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O ccu p atio n al W age S u rv e y

S T . L O U IS , M I S S O U R I
O C TO B ER

B u lletin

N o.

1 2 4 0 -4

U N IT E D ST A T E S D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
J a m e s P. M itc h e ll, Se c re ta ry




1 9 5 8

BUREAU
Ewan

OF

LABOR

C logot,

STATISTICS

C o m n m u o n «r




O c c u p a t io n a l W a g e S u r v e y




S T . L O U IS , M IS S O U R I
OCTOBER 1958

B u lle tin N o . 1 2 4 0 - 4
December 1958

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BU
REAU OF LABOR S A IS IC
TT T S
Ewan C ague, Com issioner
l
m

F r sale by th Su
o
e perintendent of D
ocum
ents, U S. G
.
overnm P tin Office, W
ent rin g
ashington 25, D C
. .

P
rice 15 cen
ts

The Library of Congress has cataloged the series
in which this publication appears as follows:

XJ. S. B u r e a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s .
Occupational wage survey. 1949Washington, U. S. Govt. Print. Off.

U. S. B u r e a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s .
Bulletin, no. 1Jfoy. 1895Washington.

no. in v. illus. 16-28 cm.
Bimonthly, Nov. 1895-May 1912; irregular, July 1912No. 1-111 issued by the Bureau of Labor.

331.06173

Library of Congress

£r58t2j




v. 23-26 cm.
Nov. 1949- issued as its Bulletin (HD8051.A62)

1. Wages—U. S. 2. Non-wage payments—U. S. (2. Employee bene­
fits) r. Title. (Series: U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bul­
letin)

1. Labor and laboring classes—U. S.—Period.

HD8051.A62

The Library of Congress has cataloged this
publication as follows:

15-23307 rev*J

HD4973.A462

U. S. Dept, of Labor.
for Library of Congress

331.2973

Library
r57r52nljt

L 49—125*

Contents

Preface

Page
The Community Wage Survey Program

Introduction ________________________________________________________
Wage trends for selected occupational groups ___________________

The Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly conducts
areawide wage surveys in a number of important industrial
centers.
The studies, made from late fall to early spring,
relate to occupational earnings and related supplementary
benefits. A preliminary report is available on completion
of the study in each area, usually in the month following the
payroll period studied. This bulletin provides additional data
not included in the earlier report. A consolidated analytical
bulletin summarizing the results of all of the year*s surveys
is issued after completion of the final area bulletin for the
current round of surveys.

Tables:
1.
2.

A.

Establishments and workers within scope of survey ____
Indexes of standard weekly salaries and straight-time
hourly earnings for selected occupational groups, and
percents of increase for selected periods _______________

Appendix: Occupational descriptions ______________________________

* NOTE: Similar tabulations are available in the St. Louis area
reports for January 1952, December 1952, January 1954, Feb­
ruary 1955, February 1956, February 1957, and November 1957.
The February 1957 report was limited to occupational earnings
of plant workers in manufacturing and public utilities. Most of
the reports also include data on shift differential provisions;
minimum entrance rates for women office workers; scheduled
weekly hours; paid holidays; paid vacations; and health, insur­
ance, and pension plans.
The 1954 report also includes wage
structure characteristics, labor-management agreements, rate
of pay for holiday work, and overtime pay provisions; the 1955
report, frequency of wage payment and pay provisions for holi­
days falling on nonworkdays.
Current reports on occupational earnings and supplementary
wage practices in the St. Louis area are also available for auto
dealer repair shops (May 1958), and men*s and boys* suits and
coats (March 1958). A similar report for the machinery indus­
tries will be available in early 1959.
Union scales, indicative
of prevailing pay levels, are available for the following trades
or industries:
Building construction, printing, local-transit
operating employees, and motortruck drivers and helpers.

in

2

00

Occupational earnings * A - 1. Office occupations __________________________________
A - 2. Professional and technical occupations _____________
A - 3. Maintenance and powerplant occupations __________
A -4 . Custodial and material movement occupations____ _

1

C N
O O

This report was prepared in the Bureau*s regional
office in Chicago, 111., by Woodrow C. Linn, under the di­
rection of George E. Votava, Regional Wage and Industrial
Relations Analyst.




1
2

10




Occupational Wage Survey— St. Louis, Mo.
Introduction

This area is one of several important industrial centers in
which the U. S. Department of Labor 1 s Bureau of Labor Statistics
conducts surveys of occupational earnings and related wage benefits
on an area basis.

based on the establishments studied are presented, therefore, as re­
lating to all establishments in the industry grouping and area, ex­
cept for those below the minimum size studied.

The bulletin presents current occupational employment and
earnings information obtained largely by mail from the establishments
visited by Bureau field agents in the last previous survey for occu­
pations reported in that earlier study. Personal visits were made
to nonrespondents and to those respondents reDorting unusual changes
since the previous survey.

The occupations selected for study are common to a variety
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupational cla s­
sification is based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to
take account of interestablishment variation in duties within the same
job. (See appendix for listing of these descriptions.) Earnings data
are presented (in the A -se rie s tables) for the following types of oc­
cupations: (a) Office clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) main­
tenance and powerplant; and (d) custodial and material movement.

Occupations and Earnings

In each area, data are obtained from representative establish­
ments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transpor­
tation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities;
wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and
services. Major industry groups excluded from these studies, besides
railroads, are government operations and the construction and ex­
tractive industries.
Establishments having fewer than a prescribed
number of workers are omitted also because they furnish insufficient
employment in the occupations studied to warrant inclusion. 1 Wher­
ever possible, separate tabulations are provided for each of the broad
industry divisions.

Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for
full-time workers, i. e. , those hired to work a regular weekly sched­
ule in the given occupational classification.
Earnings data exclude
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
Nonproduction bonuses are excluded also, but co st-o fliving bonuses and incentive earnings are included.
Where weekly
hours are reported, as for office clerical occupations, reference is
to the work schedules (rounded to the nearest half hour) for which
straight-time salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these
occupations have been rounded to the nearest half dollar.

These surveys are conducted on a sample basis because of the
unnecessary cost involved in surveying ail establishments.
To obtain
appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large
than of small establishments is studied.
In combining the data, how­
ever, all establishments are given their appropriate weight. Estimates

1

Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all
establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actu­
ally surveyed. Because of differences in occupational structure among
establishments, the estimates of occupational employment obtained
from the sample of establishments studied serve only to indicate the
relative importance of the jobs studied.
These differences in occu­
pational structure do not materially affect the accuracy of the earn­
ings data.

See table below for minimum-size establishment covered.

Table 1: Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied in St. Louis, M o .,1 by major industry 2 division, October 1958
Number of establishments
Minimum employment
in establishments
in scope of study

Industry division

All divisions

__

„

_

_
_

__

Manufacturing
_
_
_ „ —
_
__
Nonmanufacturing
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication,
and other public utilities5
_
_
_
Wholesale trade .
_
_____
Retail trade4 _
.
_______
Finance T insurance, and real estate _
_
Service.
-

Within scope
of study 3

Workers in establishments
Within scope of study

Studied

Studied
Total4

Total4

.

951

230

307.100

176.700

101
-

412
539

105
125

207,700
99,400

125,840
50,860

101
51
101
51
51

61
173
74
120
111

25
37
16
26
21

31,800
18,500
18,100
17,500
13,500

24,820
6,170
7,700
7,660
4,510

1 The St. Louis Metropolitan Area (City of St. Louis, St. Louis and St. Charles Counties, M o.; and Madison and St. Clair Counties, 111.). The "workers within scope of study" estimates shown
in this table provide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey. The estimates are not intended, however, to serve as a basis of comparison
with other area employment indexes to measure employment trends or levels since (l) planning of wage surveys requires the use of establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the pay period
studied, and (2) small establishments are excluded from the scope of the survey.
The 1957 revised edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual was used in classifying establishments by industry division. Major changes from the earlier edition used in previous sur­
veys are the transfer of milk pasteurization plants and ready mixed concrete establishments from trade (wholesale or retail) to manufacturing, and the transfer of radio and television broadcasting from
services to the transportation, communication, and other public utilities division.
3 Includes all establishments with total employment at or above the minimum-size limitation. All outlets (within the area) of companies in such industries as trade, finance, auto repair service, and
motion-picture theaters are considered as 1 establishment.
| Includes executive, professional, and other workers excluded from the separate office and plant categories.
Also excludes taxicabs, and services incidental to water transportation.
6 Excludes department and lim ited-price variety stores.
Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; motion pictures; nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




2

Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups

The table below presents indexes of salaries of office clerical
workers and industrial nurses, and of average earnings of selected
plant worker groups.
For office clerical workers and industrial nurses, the indexes
relate to average weekly salaries for normal hours of work, that is,
the standard work schedule for which straight-time salaries are paid.
For plant worker groups, they measure changes in straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for work on week­
ends, holidays, and late shifts.
The indexes are based on data for
selected key occupations and include most of the numerically important
jobs within each group. The office clerical data are based on women in
the following 18 jobs: Billers, machine (billing machine); bookkeepingmachine operators, class Aand B; Comptometer operators; clerks, file,
class A and B; clerks, order; clerks, payroll; key-punch operators;
office girls; secretaries; stenographers, general; switchboard opera­
tors; switchboard operator-receptionists; tabulating-machine operators;
transcribing-machine operators, general; and typists, class A and B.
The industrial nurse data are based on women industrial nurses. Men
in the following 10 skilled maintenance jobs and 3 unskilled jobs were
included in the plant worker data: Skilled— carpenters; electricians;
machinists; mechanics; mechanics, automotive; millwrights; painters ;
pipefitters; sheet-metal workers; and tool and die makers; unskilled—
janitors, porters, and cleaners; laborers, material handling; and
watchmen.
Average weekly salaries or average hourly earnings were
computed for each of the selected occupations. The average salaries
or hourly earnings were then multiplied by the average of 1953 and
1954 employment in the job. These weighted earnings for individual
Table 2:

occupations were then totaled to obtain
tional group. Finally, the ratio of these
year to the aggregate for the base period
was computed and the result multiplied
get the index for the given year.

