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Occupational Wage Survey

BO STO N, M A S S A C H U S E T T S
O C TO B ER

B u lle tin N o .

1 2 4 0 -6

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT O F LABOR
J a m e s P. M itc h e ll, S e cre ta ry



1 9 5 8

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan ClaQv«, Commt*won# r




Occupational Wage Survey
B O S TO N , M A S S A C H U S ETTS




OCTOBER1958

Bulletin No. 1240-6
January

1959

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BU
REAU OF LABOR S A IS IC
TT T S
Ewan Ctagwn, Com tsM
m onor

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U . S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D . C. - Price 25 cents

The Library of Congress has cataloged the series
in which this publication appears as follows:

U* S. Bureau o f L abor Statistics.
Occupational wage survey. 1949Washington, U. S. Govt. Print. Off.

U. S. Bureau o f Labor Statistics.
Bulletin, no. 1Nov. 1895Washington.
no. in

v. illus. 16-28 cm.

Bimonthly, Nov. 1895-May 1912; irregular, Ju ly 1912No. 1-111 issued by the Bureau of Labor.

331.06173

Library of Congress

tr58t2j




v. 23-26 cm.
Nov. 1949- issued as its Bulletin (HD8051.A62)

1. Wages—U. S. 2. Non-wage payments—U. S. ft. Employee bene­
fits] i. Title. (Series: U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bul­
letin)

1. Labor and laboring classes— U. S.— Period.

HD8051.A62

The Library of Congress has cataloged this
publication as follows:

15-23307 rev*J

HD4973.A462

U. S. Dept, of Labor.
for Library of Congress

331.2973

Library
(57r52nl]f

L 49—125*

Contents

Preface

Page

The Community Wage Survey Program

I n t r o d u c t i o n ___________ _____________________ __ _____________________________
W age tr e n d s fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p s _______________________

The Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly conducts
areawide wage surveys in a number of important industrial
centers.
The studies, made from late fall to early spring,
relate to occupational earnings and related supplementary
benefits. A preliminary report is available on completion
of the study in each area, usually in the month following the
payroll period studied.
This bulletin provides additional data
not included in the earlier report.
A consolidated analytical
bulletin summarizing the results of all of the year's surveys
is issued after completion of the final area bulletin for the
current round of surveys.

T a b le s :
1.
2.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f su r v e y __________
In d ex es o f sta n d a rd w e e k ly s a la r ie s and s t r a ig h t -tim e
h o u r ly e a r n in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c cu p a tio n a l g r o u p s ,
an d p e r c e n ts o f in c r e a s e fo r s e le c t e d p e r i o d s ________________

4

A;

O cc u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s :*
A - 1. O ffic e o c cu p a tio n s __________________ __________________ _____
A -2 .
P r o fe s s i o n a l an d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a t i o n s __________________
A - 3. M ain ten an ce and p ow er plant o c c u p a t io n s ____ ___ __ ______
A - 4 . C u s to d ia l and m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t o c cu p a tio n s ________

5
9
10
11

E s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and su p p le m e n ta ry w age
p r o v i s io n s ;*
B - l . Shift d iffe r e n t ia ls ____ _ ____ _________ __________ ....__________
B - 2 , M in im u m e n tra n ce r a te s fo r w o m e n o f f ic e w o r k e r s ____
B - 3 . S ch ed u led w e e k ly h o u rs ______ _____ ________________ _______
B -4 .
P a id h o lid a y s _______________________________________________
B -5 .
P a id v a c a t i o n s ________ _____________________________________
B - 6 . H ealth , in s u r a n c e , and p e n sio n plan s ____________________

14
15
15
16
17
19

B:

This report was prepared in the Bureau's regional
office in Boston, M ass. , by Leo Epstein, under the direction
of Paul V. Mulkern, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst.




1
4

A p p en d ix :

O ccu p a tio n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s ___________________________________

* NOTE: Similar tabulations for most of these items are availa­
ble in the Boston area reports for March 1951, April 1952,
March 1953, March 1954, April 1955, September 1956, and
September 1957.
The 1954 report also provides tabulations of
wage structure characteristics, labor-management agreements,
and overtime pay provisions. The 1955 report also included data
on frequency of wage payments, and pay provisions for holidays
falling on nonworkdays. A directory indicating date of study
and the price of the reports, as well as reports for other
major areas, is available upon request.
Current reports on occupational earnings and supple­
mentary wage practices in the Boston area are also available for
auto dealer, repair shops (July 1958) and men's and boys' suits
and coats ( M a r c h 1958).
A similar report for machinery indus­
tries will be available early in 1959. Union scales, indicative of
prevailing pay levels, are available for the following trades or
industries: Building construction, printing, local-transit operat­
ing employees, and motortruck drivers and helpers.

2

21




Occupational W ag* Survey— Boston, Mass,
Introduction
This area is one of several important industrial centers in
which the U. S. Department of Labor's Bureau* of Labor Statistics
has conducted survey* of'Occupational earnings and related wage bene­
fit/* on an areawide basis. In this area, data were obtained by per­
sonal visits of Bureau field agents 1 to representative establishments
within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation
(excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities; whole­
sale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and serv­
ices. Major industry groups excluded from these studies, besides
railroads, are government operations and the construction and ex­
tractive industries.
Establishments having fewer than a prescribed
number of workers are omitted also because they furnish insufficient
employment in the occupations studied to warrant inclusion. 2 Wher­
ever possible, separate tabulations are provided for each of the broad
industry divisions.

These surveys are conducted on a sample basis because of the
unnecessary cost involved in surveying all establishments. To obtain
appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large
than of small establishments is studied. In combining the data, how­
ever, all establishments are given their appropriate weight. Estimates
based on the establishments studied are presented, therefore, as re­
lating to all establishments in the industry grouping and area, ex­
cept for those below the minimum size studied.

Occupations and Earnings
The occupations selected for study are common to a variety
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupational clas­
sification is based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to
take account of inter establishment variation in duties within the same
job.
(See appendix for listing of these descriptions.) Earnings data
are presented (in the A -se r ie s tables) for the following types of oc­
cupations: (a) Office clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) main­
tenance and powerplant; and (d) custodial and material movement.

1 Data were obtained by mail from some of the smaller estab­
lishments for which visits by Bureau field agents in the last previous
survey indicated employment in relatively few of the occupations stud­
ied. Unusual changes reported by mail were verified with employers.
2 See table on page 2 for minimum-size establishment covered.




Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for
full-time workers, i. e . , those hired to work a regular weekly sched­
ule in the given occupational classification.
Earnings data exclude
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
Nonproduction bonuses are excluded also, but cost-ofliving bonuses and incentive earnings are included.
Where weekly
hours are reported, as for office clerical occupations, reference is
to the work schedules (rounded to the nearest half hour) for which
straight-time salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these
occupations have been rounded to the nearest half dollar.
Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all
establishments within the scope of the study and not the numbed actu­
ally surveyed. Because of differences in occupational structure among
establishments, the estimates of occupational employment obtained
from the sample of establishments studied serve only to indicate the
relative importance of the jobs studied. These differences in Occu­
pational structure do not materially affect the accuracy of the earn­
ings data.
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Information is presented also (in the B -series tables) on se­
lected establishment practices and supplementary benefits as they re­
late to office and plant workers.
The term "office w ork ers," as
used in this bulletin, includes working supervisors and nonsupervisory workers performing clerical or related functions, and ex­
cludes administrative, executive, and professional personnel. "Plant
workers" include working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers
(including leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Ad­
ministrative, executive, and professional employees, and force-account
construction employees who are utilized as a separate work force are
excluded. Cafeteria workers and routemen are excluded in manufac­
turing industries, but are included as plant workers in nonmanufac­
turing industries.
Shift differential data (table B - l ) are limited to manufacturing
industries. This information is presented both in terms of (a) estab­
lishment policy,1 presented in terms of total plant worker employ­
ment, and (b) effective practice, presented on the basis of workers

3
An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met
either of the following conditions: (l) Operated late shifts at the time
of the survey, or (2) had formal provisions covering late shifts.

2
actually employed on the specified shtft at the time of the survey.
In establishments having varied differentials, the amount applying to
a majority was used or, if no amount applied to a majority, the clas­
sification "other1 was used. In establishments in which some late'
shift hours are paid at normal rates, a differential was recorded only
if it applied to a majority of the shift hours.
Minimum entrance rates (table B -2 ) relate only to the estab­
lishments visited. They are presented on an establishment, rather
than on an employment basis.
Paid holidays; paid vacations; and
health, insurance, and pension plans are treated statistically on the
basis that these are applicable to all plant or office workers if a
majority of such workers are eligible or may eventually qualify for
the practices listed.
Scheduled hours are treated statistically on
the basis that these are applicable to all plant or office workers if
a majority are covered.4 Because of rounding, sums of individ­
ual items in these tabulations do not necessarily equal totals.

The first part of the paid holidays table presents the num­
ber of whole and half holidays actually provided.
The second part
combines whole and half holidays to show total holiday tim e.
The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal arrange­
ments, excluding informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted
at the discretion of the employer.
Separate estimates are provided
according to employer practice in computing vacation payfrients, such
as time payments, percent of annual earnings, or flat-sum amounts.
However, in the tabulations of vacation allowances, payments not on
a time basis were converted; for example, a payment of 2 percent of
annual earnings was considered as the equivalent of 1 week’ s pay.

Data are presented for all health, insurance, and pension
plans for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer,
excepting only legal requirements such as workmen’ s compensation
and social security. Such plans include those underwritten by a com­
mercial insurance company and those provided through a union fund or
4
Scheduled weekly hours for office workers (first section of
paid directly by the employer out of current operating funds or from
table B -3 ) in surveys made prior to late 1957 and early 1958 were
a fund set aside for this purpose. Death benefits are included as a
presented in terms of the proportion of women office workers em ­
form of life insurance.
ployed in offices with the indicated weekly hours for women workers.

TA BLE 1.

E stablishm ents and w o rk e rs within scope of su rvey and num ber studied in B oston, M ass. , 1 by m ajor industry d iv is io n ,2 O ctober 1958

Industry division

A ll division s

Minimum
em ploym ent
in esta b lish ­
m ents in scope
o f study

W orkers in establishm ents
Within scop e o f study

Studied

Studied
T o ta l4

O ffice

Plant

T otal4

1,225

252

406.200

88.400

244,400

222,900

101

454
771

86
166

206 ,800
199.400

28.700
59.700

145,800
98,600

108,970
113,930

101
51
101
51
51

53
203
123
181
211

21
40
32
36
37

32,700
22,400
64,100
49,100
31,100

6 ,5 0 0
7,300
6 ,3 0 0
33,900
5 ,7 0 0

19,800
8,5 0 0
52,800
4 2 ,400
15,100

26,760
7, 190
40, 180
28,760
11,040

_____________________________________________________ *_____

___
__ _____
_
___ _ ____
M anufacturing *__ _ _ _ _____
N onm anufacturing
_
__
__ ____ ___
____________ _______
Tran sportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), com m u nication,
and other public u tilitie s 9 __ _ _
__ _______ W holesale trade _________,________ —_______________________________
___________ ____ ______ ___ _________
R etail trade __ ____
Finan ce, in surance, and r e a l estate __
__ ___ _
S e r v ic e s 7 __
_ _

Number o f establishm ents
Within
scope of
study3

1 The Boston M etropolitan area (Suffolk County, 14 com m u nities in E sse x County, 28 in M iddlesex County, 17 in N orfolk County, and 2 in Plym outh C ounty).
The "w o rk e rs within scope of study"
estim ates shown in this table provide a reason ably accu rate de scrip tio n o f the size and com position o f the labor fo r c e included in this su rvey.
The estim ates are not intended, how ever, to s erv e as a
basis of com p a riso n with other area em ploym ent indexes to m easu re em ploym ent trends or le v e ls since (1) planning o f wage surveys req u ires the use o f establishm ent data com p iled con sid era b ly in
advance pf the pay p e rio d studied, and (2) sm all establishm ents a re excluded fro m the scope o f the survey.
2 The 1957 r e v ise d edition o f the Standard Industrial C la ssifica tio n Manual was used in cla ssifyin g establishm ents by industry division .
M ajor changes fro m the ea r lie r edition used in previous
surveys are the tra n sfer o f m ilk pasteurization plants and ready m ixed co n cre te establishm ents fro m trade (w holesale o r retail) to m anufacturing, and the tran sfer o f radio and telev ision broadcasting
fro m s e r v ic e s to the transportation , com m u nication, and other public utilities division .
3 Includes all establishm ents with total em ploym ent at or above the m in im u m -siz e lim itation.
A ll outlets (within the a rea) o f com panies in such industries as trade, finance, auto rep a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion -p ictu re theaters a re co n sid e re d as 1 establishm ent.
4 Includes execu tive, p r o fe s sio n a l, and other w o rk e rs excluded fro m the separate o ffic e and plant ca te g o r ie s .
* A ls o exclu des taxicabs and s e r v ic e s incidental to w ater transportation .
B o s to n 's transit system is m unicipally operated and, th e r e fo r e , excluded by defin ition fro m the scop e o f the studies.
4 E stim ate r e la te s to r e a l estate establishm ents only.
7 H otels; p erson al s e r v ic e s ; business s e r v ic e s ; autom obile rep air shops; m otion p ictu re s; nonprofit m em bersh ip organ ization s; and engineering and arch itectu ra l s e r v ic e s .




3
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of in*
surance under which predetermined cash payments are made directly
to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis during illness or accident
disability. Information is presented for all such plans to which the
employer contributes. However, in New York and New Jersey, which
have enacted temporary disability insurance laws which require em ­
ployer contributions,5 plans are included only if the employer (1) con­
tributes more than is legally required, or (2) provides the employee
with benefits which exceed the requirements of the law. Tabulations
of paid sick-leave ptlans are limited to formal plans * which provide

full pay or a proportion of the worker*s pay during absence from work
because of illness.
Separate tabulations are provided according to
(l) plans which provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans
providing either partial pay or a waiting period.
In addition to the
presentation of the proportions of workers who are provided sickness
and accident insurance or paid sick leave, an unduplicated total is
shown of workers who receive either or both types of benefits.

Catastrophe insurance, sometimes referred to as extended
medical insurance, includes those plans which are designed to protect
employees in case of sickness and injury involving expenses beyond
the normal coverage of hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.1
5
The temporary disability laws in California end Rhode Island
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete or partial
do not require employer contributions.
payment of doctors* fees. Such plans may be underwritten by commer­
* An establishment was considered as having a formal plan if
cial insurance companies or nonprofit organizations or they may be
it established at least the minimum number of days of sick leave that
self-insured.
Tabulations of retirement pension plans are limited to
could be expected by each employee * Such a plan need not be written,
those plans that provide monthly payments for the remainder of the
but informal sick-leave allowances, determined on an individual basis,
worker*s life.
were excluded.




4
W Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
age
The table below presents indexes of salaries of office clerical
workers and industrial nurses, and of average earnings of selected
plant worker groups.
For office clerical workers and industrial nurses, the indexes
relate to average weekly salaries for normal hours of work, that is,
the standard work schedule for which straight-time salaries are paid.
For plant worker groups, they measure changes in straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for work on week­
ends, holidays, and late shifts.
The indexes are based on data for
selected key occupations and include most of the numerically important
jobs within each group. The office clerical data are based on women in
the following 18 jobs: Billers, machine (billing machine); bookkeepingmachine operators, class Aand B; Comptometer operators; clerks, file,
class A and B; clerks, order; clerks, payroll; key-punch operators;
office girls; secretaries; stenographers, general; switchboard opera­
tors; switchboard operator-receptionists; tabulating-machine operators;
transcribing-machine operators, general; and typists, class A and B.
The industrial nurse data are based on women industrial nurses. Men
in the following 10 skilled maintenance jobs and 3 unskilled jobs were
included in the plant worker data: Skilled— carpenters; electricians;
machinists; mechanics; mechanics, automotive; millwrights; painters;
pipefitters; sheet-metal workers; and tool and die makers; unskilled—
janitors, porters, and cleaners; laborers, material handling; and
watchmen.
Average weekly salaries or average hourly earnings were
computed for each of the selected occupations. The average salaries
or hourly earnings were then multiplied by the average of 1953 and
1954 employment in the job.
These weighted earnings for individual
T A B L E 2.

occupations were then totaled to obtain an aggregate for *each occupa­
tional group. Finally, the ratio of these group aggregates for a given
year to the aggregate for the base period (survey month, winter 1952-53)
was computed and the result multiplied by the base year index (100) to
get the index for the given year.
The indexes measure, principally, the effects of (l) general
salary and wage changes; (2) merit or other increases in pay received
by individual workers while in the same job; and (3) changes in the
labor force such as labor turnover, force expansions, force reduc­
tions, and changes in the proportion of workers employed by estab­
lishments with different pay levels.
Changes in the labor force can
cause increases or decreases in the occupational averages without
actual wage changes. For example, a force expansion might increase
the proportion of lower paid workers in a specific occupation and re­
sult in a drop in the average, whereas a reduction in the proportion
of lower paid workers would have the opposite effect. The movement
of a high-paying establishment out of an area could cause the average
earnings to drop, even though no change in rates occurred in other
area establishments.
The use of constant employment weights eliminates the effects
of changes in the proportion of workers represented in each job in­
cluded in the data.
Nor are the indexes influenced by changes in
standard work schedules or in premium pay for overtime, since they
are based on pay for straight-time hours.
Indexes for the period 1953 to 1958 for workers in 17 major
labor markets appeared in BLS Bull. 1224-20* Wages and Related
Benefits, 19 Labor Markets, Winter 1957-58.

