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Occupational Wage Saivey
SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND,
CALIFORNIA
January 1950

Bulletin No. 996

U N I T E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
M A U R I C E J. T O B I N , S E C R E T A R Y




Bureau of Labor S t a t is ti c s
Ewan C la g u e , Commissioner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 35 cents




Contents
Pag©
Number
INTRODUCTION ............................. ............
THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA ..........................
Labor and Industry in the Bay Area ...............
S a i l i n g and Characteristics of the Data ••••••.•••
OCCUPATIONAL RATE STRUCTURE ...................... .
Cross-Industry Occupations ........
Office clerical occupations
..........
Maintenance occupations ..... ..................
Custodial, warehousing, and trucking occupations
Characteristic Industry Occupations
Straight-time rates or earnings ..... ••••••••••
Union wage scales ......... .................. .
Minimum Entrance Rates ...........................
SUPPLEMENTARY WAGE PRACTICES ............................................... .
TABLES:
1. Establishments and workers and number studied .............. ................
2. Average earnings for selected office occupations
............
3. Average earnings for selected office occupations inSan
Francisco County ...
I . Average earnings for selected maintenance, custodial,warehousing
t
and
trucking occupations ................. .......... ....................... .
5. Average earnings for selected occupations in machinery industries ..........
6 . Average earnings for selected occupations in ferrous foundries •••••••.....
7. Average earnings for selected occupations in fabricated structural steel
and ornamental metal work .......................... ................. •••••
8 . Average earnings for selected occupations In meat processing ...............
9. Average earnings for selected occupations in women’s coat and suit
manufacture ............... ...................... .................. .
10. Average earnings for selected occupations in industrial chemicals industries
11. Average earnings for selected occupations in department and clothing stores
12. Average earnings for selected occupations in office building service
1 3 . Average earnings for selected occupations in auto repair service ..•••••.•••
lit. Average earnings for selected occupations in power laundries ..... .
15. Average earnings for selected occupations in hospitals ...........
16. Average earnings for selected occupations in the railroad industry .......
17. Union wage scales in bakeries ..... ................. .......................
18. Union wage scales in building construction ............. ....................
19. Union wage scales for local transit operating employees
..... .
20. Union wage scales in the canning industry ....... .
21. Union wage scales In the malt liquor industry .........
22 . Union wage scales in the printing industries ....... •••••..................
23 . Union wage scales for motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s .... .
2 k . Union
wage scales
in ocean transport .........
25.
Union
wage scales
in stevedoring . ..........
.
2 6 . Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ..........
27 . Scheduled weekly hours ......
28. Paid holidays ......... ...................... ......... .
29 . Paid vacations •••••••••••••................ .............. .............. .
30. Paid sick leave ••••••.....•...... ................ ........................ .
31 • Nonproduction bonuses ...... ............................. ........... .......
32. Insurance and pension plans ...... .................. ................. .

1
1
2
3
3
3

k

li­

lt

k
5

6
6
2
7
lt
i
15
20
20

21
21

22
22
23

2k
2k
2k
25

25
26
26
2 6„
26
27

27
27
28
28

29
30

30
31
32
33
33

APPENDIX:
Descriptions of Occupations Studied ............................................

3^

I N D E X ........ .....................................................................

k9

In tro d u c tio n

Occupational wage rate information on a community basis serves a variety of impor­
tant uses. For example, employers frequently find it necessary to compare wage and salary
scales in their own establishments with the general local levels of pay. Both unions and em­
ployers use area wage information in collective bargaining. Various agencies of the Federal,
State, and local governments set wage scales for their day-rate personnel on the basis of
community-wide surveys. Firms seeking locations for new plants, distribution outlets, or new
offices usually give consideration to such information. In the administration of placement
in connection with unemployment conpensation, area wage statistics are needed in the evalua­
tion of the suitability of job offers. In many types of general economic analysis, informa­
tion on wages by area and type of work is of crucial importance.
For these reasons, the U. S. Department of labor through the Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics has given increasing enphasis to area wage studies, generally with respect to specific
industries. However, a cross-Industry approach has been used in recent years in the field of
office-clerical occupations, and in 19^9 the application of this approach to the collection
of wage data for industrial as well as office-clerical occupations was tested in six medium­
sized cities. 2 /
The present survey of wages in the San Francisco-Oakland area is among the first in
which the Bureau has utilized cross-industry methods of sampling to study office and plant
occupations in a major industrial center,
Earnings data have been compiled on a cross-in­
dustry basis for the following types of occupations:
(a) office-clerical;
(b) maintenance;
and (c) jobs, generally unskilled, related to the performance of custodial, warehousing, and
trucking functions. Other occupations that are characteristic in particular, important, local
industries have been studied as heretofore on an industry basis, within the framework of the
community survey. Even for tho^e occupational categories that lend themselves to study on a
cross-industry basis, separate data have been provided wherever possible for individual broad
industry divisions. In addition to information on wage rates, data on supplementary benefits,
such as vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension plans, have also been
collected and tabulated.
State, county, and municipal agencies in California (acting through the Bay Area
Salary Survey Committee) and Federal agencies participated in the planning of this study in
order that the results would meet their needs for wage and salary data as well as the needs
of employers, unions, and the general public.

l/ Prepared in the Bureau's Division of Wage Statistics by John L. Dana, Regional Wage
Analyst, Region IV, San Francisco, California. The planning and central direction of the pro­
gram was the responsibility of Toivo P. Kanninen and Louis E. Badenhoop under the general su­
pervision of Harry Ober, Chief of the Branch of Industry Wage Studies.
2/ Grand Rapids, Mich.; Portland, Me.; Rockford, 111.; Shreveport, La.; Spokane, Wash.;
and Trenton, N. J.
3/ Similar surveys were conducted in Buffalo, N. Y., in January 1950; Denver, Colo., No­
vember I9I 9; and Philadelphia, Pa., May 1950.
+




The San Francisco Bay Area
San Francisco and the network of Bay cities are strategically situated to form a
major hub of West Coast industry and commerce. Centered in a vast region abundantly endowed
with fertile valleys, rich mineral deposits and extensive timber stands, the area has great
natural advantages. From the Golden Gate at the Pacific Ocean, the series of bays extend to
the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers on the northeast and nearly to San
Jose on the Bouth, covering 1+50 square miles. Favorable climate in the valleys brings fruits
and vegetables to harvest every month in the year. About 15 percent of the Nation's gold out­
put is taken from mines near the celebrated 181+8 discovery point, and 60 other metallic and
nonmetallic minerals cure extracted in the Central California region. To the north, giant
redwood forests along the coast give way to only slightly less magnificent Douglas firs and
western pines inland.
The San Francisco Bay Area has grown to rank eighth in population among metropolitan
areas of the country. The discovery of gold on the American River more than a century ago set
in motion forces which brought the little-known trading post to its present position. With
the advent of World War II, San Francisco became the major continental base for the farflung
actions in the Pacific. During the war years, the port became second only to New York in
tonnages moved, and all economic activity advanced sharply. Some decline from wartime peaks
was inevitable, but a rapidly increasing population demanding all types of goods and services
and a greatly expanded industrial plant matching these demands with output indicate that war­
time gains will be largely maintained.
Labor and Industry in the Bay Area
Among the more than 2,000,000 individuals living in the closely integrated Bay Area
in early 1950> about 900,000 were employed in nonagricultural pursuits. More than a third of
these were engaged in trade, shipping, and related transportation activities; a little less
than a fifth were in services and a like proportion were in manufacturing. In the city of
San Francisco, with a little more than half the total employment of the area, more than twothirds of all employed were in shipping and trade, finance, and services. In other cities
ringing the Bay, Oakland was characterized chiefly as a manufacturing community with a wide
variety of production in processed foodstuffs, machinery, structural steel, and transportation
equipment. Emeryville and Richmond were significant as centers for the manufacture of paints,
industrial chemicals, and petroleum products. Steel mills located in Pittsburg, Niles, and
South San Francisco produced a wide variety of basic metal products. Sugar refining was im­
portant to Crockett, nonferrous metal smelting to Selby, and Naval maintenance and ship re­
pair work to Vallejo and Alameda, as well as to the Hunter's Point section of San Francisco.
Excluding managers, officials, and professional personnel, Bay Area manufacturing
employed about 160,000 workers in January 1950. Of these, more than a fifth worked in estab­
lishments processing foodstuffs, both for home consumption and for export. This proportion,
however, varies seasonally, rising to nearly a third at the peak of fruit and vegetable can­
ning when 1+0,000 workers are added. Production of chemicals and petroleum products accounted
for approximately 22,000 workers. Secondary metal manufacture including a variety of machinery
and other fabricated products employed close to 20,000. Shipbuilding and ship repair work
provided employment for another 16,000. Employees in the printing and publishing industry,
largely in San Francisco, numbered nearly 11,000. Women's apparel, almost wholly in San
Francisco, had about 6,000 workers, and ether major activities with aggregate employment up­
wards of 30,000 included furniture manufacture,
stone, clay and glass products, basic steel,
and motor vehicles.




2.

San Francisco particularly, and other Bay cities to a lesser degree, had sizable
employments in trade and transportation. As a major port engaged in worldwide trade and almost
equally broad domestic commerce, a large work force is necessary to move goods and produce.
About 70,0 0 0 workers were engaged in wholesaling activities in the Bay Area and a substantially
larger number were employed in retail trade. Major railroads; trucking, airlines, ocean
transport, harbor facilities, and dockside operations accounted for another 50,000 workers.
With San Francisco a leading convention city and the region a Mecca for tourists,
the Bay Area's service industries loom large. Workers employed in hotels, theaters, auto re­
pair shops, hospitals, and personal and business services totaled approximately 90,000.
Activities in real estate and a booming building industry, which completed 20,000
new homes for Bay Area dwellers in 19^9* provided employment to nearly 60,000 in January 1950*
Public utilities supplying heat, water, power, and local transportation for the area accounted
for another 25,000 workers.
City, county, State, and Federal government Jurisdictions were significant in the
Bay Area economy in 1950, employing close to 60,000. District and regional offices of many
branches of the California State Government are located in San Francisco. Almost 200 Federal
agencies directly responsible to Washington are also located throughout the area. In addition
to several naval shipyard installations, huge military supply depots are maintained, the
Presidio of San Francisco remains a military post as in early Spanish days, and a U. S. Mint
has functioned since its establishment in 1854 .
San Francisco has long had a widespread union movement. Nearly 95 percent of the
plant workers in the industry groups surveyed by the Bureau in January 1950 were employed In
establishments having written contracts with unions. But, the proportion of office workers
employed under union contracts was substantially less. In all Industry groups combined, about
1 in 8 office workers was employed by a firm that engaged in collective bargaining with union
representatives on conditions of employment for office workers. The proportion of office
workers covered by union agreements amounted to nearly a third in retail trade and transporta­
tion, communication, and other public utilities (except railroads); all of the office workers
in the railroad industry were covered by contract.
Sampling and Characteristics of the Data
The study of occupational wages in the San Francisco - Oakland area covered 6 broad
industry divisions. Office, maintenance, custodial, warehousing, and trucking Jobs reported
in tables 2 , 3 , and k were studied in establishments with more than 100 workers in manufac­
turing, retail trade, and transportation, communication, and other public utilities, and in
establishments with more than 20 workers in wholesale trade, finance, insurance, real estate,
and service industries. Among the Industries in which characteristic Jobs were studied, the
survey generally covered establishments with more than 20 workers; the study of meat products,
office building service, and women's coat and suit manufacture covered establishments with 8
or more workers; and the study of auto repair service covered repair departments of retail
dealer establishments and general automobile repair garages employing 5 or more workers.
Smaller establishments were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in the oc­
cupations studied to warrant their inclusion in the survey. A greater proportion of large
than of small establishments was studied in order to maximize the proportion of workers sur­
veyed with available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain size, however, was
given Its proper weight in the computation of the data.




Table 1.--ESTABLISHMENT'S AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN THE SAN ERANCISCO - OAKLAND AREA
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JANUARY 1950

Employment

Number of establishments

Item

Estimated
Estimated ^
total
total
within
in all
scope of
Industries
study
1/
2/

Estimated
Estimated
total
total
within
Studied in all
scope of
industries
study
1/
£/

In establishments
studied

Total

Office

Industry Division

39,232
Manufacturing

Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••*•••«••••••
Wholesale trade
Retail trade
Finance, insurance, and real estate..
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities
Railroads
Services:
InailF+.T''t«c' f
’
.nvfiT’tl 3 / titTi*--**-ff
TiyliiFtT’?
"pn not ooVfiTpd

2 ,65 9

12+
+1

51+3,600

31+6,1+00

1 6 0 ,0 3 0

1*7 ,9 8 0

3,851

393

118

1 5 8 ,9 0 0

102,100

1+6,690

1 2 ,1 1 * 0

30 6

38 l+,700

53
58
35

6 8 ,3 0 0
1 11 ,5 0 0

113 , 3^0
6,510
2 l+,510
6,130

3 5 ,8 1*0
i 36o
*,

35,900

2l+J+,300
l+l+,000
1+ 1,8 0 0
2 5 ,6 0 0

63,100
ll+,200

6i+,8oo
ll+,000

1+ 6 ,16 0

13,950

8,91*0
6 ,21*0

35,381
^,2 3 8
1^ ,0 2 7
3 , 1+00

2,266
751+
18 9

191

6,82 0
5 ,7 2 0

1 , 19^
65

96
10

33

7,970
i+,i +87

1,0 2 6

117

72,673
19,027

5l+,100
-

1 6 ,0 8 0
-

3 ,7 6 0
-

39,232

2 ,6 5 9

12+
+1

51+3,600

31+6,1+00

160,030

1+7,980

9 1,1+ 0 0
1+1+,800
7 3 ,8 0 0
7 1 ,5 0 0
2 5 ,5 0 0
3 6 ,2 0 0

76,930
31,290

2 0 ,0 5 0
8 ,6 3 0
9 ,18 0
6 ,5 9 0
1 ,8 6 0

10

Size of Establishment

All size groups

1,001 and over
SD] - 1,000 ............................
- 5 0 0 .. ................ .......... .
101 - 250 .... . . . ..................................... ..
51 - 100 ............................................................ ..
21 - 50 ..............................................................................
1 _ 20 ,................................

38
6b

18 7

1+70
81+5
2,183
3 5 ,^ 5

38
61+
18 7
1+70
381

32
1+
3
72
10 8

1,205

55
91

(£/)

(2/)

9 1,1+ 0 0
l+l+,800
73,800

71 ,5 00
57,900
6 6 ,7 0 0

137,500

(2 /)

26,870

17,500
l+,050
3 ,0 8 0
(2 /)

1*530

(2 /)

l/ Includes establishments with 1 or more workers in the San Francisco - Oakland Metropolitan Area (Alameda,
Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Solano Counties).
2 / Office, maintenance, custodial, warehousing, and trucking jobs reported in tables 2 , 3, and 4 were surveyed
in establishments with more than 100 workers in manufacturing, retail trade, and transportation, communication, and
other public utilities, and in establishments with more than 20 workers in wholesale trade, finance,
insurance,
real estate, and service industries; exceptions made in industries in which characteristic jobs were surveyed are
noted in footnote to tables 5 through 1 5 .
i
^
n
3 / Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair services; such professional services as
engTneering, architectural, accounting, auditing and bookkeeping firms; hospitals; motion pictures; and nonprofit
membership organizations.




Nearly a fourth of the 346,000 workers employed, in January 1950 in the industry
divisions and size groups studied are accounted for in the 104 men's jobs and 67 w o m e n s jobs
for which earnings data are presented in the accompanying tables (tables 2 through 16) ♦
The
office jobs studied alone accounted for more than 40,000 workers--7>931 men, 32,410 women.
The largest job categories, among those studied and presented on a cross-industry basis, were:
janitors, porters, and cleaners (5>056 men, 9^3 women); general stenographers (4,831 women,
53 men); stock handlers and hand truckers (4,711 men); truck drivers (
3,861 men); clerk-typists
(2,873 women); secretaries (2,523 women); and order fillers (2,273 men). 4/ The largest job
categories studied in characteristic local industries were registered nurses in hospitals
(2,155 women) and class A automobile mechanics in auto repair shops (2,086 men).
The earnings information in the report excludes overtime pay and nonproduction bo ­
nuses but includes incentive earnings for those workers employed under some form of incentive
wage system. The monetary value of perquisites such as meals or lodging accomodations provided
for hospital employees is not reflected in the earnings data shown for these workers. Weekly
hours, reported for office, department and clothing store, and hospital occupations, refer to
the work schedules for which the salaries are paid. The number of workers presented refers
to the estimated total employment in all establishments within the scope of the study and not
to the number actually surveyed. Data are shown only for full-time workers,
i.e., those who
were hired to work the establishments full-time schedule of hours for the given occupational
classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office workers and to all plant workers
as specified in the individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of all
workers employed in offices (or plant departments) which observe the practice in question,
except in the first section of table 27 , where scheduled weekly hours of women office workers
alone are presented. Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving
the specific benefits may be smaller. The summary of vacation and sick leave plans is limited
to formal arrangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at
the discretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans are further limited to
those providing full pay for at least some amount of time off and exclude health insurance
even though employers pay for it.

O c c u p a tio n a l R ate S tru c tu re
Bay Area wage and salary levels are generally higher than in most other metropolitan
wage areas.
Collective bargaining during 1949 resulted in no broad rise in occupational rates
throughout the Bay Area. Many contracts were negotiated during the year with no changes in
scales. In some negotiations, entire emphasis was placed on pensions, health and welfare
plans, and other non-wage benefits. Rate adjustments, where obtained, were predominantly in

4/

Exclusive of employment in the railroad industry




3.

the neighborhood of 5 to 10 cents an hour. Advances of more than 10 cents an hour occurred
chiefly in printing, trade, public schools, and the railroads. Among the notable settlements
featuring pension programs and health and welfare plans were those concluded in basic steel
companies, metal fabricating establishments, and the maritime industry. City, State, and
Federal employees, including members of the armed forces, participated in moderate salary in­
creases .
In the discussion of wages which follows, two main occupational groupings are dis­
tinguished: (1 ) cross-industry occupations - office clerical occupationa, maintenance occupa­
tions, and custodial, warehousing, and trucking occupations; (2 ) characteristic industry oc­
cupations. The first group of occupations was studied on a cross-industry basis from employer
pay roll records. These occupations are typically found in all or a number of industries.
In the main, the characteristic industry occupations are peculiar to a specific industry. As
indicated below, straight-time average rates or earnings are shown for some industries, while
union scales are shown for others.
Information for the railroad industry is presented separately In this report and
has not been combined with the data in any of the other tables. This has been done in recog­
nition of the fact that wages in the railroad industry bear strong imprints of interstate
considerations that have evolved over a long period of time. Some of these general considera­
tions are: Nation-wide uniformity in rates of pay for certain key occupations;
uniform
Nation-wide minimum rates that affect the entire range of occupational rates; and special
modes of wage payment and related practices.
Cross-Industry 0ccupations
Office clerical occupations - Women employed as general stenographers in the San Fran­
cisco - Oakland area averaged $51*50 weekly in January 1950* Average weekly salaries for
other nonsupervisory women office workers ranged from $ 39*50 for routine file clerks to $70
for accountants. Secretaries were paid at the rate of $59 > on the average, and clerk-typists
received $1+1+. 50. Among the general clerk categories, the average for the Junior stage was
$^3*50; the intermediate, $51.50; and the senior, $60. Average salaries for 18 of 29 office
occupations surveyed were in the $l+5-$55 bracket (table 2 ) . Salaries paid women in offices
of manufacturing industries were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing industries; in 18
of 25 Job categories permitting such a comparison, women in the manufacturing division held a
salary advantage of $3 or more a week. Within the nonmanufacturing group of industries, sal­
aries paid in transportation, communication, and other public utilities (excluding railroads)
were above the average scales for nonmanufacturing.
Average salaries of men ranged from $39 for office boys to $ 98.50 for senior ac­
countants. General clerks at the Junior level averaged $1+9, intermediate, $59*50, and senior,
$ 67 .50 . Accounting clerks were at an average weekly scale of $60,50 and order clerks and
pay-roll clerks averaged $61+.50. Average salaries were about the same in manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing industries. A comparison of salaries paid men and women in the same Jobs
indicated a wage advantage of $5 or more for men in Jobs requiring a substantial amount of
training but salary levels were about the same in routine office Jobs. Differences in average
salaries for men and women in particular occupations generally do not reflect differences in
rates within the same establishment.




k.

Office worker salaries in San Francisco County 5/, presented in table 3>vere higher
than general area averages in about half of the occupations; only in a few cases, however,
did the difference in average salaries exceed $ 1 .
Maintenance occupations - Most Bay Area skilled maintenance workers received between
$1.80 and $2.00 an hour in January 1950 • As shown in table k , carpenters and electricians
averaged $1.98 and $1.97, respectively. Machinists, the largest maintenance trade group
studied, had an average rate of $1.91. The average paid rates for mechanics, millwrights,and
painters were somewhat lower. The general average for helpers employed to assist workers at
these specialized crafts was $1.53 an hour. General utility maintenance men, found prin­
cipally in smaller establishments where specialization in maintenance work is impractical,
averaged $ 1.82 on all-industry basis.
Custodial, warehousing, and trucking occupations - Men janitors, porters, and cleaners
(listed in table
averaged $ 1 . ^ an hour on an all-industry basis, $ 1*33 in manufacturing,
2
and $ 1 .2 1 in nonmanufacturing establishments; within the latter group average pay rates ranged
from $1.17 in the service industries to $1.31 in the transportation and utility group. Watch­
men averaged $ 1.3 5 in manufacturing, $ 1.2 2 in nonmanufacturing, and $ 1.29 in all industries
combined.
Stock handlers and hand truckers employed in factories, warehouses, and stores aver­
aged $1.51 an hour with $1.^7 recorded in manufacturing and $1.53 in nonmanufacturing. Order
fillers averaged a cent more and packers, employed principally in wholesale trade, averaged
$1.^9• Fork lift operators received $1.5^ an hour, which was 3 cents more than the average
hourly rate paid power truckers operating equipment other than of the fork-lift type. Drivers
handling light pick-up and local delivery trucks earned $1.7^ an hour, on the average. Drivers
of medium-size trucks (l^to k tons) averaged a cent more and operators of heavy, trailer-type
trucks were paid $ 1.86 on the average.
Characteristic Industry Occupations
Straight-time rates or earnings
As shown above for the cross-industry occupations, the wage or salary information
for the first 12 industries below reflects rates or straight-time earnings derived from em­
ployer pay-roll records.
Machinery manufacture - Production machinists, numerically the most important Job
group in the machinery industries, averaged $1.75 in January 1950. Tool and die makers, the
highest paid among the 14 jobs studied in machinery, were at an average hourly scale of $ 2 .11*.
In the assembler categories, class A men received $1.7^, class B $1.50, and class C $ l . i o , on
the average. Class A hand welders were paid $ 1.89 and class A drill-press operators (singleand multiple-spindle) were at a $ 1.59 hourly figure (table 5 ).
Ferrous foundries - Among classifications surveyed in ferrous foundries, shake-out
men received $1.39 and wood patternmakers, $2.19 an hour. Hand coremakers and floor molders
were each at the $ 1.7 7 level (table 6 ).

5/

San Francisco County and city are conterminous.




Fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal work - Structural fitters (class A)
had an average hourly rate of $ 1 .80, exceeded among the plant jobs studied only by the $ 1.86
received by class A layout men (table 7). Average rates for other jobs in this industry,
closely allied with basic steel were: electric-bridge-crane operators (10 tons and over),
$1,49; class A power-shear operators, $1.51; flame-cutting-machine operators, $1.63; and
class A hand welders, $1.72.
Meat products, independent producers - Straight-time average hourly earnings of
$2.05 or more were reported for men in major occupations studied in meat packing and whole­
saling, and in the manufacture of sausages and other prepared meat products. General cutters
in beef cutting were paid $ 2 .08, on the average, and general butchers in cattle killing re­
ceived $ 2.06 and sausage makers received $2 ,05 . Washers and shacklers in cattle killing opera­
tions averaged $1.60 and $1.62, respectively. Women packers in sausage departments of these
establishments averaged $ 1 . 2 1 an hour (table 8 ).
W o m e n s coats and suits - Hourly averages of $2 or more were also not uncommon among
jobs found in the manufacture of women*s coats and suits. Earnings of individuals in the
various classifications studied in this important branch of San Francisco* s apparel industry
varied widely, however, since many operations are placed under incentive systems of wage pay­
ment. Men operating sewing machines under the single-hand method of production
averaged
$2.97 an hour (table 9). Women greatly outnumbered men in this job and averaged $1.96. Ma­
chine pressers earned $2.92 and cutters and markers (primarily men) $2.78, on the average. At
the other end of the scale, hand sewers (predominantly women) averaged $1.47 and women hand
pressers received $ 1 .68.
Industrial chemicals - Class A chemical operators working in the East B a y ’s impor­
tant industrial chemical industry were at an average $1.81 hourly wage. Class B chemical
operators received $1.73. Operators* helpers averaged $1.6l, and drum fillers, $1.54. These
earnings figures relate to men workers. Women laboratory assistants, the smallest job group
studied, averaged $ 1 . 7 1 on an hourly basis (table 10 ).
Department and clothing stores - Volume of business in Bay Area department and
clothing stores was directly reflected in weekly earnings of the thousands of sales persons
employed in these establishments. A percentage of sales, or a commission, was typically paid
to sales clerks. This arrangement resulted in average earnings of $91 weekly for men selling
furniture and bedding, $78 for men in men’s clothing departments, and $ 65.50 for men selling
men’s furnishings. Women averaged $54.50 in the sale of better dresses in upstairs store de­
partments and $48 in the sale of dresses in basement departments. Other women sales clerks
in upstairs store departments averaged $56 in suits and coats; $47 in women’s accessories and
$44.50 in notions and trimmings. Among non-selling Jobs, men tailors performing alterations
on men’s garments averaged $65 and women operating passenger elevator averaged $45 .50 , or
$1.14 an hour for a 40-hour week (table 1 1 ).
Office building service - Women operating passenger elevators in downtown Oakland
office buildings were at an average $ 1 . 1 1 an hour, a little under the general average for this
type of work in department and clothing stores in the entire area. On the other hand, women
in this classification in downtown San Francisco office buildidgs averaged $1.26. Women
cleaners in Oakland office buildings also received less ($1.05) than their counterparts in
San Francisco ($1.16). Men Janitors averaged $1.15 in Oakland and 10 cents more in San Fran­
cisco (table 12 ).
Auto repair service - Automotive mechanics (class A) working in East Bay auto repair
shops and repair departments of dealer establishments were receiving $ 1.92 an hour, on the
average, in January 1950. This conpared with a $1.99 figure for comparable work on the San




Francisco side of the Bay. Similarly, East Bay tody repairmen averaged $2.06 , West Bay $2.Ilf;
East Bay greasers $1.50, West Bay $1.53 (table 13).
Power laundries - About four-fifths of the more than 500 women operating flatwork
finish machines in Bay Area laundries were paid hourly rates slightly under $1 and most of
the others were at scales just over this figure. Women on machine shirt-pres sing operations
averaged $ 1.09 and identifiers, who sort, examine and list articles in the cleaning operations,
averaged $l.llf. Men operating extractor and washing machines received $1.35 and $l.lf2 an
hour, respectively (table Ilf).
Hospitals - Women registered nurses employed in hospitals averaged $52; rates for
more than 2,100 individuals in this profession ranged from less than $Vf .50 to more than
$62.50 (table 15). Bates generally falling within these same limits were paid women indus­
trial nurses employed in manufacturing establishments, but these nurses averaged $57* Average
salaries for women in other hospital occupations were: $53 for X-ray technicians; $55*50 for
dieticians; $57 for laboratory technicians; and $86.50 for pharmacists. Men were generally
paid somewhat more in these jobs.
Bailroad occupations - Bates of pay in selected office, shop maintenance and ware­
house jobs in the railroad industry of the Bay Area are presented in table 16. Average weekly
pay in railroad offices ranged from $lf8 for office boys to $7^.50 paid to men accountants.
Women general stenographers averaged $ 60, and junior clerks averaged $55 for a If0-hour week.
Straight-time average hourly rates of $1.7^ were reported for skilled maintenance
workers (electricians, machinists, and general utility maintenance men). Helpers to workers
in the maintenance crafts were paid $l.lf6 an hour. Stock handlers and hand truckers averaged
$1.39 and power truckers were at an average $1.^-5 rate. Workers performing janitorial duties
averaged $ 1 .33 .
Union wage scales
The information for the following 9 industries relates to the minimum wage rates
and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade-unions.
Bakeries - Union agreements with Oakland bakeries provided for minimum hourly scales
of $1.80 for ovenmen in hand shops and $ 1.96 for ovenmen in machine shops. In San Francisco,
such workers had basic scales of $ 1.87 in hand shops and $1.96 in machine shops. Among other
bakery classifications, the rate for dividers, molders, and roll-machine operators was the
same for both cities, $1.87. Hourly rates for bench machine helpers in San Francisco were
set at $1.50 for the first year and $ 1.58 for the second year of service. Weekly hours worked
in Oakland hand shops were k2; in San Francisco, ifO. Weekly hours worked in machine shops in
both cities were 38 (table 17).
Building construction - The basic hourly wage scales among 7 major trades of union
workers in the construction industry ranged from $ 1.55 for building laborers to $3 for brick­
layers and plasterers in both Oakland and San Francisco. Minimum rates for all classifications
covered were identical in both cities. Electricians and plumbers were at a $2.50 figure,
carpenters at $ 2.33 and painters at $ 2 .1 5 . A l- -hour week was in effect for all trades except
i0
bricklayers in San Francisco and plasterers in Oakland, who were paid overtime rates after 30
hours a week and painters in both cities who had a basic workweek of 35 hours (table 18 ).
889431 0 - 50 - 2




5.

