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Occupational Wage Survey

GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA
MAY 1960

B u

le t in




N o .

1 2 6 5 - 4 6

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Cl ague, Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey
GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA




M A Y 1960

Bulletin No. 1265-46
July 1960
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents/ U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C.

Price 20 cents




Contents

Preface

Page
T h e C o m m u n ity W a ge S u r v e y P r o g r a m
T h e B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s r e g u la r ly con du cts
a r e a w id e w a g e s u r v e y s in a n u m b er o f im p o rta n t in d u s tr ia l
c e n t e r s . T h e s tu d ie s , m ad e f r o m la te f a l l to e a r ly s p r in g ,
r e la te to o c c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s and r e la t e d s u p p le m e n ta ry
b e n e fits . A p r e lim in a r y r e p o r t is a v a ila b le on c o m p le tio n
o f the study in e a c h a r e a , u s u a lly in the m onth fo llo w in g
the p a y r o ll p e r io d s tu d ied . T h is b u lle tin p r o v id e s a d d itio n a l
d ata not in c lu d e d in the e a r l i e r r e p o r t .
A c o n s o lid a te d
a n a ly tic a l b u lle tin s u m m a r iz in g the r e s u lt s o f a ll o f the
y e a r 's s u r v e y s is is s u e d a ft e r c o m p le tio n o f the fin a l a r e a
b u lle tin f o r the c u r r e n t roun d o f s u r v e y s .

In tro d u c tio n




1

T a b le s :

1.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y ---------

2

A:

O c c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s : *
A - 1. O ffic e o c c u p a tio n s --------------------------------------------------A - 2 . P r o f e s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s -----------------A - 3 . M a in ten a n c e and p o w e r p lan t o c c u p a tio n s ---------------A - 4 . C u s to d ia l and m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t io n s --------

4
5
5
6

B:
T h is r e p o r t w as p r e p a r e d in the B u r e a u 's r e g io n a l
o f f ic e in A tla n ta , G a ., b y D on ald C r u s e , u n der the d i r e c ­
tio n o f L o u is B . W o y ty c h , R e g io n a l W a ge and In d u s tr ia l
R e la tio n s A n a ly s t.

_______________________________________________________________

E s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and s u p p le m e n ta ry
w a g e p r o v is io n s : *
B - l . S h ift d iffe r e n t ia ls ________________________________________
B - 2 . M in im u m e n tra n c e s a la r ie s f o r w o m e n
o f f ic e w o r k e r s ___________________________________________
B - 3 . S ch ed u led w e e k ly h o u rs _________________________________
B - 4 . P a id h o lid a y s ______________________________________________
B -5 . P a id v a c a tio n s _________
B - 6 . H e a lth , in s u r a n c e , and p e n s io n p lans ________________

A p p e n d ix :

O c c u p a tio n a l d e s c r ip tio n s

------------------------------------------

* NO TE:
S im ila r ta b u la tion s f o r th es e and o th e r ite m s
a r e a v a ila b le in the r e p o r t s f o r s u r v e y s in o th e r m a jo r
a r e a s . A d ir e c t o r y in d ic a tin g date o f stu d y and the p r ic e
o f the r e p o r ts is a v a ila b le upon r e q u e s t .

7
8
8
9
10
12

13




Occupational Wage Survey—Greenville, S. C.
Introduction
T h is a r e a is one o f s e v e r a l im p o rta n t in d u s tr ia l c e n te r s in
w h ich the U . S . D e p a rtm e n t o f L a b o r 's B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s has
c on d u cted s u r v e y s o f o c c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s and r e la t e d w a g e b e n e fits
on an a r e a w id e b a s is . In th is a r e a , d ata w e r e o b ta in e d b y p e r s o n a l
v is it s o f B u re a u f i e l d e c o n o m is ts to r e p r e s e n t a t iv e e s ta b lis h m e n ts
w ith in s ix b ro a d in d u s tr y d iv is io n s :
M a n u fa c tu rin g ; t r a n s p o r t a t io n ,1
c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s ; w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il
tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v i c e s . M a jo r in ­
d u s try g ro u p s e x c lu d e d f r o m th es e s tu d ie s a r e g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a tio n s
and the c o n s tru c tio n and e x t r a c t iv e in d u s tr ie s . E s ta b lis h m e n ts h a vin g
f e w e r than a p r e s c r ib e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e o m itte d a ls o b e c a u s e
th ey fu r n is h in s u ffic ie n t e m p lo y m e n t in the o c c u p a tio n s stu d ied to w a r ­
ra n t in c lu s io n . W h e r e v e r p o s s ib le , s e p a r a te ta b u la tion s a r e p r o v id e d
f o r e a c h o f the b r o a d in d u s tr y d iv is io n s .
T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e con d u cted on a s a m p le b a s is b e c a u s e o f the
u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t in v o lv e d in s u r v e y in g a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts .
T o o b ta in
a p p r o p r ia te a c c u r a c y at m in im u m c o s t, a g r e a t e r p r o p o r tio n o f la r g e
than o f s m a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts is s tu d ie d .
In c o m b in in g the d ata, h o w ­
e v e r , a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts a r e g iv e n th e ir a p p ro p ria te w e ig h t. E s tim a te s
b a s e d on the e s ta b lis h m e n ts stu d ie d a r e p re s e n te d , t h e r e f o r e , as r e ­
la tin g to a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts in the in d u s tr y g ro u p in g and a r e a , e x ­
c e p t f o r th ose b e lo w the m in im u m s iz e stu d ied .

O ccu p ation s and E a r n in g s
T h e o c c u p a tio n s s e le c t e d f o r study a r e c o m m o n to a v a r ie t y
o f m a n u fa c tu rin g and n o n m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s tr ie s . O c c u p a tio n a l c l a s ­
s ific a t io n is b a s e d on a u n ifo r m s e t o f jo b d e s c r ip tio n s d e s ig n e d to
take accou n t o f in t e r e s ta b lis h m e n t v a r ia t io n in d u ties w ith in the s a m e
jo b . (See ap p e n d ix f o r lis t in g o f th es e d e s c r ip t io n s .) E a r n in g s d ata a r e
p re s e n te d (in the A - s e r i e s t a b le s ) f o r the fo llo w in g ty p e s o f o c c u p a ­
tio n s : (a ) O f f ic e c l e r i c a l ; (b ) p r o fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l; ( c ) m a in te ­
nance and p o w e r plant; and (d ) c u s to d ia l and m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t.
O c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t and e a r n in g s d ata a r e show n f o r
fu ll- t im e w o r k e r s , i . e . , th o s e h ir e d to w o r k a r e g u la r w e e k ly s c h e d ­
u le in the g iv e n o c c u p a tio n a l c la s s ific a t io n .
E a r n in g s d ata e x c lu d e
p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and

1 R a ilr o a d s , f o r m e r l y e x c lu d e d f r o m the s c o p e o f th es e s tu d ie s ,
h a ve b een added in n e a r ly a ll o f the a r e a s to be stu d ie d d u rin g the
w in te r o f 1959-60; r a ilr o a d s w i l l b e ad d ed in the r e m a in in g a r e a s n e x t
y e a r . F o r sc o p e o f s u r v e y in th is a r e a , s e e fo o tn o te to "t r a n s p o r t a ­
tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t ie s " in ta b le 1.




la te s h ifts .
N o n p ro d u c tio n b on u ses a r e e x c lu d e d a ls o , but c o s t - o f liv in g b on u ses and in c e n tiv e e a r n in g s a r e in c lu d e d .
W h e re w e e k ly
h ou rs a r e r e p o r te d , as f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s , r e f e r e n c e is
to the w o r k sc h e d u le s (ro u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r) f o r w h ich
s t r a ig h t - t im e s a la r ie s a r e paid ; a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s f o r th ese
o c c u p a tio n s have b e e n rou n ded to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o lla r .

A v e r a g e e a r n in g s o f m en and w o m en a r e p r e s e n te d s e p a r a t e ly
f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in w h ich b oth s e x e s a r e c o m m o n ly e m p lo y e d .
D iffe r e n c e s in pay l e v e l s o f m en and w o m e n in th es e o c c u p a tio n s a r e
l a r g e l y due to ( l ) d iffe r e n c e s in the d is tr ib u tio n o f the s e x e s am on g
in d u s tr ie s and e s ta b lis h m e n ts ; (2 ) d iffe r e n c e s in s p e c ific d u ties p e r ­
fo r m e d , alth ou gh the o c c u p a tio n s a r e a p p r o p r ia t e ly c l a s s i f i e d w ith in
the sam e s u r v e y jo b d e s c r ip tio n ; and (3 ) d iffe r e n c e s in le n g th o f s e r v ­
ic e o r m e r it r e v ie w w h en in d iv id u a l s a la r ie s a r e a d ju s te d on th is b a sis.
L o n g e r a v e r a g e s e r v ic e o f m en w o u ld r e s u lt in h ig h e r a v e r a g e pay
w h en both s e x e s a r e
e m p lo y e d w ith in the sam e r a te r a n g e .
Job
d e s c r ip tio n s u sed in c la s s ify in g e m p lo y e e s in th es e s u r v e y s a re u su ­
a lly m o r e g e n e r a liz e d than th ose u sed in in d iv id u a l e s ta b lis h m e n ts to
a llo w f o r m in o r d iffe r e n c e s am on g e s ta b lis h m e n ts in s p e c ific d u ties
p e r fo r m e d .

O c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t e s tim a te s r e p r e s e n t the to ta l in a ll
e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith in the s c o p e o f the stu d y and n ot the n u m b er a c tu ­
a lly s u r v e y e d . B e c a u s e o f d iffe r e n c e s in o c c u p a tio n a l s tr u c tu r e am on g
e s ta b lis h m e n ts , the e s tim a te s o f o c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t ob ta in ed
f r o m the s a m p le o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts stu d ied s e r v e o n ly to in d ic a te the
r e la t iv e im p o rta n c e o f the jo b s s tu d ied .
T h e s e d iffe r e n c e s in o c c u ­
p a tio n a l s tr u c tu r e do n o t m a t e r i a l l y a f f e c t the a c c u r a c y o f the e a r n ­
in g s d ata.

E s ta b lis h m e n t P r a c t ic e s

and S u p p le m e n ta ry W a ge P r o v is io n s

In fo r m a tio n is p r e s e n te d a ls o (in the B - s e r i e s ta b le s ) on s e ­
le c t e d e s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and s u p p le m e n ta ry b e n e fits as th ey r e ­
la te to o f f ic e and p lan t w o r k e r s . T h e t e r m " o ff ic e w o r k e r s , " as u sed
in th is b u lle tin , in c lu d e s w o rk in g s u p e r v is o r s and n o n s u p e r v is o r y
w o r k e r s p e r fo r m in g c l e r i c a l o r r e la t e d fu n c tio n s , and e x c lu d e s a d m in ­
i s t r a t iv e , e x e c u tiv e , and p r o fe s s io n a l p e r s o n n e l. " P la n t w o r k e r s " in ­
clu d e w o rk in g fo r e m e n and a ll n o n s u p e r v is o r y w o r k e r s (in c lu d in g le a d m en and t r a in e e s ) e n g a g e d in n o n o ffic e fu n c tio n s .
A d m in is t r a t iv e ,
e x e c u tiv e , and p r o fe s s io n a l e m p lo y e e s , and fo r c e - a c c o u n t c o n s tru c tio n
e m p lo y e e s who a r e u t iliz e d as a s e p a ra te w o r k f o r c e a r e e x c lu d e d .
C a f e t e r ia w o r k e r s and r o u te m e n a r e e x c lu d e d in m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s ­
tr ie s , but a r e in c lu d e d as p lan t w o r k e r s in n o n m an u fa ctu rin g in d u s trie s .

