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Occupational Wage Survey

NEW Y O R K , NEW Y O R K
APRIL S
1 9

BLS Bulletin No.

1 1 8 8 - 1 7

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
P. Mitchell, Secretary


http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/James
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

6

BUREAU OF LABOR S A I T C
TTSIS
Ewan Clagua, C m i s o #
oms*nr




Occupational Wage S urvey
NEW YORK, NEW YO RK




A P R IL 1 9 S 6

Bulletin No. 1188-17
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BU
REAU OF LABOR ST T IC
A IST S
Ewan Clague, Com issioner
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Contents
Page
I n t r o d u c t io n ______________________________________________________________________________________________
W age tre n d s fo r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p s _______________________________________________________________

1
3

T a b le s :
1:
2:

A:

B:

E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ithin sco p e o f s u r v e y _________________________________________________
In d exes of s ta n d a r d w e e k ly s a la r ie s for o ffic e c l e r i c a l and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u rly e a r n in g s fo r
s e le c t e d p la n t o c c u p a tio n a l gro u p s , and p e r c e n t of in c r e a s e fo r s e le c t e d p e r i o d s _____________________

2
3

O c c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s * A -l:
O f f ic e o c c u p a tio n s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------A -2 :
P r o f e s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o ccu p atio n s _________________________
A -3 :
M a in te n a n c e and p o w erp la n t o c c u p a tio n s ______________________________________________________
A -4 :
C u s to d ia l and m a te r ia l m o vem en t o cc u p a tio n s ________________________________________________

5
10
10
12

E s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and su p p le m e n ta ry w a ge p r o v is io n s * B -l:
S h ift d iffe r e n tia l p r o v is io n s _________________________________________________________________
B -2 :
M in im u m e n tra n c e ra te s fo r w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s ____________________________________________
B -3 : S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h ou rs _____________________________________________________________________
B -4 :
P a id h o l i d a y s . ______________________________________________________________________________
B -5 : P a id v a c a t i o n s ______________________________________________________________________ ..______
B -6 :
H e a lth , in s u r a n c e , and p en sio n p l a n s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

15
16
17
17
18
20

A p p en d ix :

Job d e s c r i p t i o n s _______________________________________________________________________________

* N O T E : S im ila r tab u lation s for m o s t o f th e se ite m s a r e a v a ila b le in the N ew Y o r k C ity a r e a
r e p o r ts fo r A p r il 1 9 5 1 , Ja n u a ry 19 5 2 , F e b r u a r y 19 5 3 , F e b r u a r y 1954 , and M a r c h 19 5 5 .
The
1954 r e p o r t a ls o p r o v id e s tab u latio n s of w age s tr u c tu r e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s , la b o r -m a n a g e m e n t
a g r e e m e n t s , and o v e r tim e p a y p r o v is io n s . Th e 1955 r e p o r t a ls o in c lu d e s d ata on fr e q u e n c y o f
w a g e p a y m e n ts , and p ay p r o v is io n s fo r h o lid a y s fa llin g on n o n w o rk d a y s. A d ir e c t o r y in d ic a tin g
date of stu d y and the p r ic e o f the r e p o r ts , as w e ll as r e p o r ts fo r other m a jo r a r e a s , is a v a i l a ­
b le upon r e q u e s t.
C u r r e n t r e p o r ts on o ccu p a tio n a l e a r n in g s and su p p le m e n ta r y w age p r a c t ic e s in the N ew Y o r k
C it y a r e a a r e a ls o a v a ila b le for m a c h in e r y in d u s tr ie s (J a n u a ry 1956), w o m e n 1 s and m i s s e s '
d r e s s e s (A u g u s t 1955), h o tels (June 19 55), p o w er la u n d r ie s and d r y c le a n e r s (June 19 5 5 ), o ffic e
b u ild in g s e r v i c e (A p ril 1955), and c o n tr a c t c le a n in g s e r v ic e ( A p r il 1955). U nion s c a l e s , in d ic a ­
tiv e o f p r e v a ilin g p ay l e v e l s , a re a v a ila b le fo r the fo llo w in g tr a d e s o r in d u s tr ie s : B u ild in g c o n ­
s tr u c tio n , p r in tin g , lo c a l t r a n s it o p e ra tin g e m p lo y e e s , and m o to r tr u c k d r iv e r s .




iii

21




Th e C o m m u n ity W age S u r v e y P r o g r a m

The B u re a u of L a b o r S t a t is t ic s r e g u la r ly con ducts a r e a w id e
w a g e s u r v e y s in a n u m b er of im p o rta n t in d u s tr ia l c e n te r s . The stu d ies,
m ad e fro m la te f a il to e a r ly s p r in g , r e la t e to o ccu p a tio n a l e a rn in g s and
r e la te d s u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e fits . A p r e lim in a r y re p o r t is a v a ila b le on
c o m p le tio n of the stu d y in each a r e a , u s u a lly in the m onth fo llo w in g
the p a y r o ll p e r io d stu d ie d . T h is b u lle tin p r o v id e s ad d itio n al data not
in clu d ed in the e a r lie r r e p o r t. A c o n s o lid a te d a n a ly tic a l b u lle tin s u m ­
m a r iz in g the r e s u lt s of a l l of the y e a r * s s u r v e y s is is s u e d a fte r c o m ­
p le tio n of the fin a l a r e a b u lle tin fo r the cu r r e n t round of s u r v e y s .

Occupational W ago Survoy - Now York, N. Y. *
Introduction
The New York City area is one of several important industrial
centers in which the Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics
has conducted surveys of occupational earnings and related wage bene­
fits on an areawide basis. In each area, data are obtained by personal
visits of Bureaufield agents to representative establishments within six
broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation (excluding
railroads), communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade;
retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major
industry groups excluded from these studies, besides railroads, are
government operations and the construction and extractive industries.
Establishments having fewer than a prescribed number of workers are
omitted also because they furnish insufficient employment in the occu­
pations studied to warrant inclusion.* Wherever possible, separate
1
tabulations are provided for each of the broad industry divisions.

Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all
establishments within the scope of the study and not the number actually
surveyed. Because of differences in occupational structure among es­
tablishments, the estimates of occupational employment obtained from
the sample of establishments studied serve only to indicate the relative
importance of the jobs studied.
These differences in occupational
structure do not materially affect the accuracy of the earnings data.
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Information is presented also (in the B -series tables) on se­
lected establishment practices and supplementary benefits as they relate
to office and plant workers.
The term "office workers," as used in
this bulletin, includes all office clerical employees and excludes ad­
ministrative, executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant
workers" include working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (in­
cluding leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Adminis­
trative, executive, professional, and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force are excluded. Cafeteria workers and routemen are excluded in
manufacturing industries, but are included as plant workers in nonman­
ufacturing industries.

These surveys are conducted on a sample basis because of the
unnecessary cost involved in surveying all establishments , and to insure
prompt publication of results. To obtain appropriate accuracy at mini­
mum cost, a greater proportion of large than of small establishments
is studied.
In combining the data, however, all establishments are
given their appropriate weight. Estimates based on the establishments
studied are presented, therefore, as relating to all establishments in
the industry grouping and a r e a ,2 except for those below the minimum
size studied.

Shift differential data (table B -l) are limited to manufacturing
industries.
This information is presented both in terms of (a) estab­
lishment policy, 3 presented in terms of total plant worker employment,
and (b) effective practice, presented on the basis of workers actually
employed on the specified shift at the time of the survey. In estab­
lishments having varied differentials, the amount applying to a majority
was used or, if no amount applied to a majority, the classification
"other" was used.

Occupations and Earnings
The occupations selected for study are common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupational classifi­
cation is based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to take
account of inter establishment variation in duties within the same job
(see appendix for listing of these descriptions). Earnings data are
presented (in the A -series tables) for the following types of occupa­
tions: (a) Office clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) mainte­
nance and powerplant; and (d) custodial and material movement.

Minimum entrance rates (table B-2) relate only to the estab­
lishments visited.
They are presented on an establishment, rather
than on an employment basis. Scheduled hours; paid holidays; paid
vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans are treated statis­
tically on the basis that these are applicable to all plant or office
workers if a majority of such workers are eligible or may eventually
qualify for the practices listed.4 Because of rounding, sums of indi­
vidual items in these tabulations do not necessarily equal totals.

Data are shown for full-time workers, i . e . , those hired to
work a regular weekly schedule in the given occupational classification.
Earnings data exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are ex­
cluded also, but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings are in­
cluded. Where weekly hours are reported, as for office clerical oc­
cupations, reference is to the work schedules (rounded to the nearest
half hour) for which straight-time salaries are paid; average week­
ly earnings for these occupations have been rounded to the nearest
half dollar.

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal arrange­
ments, excluding informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted
at the discretion of the employer. Separate estimates are provided
3 An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met
either of the following conditions: (l) Operated late shifts at the time
of the survey, or (2) had formal provisions covering late shifts.
4 Scheduled weekly hours for office workers (first section of
table B-3) are presented in terms of the proportion of women office
workers employed in offices with the indicated weekly hours for women
workers.