Indexes of standard wee kly sala ries and s tra ig ht- ti me hourly earnings for selected occupational groups in Boston, M a s s. ,
October 1958 and September 1957, and percents of increa se for sel ected periods
Indexes
(March 1953 ■

Industry and occupational group

October
1958

P e rc e n t in cre ase s from—

100)

September
1957

September 1957
to
October 1958

A p r i l 1955
M ar ch 1954 March 1953 5A p ri l 1952
September 1956
to
to
to
to
to
September 1957 September 1956 A p ri l 1955 Mar ch 1954 M ar ch 1953

A l l industries:
Office c le ri c a l (women) -----------------------------------------------Industrial nurses ( w o m e n ) --------------------------------- — : ----Skilled maintenance (men) ------------------------------------------Unskilled plant (men) ---------------------------------------------------

130.3
130. 6
129. 1
128.2

123. 8
1 23 .4
122. 5
119. 7

5. 3
5.9
5 .4
7. 1

5. 7
4 .8
5.2
4. 7

8. 0
9.0
8. 5
6.3

2. 9
1.5
1.9
2.4

5 .2
6 .5
5. 3
5. 1

4.3
4.2
4.9
4.2

Manufacturing:
Office cl e ri c a l (women) ----------------------------------------------Industrial nurses (women) ------------------------------------------Skilled maintenance ( m e n ) ----- -------------------------------------Unskilled plant (men) ---------------------------------------------------

127.4
130.4
130. 1
128. 8

121. 6
122. 4
123. 5
119.4

4 .6
6.5
5 .3
7.9

6. 1
4. 1
5 .4
4. 6

7. 3
8.9
8.9
5 .0

2.3
.7
1 .9
3.1

4.4
7.2
5 .6
5 .5

5 .5
4.2
4. 7
3 .5




A :

O c c u p a t io n a l

5

E a r n in g s

Table A-l. Office Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area b a s is ,
by industry division , Boston, M ass. , O ctober 1958)
Avkbagk
Sex,

occupation, and industry division

Num
ber
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING 3TRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
Weekly,
Weekly. 35. 00 40. 00 45. 00
hours 1 earnings1 and
(Standard) (Standard) under
40. 00 45. 00 50. 00

$
$
50. 00 55. 00

$
$
60. 00 65.00

55. 00

65. 00

70. 00

60. 00

$
70. 00

$
75. 00

$
$
80. 00 85.00

$
90.0 0

t
95.00

75. 00 80. 00

85. 00 9 0 .0 0

9 5 .0 0

100.00

$
$
$
$
$
100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00
and
105.00 110.00 115.00 12OJ0O over

Men
C lerk s, accounting, cla ss A ------------------------------ -----------M anufacturing -----------------------------------------------------------N on m anufacturing------------------------------------------------------P ublic utilities * ---------------------------------------------------W holesale t r a d e ----------------------------------------------------Retail t r a d e -----------------------------------------------------------Finance t ----------------------------------------------------------------S ervices -----------------------------------------------------------------

540
133
407
33
110
60
142
62

3 8 .0
38. 0
3 8 .0
3 7.0
3 9 .0
37 .0
3 7. 0
39. 0

88.00
96. dO
85.50
9 8.00
95 .0 0
75.50
77.00
9 1.50

-

-

-

5
5
3
2
“

2
2
2
-

18
18
10
6
2

37
3
34
11
23
-

51
2
49
6
5
36
2

77
4
33
11
21
8

C lerk s, accounting, cla ss B -----------------------------------------M a n u fa ctu rin g------------------------------------------------------------N onm an u factu rin g -----------------------------------------------------Pu blic utilities * ---------------------------------------------------W holesale trade ---------------------------------------------------F in a n ce f -----------------------------------------------------------------

425
84
341
41
139
74

38. 5
38. 5
38. 5
39. 0
4 0 .0
3 7.0

65.00
17753"
64.00
58. 00
70.50
59.00

-

-

-

-

17
17
12
-

54
8
46
4
10
12

86
11
75
12
7
39

101
19
82
45
22

58
6
52
7
35
-

20
4
16
6
4
-

C le r k s , o r d e r -----------------------------------.------------------------------M a n u fa ctu rin g------------------------------------------------------------N on m an u factu rin g -----------------------------------------------------W holesale t r a d e ----------------------------------------------------

484
105
379
363

3 9.5
38. 5
39 .5
39.5

86.50
80. 00
88. 00
88.50

_
-

-

-

16
2
14
14

15
1
14
14

19
2
17
17

46
3l
15
15

39
20
19
• .
1-5

C le rk s , pa y roll -------------------------------------------------------------N onm an u factu rin g------------------------------------------------------

92
53

38.5
3 8.5

84.50
79. 00

-

'

4
4

1
-

2
2

5
4

6
6

O ffice b o y s ----------------------------------------------------------------------987
M an u factu rin g------------------------------------------------------------- 1 7 2
N on m anufacturing-----------------------------------------------------715
Pu blic utilities * ----------------------------------------------------66
W holesale trade ---------------------------------------------------122
302
Finance t -----------------------------------------------------------------193
S e r v i c e s --------- —-------------------------- --------------------------

38 .0
38.5
38 .0
38.5
3 9 .0
36 .5
39. 0

50. 50
50. 50
50.00
47.0 0
59. 50
50.50
46. 00

10
10
8

232
78
154
16
5
45
73

366
90
276
39
39
124
70

184
'4?
137
10
23
71
27

79
8
71
1
5
47
14

23
ll
12
5
6
*

57
34
23
14
9
-

4
2
1
1

1
1
-

6
6
4

28
5
23
2
20

55
— 5
49
4
45

55
9
46
37

56
28
28
5
13

78
40
38
6
27

"

-

52
TB----- 1
34
12

30
9
21
20

15
15
-

Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s -------------------------------------M a n u fa ctu rin g------------------------------------------------------------N onm an u factu rin g-----------------------------------------------------W holesale t r a d e ---------------------------------------------------F in a n c e f------------------------------------------------------------------

648
38. 5
~ n — 3975
317
37. 5
59
39. 0
184
3 7.0

75.
" W
71.
84.
65.

50
50
00
50

_

->
-

-

83

43
2
41
2
2
12
19
6

41
17
29
8
_
17
4

88
44
44
8
15
_
4
17

42
9
33
13
6
7
7

38
2u
18
2
11
2

50
30
20
17
1

15
4
11
-

1
1
-

-

6
1
5
5
-

4
1
3
3
-

77
3
74
70

51
11
40
36

25
8
17
17

46
2
44
40

. 12
ll

6
6

3
2

5
3

b

20
20
20
-

-

21
i o ..
11
1
2
8

39
25
14
5
4
1
4

13
13
10
3

19
19
4
13
2
-

3
3
3
-

-

3
3
3

3
3
3
-

4
4
4
-

44
6
38
38

20
7
13
13

17
2
15
15

27
7
20
20

9
2
7
7

33
1
32
32

17
4

20
1

5
5

1

1
1

■

4
4

-

10
10
10
-

~

■

•

■

"

"

137
99
38
11
9

61
40
21
3
8

36
18
18
10
4

21
------6
15
7
2

ll
6
5
5
-

3
3
-

3
2
1
1
-

4
3
1
1
-

2
2
1
-

7
7
-

8
3
5
5

20
20
20

15
15
15

-

-

~

-

"

-

b

91
" T T
25
3
15

.

Z,

1

'

Women
B ille r s , m achine (billing m a c h i n e ) ------------------------------M a n u fa c t u r in g ------— — — ------------------------ ----------------N onm an u factu rin g-----------------------------------------------------W holesale trade — -----------------------------------------------B ille r s , m achine (bookkeeping m a c h i n e )---------------------N onm an u factu rin g-----------------------------------------------------R etail t r a d e ----------------------------------------------------------B ookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to rs , cla ss A ------------------M a n u fa ctu rin g------------------------------------------------------------N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g ----------------------------------------------------W holesale t r a d e ---------------------------------------------------Finance f -----------------------------------------------------------------

See footnote at end o f table.




281

38. 5

~ T S 1 ----- 1 7 5 —

149
94
304

38. 5
39 .0
38. 5

64. 00
3 2 .0 0 ”
66. 00
72. 50

-

54.50

"

~ r r i — 1 5 7 3 — ■~ 52.1T

193

3 8 .5

50.50

335
75
260
55
160

3 7 .5
3 8.5
3 7 .5
3 9 .0
3 6.5

64. 50
? 1 .5 0
62. 00
63. 00
61.50

-

28
58
89
“ 23— “ 53— 1 9 —
28
48
69
-

2
2

2

24
24
20

78
56
9 — I T ----5
49
21
1
46
46
23

27
1 7 —
9

32
21
16

4
4
-

11
-

9
-

-

-

"

-

■

•

“

-

69
4
65
27
29

99
8
91
11
72

68
30
38
5
26

28
3
25
10

17
2
15
10
3

24
24
-

2
2
-

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
Table A-l. Office Occupations-Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an a rea b a sis,
by industry division , B oston, M a s s ., O ctober 1958)
Avbrao*
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Num
ber
of
w
orkers

W
eekly | W
eekly i
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
35.00 4 0 .0 0
"
uncle r
4 0 .0 0 45.0 0

s
4 5 .0 0

50.00

$
$
S
$
$
S
50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00
55. 00 60.00 . 65, 00 70.00 75.00 80.00

$
S
80. 00 8 5.00
8 5.00 90.00

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
9 0 .0 0 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00
and
9 5 .0 0 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 over

Women— Continued
Bookkeeping-m ach ine o p e ra to rs , cla s s B —— — —-------M anufacturing — -------- ------- -------------- -— -------- — -----------N on m an u factu rin g-------------- -------—------- ------------------ ---W holesale trade ------------------- — — -----------—
------- -—
R etail t r a d e -----------------------------------------------------------—
Finance f --------------.--------- —----- — ----------------------------

1,370
319
1,051
290
136
609

3 8.5
39. 0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
38 .5
3 7 .5

$
57.50
63. 00
56.00
64.00
54. 00
52. 50

“
-

84
13
71
1
70

182
5
177
4
46
116

319
Z1
298
14
41
242

258
68
190
47
8
133

252
76
176
125
18
31

126
55
71
37
21
13

66
32
34
29
1
4

57
39
18
18
-

12
9
3
3
-

3
1
2
2
-

11
11
-

-

C le rk s , accounting, cla ss A ------— ----- -------------- ------—- M anufacturing -------------------------------------------------------- -—
N on m an u factu rin g-------------------------------------------------------P u blic utilities * ----------------------------------------------------W holesale trade ----------------------------------------------------R etail t r a d e --------------. ------------- ------.---- -— ------------ -—
Finance " f -------- -------------- ------------------------------------- --S e r v i c e s ----------------------— ------- ------------- — —------------

1,455
543
912
72
114
132
444
150

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7.0
3 8 .0
3 8.0
37 .5
3 7.0
36. 5

72.00
72. 50
71.50
77.50
78.00
66.50
69.5 0
73.00

-

-

2
2
2
-

41
6
35
2
2
14
17

104
a
83
3
14
54
12

235

268

108

74

127
2
1
28
79
17

194
3
20
47
95
29

334
158
176
24
38
21
89
4

141
55
86
14
3
14
52
3

152
42
110
12
12
6
46
34

88
37
51
9
12
9
21

47
17
30
8
11
3
8

2,021

3 8 .0
3 9 .6
3 8 .0
3 8.5
3 8.5
3 8 .0
37. 5
38. 0

59.50
63. 00
58.50
66.00
60.50
53.00
56.00
64. 50

_

-

27
3
24
_
23

230
98
132
11
47
2
52
20

132
’ 51"
81
31
21
6
23

125
23
102
63
20
1
2
16

-

-

-

1

279
60
219
26
6
46
87
54

2
2
1
1

-

477
117
360
20
73
62
195
10

16
13
3
3
-

-

438
110
328
29
25
70
191
13

42
30
12
1
4

-

244
21
223
17
30
75
88
13

7

-

-

C le rk s , file , cla ss A ---------------------— ---------------------------- M a n u fa ctu rin g ------------------------------------------- ------------------Nonmanufacturing -------------- —----------———---- -—----- -----Finance t ------------------------------------------------------------------

3 8.5
~ r m ~ ” 39:
340
37.5
267
37. 5

62.00
63. 50
61.00
58.00

-

-

35
12
23
16

15
4
11
5

25
6
19
9

-

-

7
7

-

65
37
28
10

1
1

-

128
6F
62
45

3
3

-

88
11
77
76

153

-

20
20
19

-

-

C le r k s , file , cla ss B ----- ------------------------------------—------- -—
M a n u fa ctu rin g ------------------------- -—-------------------------------- N onm anufacturing ------------- ------------------------ -—---------------

2,041
371
1,670
60
159
188
1,134
129

38

386
33
353
14
24
82
223
10

806
61
745
22
19
25
613
66

484
119
365
15
64
21
224
41

50
24
26
5

33
36
3

8
5
3

-

1
-

-

3
" 1
'
2
1

1

3 9.5
38 .5
3 8 .5
37. 5
39 .0

49. 00
53. 50
48.0 0
50. 50
51.50
44. 50
4 8.00
49.00

1
1

l
-

3

-

3 9.0
39,0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
38. 5

61.00
61.00
60.50
65.00
50.50

_

59
n
45
6
39

55
...45"
10
2

1,040
38.5
T 6 4 " " T 9 T 75
476
38. 0
97
3 7.5
55
39 .5
38. 0
149
37. 5
82
39 .0
93

6 6 .0 0
T O iT

z9
21

54
3Z
22
5

C le r k s , accounting, cla ss B ---- ---------------—--------------------M anufacturing ---------------------------------------------------- -— —
Nonmanufa cturing —------------— --------------- ,---- ------— -----Pu blic utilities * ----------------------— — ;----------------------W holesale trade --------------------------—■ —*
— ----------- ----R etail t r a d e ------------------------------------------------------------Finance f ------------- --------------------------------—----------------S erv ices — ----------------------- —----------------- .------------------

P u b lic u t il it ie s * ---------- --------------------------- ---------------------- -—
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ------------------------------------------------------------------ R e ta il tr a d e
---------------- ---------------------------— ----------------------F in a n c e | ——------------------------------ ------—--------------- —_ _ _ _______
S e rv ic e s
-------------------------------------- ------------------------------ -— -------C l e r k s , o r d e r -------------------- -----------------------------------------------------------M a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------------------------------------------------—
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---- ------------------------------------- ------------W h o le s a le tr a d e ------------— -------------------------------------R e t a i l tr a d e -----------------------------— -------„----- -------------C l e r k s , p a y r o ll ------------ ----------------- -----— ----- -------- — ----M a n u f a c t u r i n g ------- --------------------------------------------------------------------N o p m a n u fa c tu r in g — —------------------ -— — -------------------------------P u b lic u t ilit ie s *
,-------- —— —_—— — —_— ----------------W h o l e s a l e tr a d e ---- -------------- ----------- ------------ --------R e ta il tr a d e ~ _____________ - _____________ ___________
F in a n c e t
S e rv ic e s

----------------------------------------------------------------— -----------------------------— ------------------------------

See footnote at end of table,




— 5v r ~

1,492
198
226
284
621
163
540

484
214'
2 70
141
92

3 8 .0
39. 5
38. 0

66. 50
69.00
75.00
61.50
65. 50
69.00

-

-

38
-

38
-

-

-

_

18
------ j---17
17
6

50

' -

3
3
-

-

-

3
-

14
7

8

-

14
2
1

60

93
87
231
~ "98 "
133
2
48
11
62
10

-

11
9

1

77
36
47
30
17

93
44
49
27
4

153

218

85
31
4
23
20
7

77

68... - 14T-r“
6

7
30
13

2
1

2
1
129
— 4S~
81
66
7
20C

103
97
5
15
30
14
33

-

-

172
9 T
75
19
12
17
15

12

1

-

-

-

-

15
" T5
-

-

-

1

-

-

■—

n~
-

103
60
43
14
4
17
4
4

5
------ 5
—
38
16
22
7
4
1
2

8

_
_
.
-

-

_
-

7
3
4
1
3

24
20
4
1
1
2

3
2
1
1
-

8
8
7
1
-

1
1
1
-

-

6
3
3
-

3
3
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*
■
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

■

-

-

"

-

-

12

_
_
-

_
_

-

-

ll

■
p
-

-

-

21

.

-

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

'

-

-

-

24
11
13

8

5
i
4
-

1

2

-

-

21
10
7
i
6

1
5

8

•5

6

1
3
-

2

4

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

1
-

1
1
-

7
Ioblft-A-L Office QfcupatkHw-£ontinued
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis,
by industry division, Boston, M ass. , October 1958)
Avbbms

“
45 .0 0

“
50.00

lo .o o
55.00

*55. 00 *60.00 ^ 5 .0 0
"
"
*
60.00 65.00 70* 00 75.00

0
0

1 5 .0 0

c>

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

W
eekly,
Weekly, l s . 0 0
earnings1 and
(StMxbrd) (Standard) under
4 0 .0 0

0
0

Nmbar
at
worker.

©
ere

Sex, occupation, and industry division

I 5 .OO l o . o o
80.00

I 5 .OO

"
85.00 9 0 .0 0

$ 0 .0 0

ls .0 0

9 5 .0 0

“
100.00

f o o .o o $05.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00
and
“
“
*
105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 over

W om en-—
Continued
Com ptom eter op erators ------------------------ —----------------------M a n u fa ctu rin g -------------- ----------------------------------------------N onm an u factu rin g------- ---------------------- --------------- --------W holesale trade ------------------------------------------------ -—
R etail trade ------------------- -----—
----------——
-------------- . . .
F in a n c e f------------------------------------------ -------- ----------------

1,057
35Z
615
200
294
69

3 8.0
3 8 .5
3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 7 .0
3 7.0

$
59.50
61.00
5 8.00
63. 50
55.00
52.50

2
2
2
-

33
2
31
25
6

113
21
92
19
54
12

197
.... 85
112
15
57
35

227
113
114
31
67
7

207
86

D uplicating-m achine operators
(m im eograph o r ditto) -------------- ----------------------- ■ -------—
Manufa ctur ing -------------------- ------------------—----------------—
N onm anufacturing --------------------------------------------------------

141
82
59

3 9.0
3 9.6
3 9 .0

56.00
55 .5 o
57. 00

-

4
3
l

32
16
16

41
23
18

K ey-punch op erators —------------- ---- — ------ — --------------------M a n u fa ctu rin g---------------------------------------------------------— N onm an u factu rin g---------------------- ------------------- —-------r—
P u blic utilities * ------------------------------------------------ -—
W holesale trade ----------------------------------------------------Retail trade —
----------------------------------------------------- —
Finance f ------------------ ---------------------- ---------------- ---------

1,494
§n
921
114
78
145
549

3 8.5
39.5
3 7 .5
3 9.0
3 8.5
3 8 .0
37. 5

6 0.00
62.50
58.50
61.00
69.50
55.50
57.00

1
1
1
-

19
3
16
5
11

171
29
142
34
5
29
74

O ffice g irls ___________ -____________________________ ,____
M anufacturing — -------- -------------------------------------------------N onm anufacturing------------------------------------------ —----------Retail trade ----------------------------- ------— — —-------——
F in a n cef ------------------------------------------------------------------

446
67
359
52
267

3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 7.5
3 8.0
3 7.0

49.50
54. 50
48.5 0
44.00
49. 50

12
*12
11
-

30
9
21
19
-

S ecreta ries
M anufacturing ------------------------- ----------------------------- ——
N on m anufacturing------------------------------------------------------P u blic utilities * --------- —
--------------------------------- — —
W holesale trade ----------------------------------------------------Retail trade ------------------- ----------------------------—---- —
Finance f -------------------------------------------------------------—
S ervices ------------------------------------------------------ —— -----

5.282
1,966
3 ,316
263
480
240
1,477
856

37. 5
38. 5
3 7.5
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7.5
3 6 .5
3 7 .0

76. 00
78.60
74.50
9 0 .0 0
77.00
72.50
73.50
71.50

_
-

2
2
1
1
*

------------ 3,364
S tenographers, general ------------------------------ — - —
M anufacturing --------------------------------—-------------------- ----- T7 375 1,986
Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------- --------- -------—
Pu blic utilities * -------- ------—--------- ------------------------219
W holesale trade --------- ----------------------—------------- ----437
Retail t r a d e -------------- — ------------- ------------------ ---------149
Finance f -—
___ . . . . . .
979
S e r v i c e s ------------------------------------- -----------------------— ■
■
202