2

T a b le 1.

E s t a b li s h m e n t s a n d w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f s u r v e y a n d n u m b e r s t u d ie d in G r e e n v i l l e ,

In d u s try d iv is io n

M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s in s c o p e
o f s tu d y

b y m a jo r in d u s tr y d iv is io n , 2 M a y I96 0

N u m b e r o f e s t a b l is h m e n t s
W ith in
scope of
stu d y 3

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s
W ith in s c o p e o f stu d y

S tu d ie d
T ota l

4

S tu d ie d

O ffic e

P la n t

T ota l 4

A l l d i v i s i o n s _____________________________________________________________

51

128

75

3 6 ,3 7 0

2, 600

3 0 ,3 0 0

2 9 ,4 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________________ __________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , a n d
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 5 ___________________________________________
W h o l e s a le t r a d e ____________________________ _________________ —
R e t a il t r a d e ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ___________________________
S e r v i c e s 7 ___________________________________________________ __ -----

51
51

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53

42
33

2 9 ,3 0 0
7 ,0 7 0

1 ,4 0 0
1, 200

2 5, 7 0 0
4 , 6 00

2 3, 8 00
5, 6 0 0

51
51
51
51
51

14
4
19
4
12

10
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11
4
6

1, 8 0 0
300
2, 9 0 0
970
T , 100

200

1, 2 00

1, 540
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( 6)

0

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C6)

1 T h e G r e e n v i l l e M e t r o p o l it a n A r e a ( G r e e n v i l l e C o u n t y ).
T h e " w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f s t u d y " e s t i m a t e s s h o w n in t h is t a b le p r o v i d e a r e a s o n a b ly a c c u r a t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f th e s i z e a n d
c o m p o s i t i o n o f th e l a b o r f o r c e in c lu d e d in th e s u r v e y .
T h e e s t i m a t e s a r e n o t in te n d e d , h o w e v e r , to s e r v e a s a b a s i s o f c o m p a r i s o n w it h o t h e r a r e a e m p l o y m e n t in d e x e s t o m e a s u r e e m p l o y m e n t
t r e n d s o r l e v e l s s i n c e (1 ) p la n n in g o f w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s th e u s e o f e s t a b l is h m e n t d a ta c o m p i l e d c o n s i d e r a b l y in a d v a n c e o f th e p a y r o l l p e r i o d s t u d ie d , a n d (2 ) s m a l l e s t a b l is h m e n t s
a re
e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .
2 T h e 1957 r e v i s e d e d i t io n o f th e S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r ia l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l w a s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g e s t a b l is h m e n t s b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n .
M a j o r c h a n g e s f r o m th e e a r l i e r e d i t io n (u s e d in
th e B u r e a u 's l a b o r m a r k e t w a g e s u r v e y p r o g r a m p r i o r t o th e w in t e r o f 1 9 5 8 -5 9 ) a r e th e t r a n s f e r o f m i l k p a s t e u r i z a t i o n p la n t s a n d r e a d y - m i x e d c o n c r e t e e s t a b l is h m e n t s f r o m t r a d e (w h o l e s a l e o r
r e t a il ) t o m a n u fa c t u r i n g , a n d th e t r a n s f e r o f r a d i o a n d t e l e v i s i o n b r o a d c a s t i n g f r o m s e r v i c e s t o th e t r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s d i v i s i o n .
3 I n c l u d e s a l l e s t a b l is h m e n t s w it h t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t at o r a b o v e th e m i n i m u m - s i z e l i m it a t io n .
A l l o u t le t s (w ith in th e a r e a ) o f c o m p a n i e s in s u c h in d u s t r ie s a s t r a d e , fi n a n c e , a u to r e p a i r
s e r v i c e , a n d m o t i o n - p i c t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s i d e r e d a s 1 e s t a b l is h m e n t .
4 I n c lu d e s e x e c u t i v e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d o t h e r w o r k e r s e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s e p a r a t e o f f i c e a n d p la n t c a t e g o r i e s .
5 R a i l r o a d s w e r e in c lu d e d ; t a x i c a b s a n d s e r v i c e s in c id e n t a l t o w a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n w e r e e x c l u d e d .
6 T h is i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n i s r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " a n d " n o n m a n u fa c t u r i n g " in th e S e r i e s A a n d B t a b l e s , a lt h o u g h c o v e r a g e w a s i n s u f f i c i e n t t o j u s t i f y s e p a r a t e
p r e s e n t a t io n o f d a ta .
7 H o t e l s ; p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u t o m o b i le r e p a i r s h o p s ; m o t io n p i c t u r e s ; n o n p r o fi t m e m b e r s h i p o r g a n i z a t i o n s ; a n d e n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .




3
S h ift d if fe r e n t ia l d ata (ta b le B - l ) a re lim it e d to m a n u fa c tu rin g
in d u s tr ie s . T h is in fo r m a tio n is p r e s e n te d both in te r m s o f (a ) e s ta b ­
lis h m e n t p o lic y , 2 p re s e n te d in t e r m s o f to ta l plant w o r k e r e m p lo y ­
m en t, and (b ) e f f e c t iv e p r a c t ic e , p r e s e n te d on the b a s is o f w o r k e r s
a c tu a lly e m p lo y e d on the s p e c ifie d s h ift at the tim e o f the s u r v e y .
In e s ta b lis h m e n ts h a vin g v a r ie d d if fe r e n t ia ls , the am oun t a p p ly in g to
a m a jo r it y w as u sed o r , i f no am oun t a p p lie d to a m a jo r it y , the c l a s ­
s ific a t io n “ o t h e r " w as u s e d .
In e s ta b lis h m e n ts in w h ich som e la t e s h ift hou rs a r e p aid at n o r m a l r a t e s , a d if fe r e n t ia l w as r e c o r d e d o n ly
i f it a p p lie d to a m a jo r it y o f the s h ift h o u rs .

M in im u m e n tra n c e r a te s (ta b le B - 2 ) r e la t e o n ly to the e s ta b ­
lis h m e n ts v is it e d .
T h e y a r e p r e s e n te d on an e s ta b lis h m e n t, r a th e r
than on an e m p lo y m e n t b a s is .
P a id h o lid a y s ; p aid v a c a tio n s ; and
h e a lth , in s u ra n c e , and p e n s io n plans a r e tr e a te d s t a t is t ic a lly on the
b a s is th at th es e a r e a p p lic a b le to a ll p lan t o r o f f ic e w o r k e r s i f a m a ­
j o r i t y o f such w o r k e r s a r e e lig ib le o r m a y e v e n tu a lly q u a lify f o r the
p r a c t ic e s lis t e d . S c h ed u le d h o u rs a r e t r e a te d s t a t is t ic a lly on the b a s is
that th es e a r e a p p lic a b le to a ll p lan t o r o f f ic e w o r k e r s i f a m a jo r it y
a r e c o v e r e d . 3 B e c a u s e o f rou n d in g, sum s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s in th ese
tab u la tion s m a y n ot e q u a l to ta ls .

T h e f i r s t p a r t o f the p aid h o lid a y s ta b le p r e s e n ts the nu m ­
b e r o f w h o le and h a lf h o lid a y s a c tu a lly p r o v id e d .
The secon d p a rt
c o m b in e s w h o le and h a lf h o lid a y s to show to ta l h o lid a y t i m e .

T h e s u m m a r y o f v a c a tio n plans is lim it e d to f o r m a l a r r a n g e ­
m e n ts , e x c lu d in g in fo r m a l plans w h e r e b y tim e o f f w ith p ay is g ra n te d
a t the d is c r e t io n o f the e m p lo y e r .
S e p a ra te e s tim a te s a r e p r o v id e d
a c c o r d in g to e m p lo y e r p r a c t ic e in c o m p u tin g v a c a tio n p a y m e n ts , such
as tim e p a y m e n ts , p e r c e n t o f annual e a r n in g s , o r fla t - s u m am ou n ts.
H o w e v e r , in the ta b u la tion s o f v a c a tio n a llo w a n c e s , p a y m en ts not on
a tim e b a s is w e r e c o n v e r te d ; f o r e x a m p le , a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t o f
annual e a r n in g s w a s c o n s id e r e d as the e q u iv a le n t o f 1 w e e k ’ s p ay.

D ata a r e p re s e n te d f o r a ll h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , and p e n s io n
plans f o r w h ich at le a s t a p a r t o f the c o s t is b o rn e b y the e m p lo y e r ,
e x c e p tin g o n ly le g a l r e q u ir e m e n ts such as w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n s a tio n
and s o c ia l s e c u r it y . Such plans in clu d e th ose u n d e r w r itte n b y a c o m ­
m e r c ia l in s u ra n c e c o m p a n y and th ose p r o v id e d th rou gh a union fund o r
paid d ir e c t ly b y the e m p lo y e r ou t o f c u r r e n t o p e r a tin g funds o r f r o m
a fund s e t a s id e f o r th is p u rp o s e .
D eath b e n e fits a r e in c lu d e d as a
f o r m o f l i f e in s u r a n c e .
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e is lim ited - to th at typ e o f in ­
s u ra n c e u n der w h ich p r e d e te r m in e d c a s h p a y m en ts a r e m a d e d ir e c t ly
to the in s u re d on a w e e k ly o r m o n th ly b a s is d u rin g illn e s s o r a c c id e n t
d is a b ilit y .
In fo r m a tio n is p r e s e n te d f o r a ll such plans to w h ich the
e m p lo y e r c o n trib u te s .
H o w e v e r , in N e w Y o r k and N e w J e r s e y , w h ich
h a ve e n a c te d te m p o r a r y d is a b ilit y in s u ra n c e la w s w h ich r e q u ir e e m ­
p lo y e r c o n tr ib u t io n s ,4 p lans a r e in c lu d e d o n ly i f the e m p lo y e r (1 ) c o n ­
tr ib u te s m o r e than is le g a l l y r e q u ir e d , o r (2 ) p r o v id e s the e m p lo y e e
w ith b e n e fits w h ich e x c e e d the r e q u ir e m e n ts o f the la w . T a b u la tio n s
o f p aid s ic k - le a v e plans a r e lim it e d to f o r m a l p la n s 5 w h ich p r o v id e
fu ll p ay o r a p r o p o r tio n o f the w o r k e r 's p ay d u rin g a b s e n c e f r o m w o r k
b e c a u s e o f illn e s s .
S e p a r a te ta b u la tio n s a r e p r o v id e d a c c o r d in g to
( l ) plans w h ich p r o v id e fu ll pay and no w a itin g p e r io d , and (2 ) plans
p r o v id in g e it h e r p a r tia l pay o r a w a itin g p e r io d .
In a d d itio n to the
p re s e n ta tio n o f the p ro p o r tio n s o f w o r k e r s who a r e p r o v id e d s ic k n e s s
and a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e o r p aid s ic k le a v e , an u n d u p lic a ted to ta l is
shown o f w o r k e r s w ho r e c e i v e e it h e r o r both ty p es o f b e n e fits .
C a ta s tro p h e in s u r a n c e , s o m e tim e s r e f e r r e d to as .e x te n d e d
m e d ic a l in s u r a n c e , in c lu d e s th ose p lan s w h ich a r e d e s ig n e d to p r o te c t
e m p lo y e e s in c a s e o f s ic k n e s s and in ju r y in v o lv in g e x p e n s e s b eyo n d
the n o r m a l c o v e r a g e o f h o s p it a liz a tio n , m e d ic a l, and s u r g ic a l p la n s .
M e d ic a l in s u ra n c e r e f e r s to plans p r o v id in g f o r c o m p le te o r p a r tia l
p a y m e n t o f d o c t o r s ' f e e s . Such plans m a y b e u n d e r w r itte n b y c o m m e r ­
c ia l in s u ra n c e c o m p a n ie s o r n o n p r o fit o r g a n iz a tio n s o r th ey m a y be
s e lf- in s u r e d .
T a b u la tio n s o f r e t ir e m e n t p e n s io n p lans a r e lim it e d to
th ose p lans th at p r o v id e m o n th ly p a y m e n ts f o r the r e m a in d e r o f the
w o r k e r 's l i f e .