* This report was prepared in the Bureau's regional office in
New York, N. Y. , by Frederick W. Mueller, under the direction
of Paul E . Warwick, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst.
1 See table 1 for minimum-size establishment covered.
2 The tabulation of minimum entrance rates for women office
workers relates only to provisions in establishments studied.




1

2

according to employer practice in computing vacation payments, such
as time payments, percent of annual earnings, or flat-sum amounts.
However, in the tabulations of vacation allowances by years of service,
payments not on a time basis were converted; for example, a payment
of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as the equivalent of
1 week's pay.
Data are presented for all health, insurance, and pension
plans for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer,
excepting only legal requirements such as workmen's compensation and
social security. Such plans include those underwritten by a commercial
insurance company and those provided through a union fund or paid
directly by the employer out of current operating funds or from a fund
set aside for this purpose. Death benefits are included as a form of
life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of in­
surance under which predetermined cash payments are made directly
to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis during illness or accident
disability.
Information is presented for all such plans to which the
employer contributes. However, in New York and New Jersey, which
have enacted temporary disability insurance laws which require em­
ployer contributions,5 plans are included only if the employer (l) con­
tributes more than is legally required, or (2) provides the employee
T a b le 1:

with benefits which exceed the requirements of the law. Tabulations
of paid sick-leave plans are limited to formal plans which provide full
pay or a proportion of the w orker's pay during absence from work
because of illness. Separate tabulations are provided according to
(l) plans which provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans
providing either partial pay or a waiting period.
In addition to the
presentation of the proportions of workers who are provided sickness
and accident insurance or paid sick leave, an unduplicated total is}
shown of workers who receive either or both types of benefit.
Catastrophe insurance, sometimes referred to as extended
medical insurance, includes those plans which are designed to protect
employees in case of sickness and injury involving expenses beyond the
normal coverage of hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans. Med­
ical insurance refers to plans providing for complete or partial payment
of doctors' fees. Such plans m ayb e underwritten by commercial in­
surance companies or nonprofit organizations or they may be selfinsured. Tabulations of retirement pension plans are limited to those
plans that provide monthly payments for the remainder of the worker's
life.
5 The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island
do not require employer contributions.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f s u r v e y a n d n u m b e r s t u d ie d in N ew Y o r k , N . Y .

In d u stry d iv is io n

A ll d iv is io n s
M a n u fa c t u r in g ____________________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ________________________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) ,
c o m m u n i c a t i o n , a n d o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 4 ____
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________________________
R e ta il tra d e (e x c e p t l i m i t e d - p r i c e v a r ie t y
s t o r e s ) ____________________ ____________________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s ta te
____________
S e r v i c e s 6 ______________________________________________

M in im u m s iz e
e s ta b lis h ­
m ent
in s c o p e o f
s tu d y 2

b y m a j o r ^ i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , A p r i l 1 95 6

N u m b e r o f e s t a b l is h m e n t s
W ith in
scope of
s tu d y

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
W ith in s c o p e o f s tu d y

S tu d ie d

S tu d ie d
T ota l 3

O ffic e

P la n t

T ota l 3

_

4 , 383

544

1 ,3 4 5 , 0 0 0

4 0 1 , 000

6 1 8 , 100

572, 900

101
-

1, 332
3 , 051

177
367

4 2 9 ,3 0 0
9 1 5 ,7 0 0

7 7 ,8 0 0
3 2 3 ,2 0 0

2 6 7 ,1 0 0
3 51 , 000

1 4 4 ,4 9 0
4 2 8 ,4 1 0

101
51

176
952

44
78

1 8 2 ,7 0 0
1 4 1 ,4 0 0

38, 800
5 7 ,8 0 0

8 0 ,4 0 0
35, 700

140, 440
23, 860

101
51
51

351
682
890

59
79
107

1 7 4 ,9 0 0
2 3 3 ,9 0 0
1 8 2 ,8 0 0

2 5 ,1 0 0
160, 800
4 0 , 700

1 2 5 ,1 0 0
5 2 0 , 100
8 9 ,7 0 0

8 3 ,4 4 0
1 2 3 ,1 5 0
5 7 ,5 2 0

1 T h e N e w Y o r k C it y A r e a (B r o n x , K i n g s , N e w Y o r k , Q u e e n s , a n d R ic h m o n d C o u n t i e s , N . Y . ). T h e " w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f s t u d y " e s t i m a t e s s h o w n in t h is t a b l e
p r o v id e a r e a s o n a b l y a c c u r a t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f th e s i z e a n d c o m p o s i t i o n o f th e l a b o r f o r c e i n c l u d e d in th e s u r v e y .
T he e s t im a t e s a r e n ot in te n d e d , h o w e v e r , to s e r v e a s a
b a s i s o f c o m p a r i s o n w ith o t h e r a r e a e m p lo y m e n t in d e x e s t o m e a s u r e e m p lo y m e n t t r e n d s o r l e v e l s s in c e ( l ) p la n n in g o f w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s th e u s e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t
d a ta c o m p i l e d c o n s i d e r a b l y in a d v a n c e o f th e p a y p e r i o d s t u d ie d a n d (2 ) s m a l l e s t a b l is h m e n t s a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s c o p e o f t h e s u r v e y .
2 I n c l u d e s a l l e s t a b l is h m e n t s w it h t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t a t o r a b o v e th e m i n i m u m - s i z e l i m i t a t i o n . A l l o u t le t s (w it h in t h e a r e a ) o f c o m p a n i e s in s u c h i n d u s t r i e s a s t r a d e ,
f i n a n c e , a u to r e p a i r s e r v i c e , a n d m o t i o n - p i c t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s i d e r e d a s 1 e s t a b l is h m e n t .
3 I n c l u d e s e x e c u t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d o t h e r w o r k e r s e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s e p a r a t e o f f i c e a n d p la n t c a t e g o r i e s .
4 A l s o e x c l u d e s t a x i c a b s , a n d s e r v i c e s in c i d e n t a l t o w a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n . T h e p u b l i c l y o p e r a t e d p o r t i o n o f N e w Y o r k Ts t r a n s i t s y s t e m i s , a s a g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t i o n ,
e x c l u d e d f r o m t h e s c o p e o f th e s t u d i e s .
5 E s t i m a t e r e l a t e s t o r e a l e s t a t e e s t a b l is h m e n t s o n l y .
6 H o t e ls ; p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u t o m o b i l e r e p a i r s h o p s ; r a d i o b r o a d c a s t i n g a n d t e l e v i s i o n ; m o t i o n p i c t u r e s ; n o n p r o f i t m e m b e r s h i p o r g a n i z a t i o n s ; a n d
e n g in e e rin g and a r c h it e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .



3

Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups

Tabulated below are indexes of salaries of women office cleri­
cal workers, and of average earnings of selected plant worker groups.
For office clerical workers, the indexes relate to average
weekly salaries for normal hours of work, that is, the standard work
schedule for which straight-time salaries are paid. For plant worker
groups, the indexes measure changes in straight-time hourly earnings,
excluding premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holi­
days, and late shifts.
The indexes are based on data for selected
key occupations and include most of the numerically important jobs
within each group.
Eighteen jobs were included in the office clerical
index; 10 skilled maintenance jobs and 3 unskilled jobs were included
in the plant worker indexes. See footnotes to table 2.
Average weekly salaries or average hourly earnings were
computed for each of the selected occupations. The average salaries
or hourly earnings were then multiplied by the average of February 1953
and February 1954 employment in the job. These weighted earnings for
individual occupations were then added to obtain an aggregate for each
occupational group. Finally, the ratio of these group aggregates for a
given year to the aggregate for the base period (survey month, winter
1952-53) was computed and the result multiplied by the base year index
(100) to get the index for the given year.
T A B L E 2:

The indexes measure principally the effects of (1) general
salary and wage changes; (2) merit or other increases in pay re­
ceived by individual workers while in the same job; and (3) labor
turnover or force expansion or reduction. A force expansion might
increase the proportion of lower paid workers in a specific occu­
pation and result in a drop in the index, whereas a reduction in the
proportion of lower paid workers would have the opposite effect. The
indexes are also affected by shifts in the proportion of workers em­
ployed by establishments with different pay levels.
For example,
the movement of a high-paying establishment out of an area could
cause the index to drop, even though no change in rates occurred in
other area establishments.
The use of constant employment weights eliminates the effects
of changes in the proportion of workers represented in each job in­
cluded in the index. Nor are the indexes influenced by changes in
standard work schedules or in premium pay for overtime, since they
are based on pay for straight-time hours.
Indexes for the period 1952 to 1955 for workers in 17 major
labor markets, appeared in BL.S Bull. 1172, Wages and Related
Benefits, 17 Labor Markets, 1954-55.

