p r e c is io n m e a s u r in g in s tr u m e n t s ; s e t t in g up a n d

24

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE— Continued

MILLWRIGHT— Continued
W ork i n v o l v e s m ost o f the follow ing:

o p e r a tin g s ta n d a r d m a c h in e t o o l s ; s h a p in g o f m e t a l p a r ts to c l o s e t o le r ­

a re r e q u ir e d .

a n c e s ; m a k in g s ta n d a r d s h o p c o m p u ta tio n s re la tin g to d im e n s io n s o f w o rk ,

o u t o f th e w o r k ; in te rp re tin g b lu e p r in ts o r o th e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; u s in g a

t o o lin g , fe e d s

v a r ie t y o f h a n d to o ls and r ig g in g ; m a k in g s ta n d a r d s h o p c o m p u ta tio n s r e ­

e r t ie s

of

th e

a n d s p e e d s o f m a c h in in g ; k n o w le d g e
c om m o n m e t a l s ;

e q u ip m e n t r e q u ir e d fo r h is
c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t.

o f th e w o rk in g p ro p ­

s e l e c t i n g sta n d a r d m a t e r i a l s , p a r t s , and

w o rk ; fit t in g a n d a s s e m b l i n g p a r ts

in to me**

In g e n e r a l, the m a c h in is t ’ s w ork n o r m a lly r e q u ir e s

a rou n d ed tr a in in g in m a c h in e -s h o p p r a c t ic e u s u a l ly

a c q u ir e d through a

P la n n in g a n d la y in g

la t in g to s t r e s s e s , s tr e n g th o f m a t e r i a l s , a n d c e n t e r s o f g r a v it y ; a lin in g
a n d b a la n c in g o f e q u ip m e n t; s e l e c t i n g s ta n d a r d t o o l s , e q u ip m e n t, a nd p a r ts
to b e u s e d ; i n s t a l l i n g a nd m a in ta in in g in g o o d ord er p o w e r t r a n s m is s io n
e q u ip m e n t

su ch

as

d r iv e s a n d s p e e d

red u cers.

In g e n e r a l , th e m i l l ­

w r ig h t’ s w o rk n o r m a lly r e q u ir e s a ro u n d e d tr a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e in th e

fo rm a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u iv a le n t tra in in g a nd e x p e r i e n c e .

tra d e a c q u ir e d th ro u gh a fo r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u iv a le n t tra in in g a n d

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)

e x p e r ie n c e .

R e p a ir s a u t o m o b il e s , b u s e s , m o to r tr u c k s, a n d tr a c to r s o f an e s ­
t a b lis h m e n t .

OILER

W ork i n v o l v e s m ost o f the follow ing: E x a m in in g a u to m o tiv e

e q u ip m e n t to d ia g n o s e
p e rfo rm in g r e p a ir s

s o u r c e o f tr o u b le ; d i s a s s e m b l i n g e q u ip m e n t a nd

th a t in v o lv e th e u s e o f s u c h h a n d to o ls a s w r e n c h e s ,

L u b r i c a t e s , w ith o i l or g r e a s e , th e m o v in g p a r ts or w e a r in g su r ­
f a c e s o f m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t o f a n e s t a b l is h m e n t .

g a u g e s , d r i l l s , or s p e c i a l i z e d e q u ip m e n t in d i s a s s e m b l i n g or fit t in g p a r t s ;
r e p la c in g

bro k e n or d e f e c t i v e p a r ts

from s t o c k ; g r in d in g a n d a d ju s t in g

PAINTER, MAINTENANCE

v a l v e s ; r e a s s e m b l i n g a n d i n s t a lli n g th e v a r io u s a s s e m b l i e s in th e v e h i c l e
a n d m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s ; a lin in g w h e e l s , a d ju s t in g b r a k e s and
l i g h t s , or t ig h te n in g
m e c h a n ic

r e q u ir e s

body b o lts .
rou n d e d

In g e n e r a l, th e w ork o f th e a u to m o tiv e

tra in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e

u s u a l ly

P a in t s
t a b lis h m e n t .