A n e s ta b lis h m e n t w as c o n s id e r e d as h a vin g a p o lic y i f it m e t
4 T h e t e m p o r a r y d is a b ilit y la w s in C a lifo r n ia and R h od e Is la n d
e ith e r o f the fo llo w in g c o n d itio n s : ( l ) O p e ra te d la te s h ifts at the tim e
do n ot r e q u ir e e m p lo y e r c o n trib u tio n s .
o f the s u r v e y , o r (2 ) had f o r m a l p r o v is io n s c o v e r in g la te s h ifts .
5 A n e s ta b lis h m e n t w as c o n s id e r e d as h a vin g a f o r m a l p lan i f
3
S ch ed u led w e e k ly h o u rs f o r o f f ic e w o r k e r s ( f i r s t s e c t io n o t e s ta b lis h e d at le a s t the m in im u m n u m b er o f d ays o f s ic k le a v e that
if
ta b le B - 3 ) in s u r v e y s m ad e p r io r to la te 1957 and e a r ly 1958 w e r e
c o u ld be e x p e c te d b y e a c h e m p lo y e e . Such a p lan n e e d n o t b e w r it t e n ,
p re s e n te d in t e r m s o f the p r o p o r tio n o f w o m e n o f f ic e w o r k e r s e m ­
but in fo r m a l s ic k - le a v e a llo w a n c e s , d e te r m in e d on an in d iv id u a l b a s is ,
p lo y e d in o f f ic e s w ith the in d ic a te d w e e k ly h o u rs f o r w o m e n w o r k e r s .
w e r e e x c lu d e d .







A* Occupational Earnings
Table A -l. Office Occupations
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u s t r y d iv is io n , G r e e n v ille , S . C . , M a y I960)

Sex, occupation, and industry division
Men
Clerks, accounting, class A _______________ _______
Women
B illers, machine (billing machine) __________________
M anufacturing----- ---------------------------------------------B illers, machine (bookkeeping m achine)_____________
Nonm anufacturing_______________________________
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ___________
M anufacturing__________________ ____________ __
Nonm anufacturing_______________________________
Clerks, accounting, class A ________________________
M anufacturing___________________________________
Clerks, accounting, class B ________________________
M anufacturing___________________________________
Nonmanufacturing------------------ --------------- --------C lerks, file, class A ___________ __________ _______
Clerks, file, class B _______________________________
M anufacturing_______________ „ ______________
Nonmanufacturing______________ — -------- -----Clerks, o rd e r ________________ _____ _______ ____
M anufacturing----------------------------------------------------Clerks, p ay ro ll_____________________________________
M anufacturing___________________________________
Nonm anufacturing____________ ____ ____________
Keypunch operators ________________________ _______
M anufacturing__________________________ _______
Secretaries ________________________________________
M anufacturing___________________________________
Nonm anufacturing___________ __________________
Stenographers, general _____ _____________________
M anufacturing___________________________ ______
Nonmanufacturing______________ _______________
Switchboard o p e ra to rs---------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing________________________________
Switchboard operator-receptionists _________________
M anufacturing___________________________________
Tabulating-machine operators, class B ____ _____
M anufacturing___________________________________
Typists, class B _ _____________________ _________
M anufacturing------- --------------------- ------------------Nonm anufacturing_______________________________

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
35. 00 40. 00 45. 00 50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70.00 75. 00 80.00 85.00 90. 00 $95. 00 $
100.00
and
and
under
40. 00 45. 00 50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 _65, 00 70. 00 .7.5^00 _80.00 85. 00 90. 00 95. 00 100. 00 over_

Number
of
workers

Average
Weeklyj earningsi
Weekly
(Standard) (Standard)

18

39. 0 $89. 50

_

_

40. 0
40. 0
40.0
40.0
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
40.0
40.0
39. 5
40. 0
39.0
38. 5
39. 0
40.0
38. 5
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
39. 5
39.5
40. 0
39. 5
40.0
39. 0
39. 5
40.0
38. 5
40. 5
41.0
39. 5
39. 5
40. 0
40.0
38. 5
40. 0
37. 5

_
3
3
1
1
_
_
5
5
-

4
3
_

41
34
21
17
67
20
47
17
16
54
36
18
37
55
20
35
29
24
90
74
16
73
47
152
73
79
113
58
55

19
17
37
25
16
15
102
30
72

56.00
55. 50
53. 00
51. 50
53. 00
6 0 .0 0
50.00
69. 50
70.00
52. 00
52.00
52. 50
50. 50
45. 00
46.00
44. 00
58. 00
57.00
57.00
57. 00
56.00
53. 50
54. 50
72.00
74. 00
70. 00
61. 50
6 2 .0 0
61.50
48. 50
47. 50
59. 50
57. 00
66. 50
66. 50
47.00
51.00
45. 50

_
1
_
-

5
1
4
10
4
6
9
23
12
11
3
*
4
3
1
5
4
3

-

3

5

5
19
19

3

3
_
.
24
10
14

_

_

8
9
6
7
5
5
5
3
16
19
1
16
18
1
1
15
16
13
12
2
4
7
11
20
7
4
4
16
3
9
9
16
20
12 — r r n
4
5
6
33
1
20
14
4
10
14
12
1
1
13
11
1
5
5
1
2
7
6
1
_
20
26
9
20
17

_

1

2

_

1

1

7

2

_

9
9
2
2
13
7
6
3
3
2
2
5
_
8
8
13
10
3
19
15
18
2
16
29
25
4

4
4
.3
3
5
5
2
1
6
4
2
3

4
4
2
7
5
2
2
2
2
2
2

_
*
1
1
-

2
_
_
2
2
_
_

_
_
_
-

_
-

1
1

_

_

_

1

.

_

_
1
1
_
7
7
2
1
1
_
_
1
1

3

1
14
10
1
1
11
9
2

5
5
21
19
2
6
4

17
11
6
19
14
5

1
1
8
6
4
4
2
2
“

1

15
15
2
2

17
7
10
9
4
5

.
2
2

7
7
_
-

1
1
_
_
1
1
20
11
9
15
10
5

_
_
3

_

.

*

_
-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

26
12
14
2
2
2

*

-

16
14
2

6
1
5

1
1
1
-

_

_
-

-

.

2
-

_

_
_

_
.
_

_

*
_
_
_

_
.
1
1
_
5
1
4
1
1
_

4

_
5

2

3

2
3

_
_

_
_

1

-

_
-

_

_

-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

10
8

-

_

2

-

1
1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

24

1 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
2 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s fo l lo w s : 1 at $ 1 0 0 to $ 1 0 5 ; 1 at $ 1 1 0 to $ 1 1 5 ; 2 at $ 1 2 5 to $ 1 3 0 .

_

-

1

-

“

3

-

3

~

"

5

Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a rn in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n , G r e e n v ille , S. C . , M a y i9 6 0 )

Average
S ex, o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s try d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

NU M B ER OF W O RK ERS R E CE IVIN G S T R A IG H T-TIM E W E E K L Y EA RN IN G S OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
50. 00 55. 00 60. 00 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80. 00 85. 00 90. 00 95. 00 100.00 105. 00 110.00 115,00
and
"
■
"
"
under
55. 00 60. 0Q 6 5. QQ_ _IQ. OIL j?5^oa_ _8fL-0Q &5. QjQ_ _90._00_. _95._0£L 100 . 00 105. 00. it Q .m 1 15. Q0 120.00
$

Weeklyj
(Standard)

Weekly t
earnings
(Standard)

M en
D ra fts m e n , s e n io r -----------------------------------------------------------

37

40. 0 $ 100. 50

_

_

_

_

_

1

W om en
N u rs e s , in d u s tria l ( re g is te re d ) ----------------------------------M a n u fac tu rin g ------------------------------------------------------------

16
16

40. 0
40. 0

1
1

-

2
2

4
4

4
4

_

_

"

"

73. 00
73. 00

_

4

2

4
4

"

4

3

1
1

_

13
_

_

‘

"

1

9

_

"

-

1 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .

Table A-3. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s f o r m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u s t r y d i v is i o n , G r e e n v il le , S. C . , M a y I960)
N U M B ER OF W O RK EE S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T-TIM E H OUR LY EA RN IN G S OF—

Occupation and industry division
C arpenters, maintenance ---------------------------Manufacturing ---------------------- --------------E lectricians, maintenance ----------- --------------Manufacturing --------------- ------ — ---------Engineers, stationary --------------------------------Manufacturing ---------------------------------------Firem en, stationary boiler -------------------------Manufacturing --------------- ------ --------------H elpers, trades, maintenance _______________
Manufacturing ------------------------ _ --------M achinists, maintenance ----------------------------Manufacturing ---------------------------- ---------Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ---------Nonmanufacturing ---------------------------------Public utilities 3 ----------- ------------------Mechanics, maintenance -----------------------------Manufacturing ----------------------------------------Oilers -------------------------------------------------------Manufacturing --------------------------- -----P ainters, maintenance -------------------------------Manufacturing ---------------------------------------Plum bers, maintenance -------------- — ---------Manufacturing ----------------------------------------

Number
of

workers
64
55
86
85
27
22
48
41
83
81
105
105
59
51
27
169
168
123
123
26
23
15
15

$
$
$
$
$
earnings Under 1. 00 1. 10 1. 20 1. 30 1.40
and
$
1. 00 under 1. 20 1. 30 1.40 1. 50
1. 10
1
3
$ 1. 72
3
1. 72
“
"
_
_
_
_
1. 87
j
1.88
"
“
_
1
2. 01
2
1
2. 03
2
"
_
12
12
12
1. 26 27
5
12
12
12
1. 33
5
“
11
12
2
5
1. 33
18
9
11
11
2
5
17
1. 34
9
_
_
.
_
_
_
1. 87
1. 87
_
_
_
_
_
2. 24
2. 31
2. 24
~
_
_
1
2
8
1. 94
1
2
8
1. 94
_
_
_
6
37
1. 33
79
6
37
1. 33
79
"
_
_
_
1
2
6
1. 57
1
1
6
1. 56
"
_
_
1
1. 70
1
1. 70
“
"
"
"
"
Average
hourly ,

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la t e sh ifts,
W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d as fo llo w s : 3 at $ 0 . 80 to $ 0 . 90; 4 at $ 0 . 90 to $ 1.
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o t h e r p u b lic u t il it i e s .