I n d e x e s o f s t a n d a r d w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l 1 a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d p la n t o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s
in N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , M a r c h 1955 a n d A p r i l 195 6 a n d p e r c e n t o f i n c r e a s e f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s
In d ex es
(F e b ru a ry 1953*100)

A ll in d u s t r ie s :
O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ( w o m e n ) __
S k i ll e d m a i n t e n a n c e (m e n )
U n s k i ll e d p la n t ( m e n )

_ _
____

_____
_____

_

M a n u fa c tu r in g :
O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ( w o m e n ) ______ ; ________________________
_
S k i ll e d m a i n t e n a n c e (m e n ) __ _
_ ________________
U n s k i ll e d p la n t (m e n )
^
_
___

1

M arch
1955

M a r c h 1955
to
A p r i l 1956

1 1 4 .3
1 1 3 .4
1 1 3 .5

1 0 8 .0
1 0 9 .7
1 0 8 .1

5 .9
3 .4
5 .0

3 .5
5 .0
2 .6

4 .3
4 .5
5 .4

5 .5
6 .0
4 .7

2 0 .6
2 0 .2
1 8 .8

1 1 9 .7
1 1 3 .2
1 1 4 .5

1 1 0 .2
1 0 9 .6
1 1 0 .3

5 .3
3 .2
3 .8

4 .7
4 .2
3 .8

5 .2
5 .2
6 .3

5 .6
5 .7
3 .9

2 6 .4
1 9 .6
1 9 .0

2

B a s e d on d a ta f o r th e f o l l o w i n g j o b s :
O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ( w o m e n ):
B i l l e r s , m a c h in e (b illin g m a c h in e )
B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s A and B
C o m p to m e te r o p e ra to rs
C le r k s , file , c la s s A and B
C le r k s , o r d e r
C le r k s , p a y ro ll
Ke
FRASER y - p u n c h o p e r a t o r s
O ffic e g ir ls

Digitized for


P e rc e n t in cr e a s e s fr o m —

A p r il
1956

In d u s try a n d o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p

S e c r e ta r ie s
S te n o g ra p h e r s , g e n e ra l
S w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s
S w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r r e c e p t io n is ts
T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
T r a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
gen era l
T y p is ts , c la s s A and B

F e b r u a r y 1954
to
M a r c h 1955

F e b r u a r y 1953
to
F e b r u a r v 1 95 4

J a n u a r y 1 952
to
F e b r u a r y 1 953

J a n u a ry 1 952
to
A p r i l 1956

B a s e d o n d a ta f o r th e f o l l o w i n g j o b s :
S k i ll e d m a in t e n a n c e ( m e n ):
C a rp en ters
E le c tr ic ia n s
M a c h in is t s
M e c h a n ic s
M e c h a n i c s , a u t o m o t iv e
M illw r ig h ts
P a in te r s
P ip e fit t e r s
S h e e t-m e ta l w o r k e r s
T o o l a n d d ie m a k e r s

U n s k i ll e d p la n t ( m e n ):
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d lin g
W atch m en




5

A: Occupational Earnings
Table A-l: Office Occupations
(A v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 1 fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s stu d ied on an a r e a b a s is
in New Y o r k , N . Y . , by in d u stry d iv is io n , A p r il 1956)
Avebaqk
N um ber

S e x , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s tr y

d iv is io n

W e e k ly

W e e k ly

(S ta n d a rd )

(S ta n d a id )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E

W EEKLY

E A R N IN G S OF-

$
|
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
3 0 .0 0 35.0 0 4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00
and
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
_
_
_
and
35?00 4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 o v e r

M en

C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c la s s A _____________
M an u factu rin g __________________________
N on m an u factu rin g
P u b lic u tilitie s * ____________________
W h o le s a le tra d e
R e ta il tra d e 2 ________________________
F in a n ce **
S e r v ic e s

4 ,3 5 0
8 l3
3, 537
466
1, 167
238
1, 102
564

$
8 2 .5 0
3 6 .5
3 6 .6 TSTO 'iT
3 6 .5
8 2 .0 0
3 7 .0
8 9 .0 0
36. 0
8 4 . 50
3 9 .5
78. 50
7 8 .5 0
3 5 .5
3 6 .5
7 9 .0 0

C le r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c la s s B ____________
............. .
M an u factu rin g _
N o n m an u factu rin g _____________________
P u b lic u t ilitie s *
W h o le s a le tra d e
R e ta il tra d e 2
F in a n ce **
S e r v ic e s

2 ,6 2 1
461
2 , 160
201
578
147
967
267

3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 9 .5
3 5 .5
3 6 .0

6 2 .5 0
6 6 .0 0
6 2 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
6 4 .0 0
5 8 .0 0
5 8 .5 0

.

.

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

-

C le r k s , o r d e r _____________________________
M an u factu rin g
N o n m an u factu rin g _____________________
W h o le s a le tra d e

1 ,6 9 7
429
1 ,2 6 8
1, 184

3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

7 1 .5 0
7 1 .5 0
7 1 .5 0
7 1 .0 0

.
-

C le r k s , p a y r o ll ___________________________
M an u factu rin g
N o n m an u factu rin g
..
P u b lic u tilitie s * ____________________
W h o le s a le trad e

655
233
422
131
123

3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 6 .5

7 6 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
75.00
7 4 .5 0
7 5 .5 0

.
_

-

-

-

O ffic e b oy s
............. .
M an u factu rin g ______________ _________
N o n m an u factu rin g
_ ___
P u b lic u tilitie s * ____________________
W h o le s a le tra d e
R e ta il tra d e 2
__
F in a n ce ** _ _______________________
S e r v ic e s _ ___________________________

7 ,6 7 5
2 ,0 4 6
5 ,6 2 9
344
1 ,4 7 2
185
2 ,3 1 3
1 ,3 1 5

3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5

4 6 .5 0
4 7 .0 0
4 6 .0 0
5 0 .5 0
4 7 .0 0
4 4 .0 0
4 6 .0 0
4 4 .0 0

55

542
$3
449
4
2
20
165
258

T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
M an u factu rin g __________________________
N on m an u factu rin g
P u b lic u t i li t ie s *
......... .
W h o le s a le trad e
R e ta il tra d e 2
_ _______ __ ...
F in a n ce ** ___________________________
S e r v ic e s ____________________________

2 ,6 4 9
306
2 ,3 4 3
262
355
116
1 ,4 3 5
175

3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 9 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .0

7 0 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
6 9 .0 0
7 9 .5 0
7 4 .5 0
6 7 .0 0
6 5 .5 0
7 6 .0 0

40
40
_
_
15
25

14
14
1
_
11
2
"

92
21
71
7
8
2
27
27

365
3l
334
24
70
30
173
37

347
67
280
26
61
8
128
57

407
70
337
19
145
6
117
50

703
577
84
142
60
179
112

523
108
415
18
166
35
113
83

496
6l
435
55
187
50
94
49

445
103
342
77
130
9
88
38

392
114
278
57
71
17
112
21

162
15
97
2
23
25

137
5
132
4
14
4
80
30

443
63
380
19
49
20
228
64

452
82
370
31
65
22
166
86

452
86
366
37
87
30
194
18

400
83
317
46
95
3
149
24

278
49
229
11
98
47
50
23

187
24
163
20
73
18
31
21

69
26
43
14
19
1
9
-

79
18
61
12
45
1
2
1

41
9
32
1
27
1
3
“

16
10
6
6
_
_
_

2
2
_
_
_
_

"

56
1
55
_
_
_
55
-

-

.
-

60
3
57
57

133
66
67
67

196
27
169
169

234
35
199
183

143
49
94
92

180
22
158
155

222
85
137
133

178
74
104
68

146
30
116
100

38
19
19
16

91
9
82
81

39
4
35
32

34
6
28
28

2
_
2
2

1
_
1
1

7
5
2
_

45
12
33
5
21

54
11
43
21
5

57
24
33
13
6

43
22
21
9
2

27
11
16
6
-

121
18
103
32
19

166
74
92
24
49

47
12
35
6
14

13
5
8
_

19
5
14
13
-

20
9
11
_
4

6
6
_
_

-

22
i4
8
2
-

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

.

_

.

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

55
_
14
_
41

_

2
2
-

3044
T66
2278
103
645
103
1057
370

1908
470
1438
99
275
43
619
402

1272
" '489"
783
46
333
14
185
205

42

87
1
86

282
8
274
3
30
11
213
17

.

_

-

-

-

-

42

_

_

_

_
_

_

_

_

-

-

42

_

See fo o tn o te s at en d o f t a b le .
* T r a n s p o rta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i lr o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and oth er public u tilitie s
** F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te .