Local transit operating employees - Operators of busses, and motormen and conductors
of bridge trains in Oakland's local transit system had basic scales of $1.^2 hourly for the
first 6 months of service, $1.^7 thereafter, in early 1950- In San Francisco, operators and
conductors of busses, trackless trolley, streetcars, and cable cars were at a standard $ 1 .5 1
hourly rate, regardless of service. Hours of work in Oakland were k-0 a week, in San Francisco
kd (table 19 ).
Canning, fruits and vegetables - In the fruit and vegetable canning industry in
Oakland, union scales for all classifications were determined according to a job evaluation
system resulting in 5 job brackets for men workers (table 20). Thus, among men workers,
Bracket I, covering the highest production skills, commanded an hourly rate of $1.65 i . Janu­
n
ary 1950 i and Bracket V with the lowest skills called for $1.20, Among women workers, floorladies were paid at the $1.20 rate and unassigned women workers were at a $1,05 rate. Since
incentive method of wage payment for some job categories is common practice in many canneries,
a minimum guaranteed hourly rate of $ 1.0 5 was set for either men or women paid on the basis
of output, regardless of job classification. Average hourly earnings under such conditions
are determined by the volume of material handled by the workers involved. Weekly hours for
cannery workers were ^0. In periods of high seasonal activity, "exempt" weeks may be claimed
in accordance with Fair Labor Standards Act provisions. During such "exempt" weeks, ^8 hours
may be worked before premium overtime is effective.
Malt liquor Industry - San Francisco's malt liquor industry paid weekly minimum
scales of $76.50 to brewers on daytime work and $ 78.50 and $ 80.50 for work on second and
third shifts. Bottlers and shipping and receiving clerks were paid $72 for first-shift work,
$7^ on the second shift, and $76 on the third shift. The ifO-hour week for all shifts was the
practice in the-brewing industry (table 2 1 ).
Printing - In book and job printing, hand compositors and cylinder pressmen were at
a basic union scale of $2.63 an hour in both Oakland and San Francisco establishments. The
rate for press assistants and feeders in both cities was $2.08 on cylinder presses and $ 1.65
on platen presses. In newspaper work, web pressmen in both cities were at hourly scales of
$2.^9 for day work and $2.62 for night work. Hours of work in Bay Area printing trades were
37i weekly (table 22 ).
Motortruck drivers and helpers - Union scales for motortruck drivers varied widely
according to materials transported, size of truck, and length of service. Hourly rates for
Oakland drivers conveying building materials ranged from $ 1.6 3 on trucks of J+~cubic yards or
less capacity to $2.23 on trucks with capacity of 8-cubic yards or more. In petroleum tanktruck work, rates were scaled according to length of service of drivers, ranging from $ 1.63
at start to $1.78 after 2 years in Oakland, and $ 1.6 5 at start to $1.82 after 2 years In San
Francisco. Higher rates were provided for drivers conveying newspapers and periodicals
(table 23 ).
Ocean transport - Among offshore unlicensed maritime personnel, the basic monthly
rate for able-bodied seamen standing watches was $226. The scale Ibr ordinary seamen was $186.
Boatswains, not standing watches, had minimum monthly rates of $290 on vessels under 10,000
tons, $305 on vessels of 10,000 to 15,000 tons, and $320 on vessels of 15,000 to 20,000 tons.
These and other deck department ratings received $ 7.50 per month in addition to basic scales
as a clothing allowance. Hours of work while at sea were fixed at
for men not standing
watches and 56 for watch standers. Premium overtime was paid for 8 hours of the 56 worked by
watch standers, and men not standing watches were further compensated over basic scales at the
rate of $25 monthly in lieu of work at an overtime rate (table 2H).




In engine-room departments tbe basic rate for daytime firemen was $251.25; for watch­
standing firemen, $221.68. The basic rates for all members of engine-room departments included
a $7.50 monthly allowance for clothing. Chief reefer engineers, standing watch, were paid
basic scales according to type of vessel worked; rates ranged from $ 321.05 to $ 369.56 monthly.
Hours of work in engine-room departments were the same as those applying to deck departments
and the same provisions for overtime payments and payment in lieu of overtime were in force.
Basic rates for stewards department ratings varied according to types of vessels
(freighter or passenger) and the kind of trade (off-shore or intercoastal). Chief stewards
on freighters engaged in off-shore trade had a rate of $293*79 & month, while those in the
Alaska service were at a $316.^2 figure. Second stewards working on class A passenger vessels
received $370.15, and class B passenger vessels, $300, as basic rates. Allowances of $7*50
monthly for clothing were included in all basic rates for the stewards department. Hours of
work at sea were 56 weekly with provisions for 8 hours at premium overtime.
Stevedoring - On the San Francisco waterfront and on docks throughout the Bay Area,
the hourly scale for longshoremen handling general cargo was $1.82. Penalty rates taking the
place of the basic scale for handling specifically designated commodities, not considered
general cargo, ranged from $ 1.92 for handling paper and pulp in packages of 300 pounds or
more to $ 3 .6k for explosives. Hatch tenders and lift-truck-Jitney drivers had a basic rate
10 cents an hour above that for longshoremen, and received penalty cargo rates as well. The
basic rate for gang bosses was $1.97 and they also received penalty cargo rates. The maximum
straight-time hours allowed per week by the union agreement covering longshoremen was 30
(table 25 ).
Minimum entrance rates
Generally included in the formalized rate structure of a large majority of Bay Area
firms in all industries was the designation of minimum entrance rates for the employment of
plant workers with no previous work experience. Among manufacturing firms the practice was
widespread, particularly among larger companies. Prescribed scales for inexperienced employees
were also found in wholesale trade and services, but to a smaller degree. Least formalized
In this respect were establishments in retail trade. Although entrance rates set by individual
establishments in all industries ranged from 65 cents to $ 1.80 an hour, major employment was
in firms specifying rates of 95 cents to $ 1.5 5 (table 26 ).

S u p p le m e n ta ry W a g e P ractices
Shift differentials
Among Bay Area manufacturing industries typically operating under conditions re­
quiring shift employment, payment of differentials over first-shift rates for both secondand third-shift workers was general. About 5 percent of total employment in machinery manu­
facturing and ferrous foundries were employed on second-shift work in January 1950* In indus­
trial chemicals and petroleum refining, shift operations were more extensive, with 18 percent
and 30 percent of total employment, respectively, on extra-shift work. The differential paid
second-shift workers in machinery amounted to 10 percent over daytime scales, and a differ­
ential of 8 cents an hour was reported in ferrous foundries. Uniform practices were not found,




however, in industrial chemical establishments; hourly differentials ranged from k to 6 cents
for second-shift workers, and from 6 to 12 cents for third-shift workers and one firm reported
payment of an additional 10 and 15 percent of base pa,y to these workers. In petroleum refin­
ing, second-shift workers were paid an additional b cents an hour and third-shift workers re­
ceived 6 cents.
Scheduled workweek
The ^0-hour week was most common for both office and plant workers in all industries
in January 1950* About 80 percent of all office workers were on this schedule with almost all
others on a shorter workweek. Almost all plant employees were an a kO-hour schedule (table 27 )
.
Paid holidays
Provisions for paid holidays were in effect for virtually all office workers and for
9 of every 10 plant workers (table 28).
Typically, arrangements called for 6 to 8 days
allowed through the year, except in the finance, insurance, and real estate group In which
10 to 1 1 -- days were granted as a general policy.
g
Paid vacations
Almost all Bay Area establishments allowed paid vacations to both office and plant
workers after a year of service. Among office workers, ^ in 5 workers were eligible for va­
cations of 2 weeks after a year of service. For plant workers a 1-week vacation was the
general rule. With the completion of 2 years of service, almost all office workers were
granted vacations of 2 weeks and a majority of plant workers were eligible for similar leave
(table 29 ).
Paid sick leave
About two-fifths of the office workers and nearly a third of the plant workers were
employed in establishments reporting formal provisions for paid sick leave. Allowances, after
completion of a year of service, ranged from less than 5 to more than 20 days a year, with 10
days most commonly provided for office workers and 5 days provided for plant workers (table 30 ).
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities (excluding railroads) was the only
industry group with more than half of total employment covered by formal sick leave plans.
Nonproduction bonuses
The payment of nonproduction bonuses, typically at Christmas or year-end, were re­
ported by establishments accounting for a third of the office workers and an eighth of the
plant workers In the Bay Area (table 31)*
Insurance and pension plans
Insurance or pension plans financed wholly or in part by employers were in force in
establishments employing 87 percent of Bay Area office workers and a somewhat smaller propor­
tion of plant workers. Life insurance plans were the most commonly accepted security measures
in all industries, with health insurance coverage also found in firms with a substantial num­
ber of employees. Establishments having retirement pension plans (beyond Federal Old Age and
Survivors* Insurance) employed nearly 50 percent of the office workers and l-0 percent of the
j
plant workers. Mere than four-fifths of both office and plant workers in transportation,
communication, and other public utilities (excluding railroads) were employed by firms with
employee pension plans (table 32 ).




7
Table

2.— - O F F I C E O C C U P A T I O N S

(Average earnings

1/ and. w e e k l y scheduled, h o u r s

f o r selected occupations by industry division)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division 2j

$
$
$
Weekly
Under 3 2 .5 0 35.00 37.50
Number
Weekly
sched- Hourly
A
and
of
uled earnings earnings
workers
32*50 under
hours
3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0

Humber 0/ workers receiving strainght-time weekly earnings of $
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5
U .O 42.50 U .0 0 4 7 *5 0 50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 85.OO 90.00 95.00 100.00
OO

U .O U2.50 U O 47.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 85.OO 90.00 95*00 100.00
OO
5.O

and
over

Men
Accountants, senior ..........................
Manufacturing........ .....................
Nonmanufacturing
•.......................
Wholesale trade .......................... .
Accountants • «■•••..... *.............. ........
Manufacturing ..•«•••••••••••.... ..••••*•••
Nonmanufacturing
•........ ••••••.....
Wholesale t r a d e ..........................
Retail trade ••••.•••..... ...............
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities .
Services .•••••»•••....... .
Bookkeepers, h a n d .................. ..........
Manufacturing .................... ..........
Nonmanufacturing
..... ..................
Wholesale trade •••••••«•.••.............
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities •
Services ...............•••••.............
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B
....
Nonmanufacturing J j j ..... .................. .
Wholesale trade ........ ..................
Clerks, accounting ••••••...•...... .
Manufacturing..............................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Wholesale trade ...... ....................
Retail trade .............................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities •
Services • •••*...................... ......
Clerks, file, class B
.... ........... .
Nonmanufacturing...........................
Clerks, general, senior .......... *...........
Manufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufacturing
......... ............. .
Wholesale trade •......... ......... ......
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities •

3*7
155

192
79

39-5
39-5

39.0
39.0

$2-49
2 .U9
2 .5 1
2 .6 9

2
2

9 8 .5 0

98.00
105.00
“

-

-

S30
339
491
199
U
S

4 0 .0
39.5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
U .5
0

86
97

Uo.o
U1.0

1.89

7 7 .5 0

-

290
SI
209
SI

uo.o
Uo.o
uo.o
Uo.o

1 .8 0
1 .7 9
1 .8 0
1 .7 5

72.00

•*

27
91

U0.5
Uo.o

1.6U
1.90

66.50
76.00

-

p.

171
168
30

U .O
O
Uo.o
uo.o

1.20
1.19
1.26

U8.00
U .5 0
7
5O.5O

—
-

-

1-53

6O
.5O
6U.Q
0
57.OO
52.50
60.00

-

-

-

-

5
5

9
9

M

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .2 8 5

636
6U
9
I83
68

39.5
Uo.o
39-5

39.5
U2.0

1 .9 0
1 .9 6

1.88
1.85
1.89

7 7 .5 0
7 5 .0 0
7 3 .0 0
7 6 .5 0

1 .9 5

78.00

1.60
l.UU
1-33

I.U3

106
109

39.0
U0.5

1.36

32

39.0
38.5

1.0 1

39.5
39.5

22
932

76.00

7 1 .5 0

72.00
70.00

-

-

-

60.50
55.OO

-

•97

3 9 .5 0
3 7 .5 0

*

67.50
68.50
67.50
62.00
76.00

1 .5 5

166
766
U
06

39*5
Uo.o

1 .7 1
1-73
1-71
1 .5 5

231

Uo.o

1.90

-

-

a.
-

«
•

-

-

-

8
8
-

•
-

-

-

-

-

-

U

12
8

20
6
lU

U
O
2

5
5

20

-

21
20

-

5U
25
29
-

102

72
36
36
7

25
~

18
-

63

78
38
U
O
28

3
3

13
85

198

69
35
3^
*•

27
27
7

-

16

13
13
3

36
36

28
28
-

-

U
2U

12
12

2
-

2

1
1

-

-

-

2

-

“

-

-

-

-

20

1
2

6
6
-

-

39

13

-

-

2
3^
1

lU
8
U

10
63
23
8

-

-

36

27
13

-

-

U
9
10

2
2
2
-

2
2

-

-

•*

-

••
-

6
U
2

m

-

-

21
21

16

78

-

9
7

2
5

1

-

17

U

73

38

1U

26

139

109

89

-

33
56
30
3

116

13

37
72
27
5

10

17

9

U

8

3

7

10

20
2
1

8
20

11
2

U
5

11

19

u

32

2

30

26
20

10

20

2U
lU
10

U
U
22
22

23

58
81
28
7

3
23

6
3
3

-

75
37
38

193

77




2

69
36
33
25

130
U
6
8U

9

13

35

9

7

23

-

6

15

9
7

6

U
1

21

71

29
9

6
6
»
-

-

-

-

p.
-

-

-

p.
-

p.
-

p
*
•
-

8

8

20
-

7
7

1
-

1

5
-

-

-

1

U
O

20

l

•
-

-

-

-

p.
-

U
U
11

68
60
8

9
9
M
-

2
2

-

p.
-

-

-

lU

28
1
27

m

12

-

3

2

52

6
12

5U
-

63

20

p
.

3

7U
39
35

156
59
97

120
U
U

2U

3
15

16
16

15

5

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

p.

-

12

7

60

38

m

-

-

-

-

60

38

61
1
60

81

-

-

-

52

77

112
36
76
-

1U9
1U0

33

m

-

2

-

52
50
32

•

1

..

1

«»
-

12
12

7
3

9

37

U
U

20

20
6
1

U
2
11
13

89

8

1U
U
9
U
9

8

9

2

-

U

2

-

-

7

8
20

2
1

7
-

*•

17

107

154

55
52

2
152

10

5U

2U
30

lU
10

l l ?

1U
99

-

66

17
10

18

-

12

38

p.

149

27
5

u

10
9

22

10
8

-

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Cakland,
Se e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f table.

65
32
33

7

69
^7
-

..

•

**

-

7

7

$ 98.50

7
-

-

10
p.
•

10

-

-

-

-

California, January 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

.

8

Table

2.— O F F I C E O C C U P A T I O N S - C o n t i n u e d

(Average earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours
for selected occupations hy industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division 2/

s
Number ot1 workei• receiving sirai,gilt-time weekly earnings 01 Average
$
$
$
1
:1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
*
1
Weekly
f
Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 U 0.00 1(2.50 i(5.oo 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.OO 1 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00
Number sched­ Hourly
Weekly
and
of
uled earnings earnings $
workers
32.50 under
hours
*0.00 te .50 *5.00 1+7*50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.oo 80.00 85.00
+
+
35 .OO

$
*
1
85.00 90.00 95*00

90.00

95.00

100.00

$
ioo;oo
and
over

Men » Continued

342
*767
452

*0.0
+
*0.0
+
1(
0.0
1(
0.0

$1.1+9
1 .1+6
l.*+9

1.39

55.50

223

*0.0
+

1 .71*

69.50

*+01 39.5
+
63 *0.0
33S 39.5

1 .2*
+
1.26

-

ICO
IJeZ

hn n
HUtv

U 9.00
5O.5O
1+9-00
lik ff
ii

12k

*0.0
+

1.1+8

59*00

-

Clerks, order ................ ............ .
Manufacturing ................. ..............
Nonmanufacturing 3 / .........................
V-Tiolesale trade ...........................

927
199

*+0.0

1.6 1
1.62
1.60

6*+.50
6*+.oo
6U .50
6*+.oo

-

Clerks, pay roll ................ .............
Manufacturing........... ...................
Nonmanufacturing 3/ ............. .
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..

203 39.5

I .63

10

Clerks, general, j u n i o r .................... .
Manufacturing ................................
Nonmanufacturing 3 / ............. .
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, a n o t h e r public utilities ..

•

-/

Nonmanufacturing............................
Office boys ....................................
Manufacturing ......... ............. .
Nonmanufacturing 3/ ....... .................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..
Serv i c e s .... ......*......................

1,109

39.5
0.0
728 1+
70S *+0.0

15*+
k9

39-5
*+0.0

28

1.2*+

1.6l

1.62

$ 59.50
58.50
59.50

6*+.oo

l.6*+
1-75

70.00

i
0+ hfi f
+
76 *0.0

1 AO
1« 1St
1.19

k7 no
* 7.50
+

•99
•97

39-00
$0.00
3S .50

1.11

i+*+.oo

651
231

39.5

*2
+0

$0.0
39-5

62

39-5

I30

39.0

1.00

-

-

-

-

*
*

•
•

3
3

-

33

-

*+
0

*
•

13

2?

13

-

22

—

—

-

-

-

10
6

33

62

27

k5

•
*

-

*
*

1

1

1

30
30
28

80

1

77
l*+

26
16

16

79

63
si

10
10

2

-

*
+

-

—
-

-

7
7
7

50
9
*l
+
*l
+

3?
l+
*
2*
+
2*
+

-

-

*
+
*
+
-

*
+
3

88

33

10

37

28

3

19

85
3
82
82

i25

112

*0
+

26

23

30

n

6

21
21

3
9

35.50

5
67

9
9

1
21

10

*
•

13
—

21

1

12
1

3

•9i

17
3

-

-

1

1

2
2

75
13

18
+
1+
1

39
15
7k
7k

119

38

8
111

11

-

*
»
-

•
-

10
10

m
m
-

8
8

2
2

2
2

-

25
22
3

7
7
-

62
62

-

-

-

*
*
~
-

-

—

3

1

2

-

-

-

1

16

2

2

-

•
•

-

•
•

*
*

"
•

—

—

—

-

-

-

-

X
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

—

—

*
“

•
*

u
.

5

-

5
*
~

12

2
2

5
*
"

*
*

~

—

—

—

12

20

2

19
17

-

7

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

"
•

•
•

22
20

M

7
7

1.62
1.62

6*+.oo
6*+.oo

-

*
+
*
+

2
2

8
8

16
16

10

12
12

6
2

2

31
30
1*
+

7

1*
+
7

22

20
3

15
15
7

-

17
lk
3

-

-

-

2

19
17

5

56.00
53.50

«
-

1
1

7

1 .1+0
1 .3*
+

-

26
10
16

*■
"

-

91

27
27

-

—

13

11
2
-

20
20

3k
3k

-

0.0
53 1+
+
36 *0.0




89
89

7k
27
k7
k7

-

Stenographers, general ^ / ................... .
Nonmanufacturing............................

See f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f table.

-

*
+

-

1-75

X
*

18

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

«
.
-

*
*

-

-

69.00

-

-

-

39-5
39-5
39-5

-

—

-

232
209
83

k3

*
•

6*+.oo

Tabulating-machine operators
...............
Nonmanufacturing y ........................ .
Wholesale trade ............. i.............

*+
8

6

1.60

-

99
99

22
8
1*
+

0.0
* 0 1+
+

-

6

20

Secretaries .........*..................... .

-

-

-

33

5

25

71

37

9

57

88

10

k5

36
1
C

-

-

-

3
l

16

*
•

2

33
H

12

*l
+

88

12

*
"

31
3
28

21
2

l*+5

ik*+

-

*2

1

12
6
6

82
52
30

12

lk

ll

*
•

7

12
11

-

*+
2

11
11

1

16
1*
+

7

19
7

-

15 1

32

2
2

IQ
18

1
1

12

<
-

2
1

2
2

i+
*

135
82

12

-

*
-

165

k

2
16

1

*
•

*
•

16

21
2

IS

27
27
-

5

•

•
*

158
23

7

8

1

*
•

k5
6s

16

91

35

1+1

13
3

-

12

ll
5

165

60
105
62

1

-

«3

90

55
k7

l+
*
l+
*
-

-

-

95
5k

5

-

*

l*+
8
53
95

3
37
28

7
1

65.50

*+0.0

-

66
*
+

6*
1.50

Clerks, general, intermediate .................
Manufacturing •..............................
Nonmanufacturing
...............
Wholesale trade • •....... ................ .
Transportation (excluding railroads), c m *
o?*
munication, and other public utilities ••

35
3k
7

29
25

2k

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9.
Table

2 .— C O T I C E O C C U P A T I O N S - C o n t i n u e d

( A r e r a g e e a r n i n g s l/ a n d w e e k l y s c h e d u l e d h o u r s
f or selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division 2/

Average
Number of
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
Number Weekly
of
Weekly Under 32.5O 35.00 37.50 1+0.00 1+2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50
sched- Hourly
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
32.50 ander
hours
35.OO 37.50 1+0.00 1*2.50 1+5.00 1*7.50 50.00

workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of $
*
$
t
*
$
*
1
*
*
*
*
*
1
50.00 52 .50 55.00 57 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 35.00 90.00 95-00
100.00
and
over
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 8 0 .00 85.00 90.00 95*00 100.00

Women
Accountants ~$J ...............................
Nonmanufacturing
........ ....... ........
Services ............ ........... ....... .
Billers, machine (billing machine) ..........
Manufac turing ..........................
Honmanufacturing
••••••••••..... .........
Wholesale trade ................ ..........
Be tail trade ............ .................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities •
S e r v i c e s ..... ............................

118

39-5

106
65

1+0.0
1*0.0

801
156

6k5

280
35
172
136

39.5
39*5
39*5

$1.77
1.76
1 -7 *

1.19
1.29
1.16

1.18
1.18
1.08

1+6.50
1+3.00

1.20

56
1+05
90
129
130

1*0.0
1*0.0
1+0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1+0.0

1.55
1.59
1.55

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A
....
Nonmanufacturing J jj • ...... ................
Wholesale t r a d e .................. ........

157
138
103

39-5
39*5
39.5

1 .1+
7

1,366
151+
1,212
1+29

39-5
39-5
39*5
39.5

1.23

See footnotes at end of table.
889431 0 - 50 -3




1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0

1.19
1.21

1.65

1.51
1 .5 6
1.1+7
1.1+7

1-33

-

50 .50
5 3 .50

*31

1+9.00
50.00
1 7 .50
+

126

39.5

1.29

51.00

w
-

tt
m
-

*7
3
ii
++
20
-

157
5
152
61
1
+

1
+
20

-

*
*

53*50

-

*
•

-

-

1 8.5 0
+
52 .50

1.26
1.31+
1.07
1.27
1.19

982
36O

-

-

1+0.0
1+0.0
1+6.0
39.5
1*0.0

3*40

-

58.00
58.00
58.00

1*0.5
1+0.0

1.322

-

*
*
*

1+8.00
1 9 .5 0
+
1+9.00

182

—

62.00
63.50
62.00
66.00
60.50
62.50

1.22
1.25
1.21
1.31+

75

-

1+8.00
1+7.50
1+8.50

k6 l

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) ...........................
Manufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufacturing
•.....................
Wholesale trade .............. ............
Retail trade .......... ...................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities .

1*7.00
51.00
1+6.00
1+6.50
1+5.00

39-5
>+0.0

Bookkeepers, h a n d ............... ........... ..
Manufacturing..............................
Nonmanufacturing
•............. .
Wholesale t r a d e ..........................
Retail t r a d e ..... ........ ...............
Services ............. ....................

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ......
Manufacturing ..............................
Nonmanufacturing jj/ • ••......... ........... ,
Wholesale trade •.. ........ .
Retail trade ..............................
S e r v i c e s .............................. .

-

69.50

1.13

237

133

70.50

8:3

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) 3/ ••••
Nonmanufacturing
•...... ................
Retail trade .............................

22k

$70.00

-

-

-

-

70
70
-

-

—

«
•
-

*
“

2
2

-

-

2

138

32
106
ll
+

—

-

95

88

55

22
125

11
81+

32
56
3*

ll
11
++
3*

1*7

30
9

21
12

21
20
-

9

-

5
5

15
15
1
+

1

1
+

2+
1
63

18

61+
21

10
+
-

8

10
-

1
-

-

-

-

16
16
16

*5

87
87

33
32

12
*

13
13

22

12

10

1
1
1

1
+
1
+

6
1
+
1
+

-

17

19
17

5

15
*

-

1+
1
1+
1

5

3

73

62

5

59
13

—
-

2+
l

-

2

-

-

1
1
-

3
3
3

88
88

201
6

233
32

101

195

201

86

27

5*

18

75
18

50

21

12
+

262
3*
i

228

109
86

80
5*

20

10

2
*
*

5
-

92
3
82

92
9
83
15
50

5

7

18

103
11

30
21
20

15
6
1

201+
10
+
161+

7

1*6
20
16

3
3

3

»
»

3
13
12

3
3!3
36
277
171
7

52

75
25
50
1
+
1+
1
2

-

73

1

1+
2

1*
1
+

13

5
5

13
13
10

1
1
-

6

5
1

1
1
-

_

5
57

12
1
+
8

35
30

3

1+9

1
+
1

39
39
37

22
20
20

8

77

11
*

12

5
36
28

31
3
28

5

1
-

5

—

.
.

1
+
-

-

-

-

-

3
3
3

M
M

36

26

36

21
20

17

51

7
7

20

-

9
7

1

20
20
20

-

-

V
.
V
.
M

_

-

-

-

1
1
-

1
1
M

-

23
1+
1
1+
1
-

1
+

38

_
-

1
+
-

-

*5

27
18

1

9

10
2
8
-

97

35

81

29
18
+

7
17

12

1

23

-

8

16

-

-

10

1
60

209
102

-

1

1+
1

1+
6

-

52

2
2

*s
6
16
l+o

-

1
1
1

8
11
M
2
1

2
2
H
-

86
51

-

19

10
10

62

-

8
66
20
22

69
6
63

159

-

Ik

-

51

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
1
1

-

260

9

-

«
>

M

-

1
+
I
f
-

-

-

6
8
1
+

1+
5
*5

1

-

65

15

16

18
•
«

*3

-

5

1
+
2
2

2

-

53
-

-

27

-

53
-

-

-

23

-

-

6

7

-

7

1
l
-

6
2

3

1
+

3

v
.

1
+

3

-

-

-

-

-

M
-

_
-

-

5

«

|»
H
_

-

-

-

M

_

-

„

M

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*
*

8

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10,
Table

2 .— O F F I C E O C C U P A T I O N S - C o n t i n u e d

(Average earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours
for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

2j

Average
Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of $
Number Weekly
$
$
$ ;
$
$
*
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
50.00 52.50 55.00 57 .50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 5 .0 0 $
of
sched­ Hourly
Weekly Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 42.50 1*5.00 ^7 *50
100.00
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
and
32.50 under
hours
over
35.OO
1*0.00 1*2.50 45.00 1 7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57-50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.^0 75.00 80 .00 85.OO 90.00 3 5 .00 100.00
+

Women - Continued
Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type)
......... ...
Nonmannfacturing ........... .................
Clerks, accounting............... ........... *
Manufacturing ............ ................ .
Nonmanufacturing t .........................
J
Wholesale t r a d e ........................ .
Retail trade .............. ................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..
Servi c e s ..................................
Clerks, file, class A ............... ........
Manufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufacturing 3/ .........................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..
Services ..................................

39.00

$1.23

38.5

1.17

$1+8.00
1+5.00

39-5
1*0.0

1.28
1-39

50.50
55-50

52k

39*5
39*5

1.25
1.23

1+32

1*0.0

1*9.50
1+8.50
50.00

190
1*83

1*0.0

1.30

52.00

39-5

1.28

50 .50

368

39.5
39-5
39.5

1.22
I.3I+

1+8.00

53-00

1.19

1+7.00

39.5

1.21+

1+9.00
1*6.00

13 S
9^
2,330
363
1,967

83
285

35
50

39.O

-

1.52
1.60
1.52
1.1+6
1.36
1.86
1.61+

7 * 50
1.
63.00

1*0.00
38.5

2,177
379
1,792

39.5
39*5
39*5

1.30

591

1*0.0
1*0.0

1.23

338

51*.00
50.50
1*9.00
1*7.00

204
453

1*0.5
1*0.0

1.62

37

1*+
11

55

72

11
11
**

2

58
8

-

-

175
-

-

253
3

1.18
1.28

65.50
51.00

9

3^3
17

2*
1

28

13

-

-

-

335

16
*
289

51

68

7
18

28
33

30
69

98

87

—

1
-

3

-

1
*
1
+
-

2
2
-

_
-

-

-

-

5

20

30

-

3
17

-

-

6
11

1

ill*

-

7
3

5

29

2

k

27

3

2

-

-

2

32
28
1
*
1
*

—

9
12
-

7

2

6

6

15

51
2
19
*
23
21

50

6
21

21
11

10
*

20

17

15

13

1
*

20

3
6

8*
1

12k

19

33
91
^3

3
-

*

6
1

~

22
22
—

159

231*

*+75

350

21+5

123

21
I38
10
*
18
*

5

60
290

51

229
18
*
105

16
+
1*29

193

128
29

52
71
9
17

10

25

5
>3
+

191+
7^

55

65
20

13

17

5

2

10

8

129

32

59

23

20

27

-

53
Ik

39
13

52
13
39
38

1
+

-

13

2
11
*
-

1
10

9
1
«

2

23
11
12

7

-

35
66

2

17
3

ik

7

3
3

5
109
-

7
7
-

8
8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—
-

-

-

-

5
1
~

1

109

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30

11
«
11

-

1
1

1

-

-

-

-

_
-

1
+

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

7

*
ri

*#
-

1
+

6

5
3

9
1+
1

51*' 11*3
^5
19
12k
9
19
3

1
*

7
33

-

3

*
-

5

2

15

—

63

-

17
7

5

1
6
-

20
10

-

28

53
3
50

62
12

20

-

_

-

86
3
?3

6
6
6

_

_
-

10

—

-

1
1

-

-

2
11

1

-

8
-

-

36

2

10
10
-

6
1

21

7
29

7

3^
20
1*
1
1
-

5
3

1

1
*
1
*
-

189
35
15 l
+
37

2*
l

-

27

1
1
-

62
1
61

^3

-

ll
61

-

8

-

18
*
20
12

85
37

1

51

-

72
9
32

8
10

9

-

1
-

50
1*
1
36
1
*
9

76

5
5

13

-

-

108

1

12

25

26
-

17 ^
27
1^7
50
17

8
12

33

17

2+
l

-

50

-

90
13

161+

10
10

70

39
9
30

15
3

3
6

193
29

21
271*
88

26

326

11
206
18
*
16
*

1
+
1
*

28
13
15

*
*
-

295

1
-

35
7
28
6

250

51.50

1*37
1.28

12
l+
i

217

39.5

69

67

20

505
52

16
*

16

_

60.00
62.50
60.00
52.50
5 50
1*.