$ 1. 70 $ 1. 80 $ 1. 90 $ 2. 00 $2. 10 $2. 20 $2. 30 $2.40

$1. 50

$1. 60

1. 60
9
9
3
3
1
"
_

1. 70__ L 80
14
24
14
16
20
3
3
19
7
5
_
_
20
5
20
5
1
3
3
3
38
15
15
38
.
1
1
2
9
2
7
2
8
2
8

26
26
2
2
3
11
11
_

6
6
2
2

L 90 _ 2, 0Q__ 2. 10 _2,-20
4
1
5
2
4
1
5
2
15
31
8
5
15
8
5
31
1
1
4
2
1
1
3
2
_
_
_
_
"
.
5
37
30
5
37
30
5
5
4
10
2
8
2
8
'
31
10
14
13
10
31
14
13
_

-

_

1
1

_

1
1

_

2.. 30
1
1
_
2
2
_
-

2.40

"
5
5

_
4
3
_
21
21
1
2
1

_

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

'

-

“

'

"
-

$2. 50

2. 50

2. 60

1
1
_

_
“
_
-

_
"
2
2
2
1
1

15
15
11
4
4

-

-

-

$2. 60
and
over
_
2
2
_
"
1
1
"
14
14
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

"

"

-

6

Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u s t r y d i v is i o n , G r e e n v il le , S . C . , M a y I96 0 )
N U M B ER OF W O RK ER S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H OURLY E A RN IN G S OF—

Number
of
workers

O c c u p a t io n 1 and in d u s t r y d i v is i o n

Average
hourly

$
$
0 .7 0
U n d e r 0 .6 0
and
under
0 . 60
.8 0
.7 0

$
1 .6 0

$
1 .7 0

$
1 .8 0

$
1 .9 0

$
2. 00

$
2. 10

$
2. 20

$
2. 30

$
2 .4 0

$
2. 50

$
2 .6 0

.9 0

-1 .7 0 -

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

2. 10

2 .2 0

2. 30

2 .4 0

2. 50

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

-

-

-

~

_

_

_
-

0. 9 0

$
1 .0 0

$
1. 10

$
1 .2 0

$
1. 30

1.0 0

1 .1 0

1 .2 0

JL 30

1 .4 0

L .5 S

4

$
0 .8 0

81
54
27
6

67
51
16
4

185
176
9
7

57
55
2
"

13

3

2
-

3
1

-

-

33
29

7
6

2
2

_

_

_

>

_

-

$

$
1 .4 0

$
1. 50

3

6

11

3

6

11
-

.9 7
1 .0 4

5

1

_

4 05
341
64
29

1 .2 4
1. 16
1 .6 4
2. 27

_
-

_
"

_
-

4
4
"

_
-

110
90
20
"

83
83
-

156
156
-

10
9
1
1

14
2
12
1

1
1
1

_
-

89
52

1 .3 9
1. 33

_

„_

_

_

_

-

-

11
10

14
8

12
6

17
11

1
1

6
6

76
73

1. 39
1 .4 1

1

_
-

3
3

4
2

9
9

33
33

4
4

30
20

1 .4 7
1 .4 8

3
3

2
1

2
1

22
20

1. 62
~ "1 T 5 5 ~

_

_

-

-

Shippin g and r e c e iv in g c l e r k s
-------- -------- _
M a n u fa c t u r in g -----------------------------------------------------

29
29

1 .6 0

_

_

1.60

-

T r u c k d r iv e r s 4
--------- --------- ----- __ ---------------M a n u fa c t u r in g ------------------------ ------------ -------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g __ --------- _ ----------------P u b lic u t il it i e s 3 ________
— ----------

196
84
112
75

1 .6 4
1 .2 9
1 .9 0
1 .9 4

_
-

T r u c k d r iv e r s , m e d iu m ( 1 V 2 to and
in c lu d in g 4 to n s)
-------- — —
— -----M a n u fa c t u r in g ------------ -------------------------N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ------ _
_ _ _ _ _

113
59
54

1. 31
1 .2 4
1 .3 8

-

T r u c k d r iv e r s , h e a v y ( o v e r 4 t o n s ,
t r a i l e r type) __ ------ ------------__ — _
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ---------- __ __ __
----P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3 ----------

45
38
32

2. 36
2 .4 9
2. 57

“

T r u c k d r iv e r s , h e a v y ( o v e r 4 t o n s , o t h e r
than t r a i l e r ty p e)
---------------- ---------- ------

28

1 .9 4
1 .3 9

J a n it o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s (m en )
N on m a n u fa c tu rin g „
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s 3

—

-

----__
- _ --------

- -

J a n it o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s ( w o m e n ) -------M a n u fa ctu r in g _ —
_ __
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g
__ __
----M a n u fa c t u r in g _____________________ — —
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
--------—
----P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3
O rd er fille r s
________
_____
M a n u fa ctu r in g _ __ _ __ ___

___
___ __

P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g
-----__ __ —
M a n u fa ctu r in g _ -------------------------R e c e iv in g c l e r k s _ ----M a n u fa c t u r in g ----S h ippin g c l e r k s _______
M a n u fa c t u r in g ____ ___

_

-----

__ __
__ — ------------ -------------------- —
___

__ ----__
-----

4 34
347
87
21

$ 1 . 18
1 .2 1
1 .0 5
1. 30

48
37

T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (f o r k lif t ) _______________________
M a n u fa c t u r in g -----------------------------------------------------

55
45
136
118
18

1 .2 2
1 .2 6
1 .0 2

4
-

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

"

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

"

2
-

_

_

_

-

-

1
1

2
2

'

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

_
-

_
-

4
4
4

_
-

_
-

_
-

22
22
22

_
-

1
1

27
9

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
14

2
2

2
2

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

12
6

2
2

1
-

8
7

_

_

_

_

>

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

9
9

3
3

5
5

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

3
3

-

-

"

*

-

5
5

5
5

8
8

_

3
3

_

_

_

_ .

_

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

3
3

"

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

2
2
-

_
-

48
8
40
30

9
9
-

38
37
1
"

12
12
-

11
11
-

1
1
-

_
-

2
2
"

10
4
6

_
-

3
3

7
7
4

_
-

2
2

4
4

43
43
41

4
4
-

-

-

-

"

41
4
37

8
8
"

38
37

7
7

2
2

1
1

-

“

6
6

“

“

4
4

-

2
2

4
4

-

"

-

-

"

_

1
1

_

"

"

3
■

"

-

■

4
-

'

3
3
■

-

"

-

"

34
34
32

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

7

4

_

_

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

_

.

-

-

"

-

"

3
-

.

-

9
2

_

-

5
5

5
5

3
3

_
-

3
3

19
16
3

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1

1

-

5

6

-

_

11

21
21

-

1
1

5
5

20
20

20
20

3
3

n

16
16

45
43
2

_
-

-

4
4

_

-

_

1 D ata li m it e d to m e n w o r k e r s e x c e p t w h e r e o t h e r w is e in d ic a t e d .
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o t h e r p u b lic u t il it i e s .
4 I n c lu d e s a ll d r iv e r s r e g a r d le s s o f s i z e and ty p e o f t r u c k o p e r a t e d .




-

_

1.26

W a tch m e n
__
---------- __
----------------------------M a n u fa c t u r in g ------ — ------------------------ -----N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
— --------------------------------

1

2

“
_
-

2
2

_
-

-




7

B Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
•

Table B-1. Shift Differentials
( P e r c e n t o f m a n u fa ctu rin g plant w o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s na vin g f o r m a l p r o v is i o n s f o r sh ift w o r k , an d in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
a c t u a lly o p e r a t in g la t e s h ifts b y ty p e and a m ou n t o f d iff e r e n t ia l, G r e e n v ille , S. C . , M a y I960)
In e s t a b lis h m e n t s h a vin g fo r m a l
p r o v is i o n s 1 f o r —
S hift d iffe r e n t ia l

S e c o n d sh ift
w ork

T h ir d o r o th e r
sh ift w o r k

In e s t a b lis h m e n t s a c t u a lly
o p e r a t in g —
S e c o n d sh ift

T h ir d o r o t h e r
sh ift

69 . 8

U n ifo r m c e n t s (p e r h ou r)

3 ce n ts
_ __ -----5 cen ts
__ _ _ _
----- __
7 ce n ts
—
1 8 2/3 c e n t s ---------- -----

U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e

5 p e r c e n t __ __ __

_

__ __ _______

_

— ----__ __
___
__ __ ------------- ------------- __ --------

----------

----- —

__ _____

_

---------

_____

N o sh ift p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l ______________________________

2 0. 3

1 5 .9

2.6

W ith sh ift p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l ----- __ __ __ _

6 5. 5

5 7 .4

1. 1

1 4 .8

2. 6

5 2 .6

1. 1

14. 1

52. 0
.5
-

.2

_

.4

-

1 .4
-

. 5
.7

.4
-

14. 1

-

4 .8

-

.7

-

4. 8

-

.7

6 7. 2

8 .1

1 9 .3

1. 1

1
In c lu d e s e s t a b lis h m e n t s c u r r e n t l y o p e r a t in g la te s h ift s ,
th ou g h th e y w e r e n ot c u r r e n t l y o p e r a t in g la t e s h ift s .

and e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith fo r m a l p r o v is i o n s c o v e r i n g la te

s h ift s

even

8

Table B-2. Minimum Entrance Salaries for Women O ffice W orkers
( D i s t r i b u t i o n o f e s t a b l is h m e n t s s t u d ie d in a l l in d u s t r ie s an d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y m in i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r y f o r s e l e c t e d c a t e g o r i e s
o f i n e x p e r i e n c e d w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s , G r e e n v i l l e , S. C
M a y I9 6 0 )

.,

In e x p e rie n ce d ty p ists
M a n u f a c t u r in g
M in im u m w e e k l y s a l a r y 1

O t h e r in e x p e r i e n c e d c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s 2
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