_

9
76
1

161
131
514
4
115 ------ 6 T r 5 - —
97
101
399
32
16
22
25
127
51
_
3
1
203
59
19
34
5
313
35
278
8
35
9
209
17

365
48
317
19
1
19
260
18

274
11
263
37
46
21
133
26

HE~

18
30
n n -------5 ~
5
24
18
4
_
_
_
1
_
6
298
45
253
23
61
15
127
27

279
40
239
28
37
16
142
16

-

-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

188
26

86
— zri
65
23
16
_
10
16
7
1
6
_
6
_
_

114
25” —
86
12
51
7
8
8

-

-

-

_
.
_

45
14
31
12
12
_
1
6

15
------ - T
11
_
_
_
5
6

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

9
3
6
_
1
_
5
*

2
2
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
.

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

.
_
_
_
_
_

-

_
_
.
_
_

69
rr
53
36
10
1
2
4

-

-

"

*

_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

-

-

3
3
_
3

2
2
_
_

1
1
_

-

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

h

|

-

_
_

.
_
_

-

“

-

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

208
35
173
23
65
3
77
5

202
32
170
59
16

163
25
138
60
45
1
27
5

58
17
41
2
9

36
4
32

20
5
15

-

_

_

_

18

2

_

4

6

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

30

15
13

8
1

.

_

18

2

12

76
7

_

18

_

2

2
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

_

2

O ccu p a tion a l W age S u rv ey , New Y o r k , N. Y . , A p r il 1956
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u rea u o f L a b or S ta tistics

•
'

6

Table A-1: Office Occupations - Continued
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 1 fo r s e le c t e d occu p a tio n s studied on an a r e a b a s is
in New Y o r k , N. Y . , by in d u stry d iv is io n , A p r il 1956)
Average
S ex, o c c u p a tio n , and in d u stry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF
$
$
$
$
|
$
Is
$
3 5 .0 0 4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0 $ 0 .0 0 *65.00 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 ' 95.00 ; 100.00 105.00 *110.00 *115.00 *120.00 *125.00 *130.00 *135.00
6
and

W
eekly
Weekly 3 0 .0 0
houra . earnings
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
3 5 .0 0 40 . 00 4 5 .0 0

5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00
j

over

j

W om en

B i l le r s , m ach in e (b illin g m a c h in e ) _____
1 ,5 1 9
M anufacturin g
— 45T ~
1,0 3 7
N onm anufacturing ____________________
497
W h o le s a le tra d e
__________________
F in an ce **
328

3 6 .0
36. 5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 5 .5

$
6 2 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
6 2 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
6 1 .5 0

B i l le r s , m a ch in e (book k eepin g
m a ch in e )
... ___ _
_ ._
.
M anufacturin g _________________________
N onm anufacturing
_
_
. _
R eta il trad e 2 _______________________
S e r v ic e s

1 .3 7 9
302
1,077
291
106

3 6 .0
3 5 .5
3 6 .0
3 8 .0
3 6 .0

B o o k k eep in g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s A __________________________________
M anufacturin g
N onm anufacturing _____________________
W h olesa le trad e
R eta il tra d e 2 ________________________
F in a n ce ** __________________________

2 ,2 6 8
384
1 ,8 8 4
314
164
1 ,2 8 4

B o o k k eep in g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s B
_ ____
_
_ ..........
M anufacturin g
N onm anufacturing _____________________
P u b lic u tilitie s * ___________________
W h o le s a le tra d e ___________________
R e ta il tra d e 2
F in a n ce ** _________________________
S e r v ic e s

. -

.
-

-

-

6 2 .0 0
6 1 .0 0
6 2 .5 0
6 1 .0 0
64 . 50

_

-

-

3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .0

6 6 .0 0
6 9 .5 0
6 5 . 50
7 4 .0 0
6 2 .0 0
63. 50

6 ,2 5 4
665“
5 ,5 8 9
138
77 6
207
4 , 157
! 311

3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 8 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0

5 9 .0 0
6 4 .5 0
5 8 .5 0
6 0 .5 0
6 3 .5 0
5 9 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
6 4 .0 0

C le r k s , a cco u n tin g , c la s s A
M anufacturin g _________________________
___________________
N onm anufacturing
P u b lic u t ilit ie s *
___ ____________
W h o le s a le t r a d e ____________________
R eta il trad e 2
F in a n c e * *
. ...
__
. ........
S e r v ic e s

3, 505
902
2 ,6 0 3
174
718
324
624
763

3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5
3 8 .0
3 5 .5
3 5 .5

73. 50
? 4 . 50
7 3 .5 0
8 5 .0 0
7 5 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
7 2 .0 0
7 1 .0 0

............
C le r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c la s s B
M anufacturin g
N onm anufacturing ... _ ............. ..... _ ...
P u b lic u tilitie s *
W h olesa le trad e
R eta il trad e 2
......................... .
F in an ce **
S e r v ic e s _
_
___
__

6 ,2 9 8
9 ?4
5, 324
479
1 ,0 4 6
1 ,2 8 4
1 ,6 6 6
849

3 6 .5
3 5 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5

5 8 .5 0
6 0 .0 0
5 8 .5 0
6 7 .5 0
6 2 .5 0
5 4 .0 0
5 6 .5 0
5 9 .5 0

.
-

-

"

-

*

“

"

-

1
1
-

_

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

_
1
-

_
-

-

_
-

2
2
_
-

_
_

-

19
11
8
1

78
15
63
5
51

144
42
102
25
22

315
87
228
110
72

387
138
249
144
75

259
69
190
142
27

141
62
79
23
48

88
38
50
48
-

47
13
34
16

2
2
-

19
3
16
16

2
2
-

18
18
"

-

13
5
8
3
5

65
43
22
21
-

118
32
86
51
12

301
52
249
80
22

397
66
337
31
11

173
38
135
39
24

258
48
210
46
27

13
13
11
2

14
4
10
4
3

10
7
3
3
“

12
9
3
1
-

5
4
1
1
-

_
_

.
_

_

-

"

-

50
50
_
50

208
6
202
7
192

369
42
327
2
76
239

423
62
361
49
31
262

352
105
247
19
18
195

384
76
308
99
9
143

242
37
205
91
20
87

124
27
97
24
_
62

58
18
40
7
33

20
1
19
1
_
18

_
_
_

_
_
_

71
1
70
2
68
-

714
34
680
12
24
17
626
1

1291
49
1242
27
111
49
1033
22

1389
140
1249
15
127
52
1036
19

1234
152
1082
46
101
40
798
97

877
101
776
9
211
11
443
102

348
53
295
21
109
31
67
67

166
63
103
7
61
2
33
-

96
21
75
1
20
2
52
"

51
38
13
12
1
-

10
10
_
-

29
21

83
33
50
_
_
1
40
9

237
32
205
_
33
28
87
57

443
31
392
1
91
34
127
139

533
117
416
16
120
88
68
124

678
534
174 ~ Z 2 T ~
504
309
24
25
141
122
33
75
58
69
194
72

331
83
248
10
80
34
32
92

1357 1217
157 "'T9'4
1200 1023
32
29
126
209
286
273
550
355
206
157

1103
201
902
114
242
94
2 54
198

889
i4'i
748
62
276
159
151
100

421
82
339
128
84
36
26
65

105
17
88
35
18
2
17
16

.

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_

-

-

-

53
_

53

204
19
185
2

_

_

_

52

_

125
35
23

_

_

"

1

1

_
_
_
_
7

686
116
576
8
37
249
227
55

179
21
158
66
16
7
45
24

-

~

"

-

-

*

31
4
27
21
3
3

6
5
1
1
-

-

4
1
3
_
3

202
47
155
11
39
27
52
26

224
53
171
52
41
4
56
18

111
36
75
24
22
19
10

40
l6
30
10
5
-

51
19
32
3
28

20
8
12

3
3

9
2
7

1

_

-

-

1

-

-

-

15

22
IS
7
_
6
1
-

1

-

-

-

6
1
2
3

-

4

-

-

-

-

2
1

-■
1

"
15
2
13
6
7
-

2
1
1
1
-




“

-

_
20

"

_
_

~

|
*

1
------j—

.

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

20
_
12
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

_

.

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_
-

-

_

_

_

'

_

_

-

_

“

-

'

See footn otes at end o f ta b le .
* T r a n sp o rta tio n (exclu d in g r a ilr o a d s ), co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th er p u b lic u tilit ie s .
** F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and re a l e s ta te .

-

■

.