an aggregate for >each occupa­
group aggregates for a given
(survey month, winter 1952-53)
by the base year index ( 1 0 0 ) to

The indexes measure, principally, the effects of (l) general
salary and wage changes; (2 ) merit or other increases in pay received
by individual workers while in the same job; and (3) changes in the
labor force such as labor turnover, force expansions, force reduc­
tions, and changes in the proportion of workers employed by estab­
lishments with different pay levels.
Changes in the labor force can
cause increases or decreases in the occupational averages without
actual wage changes. For example, a force expansion might increase
the proportion of lower paid workers in a specific occupation and re­
sult in a drop in the average, whereas a reduction in the proportion
of lower paid workers would have the opposite effect. The movement
of a high-paying establishment out of an area could cause the average
earnings to drop, even though no change in rates occurred in other
area establishments.
The use of constant employment weights eliminates the effects
of changes in the proportion of workers represented in each job in­
cluded in the data.
Nor are the indexes influenced by changes in
standard work schedules or in premium pay for overtime, since they
are based on pay for straight-time hours.
Indexes for the period 1953 to 1958 for workers in 17 major
labor markets appeared in BLS Bull. 1224-20, Wages and Related
Benefits, 19 Ljabor Markets, Winter 1957-58.

Indexes of standard w eekly s a la ries and s tra igh t-tim e hourly earnings for s ele cted occupational groups in S t. L o u is, Mo. ,
O ctober 1958 and N ovem ber 1957, and percents of in cre ase for s ele cted periods
Indexes
(Decem ber 1952 =100)

Industry and occupational group
O ctober 1958

P e rc e n t in cre ase s from —

N ovem ber 1957
to
N ovem ber 1957
O ctober 1958

F eb ru a ry 1956
to
N ovem ber 1957

F eb ru a ry 1955
to
F eb ru a ry 1956

January 1954
to
F eb ru a ry 1955

D ecem ber 19&2 January 1952
to
to
January 1954 D ecem ber 1952

A ll industries:
O ffice c le r ic a l (women) _____________
Industrial n urses (women) __________
S k illed maintenance (men) __________
U n skilled plant (men) ______________

128. 9
136.0
13 4 .4
1 3 1 .5

124.0
138.8
129.0
1 2 7 .5

4.0
5 .6
4 .2
3 .2

8 .1
10.3
10.0
9.4

4 .2
6.6
6 .1
4 .4

4 .2
3.0
3 .2
3.0

5 .7
6.4
7 .1
8 .5

6.3
6.8
5 .1
4 .5

Manuf ac tur ing:
O ffice c le r ic a l (women) ------------------------Industrial n urses (women) __________
S k illed maintenance (men) ______ ___
U n skilled plant (men) — ----------------------

129. 7
136.0
13 3 .8
132.0

124 .3
128.8
128 .5
126. 7

4 .3
5. 6
4 .1
4 .2

9 .1
10 .3
10.0
10.0

4. 8
6. 6
6.2
4. 6

3. 1
3 .8
2 .9
2. 6

5. 5
5. 6
7.0
7 .4

7. 6
6.8
5.0
4 .8




A* Occupational Earnings

3

Table A -l. O ffice Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s elected occupations studied on an area b a s is ,
by industry d ivision , St. L ou is, M o ., O ctober 1958)

8

Atsbaob
Num
ber
of
worker*

Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

NUMBER OF WORKER RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Weekly, W
eekly ,
hours
earnings Under
(Standard) (Standard) $
4 0 .0 0

1

$
$
t
$
$
$
40. 00 45. 00 50. 00 55. 00 60.
65.00
and
under
45. 00 50. 00 55. 00 60.
65. 00 70.00

0
0

0
0

S
70. 00

$
75.00

%

75.0 0

80.00

85. 00

80.

0
0

S
85.00
9 0 .0 0

S
9 0 .0 0

$
$
95. 00

$

$

S

$

10 . 0 105.00 n o . 0 115. 00 12 . 0
00
0
00
and
9*. 0 10 .0 105. 00 110 0 115. 0 12 .0 ov er
0 00
. 0
0 00

Men
C le rk s , accounting, c la s s A —
M anufacturing
. __
Nonm anufacturing
Public utilities *
W holesale trade
Finance t

545
29B
255
52

_

8
8

70

264
M anufacturing
Nonmanufacturing

8
6

_
_

_

178

C lerk s, ord er
_
_
__
_
-----Manufacturing ..
---_
_ ..........
... ..
__
N onm anufacturing
_
W holesale trade __ .........
_ . _
..
_ ...
C le r k s , p ayroll
_
..
. __
_
.
M an u factu rin g------------------------------------------------------------O ffice hoys _
. .
M anufacturing .
Nonmanufacturing
W holesale trade
Finance t

.
_

_ __

_ .
------

Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to rs
M anufacturing _
Nonmanufacturing

......
______

...
..........

........ — ...
.

39.5
39.5
39.5
3 9.0
39.5
39. 5

$
93.50
95.00
92.
87. 00
95.50
. 50

8
6

-

3 9.5
39. 5
39.5

75. 50
9 1 .0 0
. 50

6
8

_
-

84. 50
. 50
81.50
84.00

8. 0
80
" 8 : <50
8

485
39.5
T9T“ “ 3975”
286
4 0 .0
40. 0
249

16
0
147

39. 5
'3"91 5

367
l8 4
183
55
91

39. 5
39. 5
39. 5
39.5
39.

22
6

0

0
0

8
8

53.
56.
49.
54.
45.

00
do
50
00
50

8 . 50
8

-

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

24
24

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

_
.
-

70
T5
55

78
T7

8

31

_

179
83

39.5
i o : < r H" W O O "
89. 50
39. 5

'

_
-

279
115
164

.. ...

39. 5
40. 0
39.5

63. 50
63. 5o
63. 00

_
-

24

6
1
6
50

2
2

6
2

7
4
3
3
-

36
— rs

-

-

-

9

15
15

15
15

55
13
42

17
5

12

—

2
0
ir~
12

2
1

1
0
10
10

24
------ —

31
9

31
43
------ T ~ — 57
24
5

------g—
13
~

1
1

14
14

6
1
79
....5 6 "
15
23
16
16 13
4
2
2 ------ 3
3—
2
-

3
2
1
18

2
2
17

7
10
— T
2
2

5
------r _ ------ 7
48
3?
14
7
4

10
------ 5
5

-

2
2
— rr~
5

2
0
8
-

46
— IT ~ -----53
27
29
7

6
10
11
11
11

6

2
0

12

6
8
5
23
11
10 14
4
1
6 13
6
6 6
1
1
2 “ -----2
T
37
27

13
— rT ~ ------ g

9
4

16
------ 5

1
1
-

3

2
1
1

11
2
-

-

29

2
0
9

—

80
40
40

-

40
40

99
52
47

45

2
1

25
4

24
5
5
7

37

13

11

11
2
6
119
-----51

8
8

87

12
1
12
------- 5
—
7
7

8

36 -----Pj—
19
------ 5“ — 55"
_
_
-

16 23
24
1
n r 1 — n r * —2
3
3 13

_
.
“

_
_

27

31

-

— r r ~ — IE
5

8

51
28
23
3
17
7
-------—
39

— w ~
13
13

8
7

1
1

.
-

31

—2
2

52
37
15
3.

11

2w1
2
_
2

-

-

16
15
1
6
------- 5
3
3

11
1
0
_
.
_
15
— rr~

6

-------r _
-

2 2
6 0
T8
—
23
2
_
_

------- g ~

4
5

-

_
-

4
4
-

1
1

_
-

2
1
2
2
8

“ T9—

6
3
------- 5 ------- y - — 5----—
_ _
_
_
-

.
_
-

_
„
-

17
9

!
-

9
3

-

_
-

_
-

8

6

9

4

_
-

_
.

_

_

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

1

W om en
B ille r s , m achine (billin g m achine)
M anufacturing
Nonmanufacturing

—

8
6

B ille r s , m achine (bookkeeping m achine) _

39 .5

B ookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to rs , c la s s A __________ —_
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Finance t —

196
53
143
92

39. 5
4 0 .6
39. 5
39. 5

B ookkeeping-m achine o p e r a to r s , c la s s B
---- _ _ _
M anufacturing _
N onm anufacturing--------- -------------------------------------------W holesale trade
_ . . . ------ ----- . . .
---Finance t __

1,041
312
729
146
475

39. 5
'3 9 : 5 '
39.5
4 0 .0
39. 0

6. 0
80
6 . 50
6
74. 50
63. 50
56. 50

58.
65.
54.
62.
51.

00
50
50

0
0
50

25

1

_

„

_
-

_
-

5
5
_

41
41

35

2
1
14

2
_
-

150
9
141

-

-

41

141

41
24
17

2
0
1
19
8

24
15
9
7

41
17
24

108
76
32

42
— T5
27

53

7

42

12

11

54
54
54

17

333
53
278
56
196

23

28

7
10
5

18

11

1
16
16
173
49
124
9
79

11

95
' ' 35... .

6
0
31
15

17

16
1

8

15

8
6

2
1
'

18
13
5

1
15
3

12
1
31
19

12
1
0
2

See footnotes at end o f table.




