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O c c u p a tio n a l Wage S u r v e y
CLEVELAND, OHIO
SEPTEMBER 1959

B u lle tin




N o .

1 2 6 5 -1

UNITED S T A T E S D EPARTM EN T O F LA B O R
Ja m es P . M itc h e ll, S e c r e t a r y
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey




CLEVELAND, OHIO
SEPTEM BER

1959

B u lle tin

N o .

1 2 6 5 -1
November 1959

UNITED S T A T E S D EPARTM EN T O F LA B O R
Jam es P. M itc h e ll, S e c r e t a r y
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, US Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D - Price 20 cents
.
.C.




Contents

Preface

Page
The

C o m m u n ity

W age

S u rvey

I n tr o d u c tio n

P rogram

W age
T he B u rea u
a r e a w id e
tr ia l

w age

cen ters.

s p r in g ,

c o m p le t io n

s o lid a te d

in

a

s tu d ie s ,
A

s tu d y in

each

not

in c lu d e d

a n a ly t ic a l b u lle tin

y e a r’ s

fin a l a r e a

m ade

su rveys

b u lle tin

fo r

is
th e

area,
th e

la te

and

fa ll

u s u a lly

e a r lie r

is s u e d

a fte r

cu rren t

rou n d

m on th

1.

E s t a b lis h m e n t s a n d w o r k e r s

2.

In d exes

rep ort.

th e

r e s u lts

c o m p le t io n
of

T a b le s:

on

p r o v id e s

th e

T h is b u lle tin

s u m m a r iz in g

e a r ly

s u p p le ­

a v a ila b le
in

A
of

and

a ll

in

d ir e c tio n
tr ia l

C h ic a g o ,
of

G eorge

R e la tio n s




1 1 1 .,
E .

prepared
by

in th e

W oodrow

V ota v a ,

C .

R e g io n a l

s ta n d a r d w e e k ly

e a r n in g s

p ercen ts

fo r

w it h in

scope

s a la r ie s

s e le c te d

o f in c r e a s e

fo r

and

of

su rvey

_______________

2

s t r a ig h t-t im e

o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p s ,
s e le c te d

p e r io d s

______________________

2

th e

su rveys.

L in n ,
W age

under
and

O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s : *
A - 1.

A n a ly s t .

M a in te n a n c e

A -4.

In d u s­

P r o fe s s io n a l and

A -3.

th e

O ffic e

A -2.

B u re a u ’ s r e g io n a l

C u s to d ia l a n d m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t io n s

A p p e n d ix :

*

o c c u p a tio n s

o c c u p a tio n s

________

a n d p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s _______

11

O c c u p a tio n a l d e s c r ip t io n s

N O TE:

la n d
and

S im ila r

June

ta b u la tio n s

rep orts

area

fo r

1958.

e s t a b lis h m e n t
s io n s .
o f th e
is

A

M ost

d ir e c to r y

a v a ila b le

as

C u rren t
fo r

th e
and

in d ic a tin g

on

1951,

rep orts

in

d a te

rep orts

th e

1952,

a ls o

of

oth er

and

1956,

d a ta

w age

stu d y

fo r

C le v e ­

1954,

in c lu d e

s u p p le m e n ta r y

o c c u p a tio n a l

p r a c t ic e s
th e

in

m a c h in e r y

a u to d e a le r

r e p a ir

r ie s

(J u n e

1 9 5 9 ).

pay

le v e ls ,

are

a v a ila b le

of

on

p r o v i­

th e

m a jo r

p r ic e
a reas,

req u est.

rep orts

w age

a v a ila b le

of

w e ll a s

upon

are

O ctob er

p r a c t ic e s

rep orts,

m en ta ry

sh ops

(J u n e

U n io n
a v a ila b le

d u s tr ie s :

B u ild in g

o p e r a tin g

in

__________________________________________
te c h n ic a l

r*- oo o

o ffic e

report w as

of

h o u r ly

con ­
of

A:
T h is

3

s e le c te d

in d u s ­
to

r e la te d
is

1

o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s __________________________________

fo r

con d u cts

im p o r ta n t

rep ort

s tu d ie d .
in

r e g u la r ly

of

fro m

p r e lim in a r y

p a y r o ll p e r io d

d a ta

S ta tis tic s
num ber

o c c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s

o f th e

th e

a d d it io n a l
th e

to

b e n e fits .

fo llo w in g

of

The

r e la te

m en ta ry

of L abor

su rveys

________________________________________________________________________________________

T ren d s

e m p lo y e e s ,

th e

in d u s t r ie s
1 9 5 8 ),

s c a le s ,
fo r

e a r n in g s

C le v e la n d

th e

c o n s tr u c tio n ,

and

s u p p le ­
are

(D e ce m b e r
gray

in d ic a tiv e
fo llo w in g
p r in t in g ,

and m o to rtru ck

and

area

d r iv e r s

ir o n

of

a ls o
1 9 5 8 ),

fo u n d ­

p r e v a ilin g

tra d es

or

in ­

lo c a l-t r a n s it
and

h e lp e r s .




Occupational Wage Survey—Cleveland, Ohio
Introduction
T h is
w h ic h

th e

con d u cts

area

U .S .

is

one

of

D ep a rtm en t

su rveys

of

severa l
of

im p o r ta n t

L a b o r 's

o c c u p a tio n a l

in d u s tr ia l

B u rea u

e a r n in g s

and

of

cen ters

r e la te d

in

s ific a t io n

is

based

ta k e

accou n t of

an

area

b e n e fits

jo b .

(S e e a p p e n d ix f o r

w age

p resen ted

b a s is .

(in

O ffic e

(a )

n an ce
The
e a r n in g s
v is ite d

in fo r m a t io n
rep orted

in

n on resp on d en ts

s in c e

p resen ts
o b ta in e d

b y B u re a u fie ld

p a tio n s
to

b u lle tin

th e

th a t

th o se

stu d y .

P erson al

resp on d en ts

e m p lo y m e n t

th e

in th e l a s t p r e v i o u s

e a r lie r

to

o c c u p a tio n a l

la r g e ly b y m a il fr o m

e c o n o m is t s

and

p r e v io u s

cu rren t

In e a c h

broad

are

o b ta in e d

in

w ork ers,

th e

g iv e n
pay

s h ifts .

e s t a b lis h ­

liv in g

bon u ses

tra n sp or­

h ou rs

are

in d u s tr y g r o u p s

o c c u p a tio n s

and

th e

fe w e r

c o n s tr u c tio n

and

th a n a p r e s c r ib e d

e x t r a c t iv e
num ber

s tu d ie s

are

in d u s t r ie s .

of

w ork ers

g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a tio n s
E s ta b lis h m e n ts

are

o m itte d

a ls o

u n n ecessa ry
a p p ro p r ia te
th a n

are

c o s t in v o lv e d
a ccu ra cy

in

con d u cted

s u r v e y in g

a t m in im u m

o f s m a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts

on a

is

s a m p le b a s is

s tu d ie d .

a

g rea ter
In

th e

To

w ork

and

th e

as

are

A v era ge
fo r

s e le c te d

e a r n in g s

o c c u p a tio n s

e s t a b lis h m e n t s

in

th e

th e m in im u m

in d u s tr y

s iz e

g r o u p in g

and

o f th e
o b ta in

in

pay

la r g e ly

to

(l)

due

in d u s t r ie s

la r g e

fo rm e d ,

d a ta ,

how ­

th e

and

area,

ex­

le v e ls

The

d a ta a r e

of

occu pa­

(c)

m a in te ­

are

E a r n in g s

d a ta

a ls o ,

in c lu d e d .

fo r

h a lf

e x c lu d e

but

and

c o s t-o f-

W h ere

h a lf

w e e k ly

r e fe r e n c e

is

h ou r)

fo r

w h ic h

e a r n in g s

w e e k ly

t o th e n e a r e s t

sh ow n

h o lid a y s ,

o c c u p a tio n s ,

n earest

average

are

w eekends,

e x c lu d e d

are

th e

d a ta

r e g u la r w e e k ly s c h e d ­

fo r

th e se

d o lla r .

b o th

sexes

m ore
fo r

of m en

th e

u sed

of

m en
in

th e

are
are

p resen ted

s e p a r a te ly

c o m m o n ly

e m p lo y e d .

in th e s e

d is trib u tio n

(2 ) d i f f e r e n c e s

d e s c r ip tio n ;

are
and

in

of

o c c u p a tio n s
th e

s p e c ific

a p p r o p r ia te ly
(3 ) d i f f e r e n c e s

e m p lo y e d
th a n

d iffe r e n c e s

w it h in

th e

e m p lo y e e s

th ose

u sed

am ong

in

sam e
in th e s e

sexes

in le n g t h

ra te

are

am ong

d u tie s

c la s s ifie d

in d iv id u a l s a l a r ie s a r e a d ju s t e d
o f m e n w o u ld r e s u l t in h i g h e r

c la s s ify in g

g e n e r a liz e d
m in o r

sexes

and w om en

o c c u p a tio n s

are
in

and w om en
b o th

p e r­
w it h in

of se rv ­

o n th is b a s is .
average pay
ran ge.

su rveys

Job

are

u su ­

in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t s

e s t a b lis h m e n t s

in

to

s p e c ific

d u tie s

th e to ta l

in

p e r fo rm e d .

E a r n in g s

o c c u p a tio n s

o f m a n u fa c tu r in g

a

on

c le r ic a l

to

p a id ;

d iffe r e n c e s

s u r v e y jo b

d e s c r ip tio n s

s tu d ie d .

a llo w
and

w ork

w ork

e a r n in g s
o ffic e

e s t a b lis h m e n t s ;

a lth o u g h

sam e

a lly
O c c u p a tio n s

fo r

in w h ic h

w hen

a ll

ty p es

t e c h n ic a l;

e a r n in g s

to

bon u ses

rou n d ed

la t in g

th o se b e lo w

and

c la s s ific a t io n .

and

(ro u n d e d

s a la r ie s

have been

and

th o se h ir e d

fo r

ic e o r m e r it r e v ie w w h en
L on ger average
s e r v ic e

to

p r o fe s s io n a l

in c e n tiv e

s c h e d u le s

S tr a ig h t-tim e

of

p r o p o r tio n

c o m b in in g

e. ,

e v e r , a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s a r e g iv e n th e ir a p p r o p r ia t e w e ig h t.
E s tim a te s
b a s e d on th e e s t a b lis h m e n t s s tu d ie d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e , a s r e ­
cep t fo r

E a r n in g s

fo llo w in g

to

sam e

h a v in g

becau se

a ll e s ta b lis h m e n t s .

cost,

th e

d e s ig n e d

w it h in th e

(d ) c u s t o d ia l a n d m a t e r ia l m o v e m e n t .

o v e r t im e

D iffe r e n c e s
su rveys

d e s c r ip tio n s
in d u t ie s

becau se

t h e y f u r n is h in s u f f i c ie n t e m p lo y m e n t in th e o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d ie d to w a r ­
ra n t in c lu s io n .
W h e r e v e r p o s s i b le , s e p a r a t e ta b u la tio n s a r e p r o v id e d
f o r e a c h o f th e b r o a d in d u s t r y d iv is io n s .
T h ese

jo b

d e s c r ip tio n s .)

fo r

e m p lo y m e n t

i.

rep orted ,

to

th ese

and

N o n p r o d u c t io n

r e p r e s e n t a t iv e

t a t io n , 1 c o m m u n ic a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s ; w h o le s a le t r a d e ; r e ­
ta il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s ta te ; an d s e r v ic e s .
M a jo r
e x c lu d e d fr o m

(b )

o c c u p a tio n a l

fo r

M a n u fa c t u r in g ;

fro m

d iv is io n s :

o f th ese

ta b le s )

c le r ic a l;

O c c u p a t io n a l
fu ll-t im e
u le

in d u s tr y

lis t in g

th e A - s e r i e s

a n d p o w e r p la n t ;

m ade

u n u su al ch a n ges

su rvey.

a r e a , d a ta

s ix

of

occu ­

W ere

la te
w it h in

set

and

p r e m iu m

m en ts

u n ifo r m

e s t a b lis h m e n t s
su rv e y fo r

v is its

r e p o r t in g

a

in t e r e s t a b lis h m e n t v a r ia t io n

tio n s :

on

on

S ta tis tic s

L abor

s e le c te d

fo r

a n d n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

stu d y

are

com m on

in d u s t r ie s .

to

a

v a r ie ty

O c c u p a t io n a l c la s O c c u p a t io n a l e m p lo y m e n t e s t im a t e s
e s t a b lis h m e n t s

w it h in th e

scope

of

th e

rep resen t

s t u d y a n d n ot* th e n u m b e r

a ll

a ctu ­

a lly s u r v e y e d .
B e c a u s e o f d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t io n a l s t r u c t u r e a m o n g
s t u d i eess, t a b l i s h m e n t s ,
th e
e s t im a t e s
of
o c c u p a tio n a l
e m p lo y m e n t
o b ta in e d
have been
a d d e d in n e a r ly a ll o f th e a r e a s to b e s tu d ie d d u r in g th e
fro m
th e s a m p le o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s s t u d ie d s e r v e o n ly t o in d ic a t e th e
w in t e r o f 1 9 5 9 -6 0 ; r a i l r o a d s w il l b e a d d e d in th e r e m a in in g a r e a s n e x t
r e la t iv e im p o r t a n c e o f th e jo b s
s tu d ie d .
T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u ­
year.
F o r s c o p e o f s u r v e y in th is a r e a , s e e f o o t n o t e to " t r a n s p o r t a ­
p a tio n a l s t r u c t u r e d o n o t m a t e r ia lly a f fe c t th e a c c u r a c y o f th e e a r n ­
t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s " in t a b le 1.
in g s d a ta .
1




R a ilr o a d s ,

fo r m e r ly

e x c lu d e d

fro m

th e

scope

of th ese

2

T able 1.