65.50
3 8.0
3976" 1" '6 8 . W
37 .5
64.0 0
68. 00
38 .0
3 9 .0
73.50
37. 5
58.00
60.50
36 .5
39 .0
62.50

Stenographers, technical ------------- —-------- —----------—------Manufa cturing --------------- ------------- ---------------------— -----Nonmanufacturing -------- —--------- -—— -------— — ------- -Finance f -------- -------- —----------------- ----------, --- — — ------

38. 5
38."5
38.5
3 8.5
3 8.5

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le ,




410
jr s
172
71
98

68.00
66. 00
67. 50
59.50
72.50

-

_

3
------j—
2
•
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

n
45

67
40
6

131
68
63
21
27
3

32
13
9
-

25
5
20
11
9
-

z
17
13
3
"

20
12
8

16
l4
2

14
11
3

4
3
1

6
6

284
90
194
12
3
32
147

300
90
210
8
18
34
148

277
129
148
17
4
12
96

204
101
103
10
9
29
54

139
87
52
10
11
3
15

225
34
191
16
157

99
5
94
6
78

52
16
36
27

6
1
5
5

19
19
-

3
3
-

29
1
28
1
16

124
10
114
7
13
36
58

331
67
264
1
41
13
125
84

633
179
454
9
80
43
226
96

642
153
489
14
71
36
227
141

777
290
487
10
65
34
199
179

106
363
'■"72“ 79
284
94
13
10
3
40
6
30
68
163
41
4

505
“T88
337
IS
42
47
213
17

711
TT7
474
47
74
31
248
74

496
191
305
33
78
19
154
21

55
12
43
33
10

100

97
5V
40
5
35

11

1
1
1

16
1
15
15

121

85
15
7

8

6
1
“

7
4
3
3
-

4
4

-

-

66
32
34
22
9
3

17
5
12
1
10
1

8
4
4
4
“

4
3
1
1
*

.
-

-

-

734
278“
456
17
61
33
242
103

850
562
288
35
29
23
143
58

453
183
2 70
63
38
11
123
35

249

733
534
199
32
26
12
100
29

166
103
63
19
12
1
24
7

117
33
84
39
40
1
4

45
8
37

61
5
56
51
1
1
3

70
60
10
6
4

20
10
10
3
6

25
5
20
1
19

-

-

-

■

-

_
-

■

_
*

_
■

*

.
-

_
•

-

155
38
117
19
26
8
24
40

76
1561
20
15
3
9
14

72
15
57
27
22
4
4

9
1

------ 7
j-—

1
*
1
1
-

7
------ j— 1

1
1
-

3
3
3
-

_
“

-

"

-

12
5
7

126

121
28
5
7
63
18

8

20
7
2
9
2
1
5

‘

6
7
4
4

1

1
1

.
-

1

1

1

•

.
■‘ ■
119
39
80
15
12
9
38
6
-----42
37
37
-

8
2
6
6

-

6
6
•
2
2
-

_
-

.

_
•
.
_
-

6
b
-

19

_
_

8
2
4
2

27
7
20
3
4
5
1
7

6
6
-

!
1
1
"

_
*

-

-

-

8
T ab le A-1: O ffic e O c c u p a tio n s > C o n tin u e d
(A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t -t i m e

w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s f o r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s i s ,
b y in d u s tr y d iv i s io n , B o s to n , M a s s . , O c to b e r 1 9 5 8 )

AvaltA X
Q
Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

Num
ber
of
w
orker*

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
Weekly. W
eekly I 35.00 40, 00
and
hours
earning*
(Standard) (Standard) tinder
4 0 .0 0 45.0 0

$
4 5.00

$
50. 00 *55. 00 *60. 00 I s . 00

50.00

55.00

*70. 00

75.00

lo .o o

I s . 00

75. 00 80. 00

85. 00

90. 00

60.00

65. 00

70. 00

127
29
98
1
25
7
62
3

100
35
67
11
12
13
28
3

61
16
45
13
5
8
10
9

io .o o

*95. 00 i o o l o o f 05.00 *110.00 115.00 120.00
and
95. 00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 over

W omen— Continued
Sw itchboard o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------------------707
M a n u fa ctu rin g-------------------------------------------------------------- — TEZ
Nonmanufacturing ------------------------------- ----------------------545
P u blic utilities * ----------------------------------------------------41
W holesale t r a d e ----------------------------------------------------80
R etail t r a d e --------- ------------— — — ----------------- --------101
Finance f ------------------- -------------------------------------------- 206
S erv ices -----------------------------------------------------------------117

38 .5
3 9.0
38 .0
3 9.5
3 9 .0
38 .0
3 7.0
3 9.5

$
61.50
70.00
59.50
72.50
65.50
55.50
6 0.50
51.50

5
5
5
-

9
9
9
-

105
105
21
12
72

83
2
81
13
15
25
28

122
27
95
3
8
18
65

Sw itchboard o p e r a to r -r e c e p tio n ists -----------------------------M anufacturing —---------------------------------------------------------N on m an u factu rin g--------- ---------------------------------------------P u blic utilities * ------------------------- --------------------------W holesale t r a d e --------------------------- —------------------------.
Retail t r a d e --------------------------------------------------------—
Finance ' f ------------------------------ —______________ _______
S erv ices -------------------- -— — ------------------------------------

870
369
501
34
157
62
105
143

3 8 .0
39 0
3 8.0
3 8.0
39.0
38. 0
36.0
37.5

61.50
63.00
60. 50
61.00
65.00
5 4 .5 0
59. 00
59.00

6
6
6

10
10
2
8
-

25
25
12
13
'

90
21
69
5
20
5
18
21

304
125
179
5
62
23
36
53

158
82
76
12
10
1
26
27

127
80
47
2
21
5
1
18

Tabulating-m achine op erators ---------------------------------------M anufacturing --------------------------- ---------------------------------N onm anufacturing ------------------------------------------------------Finance f ------------------------------------------------------------------

411
84
32 7
175

38.0
39 .0
37. 5
37 .0

63.50
717 00"'
61.50
65.00

_
•

_
_

77
77
17

45
6
39
12

66
13
53
35

50
4
46
30

T ra n scribin g-m ach in e o p e ra to rs , g e n e r a l--------------------M a n u fa ctu rin g -------------------------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing -----------------------------------------------------W holesale trade ----------------------------------------------------Finance f -----------------------------------------------------------------S ervices ------------------------------------------------------------------

1,057
334
723
106
351
247

3 8.0
39 0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
37.5
37. 5

60.5 0
64. 00
58. 50
6 5.50
57.00
56. 50

_
-

13
3
10
9
-

120
12
108
9
42
'56

168
lb
158
14
83
57

279
165
171
12
106
51

T yp ists, cla s s A ---------------------------------------------------------- -—
M anufacturing ---------------------------.--------------------------------N onm an u factu rin g-------------------------------------------------------W holesale t r a d e ----------------------------------------------------Finance t -----------------------------------------------------------------S e r v i c e s ------------------------------------------------------------------

1,473
706
767
51
444
236

38 .5
39. 5
3 7.5
38 .5
37.0
38 .0

61.50
61.0 0
62. 50
77.00
60.00
64.00

_
-

_
-

30
7
23
6
1

208
7b
138
5
113
19

3 8 .0
39 .0
37. 5
38.5
3 8.5
3 8 .5
3 7.0
4 0 .5

54.5 0
58. 00
53.00
52.00
58.50
50.50
53.00
53.00

1
1
1
-

194
7
187
5
33
119
30

905
104
801
80
19
43
578
81

1124
262
862
16
60
71
641
74

T yp ists, cla s s B _________________________________________ 3,8 0 0
M anufacturing ----------------------------- ------------------------------- — T O ~
N on m an u factu rin g------------- ------------------------------------------- 2 ,8 1 4
Pu blic utilities * ---------------------------------------------------142
W holesale t r a d e --------------- ------------------.--------------------258
R etail trade -----------------------------------------------------------187
Finance f --------------------------------------------------- --------------- 1,946
S erv ices ------------------------------ ---------------------------------281

1
*
*
f

_
_
-

_
_
_
-

3
3
-

1
1
1
-

_
~

-

2
2
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

6
6
6
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

10
10
8
1

5
5
3
2

1
1
-

_
“

_
-

1

>
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

.
-

-

_
-

.
-

12
7
1
2
2
-

5
1
4
3
1

8
6
2
2
-

1
1
_
-

76
29
47
15
8
10
14

33
£3
10
8
2

6
6
5
1
-

13
13
13
-

16
6
10
10
-

2
2
2

31
7
24
21

44
5
39
27

54
40
14
12

17
5
12
7

17
1
16
14

2
2
-

6
1
5
-

188
75
113
21
59
33

140
38
102
18
42
40

42
12
30
15
10
1

50
43
7
2

45
32
13
6
7

3
2
2
-

3
3
3
-

447
27?
170
5
132
32

400
196
204
1
101
95

147
66
81
1
41
35

137
76
61
8
20
32

58
7
51
6
26
14

21
3
18
12
4
2

9
4
5
2
1
2

735
" W
475
12
97
14
316
36

369
104
265
14
38
23
179

288
143 ‘
145
8
18
2
75
42

129
83
46
5
5
35

34
21
13
1
5
2
5

20
2
18
16

1
1
1
-

11

1

1

.1

\

S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t -t i m e s a l a r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
In c lu d e s 1 w o r k e r a t $ 3 0 to $ 3 5 .
T r a n s p o r ta t io n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ,
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




_
-

47
Z6
21
3
13
3
2
-

1

34
Iz

-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_
-

.
-

1

9
Table A-2» Professional and Technical Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area b a sis,
by industry d ivision , B oston, M a s s ., O ctober 1958)
number

Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

Nuabcr

o r w om ans receiving straight -time weekly barkings o r -

t
$
»
»
B
K
B
8
B
8
•
t
8
00
.0
W*Aly , Under *50. 00 ^ 5 .0 0 l o . o o *65. 00 *70.00 *75. 00 80. 0 *85.00 9 .0 * 95.00 10 .0 105.00 110 0 115.00 12 .0 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00
00
0
0 0
and
$
and
(Staadsrdl (StaadtSd) 50. 00 under
00
.0
0 0
55. 00 60. 0 65. 00 70. 00 75. 00 80.00 85.00 qo. no 9 5 .0 0 10 .0 105.00 110 0115.00 12 .0 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 Qyex
0

Men

*

D raftsm en, l e a d e r -------------- ------------------M a n u fa ctu rin g-------------------------------------N on m anufacturing--------------------------------

594
239
355
342

D raftsm en, s e n i o r ------------------------------------ 3,021
M a n u fa ctu rin g -------------------------------------- T7TT9
N on m an u factu rin g------- — --------------------- 1,482
S erv ices ------------------------------------------ 1,410
D raftsm en, j u n i o r ------------------------------------M anufacturing ------------------------------------N on m an u factu rin g-------------------------------S erv ices ------------------------------------------

1,211

T r a c e r s ----------------------------------------------------N onm anufacturing -------------------------------S erv ices ------------------------------------------

230
137

?91
420
375

12
0

39.5
40. 0
39.0
39. 0

$
149.00
141.50
154.00
155.00

.

.

_. _

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

39 .5
4 0.0
39. 5
39. 5

113.00
" l l 'I . 50
114.50
114.50

■

.
-

-

-

-

40. 0
40 0
4 0.0
40. 0

84. 50
$ 6 50
.
81.00
81.50

17
17

3
3
-

39.5
39. 5
4 0 .0

62.00
64.00
63.50

15
15

40
i2
9

48
27
25

-

-

16

1
2

7
60
7 ■ 36
24

2
0

192
l4'9
43
39

65

2
0

23

19
19

9

18

2
6

9

8
1
1

1
1

-

_

_

-

- '

16
8
72
72 TC S
60
59
-

143
92
51
51

157
84
73
70

I ll
67
44
34

12
0

112

48
72
62

89
23
19

18
17

1

12
10
8

16

-

2
2
■

6
6
-

248

6
6
-

15
15
-

16
1

311
223

22
0

87
85

81

144
114

8
8

346

31
3i
-

34
32

117
58
59
59

21
2

2

43
178
176

19
19
-

213
63
150
148

8
6
2

11
10
1
335
63
2 72
254

262
116
146
142

26
26
26

41
41
37

31
31
31

z

156
26
130
129

12
2
69
53
51

70
9

6
1

*16
2

60

64
64
-

3
3
-

*

.
-

-

-

-

- i
|
- i

12

332

3235
232
164

2
-

108
5
33
33

65
65
-

13
13

-

1
2
12

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

■

-

"

16
5
9
— r r ------ 3“ — 3
2
5
6

7
4
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- '

8
8
8

1

12

84“

3
3
-

31

19
16

70
42
28
27

69
36
33
31

15
3

1
0
no
-

-

-

-

*

■

"

1

W om en
N u rses, industrial ( r e g is t e r e d ) --------s
-----M a n u fa ctu rin g -------------------------------------N onm an u factu rin g-----------r------------- -------

1
*
3
4

Standard hours refle ct the
W ork ers w ere distributed
W ork ers w ere distributed
W ork ers w ere distributed




277
“TT9
78

39.5
39. 5
38. 5

81.00
“ "ST. 50"
80. 50

_

.-

l
—

T~------ 5~
13

28
19
9

54
— 3T
23

76

~n—
5

55
43

12

workweek for which em ployees receive their regular stra igh t-tim e salarie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
as follow s: 8 at $1 50 to $ 1 6 0 ; 22 at $160 to $1 70 ; 20 at $1 80 to $ 1 9 0 ; 21 at $ 1 90 to $2 00 ; 24 at $2 00 to $ 2 1 0 ; 2 at $210 and over.
as follow s: 73 at $1 50 to $1 55 ; 68 at $1 55 to $1 60 ; 10 at $1 60 to $1 65 ; 52 at $ 1 65 to $1 70 ; 8 at $1 70 to $ 1 8 0 ; 24 at $1 80 to $ 1 9 0 .
as follow s: 81 at $155 to $1 60 ; 59 at $1 60 to $ 1 6 5 ; 22 at $165 and over.

10

Table A-3. Maintenance apd Powerplant Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r m en ^n se le cte d occupation# studied on an area b a s is
by industry div isio n , B oston, M a s s ., O ctober 1958)
NUMBER OF WORKEB8RECEIYINO (STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
worker*

O ccupation and industry d ivision

C a rp en ters, m aintenance ____________________
M anufacturing _____________________________ —
Nonmanufacturing
____ _____________ __
______ __
E le c tr ic ia n s , m a in te n a n ce __
M anufacturing' _____________________________

—

575
386
195

12
1

985
521
164

2 .5 8
2 .6 2
2 .4 0
2. 56

365
245

2 .5 1
2 .6 1
2 .2 9

8
6

E n gin eers, s t a t io n a r y _____ __
________
_
M anufacturing _______ ______ <_____________ . . .
F irem en , stationary b o ile r

________ ____

H elpers, tra d es, m a in te n a n ce_______________
M a n u fa ctu rin g ______ _______________________ - P u blic utilities * _______________________ . . .
W holesale trade ____ _________________
M a ch in e-tool o p e r a to r s , to o lr o o m
..................... ....
M anufacturing

___

12
0

490
362
188
700
543
157
72
54
339
“ 3 1 9 -----

M achinists, m aintenance ____________________
M anufacturing
.... .................... __
Nonmanufacturing
...... ..........................
P u blic utilities *

Avenge
hourly
earnings 1 Under
$
1.50
$
n
2 .5 1
2 .4 2
ii
2 .6 9
4
2. 97

968
928
40
40

M ech an ics, autom otive (m a in te n a n ce )_______
612
Ri
M anufacturing _____________________________
Nonmanufacturing
468
P u blic utilities
338
—
W holesale trade ___•„___________________
112
M ech an ics, m aintenance
_
_
__
1,399
M anufacturing _______________ ______________ . .. I7T31----Nonmanufacturinv
266
P u blic u tilitie s *
_
_
97
R etail trade
. _ _
106

T o o l and die m akers
________ ______________
M an u factu rin g____________________ ________

1
2
3
4
5
6

1
0
1
0

14

60
'45
15

58
37

64
57
7

2
1

3
.

8
6
8
1

2
2

69

6
6

59
36
23

1

11
1
2

2
0
6
8

-

-

-

5
4

_

_

17

2
6

32
------ 1-----

17

26
15

28
92
82
23
5
2
186
211
~T84----- — Z09—

_

15
14

2 .41
1.60

2 .5 5

932

2 .7 4
" 2 .7 5 ...

14
*

_
_

_

_

15

10

36
7
------ 5----- ----- 15

1

_

_
.
-

_

2

f

2
1
1
0

2
0

*25

7

25

7

6
6

35

1
0

2
2
16
6

25

7

4

17

7
_

10

- *

-

18

-

46
46

16
16

35

18
------- 5

-

1

27

—

T~
T

53
32 "

12
12

225
187
38
37

34
26
14
14

62
62

56
36

62
62

114

59
59

87
76

11
11

58

12

45

27
24
3
154
123
31

2
2

29
29

67

59
51

33
35
35

105
14
91
78

82
70

161
95

8
8

95
17

1
2

— T5
T—
_
.

-

-

-

-

*

-

_

_

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

17
13
4

21

16
16
„

2
1

4
-------i

2
2
2

1

>
-

18
3

17

5

-

E xcludes prem iu m pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.
W orkers w ere distributed as follow s: 57 at $ 3 . 30 to $ 3 .4 0 ; 16 at $ 3 .4 0 to $ 3 . 50; 14 at $ 3 . 50 and o v e r .
W orkers w ere distributed as fo llo w s: 4 at $ 3 . 10 to $ 3 .2 0 ; 3 at $ 3 .2 0 to $ 3 .3 0 ; 18 at $ 3 .3 0 to $ 3 .4 0 ; 4 at $ 3 .5 0 and o v e r .
W orkers w e re distributed a s fo llo w s: 10 at $ 1 .3 0 to $ 1.40; 20 at $ 1.40 to $ 1. 50.
W orkers w ere distributed as fo llo w s: 11 at $ 1. 30 to $ 1.40; 14 at $ 1.40 to $ 1.50.
W orkers w ere distributed as fo llo w s: 197 at $ 3 . 10 to $ 3 .2 0 ; 4 at $ 3 . 30 and o v e r .
* T ran sp ortation (excluding ra ilr o a d s ), com m u nication, and other public u tilities.




103
98
5

12
12
12
0
11$
2
2

10
2
12
12
6
8

6

2
0
9
1
23
23
3

5
-------§—

2
0
19

i

6
2

$
1

2
6

12
l2

57
44
13
30

51
47
4

21

28

6
6

"

-

2 .8 0

179
153
26

207
"TEE
5

34

30
id

25,
"24

2
2
6

28

8
8'
~

-

-

3
3
_
■

77
7

1

25
25

105
103

51
42
9
9

79
79

20
2
2o
2
_

43
39
4
4

21
2

23
15

14
4

4
4

3

1
2
1
1
90
-4
9

19

8
8

19
113
145
43 " “ 14J
70
2
35
_
3

35
29

15
14

z

6
8

112
11 r

41

10

28

6
1

52
52

1

43
4o

2

10
1
0
2
2

_

6
6
_
_

_

•

-

-

-

•
-

-

-

1
1

1
103
94

-

2
2

_

_

j

15
15
-

-

1
1
1

2
2

_
“

3

27

3

5

1

24
23

75
75

14
13

17
17

14
14

_

12
2

109
165

74
58

128
12
$

77
77

119
119

49
49

114

"

.