a n d r e d e c o r a t e s W a l l s , w o o d w o r k , a n d fix t u r e s o f an e s ­

Work in v olves the follow ing:

K n o w le d g e

o f s u r fa c e p e c u ­

a c q u ir e d

l i a r i t i e s a nd t y p e s o f p a in t re q u ir e d fo r d iffe r e n t a p p l i c a t i o n s ; p re p a rin g

through a fo r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u iv a le n t tra in in g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .

s u r fa c e for p a in tin g b y r e m o v in g o ld f i n i s h or b y p l a c i n g p u tty or f i l l e r in
n a il h o l e s a n d i n t e r s t i c e s ; a p p ly in g p a in t w ith s p r a y g u n or b r u s h . M ay
m ix c o l o r s , o i l s , w h ite le a d , a nd o th e r p a in t in g r e d ie n ts t o o b ta in p rop er

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE

c o l o r or c o n s i s t e n c y .
R e p a ir s m a c h in e r y or m e c h a n ic a l eq u ip m e n t o f an e s t a b l is h m e n t .
W ork in v o lv e s

m ost o f the follow ing: E x a m in in g m a c h in e s and m e c h a n ­

In g e n e r a l, th e w ork o f th e m a in te n a n c e p a in te r

r e q u ir e s ro u n d e d tra in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a l l y a c q u ir e d through a fo r ­
m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u iv a le n t tr a in in g a n d e x p e r i e n c e .

i c a l e q u ip m e n t to d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b le ; d is m a n tlin g or p a r tly d i s ­
m a n tlin g m a c h in e s a n d p e rfo rm in g r e p a ir s th at m a in ly in v o lv e th e u s e o f
h a n d to o ls

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE

in s c r a p in g a n d fit t in g p a r t s ; r e p la c in g b ro k en or d e f e c t i v e

p a r ts w ith ite m s o b t a in e d from s t o c k ; o rd erin g the p ro d u c tio n o f a r e p l a c e ­

I n s t a l l s or r e p a ir s w a t e r , s t e a m , g a s , or o th e r t y p e s o f p ip e a n d

m ost o f the follow ing:

m en t p a rt b y a m a c h in e s h o p or s e n d in g o f the m a c h in e to a m a c h in e s h o p

p i p e fit t in g s

fo r m ajor r e p a ir s ;

L a y i n g o u t o f w ork and m e a s u r in g t o l o c a t e p o s i t i o n o f p ip e from d r a w in g s

p rep a rin g w r itte n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s

fo r m ajor r e p a ir s or

in a n e s t a b l is h m e n t .

W ork i n v o l v e s

fo r th e p r o d u c tio n o f p a r ts o rd e r e d from m a c h in e s h o p ; r e a s s e m b l in g m a­

or o th e r w ritte n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; c u t t in g v a r io u s

c h i n e s ; a n d m a k in g a l l n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n ts fo r o p e r a tio n . In g e n e r a l,

le n g t h s w ith c h i s e l a nd ham m er or o x y a c e t y l e n e to rc h or p ip e -c u t t in g m a ­

s i z e s o f p ip e to c o r r e c t

th e w ork o f a m a in te n a n c e m e c h a n ic r e q u ir e s rou n d e d tra in in g a nd e x ­

c h i n e ; th re a d in g p ip e w ith s t o c k s

p e r ie n c e u s u a l ly a c q u ir e d th rou gh a fo r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u iv a le n t

or p o w e r-d r iv e n m a c h in e s ; a s s e m b l i n g p ip e w ith c o u p lin g s a n d f a s t e n i n g

tr a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

E x c lu d e d

from t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n a re w o rk e rs

w h o s e primary duties i n v o lv e s e t t in g up or a d ju s t in g m a c h in e s .