■

7

Table A-1: Office Occupations - Continued
(A v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e w e e k ly h o u rs and e a rn in g s 1 fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s stu d ied on an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N. Y . , by in d u stry d iv is io n , A p r il 1956)

W
eekly
W
eekly 1 0 .0 0 1 5 .0 0 4 0 .0 0 1 5 .0 0 ^ 0 .0 0
hours
earnings
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
3 5 .0 0 4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0

0s
O
O
O

S ex, o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF<I
J
O
O

A
vebaqe
Number
of
workers

S
%
%
%
s
i
t
$
$
%
S
%
(
$
1 0 .0 0 l>5.0o| 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00
and
6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 l 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 . 04 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 o v e r
|

i
W om en - C on tin u ed

C le r k s , f il e , c la s s A _____________________
M an u factu rin g
__
_ __
N onm an u factu rin g
P u b lic u tilitie s * ____________________
W h o le s a le t r a d e ____________________
F in a n ce * * ___
S e r v ic e s
_

2 ,5 3 7
672
1 ,9 6 5
194
532
926
259

3 6 .5
3 5 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 6 .0

$
6 3 .5 0
6 6 .5 0
6 2 .5 0
7 0 .0 0
6 1 .5 0
6 1 .0 0
6 3 .5 0

C le r k s , f i l e , c la s s B _____________________
M an u factu rin g
_
...... .......................
N on m an u factu rin g _
_ _
_
P u b lic u tilitie s *
W h o le s a le tra d e ____________________
R e ta il tra d e 2 _______________________
F in a n ce **
S e r v ic e s ____________________________

9 , 185
1 ,3 2 3
7 ,8 6 2
559
1 ,1 5 1
693
4 ,8 2 8
631

3 6 .5
" 3'6Vo
3 6 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .0

4 9 .0 0
5 3 .0 0
4 8 .0 0
5 3 .0 0
5 1 .0 0
4 6 .5 0
4 7 .0 0
4 9 .0 0

C le r k s , o r d e r
M a n u fa c t u r in g ____ ____________________
N on m an u factu rin g _____________________
W h o le s a le tra d e
R e ta il t r a d e 2 __ _____ _____________

2 ,3 7 5
8'5'2
1 ,5 2 3
1, 147
343

3 7 .0
3 6 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .0
3 8 .5

6 0 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
5 7 .5 0
57.505 7 .0 0

C le r k s , p a y r o ll ________________ _________
M an u factu rin g _ __ _____ __ _________
N on m an u factu rin g _____________________
P u b lic u tilitie s * ____________________
W hole s a le tr a d e _
R e ta il tra d e 2 _______________________
F in a n ce **
S e r v i c e s _____________________ _______

2 ,9 0 0
1, 165
1 ,7 3 5
162
451
346
345
431

3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 8 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .5

6 8 .0 0
6 7 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
6 5 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
7 1 .5 0
6 8 .0 0

4 ,4 6 0

6 3 .5 0
3 6 .5
3'r. B ~ T T 7 W ~
3 6 .5
6 2 .5 0
3 5 .5
6 8 .0 0
3 7 .0
6 4 .5 0
3 6 .5
6 0 .0 0
3 5 .5
6 2 .0 0
3 6 .5
6 1 .5 0

C o m p to m e te r o p e r a t o r s
M an u factu rin g _
N on m an u factu rin g
P u b lic u t ilitie s * ____
_
W h o le s a le tr a d e ____________________
R e ta il tra d e 2
_ _
F in a n ce * * __________________________
S e r v ic e s ____________________________
D u p lic a tin g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s
(m im e o g r a p h o r d itto ) __________________
M an u factu rin g
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g _____________________

~ 9 T 5

3 ,4 6 5
302
1 ,0 1 7
993
825
328

308
100
208

3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5

5 5 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
5 5 .5 0

8
8
_
8

18
18
.
15
3

1944

■

612
1
611
_
14
42
542
13

_

-

-

-

.
_
_

.
_
_
-

45
19
26
13
_
13
_

-

3
3
_
3

_

20
20
_
20
.

-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

131
43
88
3
6
43
32

365
65
300
11
54
170
37

559
121
438
22
152
230
29

564
$7
467
35
184
196
45

268
59
209
23
33
137
11

210
36
174
39
58
53
23

170
"57
113
19
23
37
31

97
21
76
12
6
30
28

74
27
47
28
12
3
3

3224
406
1734 2819
56
196
137
37 3
228
226
1093 1879
220
145

1924
311
1613
116
335
85
927
150

638
"113
525
64
119
48
235
59

423
93
330
74
111
32
93
20

199
68
131
30
38
8
38
17

85
56
29
8
6
3
5
7

56
30
26
7
12
1
6

28
i'S
10
3
6
_
1
-

23

579

226
106 f
120
87
32

207
75"
131
111
20

99

392
328
64

391
157
234
9
89
42
22
72

z m

34
362
------ I T — W ~
21
344
284
9
10
57

413
327
103 "■204
224
209
123
156
100
52

— w r

60

39
35
4

it

11
4
7
”

10
6
4
4

90
------ 5T"
39
14
-

2
2
_
_
_
_

2
2
_
_
_
_

_
_
-

■

“

2
2
-

2
2
-

1
1
-

-

-

15
12
3
_
_
3
-

5
2
3
1
_
2
“

13
2
4
2
5

6
2
4
_
.
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

1
1
_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

"

_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

“

_

8
8
-

-

15
15
-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
_
_

4
2
2
2
-

-

-

1
_
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- j

21
7
14
_
7
2
5

10
10
1
5
2
2

12
10
2
1
1
-

44
44
_
35
9
-

167
6
161
11
126
24
-

477
841
79 " m
398
720
17
44
36
227
180
186
137
117
28
146

1010
ITT'
839
74
294
162
251
58

788
209
579
57
186
123
170
43

80
44
558
315
124
2 17 r w . — ? r — T T ~ ------T T
82
53
27
210
341
43
13
5
30
19
18
136
87
12
9
10
61
46
34
20
_
78
37
2
23
21
9
-

4
1
3
1
2
_

2
2
_
2
-

1
1
1
-

1
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

35
13
22

59
25
34

25
5
20

22
18
4

-

-

-

-

-

1

1
1

See fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le .
* T r a n s p o rta tio n (e x clu d in g r a i lr o a d s ) , co m m u n ic a tio n , and oth er pub lic u tilitie s
** F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .

-

-

|
|
;
‘
_
-

“

21
8
13
_
6
2
5

17
17 1

~

_
-

76
38'
38
3
26
7
2

9
- ■
9

_

-

-

403
150
253
10
61
33
69
80

12
7
5

“

-

422
195
227
35
56
45
40
51

32
14
18

-

_
-

_
_

457
216
241
19
56
56
51
59

96
18
78

_
"

2

345
87
258
9
74
37
47
91

121
53
68
12
_
2
28
26

!
i

-

~

170
80
90
5
2
58
12
13

244
60
184
20
61
39
58
6

_
-

-

152
77
75
25
8
21
2
19

J
_______




. 7

4

9
2
7
_
.
7
-

35
It

-

l
-

1
-

-

!
j

-

|
‘
i
j_______

8

Table A-1: Office Occupations - Continued
(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a rn in g s 1 fo r s e le c t e d occu p a tion s studied on an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N. Y . , by in d u stry d iv is io n , A p ril 1956)
A verage
N um ber

Sex, o c c u p a tio n , and in d u stry d iv is io n

of

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a rd )

w orkers

W e e k ly
e a rn in g s
(S ta n d a rd )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E

$
30

$

5 0 .0 0

$
5 5 .0 0

6 0 .0 0

|$
$
6 5 . 0 0 |7 0 . 0 0

5 5 .0 0

6 0 .0 0

6 5 .0 0

7 0 .0 0

$
7 5 .0 0

$
3 5 .0 0

$
4 0 .0 0

$
4 5 .0 0

.0 0

4 0 .0 0

4 5 .0 0

5 0 .0 0

339
33

762

_
_
_

47

123

190

nnr

105

73

61

306

715

969

883

503

170

10 2

.0 0

!$
$
8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0

W EEKLY

$

$

E A R N IN G S O F

s

9 0 .0 0

9 5 .0 0

1 0 0 .0 0

9 5 .0 0

1 0 0 .0 0

1 0 5 .0 0

$
$
1 0 5 .0 0 110

.0 0

$
1 1 5 .0 0

1 15.00

%

1 2 0 .0 0

1 2 0 .0 0

S
$
S
1 2 5 . 0C 1 3 0 . 0C 1 3 5 . 0 0

nd
uS d e r
35

7 5 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

8 5 .0 0

9 0 .0 0

11 0 .0 0

and
over

1 2 5 . 0C 1 3 0 . GC 1 3 5 . 0 C

W om en - C ontinued
K ey-p u n ch o p e r a t o r s
M anufacturin g _________________________
N onm anufacturing
P u b lic u tilities * ___________________
W h o le s a le tra d e _
R eta il trade 2
.................
F in a n c e * *
_
S e r v ic e s
.
................

O ffice g ir ls _ . _
M anufacturin g .
.
N onm anufacturing
..... ..
P u b lic u tilitie s *
F in a n c e * *
_
..............