17
17

6

-

_

6
2

"■

29

”

46
26

63

3
29

_

4
4
-

71
69

1
1

_
“

4
4
-

14

19
19

.

16

53
9
9

12
12

6

_
■

47
47
-

2
0

81
77

.
■

136
li6
-

9
5

*87

”

51
51
4
4

21’

2
2

21
21
2
2

3. 10
and
over

_

2
0

"

3. 10

8

_

9

30

3 .0 0

-

2
2

26
24
24

8

-

95
'91"
4
4
.

6
6

2 .9 0

8
2
6
6
1
1

9
57

12
4
6

35
'15'

8
2
6
6

5

4

24
24
57
5? '

78
74
4

6

123
9l
32

44
18
26
7

8

3. 00

14
5

8

40
32

2

2 .9 0

63
35

37
35

1

2 .8 0

63
55

12

8

* 2 .7 0

2 .7 0

8
1
10
0

8

2 .6 0

2 .6 0

2

_
104

8

2 .5 0

42
30

12

32
2
2
9
— n r — — 5 F “ “ 7 1 — ------- g
23
43
28
23
23----- — 43
"73 “
—

1
0
8

3
3

2 .5 0
2 .5 6
2 .5 6

_
_

■

x

--------j—

2 .5 0

2
0
8
12

47
35

10
1
0
1
0

"

8
8
11

8

37
19
18

75
1 S'S '■

15

2. 17

6
8
56

2 .4 0

39
41
33

21

_

2 .33
ZTIU
2 .4 6
2 .5 2
2 .4 1

5

8

77

17
5

9

2 .2 5
2 .4 2

15

11

4

_
_
_

174
172

~W
~l

9

42
31

92
77
15
9

26
24

14

26
19
7

2 .4 0

2 .3 0

" 14 '
7

_

_
_
_

-

8
8
2.20 2 .3 0

2.20
21

9

4

_

1
0

2.20
2.21

2. 1
0

14

_
*

_
_

56

-

4

_
_
_

2 .6 0

2. 53
2. 53

2.22
2 .3 9
1.98

...

8

2.66

377
216
161
38
62

P lu m b ers, maintenance . ..

35
27

29
29

-

P a in ters, m aintenance _______________________
M anufacturing -------------------------------------------Nonmanufacturing -------------------------------------Pu blic utilities * -----------------------------------S erv ices

Sheet-m etal w o rk e rs , m aintenance
M anufacturing ..
_ ... . ...

__2.10

8

49
42
7

■

X

6

2.0
0

12
1
2

_

19
14
13

6

12

2.0
0

$

1
1

_

1

1.90

- 1 .8 0

1.90

4

15

2
2

1.80

-

2 .4 4
2 .4 4
1.97
r 0 7 ...

535
511

15

3

1.70

$

-

335
333
240
216

. ..
_ _ _____________

-

4

3

t

5
-

2 .4 8
2743 “

M illw r ig h t s _____________
_
____ __
Manufact urine
O ile rs
„ _________________________________
M anufacturing

P ip efitters, m aintenance ...
M anufacturing
_
_

4
4

_

$

1
2

4

4

2. 1 430
2
2. 19
2. 0
0 30
2.01
25
2.0
2
15
1
0
2. 0
1
2. 15
1.99

S
$
1.50
1.60
and
under
1.70
___

■

31
31

*20
1
21
0

11
Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area b a s is ,
by industry d ivision , B oston, M a s s ., O ctober 1958)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O ccupation 1 and industry div isio n

Number
of

E levator o p e r a to r s , passen ger (m en) T __
_
_
483
Nonmanufacturing ________ ____ _______ _______ .....475
P u blic utilities * -_______.___________ ______
26
Finance t ___________ _ _ _ _ _
302

Average S
S
$
hourly 2 0 . 80
0 .9 0
1 . 00
*
“
uncle r
.—
*.9.0-, -1.-QQ-. L 10
$
1.28
1.27
1.58
1.35

-

•

43
43
-

46
'46
6

$

1. 10

-

S
1 .2 0

-

1 .2 0

52
52
-

1 .1 0

36
36
8
20

S
1.30
1.40

$
1.40
1.50

236
236 1—
234

12

$
1. 50
1.60

424
402

1 . 18

Finance T _______ -___________ *_____ -_______

129

1 .2 6

G u ard8 ___________________________________________

M anufacturing _____________________________ __
Nonmanufacturing __________ . .. ______________
Finance t ----------------------------------------------------

938
571
367
253

1.91
1.95
1.84
1.77

_
■

_
-

Jan itors, p o rte rs , and cle a n e r s (m en) ______ _
M anufacturing ____,__*_____ ___________________
N on m an u factu rin g____ ______________2____ ___
P u blic utilities * __________________________ ,
W holesale t r a d e _________ __________ ______
R etail t r a d e _____ _____________________ _
Finance f _ ______________ __________________
S erv ices _ _ _____ _________
__ __
_ __

3,945
1,765
2 , 180
419
103
536
741
381

1.59
1.76
1.44
1.75
1.75
1.36
1.42
1 . 19

n
li
li

52
52
30
-

Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs (wom en) _____
M a n u fa ctu rin g ___________________________ ___
Nonmanufacturing _________ ________ _ ____
R etail t r a d e _______________________________
Finance t ________________________-____—___

2 ,0 0 8
247
1,761

1.31
' 1.53
1.28
1. 07
1.31

22

L a b o r e rs , m a teria l h a n d lin g _____ ____________ _
M anufacturing _ ____ ___________ __ ______
Nonmanufacturing ___________________________
Pu blic utilities * ______________ _________
W holesale t r a d e ________ __________________
R etail t r a d e ____ _____________________ _____

4 ,7 0 8
2 ,633
2, 075
504
737
794

O rder fille r s
_ _ _ _ _
M a n u fa ctu rin g ______ _
_
________
Nonmanufacturing
____ __ _
__ _
__ _
W holesale t r a d e _______________________ __
R etail trade
__ _____________________

2.239
r?5
1.494

P a ck e rs , shipping ( m e n ) __ ______ ___ ____
M anufacturing _____________________,__________
Nonmanufacturing
_ ____
__ _
W holesale t r a d e _________________<
_________
......................... ..........
R etail t r a d e ..... ........

See footn otes at end o f table.




112

1,280

1 ,0 6 2

432
1,803
17175
668

461
177

L IT ”

1.81
1.7$
1 .8 2
2 . 10

1.89
1.61
1.82
“ TTCT
1.79
1.75
1.87
1.72
1 .6 8

1.78
1.95
1.38

2

7

22

-

“
_
-

43
43

22

86

56
56
18

124
124
49
38
37

35
35
24
“

106

3
3
3

76
9
67
63

■

•

.
-

.
-

2

104
36
49

34
34
10

24
16
6
10

10

$
1.70
1.80

$
1.80
1.90
10

$

*

$

s

1 .9 0

2 . 00

2 . 10

2 .2 0

2 . 00

2 . 10

1
1
1

-

S
2 .3 0
2 .4 0

s
2 .4 0
2 .5 0

$
2 .5 0
*
2 .6 0

<
2 .6 0
*
2. 70

$
2 .7 0
2 .8 0

$
2 .8 0
2 .9 0

$
2 .9 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

46
44

_
-

24
19
5
■

30
36
■

_
•

_
~

_
‘

_
-

_
“

15
15
■

>
■

_
-

_
'

_
“

_
_
-

_
-

_
■

■

_
*

_
“

■

_
~

50
50
50

_
~

“

_
~

and
over

5

22
21

19
17

i

8

-

12

20

9

1

-

-

-

1
--------r

2
2

6
6

2
2

3

79
49
30
30

87
60
27
27

379
253
126
56
-

177
39
138
94
17
27
-

334
173
161
119
5
37
-

421
358
63

86

7o
16
"

31
27
4
•

_
“

292
164
128
9
79
39

608
321
287
163
79
40

rr
_

2

E levator o p e r a to r s , passen ger (w o m e n )____
N onm anufacturing ______________________ _____

I
1.60
1.70

117
.117

66

72
72

13

6

54

12

-

9

20

70
25
19

24 ------ j —
30
27
24
24
27

lo
8

12

1

1

_
_
234
26

214
5

1
1

236
33
203
10
2

6

5
660
57
603
3

331
157
174
3
15
49
55
52

536
332
204
82
9

62
19
43
3
32

34

637
539
98
25
72

399
..2'"06"
193

22
8

178
97
81
35
45

120

140

115

152
— STlli
92
19

6

115

57
42
92

173
381
40

255
19
236
48
28

402
52
350
334

957
31
926

179

164
64

88
6

28

151
29
118

100

39
------ r -

91
91
39
52

30
22
8

53
— IT "
40
36

31
60

1

835
229
1^4
45
-

-

134

107
13

122
12

75
24
51

249

10

25
36

37

10

60
*

12

12
22

2

6

120

11

90

61

60
46
14

8
1 §

3
■

2

61
130

60
322
129
— n r IT T " t c r
26
32
49
21
32
19
7
17
11

2 98
180

118
86

32
178
i 06
72
40
10

332
42
26 2 “ ""TO"
130
32
28
85

22

17
23
1

"

28
190
- ~TT5“
28
55
11
13
68

30
38
12
22

4
■
6
6

*
■
~

351
287
64
13
5
46
“
3
3
-

2
2

16
11

5
' 5
_
■
1

i
■
395
166
289
215

48
24
24
-

12
62

22
2

273
258
121 -----^
389
121
... m ~ " I T T " — 5TT ----- 6 “
71
115
230
88
262
115
36
86
262
9
194
62
2
“

31
16
15
15
“

147
124
23
23

391
132 "
159
13
130
16

138
96
48
48

308
269
99
8

84
7

102
68

34
34

649
370
279
94
56
129

76
39
37
24
13

243
58
185
185

3
3
-

88

14

72
16
-

8
6

16

6
~

"

-

3
3
3 ----- 3—
“
12
12

-

_
-

35 -----j —
3
36
5
5
_
-

_
-

3
3
-

10

10
10

"

“

_
-

_
-

12
Table A-4. Custodial and M aterial Movement Occupations-Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area b a s is ,
by industry division , B oston, M a s s ., O ctober 1958)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O c c u p a tio n 1 an d in d u s tr y d iv is io n

P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g ( w o m e n ) ____
M a n u fa c tu r in g
_ . .
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
_______________________________
R e t a i l tr a d e
„
_______________________________

Number
of
workers

354
245
109
70

$
Average
$
hourly 2 0 . 80
0 .9 0
earnings
and
u nder
1. 0 0
.9 0
$
1 .4 5
1 .4 8
1 .3 8
1 .3 2

$
1. 00

$
1. 10

$
1 .2 0

$
1 .3 0

1. 10

1 .2 0

1 .3 0

24
24
-

■

36
21
15
15

_
-

15
15
-

.
-

■

1

“

34
34
7
23

4
4
4

1
1
1

2
2
2

-

-

_

R e c e iv in g c l e r k s
M a n u fa c tu r in g ______________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g _________________________________
W h o le s a le tr a d e ________________________________
R e t a i l tr a d e _____________________________________

751
344“ 1
407
194
1 70

1. 83
1 .9 1
1 .7 7
1 .8 8
1 .7 1

-

Sh ip p in g c l e r k s
___ . . . . . .
M a n u fa c tu r in g
................. . _ .
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
.............. . .
W h o le s a le t r a d e
_ _
R e t a i l t r a d e _______________________________________
S e r v i c e s ________________________________________

758
322
436
285
94
55

1 .9 9
2 . 10
1 .9 1
2 .0 1
1 .7 4
1 .6 7

_

_

-

-

'

•

Sh ip p in g and r e c e iv i n g c l e r k s
_________________
M a n u fa c tu r in g
_
.
____ _
_
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
.. ....
_
W h o le s a le t r a d e _________________________________

486
251“
234
51

1 .9 7
2.
1 .8 5
2 . 05

_

.

.

-

'* -

-

2
2

~

■

“

"

_
-

_

_

-

8
8
.8

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
-

-

-

8
8

-

-

-

0
6

T ru c k d riv e rs3
_
M a n u fa c tu r in g _____________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
. .
. .
P u b lic u t ilit ie s * ________________________________
W h o le s a le t r a d e ______ _______________________
R e t a i l tr a d e
___
S e rv ic es
_

3, 354
'1 7 6 7 4
2 ,2 8 0
839
802
517
112

2 . 19
2725
2 . 16
2 .2 7
2 .2 4
2 .0 3
1 .5 0

T r u c k d r i v e r s , lig h t (u n d e r lV g to n s )
M a n u fa c tu r in g ___________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ___________ _____________
W h o le s a le tr a d e
S e r v i c e s ________ _____ __ ______________

494
239
255
107
77

1 .8 6
2 . 11
1 .6 3
1 .6 9
1 .4 8

T r u c k d r i v e r s , m e d iu m ( I V to and
in c lu d in g 4 to n s ) _______ _____ _____ _______
M a n u fa c tu r in g
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g _____________________________
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ___________________________
W h o le s a le t r a d e ______________________ ___
R e ta il tr a d e
_________ _________________

1, 153
— ¥53
67 0
73
242
318

2 . 08
2 .2 3
1 .9 7
2 .2 3
2 . 04
1 .9 0

T r u c k d r i v e r s , h e a v y (o v e r 4 t o n s ,
t r a i l e r t y p e ) __________________________ _________
M a n u fa c tu r in g _________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g _________
_____________
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * __________ _________ ___
W h o le s a le t r a d e ----------------------------------- ------

1, 0 2 1
—
823
472
275

2 .3 7
2 .2 5
2 .4 0
2 .2 7
2 .5 9

2

See footn otes at end o f table




m~

-

-

_

101
85
16
14

15
15
15

16
16

—

21
rs~ —
3
2
1

-

-

55
13
42
25
15

S
1 .9 0

$
2 . 00

t
2 . 10

S
2 .2 0

$
2 .3 0

$
2 .4 0

$. 5 0
2

2 .6 0

$
2 .7 0

s
2 .8 0

$
2 .9 0

- 1 .8 0

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

2 . 10

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

and
over

2
2

-

16
16
-

-

-

-■
-

-

-

-

"

■

'

'

~

"

-

2
-

_

47
77
72
r e- ------15“ ------31
62
56
25
32
2
37
24
24

T
T

17
-

2
-

28
-

17
10

2
-

28
10

22
22
10
12

1 14
114
29
30
53

4
13

20
20
-

13

12

47
47
12
18

T
z

16

2
-

62
-

4
4

2
2

62

-

-

-

-

39

2
6

12
14

83
------- T T
66
*1
50
9
6

74

—W - S
25
20
4

38
'" 3 2 ’ —
6
2

80
i - —
26
17
8

90
*n r
32
13
13

96
4
90
-

38
17
21
15
6

95
18
77
35
13

10
10
1
-

53

10
1

9

14
14

-------I T 90
90

-

-

237
— r e -

24
0
101
103
"

-

-

-

26
26
-

55

29
15
10
5

f t

17

40

4

16

8

5

1

■

"

•

63
29
5 T “ -----10
8
10
-

13
13
-

—

28
z ir
8
8

■

TT

247
1 142
102
— r e r ~ k T4B“ " “ 77“
84
0
994
25
7
4
811
17
87
134
21
8
58
48
5
~
-

22
21
1

1

35
27
8
6
2

-

_

_
-

24
18
6

2

177
163
14
12
2
-

1 26
29
97
97

1
-

-

3
3
3
142
"""S B '
44
44
-

TT

“

10
10
10
_
-

-

39
3b
9
5

_

_

_

-

-

-

60
60
-

-

"

■

"

■

_

214
36
1 84
81
103

1 38
45
93
7
82
4

163
86
77
20
56

1 78

112
112
-

28
28
-

“

12
3
7
7

38

1 14
65
45
4

18
13
5
2
3

~

3

2
2
-

21
20
1
1

596
48
548
472
60

48
48
-

48
48
-

60
60
-

217
3
214
214

-

54
54
-

_

_

-

-

-

"

3

_
-

-

-

28
13
15
15

"

•

-

3
18
r r ------ 1----2
2
-

•

293
-----262
259
3

-

-

21
-------T ” —
18
18
-

1
1

-

_

-

2
2
-

~

“

198

34
3<J"
4
-

19

rrr- -------- T — 3“
8
16
1
9
4
3
15

—W
1
0

_

17
n
6
-

vr~—
26
22
4

84
55
2
0
vr~—rr 16
14
9 3
7 7
10
13
10
32
89
-

T
T

—~fr

-

133
re

84
98
44
r e - ~ 2 F “ ------58
31
22
1
2
~
1 50

"

Z
T

149
SB”
91
35
42
13

-

■

98
50
63
52
r - ' i r 'r
r e - — r e - -----36
75
13
13
30
15
42
14
11
7
6
6
26
"

14
-

55
— IF 17
-

78
¥T~
37
20
5

52
52
-

4
7

14

13
-

-

S
1 .8 0

89
44
45
20

-

-

$
1 .7 0

13
48
30
--------8 ” ------- I T ■------5“ —
5
17
42
5
10
11
20
11
6
*

"
55
re
42
25
15

19
3
16
6

$
1 .5 0

$
1 .6 0
-l._70.

l«AQ

S
1 .4 0

"

-

■

■

”
-

■
■

-

-

“

13
Table A-4. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations-Continued
(Average stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area b a sis,
by industry d ivision, B oston, M a s s ., October 1958)

Occupation

1

and industry division

$

$
$
0.90 1 .00
under _ ^ ! 0 _ JLJML 1 .1 0

Number

0 .8j
)

Truckdrivers: 3— Continued
Truckdrivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
other than trailer type)- ---- -----Manufacturing
________________ _
_
Nonmanufacturing __________________
Public utilities* _________________
Wholesale trade __________________

546
fl
f
465
283
134

2.26

Truckers, power (forklift)_______________
Manufacturing _ ___ ________________
Nonmanufacturing _____________________
Wholesale trade ___________ _______
Retail trade _________ ____________

803
5FS~
235
97
114

2.07
2. 63
2 . 16
2 .09

Truckers, power (other than forklift) _______
Manufacturing __________ ___________

166

2.03

_

166

2 . to

■

Watchmen____ „ ..
._______ ____________
Manufacturing _____________ _ _______
_
Nonmanufacturing ____ i
.
__________ —
Public utilities* ___________________
Retail trade ________________________
Finance t ......
...............