E sta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s within sco pe of su rv ey and num ber studied in C lev elan d , O h io ,1 by m a jo r in du stry d iv isio n , 2 S ep tem b er 1959
M inim um
em ploym ent
in e s t a b lis h ­
m en ts in scope
of study

In d u stry d ivisio n

N um ber of e sta b lish m e n ts
Within scope
of study 3

W orkers in e sta b lish m e n ts
Within scope
of study

Studied

Studied

A ll d i v i s i o n s _____ _________________________________ _______

-

959

239

3 3 7 ,0 0 0

203, 910

M an u factu rin g (excludin g n e w sp a p e rs)
. . .
N onm anufacturing _________________________________________
T ra n sp o rta tio n , com m u n ication , and
other public u t ilit ie s 4
.. _
. ..
W holesale trad e
_. _
...................... ...............
R e ta il trad e (excluding dep artm en t s t o r e s ) 5 _
F in an c e , in su ra n c e , and r e a l e sta te
S e r v ic e s 5 , 6
_
. _

101
“

461
498

113
126

2 4 2 ,9 0 0
94, 100

153, 130
50, 780

101
51
101
51
51

61
163
65
96
113

24
34
18
27
23

2 8 ,4 0 0
17, 700
19, 900
15, 800
12, 300

20, 330
7 ,2 7 0
11, 150
7, 820
4 ,2 1 0

1 The C levelan d M etrop olitan A re a (C uyahoga and L ak e C o u n ties). The "w o r k e r s within scope of study" e st im a te s shown in th is tab le p ro vide a re a so n a b ly a c c u r a te d e sc rip tio n of the siz e and
com p osition of the lab o r fo rc e included in the su rv e y . The e stim a te s a r e not intended, how ever, to se rv e a s a b a s is of co m p ariso n with other a r e a in d exes to m e a su r e em ploym en t tre n d s or le v e ls
sin ce ( i ) planning of w age su rv e y s re q u ir e sth e use of e sta b lish m e n t data com p iled c o n sid e ra b ly in advan ce of the pay p erio d stu died and (2) sm a ll e sta b lish m e n ts a r e exclu d ed fro m the sco pe of the su rv ey .
2 The 1957 r e v ise d edition of the S tan d ard In d u stria l C la s s if ic a t io n M anual w as u sed in c la ssify in g e sta b lish m e n ts by in d u stry d iv isio n . M ajo r ch an ges fro m the e a r li e r edition (u sed in t h e B u r e a u 's
la b o r m a rk et w age su rv ey p ro g ra m p rio r to the w in ter of 1 9 5 8 -5 9 )are the t r a n s fe r of m ilk p a ste u r iz a tio n p lan ts and read y m ixed co n crete e sta b lish m e n ts fro m trad e (w h o lesale o r retail) to m an ufactu rin g
and the tr a n s fe r of rad io and te le v isio n b ro a d c a stin g fro m s e r v ic e s to the tr a n sp o rta tio n , com m u n ication , and other public u tilitie s d iv isio n .
3 In clu des a ll e sta b lish m e n ts with total em ploym ent at or above the m in im u m -siz e lim itatio n . A ll o u tlets (within the a r e a )o f co m p an ies in such in d u str ie s a s tr a d e , fin an ce, auto r e p a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m o tio n -p ictu re th e a te rs a r e c o n sid e re d a s 1 e sta b lish m e n t.
4 R a ilr o a d s w ere excluded fro m the su rv ey a s w ere ta x ic a b s, and s e r v ic e s in cid en tal to w ater tra n sp o rta tio n . C le v e la n d *s t r a n sit sy ste m is m u n icip ally o p erated and, t h e r e fo r e , exclu d ed by
defin ition fro m the scope of the stu d ie s.
5 T h is in du stry d iv isio n is re p re se n te d in e s t im a te s fo r " a ll in d u str ie s" and "n o n m an u factu rin g " in the S e r ie s A t a b le s, although co v e ra g e w as in su fficien t to ju stify se p a r a te p re se n tatio n o f d ata.

6

H o te ls ; p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s in e s s

T a b le 2.

s e r v i c e s ; a u t o m o b ile

r e p a ir

s h o p s ; m o t io n p ic t u r e s ; n o n p r o fit m e m b e r s h ip o r g a n iz a t io n s ; an d e n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h it e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .

In d exes of stan d ard w eekly s a l a r ie s and str a ig h t- tim e hourly e arn in g s fo r se le c te d occu patio n al g ro u p s in C lev elan d , Ohio,
Sep tem b er 1959 and June 1958, and p e rc e n ts of in c r e a se fo r se le c te d p e rio d s
In d exes
(O ctober 1952 = 100)

In d u stry and occu pation al group

S ep tem b er
1959

P e rc e n t in c r e a s e s fr o m —

June
1958

June 1958
to
S ep tem b er 1959

O ctober 1956
to
June 1958

O ctober 1954
to
O ctober 1956

O ctober 1952
to
O ctober 1954

A ll in d u strie s:
O ffice c le r ic a l (w o m e n )_________________________________
In d u stria l n u r se s (women) ______________________________
S k illed m ain ten ance (m en) _____________________________
U n sk illed plant ( m e n )___________________________________

136.
145.
139.
142.

7
9
6
1

131 .9
138. 3
130. 5
134. 5

3 .6
5 .4
7. 0
5. 6

8. 1
10. 8
7. 1
7 .9

10.6
11.4
10.7
11.7

10. 3
12. 0
10. 1
11.6

M an u factu rin g:
O ffice c le r ic a l (women) _________________________________
In d u stria l n u r se s (women) ______________________________
S k ille d m ain ten ance (m en) _____________________________
U n sk illed plant ( m e n ) ___________________________________

139.7
145. 1
139. 6
138. 8

134.7
138. 3
130. 3
129. 8

3 .7
4 .9
7. 1
6 .9

9 .0
1 1.5
6 .9
7. 1

11. 1
10.7
10.7
11.3

11. 3
12. 0
10.2
8. 9




3
W age T re n d s fo r S e le c te d O ccu p atio n al G ro u p s

P r e s e n t e d in t a b le 2 a r e in d e x e s of s a l a r i e s o f o ffic e
w o r k e r s and in d u stria l n u r s e s , and of a v e r a g e e a rn in g s of
p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s.

c le ric a l
se le cte d

F o r o ffic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s a n d i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , the in d e x e s
r e la t e to a v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s f o r n o r m a l h o u r s of w o r k , th at i s ,
th e s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u le f o r w h ic h s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a r e p a id .
F o r p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s , th e y m e a s u r e c h a n g e s in s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly
e a r n in g s , e x clu d in g p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k ­
e n d s, h o lid a y s, and late sh ifts.
The* i n d e x e s a r e b a s e d on d a t a f o r
s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t io n s a n d in c lu d e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y im p o r t a n t
jo b s w ith in e a c h g r o u p .
T h e o f f ic e c l e r i c a l d a t a a r e b a s e d on w o m e n in
the fo llo w in g 18 j o b s :
B i l l e r s , m a c h in e (b illin g m a c h in e ); b o o k k e e p in g m a ch in e o p e r a to r s, c la s s A and B ; C o m p to m e te r o p e r a to r s ; c l e r k s , file,
c la s s - A and B; c le r k s,
o rd e r; c le r k s, p ay ro ll; keypu n ch o p e r a to r s;
o ffic e g ir ls ; s e c r e t a r i e s ; s te n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l; sw itc h b o a rd o p e r a ­
to r s ; sw itc h b o ard o p e r a to r - r e c e p t io n is ts ; ta b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s;
tra n sc rib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s, g e n e ra l; and ty p ists, c la s s A and B .
T h e in d u s tr ia l n u r s e d a ta a r e b a s e d on w o m e n in d u str ia l n u r s e s .
M en
in th e fo ll o w in g 10 s k i l l e d m a i n t e n a n c e j o b s a n d 3 u n s k i l l e d j o b s w e r e
i n c l u d e d in th e p l a n t w o r k e r d a t a :
S k ille d -— c a r p e n t e r s ; e l e c t r i c i a n s ;
m a c h in ists; m e c h a n ic s ; m e c h a n ic s , au to m o tiv e ; m illw rig h ts; p a in te r s;
p ip e fit t e r s ; s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r s ; an d to ol an d d ie m a k e r s ; u n sk ille d —
ja n ito rs,
p o rters,
and
clean ers;
la b o re rs,
m a t e r ia l h an d lin g;
and
w atch m en .

A verage
w eek ly
salarie s or average
h o u rly e arn in g s w e re
c o m p u te d f o r e a c h of the s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s .
The av erage sa la rie s
o r h o u r ly e a r n in g s w e r e th e n m u l t i p l ie d b y the a v e r a g e o f 1 9 5 3 an d
1 9 5 4 e m p l o y m e n t in th e jo b .
T h e se w e ig h te d e a r n in g s fo r in d iv id u al
o c c u p a tio n s w e r e th en to ta le d to o b ta in a n a g g r e g a t e f o r e a c h o c c u p a ­
tio n al g ro u p .
F in a l ly , the r a t io o f t h e s e g r o u p a g g r e g a t e s f o r a g iv e n
y e a r to th e a g g r e g a t e f o r th e b a s e p e r i o d ( s u r v e y m o n t h , w i n t e r 1 9 5 2 - 5 3 )




w a s c o m p u t e d a n d the r e s u l t m u l t i p l ie d b y th e b a s e
g e t the in d e x f o r th e g iv e n y e a r .

year

in d e x

(100)

to

A d ju stm e n ts h a v e b e e n m a d e w h e re n e c e s s a r y
to m a in ta in
c o m p a r a b i l i t y . F o r e x a m p l e , in m o s t o f th e a r e a s s u r v e y e d , r a i l r o a d s
w e r e in c lu d e d in th e c o v e r a g e o f th e
s u r v e y s f o r th e f i r s t t im e th is
year.
In c o m p u t in g th e i n d e x e s , d a t a r e l a t i n g to th e r a i l r o a d i n d u s t r y
w e re e x clu d e d .

T h e in d e x e s m e a s u r e , p r in c ip a l ly , the e f f e c t s of ( l ) g e n e r a l
s a l a r y a n d w a g e c h a n g e s ; (2) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d
b y in d iv id u a l w o r k e r s w h ile in th e s a m e jo b ; a n d (3) c h a n g e s in th e
la b o r fo rc e su ch a s la b o r tu rn o v e r, fo r c e
e x p an sio n s, fo rc e re d u c ­
t io n s , an d c h a n g e s in th e p r o p o r t i o n of w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d b y e s t a b ­
lis h m e n ts w ith d iffe r e n t p a y le v e l s .
C h a n g e s in th e l a b o r f o r c e c a n
cau se in c re a se s
or d ecreases
in th e o c c u p a tio n a l a v e r a g e s w ith o u t
actu al w age ch an ges.
F o r e x a m p le , a fo rc e e x p an sio n m igh t in c r e a se
the p r o p o r t io n o f l o w e r p a id w o r k e r s in a s p e c i f i c o c c u p a t io n a n d r e ­
s u l t in a d r o p in th e a v e r a g e , w h e r e a s a r e d u c t i o n in th e p r o p o r t i o n
of lo w e r p a id w o r k e r s w o u ld h a v e th e o p p o s it e e ffe c t .
The m ovem ent
of a h ig h - p a y in g e s t a b lis h m e n t o u t of a n a r e a c o u ld c a u s e the a v e r a g e
e a r n in g s to d r o p , e v e n th o u g h n o c h a n g e in r a t e s o c c u r r e d in o t h e r
a r e a e sta b lish m e n ts.