76

55

-

5

39-5

12

316
100

-

-

1*0.0
1+0.0

I3+
+I
IO3
111

1
*

19

20
20

1*1*.00

117
**
201*

1*62

-

1.10

39.O

3^3
27

5

26
109

3

1*0.0

Clerks, general, senior .......................
Manufacturing...... ................. .......
Nonmanufacturing
....... .......... .
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail trade ..............................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..
Services •*..... ..........................

!35

-

_

136

39-5

19

15
12

12
12
-

8

1*0.0

199
9^

1.19

12
*
10
*

_

1.00
1.01+
1.01+

1.01

27
18

-

175

39.0
39.0
39.O




1
+
1
*
-

1++
11
1+*
11
-

1 .U9 S
99
1.399

See f o o t n o t e s at end of t a ble

1.18

-

39.50
1*6.50
39.00
1*1.00
1*1.50

Clerks, file, class B .........................
Manufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufacturing tJ .............. •.........
Wholesale trade ...........................
Betail trade ..............................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..

Clerks, general, intermediate .............. .
Manufacturing ..............••••••••.........
Nonmanufacturing
........... ............ .
Wholesale trade ...........................
Re tail t rade
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..
Services ......... ....... ........... .......

1*25

6

7
-

_

6
"

-

11
T a b l e 2.— O F F I C E O C C U P A T I O N S - C o n t i n u e d

(Average earnings 1J and weekly scheduled hours
for selected occupations hy industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

2/

------------------ -- -Average
Number Weekly
$
$
35.00 37.50
of
Weekly Under 32.50
sched­ Hourly
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
32.5O under
hours
35.00 ?7.50 1+0.00

-

■
T j
mber ot workers receiving straight-time weekly earning>8 Of $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1+0.00 1+2.50 1+5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 5 7 .50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95 .00 100.00
and
over
1+2.50 1+5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55 .00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 8 0 .00 85.OO 90.00 95.00 100.00

Women - Continued

56

107

390

-

-

56

107

5
385

2.387

39*5

300

1+0.0

2,087

39*5

1.19
1.08

316

Clerks, general, j u n i o r ......................
Manufacturing .... .........................
Nonmanufacturing
........................

llO.O
1+0.0

1.08

$1*3.50
1*7.50
1 2.50
+
1+2.50
I+3.OO

U56
203

1+0.0
1+0.0

1.21
1.05

1+8.50
1+2.00

335

UO.O
1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0

1.25
1.28
1.21+
1 PI

50.00
51.00
1 9 .5 0
+
1+8. * 0
>

_
-

1.10

1 1 .00
*+

39.5
1+0.0

1.32

52.00
53.OO

39*5

51 .50
52.50

1161

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities .
Services ..................................
Clerks, order .................................
Manufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
_____ ______________
UVinl esol a r o^ a
»
He tail trade ..............................
Clerks, pay roll • ••••.................... .
Manufacturing ..............................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade .............................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities •
Services .................................
Clerkstypists .................. ............. .
Manufacturing ..............................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade ••...........................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities .
Services ........................................
/
»
WW *1

.t _#
l

-

1

« X _a .

Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities

See footnotes at end of table.




102

233
l £>
7
XOf
11
++

757
302
k55

$1.10

1.06

1-33

296
16

1+00
21

280

379

7a
f6

29

15

106

22
12

7
35

2
-

1

.
.

12

17

16
+

27

5

79
30

l+
i

?7

6
21
l+
i

61
10

-

6
6

-

-

6

3

3

1+
1

7

1
+
1
+
-

9
9

17
9

18
+
12

62

120

68

120

-

8
1

36

37
25

13
107

8

51
69
28
23

33
35
7

52.00

-

1+
1

33

-

7

20
-

12

13

-

6
-

l+
l
12
+

368

561

568
68
500

365
158

310

9
3

50.00
5I+.OO

-

-

39.5

1.13
1.23
1.10

11+.50
+

10
+

153

-

1.18
1.08

1+8.50
I+3.5O
1 6.50
+
1+3.00

1+
1
1+
1
-

10
+
-

10
11+3
12
21

1.19

1 7.50
+

-

1.06

1+2.00

-

1
+
12

2
10
+

133

1.11+

0

12

23

12

3
on
CSJ

1+0.0
39.5

pi l
e l1

39-5

35

1.19

Al
l
OH

1+0.0
7Q K
3p o
1+0.0

1.10

1+5.00
1+7.50
1+1+.50
1+1+.00

33

38.5

1.19

1+6.00

n. 1i37
1

c
J

21

1-27
1-37

156

PR
1R

17
39

166
12

39.5
39.5

585

kl

56

10

-

106
7k

295

P*

&9
82

3*
+

1*0.0
1+0.0

39.5
39.5
1+0.0

65

1?1

39

85
125

39-5

ill

I63
hi

53

2

1.30
1.31
1.30

2,873
600
2,273
1+15

216

113
++
63
380
1QQ
■+PP

28
3I+O
12

17
8

1

17

1
+

11
+

5

1

5

—

11
+
8

25

22

76
29
k7

16
6

1+
1
6

25

22
8
1+
1

13

26
2k
2

13

7
1

3

123
1
+
119

-

-

-

-

-

-

- #

-

119
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
+
1
+
-

~
-

-

20
20

1
1

1

-

-

-

«

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1+
2
22
20
12

28

1
+
1
+
-

7

13

22

6
1
1

6

6
6
-

-

-

-

-

2

10
8
2
1

2
2

-

12
1
+
8
2

1
+
-

1
2

6
-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25

-

5

51
R1

3

6

7

1

78
33

-

85
30
55

15
+

20
11

13

3

28
3
9

12

11
6

1

16

-

-

205
7k

129
102

102
67

18

15
-

131
5°

27

35
18

15
7

11
11

-

10

3

1

2
16
-

11
+
1

1
+

8

1
+

117
57

207
21+
k7

18
169

26
60

38
18

13
30

2

1

119

7

“

3

1

36

26

12
+

22

PR

2

12

7

7
1

-

7
3

17
5

1

-

-

2+
l

7
1
PQ
21

j
^3

3p

11

20

6

1

2

2

14
.

16

PR

2

8

-

-

-

-

9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"
"
*
*

2

-

-

■
z
3

6

-

-

6
R
J
1

511+
58
119

-

2+
1

k3
267
110
20

b7

•
7
3

c
0

k3

25
3

k3
10
*

8

*
*
‘

"

"

"

"

12,
Table 2.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued

(Average earnings 1 / and weekly scheduled hours
for selected occupations by industry division)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division 2 /

dumber of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of $
$
ST
1
$
6
$
1
£
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
I ---- 1 -----%
Number Weekly
Under 3 2 . 5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 . 5 0 U0.00 U2.50 U5.00 ^7.50 50.00 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 8 0 . 0 0 85.00 90.00 9 5 . 0 0 $
sched- Hourly Weekly
of
100.00
and
$
workers uled earnings earnings 3 2 . 5 0 under
and
hours
2 5 . 0 0 37.50 U0.00 U2.50 U5.00 U l ^ o 50.00 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.^0 70.00 7 2 . 5 0 75.00 8 0 . 0 0 85.00 90.00 9 5 . 0 0 100.00 over

Women - Continued
6so

3 9 .0

119
561
100

3 9 .5
39.0
3 9 .5

92

Office girls .....................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................
Nonmanufacturing
...........................
Wholesale trade .............................
Retail trade .................................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..
Services .....................................

U36
88
3US
10U

-

100
15
85
5

11U
18
96
7

2U
8
16
-

U5
15
30
9

^3
10

39
10

3f
U

17
8

13

118
22
96
10

33
22

29
lU

3^
17

2

9

3

9

ll

3

2

11

15

7U
10
6U

7U
lU
60

UU
10

23
8

U7
lU

22

15
-

3

23
10

lU

3^
19
-

15
2

33
U

11
1
10
-

57
17
Uo
lU

—

“

-

-

-

-

15
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

1
1
-

-

_

33

Ul
Ul
-

27
lU
-

SI
Us

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1.16

U6.00
39.50

5
20

1

5
5

16
-

2
10

7
-

9
-

10
5

9
1

3
6

15
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Secretaries ......................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................
...........................
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade .............................
Retail trade ................................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..
Services .....................................

2,523
U91
2,032
U4 6
26s

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1.U9
1.56
l.Us

-

_
-

-

12
12
-

11
11
-

3.6
U

SU
1

iU-5
24

23U
61

218

S3
20
10

119
7
21

173
20

327
3^
293
70
68

U62
S9
373
73
UU

1U6
28
118
26

1U9
66

32
2

33
1 S5
3°
40

28U
U2
2U2

3

95
5°
U5
10
-

7U
15
59
17
1

25
11
lU

13

162
21
lUl
26
8

55
9
U6

1 .5 3
1 .3 9

59.00
61.50
5S.50
60.50
55.50

2
1
1
-

U
2
2
-

-

-

15U

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 .5 ^
1 .5 3

61.00
59.50

-

-

-

-

-

15
U5

21
80

3^
85

23
37

17
16

3
89

—

21

16

-

13

2
U6

lU

3

18

2

585

25

7

1

2

-

-

Stenographers, general ..........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................
Nonmanufacturing j > / ...........................
Wholesale trade .............................
Retail trade ................................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..
Services .....................................

M 3 1
1,19s
3.633
793
227

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1.30
1-3 5
1.29
1 .3 0
1.21

51.50
53.50
50.50
51.50
US. 50

-

-

5
-

26
26
-

265

U56
72
38U

371
125
2U6
56
20

3^7
121
226
U3
0

251
177

95
21
7U
11
-

10U
58
U6

32
2

10
—
10
-

1
1
—

-

-

-

30
-

U
u
-

-

-

-

-

39

581
103
U78
162
lU

-

57
20S
-

-

-

-

565
S9 S

3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1.29
1.30

51.00
50.00

-

-

5

8

21

6

U

U9

36

25

9

2
2

—
—

—

-

2U
6

10

-

51
UU

1

-

“

—
—

—

“

~

Stenographers, technical ........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............................

U69
59
U10

Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o

5U.50
5S.50
5U.00

-

-

16

lU

-

-

-

“

"

U2
2

-

-

—

U
o

-

13

—

—
—

-

—

—
—

—

-

u
—
u

-

-

Ul
28

-

-

3
3

1

1 .4 6

—

—

Switchboard operators .........................
Manufacturing...............................
Nonmanufacturing %] .........................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail trade ..............................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ..
Servic e s ............. .................. ..

1,051

1.16
1.U0
1.1 3

-

10

8

1

—

—

-

-

“

-

—

—

-

-

-

—
—

—
—
“

-

—
—

—

1.13

U6.00
56.00
UU.50
U7.00
U5.00

8

9U
0
21U
1U0

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

—
—

6g
3 S5

4 0 .0

39.0

1.23
1.05

Us. 00
U2.00

-

~

—
",

* • ~
*
—




27
-

9

-

~

17

-

Ul.50
UU.00
U1.00
3 9 .oo
4 1 .0 0

See ^ o o l n a T e ^ ^ r ' e n c T ^ ^ ' T ^ i T ^ r

1

-

1.05
1.11
l.olt

1 .1 9

—

9
-

-

3 9 .5
39.5
39.5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

ill

3^
3

-

5 3 .5 0

1 .3 5

13
-

-

1 .3 ^

.9 9

36
2

-

Uo.o

.9 9
1.03

13
-

1
1
-

1 .3 3

$1 . 2 3
1.29
1.22

20
20
-

72
6
66

$U8.00
51.00
^7.50
5 2 .5 0

Key-punch operators .............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................
Nonmanufacturing jj/ ...........................
Wholesale trade .............................
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities ..

38

5
67

13
9
-

669
15U

3

75
61

73S
141
597
1U5
52

-

3S
77

6U
100

55
146

86
lU2

108
207

82
55

-

-

16

-

52

32

-

-

-

-

16

52

36
IS
IS

7U
8
66

136

-

136

2
2

19

25

35

296

116

17

-

-

35

-

25
U

-

296
U
o

7
35

—

19

71
18
53
6

U
2

-

195
5

123

-

5

15

1
12

1
25

-

-

5
-

190

10

^3

59
25

113
27
16

U
201

9
66

U
6

10

515
89
28

32

1
115
U
9
25
12
11

S76
166
7 io
166

lU
7
2

-

13

17
2

6

-

8

u

—

1

99
20

29
U

16

lU

5U
U
7

31
lU
17
17
—

7
1
1

—
—
5,
___ L

30

5
3

S3
28

17
-

U
6

—
1

—
—

2

2

"1

1

17
-

—

—

1

—
—
-

8

—

-

3
-

-

“

8

*
*

1

i

-

_

—
“

13<
T a b l e 2 . — O F F I C E OCCUPATION'S

- Continued

J

(Average earnings 1
and weekly scheduled hburs
for selected occupations b y industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

2j

Average^
bumber or worxers receiving straignL-time'weekly' earnings or J
1
$
1
1
1—
»
$
1—
$
1—
1 ---- 1 —
1—
1—
1—
1—
11—
1—
Number Weekly
Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 !«>.00 1 2 .5 0 1+5.00 to. 50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 90.00 95.00 *
*
sched­ Hourly
Weekly
of
100. (
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
and
32.50 under
hours
3 5 .00 ?7 .5 0 U0.00 1 2 .5 0 1+5.00 to. 50 50.00 5 2 .50 5 5 .0 0 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.OO 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80 .00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 ovei
*

Women - Continued

258

39-5

iii9

$46 no
1*
7^00

756
252
107
J-W

39.5

1 .1 5

>15.50

bo.’o

1 lb
!UdO

1 00
*U

1 .1 9

1 7-50
*

1.11+
1.1*9
1.52
1.U9

1 oibManufacturing..............................
Nonmanufacturing j/ ........................

Transportation (excluding railroads),communication, and other public utilities .
Services ................................
Tabulating-machine o p e r a t o r s............. ....
Manufacturing............................. .
Nonmanufacturing..................... ......

R

40^0

53
237

bo.o

ng

b o .o

27
91

39*5
4 0 .0

Transcribing-machine operators, general ......
Manufacturing ..............................
Nonmanufacturing
*.....................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade ...................... ......
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities .

1+98

Typists, class A ..............................
Manufacturing..............................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Wholesale trade .............................
Retail trade .................................
Services ......................................
Typists, class B ....................................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing
............................
Wholesale trade . ............................
Retail trade .................................
Transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities .

7Q

39*5

3 9 .5
39*5
39 .5
39 .5

$1 i

u

18
*
11

37

ro

7
»

lUo
21
119
U7
26

1*0

21

6

7
1
7

-

-

-

3

1
*

1

15
2

10
10
-

-

11
*

”

*
*

“

171*
8
166

-

12

-

-

-

-

89
6

223

-

-

-

—

1 ,1*18
133
1,285
271
68

39 .5
39.5
39 .5
39.5
4 0 .0

1+3.50
53.50

10

20

132

i .35
1.06
1.10

-

-

-

10

20

132

.99

4 2 .0 0
1 3 .5 0
*
3 9 .50

—
-

—
-

7
20

111*

3 9 .0

l.il*

1 1*. 50
*

10

1*9.00
1*8.50

5

180
1*
1#

lU

36

8

1

u

-

7

-

“■

■
—

10

12 l
*
8

156

S3

3*
3
35

25

116

66
28
3?

21

13

3l
*

-

-

16

75

30

30

391

275
15

179

-

391

260

ift
66

75
18
57

25

1*9
8

21

13

10

5l
*
13

12
12

-

7
7

25

112
12

l
*

llU
-

122
1*
1
2

3l
*

-

-

18
*
lU
1
*

1

-

3

2
U

26
10
-

90

-

5

67
17
50
17
6

-

*-

2

59
11

12

-

1
*

33
7

118
18
100
29
11

-

-

9

1
*
1
*
-

8

-

-

2

50.00
Ug.50
50.00
1 9 .0 0
*
1 8 .0 0
*

u
1
*
-

-

2
2

1
1

-

-

—

6

5

_

31
*
3
31

-

6

6
3
3

1
*

5 9 .50

12
12

-

6
-

111*

6

5 3 .50
1 8 .0 0
*
1 9 .0 0
*

2
2

1
*
2
2

“

Us.50

-

29
11
18

“

1.2b
i .35

-

12
2
10

-

3 9 .0
39.5
39 .0
3 9 ,5
3 9 .0
39 .0

-

5
1

—

333
119
71 *
155
31

_
-

13

5

-

_
-

-

-

-

—

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
1

-

■
*

-

5

-

57 .50

-

10

-

-

-

11
17

60.00

8

20

2
2
-

13
50

5 9 .50

-

2U
U

j

10
1*2

1

33

TO
3u
°
26

20

6
23

57

RQ
26
T
J
7
1

30

111
.**

1 .1 0

71
Ix
25
1*6

1*

1*0.0

1.26

XI
Jl

171
1*3
128

18
*
133
3s
*

3
3

25

1 .2 l
*

181

1*5.00

-

b o .o

1 .2 3
1 .2 4

?7 ft
< f0
7l
*
20 U
101

—
-

27

1+26
12U

Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.




6

u

1.27
1.23
1.27
1.2U
1.20

72

1 / Excludes pay for overtime.
2 / The scope of the study is indicated in footnotes to table 1 .
889431 0 - 50 -4

Ur

6
-

5

1

10

-

—

“

*
■

—

11
1
8
5

lU

U

1
10

2l
*

21

61

10

U
o

27
3}
*

5
5

29

16
16

10

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

1

-

-

1

23
8
1?
14

1
+
b
-

—

6
77
1*2
1
*
2

25

l
*

11

1
*

2

18

36

3
1

“

11

14,
Table

3.—

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY

(Average earnings 1J and weekly scheduled
hour 8 for selected occupations)

Sex and occupation

number or workers receiving straight-tArne weekly earning£ of S
Average
$
$
$
$
J
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
1
J
■
4
•
•
1
4
4
Number Weekly
$
5.00 1*
7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.OO 90.00 95.00 100.00
ached- Hourly Weekly Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 U2.50 1*
of
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
32.50
over
hours
35.OO 37.50 40.00 1*
2.50 45.OO 1*
7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.OO 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.OO 80.00 85-00 90..00 95.00 100.00

Men
Accountants, senior... .....•••••.......
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ......
Clerks:

Order ........ .....................
Duplicating-machine operators .............
Office boys .......... ................
Tabulating-machine operators ........... .

185
460
244
133

39.5
83
40,0

$2.53
1.97
1.81
1.2 0

$100.00
78.00
72.50
48.00

1.54

61.00
40.00
69.50
58.00
47.00
64.50
64.50
48.00
38.50
62.50

_
__
-

39.5
40.0
39-5
39.5

1.7 6
1.47
1 .1 Q
1 .6 1
1.6 3
1.2 0
•97
1.58

79
572
147
299
107
1,
07s

40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39-5
39-5

1-74
1 .1 9
1 .2 1
1.5 6
1.54
1.28

69.50
47.00
48.50
62.50
61.00
50.50

929

40.0

1.2 6

50.50

120

39.O

1.2 6

49.00

-

1.813
30b
1,16 1
33f
1.076
1,636

39-5
39*5
39.0
39-5
39.5
39.
r
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.0
7Q.5
39.5
-j Q O
D? .
40.0
39.5
39-5
40.0
39-5
39-5
39.5

1.29
1.2 2
1.00
1.51
1.3 0
1.06
1.28
1*35
1.14
1 eIK
l
i-l?
1.04
1.51
1.32
1.^ 5
1.15
1.18
1.50
1.28
1.24
1 .1 0

51.00
48.00
39.00 ] 3
.6
59.50
51.50
42.00 56
51.00
53-50
44.50
c
ll5 Rfi
y
46.50
33
41.00
yy
59.50
51.50
58.00
45.50
46.50
m
m
60.00
m
m
50.50
49.00
10
43.50

10.0

-

_
-

—

824
26
500
665
259
823
89
71
532
137

39-5
39.0
39.5
39.5

-

7
y

8
6
4

h

_

-

17

6
22

>
10*

64

36
12
77
23
yy

-

-

»

8

_
20

21

2
13

15

26

64

120

38

43

49
rt

12
19
63
7

3
92
19
50

15
21

11

20
42
11
27
10
1
12
10

19
117
3
65
5

12
42
2

32
54
11
33
9
1
15
15

1
2

26

13

91
29
1
156

95
58
12
3
159

82
27
2
—
94

59
9
26
1
296

49
6
63

25
1
55
37
77

2
15
3
41
20
37

M
4
4
4
31

53
14
67

202

171

215

79

44

44

39

26

5

5

■
*

13

4

1

4

10

-

26

-

1

-

-

376
47

230
22
13

261
23
35
35
100
32
ol
81

166
47
1

148
4
4
54
49
13

73
5
10

65
25
2
21
28
15
4
18
14

31

32

22

28

5
39
59
44

42

2
19

11

4
3
y
2
14
68

20
5

19

6

4

1
11

13

14

-

221
178
14
12
1
2
4
25
16

101
74
2
7

73
71

88

71

19
102

J

2
m
m

6

3

1

14
11
1

12
12

107
p
33
77
21
12 1
9

26
19
71
17
7t
20

3?
34
21

l
30

2
51
27
1

1
48
7

26
1?
67

15
48
28

26
9

80
31
-

27

>
—

10

2

2

29
s
6

47

7

1

77

13

9

81
12

117
5

36
2

-

7

12

2

-

-

42

-

13

-

2

1

-

-

-

4l
—
2

3
17
2

9
20
"
*

21
—

1
5
—

3
*
*

—

—

—

—

—

M

—

-

-

-

-

7

8

15

7
w

9

6

53

50

106

38
Q
36
7

11
15

89
10

59
3
J

i

15

20

13

6
62
4

-

R

10
99

16

14
72

74
8

44
g

-

-

-

Women
Accountants ••.........................
Billers, machine (billing machine)... .
Biller8 machine bookkeeping machine) .....
,
Bookkeepers, hand ......................
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ... .
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ......
Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) ............... .....
Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) ...........
Clerks:
ipnfn
t ntinp" ...................... a
.
Tile, class A
File, class B .......................
General, senior.............•.......
cfr *»1 intenofidlstfi ....................
\\\
ftAnPTAl Innior
Order ..............................
Pay roll ...........................
Clerk-typist........... ................
Key-punch operators........... .........
n*P ce rl■ ................................
f ■i
'
Secretaries ...........................
Q . n ^ A jhei*R. general •
t A n r .n
Stenographers, technical ....................................................
C'y 4 f r h 'h o a H

fm e ra to rs

operator-receptionists .........................
Tabulating—machine operators • • • • • . . . . .......
Transcribing-machine operators, general ............
Typist*, class A
Typists, class B .........................................................................
Switchboard

1/
2/

Uf
l7
1.885
l6l
45?
324
1.819
3.593
266
7Rq

Rl
95
419
619
1,140

Excludes pay ror overtime.
The scope of the study is indicated in footnotes to table




1

-

—
—

20
34

132
2
50

—

—

:
*
"
*
2

2

40

55

-

-

6

15

40

4

9

4
20
269

109
46
163

153
97
4
24
20
P3

19

181
246
1
120
4
9
7g
y°
11

249
1
273
1Q
31
59
12
5
14
33

78
318
15
32
3O8

zt

15°
6
149

60
62
11
191
2
219
62

3£
37
438
18
94
37
12
255
2
137
184

27
54
337

48
143
246

PR

*
•

4

4

12

103

4

m
m
lie

ll

214
97
21
56
201
77
yy
79
10
55
537
5
107
132
5
100
88

148

i

73
35
228
17

13?
24

63
31
59
521
29
102
125
12
48
128
50

n

6
169
695
27
38
47
2
45
63
20

3C
k
56

39
18
52
89
2
19
l6
160
492
109
30
22
7
1?
16
36

is
3*
10
IS
9
241
313
12
21
25
7
43
7

2?
46
6
39
11
4
22
36
,7
247
1
44
21

M

104
32
37

i

4
4
10
4
10

4

80
2
4

4
6
10

32
1

53

66

35

-

12

«

-

-

-

-

-

•

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

m
m

m
m

m
m
m
m
m
m

-

-

m
m

-

M

4
-

-

-

-

-

4
5
13
J
6

—

-

-

125
12
1
1

—
-

m
m

w

m
m

-

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15.
Table H. — MAINTENANCE,

CUSTODIAL,

(Average hourly
occupations

2/

WAREHOUSING A ND TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS

earnings
by

1/

for

selected

industry division)

dumber of"Tor 5 ers"Teceiving straignt-time kourly earnings of -

Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
hourly
earnings

i

i

0.70

0.75 0 . 8 0

$
0 .8 5

1

$
1
1
t
0.9 0 0 . 9 5 1.00 1.05 1 . 1 0

1

i

r ^ $

?

1.15 1.20 1.25 x.30 1.35

i
1 --- 1—
%
1—
*
*
l.uo 1 . 4 5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1 . 8 0 1.90

*
$
$
$
$
2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 . 4 0

under
•75

.8 0

•8?

.90

•95

1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1 . 2 5

I.30 I.35 1 . 4 0

1.45 1.50 1.60

1.70 1 . 8 0

1 .9 0

2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.1+0 2.50

6
$
2.50

and
over

Maintenance
•
379

pkR
Nonnanufacturing h j ........ . •..... ..........
.
Retail trade ...............................
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities .........

131*
32
36
37

Manufacturing...... ................. ............. .
Nonnanufacturing h j ............ .................. ..
Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities ..........

590
403
187
130
30

4 AtiAinr . ___ ................__ ____________

V. 1 4nooi*.
*

Manufacturing ....................... .......... ....... .
Nonmanufacturing k j ...................................
Retail trade ............ ...........................
T4 . . . . .
?

flf. AiiOY^r "Ho4 1 0 r
4

. . ...... ....... . _ ........................................

aa«

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _____ . . . ___ _______

Helpers, trades, maintenance ....................................................................
Manufacturing ..............................................................* ..............................................................
Nonnanufacturing • • • • .......................................................................................................
HVi a I a a 0 1 ,
Pa

t. y»o A a

4,4 1 t. r f l i t A

_________ _

___ _ .

_____ . . . . . . ______

.....................

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities . . . . . . . . . .
Services
U , a V 4n
i

4a 4

m,4 n f o m e n A A

a

U fin n f n A t l l

r4

rj

..............................................................................................

._

.

_____

a

Nonmanufacturing k j ................................................................................................................................
Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities , # • • • • • • • • •
S o rv l

See

aa

,

...... ......... ...................................
........ ....
....

footnotes at

end




of

table.

-

2

1 -9 3
1.75
1 .9 7
1 .9 5
2.00

. ..

-

35
171

8

5

-

6

5
7
j
3

1 ,7 6 3
808

i-5 3
1.60

r

j

0

-

-

-

7

_

20

7

6

.

6

2

-

1 .4 8
1 .2 4

-

-

-

20
20

-

7

6

-

6

2

7
2
5

6

-

q
j
9
-

5
R
2
11+
10
1
+

27
27
-

21
2
19
-

7

19

101+

1 c
X J>
3
9
q

•*

15
15

-

-

_

m
m

a
_
7
i

m
m

6

2

6

1

l

s

12 U
103
21
on
C
M

153

4
149

36O

1+07

3^
326

53
35U

149

7pR

1-9 5

8k

5

33
31
2

RR
51
1
+

18
12
6
0
61
9
52

19
11

n 2
96

127

10
7
36

88

3*
2
2

56

89
73
16
16

cC
50
56

32
11+

1_ Q ?

Wage

Survey,

San Francisco-Oakland,

California,

January

f

O
C
.
O
c.

1
1

pp.
C
.C
22
2

-

-

-

77
1+5

1

15
15
-

a
.

-

-

32

-

kp
*TC
1+1
1

-

-

~

X

l
X
17
9
8

in
XU
36
36

-

c
5
5
~

-

-

-

—
M

a
0

1+
1
M

_

597
562

29
29

31
11
20

35

1£
XO
16

2
2

-

-

M
l

-

M
*

~

..

-

M
*

OA
cv

7

f

7
0
c.
0
c.

31
31

737

302

55

58

9

4

cOX

O ff
do

5

uOc

k
4h
4

4

5

4

1+ 1

27

11+

5

kX
4l

27

[

in
XU

Occupational

7

1
X

6

120

1

rq

1*98

oho
C*+C
115

70
37
33
25

6

7
3

17

75
we

23
A2
8
2

6

6

^5
38
7
1

7R 1

Cf
O
a
0

1*90

90

17
A/
30

"

p x
ci

3

k

x .^ x

bl

j

k

1.51

27
22

2
133
10
123
1
+

8

3°
26
4

5

1

-

1.31+

72
1 c
87

9
1

2

6

5

2

1

l.6l

1 211
l|oi+9
162

k

8

2

1

-

69
17

828

7

13

7
f
1

1.66

1 .1+7

-

a
.