1 023
,
620
403
31

1.57

11

_
*
-

$

1 .1 0

L 2SL

$
1.30
"
1.30 1.40

$

1.2 0

110
202

2.26

2.28
2 . 18

2.22

1.68 "

1.42
1.93
1.34
1.45

■

~

■

-

.
■

.
■

.
■

.
■

_

_
■

_
■

_

■

46
-

38
-- 1 2

46

26

17

16

70
37
33
26

11

-

-

-

“

6

-

.
- ----r
•
_
-

Excludes prem iu m pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes all d r iv e r s r e g a rd le s s o f size and type of truck operated.
Tran sportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), com m unication, and other public u tilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




$
2.40
2.50

$
2. 50
2.60

$
2.60
2.70

$
2.70
2.80

$
2.80
2.90

$
2.90
and
over

44
24

45
45
45

-

-

~

_
_

_
"

_
~

7
7

_

_
"

~

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

$
2.24

1 Data lim ited to m en w ork ers except where otherw ise indicated.

2
3
*
t

NUM
BER OF W
ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM H U
E O RLY EARNINGS O —
F
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.40 1 50 1.60 1.70 1 .80 1.90 2 .00 2 .1 0 2 . 2 0 2.30
.
1.50 -L.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .00 2 . 10 2 . 2 0 2.30 2.40

214

i
i
94

- 7T
18
150
27
7
123
11

5
5
5

35
35
35

16
—

94

n r —
-

W

-

14
14
107
Sz

15
1
12

•

-

‘
18
18

1
1

-

-

20

29
24
5
5

20

20

44
3>
l
9
9

25
25
-

_
■

3
3

159
56
44

2

323
271
24

3
3
~

12

12
12

20

-

“

26
22

10

10

■

97

74
24
9
9
T9 — 7T“ - 9— --- I T
5
6
6
5
■
■
■

2

2

14
14

12
12

48
18“

5

2

4

-

1

2

-

-

97
— S T -

W

8

38 129
98
23 ' 103' - 74~
24
15
26
13
3
1
1
1
10
25
11

325

10

69
—

27
27
-

■

39
3$

45
45

49
32
17
14
3

67
62
5

4
1

10
10

182
- ST
123

11

.

11

7
--- 34
-

_
-

_




14

B :

E s ta b lis h m e n t

P r a c tic e s

and

S u p p le m e n t a r y

W age

P r o v is io n s

Table B-1. Shift Differentials
(P e r c e n t o f m an u factu rin g plant w o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts having f o r m a l p r o v is io n s fo r sh ift w o r k , and in e s ta b lis h m e n ts
a c tu a lly o p e ra tin g late s h ifts by type and am ount o f d iffe r e n t ia l, B o s to n , M a s s ., O cto b e r 1958)

In establishment;s having formal
provision;s1 for—

In establishments actually
operating—

Second shift
wofk

-. -i-

T ota l

With shift pay differential _
---------

___________________________________ _

6 ren ts

_

------

_
_
7 cents
7Vs cents__
8 ra n ts

.

_.
_>

__

_

----- ----

9 cents
....
9Vs cents „ _
10 r e n t s

-----------

_

.....

_

----

.
..
-

____

_

,.
ri
.........
_ __
_
______
_ _
. ,.
..
, ,,
___
_
___
_
_
_ _
_ _
_
_
----

-

1 3 cents
15 cents
cents _
17 cents
19 cents __

__

-

.........
_
_
_

__ --------

1 2 cents
1 2 1* c e n t s
/

__

_
,

16

_
_ _

O v e r 19 c e n t s

Uniform percentage
_
_
— —
5 percent _____ _______ _ ________________ __ _
_
7 percent _
_ _
7*/s percent
_
_
10 p e r c e n t
1 2 Vs percent

15 percent

__

10 .0

2.3

72.5

9.8

2.3

29.5

5.3

1.3

7.3
1.5
3.0
2.4
3.4

.7
2.7
4.0
.9

.7
.3
(2)
.1
.3
(2)
.1

_
.1
.1
(2)
l2)

.6
.8

8.3

.6

_

Third or other
shift

8 .8

1.8

.4

.
-

(2)

.7

3.6

-

.5

1.2

.
3.4

2.9

Second shift

.8

.2

.6

.5
.5

.8
.8

-

2.5

1.2

.1
-

2 .2

.2

41.3

41.5

4.5

2.6

1.2

.2

4.0

4.6

.2

.1
.2

l2)
1.0

(!)
(2)

Full day's pay for reduced hours
-- ----

33. 1
.9
“

20.7
.7
14.3

.4
.1
3.7
.1
-

3. 1

____

----------------------------- , _
_
---------------------------------------------------------------

No shift pay differential __

72.5

36.2

- --

__ __

U n ifo r m r a n t s ( p e r h o u r )

5 cent8

81.4
80.5

-

Third or other
shift work

1/5

.1

-

.9

-

.1

-

.7

-

.5

l2)
.4

1 In clu d e s e sta b lis h m e n ts c u r r e n t ly o p e r a tin g late s h ift s , and e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s c o v e r in g late sh ifts
even though they w e r e not c u r r e n t ly o p e ra tin g late s h ift s .
2 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t.

15

Table. B-2. Minimum Entrance Salgries for Women Office Workers
(Distribution of establishments studied in all industries and in industry divisions by m i n i m u m entrance salary for selected categories
of inexperienced w o m e n office workers, Boston, Mass., October 1958)
Inexperienced typists

Other inexperienced clerical workers 2

Manufacturing
Mini m u m weekly salary 1

All
indust r ie s

E sta b lis h m e n ts stu died ______ _____ _
E sta b lis h m e n ts having a
s p e c ifie d m in im u m __________________
$ 35. 00 and under $ 3 7 . 50 _________
$ 3 7 .5 0 and under $ 4 0 . 0 0 _________
$ 4 0 . 00 and under $ 4 2 . 50 _________
$ 4 2 . 50 and under $ 4 5 . 0 0 .................
$ 4 5 . 00 and under $ 4 7 . 50
..............
$ 4 7 .5 0 and under $ 5 0 . 0 0 _________
_____
$ 50. 00 and under $ 5 2 . 50
$ 5 2 . 50 and under $ 5 5 . 00 _________
$ 5 7 . 5 0 .................
$ 55. 00 and under
$ 5 7 .5 0 and under $ 6 0 . 00 _________
$ 6 0 . 00 and under $ 6 2 . 50 _________
$ 62. 50 and under $ 6 5 . 00
$ 65. 00 and under $ 6 7 . 5 0 .................
$ 6 7 . 50 and under $ 7 0 . 00 _________
$ 7 0 . 00 and under $ 7 2 . 50 _________
E s ta b lis h m e n ts having no
s p e c ifie d m in im u m ___________________
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w h ich d id not
c
e m p lo y w o r k e r s in th is i a te g o r y ___

Nonmanufacturing

Manufacturing
Ail
Indus-

Based on standard weekly hours 3 of—
A ll
sch ed­
ules

35

37 Va

383/4

A ll
sched­
u le s

40

35

36 V.

t r ie s “ A i r sched­
u le s

40

37 Va

Nonmanufacturing

Based on standard weekly hours3 of—
35

37 Va

3 8 3/4

A ll
sch ed­
u le s

40

35

36 V.

37 Va

40

252

86

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

166

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

252

86

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

166

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

131

50
-

4
-

12

26
5

81

6
1

10

28
-

136

48
-

4
-

14
-

88
2

7

11

29

7
13
28

3

1

2
1

1
1

_
-

-

_
-

7
5
4

3
-

-

3
3
_

3

6

4
-

2

8
10

-

10

2

14
7

2
6

2

29

3
3
4

1

5

1
1
1

_
3

20

1

-

10

5
3

24
4

2

19
4
9
3
3
-

2

1

2

-

-

2
1

1
1

-

_
_
-

3
5
3
3

1
6

14
16
43
14
18
4
4
3

1
1
1

3
5

5
3

6
8
1

-

2
1

1
1

1

-

-

-

1

7
6

14

1

-

3
-

-

69

30

XXX

XXX

XXX

52

6

XXX

XXX

XXX

1
2
1
4

1
1
2

5
-

1

-

3
-

1
2

1

-

3
4

-

2

1
1
1

-

5
7

1

3
1

3

1
1

-

-

-

XXX

39

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

46

XXX

XXX

XXX

1
1
2

-

-

2
8

1

4
4
4
2
6
2
2
1

-

1
8
6

18
19
42
15
13
5
4
3
-

1

2

2

2

10

8

1

_
1
1

1

5
4

2

_
1

-

1

_
-

3
2

2
1

XXX

75

30

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

45

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

41

8

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

33

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

1
1

-

-

1

1
1

Lowest salary rate formally established for hiring inexperienced workers for typing or other clerical jobs.
Rates applicable to messengers, office girls, or similar subclerical jobs are not considered.
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries. Data are presented for all workweeks combined, and for the most c o m m o n workweeks reported.

Table B-3. Scheduled Weekly Hours
(Percent distribution of office and plant workers in all industries and in industry divisions by scheduled weekly hours
of first-shift workers, Boston, Mass. , October 1958)
PLANT WORKERS

OFFICE WORKERS'

Weekly hours

Services

100

100

100

100

100

100
_

5

1

1

-

1

-

(2)

_
-

3

7

5

_
-

_

-

(*)
2
-

1

-

-

1
19
11

2
-

Financef

Services

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

1
12
2
7
2
26
7
6
1
35

_

_

_

3

11

3
16

_

12

15

(*)

-

_
-

-

5

5
11
13
11

14
4
31
11
8

63

39

52

-

-

(2)

1
-

-

-

'

"

"

-

“

2

(l )

7
-

20
23

-

7

16
18
1
44

-

-

1

(2)
-

-

-

-

-

16
1
6

58
-

30
6
4

-

-

-

-

Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Less than 0. 5 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Retail trade

Retail trade

---------------------------------------------------------

1
2
*
■
f

Wholesale
trade

Manufacturing

W
holesale
trade

Under 35 hours ------------------------------- ------------------35 hours --------------------------------------------------------------Over 35 and under 36V4 hours -------------------------3 6l/ 4 h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------------Over 36V4 and under 37Va hours ---------------------37l/a h o u r s -----------------------------------------------------------Over 3 7Va and under 38V4 h o u r s ---------------------383/4 hours ----------------------------------------------------------Over 38V4 and under 40 hours -------------------------40 hours ------------------------------------------------------- ------Over 40 and under 44 hours -----------------------------44 and under 48 hours --------------------------------------48 h o u r s _______ _________-______ ---— ----------------Over 48 h o u r s --------------------------------------------------

A ll workers

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Public
utilities*

All
industries

6

All
industries 1

7
2
1
79
1
3
4
(2)

1
-

-

3
2

-

-

-

87

97

71
12
6
7

-

-

3
2

1
2

-

-

-

4
50
4

78

-

10
5

7
1

-

16

Table CM. Pqid Holidays
(Percent distribution of office and plant workers in all industries and in industry divisions by number of paid holidays
provided annually, Boston, Mass. , October 1958)
OFFICE WORKERS;
Item

A ll w o rk e rs

.

All
industries
_

W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays ___ __
... ... ...
W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid holidays ...

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

PLANT WORKERS

Retail trade

Financet

Services

All .
industries

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Retah trade

Services

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

97

100

99

100

96

70

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

1

-

4

30

1
1

_
1
1
5
1
2
16
3
12
1
25
5
27
1
1

_
1
7

8
3
(* )
61
1
( 2)
1
1
20
l 2)
6
-

_
1
3
3
6
67
18
2
-

_
2
1
1
2
1
5
1
( 2)
14
7
57
8

6
7
1
19
( 2)
7
6
8
1
7
1
( 2)
20
5
8
1

4
6
2
_
28
.
8
14
2
9
2
15

2
5
_
.
9
_
_
_
_
8
_
2
7
43
22
-

.
2
4
_
_
1
5
_
_
_
_
_
10
_
50
_
_
26
2
-

15
5
_
_
_
_
32
_
2
_
_
_
_
2
1
37
_
_
4
-

6
29

_
_
2
2
28
28
78
78
88
88
93
94
98
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

_
_
_
_
4
4
42
44
44
44
77
77
77
84
84
86
89
89
90
96

( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
7
7
10
10
13
13
20
20
36
65
65
70
70
70
70
70

N u m b e r off d a y s
L ess than 6 h o l i d a y s ____ :_____________________
6 holidays
_ __
6 holidays plus 2 half d a y s ____________________
6 holidays plus 5 half days _ •
7 h o lid a y s _
__ _ __
7 holidays plus 1 half day
7 holidays plus 2 half days
7 holidays plus 4 half d a y s ____________________
8 holidays __
_ _
_
_
8 holidays plus 1 half d a y ______________________
8 holidays plus 2 half days _
__
8 holidays plus 4 half days _
9 holidays
....
................. .
...
9 holidays plus 1 half day __
„
.
9 holidays plus 2 half days
_ .
10 holidays __________
__ __ ____
_
_
10 holidays plus 1 half day _
10 holidays plus 2 half d a y s ___________________
11 holidays
___ _____________ __________________
11 holidays plus 1 half day _
_ __
1 1 holidays plus 2 or 3 half days
12 holidays and o ver __ ___ _____
__ _ __

l a!
( 2)
2
( 2)
4
( 2)
2
5
1
( 2)
7
2
( 2)
16
6
( 2)
44
8
1
1

_
1
1
2
4
( 2)
7
53
31
-

-

41
4
41
3
4
-

( a!
( 2)

Z

5
2
-

-

1

-

_
15
_
_
_
8
_
_
_
2
_
_
3
_
_
7
_
_
( 2)

Total holiday time3
13 or m ore days _
_ _ _
12 Va or m ore days _
__
__ _
12 or m ore days
_
llV a or m ore days
11 or m ore days
10V* or m ore days __
_ _
10 or m ore days __ __
_ __
__ _
9Va or m o re days _
__ __
9 or m o re days __
. ..
__
8Va or m ore days _
8 or m o r e days _
7 Va or m ore days _
__
. ..
7 or m o re days
6 or m o re days
_ _
. ..
___ _
5Va or m ore d a y s ______________________________
5 or m o re days
_
___
4 or m o re days
____
_____
3 or m o re days
2 or m o re days __
___ __
_ __ ____ _
1 or m ore days __
„ _ _ ___

1
2
2
10
54
60
76
78
85
90
96
97
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
100

( 2)
1
1
2
29
34
59
60
75
90
93
94
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

_
-

31
85
93
93
96
96
98
98
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

_

_

-

-

4
8
52
52
92
92
99
99
99
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

6
6
26
28
28
28
89
89
89
92
92
92
96
96
96
100

_
2
2
20
87
87
93
96
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

8
8
8
8
66
66
73
73
89
91
96
96
98
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

o

( 2)
1
2
10
14
34
36
43
51
64
64
84
92
92
93
95
96
96
97

1
1
1
3
8
10
25
27
37
51
59
59
90
96
97
97
99
100
100
100

_
-

22
65
74
74
82
82
82
82
91
97
97
99
99
99
99
99

1 Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2 Less than 0.5 percent.
3 All combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for example, the proportion of workers receiving a total of 7 days includes those with 7 full days and
no half days, 6 full days and 2 half days, 5 full days and 4 half days, and so on. Proportions were then cumulated.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
f Finance, insurance, and real estate.




17
Table B-5. Paid Vacations
(P ercent distribution o f o ffice and plant w orkers in all industries and in industry divisions
by vacation pay p rovisions, Boston, M ass. , October 1958)
PLANT WORKERS

OFFICE WORKERS;

Vacation policy

All
industries

A ll w orkers

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Financet

Services

A
ll

industries 1

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
99
1
-

100
100
-

100
85
15
-

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
100
_

100
91
8
1

100
88
11
1

100
88
12
_

100
100
_
_

100
100
_
_

100
89
11
_

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

2
50
6
29

3
64
6
13

_
36
1
54

_
42
20
9

_
77
_
-

3
38
6
48

1
56
8
22

22
31
1
4

36
21
1
( 3)

_
32
2
44

13
28
12
7

_
59
_
-

7
13
( 3)
1

4
( 3)
91
( 3)
5
-

4
_
93
_
3
-

2
_
98
_
_
-

5
_
95
_
_
-

21
_
79
_
_
-

_
_
92
_
8
-

10
1
79
8
-

58
2
39
( 3)
1
( 3)

76
3
20
_
1
-

8
_
91
_
1
-

29
_
64
_
_
7

29
_
71
_
_
-

82
_
18
l 3)

1
( 3)
91

1
l 3)
93

45
28
24
1
2

8
_
91
_
1

( 3)

-

-

15
1
77
_
_
7

4
_
96
_
_

-

3
3
-

32
17
49
1
1

46
_
54

3

4
_
70
18
8

1
_
90

1
_
93

3
7

3
3
-

14
14
69
1

17
23
56
1

8
_
86
_

2
( 3)

2
-

6
-

M eth od o f p a ym en t
W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid vacations — ___________________________
L ength-of-tim e payment _
_ __ __ _
Percentage payment _______________________
Other
_ _
__ _ __ _
W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid vacations _
_ _

-

-

A m ount o f v a c a t io n p a y 2
A fter 6 months of service
L ess than 1 week
----- ---- _
1 week ________________ __ _____________________
Over 1 but less than 2 weeks
2 weeks __
___
_ ___ __ __
__ __ ___
A fter 1 year of service
1 week __
„ _ ______
_ ______ __ _
Over 1 but less than 2 weeks
2 weeks
, , ..........
_
Over 2 but less than 3 weeks
3 weeks _ _ _ _ _
_
Over 4 weeks _________________________________

2

( 3)

After 2 years of service
1 week _
_
__ _
Over 1 but less than 2 weeks _________________
2 weeks .
_
_ _
Over 2 but less than 3 w e e k s _________________
3 w e e k s _____________ _______________________
Over 4 weeks _________________________ :_______

5

2

2

_

_

_
98
_
-

_
98
_
-

_
100
-

_
87

-

-

-

-

2

2

_
98
_
-

_
_
100
-

87

"

■

~

2

10

( 3)
l 3)

-

A fter 3 years of service
1 week

__
O v er 1 hut l e s s
2 weeks _
_
Over 2 but less
3 weeks
Over 4 weeks

_

__

__ _
.

than 2 w e e k s

_
than 3 weeks __
_
___ _______

_
_

._

_ __
_ _ _ .

_
98
_
1

_
2

10

3

_
55
18
24

See footnotes at end of table.




NOTE: In the tabulations o f vacation allow ances by years of s e rv ice , payments other than "length o f tim e ,"
such as percentage o f annual earnings or flat-sum payments, w ere converted to an equivalent time
basis; for exam ple, a payment of 2 percent o f annual earnings was con sidered as 1 w eek's pay.

6
5
82
_
-

_
98
_
_

7

-

2

39

_
61
l 3)
( 3)

18
Table B-5. Paid Vc^cations-Continued
(P ercent distribution of o ffice and plant w orkers in all industries and in industry divisions
by vacation pay provision s, Boston, M ass. , October 1958)
OFFICE WORKERS'

Vacation policy

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

PLANT WORKERS
Retail trade

Financef

Services

All
industries1

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

A m o u n t o f v a c a t i o n p a y 2- r £ p ji t i n u e d .