a n d d i e s ; b e n d in g p ip e b y h a n d -d riv e n

p ip e to h a n g e r s ; m a k in g sta n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a tio n s r e la tin g t o p r e s s u r e s ,
f l o w , and

s iz e

of

p ip e r e q u ir e d ; m a k in g sta n d a r d

w h e th e r fin is h e d p i p e s m e e t s p e c i f i c a t i o n s *

te sts

to d e te rm in e

In g e n e r a l , th e w ork o f th e

m a in te n a n c e p ip e fit te r r e q u ir e s ro u n d e d tr a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e

MILLWRIGHT

u s u a lly

a c q u ir e d th ro u gh a fo r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u iv a le n t tr a in in g a n d e x ­
I n s t a l l s n e w m a c h in e s or h e a v y e q u ip m e n t and d is m a n t le s and
i n s t a l l s m a c h in e s or h e a v y e q u ip m e n t w h e n c h a n g e s




in th e p la n t la y o u t

p e r ie n c e . Workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building
sanitation or heating system s' are , excluded.

25

TOOL AND DIE MAKER

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
K eeps
W ork i n v o l v e s :
v e n ts

th e p lu m b in g s y s t e m o f an e s t a b l is h m e n t
K n o w le d g e o f s a n it a r y c o d e s

in

an d tra p s in p lu m b in g s y s t e m ; i n s t a l l i n g

( D i e m a k e r ; ji g m a k er; t o o lm a k e r ; fix tu r e m a k e r; g a u g e m ak er)

g o o d o rd e r.

r e g a r d in g in s t a lla t io n

of
C o n s t r u c t s and r e p a irs m a c h in e -s h o p t o o l s , g a u g e s ,

or r e p a irin g p ip e s and

f ix t u r e s ; o p e n in g c l o g g e d d r a in s w ith a p lu n g e r or p lu m b er’ s

sn ak e.

In

jig s ,

tu r e s or d i e s for fo r g i n g s , p u n c h in g and o th e r m e ta l-fo r m in g w o r k .

g e n e r a l, th e w o rk o f th e m a in te n a n c e p lu m b er r e q u ir e s rou n d e d tra in in g

in v o l v e s most o f the following:

an d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a l ly a c q u ir e d th rou gh a fo rm a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u iv ­

m o d e ls ,

a le n t tra in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .

u s in g a v a r ie t y o f t o o l and d ie

b lu e p r in t s , d r a w in g s ,

P la n n in g a n d la y in g

fix ­
Work

o ut o f w ork from

or o th e r o r a l and w ritte n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ;
m a k er’ s h a n d to o ls and p r e c is io n m e a s ­

u rin g in s tr u m e n ts , u n d e rsta n d in g o f th e w o rk in g p r o p e r tie s

o f com m on

m e t a ls a nd a l l o y s ; s e t t in g up and o p e r a tin g o f m a c h in e t o o ls and r e la te d

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE

e q u ip m e n t; m ak in g n e c e s s a r y s h o p c o m p u t a tio n s r e la tin g to d im e n s io n s
F a b r i c a t e s , i n s t a l l s , and m a in ta in s
m e t a l e q u ip m e n t a n d fix tu r e s ( s u c h

in g o o d rep a ir th e s h e e t -

o f m a c h in e s ; h e a ttr e a tin g o f m e ta l

p an s,

p a r ts during fa b r ic a tio n a s w e l l a s o f f i n i s h e d t o o l s and d ie s to a c h ie v e

s h e l v e s , l o c k e r s , t a n k s , v e n t i l a t o r s , c h u t e s , d u c t s , m e ta l r o o fin g ) o f an

re q u ir e d q u a l i t i e s ; w o rk in g to c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ; fit t in g and a s s e m b l i n g

e s t a b l is h m e n t .

a s m a c h in e g u a r d s , g r e a s e

o f w o rk , s p e e d s , f e e d s , and t o o lin g

W ork i n v o lv e s m ost o f the following:

P la n n in g and la y ­

o f p a r ts to p r e s c r ib e d t o le r a n c e s and a l l o w a n c e s ; s e l e c t i n g a p p ro p ria te

in g o u t a l l t y p e s o f s h e e t -m e t a l m a in te n a n c e w ork from b lu e p r in t s , m o d e ls ,

m a t e r ia l s , t o o l s ,

o r o th er s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; s e t t in g up and o p e r a tin g a l l a v a il a b l e t y p e s o f

w ork r e q u ir e s a rou n ded tra in in g in m a c h in e -s h o p a n d to o lr o o m

s h e e t-m e t a l-w o r k in g m a c h i n e s ; u s in g a v a r ie t y o f h a n d to o ls

u s u a l ly a c q u ir e d through a fo rm a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u iv a le n t tra in in g

b e n d in g , fo r m in g , s h a p in g , fit t in g , an d a s s e m b l i n g ;
m eta l a r tic le s

a s r e q u ir e d .

In g e n e r a l , th e

w ork o f

s h e e t -m e t a l w ork er r e q u ir e s rou n d e d tra in in g
a c q u ir e d

th ro u gh

a

fo r m a l

a p p r e n t ic e s h ip

and

in

c u tt in g ,

in s ta llin g

sh e e t-

and p r o c e s s e s .

In g e n e r a l , th e t o o l a nd d ie

m a k er’ s
p r a c t ic e

a n d e x p e r ie n c e .

th e m a in te n a n c e

e x p e r ie n c e

u s u a l ly
F o r c r o s s -in d u s t r y w a g e

or e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and

in t o o l a nd d ie

e x p e r ie n c e .

jo b b in g s h o p s

s t u d y p u r p o s e s , t o o l and d ie m a k e rs

are e x c lu d e d

Lorn t h is

c la s s ific a tio n .

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER — C o n tin u e d

ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER
T r a n s p o r ts
a p artm e n t h o u s e ,

passen gers

d e p a rtm en t

b e tw e e n fl o o r s

store,

h o te l

or

o f an o ffic e
s im ila r

b u ild in g

e s t a b l is h m e n t

W ork ers w h o o p e r a te e l e v a t o r s in c o n ju n c t io n w ith o th e r d u t ie s s u c h a s
t h o s e o f s t a r te r s a n d ja n ito r s are e x c lu d e d .

D u tie s i n v o lv e a combination o f the follow ing:
or s c r u b b in g , a n d p o li s h i n g f l o o r s ; re m o v in g c h i p s ,

or o th er e s t a b l is h m e n t .
S w e e p in g , m o p p in g

tr a s h , and o th e r r e f u s e ; d u s tin g e q u ip m e n t, fu r n itu r e , or f i x t u r e s ; p o l i s h ­
in g m e ta l fix tu r e s or tr im m in g s; p r o v id in g s u p p l i e s a nd m inor m a in te*
nance

s e r v ic e s ;

c le a n in g

l a v a t o r ie s , s h o w e r s , a n d r e s t r o o m s .

W orkers

w ho s p e c i a l i z e in w in d o w w a s h in g are e x c lu d e d .

GUARD
P e rfo r m s ro u tin e p o l i c e d u t i e s , e ith e r a t fix e d p o s t or on to u r,
m a in ta in in g o rd e r, u s in g arm s or fo r c e w h e re n e c e s s a r y .

I n c lu d e s g a t e -

m en w h o are stationed at gate and check on identity o f em p loyees and

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING

other persons entering.
( L o a d e r a n d u n lo a d e r ; h a n d le r a nd s t a c k e r ; s h e l v e r ; tru c k e r; s t o c k -

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER

man or s t o c k h e lp e r ; w a r e h o u se m a n or w a r e h o u s e h e lp e r )

(S w e e p e r ; c h a r w o m a n ; j a n i t r e s s )
A w o rk er e m p lo y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c tu rin g p la n t , s t o r e ,
C l e a n s a n d k e e p s in a n o rd erly c o n d it io n fa c to r y w o rk in g a r e a s
a n d w a s h r o o m s , or p r e m is e s o f an o f f i c e , a p artm e n t h o u s e , or c o m m e r c ia l




or o th er e s t a b l is h m e n t w h o s e d u t ie s in v o lv e

ing:

one or more o f the follow ­

L o a d in g a n d u n lo a d in g v a r io u s m r t e r ia ls

a n d m e r c h a n d is e on or

26

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING— Continued

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK— Continued

from fr e ig h t c a r s , t r u c k s , or o th e r tr a n s p o r tin g d e v i c e s ; u n p a c k in g , s h e l v ­