1,64

955
81
16

-

2

12S

if)

-

1*91
2 ,0 8
1-7 7
1 .9 1
1.62
1,83
1*■ R 7
■ . •2 1

237
225

7

'

2.03
2.23

197

Manufacturing.....................................................................................................
Nonnanufacturing k / ................................................ ....................................
<sA rv1

462

2

$1 . 9 8
1 _OR

Ik

*"
5

**

1950
U. S. D e p a r t m e n t of L a b o r
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

l6,
.Table 4 . --MAINTENANCE,

CUSTODIAL,

W A R E H O U S I N G A N D TRUCKING- O C C U P A T I O N S -

(Average h o u r l y earnings
occupations

Occupation and industry division %]

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2j

1

J

for

Continued

selected

“ y industry division)
b

dumber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of
$
$
1
7
$
$
J
1
1—
$
$
$
?
1
1 — j—
$
$
0.70 0.75 0.80 O.8 5 0.90 0.95 1.0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 . 1 5 1.2 0 1.25 1.3 0 1 .3 5 l.lto 1 .U5 1.50 1.6 0 1.70
and
under
•7? - .80 •85 0.90 .95 1.0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 . 1 5 1.2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 l.UO 1 .U5 1.50 1.6 0 1.70 1.80

1—
$
$
$
$
$
1— 1 —
1.80 1.9 0 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2 .30 2.U0
2.50
and
1.90 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2.30 s.ho 2.50 over

Maintenance - Continued
Maintenance men, general utility......... „.......
Manufacturing................... ...........
ironmanufacturing 4 / ........ ........... .............
Retail trade........... ............ .....
Services ......................... ........

1 5^
*
312

Mechanics, maintenance........... ..............
Manufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufacturing................. ...........

977
771
204
101

Pa toll tmAfl____
____ _____
Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities ....... .
S«nr1 r A .ttttt»TTit ttitit •,i■■t•
*S
Millwrights U/ .................................
Manufacturing .............................. .

1U2
31
40

$1.82
1.87

1.53

-

1 .7 9
1 .7 7
1.89

-

1 .7 1
1 .7 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

4

4

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

4

-

5
5

12

5

3
9

In

1 .8 5
1.85

49
47

105

1 .6 1
lift

93

20

23

3

23
7
7

-

32
31
1

on
c\
.J

85

89

69

87

74
11

66

35
34
13

66
21
1

-

23
5
10

303
286

216
1 63

17

53

1.88
1.86

19S

3

1.85

47

3

20

-

1 QP

37
Aj

12
.
.

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0
c
.

-

139
135
4

on
d)
\

1
32

_

27

7
j

7
J

17

18

27

3

1 .5 S

1
2

5
12

79
45
34

1 .5 9

2

12

26

263

1 .8 7

6

7

1 .9 1
1 .8 0
2 .1 4

26
2

15

161
102

P1 no flff.oro maint.ononr*A
'
WomTpAT'fcnTlrP - ____ ______________
i'
Nonmanufacturing 4 / ..................................
Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities....... .

46
26

19
19

51

6
2
2

_
-

152
105

1
1

47
21

_

-

15

«
.
4o

-

-

_
_
-

4
4

—
-

_
_

4o

ln
i
40

_

«
.

—

-

4
4

2
-

c
0

4
4

-

-

45

Painters, maintenance........... ...............
Manufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufacturing 4 / ............. ........... .
Retail trade............ ................
Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities.... ....
Services ..... ...........................

25
25

51

45

*5

_
00
cd
L.

l4
i4

16
16

t
r
5

*
+

15

18

74
52
22

6
«
.

Oil ATS (MuttttutttTttTtttttttfttttttm •
•
,,
Manufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufacturing 4 / ......................... .
Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities........

Pod ■h
!

/4o f
* nl

H fn n m o n i^ fo

at

end of




table.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

3
3

6

7

24

1 .7 5

50

1.61

2S3
244

1 9?

Q

j

39

1.92
1.89

12

1 .7 9
1 .9 3

118

1 .9 3

1 Q7

6

11
4

1

IS

118
118

t »&

Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities .........

See footnotes

15

-

6*
j1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

6

7

24

J

q

20

.
.

1
2

1h
IQ

68

6
_

13
13

47

4

22

—

25
13

-

5

4

«
-

..

3
3

—

1

17

2
2

74

-

3

19
7

184

5

1
12

5

7

11

pl
ni

-

-

-

-

10

23

20

21
2

_

_

-

-

-

-

4?

iO

42

10
1 £

1R
1R

0

42

18

15

5

11

-

-

-

—

—

-

-L±

27

I

c
\
>

P7

in
JU
.

27

17
Table 4 . — HAI3STOTAUCE, CUSTODIAL*

(Average

WAREHOUSING,

AND TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS -

Continued

h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1/ for s e l e c t e d
occupations
b y industey division)

Zj

^ » ? llv o ? 5 e ? T l" | r e c e T v ! E n ^ " s ^ r a I g S l^ 5 ! C m ^ T 5 ^ S T ^ ^ n C T ^ C n g F l'o ? 1^

Occupation and industry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

O
t
o
•

$
T ~ T ~ T~“ T ~ r ~ 1
$
$
T ~ $— $
$
1—
T ~ $
*
$
$
$
$
1—
Average 1 —
9— 1--- ' — a
9
0.70 o.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .U0 1.1*5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.1*0 $
hourly
2.50
and
earnings
and
under
over
1.00 1.03 1.10
1.15

-*25.

1.20

1.25 1.30 1-35 L.UO

1.43 1.50

1.60

4
4

208

1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30

2.40 2^50

Custodial. Warehousing, and Trucking
Oarage attendants .........................................................
M anufacturing....................................... ...........................
Nonmanufacturing 4/ .................
R e t a il t r a d e ............................. .
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ......... .

483
5?
i2l
* *
32

$1.56
1.52

191*

Oroundsmen and gardeners ...........................
Manufacturing .••••••...... ........ .............
Nonmanufacturing ......... .

131

Ja n ito rs , porters and cleaners (men) .............................
M anufacturing................................... ................................
Nonmanufacturing 4 / ............................
Wholesale trade ...........................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ............................................ ............. .
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), communi­
cation, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ............
Services ........................................................................
Ja n ito rs , porters and cleaners (women) ...........................
Manufacturing ................................. ...........................
Nonmanufac turin g 4/ ........... .................
R e t a il trade .................................................................
Services .......................................................................
Order f i l l e r s ..........................................................................
Manufacturing ........................................................... .
Nonmanufacturing .................................... ..
Wholesale trade ...........................................................
R e ta il trade ............................................
P a c k e r s ....... ...................................................
M anufacturing.....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing 4 / ................. .......... .
Wholesale trade
.................. . . . . . . . . ••••
R e ta il trade ......................................................
See footnotes at end of table.
889431 0 - 50 -5




31

100
5.056

1,284
3.772
213
579
552

mm

-

-

1.47

-

“

-

-

-

6

10

6

10

1.24
1.33

1.2 1
1.2 1

105
105

-

.98
1.14
•94

15

269
892
218
674
512
JJm.
Q

66

1.52
1 .1*8
1.53
1.50
1.69
1.1*9
1.1*9
1.1*9
1.48
1.32

17
“
17

—

1.27

15

1,925
1,656

m
m

2
2

1

m
m

-

-

J

1.39
1.35
1.40

1.00
1.26

2,273
348

1

7

903
76

700

2

mm

-

1.56

2,232

44

mm

1.50

1.31
1.17

82J

•

-

105

'
3
14

25
25

m
m

-

13

15
—
15

15

15

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
l4
14

-

-

—

-

•

-

..
.

-

m
m

-

l**
!l
-

l44

242

-

71

375
32
337
7 23
1

g

8
5

7
j

-

36
36
36

14
14
14

-

-

-

-

51
14

48

37
7

4l

67

3^

60 206 289

mm

24

8

7
1

-

65 152
85

100

7

18
18

2
2

_

-

7
1

>■
*
p
c
pq

m
m

m
m

-

-

345
301
44

385
80
305
pg
co
4l

26
12

57
9
48
48

-

-

67
63
4

—

l

4

20

-

l

4

20

1

4

20

34
32

36
2 25
1 1 11

13

2

11

6
5

31

23
3

13
6

31
l4
17

-

20

17
7
j

74
49
25
^5

24

4l

2
1 236

mm

15

10

7

3

2

7

j

-

-

-

■
*

«
.

_

_

i4

8
5

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

h

5
5

2

549
152
397
395

817
78
739
713

2

2

26

80
141

187
11

263

95

22

2

on
1

54

23

4

396
67

118
ihit

12

1

329 145

3 -(
J

250 202
29

71 7

21

-

4l
i
4o

lb

19
19
15
4

-

2

38

24

-

no

7
1

91
835

47
p
45
7
32
j1
-

-

-

h
p
c
.

116

16

-

-

58

218
27
119

107 221 110
11
107 221 99
8
4
107 c j 89
213
—
-

85

q
j
q

205 1,287
44
79 161
36
90

14
i4
14
-

70

-

267 407 227
70 144 60
197 267 167
24
2 42
28

5
164

100 149

86
1

7
j
1
X
2

507

22
270

-

82
12

26

265 1,493

14
13

-

58

26
182

-

2

22

20

58

2

-

Q
j
q

11

-

-

-

4o
13

_

3
49

-

49
4
45

12
-

-

6
169
169

26

12
12

30

20
222

-

52 100

64
64

-

J

m
m

-

b

7

52 100

6 * 144
1

-

-

30
4

221 198

3
92

22

C -\ J

23
14
9

-

54

-

54

m
m

18,
M A I N T E N A N C E , CUSTODIAL,

WAREHOUSING AND

(Average h o u r l y earnings
occupations

Occupation and industry d iv is io n 21

Number
of
vorkers

Average
hourly
earnings

0 .7 0

and
under
•75

for

Continued

selected

2/ b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n )

Boater of workers re ce ivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings of 1
$
$
1
$
1
1
$
$
*
T ~ 1
1
$
1
1
0.75 0 .8 0 0.S5 0.90 0 .9 5 1.00 1.05 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1(0 1 . 1*5 1 .5 0 F ~ 1.70 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.1*0 $
L.60
2.50
j

1

l]

TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS -

$

$

$

V

$

$

and

f 80

^30

. 9*
?

90 l.o *? 1 ,1 9 1 .1 5 1,,20 1 .2 5 1.39 1 .3 5 1.^0 1.U5 1 .5 0 1.60 L,7 0 M ° 1 .9 0 2,00 2,10 2,20

ro

b

s

Table

2.1*0 2 .5 0

over

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued
Stock handlers and truckers, hand #«•••••*•••••*«•••(
M anufacturing....................................... ......................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................................... .
Wholesale trade . . . . . . .......................................... .,
R e ta il trade .............................................................
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), communi­
cation, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s . . .............
S e r v ic e s .................................................................... .

^,711

n .5 1

1,765
2,9^6
1 .9 7 0

1 .5 2

Storekeepers . . ..................................................................
M anufacturing.................................................................
Nonmanufacturing...........................................................
Wholesale t r a d e .............................................. .
R e ta il t r a d e ........................................ ................... .
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), communi­
cation, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ........ ..
Services ..................................................... .............

316
109
209
101
25

Truck d riv e rs, lig h t (under l£ tons)
Manufacturing .................................................................
Nonmanufacturing b j .......... ..............
Wholesale t r a d e ....................................................... .
R e ta il trade
....................................................... .
Transportation, (excluding ra ilro a d s), communi­
cation, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s . ........ .
S e r v ic e s .................................................................... .

See footnotes at end of table,




361

H66
1U9

1.47
1.53
1.U8

1.67
l . 3l

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

—

—

-

-

-

1.62

-

19
^
3*

1 *93
1 .5 1

—

—

1,
3^2

1 . 7^

195

1.167
395
su

308
376

1.67

I.60
1 .7 1

1.69

-

1.65

-

—

-

63

35

9

63
-

21

9

23

9

-

—

_

-

9

-

-

35

5

bo

3

6

-

35

19s
97

237

126

35

101

ill

so

SO

1

-

21

2S

5

—

-

2
1

6
-

—

—

-

-

35
b

b

—

— —

—

_

-

“

6
6

-

-

5
5

-

-

-

1.66

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

b

b

-

b

_

1 .7 7
1 .7 3

**

_

-*
-

1.86
1.72

-

—

—

1+

b

—

-

-

-

b

-

-

b

-

-

27S
71 zGh 1,US2 1,331
bb 203
4 S2 55 b i
HI
SU9 b o i 237
765
27 61
636 201 so
67S
5U
1 1
50
7
99 112
26
—

3i

27

6

h i

S

3

63
37
27

bo

-

6

10

10
6

—

b

b

3

-

-

b

-

—

b

—

3

-

27

20
6

b i

-

36
b

32
bo
20
1 12
h i

150

7
30

b

27

S7

—

21
1
20
_

20

73

26

l
71
9

62

—

35
29

2b6
2^6
1U0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

5
3

-

-

-

2

h

-

-

2

h

—

—

—

105

1

65

11

5

15

5

15
7

-

5U

2

2

27
9

-

-

h

17

-

b

2

S

1

—

6

-

l

70 191 H99 269 155
IS so 37 12
52 111 1*62 257 155
SI
23 SI 130
8 h 10
39
1 16 .. 135
20 10 320

155

-

-

-

2

~

3*

-

—
_
_

h
h

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

.
.

-

19.
Table

U.~MAINTENANCE,

CUSTODIAL,

WAREHOUSING AND TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS -

(Average h o u r l y earnings l/ for
occupations

Occupation a n d industry division j/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/ b y

Continued

selected

industry division)

MumTber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of 1 — 1— f— $
$
$
i—
l.Ho 1.15 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00
*

1
1
1
3
1
$
1 — $— $— 1 —
*
0.70 0.75 o.so 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35
and
under

1— V
$
r p
2.10 2.20 2.30 2.10 $
( 2.50

.9 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 l.PO 1.P5 1 1.35 i -Uo 1 .H 5 1.50 1.60 1. 0 1.90 l.QQ 2.00 2.10 2,?0
5
.30
7

— 15-■«gQ..-JS5-

2.U Q 2.50

and
over

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued

1

$1.75

Truck drivers, medium ( - - to and including U t o n s ) ..... .
lg
Manufacturing .... .......................................
Nonmanufacturing bj .....................................
Wholesale trade ......................................

2,089
326
I J 63
969

Truck drivers, heavy (over b tons, trailer type) b *....
j
Nonmanufacturing ....................... .................
Wholesale trade ......................................
Retail trade .........................................
Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities ...............

bio
252
9
1
61

1.86
1.88
1.89
1.3*
*

100

Truckers, power (fork lift) bj .......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...........................................

617
53
9

1. b
5
1.50

Truckers, power (other than fork lift) bj ............... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...........................................

1U3
86

1.51
I.U 9

W a t c h m e n ...................... ..............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing bj .....................................
Retail trade .........................................
Transportation (excluding railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities ...............

1,095
562
533
5
7

1.29
1.35
1.22
1.23

68
285

1.18

3

_

3

13 35U 363 U 50 723
5 20 51 1 U 9
13 3^9 3^3 399 57U
(2
117 303 1 8
7

119
U2
77
60

1 21
9*
169
71
*

9
6
n
17

—
-

■

■

■

1,82

Services ........................................

1J
2/
j/

bj

Excludes premium p ay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated,
The scope of the study is indicated in footnotes to table 1 .
Includes d a t a for industry divisions not shown separately.




1.88
1.73
1.81

1.35

1

-

1

3

-

3

5
-

5
«
.

.
.

_

—

—

—

*
“

—

—

—

—

—

100
-

-

«
.
—

—

—

~

—

—

—

—

■
*

—

—

io

8

7
1
6
65
12

10

_
_

_

2

-

-

-

10

-

“

-

100

-

-

-

-

—

100

10

-

-

2

3
7

-

-

-

3
7
9
2
8
9

2

2

8

6

7

1
3

3
^

5

8

—

9 237
5 227

8
7S 1
lb 18

l 15
1 15

2
8
2
8

2
b
23

11
1
1

6b
5
2
12
3

7 7
9 2
2
67 5
1 20
2
1 8

7
8
70
8

17
1
16

5
8
5
8

-

-

9

9

9

—

11 2
— 10

8
■
*

-

-

_

-

_

—

“
—

—

—

-

**
■

_
-

-

-

-

-

—
-

—
-

-

-

—
-

m
m

60

bb
8

160 237
12U 108
3 129
6
1
9
5
1
+
10

153 62
153 62

9
5

59
59

—

■
*

—

-

-

-

m
m

_
—

-

—

-

20

_

_

_

_

_

_

—

-

—

-

—

“

-

-

so
so

1
2
12

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

so

—

—

“

—

“

-

-

-

lb

2

—

20,

CHARACTERISTIC INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS
(Average earnings in selected occupations in manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing in d u strie s)
Table 5 •—
-MACHINERY INDUSTRIES 1 /
Average
hourly
earnings
2/

Occupation 2
j

Assemblers, cla ss A . . . . . ....................................................... .
Assemblers, cla ss B .....................................
Assemblers, cla ss C ...............................................................................
Chippers and grinders ........................................ ••«»................ .
D rill~ p re ss operators, single-and m u ltiple-sp in dle, c la ss A ••»
Engine-lathe operators, cla ss A .........................................................
Engine-lathe operators, c la ss B ............... ........

336

231
102
3*
*

73

1.50

1.60
?s
-

102
10
-

-

-

32

*
*

1*55

2.1**
1.89

149

-

1*75

1
+
~
-

-

1.51
1.59
1.76
1.55
1.7**
1.56
1.7*+

163
22 *
*

$1.50

—

1 *4 0

155
129
3^
33
23
95
55 *4
32

Grinding-machine operators, cla ss B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspectors, cla ss A •••.........................................................................
M achinists, production *.......................................................................
Milling-machine operators, cla ss B *••••..........................................
Tool and die makers (other than jobbing shops) .............. ..............
Welders, hand, cla ss A *.......... .............................................................

$1.1*0
and
under
1 . 1*5

$1 *7 *4
1.50

Number
of
workers

5

24
113

-

23

-

27
*
*

Number of workers receiving straight--time hourly earnings of $1*80
$2.20
$2.10
$1.70
$1*90
$2*00
$1 .6 0
1*70
_
5
6

1.8 0

1*90

2.00
5

27s
36
117

15

12

-

-

-

-

33

-

-

2
26
-

63
522

-

-

168

-

-

32
8

-

1

$2.3*

>2.W

1275B

2.50

2.60

2.10

2*20

2*3 0

2.1(0

-

-

-

_
-

*
*

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

144

-

19

8

*
*

~

-

*
*
•
*
-

-

-

*
*

-

35

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in no n ele ctrical machinery in d u strie s (Croup 35) as defined in the Standard In d u stria l C la s s ific a tio n Manual ( 19 * edition) prepared by the Bureau
4-5
of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were scheduled* Of the estimated 62 establishments and 8 , 6**0 workers in these in d u strie s, IS establishments with **,612 workers were
actu a lly studied.
2/ Data lim ited to men workers*
Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work*

Table 6.— FOUNDRIES, FEEROUS 1 /

Occupation 2 /

Chippers and grinders ..................................................
Coremakers, h a n d ................. .........................................
Molders, flo o r *................. ............................*...........
Molders, machine *........................................... .
Patternmakers, wood........ ....................... ....................

Number
of
workers
162
105
177

Average
hourly
earnings
1/

$l***6
1*77
1-77
1*7 5

Number of workers receiving strain^it-time hourly earnings o f $1.90
$1 .6 0
$2.00
$1.70
$1 .8 0
$2.10
$1.50

$2.20

$2.30

$2 .4 0

$2.50

2*30

2.U0

2.50

2.60

1
*
•

-

-

-

3

$1-35

$1 .4 0

$1.45

1-35

1.1(0

1.1*5

1.50

1.60

-

*
*

*
4-7
**6

109
-

6
-

12

2

$1*30
and
under

21
2**

2.19

-

83

1*39

23

1*70

1 .8 0

1.90

-

89

13
35

2*00

2.10

2.20

3

-

_
138
21
**

-

*
■*

4
-

18

—

2
*
•

—

l/

The study covered independent foundries, employing more than 20 workers, manufacturing castings from gray iro n, malleable iro n, or ste e l. Of the estimated 14 establishments with 1 ,3 7 5 workers in the industry,
Although these data relate to June 19 *-9 , a fo llo w u p check indicated that no general wage adjustments had occurred between the date of survey and January
4

jjj

Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.

10 establishments with 1 ,2 2 3 workers were a ctu a lly studied.
19 50 .
2 / Data lim ited to men workers.




Occupational Wage

Survey,

San Fran c i s c o - O a k l a n d ,

California, January 1950
U. S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r

B u r e a u of L a bor

Statistics

21.

Table 7 •— FABRICATED STBUCTUBAL STEEL AID OfiHAMEHTAL METAL W
OHK l/

Average
hourly
earnings
i/

Number
of
workers

Occupation zj

Crane operators, e le c tr ic bridge (under 10 tons) ..................... ..............................
Crane operators, e le c t r ic bridge (10 tons and over) ..............................................
F it t e r s , s tru c tu ra l, c la ss A .............................. ........................
Flame-cutting-machine operators ....................................................................... .

12
21

I.6 3
1 .8 7

1.51
1.72

13H
10

1 .5 7

1.50

-

1

1 .8 0

1.4 5

-

$1 .5 0
1.1+9

70
25
3*
39

Number of workers receiving straigh t-tim e hourly earnings of $1 .6 0
51.50
$1.70
$ 1 .4 5
, 1 .8 0

, 1 .4 0

53735
and
under
1.1+0

-

6
11+
-

1.60

_

7

11+

3

-

25

2

3

2

1+1
26
-

-

2.00
-

_

16
2
5^

6

1.90

1 .8 0

1 .7 0

,1.90

_

29

6
3

77

-

7

•

5

'

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of fabricated stru ctu ra l steel and ornamental metal work (Group 3 4 4 1 ) a s defined in the Standard In d u stria l C la ss ific a tio n Manual
( 19^+5 e d itio n ) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 28 establishments and 2 ,9 0 0 workers in the industry, 13 establishments with 2,326 workers were a ctu a lly studied.
2 / Date lim ited to men workers.
2] Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.

Table 8 .—MEAT PBODCJCTS, INDEPMDMT PBODtJCERS l/

Occupation 2 /

Butchers, general, c a ttle k i l l i n g ...................................................
Cutters, general, beef cu ttin g ........................................................
Packers, sausage department, (women)..........................
Shacklers, c a ttle k i l l i n g ................................ ...............................
Washers, c a ttle k i l l i n g . . . » ............................................... *.............

Number
of
workers
72

110
35
197
13
14

Average
hourly
earnings
2/
,2.0 6
2 .0 8

1.21
2.05
1.62
1.60

$1.20 1 3 7 2 5 "
and
under
I.3 0
1 .2 5

Number* of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earaiLngs of $1 .4 0
$1 .6 0
$1 .8 0
$2.00
$1.70
$1.90
$2.10
$1.1+5
51-50

51.30

$1-35

1 ,1 5

i . 4o

1.45

1.50

1.60

2
-

-

-

-

-

pm

m*

mm

2

1.70

1 .8 0

-

•
*
-

-

5
4

4
4

4
4

_

mm

33

-

-

1.90
-

,2.2 0

52.30

, 2 .4 0

2 .4 0

2.50

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30

15

36
98

12

5

1
«
•
-

-

157

*
•

5

22
-

6
16
•
•

4

-

2
•
•

—

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers in wholesale meat packing (Group 2 0 1 1 ), sausages and other prepared meat products (Group 2OI3) and merchant wholesalers of meats and provisions
(Group 5 0 ^7 ) as defined in the Standard In d u stria l C la ss ific a tio n Manual (1945 editio n) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 45 establishments and 1 ,5 2 0 workers in these in d u strie s, 20 establishments
with 1,038 workers were a ctu a lly studied.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, C a lifo rn ia , January I95O
2 / Data lim ite d to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
U. S. Department of Labor
3/ Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.
Bureau or Labor S t a t is t ic s
889431 0 - 50 - 6




22,
Sable 9 . —W EN9S COATS AND SUITS l /
OM

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Cutters and markers (6l men and 10 women).......................
Pres sera, hand (men and women).................................

21

71

Men *..............................................................................................................
Women............................................................................................................
PresserB, machine (2 9 men and 7 women) ...................................................
Pressers, hand and machine (35 men and 1*1 women) ...................................
Sewers, hand (fin is h e r s ) (2 men and 239 women) .......................................
Sewing-machine opera tar 8, single-hand (t a ilo r ) system (men and
women) ......................................................................................................................
Men . . . . . . ...........................................................................................................
Women.........*........................................................................................................

Average
hourly
earnings

16

$2.78
1*77

Number of workers receiving straJLght-tiLme hourly earnings of Under $0.80 $0.90 $1.00 $1.10 $1.20 $1.30 $1 .U0 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2.00 $2.20 $2.U0 $2.60 $2.80 $ 3.00 $3-20
$0.80
.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.70 l j t o 1.50 _ 1 .6 q_ 1.70 1.80| 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.U0 2.60 2.80 7.00 7.20 ^.ko

2.92
2.63
l.k 7

9

2 .1 0
2 .9 7

1.96

1.68

31

36

ks

261

zjk
38

236

1.96

10

9

18

1
-

2
-

2
-

-

l

2

2

k

-

1

-

1

8
2
6

2

-

2

-

1
7
k

6
2

3

1

-

3

k

3

17
12
12

9
9

2
ki

3
19

15

19

31

3
3

•
9

10

31

k

1
1

1
1

-

10

1
2
19

_

k

2

-

2
lk

1
8

12

5

2

23

27

23

1

9
l

10

_

_

l
k

_

h

6

12

7
3

9
7

k

23

31

6

26
2
2k

lk
6
8

l
22

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers producing womens coats or s u its ; establishments p rim a rily engaged in producing s k ir t s were excluded from the study.
1 ,2 2 9 workers in the industry, 20 establishments with 1 ,0 8 6 workers were a ctu a lly studied. These data relate to September 19 ^ 9 *
2 / Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.

11
2
2

3

6
6

5

16
12
k

1

k
2

3

_

2

1

11

12
1
1

3

32

28
1

17

13

12

2
1
1

k
2
10

2

2

2
2

5
1

$ 3 .**o
and
over

3

8
1

_

k

5

1

l

5
7

5

3

k
l

Of the 27 establishments and

Table 1 0 . — INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS l/

Occupation, grade, and sex 2j

Chemical operators, c la s s A .......................................................................... ••
Chemical operators, c la s s B ..............................................................................
Chemical operators1 helpers ..............................................................................
Drum f i l l e r s ..........................................................................................................
Laboratory assista n ts (women) ..........................................................................

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

165
106

1.6l
1.5U

$1.30
1.35

Jfumber 0i workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings o f $1.60
$1.80
$1 .5 0
$1.70
$i.n o
$ i.k 5
$1.35
l.H o

$l.Sl»

86

$1 .2 5
and
under
1.10

23

11

1 .7 3
1 .7 1

1.U5

1.50

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

■*

-

7

$2.00
2.10

1.60

1.70

1 .8 0

1.90

2.00

5

lk

35
67

k7
ll

37
17

88

8

39
5
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

k

1

1

..

-

$1.90

-

-

•

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of in d u s tria l inorganic chemicals (Croup 2 8 1 ) and in d u s tria l organic chemicals (Croup 2 8 2 ) , except synthetic rubber (Croup 282 k)
and explosives (Croup 2 8 2 6 ), as defined in the Standard In d u stria l C la s s ific a tio n Manual ( 19 ^5 editio n) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 15 establishments with 2 ,7 8 0 workers in these in d u strie s,
9 establishments with 2,021 workers were a ctu a lly studied.
c
_ _
.
_ , . , „ ,, „
2 / Data lim ite d to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Occupational Wage Survey. San Fran ci.co -O aklan d ,^C alifo rn ia. January 1950
U. s. Department of Labor
2/ Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




23

Table

Occupation and sex

1 1 .— DEPARTMENT AND CLOTHING STORES 1/

£lum
D€;r or «rorkere1 receiving s
Average
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Number Weekly Hourly Weekly
f
sched­ earn­ earn- Under 1+0.00 U2.50 1+5.00 i+7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67-50 70.00 72.50 75*00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 90.00 95.00 foo.oo
of
and
$*>.00
ings
workers uled
over
hours
T
s/
50.00 52.50 55.00 57.^0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 7 2 .50 75.00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
1+2.50 1+5.00 1+7.50

Men
Sales c le rk s:
Furniture and bedding, u p sta irs store ............... ................
Men's clo th in g , u p sta irs store *............... *.......................
Men's fu rn ish in g s, u p sta irs store *.......................................
Women's shoes, u p sta irs store *..............................................
T a ilo rs , a lte ra tio n , men's garments ..........................................