A fter 5 years of serv ice
1 week
2 weeks _
.
Over 2 but less than 3 weeks . ..
3 weeks
Over 4 weeks
_

( 3)

...

..........
__
...

( 3)

66
6
27

84
4
12

( 3)

_

_

_

43
57

46
9
45

-

-

-

49
18
27
6

2
64

_

_

60

_

7

_

40

34

25
10
64

2
96

2
98

_

_
_

-

3

_

1
81
3
15

1
88
4
7

( 3)

-

!

1
69
8
21
1
-

94
6
-

5
88
_
_

2
51'
47

92
( 3)

8

7

After 10 yea rs of service
1 week

_ ..

2 weeks __ __
Over 2 but less than 3 weeks
3 weeks
4 weeks
_____
Over 4 weeks

t3)
‘

46
5
44

^
_ ....

5

( 3)

( 3)

73
3
21
3
-

_

_

_

-

-

_

46
47
-

_

-

40
2
50
2
6

55
5
30
9
( 3)

60

_

39
1

5
67
4
17

2
9
54
36

7

82
( 3)
18
-

A fter 15 years of service
1 week
_ _
_ .
2 weeks
_ _
Over 2 but less than 3 weeks _ _ __
3 weeks
Over 3 but less than 4 weeks
4 weeks
. ....
. __.
Over 4 weeks

( 3)
12
2
81

83

_

.

( 3)
14
_

_
2

2
24

5

3

_
98
_
_

( 3)

-

-

-

( 3)

( 3)

_

2
24

( 3)

_

_
1

_

9
6
85

_

_

75

52

_
_

47

_
_

-

-

_

27
2
62
_

2
6

1
17
1
72
9

1
18
2
78
1
1

( 3)

-

1
17
1
69

( 3)

_
_

99

5
20

2
6

69

68

57

31

_

_

( 3)

1

_

-

7

_

5
20

2
6

69

99

59

49

31

1

9
7

43

_

5
15

2
6

69

74

64

_

48

24

26

9
7

44

6

36

_
-

A fter 20 yea rs of serv ice
1 week
.............. _
. _ .....
2 weeks
Over 2 but less than 3 weeks _
3 weeks
.
...
Over 3 but less than 4 weeks
4 weeks ____________________________________________
Over 4 weeks
____
_

11

72
1
15

12

81

2
_

_

_

_

1

9

27
2
62

_

62

46

_

_

_

7

1

13

53

68
4
19

( 3)

"

-

-

-

-

( 3)

( 3)

_

97

_

_

2
6

12

1
17
2
76
1
4

( 3)

-

1
16
1
56
3
23

1
16
2
60
5
17

( 3)

_

_

-

( 3)

-

A fter 25 yea^s o f serv ice
1 week
_ _ _ _ _
2 weeks
Over 2 but less than 3 weeks
3 weeks
_ __
Over 3 but less than 4 weeks
4 weeks
. _____ _
Over 4 weeks ___ __

1
2
serv ice
3
*
f

8

( 3)

_ _

53
1
38

( 3)

_

_

_

2

2
20

_

10
_

_

1

.

_

3

67
3
20

68

62

33

38

_

_

_

27
2
61

17

66

60

30

_

_

3
6

Includes data for rea l estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
P eriod s of se rv ice w ere a rb itra rily chosen and do not n e ce ss a rily r e fle c t the individual provisions for p ro g re ssio n s.
include changes in provisions occu rrin g between 5 and 10 yea rs.
L ess than 0 .5 percent.
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), com m unication, and other public u tilities,
Finance, insurance, and rea l estate.




( 3)

_
_

_

_

_

( 3)

F or exam ple, the changes in proportions indicated at 10 y e a r s '

19
Table B-6. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
(P ercent o f office and plant w orkers in all industries and in industry divisions em ployed in establishm ents providing
health, insurance, or pension benefits, Boston, M a s s ., October 1958)
OFFICE W
ORKERS;
Type o f benefit

All
Industrie*

100

M
anufacturing

100

Public
utilities*

100

W
holesale
trade

100

PLANT W
ORKERS
Retail trade

100

Financet

Services

100

100

All
industries 1

100

M
anufacturing

100

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

100

100

Retail hade

Services

100

100

85

W orkers in establishm ents providing:
Life insurance
_
_
___ __
A ccidental death and dism em berm ent
___ ___ __ ________
insurance __ __
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both2

92

91

98

95

91

96

64

90

91

95

91

89

53

58

90

41

54

48

27

59

61

80

39

50

77

73

90

96

67

90

53

74

94

95

99

71

91

90

Sickness and accident insurance ___ _
Sick leave (full pay and no
waiting p e r io d ) ______________ _________
Sick leave (partial pay or
waiting period) ____
__ __ __

41

61

20

40

66

25

34

78

90

30

44

70

76

61

74

86

64

44

49

50

16

7

34

46

26

11

26

"

11

7

46

8

9

7

Hospitalization insurance
Surgical insurance ___________________ _____
M edical insurance
_ __ _
Catastrophe insurance
_
Retirem ent pension
No health, insurance, or pension p l a n ____

82
81
56
38
79

79
76
49
7
66
1

92
92
62
8
72
1

48
48
22
7
90

78
85
54
15
58
6

55
51
32
3
57
3

81
51
33
3
23
5

3

3

1

“

91
89
71
16
76
1

43
43
20
6
92

86
90
57
24
68
2

59
55
32
17
61
( 3)

91
91
58
71
89

47
45
42
26
59
1

1 Includes data for rea l estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2 Unduplicated total o f w orkers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below.
S ick-leave plans are lim ited to those w hich definitely establish at least
the minimum number of d a y s' pay that can be expected by each em ployee. Inform al sick -le a v e allow ances determ ined on an individual basis are excluded.
3 Less than 0 .5 percent.
* Transportation (excluding ra ilroa d s), com m unication, and other public u tilities,
f Finance, insurance, and real estate.







21

Appendix: Occupational Descriptions
The p r im a r y p u r p o s e o f p r e p a r in g jo b d e s c r ip tio n s f o r the B u r e a u 's w a g e s u r v e y s is to
a s s i s t its fie ld s ta ff in c la s s ify in g in to a p p r o p r ia te o c cu p a tio n s w o r k e r s w h o a r e e m p lo y e d u n der
a v a r ie t y o f p a y r o ll title s and d iffe r e n t w o r k a r r a n g e m e n ts fr o m e s ta b lis h m e n t to e s ta b lis h m e n t
and fr o m a r e a to a r e a .
T h is is e s s e n t ia l in o r d e r to p e r m it the g rou p in g o f o c c u p a tio n a l w age
r a te s r e p r e s e n t in g c o m p a r a b le jo b co n te n t.
B e c a u s e o f th is e m p h a sis on in te r e s ta b lis h m e n t and
in te r a r e a c o m p a r a b ility o f o c c u p a tio n a l c on ten t, the B u r e a u 's jo b d e s c r ip t io n s m a y d iffe r s ig n ifi­
ca n tly fr o m th ose in u s e in in d iv id u a l e s ta b lis h m e n ts o r th o se p r e p a r e d f o r o th e r p u r p o s e s .
In
a p p ly in g th e se jo b d e s c r ip t io n s , the B u r e a u 's fie ld r e p r e s e n t a t iv e s a r e in s tr u c te d to e x c lu d e w o r k ­
ing s u p e r v i s o r s , a p p r e n tic e s , le a r n e r s , b e g in n e r s , t r a in e e s , h an d ica p p ed w o r k e r s , p a r t -t im e ,
te m p o r a r y , and p r o b a tio n a r y w o r k e r s .

Of fic e
B IL L E R , M ACH IN E
P r e p a r e s sta te m e n ts, b i lls , and in v o ic e s on a m a ch in e oth er
than an o r d in a r y o r e le c t r o m a t ic ty p e w r ite r . M ay a l s o k eep r e c o r d s
as to b illin g s o r sh ip p in g c h a r g e s o r p e r fo r m o th e r c l e r i c a l w o r k in ­
c id e n ta l to b illin g o p e r a t io n s .
F o r w ag e study p u r p o s e s , b i l l e r s ,
m a ch in e , a r e c la s s if i e d b y type o f m a ch in e , a s fo llo w s :
B i lle r , m a ch in e (b illin g m a c h in e )——U s e s a s p e c ia l b illin g
m a ch in e (M oon H op k in s, fc liio tt F is h e r , B u r r o u g h s , e t c . , w h ich
a r e co m b in a tio n typin g and addin g m a c h in e s ) to p r e p a r e b ills and
in v o ic e s fr o m c u s t o m e r s ' p u r c h a s e o r d e r s , in te r n a lly p r e p a r e d
o r d e r s , sh ipp in g m e m o ra n d a , e t c .
U s u a lly in v o lv e s a p p lic a tio n
o f p r e d e te r m in e d d is co u n ts and sh ipp in g c h a r g e s and en try o f
n e c e s s a r y e x te n s io n s , w h ich m a y o r m a y n ot be c o m p u te d on the
b illin g m a ch in e , and tota ls w h ich a r e a u t o m a t ic a lly ' a c c u m u la te d
b y m a c h in e .
T h e o p e r a tio n u s u a lly in v o lv e s a la r g e n u m b er o f
c a r b o n c o p ie s o f the b ill b ein g p r e p a r e d and is o fte n done on a
fa n fo ld m a ch in e .
B i lle r , m a ch in e (b ook k eep in g m a c h in e )— U ses a b o o k k e e p in g
—
m a ch in e (Su n dstrand, E llio tt F is n e r , R em in g ton R and, e t c . , w h ich
m a y o r m a y n ot h ave ty p e w r ite r k e y b o a r d ) to p r e p a r e c u s t o m e r s '
b ills a s p a r t o f the a c c o u n ts r e c e iv a b le o p e r a t io n .
G e n e r a lly
in v o lv e s the sim u lta n eou s e n try o f fig u r e s on c u s t o m e r s ' le d g e r
record .
The m a ch in e a u to m a tic a lly a c c u m u la te s fig u r e s on a
n u m b er o f v e r t ic a l c o lu m n s and c o m p u te s and u s u a lly p r in ts a u to ­
m a t ic a lly the d eb it o r c r e d it b a la n c e s . D o e s n ot in v o lv e a k n o w l­
ed g e o f b o o k k e e p in g . W ork s fr o m u n ifo r m and sta n d a rd ty p es o f
s a le s and c r e d it s l ip s .
B O O K K E E P IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
O p era tes a b o ok k eep in g m a ch in e (R em in g ton R and , E llio tt
F is h e r , Su n dstrand, B u r ro u g h s , N a tion al C a sh R e g is t e r , w ith o r w ith ­
out a ty p e w r ite r k e y b o a r d ) to k eep a r e c o r d o f b u s in e s s tr a n s a c t io n s .




B O O K K E E P IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R ----- C on tinu ed
C la s s A — —K eep s a s e t o f r e c o r d s r e q u ir in g a k n ow led ge o f
and e x p e r ie n c e in b a s ic b o o k k e e p in g p r in c ip le s and fa m ilia r it y w ith
the s t r u c tu r e o f the p a r t ic u la r a c c o u n tin g s y s te m u s e d .
D e te r­
m in e s p r o p e r r e c o r d s and d is tr ib u tio n o f d e b it and c r e d i t ite m s
to b e u se d in e a ch p h a s e o f the w o r k . M ay p r e p a r e c o n s o lid a te d
r e p o r t s , b a la n c e s h e e ts , and o th e r r e c o r d s b y hand.
C la s s J B — -K e e p s a r e c o r d o f on e o r m o r e p h a s e s o r s e c tio n s
o f a s e t o f r e c o r d s u s u a lly r e q u ir in g little k n ow led ge o f b a s ic b o o k ­
k e e p in g .
P h a s e s o r s e c tio n s in clu d e a c c o u n ts p a y a b le , p a y r o ll,
c u s t o m e r s ' a c c o u n ts (not in clu d in g a s im p le type o f b illin g d e s c r ib e d
u n d er b i l l e r , m a c h in e ), c o s t d is tr ib u tio n , e x p e n s e d is tr ib u tio n , in ­
v e n t o r y c o n t r o l, e t c . M ay c h e c k o r a s s i s t in p r e p a r a t io n o f t r ia l
b a la n c e s and p r e p a r e c o n t r o l sh e e ts f o r the a c c o u n tin g d e p a rtm e n t.
CLERK,

A C C O U N TIN G

C la s s A — U nder g e n e r a l d ir e c t io n o f a b o o k k e e p e r o r a c c o u n t­
ant, has r e s p o n s ib ilit y f o r k eep in g on e o r m o r e s e c tio n s o f a c o m ­
p le te s e t o f b o o k s o r r e c o r d s r e la tin g to on e p h a se o f an e s t a b lis h ­
m e n t's b u s in e s s tr a n s a c t io n s . W o r k in v o lv e s p o s tin g and b a la n cin g
s u b s id ia r y le d g e r o r le d g e r s su ch as a c c o u n ts r e c e iv a b le o r a c ­
cou n ts p a y a b le ; e x a m in in g and c o d in g in v o ic e s o r v o u c h e r s w ith
p r o p e r a c c o u n tin g d is tr ib u tio n ; r e q u ir e s ju d g m en t and e x p e r ie n c e
in m a k in g p r o p e r a s s ig n a tio n s and a llo c a t io n s .
M ay a s s i s t in
p r e p a r in g , a d ju stin g , and c lo s in g jo u r n a l e n tr ie s ; m a y d ir e c t c la s s
B a c c o u n tin g c l e r k s .
C la s s B -----U n der s u p e r v is io n , p e r fo r m s one o r m o r e rou tin e
a c c o u n tin g o p e r a tio n s su ch a s p o s tin g s im p le jo u r n a l v o u c h e r s ,
a c c o u n ts p a y a b le v o u c h e r s , e n te r in g v o u c h e r s in v o u c h e r r e g is t e r s ;
r e c o n c ilin g bank a c c o u n ts ; p o s tin g s u b s id ia r y le d g e r s c o n t r o lle d
by g e n e r a l le d g e r s .
T h is jo b d o e s n ot r e q u ir e a k n ow led ge o f
a c c o u n tin g and b o o k k e e p in g p r in c ip le s but is fou nd in o f f ic e s in
w h ich the m o r e r ou tin e a c c o u n tin g w o r k is su b d iv id e d on a fu n c ­
tio n a l b a s is am on g s e v e r a l w o r k e r s .

22

CLERK,

F IL E

C la s s A ----- R e s p o n s ib le fo r m a in ta in in g an e s t a b lis h e d filin g
s y s t e m . C l a s s ifie s and in d e x e s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e o r o th e r m a te r ia l;
m a y a ls o file th is m a t e r ia l. M ay k e e p , r e c o r d s o f v a r io u s ty p es
in co n ju n ctio n w ith f ile s o r s u p e r v is e o th e r s in filin g and lo c a tin g
m a te r ia l in the f i l e s .
M ay p e r fo r m in cid e n ta l c l e r i c a l d u tie s .
C la s s B -----P e r f o r m s ro u tin e filin g , u su a lly o f m a t e r ia l that
h as a lr e a d y b e e n c la s s if i e d , o r lo c a t e s o r a s s i s t s in lo c a t in g m a ­
t e r ia l in the f i l e s .
M ay p e r fo r m in cid e n ta l c l e r i c a l d u tie s .
CLERK,

ORDER

R e c e iv e s c u s to m e r s * o r d e r s fo r m a t e r ia l o r m e r c h a n d is e by
m a il, p h on e, o r p e r s o n a lly .
D u ties in v o lv e an y c o m b in a tio n o f the
fo llo w in g : Q uoting p r ic e s to c u s t o m e r s ; m a kin g out an o r d e r sh e e t
lis tin g the it e m s to m a k e up the o r d e r ; c h e c k in g p r ic e s and q u a n tities
o f it e m s on o r d e r sh eet; d is tr ib u tin g o r d e r sh e e ts to r e s p e c t iv e d e ­
p a rtm en ts to b e f ill e d .
M ay c h e c k w ith c r e d it d e p a rtm e n t to d e t e r ­
m in e c r e d it ra tin g o f q u s t o m e r , a c k n o w le d g e r e c e ip t o f o r d e r s fr o m
c u s t o m e r s , fo llo w up o r d e r s to s e e that th ey h av e b e e n f ille d , k eep
file o f o r d e r s r e c e iv e d , and c h e c k sh ipp ing in v o ic e s w ith o r ig in a l
ord ers.
CLERK,

K E Y -P U N C H O P E R A T O R
U nder g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n and w ith no s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s i­
b i lit ie s , r e c o r d s a c c o u n tin g and s t a t is t ic a l data on tabulating c a r d s
by punching a s e r ie s o f h o le s in the c a r d s in a s p e c ifie d s e q u e n c e ,
u sin g an a lp h a b e tic a l o r a n u m e r ic a l k e y -p u n ch m a ch in e , fo llo w in g
w ritte n in fo r m a t io n on r e c o r d s .
M ay d u p lica te c a r d s b y u sin g the
d u p lica tin g d e v ic e a tta ch e d to m a c h in e .
K eep s f ile s o f punch c a r d s .
M ay v e r if y ow n w o r k o r w o r k o f o t h e r s .
O F F IC E B O Y O R G IR L
P e r f o r m s v a r io u s ro u tin e d u ties su ch a s running e r r a n d s ,
o p e r a tin g m in o r o f f i c e m a c h in e s su ch a s s e a le r s o r m a ile r s , open in g
and d is tr ib u tin g m a il, and o th e r m in o r c l e r i c a l w o r k .
SECRETARY
P e r f o r m s s e c r e t a r ia l an d c l e r i c a l d u ties fo r a s u p e r io r in an
a d m in is tr a tiv e o r e x e c u tiv e p o s it io n . D u ties in clu d e m akin g a p p o in t­
m en ts fo r s u p e r io r ; r e c e iv in g p e o p le c o m in g in to o f f ic e ; a n sw e rin g
and m a k in g phone c a lls ; h an dlin g p e r s o n a l and im p o rta n t o r c o n fi­
d en tia l m a il, and w ritin g r o u tin e c o r r e s p o n d e n c e on ow n in itia tiv e ;
taking d ic ta tio n (w h e r e tr a n s c r ib in g m a ch in e is n ot u se d ) e ith e r in
sh orth an d o r b y sten oty p e o r s im ila r m a c h in e , and tr a n s c r ib in g d ic t a ­
tion o r the r e c o r d e d in fo r m a t io n r e p r o d u c e d on a t r a n s c r ib in g m a c h in e .
M ay p r e p a r e s p e c ia l r e p o r t s o r m e m o r a n d a f o r in fo r m a t io n o f s u p e r io r .