T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e lim in a te s t h e e f f e c t s
o f c h a n g e s in th e p r o p o r t io n of w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h jo b in ­
c lu d e d in th e d a t a .
N or are
th e in d e x e s
in flu e n c e d b y c h a n g e s in
s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u le s o r in p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t im e , s in c e th e y
a r e b a s e d on p a y fo r s t r a ig h t- tim e h o u r s .
I n d e x e s f o r the p e r io d 1 9 5 3 to 1 9 5 9 f o r w o r k e r s
lab o r m a rk e ts
appeared
in B L S
B u ll.
1240-22, W ages
B e n e fits, 20 L a b o r M a r k e ts , W in ter 1 9 5 8 -5 9 .

in 17 m a j o r
and R elated

4

A *

O cc u p atio n al

E arn in gs

T a b le A -l. O f f ic e O c c u p a tio n s
(Average st raigh t-time weekly hours and earnings for select ed occupations studied on an a r e a b a s i s ,
by industry division, Cleveland, Ohio, September 1959)
A verage
Number
of
workers

o c cu p a tio n ,

a n d in d u s tr y d iv is io n

NU M B ER OF W O RK ERS RECE IVIN G S T R A IG H T-TIM E W E E K L Y EARN ING S OF—

Weekly
Weekly
U nder
hours
earnings ,
(Standard) ‘ (Standard)1 4 5 . 0 0

$
4 5 . 00

$
5 0 . 00

$
5 5 . 00

$
6 0 . 00

$
6 5 . 00

5 0 . 00

Sex,

5 5 . 00

6 0 . 00

6 5 . 00

7 0 . 00

$
7 0 . 00

$
7 5 . 00

7 5 . 00

8 0 . 00

$

$
8 0 . 00

8 5 . 00

8 5 . 00

90 . 00

$
9 0 . 00
9 5 . 00

$
9 5 .0 0

$
1 0 0 .0 0

1 0 0 .0 0

1 0 5 .0 0

$
1 0 5 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0

$
1 1 0 .0 0

$
1 1 5 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0

-

$
1 2 0 .0 0
-

1 2 0 .0 0

1 2 5 .0 0

$
1 2 5 .0 0
and
ove r

Men
$
1 0 6 .0 0
108. 50

-

-

3 9 .5
40. 0
40. 0

98. 00
1 0 3 .0 0

-

-

9 9 . 00

-

40. 0
46. 0

8 5 .5 0
88 . 06
78 . 50

-

C le r k s , accounting, c l a s s A _
Manufacturing ___________
Nonmanufacturing ________
Public utilities 2 ______
Wholesale trade _______

688

40. 0

512
176
42
73

40. 0

C le r k s, accounting, c l a s s B Manufacturing ___________
Nonmanufacturing ________

378
2V 8
100

C le r k s, o rd er ______________
Manufacturing ___________
Nonmanufacturing ________
Wholesale trade _______

369
484
481

40. 0
40. 0

9 6 . 00

-

C le r k s, payroll _____________
Manufacturing ____________

211
177

40. 0
40. 0

96. 50
98. 50

Office boys __________________
Manufacturing ____________
Nonmanufacturing ________
F in a n c e 4 ______________

262
125
137
86

39. 0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
38. 0

63.
65.
62.
61.

Tabulating-machine op er at o r s
Manufacturing ____________
Nonmanufacturing ________

347
243
104

853

39. 0
40. 0
46. 0

9 9 . 00
162. 56
9 6 . 00

2
-

4
-

9
4

-

2
-

4
-

5
-

-

-

4

4

2

33
28
5

2
2

63
27
36

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

2
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

52
15
37
12
15

49
39
10
4
1

20
7
13

71
6 1
10

55

38

50
25
25
2
12

55
43
12
9

39
16

26
20
6

51
51

75
51
24

87
13
74

94
18
76

-

144

65
46

125

19
2
6

19
2
8

84

5
10

22
14
8

3
3

10
lo

102
57

—

53
--------4 T “

W
~
18

6
4
'

53

68

43
10
6
4

59
9
5
4

7

T

1
1

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

101

64

49
52
52

32
32

57
40

3*±
25

32

17
17

9
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

19
19

11
11

-

10
10

50
00
00
50

J 28
16

6

17

37

12
12

2
4
1

2
15
8

19
18
11

3 9 .5
40. 0
39. 0

100. 00
1 0 3 .0 0
9 2 . 00

_

_

_

-

-

“

I3Z

348

39. 5
40. 0

112

39. 5

6 9 . 00
7 2 . 00
62 . 50

4

98

40. 0

7 2 . 50

236
184

39. 5
39. 0
39. 5

85. 50
85". 0 0 '
82. 00

6 6 . 00

-

3
-

"

3

6
2
4

42
8
34

36

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

33
2

25
16

31
31

9

13
25

92
26
66

-

-

-

-

9

25

66

24

74

75

45
45

5
4

11
6

14

2

26

22

-

32
32

17

13

8
4

15

22

32
30

73
30

26
12
14

34
20
14
7

17
8

7
5
2
2

6
2
4

1
1
-

1
1
-

_

_

.

_

_

9
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
4
6

12
4
8

44
38
6

22
20
2

42
32
10

34
31
3

17
13

16
10
6

49
37
12

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

43
23
8
4
4

11
9
9

11

9
7

2

2
2

-

11
8
3

30
12
18

44
32
12

45
35
10

65
50
15

18
15
3

11

20
20

2
2

1
1

"

"

-

2

4

*9
25
24
24

W om en
B i l l e r s , m a c h i n e ( b i l l i n g m a c h i n e ) _________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ___________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________
B ille r s ,

m a c h in e

(b o o k k e e p in g m a c h in e )

.

B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c la s s A
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _________ ______ __________________
______________________________

52

B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c la s s B
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ___________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 2 ____________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ____________________________
F i n a n c e 4 ______________________________________

901

2M

39. 0
40. 0

633
27

39.
39.
39.
38.

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

See

125
428

0
5
5
5

7 0 .5 0
64 . 50
7 1 . 00
6 7 . 00
6 4 . 00

4
-

_
-

15

-

15

69
11
58

-

-

12
1

16
40

50
28
22

44

31
5
18

12

22

-

5

26

3

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

3
1
2

21
13
8

36
30
6

14
5

41

10
10

_
"

_
-

-

-

2

-

-

5
3
2

2

11

28
18
10

40
40

9

35
34
1

199
101
98

95

78

47

6

3

3

29
66

17
61
10
18

13
34
19

1
1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

33

9

5

"

~

156

201

13
143
1
2
118

53
148
8
22
102

33
11

23
73

7
11
46

30

-

9
2

29
22

7

fo o tn o te s a t en d o f ta b le .




NOTE:

D a ta f o r n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g d o n o t in c lu d e in f o r m a t io n l o r d e p a r t m e n t
th e
r e m a in d e r
o f r e ta il tra d e
is
a p p r o p r ia te ly
rep resen ted
in d a t a
in d u s t r ie s c o m b in e d a n d fo r n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g .

stores;
f o r a ll

5

1

2

1

1
-

"

1

1

-

2
1

-

-

1
1

_
_

5
T able

A -l. O f f i c e O c c u p a t io n s - C o n t in u e d

(Average st raight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an a r e a b a s i s ,
by industry division, Cleveland, Ohio, September 1959)
A verage
Number
of
workers

o c cu p a tio n ,

a n d in d u s t r y d iv is i o n

N U M B ER OF W O RK ERS R E CE IVIN G S T R A IG H T-TIM E W E E K L Y EA RN IN G S OF—

Weekly
U nder
Weekly
hours , earnings ,
(Standard)1 (Standard)1
I s . 00

$
4 5 . 00
and
under

$
5 0 . 00

$
5 5 . 00

$
6 0 . 00

$
6 5 . 00

$
7 0 . 00

$
75 . 00

$
8 0 . 00

$
85. 00

5 0 . 00

Sex,

5 5 . 00

6 0 . 00

_6^ 00

7 0 . 00

7 5 . 00

80 . 00

8 5 . 00

9 0 . 00

26
2
24

95
36

172
50
122

235
43
192

68
58
10

193
102

152
62
90

103

U~

89
56
33
4
24

21

37
4
18
7

2

"

-

-

-

-

-

14
6
6

8
8

13
10
3

6

4
4

"

2
1
1

2
6

9 .0
00

$
9 5 .0 0

$
1 0 0 .0 0

$
1 0 5 .0 0

$
1 1 0 .0 0

$
1 1 5 .0 0

$
1 2 0 .0 0

$
1 2 5 .0 0

9 5 . 00

1 0 0 .0 0

1 0 5 .0 0

1 1 0 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0

1 2 0 .0 0

1 2 5 .0 0

over

$

and

W o m e n — C o n tin u e d
C le r k s ,

a c c o u n tin g ,

c la s s A

____________________________________

894

39. 5
39. 5
39. 5

M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________________________

372
522

C le r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c la s s E
___________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 2 ________________________________ _____ _______

1, 3 7 6
710

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

666
102
104

39. 5
39. 5
39. 5
3 7 .5

W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _______________________________________________
F i n a n c e 4 __________________________ ______________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A ________________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g
_____________________________________________

191
239
122
117

3 9 .5
40. 0

________________________________________________

868

M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 2 ____________________________________________ _
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _______________________________________________
F i n a n c e 4 _________________________________________________________

344
524
47
148

3 9 .5
40. 0

C le r k s ,

file ,

c la s s B

C l e r k s , o r d e r __________________________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________

243

39. 0

39.
40.
40.
38.

0
0
0
5

85. 50

.

-

_

9 1 . 50
81. 50

-

-

-

“

“

9
-

29
66
18
-

7 1 . 00

128

K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s - - - — ___________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g
______________________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _________ _______ _____ _____ __________________
F i n a n c e 4 _________________________________________________________
O ffic e g ir ls
___________________________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 2 ______________________________________________

See footnotes at end of table.




5
2

6
8

14
20

35
35

19
15

145
41
104
-

148

130

163

111

15

62
101
13
45
31

53
58
21
11
20

32
-

15
-

26
64

50
80
11
26

21
10
11
2
4

32

50
98
-

5

-

140
117

73
64

23
14

9
4

29
21
8
8

149
122
27

64
32
32
15
12

109
46
63
26
14

3
572
-

7 1 . 00
7 1 . 00

11
-

20

11

78.
80.
74.
74.

D u p lic a t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s (M im e o g r a p h
o r D i t t o ) ________________________________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________

-

24

5
5
5
5
5

39.
39.
39.
39.

-

33
17
16

12
38

895
631
264

778
454
294
115

34

53 . 00

C l e r k s , p a y r o l l ________________________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________________________
P u b lic u t ilit ie s 2
____________________________________________

C o m p t o m e t e r o p e r a t o r s ___________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _______________________________________________

70

75

50
50
50
00

7 0 . 00
7 9 . 00

95
51

34

7 3 . 00
72. 00

40. 0
40. 0

_______________________________________________

14

-

139
87

W h o le s a le t r a d e

7

7 2 . 50

443

39.
39.
39.
39.
39.

-

-

_____________________________________________
_______________________________________________

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g
W h o le s a le t r a d e

23

23
13
23

9

40. 0
40. 0

582

12

19
18
60

9
-

58 . 00

50
00
00
50

52

-

9
11
4

7
1
6
-

12
2
10
-

7 9 . 00

5
5
0
5

7 4 . 50
7 6 . 50
7 1 . 00

-

3 9 .5
40. 0

69 . 50
7 2 . 50

60
0

955

39. 5
40. 0

355

3 9 .5
40. 0

7 4 . 00
7 8 . 00
67 . 50

129
107

39. 0

246
118

39. 5
40. 0

128
37

39. 0
40. 0

_

6 9 . 50

6 9 . 00
6 4 . 50
58.
61.
56.
61.

50
00
00
00

95

33

33
33
-

41

“

-

19
10

25
16

48

129
142

91
10
17

9
-

43
5
3

-

-

13
1

2
-

29
-

43
24

109
80

2

29
9

19
4

29
18

146
82
64
33

-

82

59

271

29
9
20
-

63.
54.
63.
56.

8
1
7

136
38
98
16
5
34

50
00
50
00
50

75.
66.
65.
75.
64.