68
133

116
US
159

140.0 $2 .2 8
uo.o 1 . 9 ?
i o .o
+
1.6U
140.0 1.83
1+0.0 1.63

$91.00
78.00
65.50
73.00
65.00

-

1
-

1
-

k

3

-

-

-

-

1
20
—

2
6U

1
9

36

2

21
-

18

12

12

1
—

3

l

5

k

5

k

2
2
3

2

2
12
2

10

3

5

3

-

Ik
5

k

9

5
3
35

k
13
7

k

9
3

2

—

—

—

-

-

-

-

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

1

-

k
5

}
k

-

-

l
1

2
1
-

k

k

—

-

2
l
2
-

-

7

1
11

k

3*
+
9
71

8

10

«
-*

105

—

J

lo

2
2
k

2
—

2

2

7

13

12
6
1

22
6
1

k
Ik
k

k
Ik
1

6
9

-

2U
12
1
—

3

k

—

1

-

-

—

-

2
-

-

-

-

1

1
—

12

-

-

—
-•

—

1
—

W
omen
Cashiei^wrappers .................................•••••••••.......... ............... .
Elevator operators, passenger *..........................................
Sales c le rk s :
Furniture and bedding, u p sta irs store *............. .................
Men's fu rn ish in g s, u p sta irs store *........ ......................
Notions and trimmings, u p sta irs store *.............................. .
Women's acce sso rie s, u p sta irs store *...................................
Women's acce sso rie s, downstairs store ................................
Women's dresses:
Regular or u p sta irs store, better dress and
salon department ............................................................ ..
Regular or u p sta irs store, popular p rice department ••
Basement s t o r e ....................... ...............................................
Women's shoes *............................. ..................... * ............ .
Women's s u its and coats, up stairs store ..............................
Women's s u its and coats, downstairs store .......................
T a ilo rs , a lte ra tio n , women's garments *................................... .

367

uo.o

1.05
l.lU

1+2.00 12
1+5.50 -

159
Ul

187

1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0

1.60
1.2U
l.ll

6U.00
1
1+9.50 1
U1+.50 3
1+7.00 15
1+5.10 -

16
3S
115
2

3
19
59
9

20
106
10

1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0

1*3 6

-

21

31

29
7

25

21

k

7

51

33

U6

3

10

-

11

3

k

3
37

3*

13

105

1+0.0

31

101
103
U75
zk

223
20
278
17

308
19
kkl

1 .1 8

1.13

1.15
1.20
1 .5 1

l.Uo

1.20
1.25

51+.50
1+6.00
1+8.00
60.50
56.00
1+8.00
50.00

-

1

5

-

-

6

1

7

-

k

171

1

5U
3*
3
80

10

3

-

U2
1

21

^3

28

1
20

-

1

k

-

-

11
—
9

9

-

-

-

-

-

7

3
3
35

3

3

3

-

3

k

l

9

1
16
2
109

-

-

6

17

-

7

-

2

-

9

l

-

3

Ik

-

1

-

6

l

H
5

-

-

-

—

-

—

1

2
1
-

1
l
2
-

1
-

-

-

k

1

k

1

l

-

5

3

l

-

—

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

-

-

-

-

3

-

2

-

—
k

—

1 j The study covered department stores, men's and boys* clothing stores, women's ready-to-wear stores, and family clothing stores, employing more than 20 workers, in San Francisco and Oakland* Of the estimated 112
establishments and 2 0 .U80 workers in these industries, 3U establishments with lU,150 workers were actually studied.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January I95O
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime*
U. S. Department of Labor




Bureau of Labor Statistics

2k,
Table 1 2 .—OFFICE BUILDING- SERVICE 1 /

Table 1

Number of workers receiving straigiit-ilm e hourly
Occupation and sex 2j

San Francisco
Cleaners ..................
Cleaners (women) . . ,
Elevator operators,
passenger ..............
Elevator operators,
passenger (women) ,
Janitors ..................
Watchmen..................
Oakland
Cleaners (women) .. .
Elevator operators,
passenger (women) .
Janitors ..................

Humber
of
workers

earnings of $
*
*
$
$
$
*
$
I.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1.1)0 1.U5

hourly *
earnings 1.00
and
2/
under
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30

123
292

$1.22
1.16

26s

1 .2 3

11H

5$

-

- 216

-

58

-

li

-

-

-

-

2k6

10

-

90

2
20

-

-

22

-

*
*

28

-

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

7k

1 .0 5

35
57

*
*

1.11

1.15

5k

—

-

Us

—

2

-

-

-

2

-

10

20

-

_
_
-

512

35
32

15

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

l/ The study covered office buildings, in San Francisco and Oakland, operated by owners,
lessees, or managers, and employing more than 7 workers. Of the estimated S3 establishments
and 1,956 workers in the industry, 36 establishments with 1,025 workers were actually studied.
Although these data relate to Ju ly 19 ^ 9 * a follow-up check indicated that no general wage
adjustments had occurred between the date of survey and January 1950 .
2j Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




Occupation 2/

West Bay Area (Marin, San Fran­
cisco, and San Mateo Counties)
Body repairmen, m e ta l........... .
G reasers.................................... .
Mechanics, automotive, class A
Washers, automobile..................

-

-

1.26

-

A U T O R E P A I R S E R V I C E 1/

Number oJ^ workers re ceiving st raight-tim e hourly earnings of $
$
$
$
$
♦
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
dumber Average $
hourly 1 .2 5 1.30 1.35 1 . 1)0 1.U5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1 .8 0 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30
of
earnings and
workers
under
2/
1.1)0 1.U5 1 .5 0 1.60 1 .7 0 1.S0 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.k0
1 .7 0

1.60

123

1 .2 5
1.22

1 .3 5 l.ko 1.1*5 1.50

*
1.50

3.—

&

$2.lk
1 .5 3
1 .9 9

-

135

I.H9

East Bay Area (Alameda, Contra
Costa, and Solano Counties)
Body repairmen, metal .................
375
G reasers................ ........... .
23k
Mechanics, automotive, class A • 1,196
Washers, automobile ....................
101

2.06
1.50

7

-

7

-

6S

21
21

-

205

22

~

-

-

IS

-

1 .9 2
1 .^ 7

-

32

S 136

-

76

-

-

7

7

-

107

-

-

-

6l6

-

-

-

lk

-

-

1U9

65

39

-

5k

-

•

-

-

-

21

85

-

321

. 16

-

S90

-

90

72

87

1 / The study covered establishments with more than k workers in general automobile repair shops (Group 7538 ) and
motor vehicle dealer establishments, new and used cars, (Group 551 ) as defined in the Standard In d u stria l C la ssifica tio n
Manual ( 19^5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 39k establishments and 9 ,0 5 3 workers in
these industries, 39 establishments with 2,135 workers were actually studied.
2/ Data lim ited to men workers.

Jj/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table l k . —POW LAUNDRIES 1/
ER

Occupation and sex
M
en
Extractor operators ......................
Washers, machine ...........................
Wrappers, bundle ...........................
W en
om
Clerks, re t a il, re c e iv in g ......... .
Finishers, flatwork, machine . . . .
Id e n tifie rs (sort, exam, lis t in g )
Markers ...........................................
Pressers, machine, sh irts ...........
Wrappers, bundle ...........................

Number
of
workers

Number of workers receive ng straight-time hourly earn ings of Average
hourly $0 .9 5 $1.00 $1.05 $1 .1 0 $1.15 $1.20 $1.25 $1.30 *1.35 $1.1)0 l l . ^ ?IT50 $1.60
and
earnings under
and
2/
1.00 1.05 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 1.25 1.30 i -35 l.ko 1 . 1)5 1.50 1.60 over
1
1
2

3

12

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

—

—

—

-

-

-

-

-

1.9

—

5

1

5

k

-

1

1

3

13
11s

7
7

Ik

1
2

k

2
-

ko6

5

2

6

_
2

2

lk£
k

1

kl
•
rtf

$

—

$

15

1

—

0
d
2
2

$

8

—

l

_
1

l/ The study covered power laundries, in San Francisco and Oakland, employing more than 20 workers. Of the estimated 33
establishments and 2 ,3 0 0 workers in th is industry, 25 establishments with 1,966 workers were actually studied. Although these
data relate to June 19 ^9 * a follow-up check indicated that no general wage adjustments had occurred between the date of survey
and January 1950 .
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
O c c u p a t i o n a l Wage Survey,

San F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d , C a l i f o r n i a , J a n u a r y 1950
v U. S. D e p a r t m e n t of L a b o r
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

T a b l e 35—

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average Weekly Hourly Weekly
earn­
sched­ earn­
ings
ings
uled
hours
2/
1/

$42.50
and
under
I45.OO

$1)5.00

1)7 .5 0

H O S P I T A L S 1/

$ 4 7 .5 0

$50.00

50*00

Number o i workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of $62.50
$65.00 $67.50 $70.00 $ 7 2 .5 0
$55.00
$ 5 2 .5 0
$57.50 $ 6 0 .0 0

$75.00

7 5 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

52.50

5 5 .0 0

57.50

60.00

62.50

65.00

67.50

70.00

7 2 .5 0

$85.60

$$O.O0

$90.00
and
over

90.00

85.00

Men
Laboratory technicians (clinical) ••••••••..
............
Pharmacists
X-ray technicians ............................

52

21

37

5 8 .5 0

—
-

—
-

5 5 .5 0
5 7 .0 0
8 6 .5 0

-

5

UO.O
10 . 5
)
1)0.0

$i.i+5

$58.00
88.50

1.1+6

1)0.0
1)0.0
1)1.0
1)0.0

1 .3 9
1 .4 3

1)0.0

i-3 ?

2 .1 9

-

9
-

-

3

3

12
22
6

7

1
+

2
-

22
—

5

13

2
—
6

14
3°

10
1+2
—
20

10
22
—
-

1*0

11
6
1

1
+
*

5

2
-

3

—
-

1
-

—
1

~
6
-

6
-

-

—
-

~
-

2
-

-

2
2

8
-

-

11
-

—
—

2
—

—
—

—
*
•
—

—
-

9
-

Women
Dietitians ................... ................
Laboratory technicians (clinical) ..........
Pharmacists ..................................
Physiotherapists ............... ...... .
Registered nurses*
Hospitals ......... .......................
Manufacturing e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .... .......
X-ray technicians ........ .................. .

63
163
23

*+9
2 ,1 5 5
81
76

39*5

1)0.0

2.11
1 .1+
5

1 -33

2
-

58.00
52.00

5 7 .0 0
5 3 .0 0

—
1
+

5
k

560
l
1
+

\ J
The study covered hospitals employing more than 20 workers.
Of the estimated h o establishments and
registered nurses in manufacturing were obtained by visits to 118 establishments in this industry division*
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and ni^at work*

972
15
18

3

26

-

7

5

1+13

93
9
13

8
17

33
15

-

4
-

9

3
7

5

-

-

-

—
—

61

5

-

—

-

2
—

1 0 ,5 8 0 workers in this service, 19 establishments with 6 ,3^2 workers were actually studied.

The data for

Table l6.— RAILROADS
(Average earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected office occupations and average hourly
earnings Z ] for selected maintenance, custodial, warehousing and trucking occupations)

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Weekly
scheduled
hours

Average
Hourly
earnings
u

Weekly
earnings
1/

Occupation j /

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

Office

Maintenance

Men

56
74

Accountants ...... .....
Clerks, accounting .....
Clerks, general, junior
Office b o y s ........... Stenographers, general ,

no

49
3«

1)0 .0
10 .0
)

1)0.0
1)0.0
1)0.0

$1.86
1.68
1.38
1.20

$7 4 .50
67.OO
5 5 .0 0
4 8 .0 0

1-53

61.00

1.1)8
I.3 8
1.1)8
1.1)6

5 9 .0 0
55*00
5 9 .0 0
58*50
60 .0 0

Women
Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer type)
Clerks, general, junior .........................
Clerk-typists ••••••••••»•••••.............. .
Key-punch operators .......... *..................
Stenographers, general ................. .........
l/
2/
3/

Excludes pay for overtime.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Data limited to men workers*

889431 0 - 50 - 7




163
75

98
54
105

1)0.0
1)0.0
1)0.0
1)0.0
1)0.0

I.50

E le c t r ic ia n s , maintenance ••••••........ ................................ ...............................
Firemen, stationary b o i l e r ............................ ................................................... .
Helpers, trades, maintenance ................................................ .................
M achinists, maintenance ................................................... .........................
Maintenance men, general u t i l i t y .........................................................................
Custodial, Warehousing, and Trucking
Ja n ito rs , porters and cleaners ................... ....................... ..............................
Stock handlers and truckers,hand ..........................................................................
Storekeepers ............... ..................... .......................................................................
Truck d riv e rs, lig h t (under l j tons) ..................................................................
Truckers, power (other than fork l i f t ) ..................... ........................................

110

21
328
256
92

64
331

16
32
76

$ 1 .7*
+
1 .1+9

1 .4 6
l* 7 *
+
1.7U

J-33
1*39
1.75

l. f i

1.4 5

Occupational Wage Survey, San Franc is co-Oakland, California, January 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

26,
UNION WAGE SCALES
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon throu^i collective “
bargaining
“
between employers and trade unions. Hates and hours are those in effect in January 1950 )
Table

1 7 •— BAKERIES

City and classification

Table

ikate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Machine shops:
Foremen* dough mixers * and ovenmen ......
Dividers, molders, roll-machine operators

$ 1.80

1.6U
■96
.87

42
Us

3!

Sain Francisco
Hand shops - bread:
Foremen .................
Dough mixers, ovenmen .•.
Benchmen ................
Bench and machine helpers
Hand shops - cake:
Foremen ...... .....
Mixers, ovenmen ...
Bench hands .......
Helpers:
First y e a r .... .
After first year
Pan cleaners ....

City and classification

Table

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Bricklayers ............... .
............. .
Carpenters ••»••*•••••».*••»••«»•••••••••••*•*••**
Electricians ••»•••••••••••*»»••••»••••••*.•*»••••
Painters
pi oaf awp 7*a ...............
Plumbers ••••*•••»••••••*••••««•••••••••••••••••••
. . . . . . . a . . . .......... . . a........

$3.00
2.23

2.50
2 .15

4o
40
40
35

1.87
I.78

4o
40

1 .51

1.94
1.87
1.78

1-37

1.51

1-37

40
40
40

Dough mixers, ovenmen .................... .

2.02

1.96

helpers ...............................................................

Machine shops - cake:
Foremen ................. .....................
Mixers, icing mixers, ovenmen ................
Ingredient scalers, scaling-machine operators,
cake dumpers, bench hands, grease-machine
operators, women auxiliary workers .........
Helpers:
First year .................................
Second year ............. ............ .......
pan cleaners ............... ............ .
Women workers:
Floor ladies
............. .......
Cake wrapping-machine operators




1 . 7S
1.50

1-55

70

Bracket II
(Examples: Cannery mechanics, class 2 ; head
labeling operators; seamer mechanics, class
2; and shipping leadermen) ................

■Rriclclavera .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.........
C a r n e n t p r a ...........................a>..........

Electricians
Paint ers ••»••••*••»••.••»•*•**••■•»•»»»»••••••»»•
Plasterers »•••*•.»•••**»•.••••••»•»»••«•••••»••••
Plumbers
Building laborers •••••»•••*»••••••••••»•••••*•••»

3.00
2.23
2.50
2.15
3.00
2.50
1.55

40
40
35
40
40
4o

1.50

40

Bracket III
(Examples: Cannery mechanics, class 3; cooks,
tomatoes; label-machine operators; retort
operators; and syrup makers) ..............

I.36

40

1.26

4o

Bracket V
(Examples: Can run attendants; can forkers;
car and truck loaders; and labeling
inspectors) ..................... .

1.20

40

1.20

40
40

3«
33

38
38

l:So8

38
38
38

2.02
1.96

38
38

1.87
1.50

38

City and classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Operators and conductors:
1-man busses and bridge trains:
First 6 months ••«••»••«••• •••••••••••••• *»»•
After 6 months

Floorladies •
Women workers

1-47

40
40

1.5 1

48

$1 .4 2

San Francisco

3f

1.40

33

1. 5
1. 7

40
38

Women

Oakland

38

1 .5 8

Bracket I
(Examples: Cannery mechanics, class 1 ;
printers, labels and forms; and searner
mechanics, class 1) ............ .

4o

Table 19.— LOCAL TRANSIT OPERATING EMPLOYEES

1.87

per
week 1J

$1.65

70

40
40

40
4o
4o

Dividermen, molders, roll-machine operators,
ingredient men, benchmen, bread packers, pan
greasing-machine operators, women bench
Flour dumpers ................... ........... .
Bench machine helpers:
First y e a r ................................. Second y e a r ............ ...................
Pan greas e r s ........... ..................... .

Tours™"

Bracket IV
(Examples: Coil cleaners; feeders, labeling
machine; hand casers; and liner operators)

3.OO
2.50

San Francisco

1.94

Rate
per
hour

Sex and classification

Men

Machine shops - bread:

Foremen........................ .........................................

2 0 .— CANNING (FRUITS AND VEGETABLES) - OAKLAND

Oakland

Oakland
Hand shops:
Foremen and orenmen
Bench hands ......

18 .— BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

Operators and conductors:
1-man busses and trackless trolleys,
2-man cars and cabl® ce ts T..................

except floor ladies

2/ 1.05

l/ The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked per
weelc except during seasonal operations when ”exempt” weeks may
be claimed in accordance with provisions of the Fair Labor
Standards Act.
The maximum straight-time hours which may be
worked per ”exempt” week are 4 8 .
2_j
This rate is also the basic guaranteed hourly rate for all
workers (both men and women) in any job categories which may be
placed on an incentive method of wage payment.

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey,

San F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d ,

California, J a n u a r y 1950
U. S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r

B u r e a u of Lab o r Statistics

27.
UNION VASE SCALES - Continued
Table

2 1 .— MALT LIQUORS - SAN FRANCISCO

Table 23.— MOTOR TRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS

1 Sate
Classification

Table

Hours
per
week

$72.00

bo

lb . 00

76.00

bo

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

City and classification

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$1.6l
1.7
H
I.83
2.20

HO

bo

76.50

City and classification

bo

7 8 .5 0

so. 50

bo
bo

000
000
c
r-t'-r—

Bottlers:
First shift .....................................
Second shift . . . .................. . .............
Third shift .....................................
Brewers:
First s h i f t ................................... ..
Second shift . . . . ...............................
Third shift .....................................
Clerks (shipping and receiving) and checkers:
First shift .....................................
Second shift . . . . . . ........................... ......................
Third s h i f t ....................... . .....................
Drivers; keg beer, bottle beer, shipping and
special trucks ........................................... . .......
Helpers; keg beer, bottle beer and shipping trucks
Night loaders (second shift) .....................
Washers , truck:
First shift .....................................
Second shift . . . . . . . . ....... ...................

per
week

Table 23.— MOTOR TRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS - Continued

H
o
H
o
o
H

7 5 .5 0
7 2 .5 0
7 7 .5 0

H
o
H
o
H
o

7 2 .5 0

H
o
H
o

71+. 50

Oakland

Building:
Construction:
Drivers, dump truck:
H cubic yards or less .......................
H to 6 cubic yards ...........................
6 to S cubic yards ......... .................
8 cubic yards and o v e r ........... ..........

Material:
Drivers, truck:
H cubic yards or less .......................
H to 6 cubic yards ...........................
6 to S cubic y a r d s .................... ......
S cubic yards and o v e r .... ........ .........

San Francisco

1 .7 6
1 .8 5

2.23

H
o
H
o
H
O
H
O

1.62
1 . 7^
1.8H
2.21

H
o
H
o
H
o
H
o

1 .6 9
1 .8 1
1 . 9H
1 .7 1

H
o
H
o
H
o
H
o

$1.63

Building:
Construction:
Drivers, excavating and dump truck:
Under H cubic yards .......................
H to 6 cubic yards ........................
6 to 8 cubic yards ........................
8 cubic yards and over ....................

Material:
Drivers, truck:
Less than H cubic yards ...................
H to 6 cubic yards ........................
6 to 8 cubic yards ........................
8 cubic yards and o v e r ....................

I.63

1.76
1.85
2.22

H
o
H
o
H
o

H
o
H
o
H
o
H
o

2 2 .— PRINTING - SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND
Clas sif icat ion

Book and job shops:
Bindery w o m e n ...............
Compositors, hand ...........
Electrotypers ...............
Photoengravers ..............
Pressmen, cylinder .........
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder p r e s s ............
Platen p r e s s ..............
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day w o r k ..................
Night w o r k ................
Mailers:
Day w o r k ...... ...........
Night w o r k ................
Pressmen, web presses:
Day w o r k ..................
Night w o r k ................
Stereotypers:
Day w o r k ..................
Night work ................




Rate
per
week

$1.*+S

1:8
2.67
2.63
2.08

1.65
2.60
2 .7 3

2.32
2.U6

2.U9
2.62

2.U8

2.61

Hours
per
week

37 |
37 |
37 i
37 f
37 s37 l
37 i
37 f
37i

General:
Drivers, truck:
Less than 1 0 ,5 0 0 lbs...........................
10,500 lbs. and over ..........................
Low bed, dual or more axle trailers ..........
Parcel delivery ...............................

Newspapers and periodicals:
Drivers, truck (day):
First 6 months .................................
Second 6 m o n t h s ..... ..........................
After 1 y e a r ............... .................. .
Drivers, truck (night):
First 6 m o n t h s ............. ....... ............
Second 6 months ...............................
After 1 year ...................................

2.02
2 .1 5

2.28

H
o
H
o
H
o

2.lH

H
o
H
o
2.H H
O
o

2 .2 7

37f
37i
37 f
37 s
37|
37s

Petroleum:
Drivers, truck:
Less than 6 m o n t h s ............................
6 months to 1 year ............................
1 year to 2 years .............................
2 years to 30 m o n t h s ..........................

I.63
1.65
1 .7 5
1 .7 8

H
o
H
o
H
o
H
o

General:
Drivers, truck:
Under 2,500 lbs..............................
2,500 to H,500 lbs...........................
H,500 to 6,500 lbs...........................
6,500 to 15,500 lbs..........................
15,500 to 20,500 lbs.........................
Over 20,500 lbs......... ....................

Moving:
Drivers, large vans ...........................
Drivers, 1
-ton auto trucks ....................
Helpers ......................................
Piano m o v e r s ................................

Petroleum:
Drivers, truck:
Less than 6 m o n t h s .................... ......
6 to 12 m o n t h s ..............................
12 to 1 m o n t h s .............................
8
1 to 2H months .............................
8
Over 2H months ...............................

1.56
I.63
1.69

1.75
1.81
1.88

1.75
1
.75
I.63

2.00

I.65

1.68

1
.72
1
.75
1
.82

HO

H
o
H
o
H
o
H
o
H
o

H
6
H
6
H
6
H
6

H
o
H
o
H
o
H
o
H
o

TESTOH WAGE SCALES - Continued
- ; 2k. -ocsAjr

r r ,w o i®

- unlicensed

personnel

Department «m cla ssifica tio n
d
Deck department: Zf
Day men:
A. B. maintenance men........................................
Boatswains:
Vessels of 15*000 - 20,000 t o n s ................ .
Vessels of 1 0 ,000 - 15,000 tons ..................
Vessels under 1 0 ,0 0 0 tons .............................
Carpenters:
Vessels of 15*000 - 20,000 tons ..................
Vessels of 10 ,000 - 15*000 tons ..................
Vessels under 10 ,000 tons ...................... .
Carpenter’ s mates ............................................. .
Deck storekeepers ...............................................
Watch men:
Able bodied seamen.............................................
Boatswain's m ates...............................................
Ordinary seamen..................................................
Quartermasters....................................................
Watchman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine-room department: 2 /
Day men:
Chief e lectricians:
P-2 turbo-electric vessels ...........................
P-2 turbine vessels ........................................
C -l, C- 2 , C- 3 , Victory Ships, and CIMAVI
vessels ............................................. ......... .
C-L vessels .....................................................
Deck engineers:
Class A and B passenger v e s s e ls ..................
Freighters ........................................................
Firemen .................... .
Unlicensed juniors .............................................
Vipers
...................................
Watch men:
Chief reefer engineers:
R - 2 refrigerator steam type vessels ...........
Freight refrigerator vessels, 52,000 cubic
feet and o v e r ...............................................
Passenger or freight refrigerator vessels,
less than 52,000 cubic feet ......................
Freight vessels, less than 5 2 ,000 cubic
feet , ....... ................ .
Class A passenger vessels with a ir
conditio ning................................................
Firemen .................................................................
O ilers .............................................




Table

i/

2L.— OCEAN THAN SPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL 1 / - Continued

" T E U ------- Hours
per
per
month 1/ week

$250.00

kk

320.00
305.00
290.00

LL
LL
LL

280.00

kk
kk

275.00
270.00
265.OO
255-00
226.00
250.00
186.00

226.00
226.00

LL
LL

kh
ks
ks
ks
kS
ks

L 37.59
*13-93
*

kk
kk

371.93
3 ^ .9 3

kk

289.3L

kk
kk
kk
kk

277.50
251.25

295.62

LL

230.55

LL

369.56

kS

3L1.L6

kS

321.05

US

3LL.72

Ls

3L1.L6
221.68

kS
kS

233.51

L8

Department and cla ssifica tio n
Engine-room department: 2j — Continued
Watchmen: - Continued
Second e le ctricia n s:
P-2 turbo-electric vessels ......................
P-2 turbine vessels ..................................
Unlicensed ju n io r s ......................................
Watertenders.................................................
Stewards department: Jj/
Freighters:
Assistant cooks:
Offshore trade ......................................... .
Alaska trade ...............................................
Chief cooks:
Offshore tra d e ......................................... .
Alaska trade ...............................................
Chief stewards:
Offshore trade ...........................................
Alaska trade ...............................................
M samen and utilitymen:
e
Offshore t ra d e ..........................................
Alaska trade ...............................................
Passenger vessels:
Assistant laundrymen:
Class A v e s s e ls ........................... .............
Class B v e s s e ls .........................................
Chef8, class A v e s s e ls ................................
Chief cooks, class B vessels ......................
Head waiters, class A vessels ....................
Linesmen:
Class A v e s s e ls ................ ........................
Class B vessels ........................... .............
Messmen and waiters:
Class A vessels .........................................
Class B vessels .........................................
Room stewards, class A vessels ..................
Second stewards:
Class A vessels ..................................
Class B vessels ..........................................
Silvermen:
Class A vessels .................... ....................
Class B vessels .........................................
Storekeepers:
Class A v e s s e ls ............................. ...........
Class B v e s s e ls .................... .............. .
'

m

Class

M

B

i

i

.....................

vessels .........................................

Lours
Late
per
per
month 1/ week

$353.28

U8

233.51

ks
ks
kS

236.L6
236.L6

ks
kS

266.oL
266. ki

kS
kS

293.79

kS

200.97

kS
ks

206.89
206.89

ks
ks
ks

335.00

266.OL

316.L2
206.89

519.53
330.82

L8

L8

273.LL

ks

236.L6

ks
ks

200.97

200.97
200.97

ks
ks
ks

370.15
300.00

ks
ks

22L.63

ks
ks

206.S9

212.80

25L.21
25L.21
26q.21
252.50

ks
ks
L8

ks

Table

2 L.— OCEAfJ TRANSPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL 1 / - Continued

1/
All ratings of the deck department receive $ 7-50 P er month
clothing allowance in addition to basic rates as shown. This al­
lowance is included in basic rates shown for ratings of the engine
room and stewards departments. All ratings of all unlicensed
departments also receive additional payment in accordance with
conditions as follows:
1 . On vessels carrying explosives in 50 -ton lots or over,
10 percent of basic monthly wages is added while such
cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or unloaded.
2 . (ha vessels carrying sulphur in amount of 25 percent
or more of dead weight carrying capacity, $ 1 0 .0 0 per
voyage is added.
3 . On vessels operated in described areas of China
coastal waters, 75 percent or 100 percent of daily
basic wages, including allowances in lieu of over­
time for Sunday for day men, is added according to
degree of proximity to the China coast and adjacent
areas rendered unsafe by hostilities.
2 / The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked per
week at sea. The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week in port are Lo for both day men and watch men. At sea,
the normal workweek for watch men is 56 hours with 8 hours (Sunday)
being paid at the overtime rate. Day men at sea are compensated
at the rate of $ 2 5 .0 0 monthly in lieu of Sunday work at the overtime
rate. This allowance is included in the basic monthly scales shown
for day men.
The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked per week
both at sea and in port. At sea, the normal workweek for members
of the stewards department is 56 hours with 8 hours (Sunday) being
paid at the overtime rate.

Table 25.— STEVEDORING
Classification

Longshoremen:
General c a r g o .............. ............. .......
Paper and pulp in packages of 300 lbs. or more ..
Shoveling j o b s ..................... .............
Phosphate rock in b u l k ....... ..................
Bulk sulphur, soda ash and crude untreated
p o t a s h ........................................
Damaged c a r g o ......... .........................
Explosives.... .................... ...............
Gang bosses, general c a r g o ....................... .
Hatch tenders, general cargo ............... .......
Lift-truck-jitney drivers, general cargo .........

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$ 1 .8 2

30
30
30
30

1 .9 2
2.02
2.12

2 .2 7
2.67
3.6L

1 .9 7
l

.$2

1 .9 2

30
30
30
30
30
30

29
T a b l e 26.— M I N I M U M E N T R A N C E R A T E S F O R P L A N T W O R K E R S

1/

Percent of plant 2 j workers in establishments with
specified minimum rates in -

Minimum rate
(in cents)

6 5 ..................

7 5 ....................

s o ..................................
Over SO and under

85 •

8 5 .................

85 and under 90 •

Over

Transpor­
Manufac tur ing
tation,
All
Whole­
Retail
communi­
Indus'*
sale
Establishments Establishments
trade cation, and Services
tries
with 21 - 250 with 251 or more trade
other public
1/
workers
workers
utilities

100.0

All establishments

0.5
1.0
.2
1.1

.4
•9

9 0 .................
Over 90 and under 95 •
9 5 ....................
Over 95 and under 100

100

................

100 and under 105

Over

105

................

105 and under 110

Over

110

................