$
5 7 .5 0

5 6 .5

6 1 .5 0

4, 642

3 6 .5

5 7 .0 0

3 8 .0

5 9 .5 0

774

3 6 .0

6 0 .0 0

406

3 7 .5

5 5 .0 0

2, 643

3 6 .5

5 5 .5 0

_
_
_

309

3 6 .0

5 9 .0 0

-

510

3 6 .0

4 8 .0 0

1 ,4 1 5

3 6 .0

4 5 .5 0

411

3 6 .0

4 3 .5 0

8 16

3 6 .5

4 6 .0 0

_

'

3 6 .0

3 1 ,1 5 2

_

-

_
.
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

3 6 .0

6 2 .0 0

1 ,4 3 7

3 6 .5

6 2 .0 0

2 ,4 6 9
563

3 6 .0
3 6 .5

6 4 . 50
6 1 .0 0

5, 6 64

3 6 .0

6 0 .5 0

1, 5 2 0

3 6 .0

6 2 .5 0

817

3 6 .0

7 2 .5 0

8 l8

3 5 .5

7 4 .0 0

499
114

3 6 .0

7 2 .0 0

3 7 .0

7 6 .5 0

190

3 6 .0

7 1 .5 0

-

3 7 .0

6 2 .0 0

832

35. 5

6 6 .5 0

5, 362

3 7 .5

6 1 .0 0

498

3 8 .5

6 4 .0 0

1, 0 5 8

3 6 .5

6 4 .5 0

570

3 9 .0

5 8 .0 0

1, 6 8 4

3 6 .5

6 2 .0 0

1, 5 5 2

3 8 .0

5 7 .5 0

_

6
1

5

4

_

_

152

521

661

521

236

6

5

1

115

79
17

32

69

429
48

_
_

6

4

-

-

3

5
5

3
3

_

.
_

-

.
_

_

6

_
_
_
_
_
_

44

645
134

213

46

64

21

511

25

31

1
12

1

_

_

27

2

-

1313

2556

4465

288

118

149
3

299

315

109

-

66

506
59
--------- 5 ~ ---------5 5 451

&5T

291

10 22

1924
99
267

3

“

-

3980

2861

nW

1343"

1194

....7 5 3

3129
210

3884

2786

2106

4275
'

5227

'

_
>
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_
_

.
_

-

.
_

-

2029
595

1173

1434

678

474

_
_
_
_
_

1049
371

465

285
137

37

W

96

114

293

194

162

142

127

43

28

26

19

1

22

942

775

417

161

223

62

35

61

32

6

9

147

160

69

37

25

10

4

_

-

_

_

1
I

73

192

174

445

918

953

1171

922

566

449

210

190

56

44

30

30

17

19

1

191

580

952

1090

851

917

581

443

35*

180

113

94

26

9

17

10

49

12
7

2087

3428

!

1

8
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

1

1

_
-

_
_

_

_

.
.
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_

*

-

*

-

_
_

.
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

.
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

2

_
_
_
.

_
_
_
_
_
_

43

64

592

5

121

59

471

1633

_
_

64

189
180

453“

757
26.71'
363

.

3879
1086

2559
71 3 "'

1805

1185

457

246

120

82

612

583

245“

165

63

54

10

2793

1846

1193

600

211

81

57

28

8

359
653

183

139
390

108

18

7

1

6

-

575

153

52

17

16

2

2

6

99

128

82

42

17

15

2

9
1

_

-

57

331

1363

1240

763

42

3

3

413

243

229
93

46

369

429
193

109

57

1049
116

17

9

4

3

3

-

3

24

47

155

142

101

135

61

94

30

11

8

6

1

1

21

71

37

47

45

24

3b

19

8

8

6

_
“

409
167

2

26

84

105

90

37

64

11

3

1

6

7

7

18

10

46

-

_

-

1

12

12

9
31

10

-

22

26

47

18

10

8

3

-

31

77

204

1434

1127

1054

825

766

369

197

79

23

5

1

-

21

48

156

116

106

2

1

1386

971

660

152

7

3

3

18

45

102

102

709
106

29
50

16

183

99
270

45

77

191
863

80

2

1

1

80

267

156

151

170

163

39
17

_

28

23

2

_
6
21

_
-

_
_
2

_
_
_

See foo tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
* T ra n sp o rta tio n (exclu d in g r a ilr o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th er p u b lic u tilit ie s .
** F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .

133

54
21

1311

3

31

2 10

113

TOT

187

55

6

215
“

12 6

-

928

4

40

“

242

_
_

_
_
_
_

.
j

1098

63
99
106

_
_

31

-

161

12
159
34

.
_
_

_

235

148 ...

265

■

-

“

~ m r

_
_

109
30

23

54

50

127

108

87

77

67

10

4

24

340

357

286

216

48

80

90

794

319
175

161

89

127

47

_

12
i




_

-

3589
241

876

_
_

_
_
_

699
111

4

13

-

2

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

34
3

2

-

-

_
_

6, 194

_

15

_

_
_

-

11, 6 5 3

16

30

8

_
_
_

7 4 .0 0

6 3 .0 0

34

33

51

3 6 .0

6 6 .3 0

33

93
42

3

6, 513

3 6 .0

88

78

3

7 8 .0 0

3 5 .5

_
2

262

_
_
_
_

3 6 .5

87T

_
4

93

-

_

6 ,2 6 5

1 6 ,5 3 2

4

6

69
171

52

7 8 .5 0

" 4 ,

12

12

52

75

7 4 .0 0

8 3 . 50

25

w — TT ------------ 5 -

60

49
621

3 6 .0

3 7 .0

7 7 .5 0

—

76

670

7 8 .5 0
' T T T W l

60
41

163

28

36

3 7 .5

1, 8 4 3

3 6 .5

243

84

-

1, 3 7 8

7 5 .5

608

65

41

“

6 ,6 5 8

'

1065

1159

48

_
_
_
_
.

8 ,4 9 5
2 2 ,6 5 7

1052
929
87

I ll

4 6 .0 0

3 5 .0

315

S te n o g ra p h e rs, g e n e r a l __________________
M anufacturin g _
___
. . . . . . . ......
N onm anufacturing ....... _
P u b lic u t ilit ie s *
W h oles a le tra d e
R eta il trad e 2 ________________________
F in a n c e * *
S e r v ic e s

S w itch boa rd o p e r a to r s
M anufacturin g _ ....... ...........
N onm anufacturing _____________________
P u b lic u tilitie s *
W h oles a le tra d e
R eta il tra d e 2
F in an ce * * ___
S e r v ic e s _ __

3 6 .5

852

1, 7 3 0

S e c r e t a r ie s
M anufacturin g _
N onm anufacturing
P u b lic u tilitie s * ___________________
W h oles a le tra d e R eta il t r a d e 2
_
.
. ___
F in a n ce **
____ _ _ _
S e r v ic e s
........ .............

S te n o g ra p h e rs, te c h n ica l _
M anufacturin g
........ ..
N onm anufacturing
P u b lic u tilitie s * ........ .
F in an ce **

5 ,4 9 4

5

_
_
_

1

_
_
_
_

1

2

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

9

Table A-l: Office Occupations - Continued
(A v e r a g e stra ig h t-tim e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a rn in g s 1 fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s studied on an a r e a b a s is
in New Y o r k , N. Y . , by in d u stry d iv is io n , A p r il 1956)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

AVERAQa
N um ber

S ex, o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

of
w ork ers

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a rd )

W e e k ly
e a rn in g s
(S ta n d a rd )

S T R A IG H T -T IM E

W EEKLY

E A R N IN G S OF-

$
$
S
s
%
S
$
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
1
$
S
s
$
*
S
3 0 .0 0 35.00 4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135 .00
and
and
under
3 5 .0 0 4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 5 0 .0 0 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 o v e r
I

W om en - C on tinued

S w itch b oa rd o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t i o n i s t s ____
M a n u fa c t u r in g ____ ____________________
N on m an u factu rin g _____________________
P u b lic u tilitie s * ___________________
W h o le s a le tr a d e ___________ ______
R e ta il t r a d e 2
__
__
______
F in a n ce * * ___________________________
S e r v ic e s
__
_______ _____________

2 ,4 2 6
924
1 ,5 0 2
152
504
152
276
418

3 7 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

$
6 0 .5 0
66. 50
6 0 .5 0
6 3 .5 0
6 1 .5 0
5 9 .0 0
5 9 .0 0
6 0 .0 0

T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s __________
N on m an u factu rin g _____________________
F in a n ce **

1 ,047
958
578

3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 6 .5

6 6 .0 0
6 9 .0 0
6 6 .0 0

T r a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
general
M an u factu rin g __________________________
N onm an u factu rin g _____________________
W h o le s a le tr a d e ___________________
F in a n ce **
S e r v ic e s
_____ ____________________

2 ,7 9 1
553
2 ,2 3 8
847
1 ,111
129

3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 5 .5

6 3 .0 0
6 4 .5 0
6 2 .5 0
6 6 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
6 4 .0 0

_
-

T y p is t s , c la s s A __________________________
M a n u fa c t u r in g __________________________
N on m an u factu rin g
P u b lic u t i li t ie s * .
W h o le s a le tr a d e _ _
R e ta il tra d e 2 ________________________
F in a n ce **
S e r v ic e s

7 ,7 3 0
1 ,3 4 6
6 ,3 8 4
691
1, 189
188
3 ,3 1 5
1 ,0 0 1

3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 7 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .5

6 1 .5 0
6 5 .5 0
6 0 .5 0
5 9 .0 0
6 6 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
5 7 .5 0
6 4 .0 0

_
_
-

_
_
-

~

"

T y p is t s , c la s s B
. _ 1 3 ,4 8 4
M an u factu rin g _
. _ . . 2 ,4 4 0
N on m an u factu rin g _____
1 1 ,0 4 4
P u b lic u t i li t ie s * ____________________
653
W hole sa le tra d e _
1,8 3 8
R e ta il tra d e 2
..
......
57 5
F in a n ce * * __________________________
6 ,5 8 8
S e r v ic e s
_____________________ ___
1 ,3 9 0

3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
36. 5
3 6 .0

5 3 .5 0
5 7 .0 0
5 3 .0 0
5 8 .0 0
5 7 .5 0
50. 50
5 1 .0 0
5 5 .5 0

_
_
_
.