4
4

"

165
94
71
7
8

—

81
33
48

58
50
8
1

52
30

59
39
20

22

26
25
1
1
-

20
-

3
3

20

60
47
13

15
14
1

9
9

3
3

“

"

9
9
-

12
-------- 12
-

5
5
-

4
4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

■

-

7
7

_

-

26

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

53
35
18
14

89
70

26
20

24

-

19
19

6
6

30
26
4
4

5
1
4
4

98

96
66
30
14
7

55
42
13
2
4

77

69
29
10
5

55
51
4

102
56
46
20

93
56
37
14

76
42
34
8

54
42
12
8

79
60
‘

“

55
22
8
3

19

14
10
10

-

3
3

3
3

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

"

“

~

20
20
-

9
8
1

40

3
1

29
11
3

40
38
2

3
3
-

28
26
2
1

-

"

-

-

1
1
-

“
2
2
-

“

-

~

-

2

1

16

32

32

14

-

2

-

-

23

15

12

7
6

7
7

6
6

6
6

1
1

44
18
26
6
15

34

113

136
64

93
74

120
98

79
74

1
1

2

-

-

-

23
48

19
8

5
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

22
12
5

21
3
2

7

72
28
7

85
81
4
1

7

49
64
30
24

209
101
108

24

10
24
16
6

~

~

"

-

-

35

39
22
17
4

29
8
21
15

15
13
2
1

11
---------

1
1

6
--------- 6

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

6
-

2
-

6
-

-

2

12
-

29
10

12

19
11

67
30
37

19
16
2

3
3

-

-

-

4
4

1
1
1

-

1

7
7
-

_
-

2

-

-

-

-

"

"

“

-

-

-

-

-

6
T able
(A v e r a g e

A -l. O ffic e O c c u p a tio n s- C o n tin u e d

s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n in g s f o r s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d o n a n a r e a b a s is ,
b y in d u s t r y d iv is i o n , C le v e la n d , O h io , S e p t e m b e r 1 9 5 9 )

A vehaqe
Sex,

o c cu p a tio n ,

Number
of
workers

a n d in d u s tr y d iv is io n

N U M B ER OF W O RK ERS R E CE IVIN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A RN ING S OF—

Weekly

Weekly
earnings
(Standard)1 (Standard)

1

U nder
I s . 00

$
4 5 . 00
and
under
50 . 00

8 5 . 00

9 0
00
.

^ 9 5 .0 0

W

. 00

f o 5 .0 0

$
1 1 0 .0 0

$
1 1 5 .0 0

$
1 2 0 .0 0

? 2 5 .0 0

9 0
00
.

9 5 . 00

1 0 0 .0 0

1 0 5 .0 0

1 1 0 . 0 .0

1 1 5 .0 0

1 2 0 .0 0

1 2 5 .0 0

over

375
186

466
271
195
33
52
58

294

178
116
62
30
12
5

246
182
64
36
11
7

145
121
24

156
105
51
16
21
8

187
168

74
67
7
1
4

24
24
-

$
5 0 . 00

$
55 . 00

$
6 0 . 00

$
6 5 . 00

$
7 0 . 00

$
7 5 . 00

$8 0 . 0 0

5 5 . 00

60 . 00

6 5 . 00

70 . 00

7 5 . 00

8 0 . 00

8 5 . 00

112
32
80
5
18
46

278

341

115
163
14
70
57

156
185
25
52
79

62

343
183
160
21
34
70

380
245
135
18
36
31

328
218
110
20
44
23

229
155
74

34

17

45
34

17

37

37
18

19
16
3

$

$

and

W o m e n— C o n tin u e d
S e c r e t a r ie s

____________________________________________________________

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________________________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 2 .............................................. ..................................
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________________________________
F i n a n c e 4 ________________________________________________________
S ten og rap h ers,

g e n e r a l ___________________________________________

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________________________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 2 _____________________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________________________________
F i n a n c e 4 ________________________________________________________
S ten og rap h ers,

2, 804

«P
9 3 .5 0
9 7 . 00
88. 50

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
38. 5

2, 671
1,

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

.
40. 0
3 9 .5
38. 5

79.
72.
75.
75.
68.

39. 0
39. 0
39. 5
40. 0

7 3 . 50
83. 50
6 6 . 00

158

----------- ------------------------------------------------------------------

110

S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s _____________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________________________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 2 _____________________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________________________________
F i n a n c e 4 ________________________________________________________

417
180
237
41
74
54

S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t i o n i s t s _________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________________________________

680

39. 5
40. 0
39. 5

39
.0

6

18
3
15
-

22
4
18

136

338

21
115
-

211
127
32
17
62

1
12
3

.

_

-

-

-

12
-

-

36
-

24

4

12
-

-

36
-

14
57
_

3
21
1
14

46

9

"

-

33
1
32

6 9 . 50

39. 5
40. 0

8 2 . 00
92 . 00

_

-

-

-

644
408
236
62

39. 5
39. 5
.
40. 0

7 1 . 00
7 3 .5 0
6 6 . 00
7 0 . 00

-

-

3 0
9

-

-

"

-

“

19
7

936

3 9 .5

77 . 00

-

_

623
313

40. 0

8 1 . 00

44
8

39. 5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

6 9 . 50
72. 50
6 5 . 50

-

2
-

-

2
-

36
-

39
85
17

-

-

2

21

23

3 9 .5
40. 0

63 . 00
6 7 .5 0

20
20

40. 0

59. 50
6 8 . 00

98
24
74

418
151
267
18

3 9 .5
38. 0

61. 50
57. 50

379
113
266
8
36
142

444
188
256
27
71
127

240
97

T r a n s c r i b i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , g e n e r a l _______________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________________________________
T y p i s t s , c l a s s A ______________________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________________________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 2 _____________________________________________
F i n a n c e 4 ________________________________________________________

69
91
2, 208
1, 0 4 1
1, 1 6 7
110
267
602

-

-

9
---------- 5 “
52
20

23

--------

63
36
27

189
17
61

19
38
11

13
33
2
14
15

32
10
14
8

-

19
9
5
5

103
77
26
2

99
53
46
28

43
32
11

24
17
7

-

"

59
6

19
4

40
15

40
3
1

5
19
3

29
8
5
3

12

3
-

172
122
36
28
46

19
1
ia

25
25
-

-

-

-

_

_

-

"

-

-

3
3
-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

23
16
7
4

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

4
4
4

-

-

-

-

-

13
6

13

12
11

14
12

6
4

6
6

6
6

2
2

2
2

43

30
26
4
4

10
10
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

56
48
8

43
37
6
-

14

5
4
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

104

111

86

71

46
58
10

53
58
24

42
44

53
18

5

9

70
66
4
2

124

104
45

109
65
44
7

137

2 03

95

105
32

169
34
7
4

89
6
5
-

-

-

-

89
83
6
2
-

40
40

26

-

135
100
35
23
5
6

-

1
1
-

40
12

170
124
46
3
13
30

_
-

10
10
.

8
2

360
m

4
4
-

_

.

9
8

10
10
-

73
30

13

86
54
32
18
7
6

69

_

123
75
48
28

59
19
20

49
20
12
6
2

8
-----------T ~

157
84

69
50

15
2
7

9
4
1
4

89
80

6
3

-

10
9

56
35
21
4

50
22
28

212
32
81
75

51
5
46
7
18

-

-

422
210

7
7

-

3 0
9

73
31
42
1
6
27

5
3

4
4
4

o p e r a t o r s _________________________________
_____________________________________________________

T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e

B ______________________________________________________

-

_

7 7 . 00
7 0 . 50
6 7 .5 0

399
281
104

c la s s

2

2
-

9

7 0 . 00
71 . 50
6 7 . 00

T y p is t s ,

33
4
29
7
4
14

8 4 .5 0

39. 5
39. 5
.
39. 5

M a n u fa c t u r in g

17
17
-

-

84. 50

349

3 0
9

-

-

50
00
00
00
00

66
2

39.0

2
-

-

7 6 . 50

1, 04 3
161
323

-

99. 00
87. 50
84. 50

te c h n ica l

M a n u fa c t u r in g

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1, 5 6 9
1, 2 3 5
- 253
330
428

9

5

9
2

-

-

29
21
8
8
-

“

“

14
-

• “

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

2
6

1
2
3
4
5

S tan d ard h o u rs

r e fl e c t th e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s

T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a ilr o a d s ) ,
W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u te d a s fo llo w s :
F in a n ce , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s ta te .
v V o rk e rs w e r e d is tr ib u te d a s fo llo w s ;




39
.0

r e c e iv e

t h e ir

18

r e g u la r

c o m m u n ic a t io n , an d o t h e r p u b lic u t ili t ie s .
9 a t $ 3 5 t o $ 4 0 ; 19 a t $ 4 0 t o $ 4 5 .
15 a t $ 3 5

to

$ 4 0 ; 57 a t' $ 4 0 to

$45.

16
41

s tr a ig h t-tim e

39
178

s a l a r i e s a n d th e

189
21
87
56

e a r n in g s

corresp on d

4

-

to th e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ____________________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________________ _____ _
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 2 _________ _________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________________________________
F i n a n c e 4 ________________________________________________________

"

'

“

_

7

T a b le A -2. P rofession al a n d
.( A v e r a g e

s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s

an d e a r n in g s

b y in d u s t r y d iv is i o n ,

T ech n ical O cc u p atio n s

fo r

C le v e la n d ,

o c cu p a tio n ,

an d in d u s tr y d iv is io n

W
eekly
W
eekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(Standard) (Standard)

$
U n d e r 7 0 .0 0
and

$
$
7 5 .0 0 . 8 0 .0 0

7 0 .0 0

Sax,

O h io ,

o c cu p a tio n s

S e p te m b e r

s tu d ie d

on an a r e a b a s is ,

1959)

NUMBER O W
F ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM W
E EEKLY EARNINGS O
F

A verage

Num
ber
of
workers

s e le c te d

6 0 .0 0

$
!$
$
$
s
S
$
$
$
s
$
9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 2 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 1 4 0 .0 o jl4 5 .0 o | l5 0 .0 o | l5 5 .0 0 1 6 0 .0 0 1 6 5 .0 0 1 7 0 .0 0

$

8 5 .0 0

$
9 0 .0 0

9 0 . 00

9 5 .0 0

1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 2 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 1 4 0 .0 0 1 4 5 .0 o ll 5 0 .0 0 1 5 5 .0 0 1 6 0 .0 0 1 6 5 .0 0 1 7 0 .0 0

and

?S ?8 6

8 5 .0 0

over

M en
i
D r a fts m e n ,

l e a d e r _______________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________ ________

188
184

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

14 5 .5 0
$
1 4 5 .0 0

4
4

|
-

"

-

-

-

"

5
5

15
15

40
46

|

9
9

!

1
I
5

5

12

26
26

41
40

22
20

.

39
59

.

j

12

!

15

13

11

5
5

!

8
8

1
1

'

j
D r a f t s m e n , s e n i o r - ____ ______ __
_____
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _________________________________

D r a ftm e n .

ju n io r

.............................

M a n u fa c t u r in g

1 ,1 1 4
1 ,0 7 1

40. 0
40. 0

1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 0 .5 0

10
10

10
10

642
596

40. 0
40. 0

9 4 .5 0
9 3 .5 0

14
14

32
32

_
!
—
i
!

:—

45
41

1
1

20
18

90
86

84
80

11
9

—

80
76

115

76
2

1

—

120

n o

47
46

116

63
6T ~

75
75

118
118

—

83
..... 7 9

14
37
5 6 “ ..... 1 3 " " "

147
141

70
65

119
111

6
4

3

7

2

3

92

5°

92

49

16
-----— !j
! ” j

,

29
27

"

l5

_

.

_

■

“
j

W om en

i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g i s t e r e d ) ____________

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

9 7 .0 0

3

1

T 6 75 0

3

1

11
11

30
30

21

47

21

42

46
43

I

40

!

M a n u f a c t u r i n g _________________________________

271
256

1

i

1
iN u r s e s ,

4
5

i

2
2

38

47
47

19
15

!

■

■

■

1
!

_________
1

t

S tan d ard h o u rs




r e f l e c t th e w o r k w e e k

fo r w h ic h

e m p lo y e e s

r e c e iv e

NOTE:

t h e ir

r e g u la r

s tr a ig h t-tim e

s a la r ie i

j

an d th e e a r n in g s

i
i ________
_
correspon d

to th e s e

D a ta fo r n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g d o n o t in c lu d e in fo r m a t io n f o r d e p a r t m e n t
th e
r e m a in d e r
o f r e ta il tr a d e
is
a p p r o p r ia te ly
re p re se n te d
in d a t a
in d u s t r ie s c o m b in e d a n d f o r n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g .