For w age

stu d y p u r p o se s,

w o rk e rs a re c l a s s i f i e d

a s fo llo w s :

in g , or p l a c i n g m a t e r ia ls or m e r c h a n d is e in p ro p er s t o r a g e lo c a t i o n ; tr a n s ­
p o rtin g

m a t e r ia ls

or m e r c h a n d is e

,

b y h an d tru c k ,

c a r , or w h e e lb a r r o w .

Longshoremen who load and unload sh ips are excluded

.

ORDER FILLER

R ec eivin g clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receivin g clerk

TRUCKDRIVER

(O rd e r p ic k e r ; s t o c k s e l e c t o r ; w a r e h o u s e s t o c k m a n )
D r iv e s a tru ck w ith in a c i t y
F ills

s h ip p in g or tr a n s fe r o rd e rs fo r f i n i s h e d g o o d s from s to r e d

m e r c h a n d is e in a c c o r d a n c e w ith s p e c i f i c a t i o n s on s a l e s s l i p s , c u s t o m e r s ’
o r d e r s , or o th e r in s t r u c t i o n s .
c a t in g ite m s

fille d

M a y , in a d d itio n to f i l l i n g o rd e r s a n d in d i­

or o m itte d , k e e p r e c o r d s o f o u t g o in g o r d e r s , r e q u is i­

or in d u s t r ia l a re a to tra n sp o rt m a ­

t e r i a l s , m e r c h a n d is e , e q u ip m e n t, or m en b e t w e e n v a r io u s t y p e s o f e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t s

su ch

w h o le s a le

a n d r e t a i l e s t a b l is h m e n t s , or b e tw e e n

as:

M a n u fa c tu r in g p l a n t s ,

and c u s to m e r s 9 h o u se s

or p l a c e s o f b u s i n e s s .

tio n a d d it io n a l s t o c k , or report s h o r t s u p p l i e s to s u p e r v is o r , a nd pertorm

tru ck w ith or w ith o u t

o th e r r e la te d d u t i e s .

tru ck in g o o d w o rk in g o rd e r .

are excluded

.

fr e ig h t d e p o t s , w a r e h o u s e s ,
r e t a i l e s t a b l is h m e n t s

M a y a l s o lo a d or u n lo a d

h e l p e r s , m ak e m inor m e c h a n ic a l r e p a ir s , and k e e p

D river-salesm en and over-the-road drivers

PACKER, SHIPPING
For w age
P r e p a r e s fi n i s h e d p r o d u c ts fo r sh ip m e n t or s t o r a g e b y p la c in g
them in s h ip p in g c o n t a in e r s , th e
d e p e n d e n t u p o n th e t y p e , s i z e ,

s p e c ific

o p e r a t io n s p e rfo rm ed

b e in g

a n d n um ber o f u n its

Work r e q u ir e s the

a re

c la s s ifie d

( T r a c t o r -t r a ile r s h o u ld

by s i z e

b e r a te d on

to b e p a c k e d , the

ty p e o f c o n t a in e r e m p lo y e d , a n d m eth o d o f s h ip m e n t.

s t u d y p u r p o s e s , tr u c k d riv e r s

a nd ty p e o f e q u ip m e n t, a s f o l l o w s :
th e b a s i s o f t r a ile r c a p a c i t y .)

p l a c i n g o f ite m s

in s h ip p in g c o n t a in e r s a n d may in volve one or more o f

the follow ing: K n o w le d g e o f v a r io u s ite m s o f s t o c k in ord er to v e r ify
co n te n t; s e le c tio n
e n c lo s u r e s
b reak age

o f a p p ro p ria te

ty p e

and s i z e o f c o n t a in e r ; in s e r tin g

in c o n t a in e r ; u s in g e x c e l s i o r or o th e r m a te r ia l

or d a m a g e ; c l o s i n g a n d s e a l i n g

e n te r in g id e n t ify in g d a ta on c o n t a in e r .