NOTE: Data fo r nonm anufacturing do not include inform ation fo r departm ent and lim ite d p r ice variety s to r e s; the rem ain der o f retail trade is app ropriately rep resen ted in
data fo r all industries com bin ed and fo r nonm anufacturing.

6
6
-

36
iO
26

3

«

11
10
1

5

1

-

4

16

.

-

!
-

3
3

7

-

-

1

-

1
6

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30
24

27
24
3

1

_

_
-

6
2
"

2
2

2
2

1

“

2
2
-

“

3
------g— ------ j _ j
_
.
~

-

_
-

-

-

_
_
~

-

_
_

4
Table A-1. O ffice Occupations-Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly h ou rs and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an a rea basis,
by industry d iv isio n , St. L o u is, M o ., O ctober 1958)
Atbusi
Num
ber
of
w
orker*

Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O
F—

Weekly. W
eekly , Under *40.00 *45.00 1 0 .0 0
earning*
hour*
and
(Stsndsrd) (Standard) $
4 0 .0 0
5 0 .0 0 55.00

^ 5 .0 0 1 0 .0 0
6 0 .0 0

£

5.0
0

6 5 .0 0 70.00

^ 0 .0 0

*75.00 *80 .0 0 1 5 .0 0

75.00

80.0 0

8 5 .0 0

2
2

69
27
42

80
35
45

1
2

5
19

96
48
48
4
14
7
89

35
16
19

1 0 .0 0

90.00 95.0 0

S
95.00 1*00.00 1*05.00 1*10.00 1*15.00 *20.00
and
100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00

over

W om en— Continued
C le r k s , accounting, cla s s A
M anufacturing __
N onmanufa c tur ing
P u blic u tilitie s*
W holesale trade _
F inan ret

39.5
8 0.50
510
— Z3T “ " 39:5” “ 8T71CT
3 9.0
76.50
275
39.5
9 0.00
39
56
4 0 .0
79.50
37.5
- 87
70.50

- -

C le r k s , f ile , c la s s A
_
M anufacturing
N onm anufarturing
F in an cef
... _

.

C le r k s , ord er
__
M anufacturing _
N onm anufacturing

_ _

39.5
4 o. b
39.5
39.5
4 0 .0
38.5
39.5
“ ¥ X
39.0
38.5

1.055

39.5
4 6 .6
3 9 .0
39.5
4 0 .0
38.5

53.00
55.5 0
5 1 .5 0
6 0 .5 0
5 4 .5 0
4 8 .5 0

4 0 .0

T T T

-----

41T

. .............
...

._

. ..

----

644
67
150
349

__

_
__
. . .

.

C le r k s , payroll
....
M anufacturing
..................
Nonmanufacturing
. .
P ublic utilities * ______
W holesale trade --...
C om ptom eter op e ra to rs
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
_
W holesale trade „ _

1,415

---.

. . -----...
... - . - ...

C le r k s , file , c la s s B
M anufacturing .
N onm anufacturing
P u blic u tilities*
W holesale trade
F in an cef _

892
179
147
291
308
179
129
76

C le r k s , accounting, c la s s B
M anufacturing _ T
_ .......
_ ....
N onm an u factu rin g---------- ------- --------- -- ---------------------P ublic u tilities*
>
_
_
_
W holesale trade
F in a n cef -

.

_
416
...
----- . . ------ITT"
----- — ......... . .
279
...
_

__

----

... .

....
----

------

.
___
. _

.. _

. .....

D uplicating-m ach ine o p e ra to rs
(m im eograph o r ditto) _ .
_
_ ...
M anufacturing
.... ..
K ey-punch o p era to rs
_
M anufacturing . ._ .. ... .
Nonm anufacturing
.....
Pu blic u tilitie s*
....... W holesale trade
.. .
F in a n cef
__

_ -----~ ---.............. ....
------ . . . . . . ...
....... _
_

_

807
39.5
-----5TTT" “ T U X
300
39.5
130
39.5
_
77
39.5




.6
0

6 5.00
T53E T
64.00

6 .0
00

_
-

_
-

_
.
-

43
7
36
_
18

225
i
164
4
I ll

.
-

1
0
1
0

5
5

2

_
-

236
6 2 "'
174
l
32
125

6 0 .0 0
T T 757T
59.5 0

5
5

34
— 5—
29

6 .0
80

_
.
-

65.0 0
73.50
77.00
74.50

6 .0
60

2
0
2
0
.
-

1
0
— 5—

6

1
0

----- j---9
4

21
6
95
16
6
5
26

112
6
1
“ 2—
2

----- -----

874
39.5
6 4 .5 0
— 5T T" “ u n r W
38.5
6 5 .0 0
358
39.5
70.50
60
39.5
72.00
157
38.0
5 8 .5 0

_
.
-

34
16
18
_
18

63

4
4
4

49
15—
34
30

56
28
28

12
2

5 3 .0 0
39.0
3175“ "5775TT
38.5
'54.00
4 9 .0 0
37.0

124
iz

92

1
0

25
48

13
-

.
-

1
1

2
2
16
11

3
4

6 1 .5 0
" 5 7 /5 0

r r

38
—

59
38

1
0

39.5
40.ff

106

274
89
185
23
30
81

63
53

’s o r
6 2.50
6 3 .5 0

—

9

39

_
.
-

5
-

I!
-

11

59
23
36

1,017
39.5
61T T ■"19 r r
39.5
407
145
39.5

O ffice g ir ls ------------.
_
....... ...
. .
260
M anufacturing
-----.
— m ~
152
N on m anufacturing______ - ----- ------------ . . . . . .
F in an cef
__
79

See footnotes at end o f table

4 0 .0

6 0.50
63
5 8.50
6 6.50
6 2 .5 0
5 2.50

_
_
-

63
“ 25
38

1
0

13

12

Zb

37
-

5
31

3

20
-

2
0
-

1
0
241
93
148

2
0

46
40

15
15
3
4

40
18

192
94
98
37

139
39

1
6
11

5

10
0
2
1

127
83
74
35

50
48

17
29

58
?9
29
19

41
17
24

63
53

136
55
81
27
14
31

150

87
34
53

6
8
29
39

2
2

112
38
4
13
17

42
13
29

2

1
0
7

6
16
6
6
1?
31

49

1
6

tb

63
27
14

-

2
2
2
0
16
1
0
7
2

1
1
6
16
11
6
-

2
0
6
14
9

6
6
1

6
2

4
-

12
_
12
6
-

-

5
-

29
5
24

11
6
6

89
39
50

80
39
41

48
28

15

5

76
44
32

1
0
------8
2
2
-

3

” 59
47
13
9

34

11

18
13

105
57
48

139
98
41
23

105
70
35

6

3
14

15

90
36
54
17
19
18

3

7

23

3

-

-

-

4

23

-

-

8
116
8
6
30

6
.

10
5

2
1

2
6

70
33"
37
28

30

18

16

12

14

8

8
6

146
“ W ”

6
2

23

8
8
16
1
2

2

1
0
1
6

2
0
110

115
s i — ” 94
34
36
13

8

6
5

107
53
54
29

9

4

1
6
±

45
■~ f r '

8

53
Z9
24
13

8

27
16

3

11
2

-

-

78
48
30
15

23

11
4

1
8
5
2
1
2

1
-

-

-

Z
.
-

_
_
_
.
-

_
_
_
.
-

_
.
-

_

_
_
-

-

_
_
-

“

-

_
_
_
.
_
-

_
_
_
.
.
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_

_
_
-

13
------

3
_
3

-

2
1

_
-

1
1
1

6

------5
-

_
-

_
~

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

1
1
_

_
_

_
_

_
.

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3
16
9
1

16
11
5

21
19

2
1

2
1

-

-

-

13
13
.

5
------ — —
_
-

—

_
-

3
r~
_
.
.
-

_
.
_
_
-

------2
j—
4
1
2
6 2
0
15
n

— n—
15

1
2
1

T3
7
5

2
6
59
----- 5
—
53
6
1
5
1
1
1
13
7

6
4

1
“

_
-

_
-

3

20
------ —

-

6
_
6

9
-

178
"T O
77
40

5

2
2

1
1
1
0
1

15
9
----- — — Z ~
5
13

2
0
1
0

13
ll

-

136
53
82
27

116

2

8
8
17
6

5
-

13
3

113
62
51
17

105

16
11

1
0
5
1
0
16

104
81
23
7
13

2
1

42
26

5

1
1

_

1
0
4
6
2
4

2

2
11
1
0

3
------ —

-

1

1

------ j---_
_
-

_

5

Table A -l. O ffice Occupations-Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly h ours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an a r e a b a s is ,
by industry division , St. L ou is, M o ., O ctober 1958)

8

At iiis i
Number
at
w
orkers

Sex, occupation, and industry d ivision

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVINO TRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
Weekly,
Weekly. Under 4 0 .0 0
hours
earnings
and
(Standard) (Standard) $
40.00

1

0 $70.00
0

$
45.00

50.00

5 5.00

1 0 .0 0

Is.

5 0.00

55.00

6 0.00

6 5 .0 0

70.0 0

40
4
36
-

93

21
0

75.00

$
75.00

8 0.00

Is.

8 0.00

85.00

9 0.00

343

309
■216
93
40

247
168
79
46
17
7

359
” 138

159
166
53
23
14

140
TI2
28
23
5
-

49
26
23
23
-

42
— 33

5
4

0 $0 0
0 .0
95.00

*95.00 t l o . o o

? 0 5 .00 f i o . o o f 15.00 $

10 .0 105.00 110 0 115.00 12 .0
00
.0
00

2 .0
00

and
over

W omen— Continued
S ecreta ries
___
M anufacturing
_
N onm anufacturing
_
P u blic u tilities* _
W holesale trade . . .
F in a n ce!
_
Stenographers, general
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
P ublic u tilities*
W holesale trade
F in a n c e !__

_
__
_
_

.