'e e k l y h o u r s .

sto re s;
fo r a ll

|

Table A-3. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations

8

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a b a s i s ,
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , C l e v e l a n d , O h io , S e p t e m b e r 1 9 5 9 )
NUMBER OP W0RKEB8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

O c c u p a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

Average
hourly
earnings1

$
U nder
f . 90

C a r p e n t e r s , m a in t e n a n c e
M a n u fa c tu r in g
....
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n p . . ..

$

$

E n g in e e r s , s ta t io n a r y
_ ...........
. ...
M a n u fa c tu r in g
.
.....................
F i r e m e n , s t a t io n a r y b o i l e r
M a n u fa c tu r in g
. _ _. .
.

.
..

. ...

......... .

2 . 70

2 . 80

2 . 90

3 . 00

3 . 10

3. 20

3 . 30

2 . 10

2 . 20

2 . 30

2 . 40

2. 50

2 . 60

2. 70

2 . 80

2. 90

3. 00

3. 10

3 . 20

3 . 30

3 .4 0

4
4

30
30

17
14
3

7
6

1

32
32

4

71

2
2

66

38
37

5

1

12

4

28
5

13
13

53
46

72
72
79
77

2. 9 7
2. 9 7

-

2
2

"

“

17
17

-

2. 85
2 . 98

-

2

-

23

-

-

“

2. 50
2. 51

39
36

-

33
32

34
83

28
24

59
38

-

5^
5

8

H e lp e r s , t r a d e s , m a in t e n a n c e
..................... .. .
M a n u fa c tu r in g
...
. . . .
.........
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in p _
.........
_

1, 2 7 2
1, 193

2. 4 8
2. 51

1 23
'T T o4

27

2 . 06

19

8

21
6

M a c h in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s . t o o lr o o m
M a n u fa c t u r in g
..
.

. ....
...

1, 3 0 0
1, 3 0 0

2. 87
2. 87

.

1

10

-

1

M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ...................
M a n u fa c tu r in g
.....

1, 2 7 4
270

2. 95
2. 95

_

........... .

-

77
83
73
70

1, 7 b 5
1 ,7 0 5

2. 80
2. 79

1, 3 7 5
1, 3 2 7

2. 95
2. 9 4

-

2. 44
2. 45

21
' — n

M e c h a n ic s , a u t o m o t iv e (m a in te n a n c e )
.................
M a n u f a c t u r in g _________ __
__
_____
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _____ _ _____________________ __
_
P u b lic , u t i l i t i e s 3 ..
........ . . . . -----

M illw r ig h t s
M a n u fa c tu r in g
O ile r s
M a n u fa c tu r in g

.........

...

..

.... ... .

_

.

................
. ____
........ . . ... . .
......
. . . . . . . .

.. ...
._

.
___

T

778
3 15
463
350

522
— 5 TB —

2.
2.
2.
2.

-

1

27

19

79

....

12

90
71
19

194
3

10

4
4

43
43

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

1
l

3
3

49

7
7

_

_

—

W

~

_
12
12

40
40

20
20

12
2
10

5
5
-

-

-

-

_

_

7
7

_

11

21

54
54

56
53

52
■ 49

52
49

48
47

19
19

78
78

34

181

381

30

34

181

380

30
-

25
-------- 25“

id

7
-----------7 _

_

_

-

-

2
2

-

1

3

.

1

3

1

3

-

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

87
87

94
94

187
' 187

54
3
--------5 T ~ ------------r

14
14

6
6

8
8

33
33

3
3

168

"1

_

60
60

23
23

68
68

2 01
201

126
122

76
76

177
1?7

164
164

295
295

6
6

6
6

18
18

9
9
-

8
1
7
7

7
7
-

39

1 99
67
132
111

235
36
199
176

79
20
59
43

102
58
44
4

66
65
1

32
32
-

_
-

_
_
-

_
_

_
_

-

21
9

29
z r~

74
74

204
T o !

235
231

llo
114

176
165

90
973

33
33

23
Z3

~TT5

190
T975—

45
45

98
T8

144
T 4 4 -------

37
49
--------j j —
49------

55
------- 5 ------- —
50
44

22
n —

1 66
------- T W —
6
6

50
52
--------- 4 5 1 --------5 2 “

_

29

-

29

1, 8 89
1, 689

3. 07
3. 07

.

-

-

■

“

“

50
------- 575

-




2

11
11

31
30

22
22

_

NOTE:

-

43
42

-

172
172

“

4

40
38

100
1

44
41

—

110

40
--------- r r
19
15

7
---------- 6
1
1

1
1

37
--------- r r

8
8

16
16

41
41

67
67

2
2

2
2

_

8
8

9
9

83
83

92
92

124
-------T 2 4 ~

21
21

9
9

48
------- 4 8
-

—

tsf"

194
194

4
4
4 ~ ----------5

46
45

3
----------J —

30
-------- 9 —

18

-

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a '; f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , a n d l a t e
A ll w o r k e r s w e r e at $ 1 .8 0 to $ 1 .9 0 .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n (e x c lu d in g r a il r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e .

54
54

1

114
114

-

1
2
3

101

106
105

1

202

-

_. ...

76
40
36

344
343

334
237
97

24

-

■ 202

-

--------..
.................. .

112
110

2 71
--------2 5 0 ~

2

210
210

-

-

1

21

“

4
4

1

65
65

_

T o o l and d ie m a k e r s
M a n u fa c t u r in g

2

3 .5 0

46
3
5
-------- * 5 — ------------ 2“ -----------

55
'53

2. 85
2. $5

...

21
21

27
2?

136
136

-

144
135”
9

43
4l

-

2 . 90
2. 9 o

m a in t e n a n c e
......................

3

58
53
5

-

785
----- 7 53------

S h e e t -m e t a lw o r k e r s ,
M a n u fa c tu r in g

86

52
37
15

1

P i p e f i t t e r s , m a in t e n a n c e
...................... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..
. . _ ___ ______
.

-

89

3 . 50
and
over

32
32

6
8

4
------- 5------

45
32
13

$
3 . 40

2

419
— m .—
138
91

69
s i—
39
46

1

197

21

P a i n t e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e ----.... ...
___
M a n u fa r .t u r in p . _
_
....................
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in p
...
.......................
F in a n c e 4
.... ............... ................ ...

2.
T r
2.
2.

$

2 . 60

2 . 89

$61

$

2. 50

396
31 6

.

$

2. 4 0

1 , 881
1, 7 2 2
159

.

$

2. 30

524

. ..

$

2 . 20

8

-

$

$

$

$

2 . 10

$
2. 9 0
2. 87
3. 00

_

$

$

2 . 00

1 .9 0
and
under
2 . 00

513
416
97

. ... . .
...
......
.. . . . .
............................

E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a in t e n a n c e
M a n u fa c t u r in g
...............
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e
M a n u fa c tu r in g

$

$

82
---------81
1
1

19
------- T9
-

262
2 4 7 ------

-

-

-

-

-

16
15

107
107

202
202

6
6

2
2

38
3b

2
----------2

73
---------7 3 “

47
29

91
391
------85 ------ ----- J 8 T “
7
-------- 7-----33
— Z9—
4

_

_

25

4

-

-

Z 5 ~ ^ -----------

-

-

-

-

137
IT T ”

96
95

92
92

171

58
58

3
3

5
5

20
20

8
8

57

57

2

110
110

134
134

1 69
169

142
142

290
297)

s h ift s .

D a ta f o r n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g d o n o t in c lu d e in f o r m a t i o n f o r d e p a r t m e n t s t o r e s ;
th e r e m a i n d e r o f r e t a i l t r a d e i s a p p r o p r i a t e l y r e p r e s e n t e d in d a t a f o r a l l
in d u s t r ie s c o m b in e d an d f o r n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g .

_

m—

2

371
371“

9
----------5 “
3
“

_

_

-

-

-

2
6
----------- T ~ ---------- 5—
-

-

5
2
1
--------- 5— ----------- T ~ ---------- 1-----_

_

_

-

-

-

47
47

36
36

353
' 353“

9
Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s f o r s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is ,
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , C l e v e l a n d , O h io , S e p t e m b e r 1 9 5 9 )
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O c c u p a tio n 1 a n d in d u s tr y d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

E l e v a t o r o p e r a t o r s , p a s s e n g e r ( m e n ) __________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g
------------------------------------------------

64
64

E l e v a t o r o p e r a t o r s , p a s s e n g e r ( w o m e n ) _______
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________

148
146

G u a r d s ____________________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
F i n a n c e 3 -------------- -------------------------------------------------

1, 0 8 6

937
149
98

1a.n00 $1 . 10 $1. 2 0
d
e
1 .0 0 u1n. d10r 1 .2 0 1 . 3 0

Average
hourly 2 U n d e r
earnings $

1 .2 1
2

151
214

J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , a n d c l e a n e r s ( w o m e n ) _____
M a n u fa c t u r in g
......
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
F i n a n c e 3 ________________________________________

2 , 170
4?8
1, 6 9 2
909

1 .4 6
. 86
1 .3 4
1. 35

L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d lin g ______________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 5 ______________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ________________________________

5, 659
3, 663
1, 9 7 6
673
669

2

1

46
46

20
20

2 .2 5
2 .2 9
. 62
. 02

2
2

-

-

22
22
-

-

4
4
3

9
9
7

12

106
14
92
33

251
99
152

155

101

116

23

221 8 1 1 3 3 7
20
1 8 23
61
220 8 0 3 3 1 4
22 7 1 8 161
-

223
32
191
-

78
63
15
5

95
87

8

61

3

-

50
50
24

57
24
33
28

209
85
124
-

234

258
177
81
73

17
5

36
36
28

43
26
17

71

12

53
29

22
16
8

45
17
28
28

37
29

18

77
25

141

90
15
75
-

6

-

50
9
41
-

65
9
56
-

1

81

19
19
-

43
5
38
-

39
5
34
-

2
-

8

20

"

12

-

-

17
15

640
388

-

-

"

-

-

P a c k e r s , s h ip p i n g ( m e n ) ____________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ________________________________

1 ,4 6 5
1, 2 1 9
246
229

2 .2 3
2 .2 8
1 .9 9
2 . 03

_
-

_
-

2
2

_
-

2

38

-

-

-

~

-

P a c k e r s , s h ip p i n g ( w o m e n ) ________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________

539
423

1 .7 1
1 .7 7

_

5
5

22
10

503
R e c e i v i n g c l e r k s ______________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________________ -------3"§9
114
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _______________________________

2 .2 4
2 .2 7
2 . 13
2 . 07

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

2 .2 4
2 .2 4

.

_

-

-

W L

88

S h ip p in g c l e r k s ________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ________________________________

510
420
90

86

2
2

-

-

2 .2 2
2 . 17

1. 9 0

-

.

-

1, 6 1 2

1. 80

-

1
1
1
1

2 .2 3
.2 ?
. 16
2 . 15

O r d e r f i l l e r s ___________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _______________________________

1. 7 0

2 . 00 $2 . 10 $2 .2 0
2 .0 0 2 . 10 2 .2 0 2 . 3 0

$
1 .9 0

_

-

-

-

-

2 .2 6

1 .6 0

1 . 80

$

2
2

-

-

1 .5 0

$
1 .7 0

16
16

-

-

4

1 .4 0

1. 6 0

$

3
3

-

50
9
41
-

$
1. 5 0

-

113
113

-

$
1 .4 0

22
22

4
4

114
114
-

$
1. 3 0

19
19

-

2 .3 1
2 .3 5
. 11
2 .0 7
1. 91
. 06
1 .4 9
1 .9 8
1 .6 0

1
1

7
7

1. 19

3 ,4 7 3
2, 5?7

896

20
20

$
1. 36
1. 36

J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , a n d c l e a n e r s ( m e n ) _________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 5 ___ __________________________
F i n a n c e 3 ________________________________________

$

2

5
3

2 12

6

11

33
25

5
5

.

.

-

-

5
5
-

-

2

_

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

20

17
3

54

116

8

4

121
17
5

12
12
4
4
4

$

-

-

-

_

1

-

'

-

55
35

59
49

20

5

1

44 0
348
92
56
23

1

62

221
13
-

8

8

61
7
7

156
141
15

191
156
35

5

4

1 12
-

-

-

586
464

161

7 08
639
69




$

2 .7 0

$
2 .7 0

$
2 .8 0

2 . 8 0 2 . 90

2 . 90

$
3 . 00

3 . 00

over

$

and

146
94
52
52

37
37

_

3
3

11
11

15
9

37
31

20

4

6

34
5
29

81
67
14
14

77
69

8

44
40
4
4

26

25

5
4

8
8

D a ta f o r n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g d o n o t in c l u d e i n f o r m a t i o n f o r d e p a r t m e n t
th e r e r r a i n d e r o f r e t a i l t r a d e i s a p p r o p r i a t e l y r e p r e s e n t e d in d a ta
in d u s t r ie s c o m b in e d an d f o r n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g .

sto re s;
f o r a ll

_

.