b oxes or crates are excluded

.

to p r e v e n t

Truckdriver ( combination o f s i z e s lis te d separately)
Truckdriver, light (under 1% to n s )
Truckdriver medium (1% to and including 4 ton s)
Truckdriver heavy (over 4 ton s trailer typ e)
Truckdriver h eavy (ov er 4 tons other than trailer type)

,
,
,

,
,

c o n t a in e r ; a p p ly in g l a b e l s or

Packers who also make wooden

TRUCKER, POWER
O p e r a te s

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK

a m a n u a lly c o n t r o lle d g a s o l i n e - or e le c t r ic -p o w e r e d

tru ck or tra c to r to tra n sp o rt g o o d s

a n d m a t e r ia ls

o f a l l k in d s

about a

w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c tu rin g p la n t , or o th e r e s t a b l is h m e n t .
P repares

m e r c h a n d is e fo r s h ip m e n t, or r e c e i v e s a n d i s r e s p o n ­

s i b l e for in c o m in g s h ip m e n ts o f m e r c h a n d is e or o th e r m a t e r ia l s . Shipping

work in v o lv e s: A k n o w le d g e o f s h ip p in g p r o c e d u r e s , p r a c t i c e s , r o u t e s ,

For w age
tru c k , a s f o l l o w s :

a v a il a b l e m e a n s o f tr a n s p o r ta tio n a n d r a t e s ; and p r e p a rin g r e c o r d s o f th e
goods

s h ip p e d , m a k in g up b i l l s o f la d in g , p o s t in g w e ig h t a nd s h ip p in g

c h a r g e s , a n d k e e p in g a f i l e o f s h ip p in g r e c o r d s .

M a y d ir e c t or a s s i s t in

s tu d y p u r p o s e s , w o rk e rs

a re c l a s s i f i e d

by ty p e

of

,
,

Trucker power (forklift)
Trucker power (other than forklift)

p rep a rin g th e m e r c h a n d is e fo r s h ip m e n t . R eceivin g work in v o lv e s: V e r i­
fy in g or d ir e c t in g o th e r s in v e r ify in g th e c o r r e c t n e s s o f s h ip m e n t s a g a in s t
b ills

o f la d in g , i n v o i c e s , or o th e r r e c o r d s ; c h e c k in g fo r s h o r t a g e s

r e je c t in g d a m a g e d g o o d s ; r o u tin g m e r c h a n d is e or m a t e r ia ls
p a r tm e n ts ; m a in ta in in g n e c e s s a r y r e c o r d s a n d f i l e s .




WATCHMAN

and

to p rop er d e ­

M a k e s ro u n d s

of p r e m is e s p e r i o d i c a l ly in p r o te c t in g p ro p erty

a g a in s t f i r e , t h e f t , a nd i l l e g a l e n tr y .
* U.S. G V R M N P IN G O
O E N E T R TIN FFIC : I960 0 —576520
E

Occupational Wage Surveys
Occupational wage surveys will be conducted in the 82 major labor markets listed below during late I960 and early 1961. Bulletins, when available, may be
purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing O ffice, Washington 25, D.C., or from any of the BLS regional sales offices shown on the
inside front cover.
A summary bulletin containing data for 80 labor markets, combined with additional analysis, will be issued early in 1962.
Akron, Ohio— Bull. 1285Albany—
Schenectady—Troy, N.Y.— Bull. 1285Albuquerque, N. Mex.— Bull. 1285Allentown—Bethlehem—
Easton,
P a .-N .J .— Bull. 1285Atlanta, Ga.— Bull. 1285Baltimore, Md.— Bull. 1285Beaumont—Port Arthur, T ex .— Bull. 1285Birmingham, Ala.— Bull. 1285.