M a n u fa c t u r in g

B a se d o n sta n d a rd w e e k ly h o u r s 3 o f—

A ll

A ll
sc h e d u le s

A ll
s c h e d u le s

40

A ll
in d u s t r ie s

A ll
s c h e d u le s

40

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g

B a se d on sta n d a rd w e e k ly h o u r s 3 o f —
1
40

A ll
s c h e d u le s

40

________________________________________________

75

42

XXX

33

XXX

75

42

XXX

33

XXX

E s t a b li s h m e n t s h a v in g a s p e c i f i e d m in i m u m _____________________
$ 30. 00 an d u n d e r $ 32. 50 _________________________________________
$ 3 2 . 50 a n d u n d e r $ 3 5. 00 _________________________________________
$ 35. 00 a n d u n d e r $ 37. 50 _________________________________________
$ 3 7. 50 an d u n d e r $ 4 0 . 00 _________________________________________
$ 4 0 . 00 an d u n d e r $ 4 2 . 5 0 _________________________________________
$ 4 2 . 5 0 an d u n d e r $ 4 5 . 0 0 ____________________________________ _
_
$ 4 5 . 00 a n d u n d e r $ 4 7 . 50 _________________________________________
$ 4 7 . 50 an d u n d e r $ 5 0 . 00 _________________________________________
$ 5 0 . 00 an d u n d e r $ 5 2 . 50 _________________________________________
$ 5 2 . 50 and u n d e r $ 5 5 . 0 0 _________________________________________
$ 5 5 . 00 a n d o v e r
----------------------------------------------------------------------------E s t a b li s h m e n t s h a v in g n o s p e c i f i e d m in i m u m
---------------------------—
E s t a b li s h m e n t s w h ic h d id n o t e m p l o y w o r k e r s in
t h is c a t e g o r y ____ _________ _________________ _____ _________ __

23
_
2
5
3
3
1
7

14
_
3
1

14
_
_
3
1

9
_
2
-

2

23
_
_
_
_
7
1
5
_
10
_

2

2

1
1
-

2

1
1
1
_
1

XXX

23
_
_
7
1
5
10
4

19
2
_
4
1
5

2

42
2
_
4
1
12
3
7
1
11
1
8

13
2
_
_

2

6
2

XXX

25

15

E s t a b li s h m e n t s s tu d ie d

1
2
3

2

2

6

7
1
5

_
7
1
XXX

1
1
1
1

46

23

XXX

23

2

1
4

XXX

1
1
_
1
4

XXX

XXX

10

X XX

L o w e s t s a la r y r a t e f o r m a l l y e s t a b l is h e d f o r h i r in g i n e x p e r i e n c e d w o r k e r s f o r t y p in g o r o t h e r c l e r i c a l j o b s .
R a t e s a p p l ic a b l e t o m e s s e n g e r s , o f f i c e g i r l s , o r s i m i l a r s u b c l e r i c a l j o b s a r e n o t c o n s i d e r e d .
H o u r s r e f l e c t th e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s .
D a t a a r e p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l w o r k w e e k s c o m b in e d , an d f o r th e m o s t c o m m o n w o r k w e e k

rep orted .

Table B-3. Scheduled W eekly Hours
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f o f f i c e a n d p la n t w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r ie s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s
o f f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s , G r e e n v i l l e , S. C . , M a y I 9 6 0 )
'

O F FIC E W O R K E R S

PLAN T W O RK ERS

W e e k ly h o u r s
A ll industries1

A l l w o rk e r s

-------------------------------------------------------------

U n d e r 40 h o u r s -----------------------------------------------------4 0 h o u r s ____________________________________________
O v e r 4 0 a n d u n d e r 4 4 h o u r s ------------------------------4 4 h o u r s ------------------------------------------------------------------45 h o u r s _____________________ ____________________
O v e r 45 and u n d e r 48 h o u r s ------------------------------4 8 h o u r s ____________________________________________
50 h o u r s a n d o v e r --------------------------------------------------

1
2
3
4

100
11
80
3
3
(4 )
(4 )
2
n

M anufacturing

Public utilities 2

All industries3

M anufacturing

100

100

100

100

100

1
93
1
4
-

16
71
13
-

1
62
1
8
4
1
21
1

1
64

80

(4 )
(4 )

I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; fi n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , an d s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n t o t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .




Pu blic utilities 2

"
9
2
24
(4 )

_

7
"
2
11

9

Table^B-4. Paid Holidays
( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f o f f i c e a n d p la n t w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y n u m b e r o f p a id h o l id a y s
p r o v i d e d a n n u a lly , G r e e n v i l l e , S. C . , M a y I9 6 0 )
PLAN T W ORKERS

O F FIC E W O R K E R S

Item
All industries 1

A l l w o r k e r s _________________________________________

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v id i n g
p a id h o l id a y s _________________________ _________
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v id i n g
n o p a id h o l id a y s __________________________________

100

M anufacturing

Public utilities 2

All industries 2

100

100

100

78

60

100

22

40

( 4)
7
6
8
42
7
8
1

13
4
11
20
11
-

7
11
1
9
72

-

-

M anufacturing

Public utilities 2

100

100

44

34

100

56

66

-

1
8
9
2
9
5
_

_
5
7
_
13
74

-

“

-

74
87
87
95
100
100
100

Number of days
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

h o l i d a y -------------------------------------------------------------------h o l id a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------h o l id a y s ------------------- ------------------------------------------h o l id a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------h o l id a y s _____________ ____________________________
h o l id a y s ___________________________________________
h o l id a y s ___________________________________________
h o l id a y s ___________________________________________

.
-

2
7
11
3
12
5
4
(4)

Total holijday time5
8
7
6
5

d a y s ------------------------------------------------------------------------o r m o r e d a y s ____________________________________
o r m o r e d a y s ------------------------------------------------------o r m o r e d a y s ____________________________ ________
4
d a y s ___________________________________
3 o r m o r e d a y s ------------------------------------------------------2 o r m o r e d a y s ____________________________________
1 o r m o r e d a y s ------------------------------------------------------

or m ore

1
8
15
57
65

71
78
78

.

_

-

72
81
82
93
100
100
100

11
31
43
47
60
60

(4)
4

9
21
24
35

42
44

5
14
16
25
33
34

1 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w h o le s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n to t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
3 I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o le s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n t o t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
4 L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .
5 A l l c o m b in a t i o n s o£ f u l l a n d h a lf d a y s th a t a d d t o th e s a m e a m o u n t a r e c o m b in e d ; f o r e x a m p le , th e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g a t o t a l o f 7 d a y s in c lu d e s t h o s e w it h 7 fu l l d a y s an d
n o h a lf d a y s , 6 f u l l d a y s a n d 2 hgdf d a y s , 5 f u l l d a y s a n d 4 h a lf d a y s , a n d s o o n .
P r o p o r t i o n s w e r e th e n c u m u la t e d .




10

Table B-5. Pqid Vacations
( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f o f f i c e a n d p la n t w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r ie s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t i o n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , G r e e n v i l l e , S. C . , M a y I9 6 0 )
PLANT WORKERS

OFFICE WORKERS
V a c a t io n p o l i c y
Public utilities 2

All industries3

Manufacturing

Public utilities 2

All industries 1

A ll w o r k e r s

__________

__ __ _______

__________

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
92
7
1

100
86
13
2

100
100
-

95
33
61
1
-

96
24
72
-

95
95
-

(4 )

"

-

5

4

5

13
35
4

6
34
5

_

40

8
6
(4 )

7
4
-

40
-

4
88
2

4
91
1

82
13

3
82
1
9

4
90

M a th od o f p a y m en t

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
p a id v a c a t i o n s
__________ ____ _________ _____
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t -------------------------------P e rce n ta g e paym ent
__________________________
F la t - s u m p a y m e n t _____________________________
O th er
________________________ - __________________
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v id i n g
n o p a id v a c a t i o n s
________________________________

A m ount o f v a c a tio n

p a y 5

A fte r 6 m on th s o f s e r v i c e
U n d e r 1 w e e k _______________________________________
1 w eek
______________________________________________
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ____________________ _

-

_

A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
U n der 1 w eek
------------------- -------- ------------------- _
_______ _______ ________________________ _
1 w eek
w e e k s ............................. ................................. ......................

_

_

53
47

54
46

81
19

.

32
2
66

52
48

7
20
73

_

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U n d e r 1 w e e k __________ ___________________________
1 w eek
_______________________________________________
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _____________ _____ 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

-

36
-

2

59

3
80
1
11

4
88

28

3
16
3
72
1

4
16
2
74
-

A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U n d e r 1 w e e k _ _______ „
__ __ -----------------------1 w eek
_______________________________________________
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s — ----------------------------2 w e e k s ____________________ _______________________

_

_

_

30
70

49
51

7
93

_

-

_

4

66

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w eek
_____ — _____ ___ ___________ __ _
1 w eek
-------------- -------- — — __ -----------------------O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s — ----------------------------2 w eeks
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e .




_

_

18
1
78
1
1

28
1
69
2

_

7
93
-

_
-

95
-

Table B-5. Paid Vqcations-Continued
( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f o f f i c e a n d p la n t w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r ie s an d in i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t i o n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , G r e e n v i l l e , S. C . , M a y I9 6 0 )
O F FIC E W O R K E R S

PLAN T W O RK ERS

V a c a t io n p o l i c y
All industries '

M anufacturing

Public utilities 2

All industries3

M anufacturing

Public utilities 2

Amount of vacation p ay5 — Continued
A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
U n d e r 1 w e e k _____________________________________
1 w e e k ______________________________________________
O v e r 1 an d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _____________________
2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------- --------------- O v e r 2 an d u n d e r 3 w e e k s
.................. .................
3 w e e k s ____________________________________________

_

_

_

18
1
66
3
11

28
1
65
4
2

7

_

3
16
2
72

4
16
2
74

-

-

-

95
_

3

2

"

-

_
7
11
79
3

3
16
2
67
7

4
16
2
73
1

_
7
87

-

"

-

_

3
16
2
65
8
1
1

4
16
2~
71
3
-

_

-

7
80
_
7

3
16
2
65
6
1
2

4
16
2
71
3

_
7
80

-

90

-

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
U n d e r 1 w e e k ------------------------ -----------------------------1 w e e k ---------------- ,----------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 an d tin d e r 2 w e e k s
___________________
2 w eeks
---------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s ____________________________________________

_

_

18
1
51
30

28
1
52
19

(4 )

_

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
U n d e r 1 w e e k ------------------------ ---------------------------- 1 w e e k ---------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 an d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _____________________
2 w eeks
------------------------- ----------------------------------3 w eeks
---------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 an d u n d e r 4 w e e k s -------------------------------4 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

18
1
51
28
2

28
1
52
19
-

7
11
75
7

-

A f t e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
U n d e r 1 w e e k _____________________________________
1 w e e k --------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 an d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _____________________
2 w eeks
---------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O v e r 3 an d u n d e r 4 w e e k s
----------------------------4 w e e k s ____________________________________________