'

-

-

"

-

-

290
252
38
5

84
82

76
76
-

38
38
-

-

-

-

-

-

68
1

130
103
27
27

6

-

.

2
2
86
54
2
2

122
95
27
27

11
8

-

"

_
-

-

1
1
-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

191
15
4
4

37
36

19
9

22

229
172
57
57

77
58
19
18

-

10

98
78

4*
44
-

68

1 60
147
13
13

28
15
13
13

3 84
383

20
20

1
1
6
6
101

-

-

2

4

6 2
2
-

-

*3
18
43 ------- TS~
-

_
-

.*
4
-

-

"

"

4
4

-

-

-

12
11 1

9
9
-

23

11

59
59
-

T l -------

2
-

-

46
45

11

2
10 2
-

"

21

45
43

12
12

4
4

90

44
44
-

1

11

-

~

132
85

442
226

-

-

6 97
57
64 0
573

_
-

-

2 06

652
450
02
61
24

216

1
1
-

143

451
408
43
-

2

-

"

-

1

388
318
70
5
28

6 30
6 30
60 7 6
4 4 ------ 6 F “
16
8
6
15
59
45
14
14

3
3
-

-

33
33
-

74
59
15
15

6

-

-

-

69

39
27

125
113

11

-

-

“

306
234
72
71

2

11

-

_

16 4
153

-

_

-

84
46
38
24

69
39
30
30

_

-

49

8

2 . 6, 0

2 .6 0

81
81
-

33

23

39
31

2 . 50

154
143

-

See fo o tn o te s at en d o f ta b le .

NOTE:

744
“ TO "
28
17

140

122
-

123
38
38

46
42
4
4

2
20
12
8
8

22
21

67 0
441
229
28
97

101

18
4

152
130

2
12
12
-

64
64
-

12
11
8

22

2 .4 0

-

489
452
37
28

12

17
5

-

71
58
13
13

68

2

1
“

59
16
43
36

18

$
2 . 50

-

-

10

16

246
196
50
13

$
2 .4 0

2

2
15
3

$
2 . 30

-

8
8
-

-

—

-

2
2

21
10
11
11

2
2

-

"

13
13 '
-

4
4

"

15
n r-

5
3

2

10
Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations-Continued
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is ,
b y in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n , C le v e la n d , O h io , S e p t e m b e r 1 9 5 9 )
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O c c u p a tio n 1 an d in d u s t r y d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
Average
hourly
1 . 00
1 . 10
1 . 20
1 .3 0
earnings2 le n d e r
and
under
1 . 00
l.» IQ, 1..2JL 1 . 1 0 -

275
152
123

$
2 .3 4
2 .4 0
2 .2 8

T r u c k d r i v e r s 6 ________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
P u b lic u t ilit ie s 5
..........
....................
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _______________________________

3, 262
970
2 , 292
1, 196
461

T r u c k d r i v e r s , l i g h t (u n d e r 1 1/ z t o n s ) _______
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g
........................ .........

277
75
202

T r u c k d r i v e r s , m e d i u m (1 V 2 t o a n d
in c l u d i n g 4 t o n s ) _______________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g __________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ____________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ____________________________

1, 035
436
599
115

T r u c k d r iv e r s , h ea v y (o v e r 4 to n s,
t r a i l e r t y p e ) _______________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g __________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ____________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 5 ___________________________

$
1 .4 0

$
1 .5 0

1 .5 0

1 .6 0

2

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

2
2

2 .6 0
2 .5 9
2 .6 1
2 .6 9
2 .5 3

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .2 5
2 .4 0
2 . 19

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

2 .6 6

-

-

-

-

2 .6 3

-

-

-

1, 3 3 0
191
1, 139
552

2 .6 4
2 .7 0
2 . 63
2 .6 9

-

-

-

310

2 .7 3

T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) _________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g
______________________________

1 , 886
1, 7 7 2
114

2 .4 3
2 .4 3
2 .4 8

T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( o t h e r th a n f o r k l i f t ) __________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________________

418
418

2 . 66
"2 . 66

W a t c h m e n _______________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________
F i n a n c e 3 _________________ _______________________

630
443
187
108

1 .7 7
1. 87
1 .5 4
1 .4 8

T r u c k d r iv e r s , h ea v y (o v e r 4 to n s,
o t h e r t h a n t r a i l e r t y p e ) _______________________

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

2 . 59
2 .5 1

2

$
1 .7 0

1 .7 0

1 .8 0

$

$

$

$

1 . 80

1 . 90

2 . 00

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

$
2. 30

$
2 .4 0

$
2 . 50

1 .9 0

2 . 00

_2 . 1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 . 50

2 .6 0

22
2
20

22
20

21

34

15

20

44
18

2

6

14

26

32
15
17

166
34
132
-

99
39
60
-

39
24
15
7

-

-

-

-

60

10

14 4

5
5

12

69
9

-

26
26

4
4

132

60

-

-

19
15
4

12
12

17
17
-

25
14

1 54
114
40

-

"

1
1

19

3

5

6

-

13

2
1

1

-

4

-

8
8

-

17
13
4
4

-

_
-

-

"

“

-

-

-

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

22

8

-

-

7

-

22
11

1

47
40
7

72
23
49
23

-

1

1

-

1

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

97
------- 7 —
90
90
-

1

17
13
4
4

-

$

$
2 .6 0

$
2. 70

2 .7 0

2 . 80

29
19

22

18

11

7

10

18 —
4

TT~
1

77
373
------7 T ~ " 2 0 8
6
165
48

895
242
653
414
79

$

$

2 . 80

2 . 90

2 . 90

$
3 . 00

3 .0 0

7
7
-•

2
2

22
10
12

-

11

32
26
6

18

8

5
1

-

1

---------- r

3
3

_
-

-

-

-

-

"

-

374
165
209
75

353
37
316
28

10
10

4
3

-

1

-

-

*

-

693
73 —
62 0
227

11

2
2

90
90

-

10
10

2
2

5

-

-

4

-

107
38
69

-

“

“

-

-

-

-

-

21

395
------4 l
354
3 04

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

55

90

21

15
15
-

19
17

15
15

76
70

20
18
2

63
63

222
222

-

“

12 4
91
33

714
714

2

-

404
380
24

90
54
36

26
23
r r ------2 6 “
9
~

2
2

_

-

-

-

-

72
72

21
21

56
56

54
54

57
57

8
8

23
13

117
82
35
34

25
5

33
31

85
85

5

20

-

19

-

-

2

41
28
13

43
42

20

1

-

5

1

-

-

10
6

13

2

6
2
2

_
-

23
23

36
18
18
15

30
28

22
22

2

-

15
H -------

6

-

-

1

9

"

226

-

-

9
-

-

17 4
1263
127 " 1 6 2
1136
12
10
715

-

D a ta li m it e d to m e n w o r k e r s e x c e p t w h e r e o t h e r w is e in d ic a t e d .
E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , a n d lu t e s h i f t s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .
W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o l l o w s : 7 0 a t $ 0. 7 0 t o $ 0. 8 0 ; 4 a t $ 0. 8 0 t o $ 0 . 9 0 ; a n d 4 0 a t $ 0. 9 0 t o $ 1.
T r a n s p o r t a t io n (e x c lu d in g r a il r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
In c lu d e s a ll d r iv e r s r e g a r d le s s o f s iz e an d ty p e o f tr u c k o p e r a t e d .
W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o llo w s ;
l a t $ 3 t o $ 3 . 2 0 ; 17 a t $ 3 . 2 0 t o $ 3 . 4 0 ; 9 4 a t $ 3 . 4 0 t o $ 3 . 6 0 .




1 . 60

and

-

S h ip p i n g a n d r e c e i v i n g c l e r k s _____________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________ ________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________

$

-

* r
2

-

15
15-------

-

-

140

3
3

-

-

-

5
5

-

-

3
7 112
------ 3 —
112

-

1

_

-

1
-

73
r73—

-

-

11
Appendix*. Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’ s wage surveys is to a s s i s t its
field sta ff in c la ssify in g into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll
titles and different work arrangements from establishm ent to establishm ent and from area to area. T his is
e sse n tia l in order to permit the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
B ecau se of this em phasis on interestablishm ent and interarea comparability of occupational content, the
Bureau’ s job descriptions may differ significan tly from those in use in individual establishm ents or those
prepared for other purposes In applying th ese job description s, the B ureau's field econom ists are
instructed to exclude working superv isors, apprentices, learners, beginners, train ees, handicapped workers,
part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.
OFFICE

BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Prepares statem ents, b ills, and in v oices on a machine other
than an ordinary or electrom atic typewriter. May a lso keep records a s
to billin gs or shipping charges or perform other cle rica l work inciden­
tal to billing operations. For wage study p u rpo ses, b illers, machine,
are c la s s ifie d by type of machine, a s follow s:

O perates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, E llio tt
Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs, National C ash R egister, with or with­
out a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of b u sin e ss tran sactio n s.

Biller , machine (billing machine)— U se s a s p e c ia l billing ma­
chine (Moon Hopkins, E lliott F ish er, Burroughs, e tc ., which are
combination typing and adding m achines) to prepare b ills and in­
voices from custom ers’ purchase orders, internally prepared orders,
shipping memorandums, etc. U sually involves application of prede­
termined discounts and shipping charges and entry of n ecessary
exten sion s, which may or may not be computed on the billing ma­
chine, and to tals which are autom atically accumulated by machine.
The operation usually involves a large number of carton co p ies
of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.
Biller , machine (bookkeeping m a c h i n e U se s a bookkeeping
machine (Sundstrand, E llio tt Fish er, Remington Rand, e tc ., which
may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare custom ers’
b ills a s part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally in­
volves the sim ultaneous entry of figures on custom ers’ ledger
record. The machine autom atically accum ulates figures on a num­
ber of vertical columns and computes and usually prints auto­
m atically the debit or credit b alan ces. D oes not involve a knowl­
edge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of
s a le s and credit s lip s .




Class A — K eeps a se t of records requiring a knowledge^ of
and experience in b a sic bookkeeping principles and fam iliarity with
the structure of the particular accounting system used. Deter­
mines proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to
be used in each phase of the work. May prepare con solidated re­
ports, balance sh e e ts, and other records by hand.
Class B — K eeps a record of one or more p h ases or se ctio n s
of a se t of records usually requiring little knowledge of b a sic
bookkeeping. P h a se s or sectio n s include accounts payable, pay­
roll, cu stom ers’ accounts (not including a sim ple type of billin g
described under biller, machine), co st distribution, expense d is ­
tribution, inventory control, e tc. May check or a s s i s t in prep­
aration of trial b alan ces and prepare control sh eets for the a c ­
counting department.

CLERK, ACCOUNTING
C la s s A — Under general direction of a bookkeeper or a c ­
countant, has respon sibility for keeping one or more sectio n s of a
complete s e t of books or records relating to one ph ase of an e s ­
tablishm ent’ s b u sin ess tran sactions. Work involves posting and

12
CLERK, ACCOUNTING— Continued

balancing subsidiary ledger or ledgers such as accounts receiv­
able or accounts payable; examining and coding invoices or vouch­
ers with proper accounting distribution; requires judgment and ex­
perience in making proper assignations and allocations. May
assist in preparing, adjusting, and closing journal entries; may
direct class B accounting clerks.
Class B — Under supervision, performs one or more routine
accounting operations such as posting simple journal vouchers,
accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher registers;
reconciling bank accounts; posting subsidiary ledgers controlled
by general ledgers. This job does not require a knowledge of
accounting and bookkeeping principles but is found in offices in
which the more routine accounting work is subdivided on a func­
tional basis among several workers.

CLERK, PAYROLL

Computes wages of company employees and enters the neces­
sary data on the payroll sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers’
earnings based on time or production records; posting calculated data
on payroll sheet, showing information such as worker’s name, working
days, time, rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. May
make out paychecks and assist paymaster in making up and distrib­
uting pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.
COMPTOMETER OPERATOR

Primary duty is to operate a Comptometer to perform mathe­
matical computations. This job is not to be confused with that of
statistical or other type of clerk, which may involve frequent use of
a Comptometer but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to
performance of other duties.
DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)

CLERK, FILE

Class A — Responsible for maintaining an established filing

system. Classifies and indexes correspondence or other material;
may also file this material. May keep records of various types
in conjunction with files or supervise others in filing and locating
material in the files. May perform incidental clerical duties.
Class B — Performs routine filing, usually of material that
has already been classified, or locates or assists in locating ma­
terial in the files. May perform incidental clerical duties.