* Green Bay, Wis.— Bull. 1285-2
Greenville, S.C.— Bull. 1285Houston, T ex.— Bull. 1285Indianapolis, Ind.— Bull. 1285Jackson, M iss.— Bull. 1285Jacksonville, F ia.— Bull. 1285Kansas City, Mo.—
Kans.— Bull. 1285Lawrence—
Haverhill, Mass.—
N.H.— Bull. 1285* Little Rock—
North Little Rock, A rk .— Bull. 1285-6

Boise, Idaho— Bull. 1285Boston, Mass.— Bull. 1285Buffalo, N .Y .— Bull. 1285Burlington, Vt.— Bull. 1285Canton, Ohio— Bull. 1285Charleston, W. Va.— Bull. 1285Charlotte, N .C.— Bull. 1285Chattanooga, Tenn.—
Ga.-—Bull. 1285Chicago, 111.— Bull. 1285-

Los Angeles—
Long Beach, C alif.— Bull. 1285Louisville, Ky.—
Ind.— Bull. 1285Lubbock, T ex.— Bull. 1285* Manchester, N.H.— Bull. 1285-1
Memphis, Tenn.— Bull. 1285Miami, F la.— Bull. 1285Milwaukee, Wis.— Bull. 1285Minneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn.— Bull. 1285Muskegon—
Muskegon Heights, Mich.— Bull. 1285-

Cincinnati, Ohio—
Ky.— Bull. 1285Cleveland, O h io -B u ll. 1285-11
Columbus, Ohio— Bull. 1285Dallas, T ex.— Bull. 1285Davenport—
Rock Island—
Moline, Iowa—
111.—
Bull. 1285Dayton, Ohio— Bull. 1285Denver, C olo.— Bull. 1285Des Moines, Iowa— Bull. 1285Detroit, Mich.— Bull. 1285Fort Worth, T ex.— Bull. 1285-

Newark and Jersey City, N .J.— Bull. 1285New Haven, Conn.— Bull. 1285New Orleans, L a.— Bull. 1285New York, N .Y .— Bull. 1285Norfoik—
Portsmouth and Newport News—
Hampton, Va.— Bull. 1285* * Oklahoma City, Okla.— Bull. 1285-3
Omaha, Nebr.—
Iowa— Bull. 1285Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic, N.J.— Bull. 1285Philadelphia, Pa.— Bull. 1285Phoenix, Ariz.— Bull. 1285-

Pittsburgh, Pa.— Bull. 1285Portland, Maine— Bull. 1285Portland, Oreg.—
Wash.— Bull. 1285Providence—
Pawtucket, R .I.—
Mass.— Bull. 1285* * Raleigh, N.C.— Bull. 1285-5
Richmond, Va.— Bull. 1285Rockford, 111.— Bull. 1285St. Louis, M o.-Ill.— Bull. 1285-10
Salt Lake City, Utah— Bull. 1285San Antonio, Tex.— Bull. 1285San Bernardino—
Riverside—
Ontario,
C alif.— Bull. 1285-4
San Francisco—
Oakland, C a lif.— Bull. 1285Savannah, Ga.-—Bull. 1285Scranton, Pa.— Bull. 1285*8
Seattle, Wash.— Bull. 1285-7
Sioux Falls, S. Dak.— Bull. 1285South Bend, Ind.— Bull. 1285Spokane, Wash.— Bull. 1285Toledo, Ohio— Bull. 1285Trenton, N.J.— Bull. 1285Washington, D .C.—
Md.—
Va.-—Bull. 1285Waterbury, Conn.-—Bull. 1285Waterloo, Iowa— Bull. 1285Wichita, Kans.— Bull. 1285-9
Wilmington, D el.— .J.— Bull. 1285N
Worcester, Mass.— Bull. 1285York, P a.— Bull. 1285-

An asterisk preceding a labor market indicates the availability and
price of the bulletin.
Please do not order copies in advance.

*
**




Price, 20 cents.
Price, 25 cents.





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