97
97
_
_
29
68

1
2
*
**

"

12
12
8
_
2
2

143
39
104
12
21
16
35
20

350
110
240
9
111
67
53

589
270
319
17
75
67
50
110

■

44
44
“

42

~

At

33

95
9o
41

-

_

_
_
“

130
4
126
_
118
4

130
1
129
102
_
26
1

498
26
472
148
7
_
298
19

_
-

.
-

■

97 5 3399
98
386
3013
3
102
5
178
65
176
784 2370
20
187

877

595

323

212
66
146
_
66
2
37
41

157
30
127
41
55
_
15
16

26
20
6
_
_
_
4
2

1
1
_
_
1
“

18
17
1
_
_
_
1

174
109

77
66
50

88
78
60

38
29
7

19
19
4

3
3
1

554
344
156
17

226
64
162
81
43
18

168
67
101
43
48
8

83
20
63
41
16
6

29
8
21
13
8

28
5
23
21
1
1

2
_
1
1

1465
322
1143
66
269
32
506
270

1065
242
823
40
292
26
308
157

561
149
412
36
203
9
102
62

313
74
239
15
77
4
78
65

111
86
75
4
10
21
40

176
31
145
97
13
_
1
34

74
34
40
_
15
_
4
21

47

1703
419
1284
104
438
27
421
294

647
258
389
41
167
16
113
52

312
138
174
20
56
10
88

112
50
62
38
13
1
6
4

51
20
31
11
14
1
2
3

33
21
12
1
6
_
_
5

16
8
8
1
6
_
1

1
_
1
_

144

m

351
23
129
29
57
113

195
42
47
38
7
61

155
153
83

140
124
90

172
146
100

361
53
308
10
268
8

509
150
359
68
240
30

630
120
510
226
203
36

616

1494
135
1359
101
59
46
1050
103

1749
256
1491
80
198
71
913
229

3557 2581
57 5
467
2982 2114
178
154
401
554
166
83
1781
954
456
369

bt

r

T&T

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

“

~

_

-

_

.

.

_

“

“

“

-

-

-

2
-

4
4
_
4
-

1
1
_
1
“

-

_
_
_
_

_
_

“

1
_
1
_
1
“

1
,
1
_
1
"

16

31
_
28
_
3

20
4
16
1
12
_
3
~

17
8
9
1
6
_
2
~

_
_
>
_
_

4
4
_
_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

1
_

_
_
_
_
_

_

~

'

H ou rs r e fl e c t the w o rk w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th eir regu la r s t r a ig h t-t im e s a la r ie s and the e a rn in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e se w e e k ly h o u r s .
E x clu d e s l im i t e d -p r i c e v a r ie t y s t o r e s .
T r a n s p o rta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i lr o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and other public u tilit ie s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

■

“

2
2
_
2
~

_
.
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

4
4
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

2
2
_
_
_
.

“

■

~

-

"

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

10

Table A-2: Professional and Technical Occupations
(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-t im e w e e k ly h o u rs and e a rn in g s 1 f o r s e le c t e d occu p a tio n s studied on an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , by in d u stry d iv is io n , A p ril 1956)

M en

301

3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .5

$
1 4 4 .5 0
145. 00
1 4 4 .0 0

D r a ft s m e n , s e n i o r _______________________
M a n u fa c t u r in g _________________________
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ____________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ____________________
S e r v i c e s _____________________________

2 , 80 7
1, 148
1 ,6 5 9
96
1, 3 7 2

3 8 .0
3 7 .0
39. 0
3 6 .5
3 9 .5

1 0 8 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0
1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 3 . 00
1 1 0 . 50

D r a ft s m e n , j u n i o r _________________________
M a n u fa c t u r in g
_____________ ________
N o n n q a n u fa ct u r in g _____________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ♦ ___________________
___________________________
S e r v ic e s

1, 156
525
531

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 8 .0
3 6 .5
3 9 .0

D r a ft s m e n , l e a d e r _______________________
M a n u fa c t u r in g -------------------------------------N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g -------------------------------

201

502

88
320

7 0 . 00 7 5 . 0 0

7 5 . 00 8 0 . 00 8 5 . 0 0

8 5 .0 0
9 0 .0 0

$
1 9 5 .0 0

S

S

s

$

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

©

o

-

1

-

-

■

-

2
1
1

10

-

19
17

1

-

2

183
64
119
98

226

220

107
119
13
97

124
96
5

311
144
167
3
145

45
28
17

26
15

8

_

7

11

1

1

9

-

-

13

1

1

-

63

1

11

------- Y “

309
16'7
142

338
129
209
28
166

-

15

11

55
52
3
3

132
44

151
80
71
9
32

148
6o

109
59
50
3
30

81
51
30
19

42
23
19
4
4

60

114
26

123
45
78

31

10

13

30

12

1

7

-

19
9

6
1

2

14
17

10

3

1

3
-

2

-

28

5

8

2

1

*

1

9

33
4

1

8

109
37
72
27

-

-

-

220

197
93
104

-

145
75

9

2

-

2
2

7 2 . 0 0 3 128
7 2 . 06 — 53“
7 1 . 50
65
7 1 .5 0
20
7 1 . 00
32

10

-

4
-

4

-

_
-

21

2
2

70

21

4

11

49

S

t

S

%

t

100.00 1 0 5 .0 0 110.00 1 1 5 .0 0 120.00 1 2 5 .0 0 1 1 3 0 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 1 4 0 .0 0 1 4 5 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 5 5 .0 0 1 6 0 .0 0 o v e r

“

_
-

$

|
$

100.00 1 0 5 .0 0 110.00 1 1 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 )1 2 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 1 4 0 .0 0 1 4 5 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 5 5 .0 0 1 6 0 .0 0
and

-

-

©

8 0 .0 0

©
©

$

m

er
60 . 00 u n d0 0
65.

o
o

Weekly
U n d er 1 0 .0 0
earnings
and
(Standard) $

cr-w
(Ji

Weekly
hours
(Standard)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

o 1
o

Number
of
workers

-vi
©

Average

S ex , o c c u p a t io n , an d in d u s tr y d iv is io n

49
29

88
8
69

88
9
78

2

68

29 2

121
171

1

1

146

128

244
39
205

123
46
77

12
162

6
64

19
9

46

10

34

67

68

12
47

33
35
33

40
5
35
32

-

-

_

_

-

-

_
_
- ! ------ -—
- !
- i
-

”

-

116
37
79
59

55

6

69
39
30

12

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

”

“

"

~

56
84
4

18
18
17

25

'

17
15

2

10

-

2

i

44
$
35

-

4

-

-

1
1

2 140

21
20
1

19 ! 125
8
7
118

11

2
2
-

2

W om en
N u r s e s , i n d u s t r ia l ( r e g i s t e r e d ) ________
M a n u fa c t u r in g _________________________
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ____________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ♦ ___________________
R e t a i l t r a d e 4 _______________________
F i n a n c e *♦

622
2l 2
390
82
73
146

3 7 .0
37. 5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 8 .5
3 6 .5

13
5

8 2 . 00

84. 00

5
16

8
6

8 0 . 50
8 0 . 00
7 7 . 00
8 1 .0 0

16
44

20

10

-

2
4

6
12
21

5
13

~

88
6
16

1

57

-

"

-

"

1 H ou rs r e fle c t the w ork w e e k fo r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir r e g u la r s tr a ig h t-t im e s a la r ie s and the e a rn in g s c o r re s p o n d to th e se w eek ly h o u r s .
2 W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u te d a s f o llo w s : 73 at $ 160 to $ 165; 33 at $ 165 to $ 170; 34 at $ 170 and o v e r .
3 W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d as fo llo w s : -2 at $ 4 0 to $ 4 5 ; 10 at $ 4 5 to $ 5 0 ; 32 at $ 5 0 to $ 5 5 ; 84 at $ 5 5 to $ 6 0 .
4 E x clu d e s l im i t e d -p r i c e v a r ie ty s t o r e s .
* T ra n sp o rta tio n (e x clu d in g r a ilr o a d s ), c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
♦ ♦ F in a n ce, in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te .