110 and under 115
1 1 5 ...................
Over 115 and under 120
1 2 0 ..............................
Over 120 and under 125
1 2 5 ...................
Over 125 and under I3O

Over

l/

2/

3/

4/

Percent of plant 2 / workers in establishments with
specified minimum rates in -

1-9
2 .4
8.3

3 -3
l.*

1*9
2.9
•9
1.8
1.9

100.0

100.0

_
-

4-5
6 .5
6.0
.8
.9

3 -1
-

4 -5
1 -3
2 .4

o .4
2.0
-

2.8

1-9
5 *1

3~4

12.2
29.2
-

•5

2 ?6

1 .4

3.8

3 -3

5 .8
6 .4
1-3

5 .8
6 .7
8 .2

.2
6*3

-

4.9
-

1 .7

2 .8

100.0

.2

2 .3
3 -2
6.7
2.9
~
5.8
-

3-7
1 -3

1 .1
-

4 .0

•*
s

5 .2

100.0

1 3 0 ...........................
Over I3O and under I35 .......

1.1
-

5 -7
3.0

7~6
6.5
-

3-5
2.8

.2
2 .7
1 .5
2 .5
3 .0

1 3 5 ...........................
Over I35 and under 140 .......
1140...........................
Over 140 and under 145 .......
1 U 5 ...........................
Over 145 and under 150 .......
150 ...........................
Over I50 and under 1 5 5 .......
1 5 5 ...........................
Over 155 and under l 60 .......
1 6 0 ...........................
Over 160 and under 165 .......
1 6 5 ...........................
Over 165 and under 170 ......
1 8 0 ...........................
Establishments with no
established m i n i m u m .........

1.6
2.1
.8

1 .9
4 .1
2 .7
•9
3.6

3 -3
1.1
1.1

•3
-

.1
(l/)

.1
•5

0 .7
5-1

1-3

.6
1.1
2.2
-

2 .5
5-1

1 .7
•5
3-5

7 .0

1.0

1.0
2.8
6.6
-

3-7
1-3
-

8.8
1.2
-

2 .5
3-1
15.6
8.1
-

1-3
-

•3

«
.
-

1.1
1.1

Services

1 .1

1 .5
•3
•7
•3
1 .4

1 6 .5
5 -6

6.8

-

-7
.4
3-9

1-3

2.0
-

-

.6
-

4 .8

22.6

40.3

15.8

1 0 .2

1 8 .1

2 0 .6

31 -5

Information not available • ••» 11.6

.8

2 .6

26.0

52.6

2 .2

4 .6

2 .8

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than watchmen.
Other than office workers.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, real estate, and railroads.
Less than O.O5 of 1 percent.




Manufacturing
Transpor­
All
tation,
Whole­
Retail
indus­
communi­
sale
Establishments Es tabl i shmen t s
trade cation, and
tries
with 21 - 250 with 251 or more trade
other public
1/
workers
workers
utilities

All establishments - Continued

2 .4

_

4 .6
1 .9
2 .6

3.0

100.0

100.0

Minimum rate
(in cents)

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January I95O
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

30,

Table27.— SCHEDULED WEEKLY HOURS

Weekly hours

All establishments ..............................................................................................
Under 35 hours......... ..........................................................................................
35 hours ........................................................ ......... .........................................
Over 35 and under 37i hours............................................................................ .
37-J hours ..............................................................................................................
Over 37 J and under 1+ hours ............................................ ................................
0
1+ hours ...............................................................................................................
0
Over kO and under 1+ hours................................................................................
1+
k h hours....................... ................................ .....................................................
Over h h and under 1+5 hours ...............................................................................
2
1+5 hours..............................................................................................................
2
Over U hours ........................................................................................ ..............
S

Percent of w en office workers em
om
]ployed in Transpor­
tation,
All
M
anu­
Wholesale
com uni­
m
Retail
Services
industries
trade
cation, and
facturing
trade
2/
other public
u tilitie s
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

2 .0
l.h

1.9
5.8
9.^
S2 . 5
.1+
—

.7

2.2
97.5

2.1+
3.7
.u

7 .0
.5
.5
1.7

8.9
7.8
78.9
.3

.6
.1

<y>

6.0

5.1
SS.2
-

-

•3

91.1

2.1+
—

S6.S
1.9
1.6
-

Percent of plant 1 j workers employed in Transpor­
tation,
All
M
anu­
Wholesale Retail
com uni­
m
Services
industries
trade
trade cation, and
facturing
2/
other public
u tilitie s
100.0

100.0

Q f)

0.1
-

0 .3

.6

2 .7
1.3
95.9

100.0
(3/)
0.3
1.5

9 5 .3
.3

A
1.1
.5

_
a n
-

99.3

-

-

.1+
-

—

100.0
_
2.2
1.1
-

90.7
-

1.1+
U.6
—

100.0

100.0

.
-

1.7
95.0

-

95.7

-

-

-

1.2

_
•3
2.S

1.3
2 .0

—

1 / Other than office workers.
2 / Includes data for industries other than those shorn separately; data for railroads excluded from table.
Less than 0 .0 5 of 1 percent.
Table

Number of paid holidays

All
industries

2/

38.— PAID HOLIDAYS

Percent of office workers emplo'yed in Transpor­
tation,
communi­
Manu­
Wholesale
Retail
cation, and
trade
trade
facturing
other public
utilities

All establishments ................................................. .

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments providing paid holidays ...............................
1 to 5 clays ............... ....... ...............................
6 days ................................................. .........
7 days ...........................................................
8 days ........................................................ .
9 days ..........................................................
10 d a y s .........................................................
1 1 days .........................................................
llj days ........................................................
12 days ......................................................
Establishments providing no paid holidays ............................

9 9 .3

99.6

97.9
15.5
76.5
5.5
.U
-

.2
15.6
1+
1.8
16.2
3*3

1.6
16.2
1+.2
.2
.7

^7.2

32.0
IS. 2
2.2
-

.h

2.1

2/
j/

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately; data for railroads excluded from table
Less than 0 .0 5 of 1 percent.




Services

All
industries

2/

Manu­
facturing

workers e r !
u o Loyei in Transpor­
tation,
communi­
Wholesale
Retail
cation, and
trade
trade
other public
utilities

p l a n t ,1/

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
2.1
21.8

100.0

100.0

17.2

52.2

11.5
l.
+l
7.9

10.5

95.6
1.6
16.5
70.6
6.9

95.5

29.5

90.6
1.2
30.u
35.8
20.8
2.3
.1

92.1
2.5
56.25

72.9
3.2

97.9
5.5
63.9

—
—

—

h.h

^.5

76.9
•3
7.9
53.2
13.1
2 .U
—
—
23.1

—
"

1/

Percent of

-

6.6
60.0
2.1
1.8
—

16.2

9.9
2.1+
—

(i/>
-

3^-7

2.6
—
—
—

-

10.8
23.9

60.8

“
Occupational Wage

Survey,

San F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d , California,
U.

January 1950

S. D e p a r t m e n t

Bureau of Labor

of Labor

Statistics

31 .
Table

29.—

PAID VACATIONS

(FORMAL PROVISIONS)

^erceni 0 i' office workers employed in Vacation policy

All establishments ...... .....................................................

All
industries Manufacturing Wholesale
trade
2/

Transportation,
Retail
communication,
trade
and other
public util itlaa

Percent of plant
Services

1 / workers employed in -

All
industries Manufacturing Wholesale
trade
2/

Retail
trade

Transportation,
communication,
Services
and other
Dublic utilities

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9 9 .5

99.6

8 .2

9 7 .9
i 6 .s

100.0
6 8 .0
—
32.0
-

100.0
58.9
-

9 9 .9
2 2 .4

96.0
51.0

9 8 .0
7 ^ .2

9 ^ .9

b i.i

7 7 .5

1 0 0 .0
6 3 .7
8 .2
2 7 .3
.8

1 0 0 .0

20.6

1 year of service
Establishments with paid vacations ..........................................
1 week ......... ............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...... ........... .............. .................
2 w e e k s ....................................................................
Over 2 weeks ......................................... ................. .
Establishments with no paid v a c a t i o n s ..... •.••••••••••...... •...... .
Information not a v a i l a b l e .............................. .....................

.8
7 8 .1

91.^
-

.b

y

.1

76.8
-

2 .1

-

-

.1

2 .3

—

-

( if)

-

-

-

97.7
61.7
3.8
31.9
.3

-

-

Kk
U0.6
3.5
.5

71.8
-

2 8 .2

-

be. 2

1 .7

-

U7.0
-

2 .0

-

23.8
-

5 .1

-

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ........ ...... .......... ........... .
1 w e e k ......................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............................... .......... ........
2 weeks ........................................................... .........
Over 2 weeks ......... .................... ......... .......................
Establishments with no paid vacations ............. ........... ............ .
Information not available ....... ..*••...... ...... ..........................

9 9 .5

99.6

.8

•O

.9
9 8 .0

-

9 8 .8

OD

—

mb

y

.1

9 7 .9
-

.b

9 7 .5

1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0

—

-

2.1
—

100.0
-

b .b
95.6
-

—

9 9 .9
3 .1

9 7 .7

1 0 0 .0

ib .l

2.1

12.2

9 ^ .5

70.3

31.u
21.3
U6.5

.2

.5

.8

.1
—

2.3

-

-

cs/>

—

96.0
10.6
8.1

1 0 0 .0

7 7 .3

1 0 0 .0

-

9 8 .0
-

6 .9
9 1 .1

9 ^ .9
1 0 .4
1 1 .2
7 2 .3
1 .0

-

3 .5
.5

2.0
-

5 .1

-

9 8 .0

9^.9
2.0

-

5 years of service
Establishments wit h paid v a c a t i o n s .... .......... ........................ ..
1 week .............................................. ...... ................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ................ ...... ......... ............. • • ••
2 w e e k s ...................................... ..............................
Over 2 weeks ...............................................................

9 9 .5
.1
•1
93*9

Establishments with no paid vacations .......................................
Information not available ....................................................

.b

if

2/
2/

99.6
.

9 7 .9

8 5 .7
1 3 .9

9 7 .5

-

.b
2.1

.1

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately; data for railroads excluded from table
Less than 0 .0 5 of 1 percent.




1 0 0 .0
—
-

9 8 .2
1 .8
-

100.0
100.0
-

9 9 .9
•5
-

97.7

1
1
I

-6
1 *°

1 0 .7

9 1 .6
U .5

.1

2 .3

8S.7

m
m

w

1 0 0 .0
1.6

9 3 .2
5 .2
_
m
m

96.0

1 0 0 .0

2 .7
2 .5

~
-

90.8
-

97.5
2.5

3 .5
.5

-

-

9 6 .3
1 .7

.6
8 2 .5
9 .8

2 .0

5 .1

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California,January I95Q
U. S» Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table

Provisions for paid sick leave

30.—

PAID

SICK LEAVE

(FORMAL PROVISIONS)

— - ----------Percent o f office w Drkers enrployed in -_____
J
Transpor tati on,
All
communication,
industries Manufacturing Wholesale Retail
Services
trade
trade
and other
2/
public utilities
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

10 0 .0

100.0

Establishments with formal provisions for paid sick l eave...............
Under 5 days .......................................................
5 days ............................................................
6 days ...................... ......................................
7 days ............................................................
1 0 days ...........................................................
1 2 days ...........................................................
1 5 days ...........................................................
20 days ...........................................................
Over 20 days ................................. .....................

3 9 .3
1.8
s.5
, -3
U .i
lb. 7
5 .9
.6
1.9
1.5

35.2
l.U
3.6
.3
1.2
20.9
U.U

1U.6
1.6
3 .8
3 -9
ft. 7
.6

83.U
3 6 .5
1.9
2 7 .1
17 .7
.2
-

2 9 .7

l.b

30. u
11.2
5.8
7 .0
6.U

Establishments with no formal provisions for paid sick lea v e ............

6 0 .7

6U.g

69.6

85.U

16 .6

7 0 .3

Establishments with formal provisions for paid sick l e a v e ...... ........
U^der 9 days ................................................ ......
5 days .............................................................
6 days .............................................................
7 d a y s ............................................................
1 0 d a y s ...........................................................
1 2 d a y s ...........................................................
1 5 < k y s ...........................................................
20 d a y s ............ ...............................................
Over 20 days ........... ............................................

3 9 .5
1.0
3 .8
•3
2 .6
i3 .6
6 .0
1.6
8 .1
2 .5

35.2
l. U
2 .7
.3
16 .5
5.0
5 .3
U.o

3 1.7
9 .1
7 .8
8.U
6.U

1U.6
1.6
3 .8
3 .8
^ 7
.7

8 3.U
6 .3
2 7 .1
17 .7
.2
3 2 .1
-

Establishments with no formal provisions for paid sick leave ..............

6 0 .5

6U.g

6g.3

8 5.U

Establishments with formal provisions for paid sick l e a v e...............
Under 5 days ......................................... ..............
5 d a y s ........................................................... .
6 d a y s ............................................................
7 days ............................................................
1 0 d s s •........ ....................................................
gr
1 2 days ............................................................
1 5 days ................................. ..........................
20 days ............................................................
Over 20 days .......................................................

bo.o
.3
3 .1
.2
2 .2
ll.o
5 .6
U.2
1.8
11.0

36 .9
.5
2 .7
It 1*3
u.ft
1U .9
2 .2
9 .7

3 1.7
9 .1
5 .8
2 .1
7.0
7 .7

Establishments with no formal provisions for paid sick leave .............

60.0

6 3 .1

66.3

All establishments ....................................................

Percent of plant 1 / workers eirmloved in Transportation,
Wholesale Retail
communication,
Services
trade
trade
and other
public utilities

All
industries Manufacturing
2/
1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

10 0 .0

16 .5
3.3
5 .3
•3

13 .8

78 .3

7.0
5.5
-

U1T5

3 2 .3
2 .8
1.2
-

7 .6
-

U 1 .2
3 0 .0
2 .6
8 .6
-

1.3

-

5 .1
2 2 .0
-

66.2

8 3 .5

5 8 .8

86.2

2 1.7

6 7 .7

2 9 .7
5 .6
6 .2
f.3
t
7 . ft
2 .0
.U
3 .8

3U.6
1.7
5 .8
.6
8 .5
7 .f
t
1.1
9 .3
.2

17 .6
3 .3
5.3
.3

13 .8

78 .3

3 2 .3
2 .8
1.2
-

7.0
1.7
“

UU.5
2 8 .0
U.G
S .6
3.3
“

5 .5
1.3

2 1.5
13 .6
U3.2
-

3 .9
2 0 .3
2.U
1.7

16 .6

7O.3

65.U

82. U

55.5

86.2

2 1.7

6 7 .7

16 .0
1.6
3.7
.8
7 .8
2 .1

8 3.u
■ 1.9
3 1.5
15 .8
.2
3U.0

2 9 .7
5.6
5.7
2 .9
5.U
3.9
1.0
5.2

35.3
1.5
6 .1

UU.5
3 0 .0
2 .6
8 .6
3.3

1U .9
7.0
5.5
2.U

7 8 .3
2 1.5
12 .5

3 2 .3
2 .8

U.g
7 .1
3*ft
.9
10 .9

19 .2
2 .7
5 .3
.9
.2
6.2
1.5
2.U

UU.3

2 .5
2 0.3
l.U
1.7
2.U

gU.o

16 .6

7 0 .3

6H.7

80.8

55.5

8 5.1.

2 1.7

6 7 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 year of service .

2

5

i.b
.6

-

6 .1
5 .7
5.7
7 .8
.6
3 .8

3 3 .8
1.7
1ft. 3
.t
f
.2
9 .3
7.7
.2

*

7 .0
-

_

years of service

Other than o ffice workers.
Includes data fo r industries other than those shown separately; data fo r ra ilro a d s excluded from table.




1.2

years of service

.6

Occupational Wage

1/
2/

2 3 .2
13.6

Survey,

S a n jrranc i s c o - O a k l a n d , C a l i f o r n i a ,

1.2

January 1950

U. S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r
B u r e a u of L a b o r Statistics

33.
Table

Type of bonus

A ll
industries
2/

31—

UOKPEOIXJCTION BONUSES

Percent of o ffic e workers employed in Transportation,
R e ta il
communication,
Wholesale
Manufacturing
trade
trade
and other
p ub lic u t i l it i e s

Services
Tf

A l l e sta b lish m e n ts.......... ..............................................

100*0

100*0

100.0

100*0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction bonuses 3/ •••••
Christmas or year-end • •••»..................... . . . . . . . .
P ro fit-s h a rin g ...........................................................
Other ••.............................................................. .
Establishments with no nonproduction bonuses

30.8
1*6
2.1+
65.3

3^*7

16.8
16.8
-

3 5 *^
3h *2
2 .1

21*8
17.2

16.2
16.2
*
*

34.9
29.0

l/
2/

83.2

—
61+.6

3*5

l.l
7 S .2

83.8

A ll
industries

5-8

65.1

2/

. .

100.0
1 2 .1
11*2
•5
.1
+
87*9

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in —
Transportation,
Wholesale
B e t a il
communication,
Manufacturing
trade
trade
and other
pub lic u t i l it i e s

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

12 *3
12*3

1 5 .7
11*.6
1*3

21.7
15.1*

5 *6
5*6

9 *1
9*1

81**3

78.3

87 *7

-

3*2
3*2

9 i*.l*

•
*

9 0 .9

Other than o ffic e workers.
Includes data fo r in d u strie s other than those shown separately; data fo r ra ilro a d s excluded from table*
Unduplicated total*

Table 32 .— INSURANCE AND PENSION PLANS

Type of plan

A ll establishments .....................................................
Establishments with insurance or pension plans 3/.
L if e insurance ....................................................... .
Health insurance .......................................... ...........
Retirement pension ••••*••••••........*.............. . . .
Other ...........................................................••••••••
Establishm ents with no insurance or pension plans
Information not a va ila b le •••••••.............................
1/
2j
2/

A ll
industries
2/

Percent of o ffice workers employed in Transportation,
communication,
R e ta il
Wholesale
Manufacturing
trade
trade
and other
p u b lic u t i l it i e s

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in Transportation,
Wholesale
R e ta il
communication,
Manufacturing
trade
trade
and other
pub lic u t i l it i e s

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

86.6
71.6
22.6
1*8.5

86*1

8 2 .2
79*1

57-2
45-3
2 .0

8 2 .5

7 9 .5
6 6 .2
2 2 .0
1* .8
1

13*3
3 5 .1

51.3
41.7
5.0
16.5

92.1
1*8.6
l.h
83.3

56.0
3O.I

17.6
4.9
>
12.8
*
*

72.2
51.1
11.7
38.9
31.8
27.8

67.7
55.6

32. 1
*
2 8 .7

96.8
66.3
7.6
83.7

32-3

3*9
4 8 .7

5 2 .9
7 *9

25*5
13-3

.1

7 ^*1
2 1 .0
5 6 .7
2 5 .1
13*5

.1*

31.6
17.8
«
*

Other than o ffic e workers.
Includes data fo r in d u strie s other than those shown separately; data fo r ra ilro a d s excluded from table
Unduplicated total*




Services

A ll
in d u strie s
2/

4 0 .1
3-2

61.0

1 7 .3

13.1
3l*.2
17.5
**

29.6
2 0 .5

*
*

26.0

■*

6 .1
5 .5

37.O
l*l+.0
*■
"

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, California, January 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Appendix - ^ b e icSiifU ia n l

3^.
Office

ACCOUNTANT, SENIOR
A worker who is responsible for maintaining accounting records, devising accounting
systems and procedures, and supervising these installations. Prepares or directs the prep­
aration of all types of financial statements and reports.
ACCOUNTANT
A worker who maintains accounting records, usually under the supervision of a senior
accountant or other official, and whose work involves most of the following: maintaining var­
ious accounting records; preparing necessary journal entries or vouchers to reflect intent of
various actions on the records; computing and distributing costs; establishing and maintaining
reserves for various accounts; taking trial balances and raking ad justing and closing entries;
and analyzing and preparing various statements and reports. May direct and review the work
of accounting clerks and other clerical employees in the accounting section.
BILLER, MACHINE
A worker who prepares statements, bills and invoices on a machine other than an
ordinary typewriter. May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform
other clerical work incidental to billing operations. Should be designated as working on
billing machine or bookkeeping machine as described below.
Billing Machine - A worker who uses a special billing machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
Fisher, Burroughs, etc., which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills
and invoices from customers1 purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping memoranda,
etc. Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and shipping charges and entry
of necessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing machine, and totals
which are automatically accumulated by machine. The operation usually involves a large num­
ber of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fan-fold machine.
Bookkeeping Machine - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand, Elliott
Fisher, Remington Rand, etc., which may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare cus­
tomers* bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simulta­
neous entry of figures on a customer's ledger record. The machine automatically accumulates
figures on a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically the deb­
it or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and
standard types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPER, HAND
A worker who keeps a set of books for recording business transactions and whose
work involves most of the following: posting and balancing subsidiary ledgers, cash books or
journals, journalizing transactions where judgment is involved as to accounts affected; post­
ing general ledger; and taking trial balances. May also prepare accounting statements and
bills; may direct work of assistants or accounting clerks.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher, Sunds­
trand, Burroughs, National Cash Register) to keep a record of business transactions.




)/

Occitfiatiani' Studied
Office - Continued

BOOKKHEPPIG-MACHINE OPERATOR - Continued
Class A - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a set of records of business transactions usually requiring a knowledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with the structure of the particu­
lar accounting system used. Determines proper records and distribution of debit and credit
items to be used in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets,
and other records by hand.
Class B - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records pertaining to
business transactions usually requiring some knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sec­
tions include accounts payable, pay rolls, customers' accounts (not Including simple type of
billing described under Biller, Machine), cost distributions, expense distributions, inventory
controls, etc. In addition may check or assist in preparation of trial balances and prepare
control sheets for the accounting department.
CALCULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker whose primary function consists of operating a calculating machine to per­
form mathematical computations other than addition exclusively.
Comptometer type
Other than Comptometer type
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
A worker who perforins one or more accounting operations such as preparing simple
journal vouchers; accounts payable vouchers; coding invoices or vouchers with proper account­
ing distributions; entering vouchers In voucher registers; reconciling bank accounts; post­
ing and balancing subsidiary ledgers controlled by general ledger, e.g., accounts receivable,
accounts payable, stock records, voucher journals. May assist in preparing journal entries.
For workers whose duties include handling the general ledger or a set of books see Bookkeep­
er, Hand.
CLERK, FILE
Class A - A worker who is responsible for maintaining an established filing system
and classifies and indexes correspondence or other material; may also file this material. May
keep records of various types in conjunction with files or supervise others in filing and lo­
cating material in the files. May perform incidental clerical duties.
Class B - A worker who performs routine filing, usually of material that has already
been classified, or locates or assists in locating material in files. May perform incidental
clerical duties.
CLERK, GENERAL, SENIOR
A worker who performs a variety of office operations and whose duties involve most
of the following: knowledge of extensive office procedures, practices and policies; organ!-




Office - Continued

CLERK, G E N E R A L ,

SENIOR

- Continued

zation of office routine and sequence of operations; reviewing office methods and procedures
and standards of performance; devising new procedures and methods; dealing with public in
regard to inquiries, complaints and adjustments; and responsibility for directing Junior
and/or intermediate clerks.
CLERK, GENERAL, INTERMEDIATE
A worker who, under general supervision, performs a variety of office operations
and whose duties involve most of the following: knowledge of extensive office procedures and
practices; carrying on an established office routine and sequence of operations; operating a
variety of office machines; preparing reports and analyses; dealing with public in regard to
inquiries, complaints and adjustments on the basis of established procedures; and responsi­
bility for directing one or more junior clerks.
CLERK, GENERAL, JUNIOR

A worker who, under direct supervision, performs various routine office operations.
The work assigned does
not involve
responsibility for a sequence of related office opera
tions. Each task is assigned as it occurs and the product is subject to detailed review.
CLERK, ORDER
A worker who receives customers * orders for material or merchandise by mail, phone,
or personally and whose duties involve any combination of the followings quoting prices to
customers, making out an order sheet listing the items to make up the order, checking prices
and quantities of items on order sheet, distributing order sheets to respective departments to
be filled. May also check with credit department to determine credit rating of customer, ac­
knowledge receipt of orders from customers, follow-up orders to see that they have been filled,
keep file of orders received, and check shipping invoices with original orders.
CLERK, PAY ROLL
A worker who computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary data on
the pay-roll sheets and whose duties involve: calculating worker*s earnings based on time or
production records; posting calculated data on pay-roll sheet, showing information such as
worker's name, working days, time, rate, deductions for insurance and total wages due.
In
addition, may make out pay checks and assist the paymaster in making up and distributing the
pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.
CLERK-TYPIST
A worker who does clerical work requiring little special training but the perf ormance
of which requires the use of a typewriter for a major portion of the time and whose work in­
volves typing letters, reports, and other matter from rough draft or corrected copy and one or
more of the following: keeping simple records; filing records and reports; making out bills;
sorting and distributing incoming mail.




35.

O f fice - C o n t i n u e d

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsibilities, reproduces
multiple copies of typewritten or handwriting matter, using a mimeograph or ditto machine*
Makes necessary adjustment such as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed. Is not
required to prepare stencil or ditto master. May keep file of used stencils or ditto masters.
May sort, collate, and staple completed material.
KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR
Under general supervision andvith no supervisory responsibilities, records account­
ing and statistical data on tabulating cards by punching a series of holes in the cards in a
specified sequence, using a numerical key-punch machine, following written information on
records. May be required to duplicate cards by using the duplicating device attached to ma­
chine. Keeps files of punch cards. May verify own work or work of others,
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
A worker who performs a variety of routine duties such as running errands; operating
minor office machines; such as sealers or mailers; opening and distributing mail; and other
minor clerical work.
(Bonded messengers are excluded from this classification.)
SECRETARY
A worker who performs secretarial and clerical duties for a superior in an adminis­
trative or executive position and whose duties involve the following: making appointments for
superior; receiving people coming into office; answering and making phone calls; handling
personal and important or confidential mail, and writing routine correspondence on own initia­
tive; taking dictation, either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine (except where
transcribing machine is used), and transcribing dictation or the recorded information repro­
duced on a transcribing machine. In addition, may prepare special reports or memoranda for
information of superior.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
A worker whose primary function is to take dictation from one or more persons, either
in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, involving a normal routine vocabulary, and to
transcribe this dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up
and keep files in order, keep simple records, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine
work.
(See Transcribing-Machine Operator.)
STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary function Is to take dictation from one or more persons,
either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, involving a varied technical or spe­
cialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research and to tran­
scribe this dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up and
keep files in order, keep simple records, etc. Does not include transcrib ing-machine work.
(See Transcribing-Machlne Operator.)




36.
Office

- Continued

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
A worker who operates a single or multiple position telephone switchboard, and whose
duties involve: handling incoming, outgoing and intraplant or office calls. In addition, may
record toll calls and take messages. As a minor part of duties, may give information to per­
sons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders. For workers who also do typing or
other stenographic work or act as receptionists, see Switchboard Operator-Receptionist.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
A worker who in addition to performing duties of operator, on a single position or
monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and/or performs typing or other routine cleri­
cal work as part of regular duties. This typing or clerical work may take the major part of
this worker*s time while at switchboard.
TABUIATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates machine that automatically analyzes and translates information
punched in groups of tabulating cards, and prints translated data on forms or accounting re­
cords; sets or adjusts machine to add, subtract, multiply, and make other calculations; places
cards to be tabulated in feed magazine and starts machine. May file cards after they are
tabulated. May sort and verify punched cards.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
A worker whose primary function is to transcribe dictation involving a normal rou­
tine vocabulary from transcribing-machine records. May also type from written copy and do
simple clerical work. A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype or similar
machine is classified as a Stenographer, General.
TYPIST
A worker who uses a typewriter to make copies of
bills after calculations have been made by another person.

various material or to make out
May operate a teletype machine.

Class A - A worker who performs one or more of the following:
typing material In
final form from very rough and involved draft; copying from plain or corrected copy in which
there is a frequent and varied use of technical and unusual words or from foreign language
copy; combining material from several sources; or planning layout of complicated statistical
tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing, typing tables from rough draft in final
form. May also type routine form letters, varying details to suit circumstances.
Class B - A worker who performs one or more of the following:
typing from rela­
tively clear or typed drafts; routine typing of forms, Insurance policies, etc.; setting up
simple standard tabulations, or copying more coup lex tables already set up and spaced properly.




Maintenance

CARPENTER , M A I N T E N A N C E

A worker who performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain in
good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions,
doors, floors, stairs, casings, trim made of wood in an establishment, and whose work involves
most of the following: planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models or
verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenters* hand tools, portable power tools, and
standard measuring instruments; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of
work; and selecting materials necessary for the work.
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
A worker who performs a variety of electrical trade functions in the installation,
maintenance or repair of equipment for the generating, distribution, and/or utilization of
electric energy in an establishment, and whose work involves most of the following: Instal­
ling or repairing any of a variety of electrical equipment such as generators, transformers,
switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems or other
transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layout or other specifications; lo­
cating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working standard computa­
tions relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of
electricians* hand tools and measuring and testing instruments.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
A worker who operates and maintains and/or supervises the operation of stationary
engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply power, heat, refrigeration or airconditioning and whose work Involves: operating and maintaining and/or supervising the opera­
tion of such equipment as steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors, turbines, ven­
tilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and boiler-fed water pumps; making or
supervising equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation of machinery, temperature,
and fuel consumption. This classification does not include head or chief engineers in estab­
lishments employing more than one engineer.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
A worker who fires stationary boilers used in a factory, power plant, or other es­
tablishment to furnish heat, to generate power, or to supply steam for industrial processes,
and whose work Involves feeding fuel to fire by hand or operating a mechanical stoker, gas,
or oil burner; and checking water and safety valves. In addition, may clean, oil, or assist
in repairing boiler room equipment.
HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE
A worker who assists another worker in one of the skilled maintenance trades, by per­
forming specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a worker supplied with ma­
terials and tools; cleaning working area, machine and equipment; assisting worker by holding
materials or tools; and performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. In some
trades the term helper is synonymous with apprentice, since the helper is expected to learn
the trade of the worker he assists. The kind of work the helper is permitted to perform also
varies from trade to trade: in some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting and
holding materials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he Is permitted to per­
form specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are also performed by workers on
a full-time basis.