_

_

.ir.

-

_

21
6

81.00
77.00
8 8.50
77.00
6 9.50

3.294
39.5
6 6.50
— "W T "
: 515'
" it
1,595
39.0
64.00
39.5
72.50
409
462
39.5
64.00
528
58.50
38.0

6
8

_ _ ------

Stenographers, technica l
M anufacturing

2,702
39.5
T?'5ff7“ ” W T
1,195
39.5
39.5
39.5
249
38.5
392

_
__

.

__
___

228

_

18
1

71.50
4 0 .0
3 0 T “ 71707 ■

_
-

_
_
_
-

25
_
25
-

_

_

1

-

-

8

17

Switchboard o p era to rs
_
_
.
M anufacturing
N onm anufacturing _
_
F i n a n c e ! ____________________ —---------- -----------------

453
39.5
------ T E 5“ ■~ w : v
288
39.5
39.0

62.00
.72760
56.50
58.50

_
-

5
5
'

Sw itchboard o p e r a to r -r e c e p tio n is ts
M anufacturing __
Nonm anufacturing __
Pu blic u tilities*
W holesale trade
_
—

569
------25T"
316
44
142

39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5

61.50
62.50
60.50

_
.
-

9
9
-

39.0
40 .0
38.5
39.5

77.00
78.50
75.50
8 7.00

_
-

39.0
39.0
39.5
4 0 .0
38.5

62.50
63.00
62.00
67.00
6 0.00

39.5

6 5.00

...

.

_

_

_ ....
. ...

_
---........ . ...

. ..

T abulating-m achine o p e r a t o r s __________ — ___________
M anufacturing
_
.
.
N onm an u factu rin g__________
__
Pu blic u tilitie s* ... _ __ ...
... _ ___ .
Transrribing-m ae.hine o p e r a to r s , general
M anufacturing ..... ......... .
.
N onm anufacturing
.
.. . . _ . _
W holesale trade
...
.
_ ----F in an ce!
T yp ists, cla s s A
M anufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Finan cet
_

8
6

240
------ T W ~
132
70
615

_
..

_
_
-----

—

W T

22
2
63
119

. ------- ----- ---.. .
. ---- _ _

818
429
389
198

T yp ists, c la s s B ____________ ____ _______________________
M anufacturing
.
---------------- _
Nonmanufacturing
...
---Public u tilities*
. _
.... . . .
W holesale trade
---_ .... ... .
F in a n ce!
_ _

2,440
1,119
1,321
124
324
558

1

.
_

_.
_ . ----- . . .

W T "

39.0
39.0

6 .0
80
59.50

6 .0
80
62.00
58.50

39.5
56.00
4 0 .0 ' '60'.00
39.0
5 2.00
39.0
6 2.50
39.5
54.50
48.50
38.0

1
2
1
2

_
_
-

-

2
12
2
24
98
25
58

12
2
12
2
18

37
7
30
3

8

-

9
9
-

_
_
-

5
5
-

27
13
14
9

_
-

2
2
2

45
14
31
31

5
5
_

2 35

12

223
1
24
147

489
104
385
19
82
195

8

25

352
“ 123
232
18
48

12
2
2
1

8
2

85

23
35

425
"TS3
236
35
78
107

8
6

334
149
185

309
194
115

26

44
92

28
42

143
28
14
79

709
358
351

94
135

6
1

561
“ 533
252
92
84
36

392
269
123
57
49
14

298
""153” '
145
54
55
27

55
29

39
32

36
35

39
34

51
35

39
26
13
4

2
6
11

2
6
1
2

17
9

61
140

1
6
8

1
0

34
9
25

40
9
31
9

75
34
41
32

27

99
41
58

127

41

31

41

143
l
62
3
27

1
0
11
16
16

6
6
71
2
11
2

-

9
3

80
40
40

156
99
57

6
2
1
93
32

6
1
29

497
171 "
326
20
85
148

8

43

115
47

8

2
2
8
14
8
104
73
31
18

6

37

189
74
115
77

410
239
171
8
66
59

433
344
89
28
23
3

6
8

12

15
5

-"22
19
19
39
25
14

2

85
'53
32

6

24

12
6
73
53
13

26
0
l52
54
18
13

6

16

1
6
8

50
26
30

2

14
17
7

1
0
8

200

2
6
15

8

37

-

117
96

2
1

70
" 43'
27

45
l6
29
12
10
-

80
36
24
3
21
“

7

8
5
1

1

-

2
2
19
3
-

"

1
1

-

3

------ 5 ~
4

2

-

l5
2
2

1
2

18

27
' 19

-

1
0
4
6

28

15
7
5

2
0

114
82
32
17
15

17

2
2
2

34
14

-

9
3
-

1

5
18

56
34
19

1
2

18

16
1

23
13

1
0
1_
0
-

-

6
5
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
6
-

1
2
_

-

25
23




5
7
15
2
0
3

2

139
-----52
57
31

2

4

12
—
2 ----- =5
0
17
7
17
1
2
37

-

4

1
------- 1

3
1

7
i

5
5
-

“
55
-

2
2
6

38
“ 36“

_

2
2

-

-

1
1

-

.
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

.
-

_
-

_
-

-

7
“
7
-

9

2
1
1
1

11
11
11

2
1
1

5

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

6
6

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_
"

_
'

_
"

_
_

-

_
-

1

-------

1
1

1
8
8
1
1
1

-

5
5
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

“12

2
2
16

-

-

17

2
0
2
2

81
28
”
— 53” ----- 15” —

_

7
------ r _ -------j—

Standard hours r e fle c t the w orkw eek fo r w hich em p lo y e e s r e c e iv e their regu lar s tra igh t-tim e sa la rie s and the earnings co rre sp o n d to these w eekly h ou rs.
* T ran sportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), com m u n ication , and other public u tilities.
| F inance, in su ran ce, and r e a l estate.

492216 0 -5 9 —2

149
— 92

-

1
1

5
5

6
Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings £or selected occupations studied on an area basis,
by industry division, St. Louis, M o ., October 1958)
Avxkaqb
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

lo.Q
OIs. 0 $0.00 $ 5 .0 0
0
70.00 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0

W
eekly,
Weekly. Under
hours
and
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)
under
65.0 0

Draftsmen, leader _
Manufacturing ___

10
2

39.5
39.5

817
4 0 .0
7 1 7 " ■ 4 0 .0
1 0 39.5
0

115.50
116.00
110.50

_
-

_
“

Draftsmen, junior _
Manufacturing ___
Nonmanufacturing .

409
310
99

3 9.5
39.3
39.5

8 9 .0 0
8 6 .5 0
97 .0 0

2
2

71

4 0 .0

74.5 0

4 0 .0
206
187...... 4 0 .0

8 5 .0 0
63.0 0

Tracers .............

Nurses, industrial (registered) .
Manufacturing ----- ---------

90 -

*

1

-

i
-

35
24

30

-

44
3 7 ...
7

4

2

14

3

15
13

2

11

2
2
8
8

2
2
l9

19
9

1
0

44
32

1
2

24

S

t

10 .0 l q s .o c 110 0115.00 12 .0 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 155.00 16 .0 over
0 0
.0
0 0
0 0
2
2

_

33
26

8

34
33 '

1
16

37
42
34 " ’ 3 7 "

39

2
6
19

1
6
16
-

2

15
IS "

35
28
7

69
36
13

69

47
43 '
4

31
26
5

45
37

6
8
1
8

2
2
65
37

8

2
2
91
89

2

4
4

4
3

9
4

55
53
-

81
8l
~

61
61
-

12
1
2

12
16
2

13
13 '
-

6

1
1

1

24

6
1

2
6
2

5

24

1

28
26

27
24

7

6

$

2
2

Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows: 22 at $160 to $165; 5 at $165 and over.




s

10 .0 105.00 *10 0*15.00 12 .0 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 $
0 0
.0
0 0
155.00 16 .0
0 0
and

8 5 .0 0 90.0 0 9 5 .0 0

$
146.50
147.00

Draftsmen, se n io r_
Manufacturing ___
Nonmanufacturing .

l o . o o &5.00 9 0 .0 0 *95.00

NOTE: Data for nonmanufacturing do not include information for department and limitedprice variety -stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

1
1
45
44

1

9
9

2
2
'

19
3

_

-

-

_

.
-

2
2
8
8
8
8

—

3
ii

35
35

2

2

*27

6
6

27
.
27

2
2

9
8

-

2
1

-

1

_
.
-

_

_

_

_
-

.
-

_
“

.
-

7
Table A-3. Maintenance and Powerpkxnt Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r m en in se le cte d occupations studied on an area b a s is ,
by industry d iv isio n , St. L o u is, M o. , O ctober 1958)
NUMBER OF WORKEBS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
worker*

O ccupation and industry d ivision

C arpenter s , m a in t e n a n c e ________ ____________
M anufacturing
E le c tr ic ia n s , m aintenance
M anufacturing .
.

,
_ __

Average
hourly | Under
earning*
$
1.80

1.80
and
under
1.90

$

1.90

~

H elp ers, tra d es, m aintenance
_
_ _
M anufacturing
_ _
Nonm anufacturing ----------------------------------------P u blic u tilitie s *

1,390
1,313
77
72

2 .4 3
2 .4 4
2 .2 8
2 .3 4

ll
5
-

682
681

2.7 2
" 2 .7 3

-

1,278
1 , T69

2 .9 3
2 .9 3

843
175

2 .59

----

O ile r s
__
__
M anufacturing

...