PAYROLL
STENOGRAPH ER,

GENERAL

C om p u tes w a g e s o f c o m p a n y e m p lo y e e s and e n te r s the n e c e s ­
s a r y data on the p a y r o ll s h e e t s 4 D u ties in v o lv e : C a lcu la tin g w o r k e r s '
e a r n in g s b a s e d on tim e o r .p r o d u c tio n r e c o r d s ; p ostin g c a lc u la te d data
on p a y r o ll sh e e t, sh ow in g in fo r m a t io n su ch a s w o r k e r 's n a m e , w ork in g
d a y s , tim e , r a te , d e d u ctio n s fo r in s u r a n c e , and tota l w a g e s d u e . M ay
m a k e ou t p a y c h e c k s and a s s i s t p a y m a s te r in m a k in g up and d i s ­
trib u tin g pay e n v e lo p e s .
M ay u se a c a lc u la tin g m a c h in e .

P r im a r y duty is to take d ic ta tio n fr o m on e o r m o r e p e r s o n s ,
e ith e r in sh orth a n d o r b y sten oty p e o r s im ila r m a ch in e , in v o lv in g a
n o r m a l ro u tin e v o c a b u la r y , and to t r a n s c r ib e th is d ic ta tio n on a ty p e ­
w r it e r . M ay a ls o type fr o m w ritte n c o p y . M ay a l s o se t up and k eep
f i l e s in o r d e r , k e e p s im p le r e c o r d s , e t c .
D o e s n ot in c lu d e t r a n ­
s c r ib in g -m a c h in e w o r k (s e e t r a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r ).

COM PTOM ETER OPERATOR

STENOGRAPHER,

P r im a r y duty is to o p e r a t e a C o m p to m e te r to p e r fo r m m a th e ­
m a tic a l c o m p u ta tio n s .
T h is jo b is n ot to be c o n fu s e d w ith that o f
s t a t is t ic a l o r oth er type o f c le r k , w h ich m a y in v o lv e fr e q u e n t u se o f
a C o m p to m e te r but, in w h ich , u se o f th is m a ch in e is in cid e n ta l to
p e r fo r m a n c e o f o th e r d u tie s .

P r im a r y duty is to take d ic ta tio n fr o m on e o r m o r e p e r s o n s ,
e ith e r in sh orth an d o r b y ste n o ty p e o r s im ila r m a ch in e , in v o lv in g a
v a r ie d te c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia liz e d v o c a b u la r y su ch a s in le g a l b r ie f s o r
r e p o r t s on s c ie n t ific r e s e a r c h and to t r a n s c r ib e th is d ic ta tio n on a
t y p e w r it e r .
M ay a ls o ty p e fr o m w ritte n c o p y . M ay a ls o s e t up and
k e e p f ile s in o r d e r , k eep s im p le r e c o r d s , e t c .
D o e s n ot in clu d e
tr a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e w o r k .

T E C H N IC A L

D U P L IC A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R (M IM E O G R A P H OR D IT T O )
SW IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R
U nder g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n and w ith no s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n ­
s i b il it ie s , r e p r o d u c e s m u ltip le c o p ie s o f ty p e w ritte n o r h a n dw ritten
m a tte r , usin g a m im e o g r a p h o r d itto m a c h in e . M ak es n e c e s s a r y a d ­
ju stm e n t su ch a s fo r in k and pa per fe e d c o u n te r and c y lin d e r sp e e d .
Is n ot r e q u ir e d to p r e p a r e s t e n c il o r d itto m a s t e r . M ay k e e p f ile o f
u sed s t e n c ils o r ditto m a s t e r s .
M ay s o r t , c o lla t e , and sta p le c o m ­
p leted m a t e r ia l.




O p e ra te s a s in g le - o r m u lt ip le -p o s it io n telep h on e sw itch b o a rd .
D u ties in v o lv e h andling in c o m in g , ou tg oin g , and in tra p la n t o r o f f ic e
c a lls .
M ay r e c o r d to ll c a lls and take m e s s a g e s .
M ay g iv e i n f o r ­
m a tio n to p e r s o n s w ho c a ll in , o r o c c a s io n a lly take te le p h o n e o r d e r s .
F o r w o r k e r s w ho a ls o a c t a s r e c e p t io n is t s s e e sw itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r r e c e p t io n is t .

23
SW ITCH BO AR D O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T

tion
type
T h is
tim e

T R A N S C R IB IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R ,

In a d d ition to p e r fo r m in g d u ties o f o p e r a t o r , on a sin g le p o s i ­
o r m o n it o r -t y p e s w itch b o a rd , a c ts a s r e c e p t io n is t and m a y a ls o
o r p e r fo r m ro u tin e c l e r i c a l w o r k as p a rt o f r e g u la r d u tie s .
typing o r c l e r i c a l w o rk m a y take the m a jo r p a rt o f th is w o rk e r * s
w h ile at s w itc h b o a r d .

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
O p e ra te s m a ch in e that a u to m a tica lly a n a ly z e s and tr a n s la te s
in fo rm a tio n pu nch ed in g ro u p s o f tabulating c a r d s and p rin ts t r a n s ­
la ted data on f o r m s o r a cco u n tin g r e c o r d s ; se ts o r a d ju sts m a ch in e ;
d o e s s im p le w irin g o f p lu g b o a rd s a c c o r d in g to e s t a b lis h e d p r a c t ic e
o r d ia g r a m s ; p la c e s c a r d s to be ta bu la ted in fe e d m a g a z in e and sta r ts
m a ch in e . M ay file c a r d s a fte r they a r e ta bu la ted . M ay, in a d d itio n ,
o p e r a te a u x ilia r y m a c h in e s .

T R A N SC R IB IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R ,

in clu d e d . A w o r k e r w ho ta k es d ic ta tio n in sh orth an d o r b y sten otyp e
o r s im ila r m a ch in e is c la s s i f i e d a s a s te n o g r a p h e r , g e n e r a l.
T Y P IS T
U s e s a ty p e w r ite r to m a k e c o p ie s o f v a r io u s m a t e r ia l o r to
m a ke out b ills a fte r c a lc u la tio n s h ave b e e n m a de by a n oth er p e r s o n .
M ay do c l e r i c a l w o r k in v o lv in g lit tle s p e c ia l tra in in g , su ch a s k e e p ­
ing s im p le r e c o r d s , filin g r e c o r d s and r e p o r t s o r s o r tin g and d i s ­
trib u tin g in co m in g m a il.
C la s s A ----- P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g :
T ypin g
m a t e r ia l in fin a l fo r m fr o m v e r y ro u g h and in v o lv e d d r a ft; c o p y ­
ing fr o m plain o r c o r r e c t e d c o p y in w h ich th e r e is a fre q u e n t
and v a r ie d u se o f te c h n ic a l and unusual w o r d s o r fr o m f o r e ig n la n g u a g e c o p y ; c o m b in in g m a te r ia l fr o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s , o r
planning la y o u t o f c o m p lic a t e d s t a t is t ic a l ta b le s to m a in ta in u ni­
fo r m it y and b a la n c e in s p a c in g ; typin g ta b le s fr o m rou g h d ra ft in
fin a l fo r m .
M ay type ro u tin e fo r m l e t t e r s , v a r y in g d e ta ils to
su it c ir c u m s t a n c e s .

GENERAL

P r im a r y duty is to t r a n s c r ib e d ic ta tio n in v o lv in g a n o r m a l
rou tin e v o c a b u la r y fr o m tr a n s c r ib in g m a ch in e r e c o r d s .
M ay a ls o
type fr o m w ritte n c o p y and do s im p le c l e r i c a l w o r k . W o r k e r s tr a n ­
s c r ib in g d ic ta tio n in v olv in g a v a r ie d te c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia liz e d v o c a b u ­
la r y su ch a s le g a l b r ie f s o r r e p o r t s on s c ie n t ific r e s e a r c h a r e not

P r o f e s s i o n al

DRAFTSM AN,

JUNIOR

(A s sis ta n t d ra fts m a n )
D ra w s to s c a le units o r p a rts o f d ra w in g s p r e p a r e d b y d r a ft s ­
m an o r o th e r s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n , o r m a n u fa ctu rin g p u r­
poses.
U ses v a r io u s ty p es o f d ra ftin g t o o ls a s r e q u ir e d . M ay p r e ­
pa re d ra w in gs fr o m s im p le p la n s o r s k e tc h e s , o r p e r fo r m o th e r du ties
under d ir e c t io n o f a d r a fts m a n .
DRAFTSM AN,

LEADER

P la n s and d ir e c t s a c t iv it ie s o f on e o r m o r e d r a fts m e n in
p re p a ra tio n o f w ork in g plans and d e ta il d ra w in g s fr o m rou g h o r p r e ­
lim in a r y sk e tch e s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n , o r m a n u fa ctu rin g
p u r p o s e s . D uties in v o lv e a co m b in a tio n o f the fo llo w in g ; In te rp re tin g
b lu e p rin ts , s k e tc h e s , and w ritte n o r v e r b a l o r d e r s ; d e te rm in in g w o rk
p r o c e d u r e s ; a s s ig n in g d u ties to s u b o r d in a te s and in s p e c tin g th e ir w o rk ;
p e r fo r m in g m o r e d iffic u lt p r o b le m s . M ay a s s i s t s u b o r d in a te s during




G E N E R A L -----C on tin u ed

C la s s B — P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g : T ypin g
fr o m r e la t iv e ly c le a r o r ty p e d d r a fts ; ro u tin e typing o f f o r m s ,
in s u r a n c e p o li c ie s , e t c . , settin g up s im p le sta n d a rd ta b u la tion s, o r
c o p y in g m o r e c o m p le x ta b le s a lr e a d y set up and s p a c e d p r o p e r ly .

and

Technical

DRAFTSM AN,

L E A D E R ----- C on tin u ed

e m e r g e n c ie s o r a s a r e g u la r a s s ig n m e n t, o r p e r fo r m r e la t e d d u ties
o f a s u p e r v is o r y o r a d m in is tr a tiv e n a tu re.
DRAFTSM AN,

SENIOR

P r e p a r e s w o rk in g plans and d e ta il d ra w in g s fr o m n o te s ,
rou g h o r d e ta ile d s k e tch e s fo r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n , o r m a n u ­
fa c tu r in g p u r p o s e s .
D u ties in v o lv e a c o m b in a tio n o f the fo llo w in g :
P r e p a r in g w ork in g p la n s, d e ta il d r a w in g s , m a p s , c r o s s - s e c t i o n s , e t c . ,
to s c a le by use o f d ra ftin g in s tr u m e n ts ; m akin g e n g in e e rin g c o m p u ta ­
tion s s u c h a s th o se in v o lv e d in stren g th o f m a t e r ia ls , b e a m s and
t r u s s e s ; v e r ify in g c o m p le t e d w o rk , ch e c k in g d im e n s io n s , m a te r ia ls
to be u s e d , and q u a n tities; w ritin g s p e c ific a t io n s ; m akin g a d ju stm en ts
or ch a n g e s in d r a w in g s o r s p e c ific a t io n s . M ay ink in lin e s and le t t e r s
on p e n c il d r a w in g s , p r e p a r e d e ta il units o f c o m p le te d r a w in g s , o r
tr a c e d r a w in g s .
W ork is fr e q u e n tly in a s p e c ia liz e d fie ld su ch as
a r c h it e c t u r a l, e l e c t r i c a l , m e c h a n ic a l, or s tr u c tu r a l d r a ftin g .

24
N U RSE,

N U RSE,

IN D U S T R IA L (R E G IS T E R E D )

e n v ir o n m e n t, o r o th e r a c t iv it ie s
sa fe ty o f a ll p e r s o n n e l.

A r e g is t e r e d n u r s e w ho g iv e s n u rsin g s e r v ic e to i l l o r in ju r e d
e m p lo y e e s o r oth er p e r s o n s w ho b e c o m e i l l o r s u ffe r an a c c id e n t on
the p r e m is e s o f a fa c t o r y o r o th e r e s t a b lis h m e n t.
D u ties in v o lv e a
co m b in a tio n o f the fo llo w in g : G ivin g f i r s t aid to the i ll o r in ju re d ;
attending to su b seq u en t d r e s s in g o f e m p lo y e e s * in ju r ie s ; k eep in g r e c o r d s
o f patien ts tr e a te d ; p r e p a r in g a c c id e n t r e p o r t s fo r c o m p e n s a tio n o r
oth er p u r p o s e s ; co n d u ctin g p h y s ic a l e x a m in a tio n s and h ea lth e v a lu a tio n s
o f a p p lic a n ts and e m p lo y e e s ; and planning and c a r r y in g out p r o g r a m s
in v o lv in g health ed u ca tio n , a c c id e n t p r e v e n tio n , e v a lu a tio n o f plant

M aintenance

CARPENTER.

M A IN T E N A N C E

P e r f o r m s the c a r p e n t r y d u ties n e c e s s a r y to c o n s t r u c t and
m a in tain in g o o d r e p a ir b u ild in g w o o d w o r k and eq u ip m en t su ch a s b in s ,
c r ib s , c o u n te r s , b e n c h e s , p a r titio n s , d o o r s , f l o o r s , s t a ir s , c a s in g s ,
and t r im m a d e o f w o o d in an e s ta b lis h m e n t . W o rk in v o lv e s m o s t o f
the fo llo w in g : P la n n in g and la y in g out o f w o r k fr o m b lu e p r in ts , d r a w ­
ings^ m o d e ls , o r v e r b a l in s t r u c t io n s ; u sin g a v a r ie t y o f c a r p e n te r * s
h a n d to o ls , p o r ta b le p o w e r t o o ls , and sta n d a rd m e a s u r in g in s tr u m e n ts ;
m a kin g sta n d a rd sh op c o m p u ta tio n s r e la tin g to d im e n s io n s o f w o rk ;
s e le c t in g m a t e r ia ls n e c e s s a r y fo r the w o r k . In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f
the m a in ten a n ce c a r p e n t e r r e q u ir e s ro u n d ed tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e
u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou g h a fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tr a in ­
ing and e x p e r ie n c e .

E L E C T R IC IA N ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

P e r f o r m s a v a r ie t y o f e l e c t r i c a l tra d e fu n c tio n s su ch a s the
in s ta lla tio n , m a in te n a n ce , o r r e p a ir o f eq u ip m en t fo r the g e n e r a tin g ,
d is tr ib u tio n , o r u tiliz a tio n o f e l e c t r i c e n e r g y in an e s t a b lis h m e n t.
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : In sta llin g o r r e p a ir in g any o f
a v a r ie t y o f e l e c t r i c a l eq u ip m en t su ch a s g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s ,
s w itc h b o a r d s , c o n t r o ll e r s , c ir c u it b r e a k e r s , m o t o r s , h eatin g units,
con d u it s y s t e m s , o r o th e r t r a n s m is s io n eq u ip m en t; w o rk in g f r o m b lu e ­
p r in ts, d r a w in g s , la y o u t, o r o th e r s p e c ific a t io n s ; lo c a t in g and d ia g ­
n o sin g tr o u b le in the e l e c t r i c a l s y s t e m o r e q u ip m en t; w o rk in g sta n d a rd
c o m p u ta tio n s r e la t in g to lo a d r e q u ir e m e n t s o f w irin g o r e l e c t r i c a l
eq u ip m en t; u sin g a v a r ie t y o f e le c t r ic ia n * s h a n d to o ls and m e a s u r in g
and te s tin g in s t r u m e n ts .
In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f the m a in ten a n ce
e le c t r ic ia n r e q u ir e s rou n d ed tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c ­
q u ir e d th rou g h a fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and
e x p e r ie n c e .




IN D U S T R IA L (R E G IS T E R E D )----- C ontinued
a ffe c tin g

the

h ealth,

w e lfa r e ,

and

TRACER
C o p ie s plans and d ra w in g s p r e p a r e d by o th e r s , by p la cin g
tr a c in g c lo t h o r p a p er o v e r d raw in g and tr a c in g w ith pen or p e n c il.
U s e s T - s q u a r e , c o m p a s s , and oth er d ra ftin g t o o l s .
M ay p r e p a r e
s im p le d r a w in g s and do s im p le le t te r in g .

and

P o w e r plant

E N G IN E E R ,

S T A T IO N A R Y

O p e ra te s and m a in ta in s and m a y a ls o s u p e r v is e the o p e r a tio n
o f s t a tio n a r y e n g in e s and eq u ip m en t (m e c h a n ic a l o r e le c t r ic a l) to su p ­
p ly the e s ta b lis h m e n t in w h ich e m p lo y e d w ith p o w e r, h eat, r e f r i g e r a ­
tion , o r a ir -c o n d it io n in g .
W o rk in v o lv e s ; O p era tin g and m ain taining
eq u ip m e n t su ch as s te a m e n g in e s , a ir c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o ­
t o r s , tu r b in e s , v e n tila tin g and r e fr ig e r a t in g equ ip m en t, ste a m b o ile r s
and b o i l e r - f e d w a te r p u m p s; m a kin g eq u ip m en t r e p a ir s ; keepin g a
r e c o r d o f o p e r a t io n o f m a c h in e r y , te m p e r a tu r e , and fu e l c o n s u m p ­
tio n . M ay a ls o s u p e r v is e th e se o p e r a t io n s . H ead o r c h ie f e n g in e e r s
in e s t a b lis h m e n t s e m p lo y in g m o r e than one e n g in e e r a r e e x c lu d e d .
F IR E M A N ,

S T A T IO N A R Y B O IL E R

F ir e s s ta tio n a ry b o i le r s to fu rn is h the e s ta b lis h m e n t in w h ich
e m p lo y e d w ith h eat, p o w e r , o r ste a m .
F e e d s fu e ls to f ir e by hand
o r o p e r a t e s a m e c h a n ic a l s t o k e r , g a s , o r o il b u r n e r ; c h e c k s w ater
and s a fe ty v a lv e s .
M ay c le a n , o il, o r a s s i s t in r e p a ir in g b o i l e r r o o m e q u ip m e n t.
HELPER,

TRADES,

M A IN T E N A N C E

A s s i s t s one o r m o r e w o r k e r s in the s k ille d m a in ten a n ce
t r a d e s , b y p e r fo r m in g s p e c if i c o r g e n e r a l d u ties o f l e s s e r s k ill, su ch
a s k e e p in g a w o r k e r s u p p lie d w ith m a te r ia ls and t o o ls ; cle a n in g w o r k ­
in g a r e a , m a ch in e , and e q u ip m en t; a s s is tin g w o r k e r by h old in g m a ­
t e r ia ls o r t o o ls ; p e r fo r m in g o th e r u n s k ille d ta sk s a s d ir e c t e d by jo u r ­
n e y m a n . The kin d o f w o r k the h e lp e r i s p e r m it te d to p e r fo r m v a r ie s
fr o m tr a d e to tr a d e ;
In s o m e tr a d e s the h e lp e r is c o n fin e d to su p ­
p ly in g , lift in g , and h old in g m a t e r ia ls and t o o ls and cle a n in g w ork in g
a r e a s ; a n d in o th e r s he is p e r m it te d to p e r fo r m s p e c ia liz e d m a ch in e
o p e r a t io n s , o r p a rts o f a tra d e that a r e a ls o p e r fo r m e d by w o r k e r s
on a f u l l - t i m e b a s i s .