M a i n t e n a n c e - Cont i n u e d

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

A worker who produces replacement parts and new parts far mechanical equipment oper­
ated in an establishment, and whose work involves most of the following: interpreting written
instructions and specifications; planning and layout of work; using a variety of machinist’s
hand tools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of metal parts ,
to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to di­
mensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties
of the common metals; selecting standard materials, parts and equipment required for his work;
and fitting and assembling parts. In general, the machinist’s work normally requires a round­
ed training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiv­
alent training and experience.
MAINTENANCE MAN, GENERAL UTILITY
A worker who keeps the machines, mechanical equipment and/or structure of an estab­
lishment (usually a small plant where specialization in maintenance work is impractical) in
repair; whose duties involve the performance of operations and the use of tools and equipment
of several trades, rather than specialization in one trade or one type of maintenance
work
only, and whose work involves a combination of the following: planning and layout of work re­
lating to repair of buildings, machines” mechanical and/or electrical equipment; repairing
electrical and/or mechanical equipment; installing, aligning and balancing new equipment; and
repairing building, floors, stairs as well as making and repairing bins, cribs, and partitions.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
A worker who repairs machinery and mechanical equipment of an establishment and whose
work involves most of the following: examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose
source of trouble; dismantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of
hand tools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items ob­
tained from stock; ordering the production of a defective part by a machine shop or sending of
the machine to a machine shop for major repairs; preparing written specifications for major
repairs or for the production of parts ordered from machine shop; and re-assembling of machines,
and making all necessary adjustments for operation.
MTLMIGHT
A worker who installs new machines or heavy equipment and dismantles and installs
machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout are required, and whose work
involves most of the following: planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints
or other specifications; using a variety of hand tools, and rigging; making standard shop
computations relating to stresses, strength of materials, and centers of gravity; aligning
and balancing of equipment;
selecting standard tools, equipment and parts to be used; and
Installing and maintaining in good order power transmission equipment such as drives, and
speed reducers. In general, the millwright’s work normally requires a rounded training and
experience in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.
OILER
(Greaser; lubricator)
A worker who lubricates, with oil or grease,
of mechanical equipment found in an establishment.




the moving parts or wearing surfaces

37.

Maintenance - Continued

PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
(Fainter, repair)
A worker who paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an establish­
ment and whose work involves the following: knowledge of surface peculiarities and types of
paint required for different applications; mixing colors, oils, white lead, and other paint
ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency; preparing surface for painting by removing
old finish or by placing putty or filler in nail holes and interstices; applying paint with
spray gun or brush.
PIPE FITTER, MAINTENANCE
A worker who installs and/or repairs pipe and pipe fittings in an establishment,
and whose work involves most of the following: laying out of work and/or measuring to locate
position of pipe from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe
to correct lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machine;
threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven machines;
assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computa­
tions relating to pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard tests to
determine whether finished pipes meet specifications. This classification does not include
workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating systems,
RADIO TECHNICIAN*
Builds, assembles, and installs ultra high frequency A.C. and D.C. radio receivers,
transmitters and auxiliaries using frequency modulation and amplitude modulation according to
diagrams, drawings, sketches, or accepted practices; shoots trouble and services radio re­
ceivers and transmitters; makes complete shop overhauls of receivers and transmitters (up to
2000 watts); tests circuits, tubes, and other parts, using various testing meters and devices;
operates a radio transmitter. Requires a radio telegraph operator’s license 2nd class, issued
by the Federal Communications Commission.

Custodial, Warehousing and Timeking

GARAGE ATTENDANT
Performs manual tasks confined almost exclusively to the nonmechanical servicing
of automotive equipment in shop, garage, and In the field; washes and polishes autos, buses
or trucks; supplies automotive equipment with oil, water, air, gasoline; changes oil and
lubricates automotive equipment; changes tires and tubes; checks and replaces batteries, spark
plugs, and windshield wipers; cleans oil filters.

*Bay Area Salary Survey Committee description




38.
Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued

GROUNDSMAN AND GARDENER*
Cares for lawns, flowers, and shrubs, and cleans and maintains grounds and walks;
sets out poison and traps; mixes and applies insecticide and sprays; paints and makes minor
repairs to plumbing and sprinkler system; sharpens, cleans, paints, and cares for tools and
equipment.
JANITOR, PORTER OR CLEANER
This classification includes workers whose duties correspond to those of one or more
of the jobs described below.
Janitor (Manufacturing; Utilities)
(Sweeper; cleaner) - A worker who sweeps and
cleans shop areas, washrooms, and offices, and removes chips and refuse. May wash floors and
windows.
Porter (Wholesale Trade; Retail Trade)
(Day porter, cleaner) - A worker who keeps
the premises of an establishment in a clean, orderly condition. Typical of the duties the
worker performs are: sweeping and mopping floors; removing trash; dusting furniture or fix­
tures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; and washing windows and display cases.
Janitor (Office Buildings)(Janitor-maintenance man) - A building service worker, em­
ployed in an office building, who performs a variety of duties involved in cleaning the premis­
es, disposing of waste and litter, and providing supplies and minor maintenance services. May,
occasionally, operate a passenger elevator.
This classification does not include workers whose duties are limited to cleaning the
premises (see Cleaner - Office Buildings).
Cleaner (Office Buildings) - A worker who keeps halls, offices, and/or rooms of pub­
lic buildings, offices, commercial establishments, or apartment houses in a clean, orderly con­
dition and whose work involves: sweeping, mopping and/or scrubbing floors; disposing of waste
or litter; and/or dusting furniture and equipment. May also be required to polish metal fix­
tures and fittings. This classification does not include window washers nor workers whose du­
ties include cleaning rest rooms.
Cleaner (Hotels) - A person who performs heavy cleaning operations in hotel lobbies,
halls, public baths, showers, and lavatories. May also wash windows.
OKDitIR FILI.KK
This classification includes workers whose duties correspond to those of one or more
of the jobs described below.
Order Filler (Manufacturing; Warehousing and Storage) - A worker who fills shipping
orders from stored merchandise in accordance with either written specifications or verbal In­
structions. May assemble, pack and carry or transport materials to shipping room or delivery
platform.

*Bay Area Salary Survey Committee description




Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued

ORDER FILLER - Continued
Order Filler (Wholesale Groceries and Grocery Chain-Store Warehouses) - Aworker who
fills orders from stock merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slip or custom­
ers' orders and whose work involves a combination of the following: picking full case or shelf
merchandise, Indicating items filled or omitted on sales slips or customers' orders, packing
orders, transporting merchandise on a hand truck to shipping room or delivery platform, and
reporting shortages of merchandise to head stock man or other supervisors. A worker who hand­
les Incoming goods - opening cases, shelving, etc. - should be classified as Stockman.
Order Picker (Wholesale Drugs, Drug Propietories and Toiletries, and Druggists-Sun­
dries) (Order"Filler) - A worker who picks or fills merchandise on customer orders and whose
'
work involves a combination of the following: picking full case or shelf merchandise; indica­
ting items filled or omitted on orders; storing incoming cases in correct location; and requi­
sitioning case stock to replenish shelf stock and assisting In shelving stock.
Stockman, Warehouse (Department Stores, Dry-Goods Stores, General-Merchandise Stores,
Clothing Stores and Furniture Stores) - A person working in the warehouse who fills customer's
orders for merchandise from salescheck specifications. Places merchandise on flats, skids, or
rollers, and moves to packing department. Also fills transfer orders going to the store for
display on the selling floor. Receives incoming merchandise from receiving or marking depart­
ments and places it in storage. Bandies returned goods either by returning it to storage or
sending it to shipping department for delivery to supplier.
PACKER
A worker who prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them in
boxes or other containers, the specific operations performed being dependent upon the type,
size and number of units to be packed, the type of container employed, and method of shipment.
The work of the packer involves a combination of the following: knowledge of various items
of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size of container;
in­
serting enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to prevent breakage or
damage; closing and sealing containers; and applying labels or entering identifying data on
container. This classification does not include packers who also make wooden boxes or crates.
STOCK HANDIER AND TRUCKER, HAND
This classification includes workers whose duties correspond to those of one or more
of the jobs described below.
Loader and Unloader (Shipping and Receiving) (Manufacturing) - A worker whose prin­
cipal duty is to load or -unload raw materials, supplies, partially processed or finished prod­
ucts to or from freight cars, trucks (motor, industrial, hand) or other transporting device.
In addition to loading or unloading duties, may also carry, wheel, or hand truck materials to
or from storage space.
Stock Man (Manufacturing) (Stock Helper) - A worker who, under general supervision
of a head stock man, places incoming goods in proper place in stock room or warehouse, and
whose work involves any combination of the following: knowledge of proper location of goods
in storage area; checking incoming goods against invoices; loading or unloading goods from
trucks or railroad cars or unpacking goods. This classification does not include workers who
merely move goods from place to place under immediate supervision.




Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued

STOCK HANDLER AND TRUCKER, HAND - Continued
Trucker, Hand (Manufacturing; Wholesale Trade) - A worker who pushes or pulls hand
trucks, cars or wheelbarrows used for transporting goods and materials of all kinds about a
warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment, and usually loads or unloads hand
trucks or wheelbarrows. May stack materials in storage bins, etc., and may keep records of
materials' moved.
Shelver (Wholesale Trade) (Order Picker Helper) - A worker
chandise and places stock on shelves.

who opens cases of mer­

Stock Man or Stock Helper (Wholesale Trade) - A worker who, under general supervi­
sion of a head stock man, receives and places incoming goods in proper places in stock room
or warehouse and whose work involves a combination of the following: unloading goods from
trucks or railroad cars, checking incoming goods against invoices or requisitions, transporting
goods from unloading platform to stock room, unpacking goods and placing on shelves or other
proper places. He may also perform duties of Order Filler, usually in smaller establishments.
Stock Man or Stock Helper (Retail Trade) - A worker who, under general supervision
of a head stock man, receives and places incoming goods in proper place in stock room o r ware­
house and issues stock, materials, or equipment by filling orders requisitioning such materials.
The work of the stock man involves most of the following: checking incoming goods against in­
voices or requisitions; unpacking goods; loading or unloading goods from trucks or railroad
cars; tallying the number of cases or other units loaded or unloaded, and placing stock in pro­
per storage place.
Handler and Stacker (Warehousing) - A worker engaged in the placement and transfer
of household furniture and goods or miscellaneous goods and commodities between the loading
platform and storage rooms within the warehouse. The work of the handler and stacker involves
most of the following; loading, unloading, stacking and carrying incoming and/xr outgoing ship­
ments; checking goods against invoices to verify type, condition and quantity of shipments;
and locating and assembling requisitioned goods.
STOREKEEPER*
Supervises the work of a small number of stockmen as head of a moderate size store­
room or warehouse or as an assistant in a large storeroom involving receipt, storage, and
distribution of a variety of materials, supplies, and equipment; checks supplies for confor­
mance to specifications; keeps inventory records and maintains controls for stock ordering;
advises on purchases,
TRUCK DRIVER
Truck Driver (Manufacturing) - A worker who drives a truck to transport materials,
merchandise, equipment, or men. May load or unload truck, frequently assisted by Truck-Driver
Helper. May make minor mechanical repairs and keep truck in good working order. This classi­
fication does not include Driver-Salesman.

*Bay Area Salary Survey Committee description.




39.

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued

TRUCK DRIVER - Continued
Truck Driver, Local Delivery (Wholesale Trade; Retail Trade) - A worker who drives
a truck within a city or industrial area and whose work may involve loading and unloading the
truck with or without helpers and delivering between any of the following types of establish­
ments: freight depots, warehouses, wholesale establishments and retail establishments and/or
between retail establishments and customers * houses or places of business. This classification
does not include drivers who sell or solicit business.
For wage study purposes truck
equipment operated, as follows:
Truck
Truck
Truck
Truck

driver,
driver,
driver,
driver,

drivers are classified according to size and type of

(light - under lj tons)
(medium - 1^ to and including k tons)
(heavy - over ^ tons, trailer type)
(heavy - over k tons, other than trailer type)

TRUCKER, PCWER
A worker who operates a manually-controlled gasoline or electric-powered truck or
tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant
or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers whould be classified on the basis of type of truck
operated as:
Truckers, power (fork-lift)
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift)
WATCHMAN
A worker who guards premises of plant property, warehouses, office buildings, or
banks. Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property against fire, theft, and
illegal entry.

Machinery Industries

ASSEMBLER
(Bench assembler; floor assembler; jig assembler; line assembler; sub-assembler)
A worker who assembles and/or fits together parts to form complete units or subas­
semblies at a bench, conveyor line, or on the floor, depending upon the size of the units and
the organization of the production process. The work of the assembler may include processing
operations requiring the use of hand tools in scraping, chipping and filing of parts to obtain
a desired fit as well as power tools and special equipment when punching, riveting, soldering
or welding of parts is necessary. Workers who perform any of these processing operations ex­
clusively as part of specialized assembling operations are not included in this classification.




Uo.
Machinery Industries - Continued

ASSEMBLER - Continued
Class A - A worker who assembles parts Into complete units or subassemblies that re­
quire fitting of parts and decisions regarding proper performance of any consonant part or the
assembled unit, and whose work involves any combination of the following? assembling from
drawings, blueprints or other written specifications; assembling units composed of a variety
of parts and/or subassemblies; assembling large units requiring careful fitting and adjusting
of parts to obtain specified clearances; and using a variety of hand and powered tools and
precision measuring instruments.
Class B - A worker who assembles parts into units or subassemblies in accordance
with standard and prescribed procedures, and whose work involves any combination of the fol­
lowing: assembling a limited range of standard and familiar products composed of a number of
small or medium-sized parts requiring some fitting or adjusting; assembling large units that
require little or no fitting of component parts; working under conditions where accurate per­
formance and completion of work within set time limits are essential for subsequent assem­
bling operations; and using a limited variety of hand or powered tools.
Class C - A worker who performs short-cycle, repetitive assembling operations, and
whose work does not involve any fitting or making decisions regarding proper performance of
the component parts or assembling procedures.
CHIPPER AMD GRINDER
(Air hammerman; bench grinder; chipper; disc grinder; face grinder; portable-grinder
operator; power-chisel operator; shaft grinder; snagger; stand grinder; swing-frame
grinder)
Operates one or more types of chipping or grinding equipment in removing undesirable
projections or surplus metal (fins, burrs, gates, risers, weld seams) from sand- or die-cast­
ings, forgings, or welded units. The more common types of equipment employed for such oper­
ations include pneumatic chisels, portable grinding tools, stand grinders, and swing-frame
grinders. A variety of hand tools including hammers, cold chisels, hand files and saws may
also be utilized by the operator in his work. This classification includes workers who spe­
cialize on either chipping or grinding work, as well as those who perform both types of oper­
ations .
DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MULTIPLE-SPINDLE!
Performs such operations as drilling, reaming, countersinking, counterboring, spot­
facing and tapping on one or more types of single-spindle or multiple-spindle drill presses.
This classification includes operators of all types of
radial-drill presses and portable drilling equipment.

drill presses

other

than

Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine for operations requiring care­
ful positioning, blocking and aligning of units; to determine speeds, feeds, tooling and oper­
ation sequence; and to make all necessary adjustments during operation to achieve requisite
dimensions or




Machinery Industries - Continued

DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MULTIPLE-SPINDLE - Continued
Operator who is required to set up machine where speeds, feeds, tooling and operation
sequence are presecibed hut whose work involves very difficult operations such as deep drill­
ing, or boring to exacting specifications.
Class B - Operator who is required to set up machine on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; and to make all necessary adjust­
ments during operation or
Operator who is required to maintain set-up made by others, including making all ne­
cessary adjustments during operation on work requiring considerable care on the part of the
operator to maintain specified tolerances.
Class C - Operator who is required only to operate machine, on routine and repetitive
operations; to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop
the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.
ENGINE-LATHE OPERATOR
Operates an engine lathe for shaping external and internal cylindrical surfaces of
metal objects. The engine lathe, basically characterized by a headstock, tailstock, and powerfed tool carriage,
is a general-purpose machine tool used primarily for turning. It is also
commonly used in performing such operations as facing, boring, drilling, and threading; and,
equipped with appropriate attachments, it may be used for a very wide variety of specie 1 machin­
ing operations. The stock may be held in position by the lathe "centers" or by various types
of chucks and fixtures.
This classification excludes operators of bench lathes, automatic lathes, automaticscrew machines, and hand-turret lathes and hand-screw machines.
Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds, tool­
ing and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve
requisite dimensions or
Operator who is required to set up machine from drawings, blueprints or layout, in
accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence and to make necessary
adjustments during operation where changes in work and set-up are frequent and where care is
essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - Operator who is required to maintain operation set up by others, by making
all necessary adjustments, where care is essential to achieve very close tolerances or
Operator who is required to set up machine on standard or roughing operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; and to make adjustments during
operation.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing,
to select proper coolants and cutting oils.




to dress tools and

Machinery Industries - Continued

ENGINE -LATHE OPERATOR - Continued
Class C - Operator who is required only to operate machine on routine and repetitive
operations; to make* only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop
the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.
GRINDING-MACHINE OPERATOR
(Centerless-grinder operator; cylindrical-grinder operator; external-grinder opera­
tor; internal-grinder operator; surface-grinder operator; Universal-grinder operator)
A worker who operates one of several types of precision grinding machines to grind
internal and external surfaces of metal parts to a smooth and even finish and to required
dimensions. Precision grinding is used primarily as a finishing operation on previously ma­
chined parts, and consists of applying abrasive wheels rotating at high speed to the surfaces
to be ground.
In addition to the types of grinding machines indicated above, this classification
includes operators of other production grinding machines such as: single-purpose grinders,
(drill grinders, broach grinders, saw grinders, gear cutter grinders, thread grinders, etc.),
and automatic and semi-automatic general purpose grinding machines.
Class A - An operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds,
tooling and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve
requisite dimensions or
An operator who is required to set up machine from drawings or blueprints or lay-out
in accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence and to make nec­
essary adjustments during operation where changes in work and set-up are frequent and where
care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - An operator who is required to set up machine on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are either prescribed or are known from past
experience; to make adjustments during operation; and to maintain prescribed tolerances or
An operator who is required to maintain operation set up by others, by making all
necessary adjustments, where considerable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressings, to dress tools and
to select coolants and cutting oils.
Class C - An operator who is required only to operate machine on routine and repet­
itive operations; to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to
stop the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.




kl
Machinery Industries - Continued

INSPECTOR
A worker who performs such operations as examining parts or products for flaws and
defects, and checking their dimensions and appearance to determine whether they meet the re­
quired standards and specifications.
Class A - A worker who inspects parts, products, and/or processes with responsi­
bility for decisions regarding the quality of the product and/or operations, and whose work
involves any combination of the following: thorough knowledge of the processing operations
in the branch of work to which he is assigned, including the use of a variety of precision
measuring instruments; interpreting drawings and specifications in inspection work on units
composed of a large number of component parts; examining a variety of products or processing
operations; determining causes of flaws in products and/or processes and suggesting necessary
changes to correct work methods; and devising inspection procedures for new products.
Class B - A worker who inspects parts, products, and/or processes and whose work
involves any combination of the following: knowledge of processing operations in the branch
of work to which he is assigned, limited to familiar products and processes or where perform­
ance is dependent on past experience; performing inspection operations on products and/or
processes having rigid specifications, but where the inspection procedures involving a se­
quence of inspection operations,
including decisions regarding proper fit or performance of
some parts; and using precision measuring instruments•
Class C - A worker who inspects parts, products and/or processes and whose work in­
volves any combination of the following: short-cycle, repetitive inspection operations; using
a standardized, special-purposes measuring instrument repetitively; and visual examination of
parts or products, rejecting units having obvious deformities or flaws.
MACHINIST, PRODUCTION
A worker who is required to fabricate metal parts involving a series of progressive
operations and whose work involves most of the following; understanding of written instruc­
tions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinists hand
tools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to di­
mensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; understanding of the working proper­
ties of the common metals; and selecting standard materials, parts and equipment needed for
his work. In general, the machinist’s work normally requires a rounded training in machineshop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience.
MILLING-MACHINE OPERATOR
(Milling-machine operator, automatic; milling-machine operator, hand)
Performs a variety of work such as grooving, planing, and shaping metal objects on
a milling machine, which removes material from metal surfaces by the cutting action of multitoothed rotating cutters of various sizes and shapes.
Milling-machine types vary from the manually controlled machines enqployed in unit
production to fully automatic (conveyor-fed) machines found in plants engaged in mass produc-




Machinery Industries - Continued

MILLING-MACHINE OPERATOR - Continued
tion. This classification includes operators of all types of milling machines except singlepurpose millers such as thread millers, duplicators, die sinkers, pantograph millers and en­
graving millers.
Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds, tool­
ing and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve req­
uisite dimensions or
Operator who is required to set up machine from drawings, blueprints, or lay-out in
accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence, and to make neces­
sary adjustments during operation where changes in work and set up are :frequent and where con­
siderable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - Operator who is required to set up machines on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; to make adjustments during oper­
ation; and to maintain prescribed tolerances or
Operator who is required to maintain operation set up by others, by making all neces­
sary adjustments, where considerable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing,
to select proper coolants and cutting oils.

to dress tools and

Class C - Operator who is required to operate only, on routine and repetitive oper­
ations; to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop ma­
chine and call on foreman, leadman or set-up man to correct the operation.
TOOL AND LIE MAKER
(Die maker; Jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker; gauge maker)
A worker who constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gauges, Jigs, fixtures or
dies for forgings, punching and other metal-forming work, and whose work involves most of the
following: planning and laying out of work from models, blueprints, drawings or other oral
and written specifications; using a variety of tool-and-die maker* s hand tools and precision
measuring instruments; understanding of the working properties of common metals and alloys;
setting up and operating of machine tools and related equipment; making necessary shop compu­
tations relating to dimensions of work, speed, feeds, and tooling of machines; heat-treating
of metal parts during fabrication as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve required
qualities; working to close tolerances; fitting and assembling of parts to prescribed toler­
ances and allowances; and selecting appropriate materials, tools and processes. In general,
the tool-and-die maker's work requires a rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom
practice usually acquired throu^ia formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
For wage study purposes, tool and die makers are classified as:
Tool and die makers, Jobbing shops
Tool and die makers, other than Jobbing shops




Machinery Industries - Continued

WELDER, H N
AD
A worker who fuses (welds) metal objects together by means of an oxyacetylene torch
or arc welding apparatus in the fabrication of metal shapes and in repairing broken or cracked
metal objects. In addition to performing hand welding or brazing operation, he may also lay
out guide lines or marks on metal parts and may cut metal with a cutting torch.
Class A - Worker who performs welding operations requiring most of the following:
planning and laying out of work from drawings, blueprints or other written specifications;
knowledge of welding properties of a variety of metals and alloys; setting up of work and de­
termining operation sequence; welding cf high pressure vessels or other objects involving cri­
tical safety and load requirements; working from a variety of positions; and ability to weld
with gas or arc apparatus.
Class B - Worker who Is required to perform either arc or gas welding operations on
repetitive work, where no critical safety and load requirements are involved; where the work
calls mainly for one position welding; and where the layout and planning of the work are per­
formed by others.

Foundries, Ferrous

CHIPPER A D GRINDER
N
(See Machinery Industries, page

for description.)

COREM
AKER, H N
AD
A worker who shapes by hand (on bench or floor) varying cores used in molds to form
hollows and holes in metal castings, and whose work requires most of the following: selecting
appropriate core boxes and work sequence; cleaning core boxes with compressed air or hand
bellows and dusting parting sand over inside of core box to facilitate removal of finished
core; packing and ramming core sand solidly into box, using shovels, hands, and tamping tools;
selecting and setting vent wires and reinforcing wires Into cores; determining appropriate
sand blends and moisture content of sand required for a particular core; removing core box
:from core and repairing damage to impressions; baking cores to harden them; and assembling
cores of more than one section.
MOLPER, FLOOR
A worker who shapes large molds or mold sections by hand on the foundry floor or in
a pit, by ramming or packing sand around a pattern placed in a flask, and whose work Involves
most of the following: selecting and assembling appropriate flasks and patterns and position­
ing patterns in flasks for a variety of molds; determination of appropriate sand blends and
moisture content of sand required for different molds; packing and ramming sand around pattern;
drawing pattern and smoothing mold; selecting and setting in position appropriate cores; deter­
mination of appropriate gating, venting reinforcing and facing required for particular mold;
assembling mold sections into complete mold; using such ladder's hand tools as riddles, rammers,
trowels, slicks, lifters, bellows and mallets in compacting and smoothing of mold; directing
the pouring of the molten metal into mold, and operation of crane In lifting and moving of
mold or mold sections.




Foundries, Ferrous - Continued

M
OLDER, M
ACHINE
A worker who shapes molds or mold sections on any of several types of molding ma ­
chines, such as roll-over, Jarring, and squeeze machines, and whose work involves most of the
followingi selecting and assembling appropriate flasks and patterns and positioning patterns
in flasks; filling flasks with sand and ramming of sand around pattern with ramming tool or
by mechanical means; determination of appropriate sand blends and moisture content of sand
required for particular molds; preparing molds for drawing of patterns, and repairing damage
to mold impressions in sand; selecting and setting in position appropriate cores; determina­
tion of appropriate venting, gating, reinforcing and facing required; assembling upper and
lower sections of molds, and guiding or assisting in the pouring of the molten metal into the
mold.

PATTERNMAKER, W O
OD
A worker who builds wooden patterns, core boxes or match plates, and whose work in­
volves most of the following: planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, or
models; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work; using a variety of
patternmaker's hand tools such as saws, planes, chisels, gauges, and mallets; operating vari­
ous woodworking machines such as band saws, circular saws, borers, routers, lathe planers,
drill presses, senders, and shapers; checking work with calipers, rules, protractors, squares,
straight-edges, and other measuring instruments; assembling patterns and sections of patterns
by gluing, nailing, screwing, and doweling; working to required tolerances and allowances;
and selecting the materials for the construction of a particular pattern. May also make
sweeps (templates) for making molds by the sweep-molding method. In general the work of the
patternmaker requires a rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
SHAKE-OUT MAN
A worker who removes castings from the molds in which they were cast, and whose work
involves one or more of the following: releasing clamps holding sections of flask together,
separating the sections and breaking the sand mold from the castings, using a steel bar or
sledge hananer, or removing castings from the sand with the aid of metal hooks; operating a
vibrating shake-out screen in removing sand and castings from flasks; using a pneumatic shaker
which, when attached to the flask, Jars or Jolts it until the mold has crumbled; using a
vibratory air-hammer to remove the sand and castings; shaking loosely adhering sand from cast­
ings; and shoveling sand shaken from molds into a pile.

Fabricated Structural Steel and Ornamental Metal Work

CRANE OPERATOR, ELECTRIC-BRIDGE
(Overhead-crane operator; traveling-crane operator)
A worker who lifts and moves heavy objects with an electrically powered hoist which
is mounted on a metal bridge, and runs along overhead rails. The work of the operator in­
volves: closing switch to turn on electricity; moving electrical controller levers and brake




^3.

Fabricated Structural Steel and Ornamental Metal Work - Continued

CJRME OPERATOR, ELECTRIC-BRIDGE - Continued
pedal to run the crane bridge along overhead rails, to run the hoisting trolley back and forth
across the bridge, and to raise and lower the load line and anything attached to it. (Motions
of crane are usually carried out in response to signals from other workers, on the ground.)
For wage study purposes, crane operators are classified as:
Crane operators, electric-bridge (under 10 tons)
Crane operators, electric-bridge (10 tons and over)
FITTER, STRUCTURAL
A worker who, working in an establishment, assembles and^>r fits up structural steel
shapes used in the fabrication of buildings, towers, bridges and other structures. The work in­
cludes assembling of processed structural steel members in preparation for riveting or welding
operations, and Joining parts together to see that they are properly processed for assembly
by other workers at the construction site.
Class A - A worker who is required to assemble and fit up a variety of types of
structural work; to work from blueprints, drawings or other written specifications; to plan
assembly procedure; and to use hand tools and measuring devices in the performance of his work.
Class B - A worker who is required to assemble structural units requiring little or
no fitting; to do repetitive types of assembling operations according to procedures establish­
ed by others; and to use hand tools and measuring devices in the performance of his work.
FIAME-CUTTING-MACHINE OPERATOR
(Acetylene-burning-machine operator; machine burner operator)
A worker who cuts steel plate into various designs and shapes, using hand guided or
automatic flame-cutting machines, and whose work involves most of the following: laying of
template or blueprint of layout on table top adjacent to machine, or making layout of design;
positioning work for operations; adjusting burner tip of cutting torch, regulating flame and
speed of machine according to thickness of metal; and positioning guide wheels of machine
against a template, or tracing course of cutting torch with a pantograph in producing desired
cuts.
LAY-OUT MAN
A worker who outlines guide marks on structural steel, plate, castings, sheet-metal
or other metal shapes for subsequent processing and fabrication, by indicating guide lines,
centers, reference points, dimensions and processing instructions on the surface of metal
part.
Class A - A lay-out man whose work involves most of the following: laying out from
blueprints or drawings; making shop computations to locate guide lines, reference points,
centers of punch marks; preparing the surface of metal objects for lay-out; working on a
variety of products of various sizes and shapes; indicating detailed instructions to pro­
cessing workers; and using hand tools and measuring instruments.