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

P a in ters , m aintenance
M anufacturing
P ip e fitte r s , m aintenance
M a n u fa c tu rin g

.................. ... _ _

Sheet-m etal w o rk e rs , m aintenance
M a n u fa c tu r in g

_

_

T ool and d ie m a k e r s
M a n u fa c tu r in g

.. ..

---------------

............................ .
_ ...
__ .

.

.

.

.

135
135

364
364

157
155

8
8

3
~

17

2

35
33

9

39
38

23
23

_

6
6

4
4

57
57' ' '

4

23
23

6
6

148
135' "
13
13

250
247
3
3

252
214
38
38

_

_

_

2
6

-

-

-

-

26

_

_

-

-

5
5

3
3

14
14

8
8

-

_
-

39
39
39

1
1
1

6
1

_
-

-

....5 1 '
15
15

.

_ .

58
58
-

6
0
6
'0

49
49

1
1

2
2

2
0

-

25
25
-

28
28
-

18
lb
-

64
60
4
4

_

_

-

-

-

45
45

7
7

26
26

38
38

31
31

1
6
1
2

34
34

1
0
1
0

_

27
27

41
40

25
17

33
29

75
75

6
6

48
48

7
7

31
36

150
l56

7
7

5
3

9
9

17
17

6
6
8

ll

37
37

2 .7 0
2 .7 6

4
-

4

1

l
-

2 .8 4
2 .8 4

_

_

_

_

-

-

37
------2
2

58

43
— 43—
14

1
2

_
-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

l7
3
-

-

248
248
52
52
450
65
385
367

_

-

~

----- TE

19
— n—

195
103
~T27----- — 49

8

113
TO

~no—

-

11
—T
—

12
1

1
1

31
3b

54
54

28
28

_

6
6

-

19

19
-

~

-

-

14
14
.
-

_
.
_
-

_
-

_

_

_
-

23
23
_
-

_
-

.
-

97
97

181

11
11

_

_

_

18
1

_

-

-

-

-

194
T59

252
“ TEE

31
----- 51

..
-

173
T75

_

_
_

_
-

_
_
-

121

240

2
10

“ TT7—

91
l5
76
60

49
30
19
19

37
l7

2
0
2
0

.
-

-

47

_

_

63
E3----_

.
_
-

3
------ 3
-----

_

“2 0 ----- 42
2 ----5
8
8
5

_

_

_

4

462
“ "4 4 7 ""
15
13

-

-

_
-

_
-

5
------- 5

119
119

209
209

77
41
— 41----- ----- 77

23
23

1
2
1
2

42
42

15
------15

61
61

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

15
5

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

2
2
2
2

N OTE: Data fo r nonm anufacturing do not include inform ation fo r departm ent and lim ite d p r ice va rie ty s to r e s; the rem ain der o f re ta il trade is app ropriately re p re s e n te d in
data fo r a ll indu stries com bin ed and fo r nonm anufacturing.

228

12
2

8

_

T T 5 — ------- 8

8
8

35
35

29
29

239
229

347
347

169
169

89
40

84
74

26

4
4

4
4

1
2
53
— T — ------51
2

1 E xcludes prem iu m pay fo r o v ertim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.
* T ran sp ortation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), com m u nication, and other public u tilities.




177
" -1 7 5 "

.

175
161
14
13

21
2
8

213

_

_

-

64
62

58
16
42
42

2 .40
2 .4 2

-

341
340

90
l5
75
75

1
1

-

3.03
3753

23
15

-

-

-

1,148
1,148

35
32

82
78

_

_

57
57

13
3

_

-

6
1
48

2

_

-

-10
1

6
8
2
2

34
34

1

'

39
39

2
8

2.86
2.8
6

2755

5

6

1
2
1
2

5
-

2.8
8

6

1

29
29

-

215
213

over

1
6

123
114

70
7b"
-

-

3.40

3

8
8

8

3.30

42
4b

1,179
i , 129

.........._

3.20

1
0
1
0

8
6

2
2

67
47

3. 10

72
72

-

'

2 .6 3
2 .6 4
2 .5 6
2 .7 3

1,345

1,278“

3.00

2 .9 0

656
656

_____
_ _

* 3 .4 0
and

104

427
4b 1

__

* 3 .3 0

12
1
121

2
0
2
b

-

* 3 .2 0

2 .8 0

352
319

M ech an ics, m aintenance
__
M anufacturing _ .....
Nonm anufacturing _
Pu blic u tilitie s * _ _ . _ _
M illw rights
__
M anufacturing

623

* 3 .1 0

51
48

1

2 .5 7
2 .58

* 3 .0 0

2 .7 0

1

2.66

* 2.90

63
59

_

39

68
6

* 2 .8 0

2.60

-

2 .5 3
2.5 2

M ech an ics, autom otive (m aintenance)
M a n u fa ctu rin g ____________ ________ ______ ___
N onmanufa c t ur in g --------- -------- --------------------P u blic utilitie s *
__
. . . . . .

* 2 .7 0

2
1
2l

_

400
F irem en , stationary b o i l e r _________ _________
----- 275“
M anufacturing

M ach in ists, m aintenance

* 2 .6 0

2 .50

-

_

* 2 .5 0

49
49

2.91
o r

_

M ach in e-tool o p e ra to rs, to o lro o m
_ _
_
M anufacturing ---- -------- -------- ---------------------

* 2 .4 0

2.4 0

~

-

* 2. 30

2

"

4

2.20
2 .3 0

-

11
16

$

6
6
1
2
1
2

13
' '4

"

387
296

_

2. 1
0
2.20

2. 1
0

!

-

_

$

l

2.0
0

_

1
6

_

2 0
.0

_

2 .7 4
2 .8 4

E n gin eers, stationary
M anufacturing _

$

$
2 .7 4
2 •74

548
518
1,563
1,41b

$

"

51
— 51-----

103
699
r o i“ i “ E99—

_

_

31
— 51—

-

-

9
9

72
72

1
0
1
0

_

-

49
49

173
“ 173 "

57
57

1
2

l2
_

_

_

-

-

8
Table A -4. Custodial and M aterial Movement Occupations
(A verage straigh t-tim e h ou rly earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an a rea b a s is ,
by industry divisio n , St. L ou is, M o ., O ctober 1958)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O ccupation

1 and

Number
of
workers

industry division

Average

Under
$

1.0
0

$

1.26

E levator o p era tors , passen ger (m en)
Nonmanufacturing

184
147
10
?

E levator op e r a to r s , passen ger (w om en) ______

188
167

......1,22.
1. 17

870

2. 1
0
2. 19

Guards __ __
M anufacturing
_ __ __ __
Nonmanufacturing

„

„

„

__

fki
117
108

Jan itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs ( m e n ) ________
M a n u fa c tu r in g _______________________________
N onm anufacturing _
. . . . .
P u b lic u tilitie s *
....
_
...............
W holesale trade
...
. .
F inance t

4, 361
2 ,7 6 9
1,572
248

J an itors, p o r te r s , and cle a n e rs (wom en)
M a n u fa ctu rin g ____________________________ __
Nonmanufacturing
__ ._
P u blic utilities *
TTinanrA ’j’

973
271
702

L a b o r e rs , m a terial handling
M anufacturing
N onm anufacturing
P u b lic u tilitie s *
W holesale trade

.

_

_
_

__
_______

P a ck e rs , shipping (m en)
M anufacturing _ _
N on m an u factu rin g___________________________
W holesale trade _
—
P a c k e r s , shipping (wom en)
M anufacturing
R eceivin g c le r k s
M anufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
W holesale trade
Shipping c le r k s
M anufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
W holesale trade

383

1.48
1t 48

17

-

1.62 42 2
2

1.81
1.29
1.85
1.64
1. 15

and
under

1.10 1.20
57
51

15
7
7

76
7i

14

5
5
5

16

6

317

-

22
2
-

S

$

1. 0 1. 10 1.20
0

16

10

.. .. —

.——

1. 80

1.90

1

-

-

-

40
40

7
7

3
3

g

6

6

2
2
2
2

17
17
17

10
10
1
0

11
3
8

6
11

89
89

??

74

1.98
1.96
2 .0 3
2. 08

_
-

1
1

32
23
9

1.61

_

6
2

-

21

431
362

74

2
0
54
-

12
6
1
8

8

196
75

49
3
46

8
2
6
16

8
8
8

42

21
21
12

51
43

8
8

12

64
30
34

6
1
0

17

9. 0 9. 10
2 0 2

2.0 2. 10 2.20
0
1
18

g

jj

180
119

722
600

6 12
1
2
10 76

106
94

262
223
39

465
388
77
13
48
-

396
367
29

11

2.20

2 .3 0

$
2 .4 0

$
2 .5 0

2 .6 0

$
2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

9.0 0
3

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2. 50

2.60

2. 70

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3. 00

and
over

$

-

-

-

_

_

12
12

_

_

184
181
3

40
40
-

83
83
-

142
142
-

63
63
-

11
11
-

-

-

-

-

26
6
6
0

204
191
13

78
78
-

34
34
-

-

-

9
9
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

14

35
33

149

2
0

7
7

7
7

_
-

54
50

-

9
18

513
279
234

10 2
2

553
325
228
59
43

642
472
170
38

483

227
391
362
29

164

19
0
2
6
1
0

27
15

159

935
670
265
138
29

279
178

392
186
204
40

360
360
230

516
444
72
58

39
39

2
0

14
14
14

17
7

74

214
60
154
143

123
67
56
46

67
48
19
16

118
105
13
13

33
-----13~
-

161
156
5
5

71
17
54
54

93

47
39

1

14
14
-

31
27
4
4
_

_
•
"

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
“

_
"

_
-

_
"

1
12

35
35

14
9

_
-

18
-

57
3
-

11

5
5

28

_
-

206

55
54
"

69
29
40
40

142
103
39
17

1
1

277

22
2

43
40
3
3

83

4
-

g

55
54

2

137
92
45

30
18

29

21
8

2
2

24

35

24
24

95
95
-

2
2

-

8
8
_
“

2

10
8

38

8

30
14
3
3
13
5

8
8

/ _
-

834
84

1

8

20
0

842
180
178
70
56
14

12

62
36

29
4
25
19

2
2

209
209

16
-

4

10
10
10

10
4
6

2
0
10
10

5

9

2
2

2
2

_
-

11
2

2
2

58
38

63
35
28
23

2
6
2
6

‘

9
9

72
50

10
1

8
8

14

8

4

,

1
8
4

46
36

6
2

34"
28

2
0
19

-

28
6
195

12

2
2

6
18

16

12
12

2
12
12

2
2

2

19 ----- 2
4
- -

-

-

-

-

10
10

5
5
5

_
-

_
-

_
-

32
32
32

5
5
5

“

_
"

1
0
10
10

_

16
16
“

4
4
“
“

9
V
■
“

~
-

~
'

"
"

38
24
14
14

5
X

12

2
2

1
2
~

6
6

8
8
99

6
8
31

73
41
32
16
56
41
15

12

See footn otes at end o f ta b le .