25
M A C H IN E -T O O L . O P E R A T O R ,

TOOLROOM

S p e c ia liz e s in the o p e r a t io n o f on e o r m o r e ty p e s o f m a ch in e
t o o ls , su ch a s jig b o r e r s , c y lin d r ic a l o r s u r fa c e g r in d e r s , en gin e
la th e s , o r m illin g m a c h in e s in the c o n s tr u c tio n o f m a c h in e -s h o p t o o ls ,
g a u g es, ji g s , fix t u r e s , o r d ie s . W o rk in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g :
P la n n in g and p e r fo r m in g d iffic u lt m a ch in in g o p e r a t io n s ; p r o c e s s in g
it e m s r e q u ir in g c o m p lic a t e d setu p s o r a h igh d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ;
u sing a v a r ie t y o f p r e c i s io n m e a s u r in g in s tr u m e n ts ; s e le c t in g fe e d s ,
s p e e d s , to o lin g and o p e r a t io n s e q u e n c e ; m a k in g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t­
m en ts d u rin g o p e r a t io n to a c h ie v e r e q u is it e t o le r a n c e s o r d im e n s io n s .
M ay be r e q u ir e d to r e c o g n i z e w hen t o o ls n e e d d r e s s in g , to d r e s s t o o ls ,
and to s e l e c t p r o p e r c o o la n ts and cu ttin g and lu b r ic a tin g o i l s .
F or
c r o s s - in d u s t r y w ag e study p u r p o s e s , m a c h in e -t o o l o p e r a t o r s , t o o lr o o m ,
in top i and d ie jo b b in g sh op s a r e e x c lu d e d fr o m th is c la s s if i c a t io n .

M ACH IN IST,

M E C H A N IC ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

R e p a ir s m a c h in e r y o r m e c h a n ic a l eq u ip m en t o f an e s t a b lis h ­
m e n t.
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g ; E xam in in g m a ch in e s
a n d m e c h a n ic a l eq u ip m en t to d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f t r o u b le ; d ism a n tlin g
o r p a rtly d is m a n tlin g m a c h in e s and p e r fo r m in g r e p a ir s that m a in ly
in v o lv e the u se o f h a n d to o ls in s c r a p in g and fittin g p a r ts ; r e p la c in g
b r o k e n o r d e fe c t iv e p a rts w ith it e m s o b ta in e d f r o m sto c k ; o r d e r in g the
p r o d u c tio n o f a r e p la c e m e n t p a rt b y a m a ch in e sh op o r sen din g o f
th e m a ch in e to a m a ch in e sh op fo r m a jo r r e p a ir s ; p r e p a r in g w ritte n
s p e c ific a t io n s f o r m a jo r r e p a ir s o r f o r the p r o d u c tio n o f p a rts o r d e r e d
f r o m m a ch in e sh op ; r e a s s e m b lin g m a c h in e s ; and m a k in g a ll n e c e s s a r y
a d ju s tm e n ts fo r o p e r a t io n .
In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f a m a in ten a n ce
m e c h a n ic r e q u ir e s ro u n d e d tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d
th rou g h a fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
E x c lu d e d fr o m th is c la s s if i c a t io n a r e w o r k e r s w h o s e p r im a r y du ties
in v o lv e settin g up o r a d ju stin g m a c h in e s .

M A IN T E N A N C E
M IL L W R IG H T

P r o d u c e s r e p la c e m e n t p a rts and n ew p a rts in m a k in g r e p a ir s
o f m e ta l p a rts o f m e c h a n ic a l eq u ip m en t o p e r a t e d in an e s t a b lis h m e n t.
W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : In te rp re tin g w ritte n in s t r u c ­
tion s and s p e c ific a t io n s ; planning and la y in g out o f w o rk ; u sin g a v a ­
r ie t y o f m a c h in is t 's h a n d to o ls and p r e c i s io n m e a s u r in g in s tr u m e n ts ;
settin g up and o p e r a tin g sta n d a rd m a ch in e t o o ls ; shaping o f m e ta l
p a rts to c l o s e t o le r a n c e s ; m a k in g sta n d a rd sh op c o m p u ta tio n s r e l a t ­
ing to d im e n s io n s o f w o rk , to o lin g , fe e d s and s p e e d s o f m a ch in in g ;
kn ow led ge o f the w ork in g p r o p e r t ie s o f the c o m m o n m e t a ls ; s e le c t in g
stan dard m a t e r ia ls , p a rts , and eq u ip m en t r e q u ir e d fo r h is w o rk ; fittin g
and a s s e m b lin g p a r t s in to m e c h a n ic a l eq u ip m e n t.
In g e n e r a l, the
m a c h in is t 's w o r k n o r m a lly r e q u ir e s a ro u n d e d tra in in g in m a c h in e sh op p r a c t ic e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou gh a fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r
eq u iv a len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

In sta lls n ew m a c h in e s o r h ea v y eq u ip m en t and d is m a n tle s and
in s t a lls m a c h in e s o r h ea v y eq u ip m en t w hen ch a n g e s in the plant la y ­
ou t a r e r e q u ir e d . W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : P la n n in g and
la y in g ou t o f the w o rk ; in te r p r e tin g b lu e p r in ts o r o th e r s p e c ific a t io n s ;
u sin g a v a r ie t y o f h a n d tools and r ig g in g ; m a k in g sta n d a rd sh op c o m ­
p u ta tion s r e la tin g to s t r e s s e s , stren g th o f m a t e r ia ls , and c e n t e r s o f
g r a v it y ; a lin in g and b a la n cin g o f eq u ip m en t; s e le c t in g sta n d a rd t o o ls ,
eq u ip m en t, and p a rts to be u se d ; in s ta llin g an d m a in ta in in g in g o o d
o r d e r p o w e r t r a n s m is s io n eq u ip m en t su ch a s d r iv e s and s p e e d r e ­
d u c e r s . In g e n e r a l, the m illw r ig h t 's w o r k n o r m a lly r e q u ir e s a rou n d ed
tr a in in g and e x p e r ie n c e in the tr a d e a c q u ir e d th rou g h a fo r m a l a p p r e n ­
t ic e s h ip o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g an d e x p e r ie n c e .
O IL E R

M ECH A N IC,

A U T O M O T IV E (M A IN T E N A N C E )

R e p a ir s a u to m o b ile s , b u s e s , m o t o r t r u c k s , and t r a c t o r s o f
an e s ta b lis h m e n t.
W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : E x a m in in g
a u to m o tiv e eq u ip m en t to d ia g n o se s o u r c e o i t r o u b le ; d is a s s e m b lin g
equ ip m en t and p e r fo r m in g r e p a ir s that in v o lv e the u se o f su ch h an dto o ls a s w r e n c h e s , g a u g e s , d r ills , o r s p e c ia liz e d eq u ip m en t in d i s ­
a s s e m b lin g o r fittin g p a rts ; r e p la c in g b r o k e n o r d e fe c t iv e p a rts fr o m
s to c k ; g rin d in g and a d ju stin g v a lv e s ; r e a s s e m b lin g and in s ta llin g the
v a r io u s a s s e m b li e s in the v e h ic le and m akin g n e c e s s a r y a d ju s tm e n ts ;
alin in g w h e e ls , a d ju stin g b r a k e s and lig h ts , o r tigh ten in g bod y b o lt s .
In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f the a u to m o tiv e m e c h a n ic r e q u ir e s ro u n d ed
tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou g h a fo r m a l a p p r e n t ic e ­
ship o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .




L u b r ic a t e s , w ith o il o r g r e a s e , the m o v in g p a rts o r w e a rin g
s u r fa c e s o f m e c h a n ic a l eq u ip m en t o f an e s ta b lis h m e n t.
P A IN T E R ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

P a in ts and r e d e c o r a t e s w a lls , w o o d w o r k , and fix tu r e s o f an
e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o r k in v o lv e s the fo llo w in g : K n ow led g e o f s u r fa c e
p e c u lia r it ie s and ty p e s o f paint r e q u ir e d l o r d iffe r e n t a p p lic a tio n s ;
p r e p a r in g s u r fa c e fo r painting by r e m o v in g o ld fin is h o r by p la cin g
putty o r f i l l e r ip n a il h o le s and i n t e r s t ic e s ; a p p lyin g paint w ith sp ra y
gun o r b r u s h .
M ay m ix c o l o r s , o ils , w hite le a d , and o th e r paint
in g r e d ie n ts to ob ta in p r o p e r c o l o r
o r c o n s is t e n c y .
In g e n e r a l, the
w o r k o f the m a in ten a n ce p a in ter r e q u ir e s ro u n d e d tra in in g and e x ­
p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou g h a fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r eq u iv a ­
le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .

26

P IP E F IT T E R ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

S H E E T -M E T A L W O R K E R ,

In sta lls o r r e p a ir s w a te r , ste a m , g a s , o r o th e r ty p e s o f pipe
and p ip e fittin g s in an e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the f o l ­
lo w in g : L a y in g out o f w o r k and m e a s u r in g to lo c a t e p o s itio n o f pip e
fr o m d ra w in g s o r o th e r w ritte n s p e c ific a t io n s ; cu ttin g v a r io u s s i z e s
o f pip e to c o r r e c t le n g th s w ith c h is e l and h a m m e r o r o x y a c e t y le n e
t o r c h o r p ip e -c u ttin g m a ch in e ; th rea d in g p ip e w ith s t o c k s an d d ie s ;
ben din g pip e b y h a n d -d r iv e n o r p o w e r -d r iv e n m a c h in e s ; a s s e m b lin g
pipe w ith co u p lin g s and fa s te n in g pipe to h a n g e r s ; m a k in g sta n d a rd
sh op c o m p u ta tio n s r e la tin g to p r e s s u r e s , flo w , and s iz e o f pipe r e ­
q u ir e d ; m a kin g sta n d a rd te s ts to d e te r m in e w h eth er fin is h e d p ip e s m e e t
s p e c ific a t io n s .
In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f the m a in te n a n ce p ip e fitte r
r e q u ir e s ro u n d e d tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou g h a
fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r i e n c e . W o r k e r s
p r im a r ily e n g a g ed in in s ta llin g and r e p a ir in g b u ild in g sa n ita tio n o r
h eatin g s y s t e m s a r e e x c lu d e d .
PLUM BER,

M A IN T E N A N C E

K e e p s the p lu m b in g s y s t e m o f an e s ta b lis h m e n t in g o o d o r d e r .
W o r k in v o lv e s : K n ow led g e o f s a n ita ry c o d e s r e g a r d in g in s ta lla tio n o f
v en ts and tr a p s in p lu m b in g s y s t e m ; in s ta llin g o r r e p a ir in g p ip e s and
fix t u r e s ; op en in g c lo g g e d d r a in s w ith a p lu n g er o r p lu m b e r 's sn a k e.
In g e n e r a l, the w o r k o f the m a in te n a n ce p lu m b e r r e q u ir e s rou n d ed
tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou g h a fo r m a l a p p r e n t ic e ­
sh ip o r eq u iv a len t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
S H E E T -M E T A L W O R K E R ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

F a b r ic a t e s , in s t a lls , and m a in ta in s in g o o d r e p a ir the s h e e tm e ta l eq u ip m en t and fix t u r e s (su ch a s m a ch in e g u a r d s , g r e a s e pans,
s h e lv e s , l o c k e r s , ta n k s, v e n t ila t o r s , c h u te s , d u cts , m e ta l r o o fin g )
o f an e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : P la n n in g

Custodial

ELEVATOR OPERATOR,

and

T r a n s p o r ts p a s s e n g e r s b e tw e e n f l o o r s o f an o f f i c e b u ild in g ,
a p a rtm en t h o u s e , d e p a rtm e n t s t o r e , h o te l o r s im ila r e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o r k e r s w ho o p e r a t e e le v a t o r s in c o n ju n c tio n w ith o th e r d u tie s su ch
a s th o s e o f s t a r t e r s and ja n it o r s a r e e x c lu d e d .
G U AR D
P e r f o r m s ro u tin e p o lic e d u tie s , e ith e r at fix e d p o s t o r on
to u r , m a in ta in in g o r d e r , u sin g a r m s o r f o r c e w h e r e n e c e s s a r y . In c lu d e s g a te m e n w ho a r e s ta tio n e d at g a te and c h e c k on id e n tity o f
e m p lo y e e s and o th e r p e r s o n s e n t e r in g .




an d la y in g out a ll ty p e s o f s h e e t -m e t a l m a in ten a n ce w o r k fr o m b lu e ­
p r in ts , m o d e ls , o r o th e r s p e c ific a t io n s ; settin g up and o p e r a tin g a ll
a v a ila b le ty p e s o f s h e e t -m e t a l-w o r k in g m a c h in e s ; usin g a v a r ie ty o f
h a n d to o ls in cu ttin g, b en d in g , fo r m in g , sh ap in g, fittin g , and a s s e m ­
b lin g ; in s ta llin g s h e e t -m e t a l a r t i c le s a s r e q u ir e d .
In g e n e r a l, the
w o r k o f the m a in te n a n ce s h e e t -m e t a l w o r k e r r e q u ir e s rou n d ed tra in in g
an d e x p e r ie n c e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou g h a fo r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r
e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e
T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R
(D ie m a k e r ; jig

m a k e r ; t o o lm a k e r ;

fix tu r e

m a k e r ; gau ge

m a k e r)

C o n s t r u c ts and r e p a ir s m a c h in e -s h o p t o o ls , g a u g e s , ji g s , f i x ­
t u r e s o r d ie s f o r fo r g in g s , pu nch ing and o th e r m e t a l-fo r m in g w o r k .
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : P la n n in g and la yin g out o f w o rk
f r o m m o d e ls , b lu e p r in ts , d r a w in g s , o r o th e r o r a l and w ritte n s p e c i f i ­
c a t io n s ; u sin g a v a r ie t y o f t o o l and d ie m a k e r 's h a n d tools and p r e c is io n
m e a s u r in g in s tr u m e n ts , u n d ersta n d in g o f the w ork in g p r o p e r t ie s o f
c o m m o n m e t a ls and a llo y s ; settin g up and o p e r a tin g o f m a ch in e to o ls
an d r e la t e d e q u ip m en t; m a k in g n e c e s s a r y sh op c o m p u ta tio n s r e la tin g
to d im e n s io n s o f w o r k , s p e e d s , fe e d s , and to o lin g o f m a c h in e s ; h e a ttr e a tin g o f m e ta l p a rts d u rin g fa b r ic a t io n a s w e ll a s o f fin is h e d to o ls
an d d ie s to a c h ie v e r e q u ir e d q u a litie s ; w ork in g to c l o s e t o le r a n c e s ;
fittin g and a s s e m b lin g o f p a rts to p r e s c r i b e d t o le r a n c e s and a llo w ­
a n c e s ; s e le c t in g a p p r o p r ia te m a t e r ia ls , t o o ls , and p r o c e s s e s .
In
g e n e r a l, the t o o l and d ie m a k e r 's w o r k r e q u ir e s a rou n d ed tra in in g
in m a c h in e -s h o p and t o o l r o o m p r a c t ic e u su a lly a c q u ir e d th rou g h a
f o r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s - i n d u s t r y w a g e study p u r p o s e s , t o o l and d ie m a k e r s
in t o o l and d ie jo b b in g sh o p s a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m th is c la s s ifi c a t io n .

M aterial

P A S SE N G E R

M A IN T E N A N C E -----C on tinu ed

Movement

JA N IT O R ,

PORTER,

OR CLE AN E R

(S w e e p e r ; ch a rw o m a n ; ja n i t r e s s )
C le a n s and k e e p s in an o r d e r l y c o n d itio n fa c t o r y w ork in g
a r e a s an d w a s h r o o m s , o r p r e m is e s o f an o f f i c e , a p a rtm en t h o u s e ,
o r c o m m e r c i a l o r o th e r e s t a b lis h m e n t . D u ties in v o lv e a co m b in a tio n
o f the fo llo w in g : S w eep in g , m o p p in g o r s c r u b b in g , and p o lish in g f l o o r s ;
r e m o v in g c h ip s , tr a s h , and o th e r r e fu s e ; du stin g eq u ip m en t, fu rn itu r e ,
o r fix t u r e s ; p o lis h in g m e ta l fix t u r e s o r tr im m in g s ; p r o v id in g su p p lie s
a n d m in o r m a in te n a n ce s e r v i c e s ; c le a n in g la v a t o r ie s , s h o w e r s , and
r e s t r o o m s . W o r k e r s w ho s p e c ia liz e in w in d ow w ash in g a r e e x c lu d e d .

27

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker;
stockman or stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant,
store, or other establishment whose duties involve one or more of
the following: Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or from freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices;
unpacking, shelving, or placing materials or merchandise in proper
storage location; transporting materials or merchandise by hand truck,
car, or wheelbarrow. Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are
excluded.

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK---- Continued
other records; checking for shortages and rejecting damaged goods;
routing merchandise or materials to proper departments; maintaining
necessary records and files.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCKDRIVER

ORDER FILLER
(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from
stored merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips,
customers' orders, or other instructions. May, ir\ addition to filling
orders and indicating items filled or omitted, keep records of out­
going orders, requisition additional stock, or report short supplies
to supervisor, and perform other related duties.

Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport
m aterials, merchandise, equipment, or men between various types of
establishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, ware­
houses, wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail estab­
lishments and customers' houses or places of business.
May also
load or unload truck with or without helpers, make minor mechanical
repairs, and keep truck in good working order. Driver-salesm en and
over-the-road drivers are excluded.
For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size
and type of equipment, as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated
on the basis of trailer capacity.)

PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing
them in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being
dependent upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the
type of container employed, and method of shipment. Work requires
the placing of items in shipping containers and may involve one or
more of the following; Knowledge of various items of stock in order
to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size of container;
inserting enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to
prevent breakage or damage; closing and sealing container; applying
labels or entering identifying data on container.
Packers who also
make wooden boxes or crates are excluded.
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is re ­
sponsible for incoming shipments of merchandise or other m aterials.
Shipping work involves; A knowledge of shipping procedures, prac­
tices^ routes, available means of transportation and rates; and pre­
paring records of the goods shipped, making up bills of lading, post­
ing weight and shipping charges, and keeping a file of shipping records.
May direct or assist in preparing the merchandise for shipment.
Receiving work involves: Verifying or directing others in verifying
the correctness of shipments against bills of lading, invoices, or




Truckdriver
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,

(combination of sizes listed separately)
light (under IV2 tons)
medium (IV 2 to and including 4 tons)
heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)

TRUCKER, POWER
Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered
truck or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about
a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of
truck, as follows:
Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)
WATCHMAN
Make8 rounds of premises periodically in protecting property
against fire, theft, and illegal entry.
☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1959 O - 495444




Occupational Wage Surveys

Occupational wage surveys are being conducted in 20 major labor markets during late 1958 and early 1959. These bulletins, numbered
1240-1 through 1240-20, when available, may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.,
or from any of the BLS regional sa les offices shown below.
A summary bulletin (1240-21) containing data for all labor markets, combined with additional analysis w ill be issued early in I960.
Bulletins for the areas listed below are now available.




Seattle, Wash., August 1958 - BLS Bull. 1240-1, price 25 cents
Baltimore, Md., August 1958 — BLS Bull. 1240-2, price 25 cents





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102