CLERK, ORDER

Receives customers’ orders for material or merchandise by
mail, phone, or personally. Duties involve any combination of the
following: Quoting prices to customers; making out an order sheet
listing the items to make up the order; checking prices and quantities
of items on order sheet; distributing order sheets to respective de­
partments to be filled. May check with credit department to deter­
mine credit rating of customer, acknowledge receipt of orders from
customers, follow up orders to see that thv'y have been filled, keep
file of orders received, and check shipping invoices with original
orders.




Under general supervision and with no supervisory respon­
sibilities, reproduces multiple copies of typewritten or handwritten
matter, using a Mimeograph or Ditto machine. Makes necessary adjust­
ments such as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed. Is
not required to prepare stencil or Ditto master. May keep file of used
stencils or Ditto masters. May sort, collate, and staple completed
material.

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR

Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsi­
bilities, records accounting and statistical data on tabulating cards
by punching a series of holes in the cards in a specified sequence,
using an alphabetical or a numerical keypunch machine, following
written information on records. May duplicate cards by using the
duplicating device attached to machine. May keep files of punch
cards. May verify own work or work of others.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL

Performs various routine duties such as running errands,
operating minor office machines such as sealers or mailers, opening
and distributing mail, and other minor clerical work.

SECRETARY

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST

Performs secre ta ria l and clerical duties for a superior in an
administrative or executive position. D uties include making appoint­
ments for superior; receiving people coming into office; answering and
making phone c a lls ; handling personal and important or confidentai
mail, and writing routine correspondence on own in itiative; taking
dictation (where transcribing machine is not used) either in shorthand
or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine, and transcribing dictation or therecorded information reproduced on a transcribing machine. May pre­
pare sp e c ial reports or memorandums for information of superior.

In addition to performing duties of operator, on a sin gle
tion or monitor-type switchboard, a c ts a s receptionist and may
type or perform routine clerical work a s part of regular d u tie s.
typing or clerical work may take the major part of this w orker's
while at switchboard.

13
p o si­
a lso
T his
time

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more person s,
either in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine, involving a
normal routine vocabulary, and to transcribe this dictation on a type­
writer. May a lso type from written copy. May a lso s e t up and keep
file s in order, keep simple records, etc. D o e s n o t i n c l u d e t r a n s c r i b i n g m a c h in e w o r k (se e transcribing-machine operator).

Operates machine that autom atically an alyzes and tra n sla te s
information punched in groups of tabulating cards and prints tran s­
lated data on forms or accounting records; s e t s or a d ju sts machine;
does simple wiring of plugboards according to estab lish e d practice
or diagram s; p laces cards to be tabulated in feed magazine and sta rts
machine. May file cards after they are tabulated. May, i n a d d i t i o n ,
operate auxiliary machines.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more person s,
either in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar machine, involving a
varied technical or sp ecializ e d vocabulary such a s in leg al briefs or
reports on scien tific research and to transcribe this dictation on a
typewriter. May a lso type from written copy. May a lso se t up and keep
file s in order, keep simple records, etc. D o e s n o t i n c l u d e t r a n s c r i b i n g -

Primary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal
routine vocabulary from transcribing-m achine records. May a ls o type
from written copy and do sim ple clerical work. Workers transcribing
dictation involving a varied technical or sp ecializ e d vocabulary such
as leg al briefs or reports on scien tific research are not included. A
worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar
machine is c la ssifie d a s a stenographer, general.

m a c h in e w o r k .

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
TYPIST
Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard.
Duties involve handling incoming, outgoing, and intraplant or office
c a lls . May record toll c a lls and take m e ssa g e s. May give information to
persons who c a ll inf or occasion ally take telephone orders. For workers
who a lso act a s reception ists see switchboard operator-receptionist.




U ses a typewriter to make copies of various m aterial or to
make out b ills after calculation s have been made by another person.
May do clerical work involving little sp e c ia l training, such a s keeping
simple records, filing records and reports or sorting and distributing
incoming mail.

14
TYPIST— Continued

TYPIST— Continued

C l a s s A — Performs o n e o r m o r e o f th e f o l l o w i n g : Typing ma­
terial in final form from very rough and involved draft; copying
from plain or corrected copy in which there is a frequent and varied
use of technical and unusual words or from foreign-language copy;
combining material from sev eral sou rces, or planning layout of
complicated sta tis tic a l tab les to maintain uniformity and balance

in sp acin g; typing tab le s from rough draft in final form. May type
routine form letters, varying d e ta ils to su it circum stances.
C l a s s B — Performs o n e o r m o r e o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Typing from
relatively clear or typed d rafts; routine typing of forms, insurance
p o lic ie s, e tc ., settin g up sim ple standard tabulations, or copying
more complex tab les already s e t up and spaced properly.
*

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR
(A ssista n t draftsman)
Draws to sc a le units or parts of drawings prepared by d rafts­
man or others for engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes.
U se s various types of drafting tools a s required. May prepare drawings
from simple plans or sk e tch e s, or perform other duties under direction
of a draftsman.
DRAFTSMAN, LEADER
P lan s and directs a ctiv itie s of one or more draftsmen in prep­
aration of working plans and d etail drawings from rough or preliminary
sketch es for engineering, construction, or manufacturing pu rpo ses. D uties
involve a c o m b i n a t i o n o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Interpreting blueprints, sk e tch e s,
and written or verbal orders; determining work procedures; a ssig n in g
duties to subordinates and inspecting their work; performing more dif­
ficult problems. May a s s i s t subordinates during em ergencies or a s a
regular assignm ent, or perform related duties of a supervisory or ad­
m inistrative nature.
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
Prepares working plans and detail drawings from n otes, rough
or detailed sketch es for engineering, construction, or manufacturing pur­
p o se s. Duties involve a c o m b i n a t i o n o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Preparing work­
ing p lan s, detail drawings, m aps, c r o ss-se c tio n s, e tc ., to s c a le by use
of drafting instruments; making engineering computations such a s those
involved in strength of m aterials, beams and tr u sse s; verifying com­
pleted work, checking dim ensions, m aterials to be used, and q u an tities;




DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR— Continued
writing sp ecific atio n s; making adjustm ents or changes in drawings or
sp ecificatio n s* May ink in lin es and letters on pencil draw ings, prepare
detail units of complete draw ings, or trace drawings. Work is frequently
in a sp ecializ e d field such a s architectural, e le ctrical, m echanical, or
structural drafting.
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse who g iv e s nursing serv ice to ill or injured
em ployees or other persons who become ill or suffer an accident on the
prem ises of a factory or other establishm ent. Duties involve a c o m b i n e r
d o n o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Giving first aid to the ill or injured; attending to
subsequent dressin g of em ployees* in ju ries; keeping records of patients
treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or other purposes;
conducting ph ysical exam inations and health evaluations of applican ts
and em ployees; and planning and carrying out programs involving health
education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment, or other
a ctiv itie s affecting the health, w elfare, and safety of a ll personnel.

TRACER
C opies plans and drawings prepared by others, by placin g trac­
ing cloth or paper over drawing and tracing with pen or pencil. U se s
T-square, com pass, and other drafting to o ls. May prepare sim ple draw­
ings and do sim ple lettering.

MAINTENANCE

15
POWERPLANT

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER

Performs the carpentry duties n ecessary to construct and main­
tain in good repair building woodwork and equipment such a s bins, crib s,
counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, sta irs, c a sin g s, and trim
made of wood in an establishm ent. Work involves m o s t o f t h e f o l l o w i n g :
Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, m odels, or
verbal in struction s; using a variety of carpenter’ s handtools, portable
power to o ls, and standard measuring instrum ents; making standard shop
computations relating to dim ensions of work; selectin g m aterials nec­
e ssa ry for the work. In general, the work of the maintenance carpenter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a for­
mal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

F ire s stationary boilers to furnish the establishm ent in which
employed with heat, power, or steam . F e e d s fu els to fire by hand or
operates a m echanical stoker, g a s, or oil burner; checks water and safety
v a lv e s. May clean , oil, or a s s i s t in repairing boilerroom equipment.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
Performs a variety of e lectrical trade functions such as the
in stallatio n , maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generating, d is ­
tribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishm ent. Work
involves m o s t o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Installing or repairing any of a variety
of electrical equipment such a s generators, transform ers, sw itchboards,
controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit sy stem s,
or other transm ission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, lay­
out, or other sp e cific atio n s; locating and diagnosing trouble in the e le c ­
trical system or equipment; working standard computations relating to
load requirements of wiring or e lectrical equipment; using a variety of
electrician ’ s handtools and measuring and testin g instruments. In gen­
eral, the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded training
and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
O perates and maintains and may a lso supervise the operation
of stationary engines and equipment (m echanical or electrical) to sup­
ply the establishm ent in which employed with power, heat, refrigera­
tion, or air-conditioning. Work in volves: Operating and maintaining
equipment such a s steam engines, air com pressors, generators, motors
turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and
boiler-fed water pumps; making equipment repairs; keeping a record of
operation of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May a l s o
supervise these operations. H e a d o r c h i e f e n g i n e e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
e m p lo y in g m o re th a n o n e e n g in e e r a r e e x c lu d e d .




HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE
A s s is ts one or more workers in the sk illed maintenance trades,
by performing sp e cific or general duties of le sse r sk ill, such a s keeping
a worker supplied with m aterials and to o ls; cleaning working area, ma­
chine, and equipment; a ss is tin g worker by holding m aterials or to ols;
performing other unskilled ta sk s a s directed by journeyman. The kind of
work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding ma­
terials and tools and cleaning working a re a s; and in others he is per­
mitted to perform sp ecialize d machine operations, or parts ot a trade
that are a lso performed by workers on a full-time b a s is .
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
S p e c ia liz e s in the operation of one or mere types of machine
tools, such a s jig borers, cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lath es,
or milling machines in the construction of machine-shop to ols, gau ges,
jig s , fixtures, or d ie s. Work involves m o s t o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Planning
and performing difficult machining operations; processin g items requiring
complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision measuring instruments; selectin g fe ed s, sp e e d s, tooling and op­
eration sequen ce; making n ecessary adjustm ents during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dim ensions. May be required to recog­
nize when tools need dressin g, to d ress to ols, and to se le c t proper
coolants and cutting and lubricating o ils . For cross-industry wage study
purposes, machine-tool operators, toolroom, in tool and die jobbing shops
are excluded from this cla ssific a tio n .
MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of
metal parts of m echanical equipment operated in an establishm ent. Work
involves m o s t c f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Interpreting written instructions and
sp e cific atio n s; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of ma­
ch in ist's handtools and precision measuring instrum ents; settin g up and

16
MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE— Continued

MILLWRIGHT— Continued

operating standard machine to o ls; shaping of metal parts to clo se toler­
an ces; making standard shop computations relating to dim ensions of work,
tooling, feeds and sp eed s of machining; knowledge of the working prop­
erties of the common m etals; selectin g standard m aterials, parts, and
equipment required for his work; fitting and assem bling parts into me­
chanical equipment. In general, the m achin ist's work normally requires
a rounded training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a
formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

are required. Work involves m o s t o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Planning and laying
out 6f the work; interpreting blueprints or other sp ecific atio n s; using a
variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations re­
lating to s tr e s s e s , strength of m aterials, and centers of gravity; alining
and balancing of equipment; selectin g standard to ols, equipment, and parts
to be used; in stallin g and maintaining in good order power transm ission
equipment such a s drives and speed reducers. In general, the m ill­
w right's work normally requires a rounded training and experience in the
trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
R epairs autom obiles, b u se s, motortrucks, and tractors of an e s ­
tablishm ent. Work involves m o s t o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Examining automotive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; d isassem b lin g equipment and
performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools a s wrenches,
gau ges, d rills, or sp ecializ e d equipment in disassem b lin g or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
v a lv e s; reassem blin g and in stallin g the various asse m b lies in the vehicle
and making n ecessary adjustm ents; alining w heels, adjusting brakes and
ligh ts, or tightening body bo lts. In general, the work of the automotive
mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R epairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishm ent.
Work involves m o s t o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Examining machines and mechan­
ic a l equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dism antling or partly d is ­
mantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of
handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective
parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replace­
ment part by a machine shop or sending of the machine to a machine shop
for major repairs; preparing written sp ecificatio n s for major repairs or
for the production of parts ordered from machine shop; reassem bling ma­
ch in es; and making a ll n ecessary adjustm ents for operation. In general,
the work of a maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and ex­
perience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. Excluded from this c la ssific a tio n are workers
whose p r im a r y d u t i e s involve settin g up or adjusting m achines.
MILLWRIGHT
In stalls new machines or heavy equipment and dism antles and
in sta lls machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout




OILER
L u b ricates, with oil or g re a se , the moving parts or wearing sur­
fa c e s of m echanical equipment of an establishm ent.
PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Pain ts and redecorates w alls, woodwork, and fixtures of an e s ­
tablishm ent. Work i n v o l v e s t h e f o l l o w i n g : Knowledge of surface pecu­
lia ritie s and types of paint required for different application s; preparing
surface for painting by removing old finish or by placin g putty or filler in
nail holes and in terstic es; applying paint with spray gun or brush. May
mix co lo rs, o ils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper
color or con sisten cy. In general, the work of the maintenance painter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a for­
mal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
In sta lls or repairs water, steam , g a s , or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishm ent. Work involves m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
Laying out of work and measuring to locate position of pipe from drawings
or other written sp ecific atio n s; cutting various s iz e s of pipe to correct
lengths with ch ise l and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting ma­
chine; threading pipe with sto ck s and d ie s; bending pipe by hand-driven
or power-driven m achines; assem bling pipe with couplings and fastening
pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to p ressu re s,
flow, and siz e of pipe required; making standard te s ts to determine
whether finished pipes meet sp ecification s- In general, the work of the
maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience. W o r k e r s p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in i n s t a l l i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g b u i l d i n g
s a n ita tio n o r h e a tin g s y s t e m s a re e x c lu d e d .