_

14
-

29
19

2. 15

NOTE:

_

16
3

23
7
16
16

8
1
0
2
2
8

1

19
14
5
5

167
130
37

-

2. 15

3

14
5

81
78
3
3
-

1.62

2. 19
2. 10
2.0
2
2.21
2.26
2. 12

-

$
1.90

8
9

43
29
14
4
5

950
631
319
274

12
6

1.70

452

45
16

344
223
124
99

1.60

7

2.03
2 .0 9
2. 1
0

579
365
214

1.50

43

18
14
4
4

349
303

------

1.40

31
70

8

_
-

1.93

$
1.80

116

15
ii
4
4

2.0
6

$
1.70

142
92
50

9
9
-

2. 380
1, 242
1, 138

1.60

133
35
98
7

1.98
1.97

2.0
0
2. 1
2

$
1.50

121
2

45
19
26

6 .5 2 7
4 ,5 7 9
1, 948
835
746

$
1.40

289
36
253
-

*87
87
-

111

*
1.30

486
114
372
4
142

1.28
1.56
1. 17
1.51
1. 16

395

1.30

3
5

68
8

_

O rd er f il l e r s
M anufacturing
.. ..
Nonmanufacturing
W holesale trade

20
0

-

1. 15
1. ? o

$

Data fo r nonm anufacturing do not include in form ation fo r departm ent and lim ited p r ic e variety s to r e s; the rem ain der o f r e ta il trade is ap p rop riately re p resen ted in
data fo r a ll indu stries com bin ed and fo r nonm anufacturing.

115
105

10
8
8
6
2

2
2
71
2
2
45
35

1
0
10

8

4

1
6
12
4
4

3
I

1
1
■

2
2

*

9
Table A-4. Custodial and M aterial Movement Occupations-Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings £or s elected occupations studied on an area b a s is ,
by industry d ivision , St. L ou is, M o ., O ctober 1958)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O ccupation

1 and

Number
of
worker*

industry divisio n

Skipping and m > iving r.l*rk*
m
M anufacturing „ ..... ......
Nonmanufacturing
W holesale trade

________ _

__

Average

Under *1. 0
0
and
$
1. 0 under
0
1. 1
0

1
$
1. 10 1.20
1.20

1.30

*1.30
1.40

*
1.40
1.50

$

2. 16
2. 15
2. 19

408
165
143
92

2.22

-

-

-

-

-

19
l9
-

"

2
0

*1.50
1.60

12
6
4
-

1

1.60

1.70

1. 80

1.70

3, 083
916
2, 167
1,418
425

2 .4 8
2 .5 6
2 .4 4
2 .4 5
2 .4 9

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

15
— IT "

-

-

-

T ru ck d riv e rs, light (under lVa t o n s ) _____
___
M anufacturing
_
__
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g _______________________

211
158
53

2 .2 9
2 .3 4
2. 13

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

13
_ 13'
-

9
9

_
-

1,299
494
805
182

2 .4 8
2.6 3
2 .3 9
2 .4 4

"

-

-

"

2
2

11
11

-

-

-

1, 0 1
0

2 .5 1
" 2 .6 2
2 .4 9
2 .4 7
2 .5 3

_
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

T ru c k d riv e r s , m edium ( I 1 to and
/*
including 4 tons)
__ ____ __
__ __
M anufacturing
____ — __ __ __ _. __
N onm anufacturing
__
__ ______
____
W holesale trade ______________________
T ru c k d riv e r s , heavy (over 4 tons,
t r a ile r typ e) ___ __ __ ____ ___ ___
M a n u fa ctu rin g ____________________________
N on m an u factu rin g_______________________
P u blic utilities *
___
W holesale trade
T r u c k e r s , pow er (fo rk lift)
__ __ __
__ —
M anufacturing
__ ____ — ____
___ _
N onm anufacturing
__ __
___ — ____
W holesale t r a d e _________________________
T r u c k e r s , pow er (other than fo rk lift)
M anufacturing ____ __ ____ ___
____
Watchmen
__ __ __
M anufacturing
____ __ ____
Nonmanufacturing
____
__ __
P u blic u tilitie s *
_____

___ ____
__
____ __
_ __
_

iTI
870
453
216
1, 506
T363141
87
324
3rd
1, 580
638
942
76

_

-

-

_

2. 18
2.22

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

2. 1
0

_
"

_
"

_
-

_
-

_
-

179
179
4

520
------ 7
-

2. 19

"

2
2

2 .2 4

2. 09
1.45
1.84

1. 18
1.76

2
6

26

513

81
36"
45

45
-----39

T

1
0

-

2
0
6

3
3
_
-

112
57
25

-

1
1

1

1

* T ran sp ortation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), com m u nication, and other public utilities,
t F inance, in su ran ce, and real estate.




2. 0 2. 1 2.20
0
0

2. 0 2. 1 2.20
0
0
-

—

38
nr
24

1
2

2
6
21
4

_
-

17
9

_
-

3

-

"

6
6
-

2
0

31
13
18
“

-

-

_
-

24
24
_
24

2
1
-

6
0

_
“

21
2“
0
1
1
2
2

60

89

99

28
------

3

21

— T5
vr

T-

13

8

127
135
n r “ 125“
8
9
8
9
-

35
35

43
29
14

129
124
5
5

11

9
9
71
37
34

171
155"

6
-

42
40
96
-----96“
-

59
17
42
18
24
4
4..
-

—

31
28
3
3

1 .4 0

1 .5 0

2.60

2 .5 0

18
r
9
5

96
96
-

51

140

241

72
4

113
35
30

1523
— 99”
1424
1328
40

406
119
287
9
141

30
29

42
42

37
15

-

98
27
71
7

153
46
105
30

12

39
39

34
33

1
1

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

7
7
-

4
4
4

1 80
.
2. 90
2
2
1

184
-----33“
150
150

187
163
4
4

4
4

8

42
42
-

-

12
0
2
0
10
0

54
3o
24
24

85
61
4
4

24
2"3”
-

15
551
265
- ------7 ------- ~ T 9 ~
8 544 186
448
5
44
40
-

108
108
108

30
35“
-

6 12
6
8
8
1

2
2
472
36
434

97

T

19
0 I ll
146“ .... ro7"
4
44
1
2
82
82

1 .3 0
2 .4 0

2 .3 0

47

_
-

_
'

1 Data lim ited to m en w o rk e rs except w here otherw ise indicated.
* E xcludes prem iu m pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.
3 W ork ers w ere distributed as fo llo w s: 5 at $ 0. 7 0 to $ 0. 80; 12 at $ 0. 90 to $ 1.
4 W orkers w ere distributed as fo llo w s: 165 at $ 0. 7 0 to $ 0. 80; 2 at $ 0. 80 to $ 0. 90; 55 at $ 0. 90 to $ 1.
5 W orkers w ere d istributed a s fo llo w s: 60 at $ 0. 70 to $ 0. 80; 24 at $ 0. 80 to $ 0. 90; 3 at $ 0. 90 to $ 1.
4 Includes all d r iv e r s re g a r d le s s o f size and type o f truck operated.

$

17
7
80
9 ------7“ — r r
8
43
14
28
-

17
135
17 [ T i t “

50
14

V 90

_
-

3

2
1
1

*

1.90

41
28
26 — r r
15
17
15
11

9
9
"

T r u c k d riv e r s *
_
_
_ _ ___
M anufacturing
_ ________ __ __ — _____
Nonm anufacturing
__
__ ___ ___ __ __
P u blic u tilitie s *
....
......................
W holesale trade
__ __ __

* . 80
1

30

2
2
16
16
13

1.9 0

5.

3 .0 0

and
over

0
0

1
1
------j— -----j----

24
168
24 “ 165“
-

-

8
“ 8
-----

_
-

_
-

168
166
-

-

-

-

— 5
-

71
71
■

_
•

19
19
“

8

278
213
65
53

95
91
4
4

89
89
-

_
_

44
43" "
•

19
19

38
38

4
"

"

5
5

1

7

~

“

2
0
2
0

35
35
-

5

26
-

-

-

-

-

-

2
6

2
3
3

10

Appendix: Occupational Descriptions
The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to
assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under
a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment
and from area to area.
This is essential in order to permit the grouping of occupational wage
rates representing comparable job content.
Because of this emphasis on inter establishment and
interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions may differ signifi­
cantly from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes.
In
applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field representatives are instructed to exclude work­
ing supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped workers, part-time,
temporary, and probationary workers.