Fabricated Structural Steel and Ornamental Metal Work - Continued

LAY-OUT MAN - Continued
Class B - A lay-out man whose work involves any combination of the following: using
templates in indicating reference points or guide lines; working from drawings on repetitive
lay-outs; providing simple instructions to processing workers; and using hand tools and meas­
uring instruments.
POWER-SHEAF OPERATOR
A worker who operates one or more types of p w e r shears to cut metal sheets, plates,
hare, rods and other metal shapes to size or length.
Class A - A worker who is required to set up and operate power-shear equipment,
under general supervision only, and whose work involves most of the following: working from
blueprints or drawings or to material requisition lists; planning and lay-out of work; selec­
ting and utilizing material to avoid excessive scrap; setting stop gauges, aligning material
and performing shearing operation on machine; shearing large or heavy material to lay-out or
specified dimensions; and performing shearing operations involving angular or circular cuts.
Class B - A worker who is required to operate power-shears on straight shearing
operations performed on a repetitive basis where accuracy is not an important consideration
and where setting up is limited to setting stop gauges for size of stock desired or is done
by others.
WELDER, HAND
(See Machinery Industries, page

k2 for description.)

Meat Products, Independent Producers

BUTCHER, GENERAL - KILLING DEPARTMENTS
A worker who performs all or most of the operations in slaughtering cattle, hogs,
sheep, or calves. Employed for the most part in small establishments where specialization is
impractical, general butchers may, in addition to their duties in the killing department, also
do meat cutting.
CUTTER, GENERAL - CUTTING DEPARTMENTS
A worker who performs all or most of the operations necessary to cut and bone the
various cuts of meat, generally being employed in a small establishment where specialization
is impractical. This classification does not include workers who perform specialized opera­
tions such as ham trimming or rib-boning or workers who do only the initial cutting.
PACKER, SAUSAGE
A worker who packs sausage in boxes, cartons, or other containers and whose work
involves: setting up paper boxes or cartons; wrapping sausage in paper; packing sausage in
boxes, cartons or other containers; weighing packages; and attaching labels and tags to pack­
ages.




Moat Products, Independent Producers - Continued

SAUSAGE MAKER
A worker who prepares sausage meat, and whose work involves most of the following:
weighing out various meats, spices and other ingredients according to formula; using grinder
and chopper in cutting the meat to size; using a mixing machine in blending the ingredients;
and cooking sausage meat.
SHACKLER - KILLING DEPARTMENTS
A worker who attaches one end of a shackling chain to a hind leg of animal to be
slaughtered and attaches the other end to a hoist which lifts the shackled animal into posi­
tion for the sticking operation. A common type of hoisting equipment consists of a revolving
drum which raises the shackled animal to a rail conveyor.
WASHER - KILLING DEPARTMENTS
A worker who washes and cleans animal carcasses with water sprayed under pressure
from a hose or frbm a hose equipped with a brush. Where a washing crew is employed, may per­
form only part of the washing operation.

W o m e n s Coats and Suits

CUTTER AND MARKER
A worker who marks the outlines of various garment parts on a ply of fabric and who
cuts out parts with shears, hand knife, or powered cutting machine. In addition, may spread
or lay-up cloth on cutting table. This classification includes workers who specialize in
cutting or in marking; specialized markers using perforated patterns, marking by use of tal­
cum, are omitted as are all workers who specialize in spreading cloth.
Workers engaged in marking and cutting
classification.

linings and

trimmings are included

in the

PRESSER
A worker who performs pressing operations (finish or under) on garments or garment
parts by means of a hand-pressing iron and/or powered press or mangle.
For wage
equipment used.

study purposes,

pressers are classified

Presser, hand
Presser, machine
Presser, hand and machine




according to

type of

pressing

Women* s Coats and Suits - Continued

SEWERf HAND (FINISHER)
(Bench worker)
A worker who performs sewing operations by hand including sewing on buttons, making
buttonholes, stitching edges, closing openings that have been left by various hand and machine
operations.
Workers who specialize in sewing tickets or labels are not included in this classi­
fication.
SEWBfa-MACHBlE OPERATOR, SINGLE HAM) (TAILOR) SYSTEM
An operator who uses a sewing machine to perform all the standard sewing-machine
operations involved in the manufacture of a complete garment and whose work involves: assem­
bling and joining all parts of the garment except those added by finishers. Usually an expe­
rienced operator working on better-grade apparel in which the variety of design is so great
and style changes so frequent as to prevent the economical use of a section system.
This classification includes workers, employed in single-hand system shops; who
pair-up and work as a team and divide work tickets equally; this arrangement is informal, in
contrast to the section system on which rates are established for individual operations.

Industrial Chemicals

CHEMICAL OPERATOR
A worker who produces final or intermediate
specifications prepared by a professional chemist.

chemical products in

accordance with

Class A - A worker who operates one type of equipment or directs a chemical process
comprising several types of chemical equipment where the reaction involves physical and/or
chemical changes within highly critical, pressure, vacuum and/or temperature limits and whose
work involves most of the following: determining proper proportions of materials according
to formulae or specifications; making necessary standard calculations; setting and regulating
controls for temperature, pressure or flow of materials; observing controls and making neces­
sary adjustments; using measuring and testing instruments to check quality of operation;
keeping operational records and making out reports on operations; and responsibility for the
quality and quantity of the product and the equipment. May also coordinate the various
functions of other operators and helpers to achieve a required flow of work.
Class B - A worker who works at assigned equipment or position of a chemical reac­
tion process where the operations involve physical and or chemical changes under highly crit­
ical pressure, vacuum or temperature limits. The worker may perform any of the specific du­
ties of the class A operator but requires guidance in the interpretation of tests and obser­
vations in setting and regulating controls and in making out reports on operations or
A worker who operates primarily one type of
pressure control within relatively broad limits.
A worker may direct one or several helpers.




equipment under

atmospheric or

low

^5
Industrial Chemicals - Continued

CHEMICAL OPERATOR HELPER
A worker who performs a variety of simple
chemical operator. The work of the helper involves
moving, handling, dumping and weighing of materials;
ings of temperature and pressure under the direction
area; removing finished products from equipment; and

and standard tasks assigned to him "by a
most of the following; assisting in the
loading equipment; taking simple record­
of chemical operators; cleaning working
cleaning or washing equipment.

This classification includes all helpers to chemical equipment operators, regardless
of whether the operator is assigned to a specific type of apparatus or is engaged in control­
ling the operation of a series of equipment.
DRUM FILLER
A worker who fills steel drums to a predetermined level or weight with chemical
products, screws hung in place or seals cover on drum, and stencils identifying data on drum
prior to shipment.
LABORATORY ASSISTANT
A worker who performs standard and routine laboratory tests to determine properties
of materials and submits results of the tests to chemists or to operators in the various proc­
essing departments. Among the types of tests that may be carried on by the laboratory assist­
ant are viscosity tests or specific gravity tests.

Department and Clothing Stores

CASHIER -WRAPPER
A worker who wraps and receives payment for merchandise. The duties of this worker
involve most of the following: receiving payment, merchandise, and salescheck from sales­
person or customer; reviewing salescheck for correct computations; making change; checking
salescheck against merchandise for prices, quality, size, color, imperfections; wrapping mer­
chandise; attaching address label if merchandise is to be sent*
ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER
A worker who transports passengers between floors of an office building,
house, department store, hotel or similar establishment.

apartment

SALES CLERK
A worker who sells merchandise in an assigned department of a store or in a store
specializing in one or a few items. Determines merchandise desired by customer, assists in
selection, explains and demonstrates various qualities of the merchandise, receives payment,
and makes out salescheck. May also do own cashiering and wrapping and assist in stocking and
displaying merchandise.




16 .
+
Department and Clothing Stores - Continued

SALES CLERK - Continued
Sales Clerks are classified by department, as follows:
Furniture and "bedding
Men*s clothing
Men’s furnishings
Notions, trimmings
W o m e n s accessories (hosiery, gloves, handbags, etc*)
Women’s dresses
Women’s shoes
Women’s suits and coats
TAILOR, ALTERATION (MEN’S GARMENTS)
A worker who makes alterations on men’s coats, suits, trousers and vests. Typical
alterations include such items as remodeling shoulders and necklines, re-setting sleeves and
collars, taking-in side seams, and felling in accordance with markings on garment or instruc­
tions received from Fitter. The work of the alteration tailor involves most of the following:
ripping seams and linings, re-cutting fabric, basting in position for sewing, re-sewing by
hand or machine. May also press new seams, and press or iron garment with hand iron or press­
ing machine when alterations are completed.
TAILOR, ALTERATION (WOMEN’S GARMENTS)
A worker who makes alterations on women’s suits, coats, or dresses. Typical alter­
ations include such items as remodeling shoulders and necklines, re-setting sleeves and collars,
taking-in side seams, and felling in accordance with markings on garment or instructions re­
ceived from Fitter. The work of the alteration tailor involves most of the following: rip­
ping seams and linings, re-cutting fabric, basting in position for sewing, re-sewing by hand
or machine. May also press new seams, and press or iron garment with hand iron or pressing
machine when alterations are completed.

Office Building Service

CLEANER
A worker who keeps halls, offices, and/or rooms of public buildings, offices, com­
mercial establishments, or apartment houses in a clean, orderly condition and whose work in­
volves: sweeping, mopping and/or scrubbing floors; disposing of waste or litter; and/or dust­
ing furniture and equipment. May also be required to polish metal fixtures and fittings.
This classification does not include window washers.
ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER
(See Department and Clothing Stores, page




kj for

description.)

Office Building Service - Continued

JANITOR
(Janitor-maintenance man)
A building service worker, employed in an office building, who performs a variety
of duties involved in cleaning the premises, disposing of waste and litter, and providing
supplies and minor maintenance services. May, occasionally, operate a passenger elevator.
This classification does not include workers whose duties are limited to cleaning the premises.
(See Cleaner.)
WATCHMAN
(See Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking, page 39 for description.)

Auto Repair Service

BODY REPAIRMAN, METAL
(Automobile-collision serviceman; fender and body repairman; body man)
Repairs damaged automobile fenders and bodies to restore their original shape and
smoothness of surface by hammering out and filling dents, and by welding breaks in the metal.
May remove bolts and nuts, take off old fenders, and install new fenders. May perform such
related tasks as replacing broken glass and repairing damaged radiators and woodwork. May
paint repaired surfaces.
GREASER
(Lubricating man)
Lubricates, by means of hand-operated or compressed-air operated grease guns and
oil sprays, all parts of automobile or truck where lubrication is required, using proper type
lubricant on the various points on chassis or motors; drains old lubricant from lubricant reser­
voirs and refills with new. May perform other related duties, such as checking radiator water
level, checking and adding distilled water to battery, repairing tires, etc. May also perform
duties of washer.
MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE
Repairs automobiles and trucks, performing such duties as disassembling and overhaul­
ing engines, transmissions, clutches, rear ends, and other assemblies on automobiles, replac­
ing worn or broken parts, grinding valves, adjusting brakes, tightening body bolts, aligning
wheels, etc. In addition to general automotive mechanics, this classification also includes
workers whose duties are limited to repairing and overhauling the motor.
Class A - Repairs, rebuilds, or overhauls engines, transmissions, clutches, rear
ends, or other assemblies, replaces worn or broken parts, grinds valves, bores cylinders, fits
rings. In addition may adjust brakes or lights, tighten body bolts, align wheels, etc. May
remove or replace motors, transmissions or other assemblies. May do machining of parts.




Auto Repair Service - Continued

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE - Continued
Class B - Adjusts brakes or lights, tightens body bolts, aligns wheels, or makes
other adjustments or repairs of a minor nature; or removes and replaces motors, transmissions,
clutches, rear ends, etc., but does no repairing, rebuilding, or overhauling of these assem­
blies. Workers who are eugaloyed as helpers to Mechanics are excluded fbom this classification.
WASHER, AUTOMOBILE
(Car washer; wash boy)
Washes automobiles and trucks; sweeps and cleans interior of automobile; may polish
auto vehicle bodies, using polishing compound and a cloth. Various parts of this job may be
performed by individual workers in automobile laundries production lines.

Power Laundries

CLERK, RETAIL RECEIVING
A person who receives work from routemen or from customers over the counter in the
receiving office or store of a dry-cleaning or laundry establishment and whose work involves
most of the following; maintaining a record of articles or bundles received; returning com­
pleted work to customers who call for it; collecting payment and maintaining simple records
of money received; and in establishments where dry cleaning is done, fastening an identifying
marker to each article, examining an article for defects such as holes, stains or tears, and
making a record of 1he identification symbol assigned to each article with a brief description
of the article and of any defects noted. This classification does not include store managers.
EXTRACTOR OPERATOR
(Whizzer operator)
A worker who removes surplus moisture from materials (such as wet cloth, clothing,
knit goods, and yarn) by operating an extractor and whose work involves most of the following;
loading material into perforated drum of machine by hand or hoist; closing lid and starting
machine, allowing it to run a predetermined time or until fluid stops flowing from drain; re­
moving partly dried materials; and hand trucking materials within the department. In addition,
the worker may assist the Washer in loading, operating, or unloading the washing machine.
FINISHER, FLATWORK, MACHINE
A worker who performs flatwork finishing operations by machine and whose work in­
volves one or more of the following; shaking out the creases in semi-dry washing to prepare
it for the flatwork ironing machine; feeding clean, damp flatwork pieces into the flatwork
ironing machine by placing the articles on the feeder rollers; and catching or receiving arti­
cles as they emerge from the machine and partially folding them.




Power Laundries - Continued

IDENTIFIER
A worker who sorts soiled bundles, places the contents into various hags and by
means of flags, pins or other devices identifies the net with a customer tag or ticket. In
addition may weigh, list or count some or all articles contained in each bundle. This classi­
fication does not include workers who mark or otherwise identify each individual piece con­
tained in a bundle.
MARKER
A worker who marks or affixes by hand or mechanical means, customer identifying
symbols on soiled garments, linens, or other articles. In addition may weigh, list, or count
articles contained in each bundle, sort contents of each bundle into groups according to treat­
ment to be received, or note and record any damaged or stained condition of articles. This
classification does not Include workers who do sorting, examining, or listing without marking
the various articles.
PRESSER, MACHINE, SHIRTS
A worker who operates or tends the operation of one or more of the several type
machines that press shirts, and who perform such shirt pressing operations as body pressing,
bosom pressing, collar and cuff pressing, and/or sleeve pressing.
WASHER, MACHINE
A worker who operates one or metre washing machines to wash household linens, gar­
ments, curtains, drapes and other articles and whose work involves the following: manipula­
ting valves, switches, and levers to start and stop the machine and to control the amount and
temperature of water for the sudsing and rinsing of each batch* mixing and adding soap, bluing
and bleaching solutions; and loading and unloading the washing machine. In addition may make
minor repairs to washing machine.
WRAPPER, BUNDLE
A worker who wraps packages or finished products, or packs articles, goods, or ma­
terials in cardboard boxes and secures the package or box with twine, ribbon, gummed tape, or
paste. The worker may segregate articles according to size or type, or according to customer’s
order and Inspect articles for defects before wrapping.

Hospitals*

DIETICIAN
Develops and plans special diets and supervises the preparation of such diets; con­
sults with the Chef or Food Administrator on food available for special diets and prepares

*Bay Area Salary Survey Committee descriptions.




Hospitals - Continued

DIETICIAN - Continued
food orders for such diets; inspects special diets served to patients; consults with doctors
on contents of special diets and the use of substitute food; supervises activities and per­
sonnel of ward kitchens; requisitions needed supplies and equipment.
LABORATORY TECHNICIAN (CLINICAL)
Performs all types of bacteriological tests including virus work, special innoculation tests, penicillin, streptomycin, and sulfanilamide, sensitization tests, and quantita­
tive determination of concentration in body fluids, and bacteriological studies of autopsy
specimens; identifies bacteria in Bputum, feces, blood, urine exudates, and spinal fluid by
means of usual methods; makes standard and special biochemical tests on blood and other body
fluids, gastric and urine analyses and basal metabolism tests. May instruct and review work
of laboratory assistants.
PHARMACIST
Compounds and dispenses medicines and preparations as directed by
prescriptions
prepared by licensed physician; compounds, and packages bulk medicines and preparations; re­
ceives, stores, and dispenses hosiptal supplies; maintains inventory of drugs and supplies;
keeps records of medical prescriptions compounded.
Requires a California State Pharmacist
Certificate of Registration.
PHYSIOTHERAPIST
Administers physiotherapeutic treatments to patients in a hospital including hydriatic treatments, electric therapy, and Kenny packs; maintains clinical notes and records
and makes necessary reports. Registration with the American Registry of Physical Therapy
Technicians or the American Physiotherapy Association is required.
REGISTERED NURSE
Does professional nursing in wards and clinics; prepares patients for, and assists
in, examinations and treatments; maintains records such as patient charts and nurses notes;
changes dressings and administers medications and treatments prescribed by physician; super­
vises attendants and student nurses as necessary. A Registered Nurse certificate issued by
the State of California is required.
X-RAY TECHNICIAN
Performs all types of radiographic work at institutions and health clinics; prepares
patients for radiographic examinations and treatments; makes X-ray exposures; gives minor
radiographic therapy treatments as prescribed by a physician; develops films; supervises the
work of student technicians; keeps records and makes reports on films taken and supplies and
equipment used.










Ind
Page: Number
Earnings or rate
Description
A.B. maintenance man (ocean transport) .......................
Accountant .................................. .................
Accountant (railroads) .............................. ..........
Accountant, senior ................. ..........................
Assembler (machinery) ............... ............... ^ ........
Bench and machine helper (bakeries) ............. ..............
Bench hand (bakeries) ................ ........................
Benchman (bakeries) ........................ ............
Biller, machine (billing machine) ............. ...............
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine) .........................
Bindery woman (printing) ......................................
Boatswain (ocean transport) ............................... .
Boatswain's mate (ocean transport) .......... ............... .
Body repairman, metal (auto repair shops) .....................
Bookkeeper, hand ....... ............... .
Bookkeeping-machine operator ..................................
Bottler (malt liquors) .... ............................ .......
Bread packer (bakeries) ........................... ............
Brewer (malt liquors) ...... ..................................
Bricklayer (building construction) .......................... .
Building laborer (building construction) ......................
Butcher, general, cattle killing (meat products) .......... .
Cake dumper (bakeries) ...... ......... ................. .......
Cake-wrapping iisachine operator (bakeries) .............. ......
Calculating-machine operator (Comptometer type) ..............
Calculating-machine operator (Comptometer type) (railroads) ...
Calculating-machine operator (other than Comptometer type) ....
Can forker (canning) .............................. .......... .
Can run attendant (canning) .......... ...................... .
Carpenter (building construction) ...... ..... ............. .
Carpenter, maintenance ....... .............................. .
Carpenter (ocean transport) ............. .....................
Carpenter's mate (ocean transport) ............................
Cashier-wrapper (department and clothing stores) ........ .
Checker (malt liquors) ............. ..........................
Chef (ocean transport) ................. ................... .
Chemical operator (industrial chemicals) .....................
Chipper and grinder (ferrous foundries) ...................... .
Chipper and grinder (machinery) ............................ .
Cleaner ....... ...............................................
Cleaner (office buildings) ................................... .
Cleaner (railroads) .............. ..................... .
Clerk, accounting ......... ...................................
Clerk, accounting (railroads) ...............................
Clerk, file ...................................................
Clerk, general, senior .......................... ............ ..
Clerk, general, intermediate ........ .........................
Clerk, general, j u n i o r .... ................................. .
Clerk, general, Junior (railroads) ............................
Clerk, order ........... ......................................
Clerk, pay roll ...............................................
Clerk, retail, receiving (laundries) .........................
Clerk, shipping and receiving (malt liquors) ........ .........
Clerk-typist .................................... ............ .
Clerk-typist (railroads) ......................................
Coil cleaner (canning) ............................. .
Compositor, hand (printing) ..................... .
Conductor (local transit) .................. ..................
Cook, assistant (ocean transport) .......... ...............
Cook, chief (ocean transport) .......................... .......
Cook, tomato (canning) ....................................
Coremaker, hand (ferrous foundries) ............. ..............
Crane operator, electric bridge (fabricated structural steel
and ornamental metal vork) ............................... .

3b

28
7, 9 ) l b
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7, lb-

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_

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3^
_
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26
26
26
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27'
28
28
21
+
7, 9, lb7 , 9, l b

-

27

_

26
27
26
26
21

_

_
_

11
++

26

_
_

1+
2

26
9, l +
l
25
10, l +
l
26
26
26
15
28
28
23
27
28
22
20
20
17
2+
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25
7, 10, 1 +
1
25
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7, 10, 1 +
1
8, 10, l +
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8, 11, l b
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1
8, 11, l +
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26
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26
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_
_
_
_

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate
Cutter and marker (women1s coats and suits) ............... .
Cutter, general, beef cutting (meat products) ...............
Dietician (hospitals) ........................................
Divlderman (bakeries) ................ .......................
Dough mixer (bakeries) ........... ............ .
Drill-press operator, single- and multiple-spindle (machinery)
Driver (malt liquors) ........................................
Drum filler (industrial chemicals) ...........................
Duplicating-machine operator ........................... ......
Electrician (building construction) .............. ...........
Electrician, chief (ocean transport) ....................... .
Electrician, maintenance ............ .........................
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) .................. .
Electrician, second (ocean transport) ........................
Electrotyper (printing) .......... ......................... .
Elevator operator, passenger (department and clothing stores)
Elevator operator, passenger (office buildings)
Engineer, chief reefer (ocean transport) ....................
Engineer, deck (ocean transport) .............................
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .........................
Engineer, stationary........ ......................... .......
Extractor operator (laundries) ...............................
Feeder, labeling machine (canning) ............. ..............
Finisher, flatwork, machine (laundries) .....................
Fireman (ocean trausnort) ............... ........... *........
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r .... .......... ................. .
Fireman, stationary boiler (railroads) .....................
Fitter, structural (fabricated structural steel and
ornamental metal work) ...... ....................
Flame-cutting-machine operator (fabricated structural steel
and ornamental metal work) ............. .................. .
Floor lady (canning) ................. ....................... .
Flour dumper (bakeries) .................... ............ .
Forelady (bakeries) .......... ................ ..............
Foreman (bakeries) ........................... ...............
Gang boss (stevedoring) .....................................
Garage atten d a n t ...... ............... ................... .
Gardener ............................................ ........
Greaser (auto repair shops) .................................
Grease-machine operator (bakeries) ............ ..........
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ................. .
Groundsman ................ .......... ............. ...........
Hand caser (canning) .............. ............. .
Hatch tender (stevedoring) ........... ......................
Helper (bakeries) ..... ............. ........................
Helper (malt liquors) .......... ................ ............
Helper, chemical operator (industrial chemicals) ...........
Helper, motortruck driver ...................... .............
Helper, trades, maintenance .............. ..................
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ...........
Icing mixers (bakeries) .............. ......................
Identifier (laundries) ........... ................ ...........
Ingredient man (bakeries) ...................................
Ingredient scaler (bakeries) .......... .......... ........
Inspector, labeling (canning) ......... .................••••
Inspector (machinery) ....... ....................... .
Janitor ............................. ........................
Janitor (office buildings) ........................ ..........
Janitor (railroads) ............. ...........................
Key-punch operator ............ .............................
Key-punch operator (railroads) ..... ........................
Labeling operator., head (canning) ..... .....................
Label-machine operator (canning) .......................... .
Laboratory assistant (industrJal chemicals) ......... .




44
44

47
ho
45
35

22
21
25

26
26
20
27

22
8, 11, 14

26
28

36
36

^5

k6

15
25

28
27
23
24

28
28

40

20

36

15
24

47

26

36

24
2«
15
25

43

21

43

21

47
36

26

26
26

26
28
37
38
46

17
17
24
26

41

20

38

17
26
28

26
27
45

22

36
36

27
15
25

47

24

26
26
26
26

41
38
46

20

38

25
12, 14
25

35
35

17
24

26
45

26
22

50.

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate
Laboratory technician (clinical) (hospitals) ......... 1
Laundryman, assistant (ocean transport) .............. .
Lay-out man (fabricated structural steel and ornamental
metalwork) ..................... ................••••
Lift-truck-jitney driver (stevedoring) ...............
Lineman (ocean transport) .............................
Liner operator (canning) .... ................ .........
Loader, car and truck (canning) ...................... .
Longshoreman (stevedoring) ..... *.............. *......
Machinist, maintenance ..... ..........................
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) ....................
Machinist, production (machinery) ....................
Mailer (printing) ....................... ...........
Maintenance man, general utility .....................
Maintenance man, general utility (railroads) ........ .
Marker (laundries) ............ ................ .......
Mechanic, automotive (auto repair shops) .............
Mechanic, cannery (canning) ..................... .
Mechanic, maintenance ................................
Mechanic, seamer (canning) ........ ..........
Messman (ocean transport) ......................... .
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ..................
Millwright ............................................
Mixer (bakeries) .............. ........................
Molder (bakeries) .............. ......................
Molder, floor (ferrous foundries) ....................
Molder, machine (ferrous foundries) ......... .........
Motortruck driver ................. ............ .......
Night loader (malt liquors) .......... .................
Nurse, registered (hospitals) .........................
Nurse, registered (manufacturing) .............. .
Office toy ............................................
Office boy (railroads) ...... .........................
Office g i r l ...... ........... ....... ......*...........
Oiler ....................................... ..........
Oiler (ocean transport) ................ ..............
Operator (local transit) ..............................
Order filler ........... ..............................
Overman (bakeries) ............................ ........
P a c k e r ........ . .......... ................*...........
Packer, sausage department (meat products) ...........
Painter (building construction) .................. .....
Painter, maintenance .... ............................ .
Pan greasers (bakeries) ....... ...................... «
Pan-greasing machine operator (bakeries) ............. .
Patternmaker, wood (ferrous foundries) ............... Pharmacist (hospitals) ........... ...................
Photoengraver (printing) ..............................
Physiotherapist (hospitals) ...........................
Plano mover (motortruck drivers and helpers) .... .
Pipe fitter, maintenance..... .......................
Plasterer (building construction) ..... ..............
Plumber (building construction) .....................
Porter ......................................... ......
Power-shear operator (fabricated structural steel and
ornamental metal work) .............................
Press assistant (printing) ............... ............
Press feeder (printing) ..............................
Presser, hand (women's coats and suits) ..............
Presser, hand and machine (women's coats and suits) ..
Presser, machine (women's coats and suits) ...........
Presser, machine, shirts (laundries) ................
Pressman, cylinder (printing) ........................
Pressman, web press (printing) ..... .................
Printer, label and form (canning) ...................




18
-

25
28

13

21
28
28

_
_

26
26
28
15
25
20
27

_

37
37
ll
_

16

37
37
17
16
37

_
hi
37

25
21
21
26
16
26
28
20

16

_
12
13

18
18
35
35
35
37
_

38

26
26
20
20
27
27
25
25
8, 11
25
12, ll

16
28
26
17

26

38
11

17
21

37

26
16
26
26

13
18
_

18

20
25
27
25
27

37

16
26
26

38

17

11

21
27

_

11
11
11
17
_
_

27
22
22
22
21
27
27
26

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate
Radio t echnician..... ........................................
Retort operator (canning) ................................. .
Roll-machine operator (bakeries) .............................
Sales clerk (department and clothing stores) ........... ......
Sausage makers (meat products) ................... ............
Scaling-machine operator (bakeries) ...... ............ ..... .
Seaman, able bodied (ocean transport) ..... ..............
Seaman., ordinary (ocean transport) ........... .............
Secretary ................. .................... ..............
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women's coats and suits) .........
Sewing-machine operator, single-hand (tailor) system (women's
coats and suits) ..... ......................................
Shackler, cattle killing (meat products) ......................
Shake-out man (ferrous foundries) .............................
Shipping leaderman (canning) ....... .................... ......
Silverman (ocean transport) ................................. .
Stenographer, general .....................
Stenographer, general (railroads) ............................
Stenographer, technical ..........................
Stereotyper (printing) .........
Steward, chief (ocean transport)
Steward, room (ocean transport) .
Steward, second (ocean transport)
Steward, third (ocean transport)
Stock handler .................................................
Stock handler (railroads) ..........................
Storekeeper..... ......
Storekeeper (ocean transport) ................................
Storekeeper (railroads) ..............
Storekeeper, deck (ocean transport) ...........................
Switchboard opera tor ........ .............................. .
Switchboard operator-receptionist ............................
Syrup maker (canning) .............................. ...........
Tabulating-machine operator .........
Tailor, alteration (men's garments) (department and clothing
stores) .............. .................. .....................
Tailor, alteration (women's garments) (department and clothing
stores) ....................
Tool and die maker (other than jobbing shops) (machinery)....
Transcribing-machine operator, general ...................
Truck d r i v e r .... ......
Truck driver (railroads) ................................ .
Trucker, hand ............
Trucker, hand (railroads) ......................
Trucker, power (fork lift) .....................
Trucker, power (other than
forklift) .............
Trucker, power (other than
forklift) (railroads) ...........
Typist ............................
Utilityman (ocean transport) ................... ............
Waiter (ocean transport) ......... ................... ....... .
Waiter, head (ocean transport) ........... ....................
Washer, automobile (auto repair shops) ...................... .
Washer, cattle killing (meat products) .......................
Washer, machine (laundries) ...................................
Washer, truck (malt liquors) ................... ...............
Watchman ,,.... ................. ...........,.................
Watchman (ocean transport) ......... ............... .
"Watchman (office buildings)....................................
Watertender (ocean transport) .................. ...............
Welder, hand (fabricated structural steel and ornamental
metalwork) ...............
Welder, hand (machinery) ...........
Wiper (ocean transport) ...... ................................
Wrapper, bundle (laundries) .... .............................
X-ray technician (hospitals) ..................................




16

37

26

26
15
11

23

21

26
35
15

28
28
8, 12, ll
22

22

15
11
13

21
20
26

28
35

8, 12, ll

35

25

35

12, ll
27
28
23
28
28
18

38
38
39

25
18
28
25

39

36
38
38

20
12, ll
13, 1^

8,

26

13, ll

16

23

16
12

23

36

13, ll

39
39

25

38
38
39
39
39

36

17
11
I7

39
39

20
18
18
25
19
19
25
13, lb
28
23
28

21
21

2^
27
19
28

21
28

12

21

12

20

I7
18

21

28

25

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : O — 1950


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102