17
TOOL AND DIE MAKER

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
K eeps the plumbing system of an establishm ent in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding in stallation of
vents and traps in plumbing system ; in stallin g or repairing pipes and
fixtures; opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber's snake. In
general, the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded training
and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiv­
alent training and experience.
SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F a b rica te s, in sta lls, and maintains in good repair the sheetmetal equipment and fixtures (such a s machine guards, grease pan s,
sh e lv es, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an
establishm ent. Work involves m o s t o f t h e f o l l o w i n g : Planning and lay­
ing out a ll types of sheet-m etal maintenance work from blueprints, m odels,
or other sp ecific atio n s; setting up and operating a ll availab le types of
sheet-metal-working m achines; using a variety of handtools in cutting,
bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assem bling; in stallin g sheetmetal article s a s required. In general, the work of the maintenance
sheet-m etal worker requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

(Die maker; jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker; gauge maker)
Constructs and repairs machine-shop to o ls, gau ges, jig s , fix­
tures or dies for forgings, punching and other metal-forming work. Work
involves m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : Planning and laying out of work from
m odels, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written sp ecific atio n s;
using a variety of tool and die m aker's handtools and precision m eas­
uring instruments, understanding of the working properties of common
m etals and a llo y s; settin g up and operating of machine tools and related
equipment; making n ecessary shop computations relating to dim ensions
of work, sp e e d s, feed s, and tooling of m achines; heattreating of metal
parts during fabrication a s w ell a s of finished tools and dies to achieve
required q u a litie s; working to clo se to leran ces; fitting and assem bling
of parts to prescribed tolerances and allow an ces; selectin g appropriate
m aterials, to ols, and p ro c e sse s. In general, the tool and die m aker's
work requires a rounded training in m achine-shop and toolroom practice
usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die makers
in tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this c la ssific a tio n .

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER— Continued

ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER
Transports p assen g ers between floors of an office building,
apartment house, department store, hotel or sim ilar estab lish m en t.
Workers who operate elevators in conjunction with other duties such a s
those of starters and janitors are excluded.
GUARD

or other establishm ent. Duties involve a c o m b i n a t i o n o f t h e f o l l o w i n g :
Sweeping, mopping o r scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips,
trash, and other refu se; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polish ­
ing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing su p p lies and minor mainte­
nance s e rv ic e s; cleaning lav atories, show ers, and restroom s. Workers
who sp e c ializ e in window washing are excluded.

Performs routine police d u ties, either at fixed post or on tour,
maintaining order, using arms or force where n ec essary . I n c l u d e s g a t e m en w h o a r e s t a t i o n e d a t g a t e a n d c h e c k

on id e n tity

o f e m p lo y e e s a n d

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING

o th e r p e r so n s e n te rin g .

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
(Sweeper; charwoman; ja n itre ss)
C lean s and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas
and washrooms, or prem ises of an office, apartment house, or commercial




(Loader and unloader; handler and stack er; shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store,
or other establishm ent whose duties involve o n e o r m o r e o f t h e f o l l o w ­
i n g : Loading and unloading various m aterials and merchandise on or

18

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING— Continued
fr o m

fr e ig h t c a r s , tr u c k s , or o th e r tr a n s p o r tin g

in g , o r p la c in g
p o r tin g

m a te r ia ls o r m e r c h a n d is e

m a te r ia ls

L o n g s h o r e m

,

e n

or

w

h o

m e r c h a n d is e
l o a d

a n d

by

u n l o a d

in

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK— Continued

d e v ic e s ;

F or

u n p a c k in g , s h e lv ­

w age

hand

s h i p s

tru ck ,
a r e

car,

or

w h e e lb a r r o w .

R

e c e

i v i n

S h i p p i n g

e x c l u d e d .

S h i p p i n g

ORDER FILLER
s to c k

s e le c to r ;

w areh o u se

s h ip p in g

or tra n s fe r o rd e rs

in a c c o r d a n c e

tio n

ite m s

fille d

or

fo r f in is h e d

w ith s p e c if ic a t io n s

o rd e rs , or o th e r in s tr u c tio n s .
c a tin g

M a y , in

o m itte d , k e e p

on

a d d itio n
record s

good s

fro m

te r ia ls ,

sto re d

s a le s s lip s , c u sto m e rs’

to

fillin g

ord ers

o f o u tg o in g

g

are

c la s s ifie d

as

fo llo w s :

c l e r k
c l e r k

a n d

r e c e i v i n g

c l e r k

and

in d i­

o rd e rs, r e q u is i­

to

s u p e r v is o r ,

and

lis h m e n ts

su ch

w h o le s a le

and

and

d u tie s .

w ith
in

a r e

w ith in

a s:

a

or

o r in d u s tr ia l a r e a
b e tw e e n

p la n ts ,

e s ta b lis h m e n ts , o r
or

w ith o u t

good

c ity

or m en

M a n u fa c tu r in g

r e ta il

cu sto m e rs’ h o u se s

tru c k

p e rfo r m

a tru ck

m e r c h a n d is e , e q u ip m e n t,

tru c k

a d d itio n a l s t o c k , o r re p o rt s h o r t s u p p lie s

o th e r r e la te d

w o rk ers

s to c k m a n )
D r iv e s

F ills

p u rp o ses,

TRUCKDRIVER

(O rd er p ic k e r ;

m e r c h a n d is e

s tu d y

p ro p e r s to r a g e lo c a tio n ; tr a n s ­

p la c e s

h e lp e r s ,

w o r k in g

o rd er.

D

fr e ig h t

b e tw e e n

o f b u s in e s s .

m ake

to

v a r io u s

tra n sp o rt m a­
tv p e s o f e s ta b ­

d e p o ts, w a re h o u se s,
r e t a il e s ta b lis h m e n ts

M ay a ls o

lo a d

or

u n lo a d

m in o r m e c h a n i c a l r e p a i r s , a n d k e e p

r i v e r - s a l e s m

e n

a n d

o v e r - t h e - r o a d

d r i v e r s

e x c l u d e d .

PACKER, SHIPPING
F or w age
P rep ares
th e m

in

s h ip p in g

depen den t
ty p e

p ro d u c ts

c o n ta in e r s ,

upon

th e

ty p e ,

th e

s iz e ,

f o

o f

ite m s

l l o w

co n te n t;

b reakage

b o x e s

in

or

of

c r a t e s

a r e

s p e c ific

of

v a r io u s

u s in g

d a ta

on

o f

u n its

s h ip m e n t.

and

m

a y

of

and

i n

e x c e ls io r

or

s e a lin g

by

to

be

s to c k

in

o n e

o r

e r s

w

m a te r ia l

h o

m

a l s o

o f

th e b a s is o f

s tu d y

p u r p o s e s , tr u c k d r iv e r s

e q u ip m e n t, a s
tr a ile r

m

o r e

o

f

T

r u c k d r i v e r

,

m

T

r u c k d r i v e r

,

h

e a v y

( o v e r

4

t o n s

,

t r a i l e r

p reven t

T

r u c k d r i v e r

,

h

e a v y

( o

4

t o n s

,

o t h e r

to

la b e ls

a k e

w

or

o o d e n

e d iu m

m e r c h a n d is e

A

k n o w le d g e

w

o r k

i n

v o

a v a ila b le
good s

l v e s :

m eans

s h ip p e d ,

ch a rg es,
p r e p a r in g

and
th e

k e e p in g

a

fy in g

or d ir e c tin g
of

o th e rs

in

la d in g , in v o ic e s ,
dam aged

of

s h ip p in g

v e r ify in g
o r o th e r

is

or

on

( 1

%

v e r

t o

a n d

i n c l u d i n g

4

t o n s )

t y p e )
t h a n

t r a i l e r

t y p e )

tra c to r

to

a

m a n u a lly
tra n sp o rt

p o s tin g

reco rd s.
R

e c e i v i n

record s

w e ig h t an d

w

o r k

i n

v o

l v e s :

in

c h e c k in g

m e r c h a n d is e
record s

and

fo r

o r m a te r ia ls
file s .

s h o rta g e s
to

g a s o lin e m a te r ia ls

or
of

e le c tr ie - p o w e r e d
a ll

k in d s

about a

p la n t, o r o th e r e s ta b lis h m e n t.

F or
tru ck , a s

w age

s tu d y

p u rp o ses,

w o rk ers

are

c la s s ifie d

by

ty p e

of

fo llo w s :

T r u c k e r ,

p o w

e r

( f o

T r u c k e r ,

p o w

e r

( o t h e r

r k

l i f t )
t h a n

f o

r k

l i f t )

V e r i­

th e c o r r e c tn e s s o f s h ip m e n ts a g a in s t

record s;

and

o f th e

s h ip p in g

M ay d ir e c t o r a s s is t
g

c o n tr o lle d
good s

resp on ­
S h i p p i n g

p ro c e d u re s , p r a c tic e s , ro u te s ,

la d in g ,

fo r s h ip m e n t.

n ecessa ry

and

o r o th e r m a te r ia ls .

a n d r a t e s ; a n d p r e p a r in g
o f

o f s h ip p in g

g o o d s ; r o u tin g

p a rtm e n ts ; m a in ta in in g




fo r s h ip m e n t, o r r e c e iv e s

b ills

file

m e r c h a n d is e

b ills

r e je c tin g

up

s iz e

TRUCKER, POWER
tru c k

o f m e r c h a n d is e

o f tr a n s p o r ta tio n
m a k in g

by

b e ra te d

.

w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c tu r in g

s h ip m e n ts

c la s s ifie d
s h o u ld

c a p a c it y .)

v e r ify

O p e ra te s

P rep ares

are

( T r a c to r - tr a ile r

Truckdriver (combination o f sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under l l2 tons)
/

th e

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
s ib le fo r in c o m in g

fo llo w s :

in s e r tin g

o rd e r to

c o n ta in e r ; a p p ly in g

P a c k

ty p e

p a c k e d , th e

o f c o n ta in e r ;

o th e r

b e in g

W o rk r e q u ir e s
l v e

and

p la c in g

p e rfo r m e d

v o

s iz e

c o n ta in e r .

e x c l u d e d

of

ite m s

ty p e

and

o p e r a tio n s

num ber

m e th o d

a p p r o p r ia te

c o n ta in e r ;

s h ip m e n t o r s to r a g e

c o n ta in e r s

d a m a g e; c lo s in g

id e n tify in g

o r

s h ip p in g

K n o w le d g e

i n g :

s e le c tio n

e n c lo s u r e s

e n te r in g

in

fo r

and

o f c o n ta in e r e m p lo y e d , a n d

p la c in g
t h e

fin is h e d

WATCHMAN

and

p rop er d e ­

M akes

ro u n d s

a g a in s t fir e , th e ft,

and

of

p re m is e s

p e r io d ic a lly

in

p r o te c tin g

p ro p e rty

ille g a l e n try .

*

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1959 0 — 533670

Occupational Wage Surveys

Occupational wage surveys are being conducted in 60 major labor markets during late 1959 and early I960. These bulletins, when availa­
ble, may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C., or from any of the BLS regional
sales offices shown below.
A summary bulletin containing data for all labor markets, combined with additional analysis will be issued early in 1961.








Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102