O ff i c e
BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR-----Continued

Prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other
than an ordinary or eiectromatic typewriter. May also keep records
as to billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work in­
cidental to billing operations.
For wage study purposes, billers,
machine, are classified by type of machine, as follows:

Class A---- Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of
and experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with
the structure of the particular accounting system used.
Deter­
mines proper records and distribution of debit and credit items
to be used in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated
reports, balance sheets, and other records by hand.

Biller, machine (billing machine)— Uses a special billing
machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott Fisher, Burroughs, etc. , which
are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and
invoices from customers' purchase orders, internally prepared
orders, shipping memoranda, etc.
Usually involves application
of predetermined discounts and shipping charges and entry of
necessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the
billing machine, and totals which are automatically accumulated
by machine.
The operation usually involves a large number of
carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a
fanfold machine.

Class B-----Keeps a record of one or more phases or sections
of a set of records usually requiring little knowledge of basic book­
keeping.
Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll,
customers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described
under biller, machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc. May check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine)-----Uses a bookkeeping
machine (Sundstrand, Elliott Fisher, Remington Rand, etc. , which
may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare customers'
bills as part of the accounts receivable operation.
Generally
involves the simultaneous entry of figures on customers' ledger
record.
The machine automatically accumulates figures on a
number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints auto­
matically the debit or credit balances . Does not involve a knowl­
edge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of
sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott
Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register, with or with­
out a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions.




CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A — Under general direction of a bookkeeper or account­
ant, has responsibility for keeping one or more sections of a com­
plete set of books or records relating to one phase of an establish­
ment's business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing
subsidiary ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or ac­
counts payable; examining and coding invoices or vouchers with
proper accounting distribution; requires judgment and experience
in making proper assignations and allocations.
May assist in
preparing, adjusting, and closing journal entries; may direct class
B accounting clerks.
Class B ---- Under supervision, performs one or more routine
accounting operations such as posting simple journal vouchers,
accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher registers;
reconciling bank accounts; posting subsidiary ledgers controlled
by general ledgers.
This job does not require a knowledge of
accounting and bookkeeping principles but is found in offices in
which the more routine accounting work is subdivided on a func­
tional basis among several workers.

11
CLERK,

FILE

Class A -----Responsible for maintaining an established filing
system. Classifies and indexes correspondence or other material;
may also file this material. May keep records of various types
in conjunction with files or supervise others in filing and locating
material in the files.
May perform incidental clerical duties.
Class B ---- Performs routine filing, usually of material that
has already been classified, or locates or assists in locating ma­
terial in the files.
May perform incidental clerical duties.
CLERK, ORDER
Receives customers* orders for material or merchandise by
mail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the
following; Quoting prices to customers; making out an order sheet
listing the items to make up the order; checking prices and quantities
of items on order sheet; distributing order sheets to respective de­
partments to be filled.
May check with credit department to deter­
mine credit rating of customer, acknowledge receipt of orders from
customers, follow up orders to see that they have been filled, keep
file of orders received, and check shipping invoices with original
orders.

KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsi­
bilities, records accounting and statistical data on tabulating cards
by punching a series of holes in the cards in a specified sequence,
using an alphabetical or a numerical key-punch machine, following
written information on records.
May duplicate cards by using the
duplicating device attached to machine.
Keeps files of punch cards.
May verify own work or work of others.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
Performs various routine duties such as running errands,
operating minor office machines such as sealers or mailers, opening
and distributing mail, and other minor clerical work.
SECRETARY
Performs secretarial and clerical duties for a superior in an
administrative or executive position. Duties include making appoint­
ments for superior; receiving people coming into office; answering
and making phone calls; handling personal and important or confi­
dential mail, and writing routine correspondence on own initiative;
taking dictation (where transcribing machine is not used) either in
shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, and transcribing dicta­
tion or the recorded information reproduced on a transcribing machine.
May prepare special reports or memoranda for information of superior.

CLERK, PAYROLL
STENOGRAPHER,

GENERAL

Computes wages of company employees and enters the neces­
sary data on the payroll sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers'
earnings based on time or production records; posting calculated data
on payroll sheet, showing information such as worker's name, working
days, time, rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. May
make out paychecks and assist paymaster in making up and dis­
tributing pay envelopes.
May use a calculating machine.

Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more persons,
either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, involving a
normal routine vocabulary, and to transcribe this dictation on a type­
writer. May also type from written copy. May also set up and keep
files in order, keep simple records, etc.
Does not include tran­
scribing-machine work (see transcribing-machine operator).

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR

STENOGRAPHER,

Primary duty is to operate a Comptometer to perform mathe­
matical computations.
This job is not to be confused with that of
statistical or other type of clerk, which may involve frequent use of
a Comptometer but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to
performance of other duties.

Primary duty is to take dictation from one or more persons,
either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, involving a
varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or
reports on scientific research and to transcribe this dictation on a
typewriter.
May also type from written copy. May also set up and
keep files in order, keep simple records, etc.
Does noi include
transcribing-machine work.

TECHNICAL

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory respon­
sibilities, reproduces multiple copies of typewritten or handwritten
matter, using a mimeograph or ditto machine. Makes necessary ad­
justment such as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed.
Is not required to prepare stencil or ditto master. May keep file of
used stencils or ditto m asters. May sort, collate, and staple com­
pleted material.




Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard.
Duties involve handling incoming, outgoing, and intraplant or office
calls.
May record toll calls and take messages.
May give infor­
mation to persons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders.
For workers who also act as receptionists see switchboard operatorreceptionist.

12
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
tion
type
This
time

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL---- Continued

In addition to performing duties of operator, on a single posi­
or monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionis* and may also
or perform routine clerical work as part of regular duties.
typing or clerical work may take the major part of this worker*s
while at switchboard.

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates machine that automatically analyzes and translates
information punched in groups of tabulating cards and prints trans­
lated data on forms or accounting records; sets or adjusts machine;
does simple wiring of plugboards according to established practice
or diagrams; places cards to be tabulated in feed magazine and starts
machine. May file# cards after they are tabulated. May, in addition,
operate auxiliary machines.

included. A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype
or similar machine is classified as a stenographer, general.
TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies of various material or to
make out bills after calculations have been made by another person.
May do clerical work involving little special training, such as keep­
ing simple records, filing records and reports or sorting and dis­
tributing incoming mail.
Class A -----Performs one or more of the following: Typing
material in final form from very rough and involved draft; copy­
ing from plain or corrected copy in which there is a frequent
and varied use of technical and unusual words or from foreignlanguage copy; combining material from several sources, or
planning layout of complicated statistical tables to maintain uni­
formity and balance in spacing; typing tables from rough draft in
final form.
May type routine form letters, varying details to
suit circumstances.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL,
Primary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal
routine vocabulary from transcribing machine records.
May also
type from written copy and do simple clerical work. Workers tran­
scribing dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabu­
lary such as legal briefs or reports on scientific research are not

Professional

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR
(Assistant draftsman)
Draws to scale units or parts of drawings prepared by drafts­
man or others for engineering, construction, or manufacturing pur­
poses.
Uses various types of drafting tools as required. May pre­
pare drawings from simple plans or sketches, or perform other duties
under direction of a draftsman.
DRAFTSMAN,

LEADER

Plans and directs activities of one or more draftsmen in
preparation of working plans and detail drawings from rough or pre­
liminary sketches for engineering, construction, or manufacturing
purposes. Duties involve a combination of the following: Interpreting
blueprints, sketches, and written or verbal orders; determining work
procedures; assigning duties to subordinates and inspecting their work;
performing more difficult problems. May assist subordinates during




Class B ----Performs one or more of the following:
Typing
from relatively clear or typed drafts; routine typing of forms,
insurance policies, e tc ., setting up simple standard tabulations, or
copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.

and

Technical

DRAFTSMAN, LEADER-----Continued
emergencies or as a regular assignment, or perform related duties
of a supervisory or administrative nature.
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
Prepares working plans and detail drawings from notes,
rough or detailed sketches for engineering, construction, or manu­
facturing purposes.
Duties involve a combination of the following:
Preparing working plans, detail drawings, maps, cross-sections, etc.,
to scale by use of drafting instruments; making engineering . computa­
tions such as those involved in strength of materials, beams and
trusses; verifying completed work, checking dimensions, materials
to be used, and quantities; writing specifications; making adjustments
or changes in drawings or specifications. May ink in lines and letters
on pencil drawings, prepare detail units of complete drawings, or
trace drawings.
Work is frequently in a specialized field such as
architectural, electrical, mechanical, or structural drafting.

13
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

NURSE,

A registered nurse who gives nursing service to ill or injured
employees or other persons who become ill or suffer an accident on
the premises of a factory or other establishment.
Duties involve a
combination of the following: Giving first aid to the ill or injured7
attending to subsequent dressing of employees’ injuries; keeping records
of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or
other purposes; conducting physical examinations and health evaluations
of applicants and employees; and planning and carrying out programs
involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant

environment, or other activities affecting the health, welfare,
safety of all personnel.

Maintenance

INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)-----Continued
and

TRACER
Copies
tracing cloth or
Uses T-square,
simple drawings

a nd

plans and drawings prepared by others, by placing
paper over drawing and tracing with pen or pencil.
compass, and other drafting tools.
May prepare
and do simple lettering.

Powerplant

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

ENGINEER, STATIONARY

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and
maintain in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins,
cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings,
and trim made of wood in an establishment. Work involves most of
the following: Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, draw­
ings^ models, or verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenter’ s
handtools, portable power tools, and standard measuring instruments;
making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work;
selecting materials necessary for the work. In general, the work of
the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and experience
usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent train­
ing and experience.

Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation
of stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to sup­
ply the establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrigera­
tion, or air-conditioning.
Work involves: Operating and maintaining
equipment such as steam engines, air compressors, generators, mo­
tors, turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers
and boiler-fed water pumps; making equipment repairs; keeping a
record of operation of machinery, temperature, and fuel consump­
tion. May also supervise these operations. Head or chief engineers
in establishments employing more than one engineer are excluded.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the
installation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generating,
distribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Installing or repairing any of
a variety of electrical equipment such as generators, transformers,
switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units,
conduit systems, or other transmission equipment; working from blue­
prints, drawings, layout, or other specifications; locating and diag­
nosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working standard
computations relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical
equipment; using a variety of electrician’ s handtools and measuring
and testing instruments.
In general, the work of the maintenance
electrician requires rounded training and experience usually ac­
quired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.




FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which
employed with heat, power, or steam.
Feeds fuels to fire by hand
or operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; checks water
and safety valves.
May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom equipment.
HELPER,

TRADES, MAINTENANCE

A ssists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance
trades, by performing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such
as keeping a worker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning work­
ing area, machine, and equipment; assisting worker by holding ma­
terials or tools; performing other unskilled tasks as directed by jour­
neyman. The kind of work the helper is permitted to perform varies
from trade to trade: In some trades the helper is confined to sup­
plying, lifting, and holding materials and tools and cleaning working
areas; and in others he is permitted to perform specialized machine
operations, or parts of a trade that are also performed by workers
on a full-tim e basis.

14
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR,

TOOLROOM

Specializes in the operation of one or more types of machine
tools, such as jig borers, cylindrical or surface grinders, engine
lathes, or milling machines in the construction of machine-shop tools,
gauges, jigs, fixtures, or dies. Work involves most of the following:
Planning and performing difficult machining operations; processing
items requiring complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy;
using a variety of precision measuring instruments; selecting feeds,
speeds, tooling and operation sequence; making necessary adjust­
ments during operation to achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions.
May be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools,
and to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
For
cross-industry wage study purposes, machine-tool operators, toolroom,
in topi and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classification.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establish­
ment.
Work involves most of the following: Examining machines
and mechanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling
or partly dismantling machines and performing repairs that mainly
involve the use of handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing
broken or defective parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the
production of a replacement part by a machine shop or sending of
the machine to a machine shop for major repairs; preparing written
specifications for major repairs or for the production of parts ordered
from machine shop; reassembling machines; and making all necessary
adjustments for operation.
In general, the work of a maintenance
mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
Excluded from this classification are workers whose primary duties
involve setting up or adjusting machines.

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
MILLWRIGHT
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs
of metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in an establishment.
Work involves most of the following; Interpreting written instruc­
tions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a va­
riety of m achinists handtools and precision measuring instruments;
setting up and operating standard machine tools; shaping of metal
parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relat­
ing to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining;
knowledge of the working properties of the common metals; selecting
standard materials, parts, and equipment required for his work; fitting
and assembling parts into mechanical equipment.
In general, the
machinists work normally requires a rounded training in machineshop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.

Installs new machines or heavy equipment and dismantles and
installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant lay­
out are required. Work involves most of the following; Planning and
laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications;
using a variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop com­
putations relating to stresses, strength of materials, and centers of
gravity; alining and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools,
equipment, and parts to be used; installing and maintaining in good
order power transmission equipment such as drives and speed re ­
ducers. In general, the millwright* s work normally requires a rounded
training and experience in the trade acquired through a formal appren­
ticeship or equivalent training and experience.
OILER

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of
an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Examining
automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling
equipment and performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches, gauges, drills, or specialized equipment in dis­
assembling or fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts from
stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassembling and installing the
various assemblies in the vehicle and making necessary adjustments;
alining wheels, adjusting brakes and lights, or tightening body bolts.
In general, the work of the automotive mechanic requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprentice­
ship or equivalent training and experience.




Lubricates, with oil or grease, the moving parts or wearing
surfaces of mechanical equipment of an establishment.
PAINTER,

MAINTENANCE

Paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an
establishment.
Work involves the following: Knowledge of surface
peculiarities and types of paint required for different applications;
preparing surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing
putty or filler in nail holes and interstices; applying paint with spray
gun or brush.
May mix colors, oils, white lead, and other paint
ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency.
In general, the
work of the maintenance painter requires rounded training and ex­
perience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiva­
lent training and experience.

15

PIPEFITTER,

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE---- Continued

MAINTENANCE

Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe
and pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves most of the fol­
lowing: Laying out of work and measuring to locate position of pipe
from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes
of pipe to correct lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene
torch or pipe-cutting machine; threading pipe with stocks and dies;
bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven machines; assembling
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard
shop computations relating to pressures, flow, and size of pipe r e ­
quired; making standard tests to determine whether finished pipes meet
specifications.
In general, the work of the maintenance pipefitter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a
formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. Workers
primarily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or
heating systems are excluded.
PLUMBER,

MAINTENANCE

Keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order.
Work involves; Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installation of
vents and traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and
fixtures; opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber*s snake.
In general, the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprentice­
ship or equivalent training and experience.
SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheetmetal equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans,
shelves, locker’s, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing)
of an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Planning

Custodial

a nd

TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(Diemaker; jig maker; toolmaker; fixture maker; gauge maker)
Constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gauges, jigs, fix­
tures or dies for forgings, punching and other metal-forming work.
Work involves most of the following; Planning and laying out of work
from models, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifi­
cations; using a variety of tool and die maker's handtools and precision
measuring instruments, understanding of the working properties of
common metals and alloys; setting up and operating of machine tools
and related equipment; making necessary shop computations relating
to dimensions of work, speeds, feeds, and tooling of machines; heattreating of metal parts during fabrication as well as of finished tools
and dies to achieve required qualities; working to close tolerances;
fitting and assembling of parts to prescribed tolerances and allow­
ances; selecting appropriate materials, tools, and processes.
In
general, the tool and die maker's work requires a rounded training
in machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through a
formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die makers
in tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classification.

Material

ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER
Transports passengers between floors of an office building,
apartment house, department store, hotel or similar establishment.
Workers who operate elevators in conjunction with other duties such
as those of starters and janitors are excluded.
GUARD
Performs routine police duties, either at fixed post or on
tour, maintaining order, using arms or force where necessary. Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate and check on identity of
employees and other persons entering.




and laying out all types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blue­
prints, models, or other specifications; setting up and operating ail
available types of sheet-metal-working machines; using a variety of
handtools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assem ­
bling; installing sheet-metal articles as required.
In general, the
work of the maintenance sheet-metal worker requires rounded training
and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience

Movement

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
(Sweeper; charwoman; janitress)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working
areas and washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house,
or commercial or other establishment. Duties involve a combination
of the following; Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors;
removing chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture,
or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies
and minor maintenance services; cleaning lavatories, showers, and
restroom s. Workers who specialize in window washing are excluded.

16

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker;
stockman or stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant,
store, or other establishment whose duties involve one or more of
the following: Loading and unloading various materials and merchan­
dise on or from freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices;
unpacking, shelving, or placing materials or merchandise in proper
storage location; transporting materials or merchandise by hand truck,
car, or wheelbarrow. Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are
excluded.

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK---- Continued
other records; checking for shortages and rejecting damaged goods;
routing merchandise or materials to proper departments; maintaining
necessary records and files.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCKDRIVER

ORDER FILLER
(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from
stored merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips,
customers* orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to filling
orders and indicating items filled or omitted, keep records of out­
going orders, requisition additional stock, or report short supplies
to supervisor, and perform other related duties.

Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport
materials, merchandise, equipment, or men between various types of
establishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, ware­
houses, wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail estab­
lishments and customers' houses or places of business.
May also
load or unload truck with or without helpers, make minor mechanical
repairs, and keep truck in good working order. Driver-salesmen and
over-the-road drivers are excluded.
For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size
and type of equipment, as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated
on the basis of trailer capacity.)

PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing
them in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being
dependent upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the
type of container employed, and method of shipment. Work requires
the placing of items in shipping containers and may involve one or
more of the following; Knowledge of various items of stock in order
to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size of container;
inserting enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to
prevent breakage or damage; closing and sealing container; applying
labels or entering identifying data on container.
Packers who also
make wooden boxes or crates are excluded.
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is re­
sponsible for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials.
Shipping work involves; A knowledge of shipping procedures, prac­
tices, routes, available means of transportation and rates; and pre­
paring records of the goods shipped, making up bills of lading, post­
ing weight and shipping charges, and keeping a file of shipping records.
May direct or assist in preparing the merchandise for shipment.
Receiving work involves; Verifying or directing others in verifying
the correctness of shipments against bills of lading, invoices, or




Truckdriver
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,

(combination of sizes listed separately)
light (under 1V2 tons")
medium ( I V 2 to and~including 4 tons)
heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
heavy (over 4 tons, other thantrailer type)

TRUCKER, POWER
Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered
truck or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about
a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of
truck, as follows:
Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)
WATCHMAN
Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property
against fire, theft, and illegal entry.
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1959 0 — 492216

Occupational Wage Surveys

Occupational wage surveys are being conducted in 20 major labor markets during late 1958 and early 1959. These bulletins, numbered
1240-1 through 1240-20, when available, may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.,
or from any of the regional sa les offices shown below.
A summary bulletin (1240-21) containing data for all labor markets, combined with additional analysis w ill be issued early in I960.
A bulletin for the area listed below is now available.




Seattle, Wash., August 1958 - BLS Bull. 1240-1, price 25 cents





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102