_

_

_

18
1
51
22

28
1
52
13

7
11
75

-

-

-

8

5

7

_

-

-

7

1 I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; an d s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
3 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n t o t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
4 L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .
5 P e r i o d s o f s e r v i c e w e r e a r b i t r a r i l y c h o s e n a n d d o n o t n e c e s s a r i l y r e f l e c t th e in d iv id u a l p r o v i s i o n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n s .
F o r e x a m p le , th e c h a n g e s in p r o p o r t i o n s
s e r v i c e in c lu d e c h a n g e s in p r o v i s i o n s o c c u r r i n g b e t w e e n 5 a n d 10 y e a r s .
N O T E : In th e t a b u la t io n s o f v a c a t i o n a ll o w a n c e s b y y e a r s o f s e r v i c e , p a y m e n t s o t h e r th a n " le n g t h o f t im e , " s u c h a s p e r c e n t a g e o f a n n u a l e a r n i n g s o r f l a t - s u m
t o a n e q u iv a le n t t im e b a s i s ; f o r e x a m p le , a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t o f a n n u a l e a r n i n g s w a s c o n s i d e r e d a s 1 w e e k 's - p a y .




in d ic a t e d a t 10 y e a r s '

p a y m en ts,

w ere

co n v e rte d

12

Table B-6. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
( P e r c e n t o f o f f i c e a n d p la n t w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r i e s a n d in i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s e m p l o y e d in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v id i n g
h e a lt h , in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n b e n e f it s , G r e e n v i l l e , S. C . , M a y I9 6 0 )
O F FIC E W O R K E R S

PLAN T W O RK ERS

T y p e o f b e n e fit
All industries1

M anufacturing

100

100

100

100

100

100

92

91

80

81

82

72

48

45

36

40

42

48

52

32

52

50

49

66

S ic k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t in s u r a n c e
----------S ic k le a v e ( f u ll p a y a n d n o
----------------------------------------w a it in g p e r io d )
S ic k l e a v e (p a r t i a l p a y o r
w a it in g p e r i o d ) _____________________________

30

27

18

46

48

14

27

4

29

3

1

26

4

1

16

4

2

33

H o s p i t a l iz a t io n in s u r a n c e
__ —
----- ----S u r g i c a l i n s u r a n c e ___ __ ------------------------- M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e —
— -----------------------------C a t a s t r o p h e in s u r a n c e -------------------------------- _
R e t i r e m e n t p e n s io n
----- ----- — ------------ N o h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , o r p e n s i o n p la n -------

88
88
4
33
78

81
81
4
4
71
( 5)

84
84
20
59
67

79
79
3
12
28
6

80
80
2
7
23
6

67
67
28
41
66

A ll w o rk e r s

-----

-------------------- ------------------------------

Public utilities 2

All industries3

M anufacturing

Public utilities 2

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v id i n g :
L i f e i n s u r a n c e ____ _________ ________________
A c c id e n t a l d ea th and d is m e m b e r m e n t
in s u r a n c e
------ -------------------- -------------------- S ic k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s i c k le a v e o r b o t h 4 — -----------------------------------

( 5)

1 I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; fi n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n t o t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
3 I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
4 U n d u p lic a t e d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s i c k le a v e o r s i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t in s u r a n c e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y b e lo w .
S i c k - l e a v e p la n s a r e l i m i t e d t o t h o s e w h ic h d e f i n i t e l y e s t a b l i s h at l e a s t
th e m in i m u m n u m b e r o f d a y s ’ p a y th a t c a n b e e x p e c t e d b y e a c h e m p l o y e e .
I n f o r m a l s i c k - l e a v e a l l o w a n c e s d e t e r m in e d o n a n in d iv id u a l b a s i s a r e e x c l u d e d .
5 L e s s th a n 0. 5 p e r c e n t .




13

Appendix: Occupational Descriptions
The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to a s s is t its
field staff in classify in g into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll
titles and different work arrangem ents from establishm ent to establishm ent and from area to area. T his is
essen tial in order to perm it the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
B ecause of this em phasis on interestablishm ent and interarea com parability of occupational content, the
Bureau’s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishm ents or those
prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’s field econom ists are
instructed to exclude working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped workers,
part-tim e, temporary, and probationary workers..
O F F IC E

BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Prepares statem ents, b ills, and invoices on a machine other
than an ordinary or electrom atic typew riter. May also keep records as
to billings or shipping charges or perform other c lerical work incidental
to billing operations. For wage study purposes, b illers, m achine, are
classified by type of machine, as follow s:
Biller, machine (hilling machine)— U ses a sp ecial billing ma­
chine (Moon Hopkins, E llio tt F ish er, Burroughs, e tc ., which are
com bination typing and adding m achines) to prepare bills and in­
voices from custom ers’ purchase orders, internally prepared orders,
shipping memorandums, etc. U sually involves application of prede­
term ined discounts and shipping charges and entry of necessary
extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing ma­
chine, and totals which are autom atically accum ulated by m achine.
The operation usually involves a large number of carbon copies of
the b ill being prepared and is often done oh a fanfold m achine.
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine)— Uses a bookkeeping
machine (Sundstrahd, E llio tt F ish er, Remington Rand, e tc ., which
may or may not have typew riter keyboard) to prepare custom ers*
bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. G enerally involves^the sim ultaneous entry of figures on custom ers ’ ledger rec­
ord. The machine autom atically accum ulates figures on a number
of vertical columns and com putes and usually prints autom atically
the debit or credit b alances. Does not involve a knowledge of book­
keeping. Works from uniform and standard types of sa le s and
credit slip s.

O perates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, E llio tt
F ish er, Sundstrand, Burroughs, N ational C ash R egister, with or w ithout
a typew riter keyboard) to keep a record of bu sin ess tran sactio n s.




Class A— K eeps a se t of records requiring a knowledge of
and experience in b asic bookkeeping principles and fam iliarity with
the structure of the particular accounting system used. D eterm ines
proper records and distribution of debit and credit item s to be used
in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated rep o rts, balance
sh eets, and other records by hand.
Class B— Keeps a record of one or more phases or sectio n s of
a set of records usually requiring little knowledge of b asic book­
keeping . P h ases or sectio n s include accounts payable, payroll,
custom ers’ accounts (not including a sim ple type of billing described
under biller, m achine), co st distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc. May check or a s s is t in preparation of tria l
balances and prepare control sh eets for the accounting departm ent.
CLERK, ACCOUNTING

Class A— Under general direction of a bookkeeper or account­
ant, has responsibility for keeping one or more sectio n s of a com­
plete se t of books or records relating to one phase of an e sta b lish ­
m ent’s bu sin ess tran sactio n s. Work involves posting and balancing
subsidiary ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts

14
CLERK, ACCOUNTING— Continued
payable; exam ining and coding invoices or vouchers with proper a c ­
counting distribution; requires judgment and experience in making
proper assig n ation s and allo catio n s. May a s s is t in preparing, ad­
justing and closing journal en tries; may direct c la ss B accounting
clerks.

Class B — Under supervision, performs one or more routine a c ­
counting operations such as posting sim ple journal vouchers or a c ­
counts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher reg isters;
reconciling bank accounts; posting subsidiary ledgers controlled
by general ledgers, or posting sim ple co st accounting d ata. T his
job does not require a knowledge of accounting and bookkeeping
principles but is found in offices in which the more routine account­
ing work is subdivided on a functional b asis among several w orkers.
CLERK, FILE
Class A — In an estab lish ed filing system containing a num­

ber of varied su bject m atter file s, c la ssifie s and indexes co rres­
pondence or other m aterial; may also file th is m aterial. May keep
records of various types in conjunction with files or may super­
vise others in filing and locating m aterial in the file s. May per­
form incidental clerical d u ties.
Class B — Perform s routine filing, usually of m aterial th a t h as
already been classified or which is easily identifiable, or lo cates
or a s s is ts in locating m aterial in file s. May perform incidental
clerical d u ties.

CLERK, ORDER
R eceives cu sto m ers'o rd ers for m aterial or m erchandise by m ail,
phone, or personally. D uties involve any combination o f the following:
Quoting prices to custom ers; making out an order sh eet listin g the item s
to make up the order; checking prices and quantities of item s on order
sheet; distributing order sh eets to respective departm ents to be filled .
May check with credit departm ent to determ ine credit rating of custom er,
acknowledge receipt of orders from custom ers, follow up orders to see
that they have been filled, keep file of orders received, and check ship­
ping invoices with original orders.




CLERK, PAYROLL
Com putes wages of company em ployees and enters the n eces­
sary data on the payroll sh eets. D uties involve: C alculating w orkers'
earnings based on time or production records; posting calcu lated data
on payroll sh eet, showing inform ation such as w orker's name, working
days, tim e, rate, deductions for insurance, and total w ages due. May
make out paychecks and a s s is t paym aster in making up and d istrib ut­
ing pay envelopes. May use a calculating m achine.

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
Primary duty is to operate a Comptometer to perform mathem a­
tic a l com putations. T his job is not to be confused with th at of s ta tis ­
tic al or other type of clerk, which may involve frequent use of a Comp­
tom eter but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to perform ance
of other du ties.

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
Under general supervision and with no supervisory resp o n si­
b ilitie s, reproduces m ultiple copies of typew ritten or handw ritten matter,
using a Mimeograph or D itto m achine. Makes n ecessary adjustm ent such
as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed. Is not required to
prepare ste n c il or D itto m aster. May keep file of used ste n c ils or D itto
m asters. May sort, co llate, and staple com pleted m aterial.

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory resp o n si­
b ilitie s, records accounting and sta tis tic a l data on tabulating cards by
punching a series of holes in the cards in a sp ecified sequence, using
an alphabetical or a num erical keypunch m achine, following w ritten in­
formation on records. May duplicate cards by using the duplicating de­
vice attached to machine. May keep files of punch card s. May verify
own work or work of others.

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
Perform s various routine duties such as running errands, op­
erating minor office m achines such as sealers or m ailers, opening and
distributing m ail, and other minor clerical work.

15

SECRETARY
Performs secretarial and clerical duties for a superior in an ad­
m inistrative or executive position. D uties include making appointm ents
for superior; receiving people coming into office; answ ering and making
phone calls; handling personal and important or confidential m ail, and
writing routine correspondence on own initiativ e; taking dictation (where
transcribing machine is not used) either in shorthand or by Stenotype or
sim ilar machine, and transcribing dictation or the recorded information
reproduced on a transcribing m achine. May prepare sp ecial reports or
memorandums for inform ation of superior.

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more persons,
either in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar m achine, involving a nor­
mal routine vocabulary, and to transcribe this dictation on a typew riter.
May also type from w ritten copy. May also se t up and keep files in or­
der, keep sim ple records, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine
work (see transcribing-m achine operator).

STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more persons
either in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar m achine, involving a varied
technical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on
scientific research and to transcribe this dictation on a typew riter. May
also type from w ritten copy. May also se t up and keep files in order,
keep sim ple records, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine work.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
O perates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone sw itchboard.
D uties involve handling incom ing, outgoing, and intraplant or office c a lls.
May record toll calls and take m essages. May give information to per­
sons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders. For workers
who also act as receptio nists see sw itchboard operator-receptionist.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
In addition to performing duties of operator, on a single p o si­
tion or monitor-type sw itchboard, acts as receptionist and may also type
or perform routine clerical work as part of regular d u ties. T his typing
or clerical work may take the major part of this worker*s time w hile at
sw itchboard.




TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Class A— O perates a variety of tabulating or electrical a c ­
counting m achines, typically including such m achines as the tabu­
lator, calculator, interpreter, collator and others. Performs com­
plete reporting assignm ents without clo se supervision, and performs
difficult wiring as required. The com plete reporting and tabulating
assignm ents typically involve a variety of long and complex re­
ports which often are of irregular or nonrecurring type requiring
some planning and sequencing of steps to be taken. As a more
experienced operator, is typically involved in training new opera­
tors in machine operations, or partially trained operators in wiring
from diagram s and operating sequences of long and complex reports.
Does not include working supervisors performing tabulating-m achine
operations and day-to-day supervision of the work and production of
a group of tabulating-m achine operators.
Class B— O perates more difficult tabulating or electrical ac­
counting m achines such as the tabulator and calculator, in addition
to the sorter, reproducer, and collator. T his work is performed under
specific instructions and may include the perform ance of some wir­
ing from diagram s. The work typically involves, for exam ple, tabu­
lations involving a repetitive accounting ex ercise, a com plete but
sm all tabulating study, or parts of a longer and more complex report.
Such reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where
the procedures are w ell estab lish ed . May also include the training
of new em ployees in the basic operation of the m achine.
Class C— O perates sim ple tabulating or e lectrical account­
ing m achines such as the sorter, reproducing punch, collator, etc.,
with specific instructions. May include sim ple wiring from diagram s
and some filing work. The work typically involves portions of a
work unit, for exam ple, individual sorting or collating runs, or re­
petitive operations.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
Prim ary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal routine
vocabulary from transcribing-m achine records. May also type from w ritten
copy and do sim ple clerical work. Workers transcribing dictation in­
volving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal briefs
or reports on scien tific research are not included. A worker who takes
dictation in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine is classified
as a stenographer, general.

16

TYPIST

TYPIST— Continued

U ses a typew riter to make copies of various m aterial or to make
out b ills after calculations have been made by another person. May in­
clude typing of ste n c ils, m ats, or sim ilar m aterials for u se in duplicat­
ing p ro cesses. May do clerical work involving little sp ecial training,
such as keeping sim ple records, filing records and reports, or sorting
and distributing incoming m ail.

Class A— Perform s one or more of the following: Typing ma­
terial in final form when it involves combining m aterial from sev eral
sources or responsibility for correct spelling, sy llab icatio n , punc-

tuation, e tc ., of tech n ical or unusual words or foreign language ma­
terial; planning layout and typing of com plicated s ta tis tic a l tab les
to m aintain uniformity and balance in spacing. May type routine
form letters varying d etails to su it circum stances.

Class B— Perform s one or more of the following: Copy typing
from rough or clear drafts; routine typing of forms, insurance p o licies,
etc.; settin g up sim ple standard tabulations, or copying more com­
plex tab les already s e t up and spaced properly.

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N I C A L

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR

(A ssistan t draftsm an)
Draws to scale units or parts of drawings prepared by d rafts­
man or others for engineering, construction, or m anufacturing purposes.
U ses various types of drafting tools a s required. May prepare draw ings
from sim ple plans or sk etch es, or perform other duties under direction
of a draftsm an.

DRAFTSMAN, LEADER
P lans and d irects activ ities of one or more draftsm en in prep­
aration of working plans and d etail drawings from rough or prelim inary
sketches for engineering, construction, or m anufacturing purposes. D uties
involve a combination of the following: Interpretingblueprints, sk etch es,
and w ritten or verbal orders; determ ining work procedures; assig n in g
duties to subordinates and inspecting their work; performing more dif­
ficult problem s. May a s s is t subordinates during em ergencies or a s a
regular assignm ent, or perform related duties of a supervisory or ad­
m inistrative nature.

DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
Prepares working plans and d etail drawings from n o tes, rough
or detailed sketches for engineering, construction, or m anufacturing pur­
poses. D uties involve a combination of the following: Preparing work­
ing plans, detail draw ings, m aps, cro ss-sectio n s, e tc ., to scale by use
of drafting instrum ents; making engineering com putations such as those




DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR— Continued
involved in strength of m aterials, beam s and tru sse s; verifying com­
pleted work, checking dim ensions, m aterials to be used, and q uantities;
w riting sp ecificatio n s; making adjustm ents or changes in drawings or
sp ecificatio n s. May ink in lin es and letters on pencil draw ings, prepare
d etail units of com plete draw ings, or trace draw ings. Work is frequently
in a sp ecialized field such as architectural, electrical, m echanical, or
structural drafting.

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service to ill or injured
em ployees or other persons who become ill or suffer an accid en t on the
prem ises of a factory or other establishm ent. D uties involve a combiner
tion of the following: Giving first aid to the ill or injured; attending to
subsequent dressing of em ployees' inju ries; keeping records of p atients
treated; preparing accid en t reports for com pensation or other purposes;
conducting ph ysical exam inations and health evaluations of applicants
and em ployees; and planning and carrying out programs involving health
education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environm ent, or other
activ ities affecting the health, w elfare, and safety of a ll personnel.

TRACER
Copies plans and draw ings prepared by others, by placing trac­
ing cloth or paper over drawing and tracing with pen or p en cil. U ses
T -square, com pass, and other drafting to o ls. May prepare sim ple draw­
ings and do sim ple lettering.

17

M A IN T E N A N C E

D POW ERPLANT

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER

Perform s the carpentry duties n ecessary to construct and main­
tain in good repair building woodwork and equipm ent such as bins, cribs,
counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, sta irs, casin g s, and trim
made of wood in an establishm ent. Work involves most of the following:
Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, draw ings, m odels, or
verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenter’s handtools, portable
power tools, and standard m easuring instrum ents; making standard shop
com putations relating to dim ensions of work; selectin g m aterials n ec­
essary for the work. In general, the work of the m aintenance carpenter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a for­
mal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

F ires stationary boilers to furnish the establishm ent in which
employed with heat, power, or steam . F eeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a m echanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; checks water and safety
v alves. May clean, oil, or a s s is t in repairing boilerroom equipm ent.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
Perform s a variety of electrical trade functions such as the
installatio n , m aintenance, or repair of equipm ent for the generating, d is­
tribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishm ent. Work
involves most of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety
of electrical equipm ent such as generators, transform ers, sw itchboards,
controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit system s,
or other transm ission equipment; working from blueprints, draw ings, lay­
out, or other specificatio n s ;_locating and diagnosing trouble in the e lec­
trical system or equipment; working standard com putations relating to
load requirem ents of wiring or electrical equipm ent; using a variety of
electrician ’s handtools and m easuring and testin g instrum ents. In gen­
eral, the work of the m aintenance electrician requires rounded training
and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.

ENGINEER, STATIONARY
O perates and m aintains and may also supervise the operation
of stationary engines and equipment (m echanical or electrical) to sup­
ply the establishm ent in which employed with power, heat, refrigera­
tion, or air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and m aintaining
equipment such as steam engines, air com pressors, generators, motors
turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipm ent, steam boilers and
boiler-fed w ater pumps; making equipm ent repairs; keeping a record of
operation of machinery, tem perature, and fuel consum ption. May also
supervise these operations. Head or chief engineers in establishments

employing more than one engineer are excluded.




HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE
A ssists one or more workers in the skilled m aintenance trades,
by performing specific or general duties of le sse r sk ill, such as keeping
a worker supplied with m aterials and tools; cleaning working area, ma­
chine, and equipm ent; a ssistin g worker by holding m aterials or tools;
performing other unskilled task s as directed by journeyman. The kind of
work the helper is perm itted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding ma­
terials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he is per­
mitted to perform sp ecialized machine operations, or parts of a trade
that are also performed by workers on a full-tim e b asis.

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
S pecializes in the operation of one or more types of machine
tools, such as jig borers, cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or milling m achines in the construction of m achine-shop tools, gauges,
jigs, fixtures, or d ies. Work involves most of the following: Planning
and performing difficult machining operations; processing item s requiring
com plicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision m easuring instrum ents; selectin g feeds, sp eed s, tooling and op­
eration sequence; making necessary adjustm ents during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dim ensions. May be required to recog­
nize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to se le c t proper
coolants and cutting and lubricating o ils. For cross-industry wage study
purposes, m achine-tool operators, toolroom, in tool and die jobbing shops
are excluded from this classificatio n .

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces replacem ent parts and new parts in making repairs of
m etal parts of m echanical equipment operated in an establishm ent. Work
involves m ost of the following: Interpreting w ritten instructions and
sp ecificatio n s; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of ma­
c h in ist’s handtools and precision m easuring instrum ents; settin g up and

18

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE— Continued

operating standard machine tools; shaping of m etal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop com putations relating to dim ensions of work,
tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working prop­
erties of the common m etals; selectin g standard m aterials, p arts, and
equipm ent required for his work; fitting and assem bling parts into me­
chanical equipm ent. In general, the m achinist’s work normally requires
a rounded training in m achine-shop practice usually acquired through a
formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
R epairs autom obiles, b u ses, m otortrucks, and tractors of an e s ­
tablishm ent. Work involves most of the following: Examining autom otive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassem bling equipm ent and
performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as w renches,
gauges, d rills, or sp ecialized equipm ent in disassem bling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassem bling and installin g the various assem blies in the vehicle
and making n ecessary adjustm ents; alining w heels, adjusting brakes and
lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the autom otive
m echanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R epairs machinery or m echanical equipment of an establishm ent.
Work involves most of the following: Examining m achines and m echan­
ical equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dism antling or partly d is ­
m antling m achines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of
handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective
parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the production of a rep lace­
ment part by a m achine shop or sending of the machine to a m achine shop
for major repairs; preparing w ritten sp ecificatio n s for major repairs or
for the production of parts ordered from machine shop; reassem bling ma­
chines; and making all n ecessary adjustm ents for operation. In general,
the work of a m aintenance m echanic requires rounded training and ex­
perience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. Excluded from this classificatio n are workers
whose primary duties involve settin g up or adjusting m achines.

MILLWRIGHT
In stalls new m achines or heavy equipm ent and dism antles and
in stalls m achines or heavy equipm ent when changes in the plant layout




MILLWRIGHT— Continued

are required. Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying
out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other sp ecificatio n s; using a
variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop com putations re­
lating to s tre s se s , strength of m aterials, and centers of gravity; alining
and balancing of equipm ent; selectin g standard tools, equipm ent, and parts
to be used; installin g and m aintaining in good order power transm ission
equipm ent such as drives and speed reducers. In general, the m ill­
w right’s work normally requires a rounded training and experience in the
trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

OILER
L ubricates, with oil or g rease, the moving parts or wearing sur­
faces of m echanical equipm ent of an establishm ent.

PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
P ain ts and redecorates w alls, woodwork, and fixtures of an es­
tablishm ent. Work involves the following: Knowledge of surface pecu­
lia rities and types of paint required for different applications; preparing
surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler in
nail holes and in terstices; applying paint with spray gun or brush. May
mix colors, o ils, w hite lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper
color or consistency. In general, the work of the m aintenance painter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a for­
mal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
In stalls or repairs w ater, steam , g as, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishm ent. Work involves most of the following:
Laying out of work and m easuring to locate position of pipe from draw ings
or other w ritten sp ecificatio n s; cutting various siz e s of pipe to correct
lengths with ch isel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting ma­
chine; threading pipe with sto ck s and d ies; bending pipe by hand-driven
or power-driven m achines; assem bling pipe with couplings and fastening
pipe to hangers; making standard shop com putations relating to p ressu res,
flow, and size of pipe required; making standard te s ts to determ ine
whether finished pipes meet sp ecificatio n s. .In general, the work of the
m aintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience. Workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building

sanitation or heating systems are excluded.

19

TOOL AND DIE MAKER

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
K eeps the plumbing system of an establishm ent in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installatio n of
vents and traps in plumbing system ; installin g or repairing pipes and
fixtures; opening clogged drains w ith a plunger or plumber’s snake. In
general, the work of the m aintenance plumber requires rounded training
and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiv­
alent training and experience.

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F ab ricates, in sta lls, and m aintains in good repair the sheetm etal equipm ent and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans,
sh elv es, lockers, tanks, v entilators, ch u tes, du cts, m etal roofing) of an
establishm ent. Work involves most of the following: Planning and lay­
ing out all types of sheet-m etal maintenance work from blueprints, m odels,
or other specifications; setting up and operating all available types of
sheet-m etal-w orking m achines; using a variety of handtools in cutting,
bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assem bling; installin g sh eetm etal articles as required. In general, the work of the m aintenance
sheet-m etal worker requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

(Die maker; jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker; gauge maker)
C onstructs and repairs m achine-shop tools, gauges, jigs, fix­
tures or dies for forgings, punching and other metal-forming work. Work
involves most of the following: Planning and laying out of work from
m odels, blueprints, draw ings, or other oral and written sp ecificatio n s;
using a variety of tool and die maker’s handtools and precision m eas­
uring instrum ents, understanding of the working properties of common
m etals and alloys; settin g up and operating of machine tools and related
equipm ent; making necessary shop com putations relating to dim ensions
of work, sp eed s, feeds, and tooling of m achines; heattreating of m etal
parts during fabrication as w ell as of finished tools and dies to achieve
required q u alities; working to clo se tolerances;*fitting and assem bling
of parts to prescribed tolerances and allow ances; selectin g appropriate
m aterials, tools, and p ro cesses. In general, the tool and die maker’s
work requires a rounded training in m achine-shop and toolroom practice
usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die makers
in tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classificatio n .

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T

ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER
T ransports passengers betw een floors of an office building,
apartm ent house, departm ent store, hotel or sim ilar estab lish m en t.
Workers who operate elevators in conjunction with other duties such as
those of starters and janitors are excluded.

GUARD

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER— Continued
or other establishm ent. D uties involve a combination of the following:
Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips,
trash, and other refuse; dusting equipm ent, furniture, or fixtures; polish­
ing m etal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor mainte-’
nance serv ices; cleaning lavatories, show ers, and restroom s. Workers
who sp ecialize in window w ashing are excluded.

Perform s routine police d u ties, either a t fixed post or on tour,
maintaining order, using arms or force where n ecessary . Includes gate-

men who are stationed at gate and check on identity of employees and LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
other persons entering.

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER

(Sweeper; charwoman; jan itress)
C leans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas
and washrooms, or prem ises of an office, apartm ent house, or commercial




(Loader and unloader; handler and stack er; shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper; warehouseman or w arehouse helper)

A worker employed in a w arehouse, m anufacturing plant, store,
or other establishm ent whose duties involve one or more of the follow­
ing: Loading and unloading various m aterials and m erchandise on or

20

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING— Continued
from freight cars, trucks, or other transporting d ev ices; unpacking, shelv­
ing, or placing m aterials or m erchandise in proper storage location; tran s­
porting m aterials or m erchandise by hand truck, car, or wheelbarrow.

Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are excluded.
ORDER FILLER
(Order picker; stock selector; w arehouse stockm an)

F ills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
m erchandise in accordance with specifications on sa le s slip s, custom ers *
orders, or other in stru ctio n s. May, in addition to filling orders and indi­
cating item s filled or om itted, keep records of outgoing orders, req u isi­
tion additional stock, or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform
other related du ties.

PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipm ent or storage by placing
them in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being
dependent upon the type, siz e, and number of units to be packed, the
type of container em ployed, and method of shipm ent. Work requires the
placing of item s in shipping containers and may involve one or more of
the following: Knowledge of various item s of stock in order to verify
content; selectio n of appropriate type and size of container; inserting
enclosures in container; using excelsior or other m aterial to prevent
breakage or dam age; closing and sealin g container; applying lab els or
entering identifying data on container. Packers who also make wooden

boxes or crates are excluded.

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
P repares m erchandise for shipm ent, or receiv es and is respon­
sible for incom ing shipm ents of m erchandise or other m aterials. Shipping
work involves: A knowledge of shipping procedures, p ractices, routes,
available m eans of transportation and rates; and preparing records of the
goods shipped, making up b ills of lading, posting w eight and shipping
charges, and keeping a file of shipping records. May direct or a s s is t in
preparing the m erchandise for shipm ent. Receiving work involves: V eri­
fying or directing others in verifying the correctness of shipm ents ag ain st
b ills of lading, inv o ices, or other records; checking for shortages and
rejecting damaged goods; routing m erchandise or m aterials to proper de­
partm ents; m aintaining n ecessary records and file s.




SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK— Continued
For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follow s:

Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCKDRIVER
D rives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport ma­
terials, m erchandise, equipm ent, or men betw een various types of e sta b ­
lishm ents such as: M anufacturing p lants, freight depots, w arehouses,
w holesale and retail establishm ents, or betw een retail establishm ents
and customers* houses or places of b u sin ess. May also load or unload
truck with or w ithout h elpers, make minor m echanical repairs, and keep
truck in good working order. Driver~salesmen and over-the»road drivers

are excluded.

For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are c lassified by size
and type of equipm ent, as follow s: (T ractor-trailer should be rated on
the b asis of trailer capacity.)

Truckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under 1% tons)
Truckdriver, medium (1% to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)
TRUCKER, POWER
O perates a manually controlled g asoline- or electric-pow ered
truck or tractor to transport goods and m aterials of a ll kinds about a
w arehouse, m anufacturing plant, or other establishm ent.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of
truck, as follow s:

Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)
WATCHMAN
Makes rounds of prem ises periodically in protecting property
ag ainst fire, theft, and illeg al entry.
* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : I9 6 0 0 — 557566

Occupational Wage Surveys

O c c u p a tio n a l w a g e s u r v e y s a re b e in g c o n d u c te d in 6 0 m ajor la b o r m a rk ets d u rin g la te 1 9 5 9 an d e a r ly I 9 6 0 . T h e s e b u lle t in s , w h en a v a ila b le ,
m ay b e p u r c h a se d from th e S u p e r in te n d e n t o f D o c u m e n ts , U .S . G o v e rn m en t P r in tin g O ff ic e , W a sh in g to n 2 5 , D .C ., or from a n y o f th e B L S r e g io n a l
s a l e s o f f ic e s sh o w n on th e in s id e fron t c o v e r .
A sum m ary b u lle tin c o n ta in in g d a ta for a ll la b o r m a r k e ts, c o m b in e d w ith a d d itio n a l a n a ly s i s , w ill be is s u e d e a r ly in 1 9 6 1 .
B u lle t in s for th e a r e a s l i s t e d b e lo w are n ow a v a ila b le .

A lle n to w n —B e th le h e m —E a s to n , P a . —N .J ., M arch I 9 6 0 —
B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -3 3 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
B a ltim o r e , M d., S ep te m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -7 , p r ic e 15 c e n t s
B irm in gh a m , A la ., M arch I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -3 7 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
B o s to n , M a s s ., O c to b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -8 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
B u ffa lo , N .Y ., O c to b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -4 , p r ic e 2 0 c e n t s
C a n to n , O h io , D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 0 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s

M em p h is, T e n n ., J a n u a r y I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 9 , p r ic e 2 5 c e n t s
M iam i, F la ., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -6 , p r ic e 2 0 c e n t s
M in n e a p o lis —S t. P a u l, M in n ., J a n u a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 1 ,
p r ic e 25 c e n t s
N ew a rk and J e r s e y C ity , N .J ., F eb ru a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 8 ,
p r ic e 25 c e n t s
N e w O r le a n s , L a ., F eb ru a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -3 2 ,
p r ic e 25 c e n t s

C in c in n a ti, O h io —K y ., F eb ru a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -3 1 ,
p r ic e 25 c e n ts
C le v e la n d , O h io , S e p te m b er 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 , p r ic e 20 c e n t s
D a lla s , T e x ., O c to b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -3 , p r ic e 2 0 c e n ts
D a y to n , O h io , D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -9 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
D e n v e r , C o lo ., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 1 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
D e s M o in e s, Io w a , F eb ru a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -3 0 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s

P h ila d e lp h ia , P a ., N o v e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 6 ,
p r ic e 25 c e n t s
P itts b u r g h , P a ., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 0 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
P o r tla n d , M a in e, N o v e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 2 , p r ic e 2 0 c e n t s
R ic h m o n d , V a ., F e b ru a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 4 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
S t. L o u is , M o., O c to b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -5 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
S an B e r n a r d in o —R iv e r s id e —O n ta r io , C a lif ., N o v e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —
B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 5 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s

D e tr o it, M ic h ., J an u a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 5 , p r ic e 2 0 c e n t s
F o rt W orth, T e x ., N o v e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 3 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
I n d ia n a p o lis , In d ., J a n u a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 2 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
J a c k s o n , M is s ., F eb ru a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 6 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
J a c k s o n v ille , F la ., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 4 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
K a n s a s C ity , M o .—K a n s ., J a n u a r y I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 3 ,
p r ic e 25 c e n t s
L o s A n g e le s —L o n g B e a c h , C a l if ., A p ril I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -3 5 ,
p r ic e 25 c e n ts

S an F r a n c is c o —O a k la n d , C a lif ., J a n u a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 7 ,
p r ic e 25 c e n t s
S e a t t le , W a sh ., A u g u s t 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
S io u x F a l l s , S . D a k ., F eb ru a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 9 , p r ic e 20 c e n t s
S o u th B e n d , In d ., A p ril I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -3 8 , p r ic e 2 5 c e n t s
W a sh in g to n , D .C .—M d .—V a ., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 9 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -1 8 ,
p r ic e 25 c e n t s
W aterb u ry, C o n n ., M arch I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -3 6 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s
Y ork , P a ., F eb ru a ry I 9 6 0 —B L S B u ll. 1 2 6 5 -2 7 , p r ic e 25 c e n t s








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