Table A-3: Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 f o r m e n in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s on an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N. Y . , by in d u stry d iv is io n , A p r il 1956)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Average
hourly
earnings

O ccu p a tion and in d u stry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

_____________
C a rp e n te rs , m ain ten an ce
M anufacturin g -------------------------------------N onm anufacturing
„ __ __________
P u b lic u t ilitie s ♦ __________________
R e ta il tra d e 2 ______________________
F in a n ce ♦♦ _________________________
S e r v ic e s _________________________________

1 ,2 3 0
------- 3T U ~
894
139
337
209
204

2 .2 9
2 .4 1
2 .4 3
2 .2 5
2. 01

E le c t r ic ia n s , m ain ten an ce ________________
M anufacturin g ________________________
N on m anufacturing
_ ------------------------------P u b lic u tilitie s *
_________________
R e ta il tra d e 2 ______________________
F in a n ce *♦ _________________________
S e r v ic e s ___________________________

1, 545
580
965
149
130
286
375

2 . 33
2 .4 5
2 .2 6
2. 32
2 .4 0
2 .3 1
2 . 16

E n g in e e rs , s ta tion a ry ___________________
M anufacturing. ________________________
N on m anufacturing ___________________
R e ta il tra d e 2 ______________________
F in a n c e * *
. ,ir _
_
S e r v ic e s ___________________________

1, 571
523
1, 048
142
305
508

2 .3 7
2 .5 3
2 .2 9
2 . 38
2 .3 7
2. 19

$
2 .2 9

$
$
$
$
$
$
*2.00 *2. 10 ^2.20 *Z. 30 ^2.40 *2.50 *2.60 * 2 .7 0 * 2 .8 0 *2 .9 0 *3.00 *3. 10 *3 .2 0 *3.30 3 .4 0 *3 .5 0
Under 1. 10 1 .2 0 1. 30 1.4 0 1. 50 *1.60 *1.70 *1.80 *1.90
and
$
and
under
1. 10
1 .2 0 1,30 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1,60 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1,90 2,Q 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2. 30 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3. 10 3. 20 3. 30 3 .4 0 3 .5 0 o v e r
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

--

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
“

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

"

;

:

:

:

■

-

■

~

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
* T ra n sp o rta tio n (ex clu d in g r a ilr o a d s ), c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s ,
♦ ♦ F in a n ce, in s u r a n c e , and re a l e s ta te .




50
50
50

_
■

23
23
23

44
44
4
40

40
5
35
1
. 2
32

92

29
----- £ _

37
5
32
2
4

-

92
92

23
2
1
20

26

1
1
-

36
36

41
41

:

:

_

■

36

41

68
25
43
1
4
28
10

94
80
14
7
5
2

79

“

167
22
145
1
112
9
23

194
12
182
79
67
27
9

123
57
66
16
4
37
7

207
108
99
12
10
72
5

210
85
125
12
37
25
49

172
21
151
14
36
76

198
48
150
6
.95
43

187
60
127
21
62
40

169
80
89
3
30
56

“

99
18
81
12
18
50
1

-

79
13
14
26
26

176
66
110
18
10
63
5

136
67
69
16
3
4
41

111
I ll
9
7
92

183
56
127
36
34
50

110
58
52
3
13
34

-

171
51
120
35
55
30

38
12
26

11
2
9

19
10
9

24
2

4

8
1

13
13
*

-

_
-

15
6
9

-

_

7

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

"

-

“

15

“

2
2
“

12
4
8

15
15

-

"

*

"

8
1

220
59
161
60
38
5
56

24
10
14

68
6
62

23
10
13

58
55
3

7

35
35
"

7
5
2

5
2
7

42
20

1
1
11

1
2

4
3
-

■

2
-

~

"

• ~
8

228
111
117
9
26
45

117
61
56
22
5
27

63
6
57
12
19
24

28
22
6
6

37
30
7

11

4
"
4

“
“

1
“
1

42
42
“

1
1
“

-

-

1

-

-

6

*

6
5
4
1

“
-

"

-

O cc u p a tio n a l W age S u rv e y , N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , A p r il 1956
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u rea u o f JLabor S t a t is tic s

11

Table A-3: Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1 for men in selected occupations on an area basis
in New Y ork, N. Y . , by industry division, A p ril 1956)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
workers

O cc u p a tio n and in d u stry d iv is io n

F ir e m e n , sta tion a ry b o i l e r _____________
M an u factu rin g _________________________
S e r v ic e s

___

______________________

H e lp e r s , t r a d e s , m a in t e n a n c e __________

910

313
R97
413

Average
hourly
earnings

$
1.91
2 . 16
1 7ft
1.73

$
$
$
$
U nder i- 10 1 . 2 0 1.30 1 .4 0
and
$
under
1 . 10
1 . 2 0 1.3 0 1.40 1 .5 0
29
29

3
-

7
7

21

4
2

25
2

?3
1

$
1 .5 0

$
1 .6 0

$
$
$
$
1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 . 0 0

$

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

152
4
148
145

87
4
83
83

91
36
55
54

48
18

87
4?
45
7
23

167
72
95
77

432
1? 1
311
156
128

20

15

20

1 .8 2
1. 79
1 .8 4
1.84

6

1.86
1 55

-

_____

171
171

2. 35
7 .3 5

M a c h in is ts , m a in ten a n ce
M an u factu rin g _________________________
N o n m an u factu rin g _____________________

1, 263
1 , 020
243

2 .4 5
2 .4 1
2 .6 0

M e c h a n ic s , a u to m o tiv e (m a in te n a n c e )__
M an u factu rin g _ ______________________
N o n m an u factu rin g
___________________
P n K lir ntilitiPfl ♦

3, 049
403
2, 646
1 ,4 6 0

2 .2 3
£ .2 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .2 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

____________________

F in a n ce * * __________________________
M a c h in e -t o o l o p e r a t o r s , t o o lr o o m

M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n c e _______________
1 , 880
M an u factu rin g _ ______________________ T 7 3 9 5 "
484
N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g _____________________
126
P u b lic u t ilit ie s * ___________________
213
S e r v ic e s „
__ ------------- -------------M illw r ig h ts ---------- ------------- -----------------M a n u fa ctu rin g _______ ________ _____
O ile r s _____________ ____________ ________
M an u factu rin g _ _____________________
N o n m an u factu rin g ____________________

164
124
387
253
134

12
12

39
11

28

75
36
39

12

1

.
-

_

-

_
28

.
-

6
1

36

5

-

-

.
-

-

-

337
72
265
158
103

125
46
79
47

33
33

6

7
5

32
32
-

137
“ ir ir
6

117
l8
99
35

717
151
566
544
236
205
31

63

33

11
11

63

33

-

12

.
-

-

2
1

4
4

16
52

60
27
33

113

-

1

147
134
13
5

-

-

-

-

1

4

52

28

46

8

9
_
-

8

1 .73

-

2 . 12
2 . 36
2 .0 6

_
-

_
-

2. 30
2 . 35
2 . 19
1.8 7

-

-

-

-

3

1.91

P ip e f it t e r s , m a in ten a n ce __ __________
M an u factu rin g _________________________

227
164

66

47

439

2. 14
2 .3 3

376
146
146

2

S h e e t-m e ta l w o r k e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e ____
M an u factu rin g --------------------------------------

149

7
7
“

58
58

16
16
-

52

1

7
7
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

127
127
-

123
4
119
-

1
8

7

2 . 38

.

11

2 . 18
1 .8 6

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

"

127

64

119

17

64

17

-

3

64

14

2 .5 6
2 .5 6

E xclud es prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
E xclud es lim ite d -p rice variety sto re s.
* Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s), communication, and other public u tilitie s.
** Finance, in su ran ce, and re al estate.
1
2




2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

106
74
32
4

31
14
17

74
23
51
48

13

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

47
36

68

4
7

32
36

13
4
9

30

12
12

151
150
1

108
7

143

65
3
24
38

148
39
109

18

14

134

34
34
22
12

22
10
12

10

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

138
§7
51

176
152
24

"

_

6

-

-

1

"

-

-

55
55

70
70

99
57
42

4
4

-

2
2

-

_
-

_
-

23
5
18
13

55
46
7

227
227
-

-

24
24
-

8
8

26
26

-

-

-

-

-

38
38

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

18

2

-

20
20

36
36

11
11

33
33

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

13
13

179
159

127
110

59
5*

17

6

198
107
91

52
34
18

-

20

286

1162

37
249

43
1119
376

209
54
155
127

44
3
41
34

56
17
39
18

121
12

235
184
51
5

64
34
30
17

91
$
82
14
30

46
28
18

19
l6
_
-

43
35

14
12

2
2

-

-

-

79
3’T '
42

70
14
56

12
2

6
11

17
22

2 06

45
39

83

1
1

2 .9 0

3

12

31

50
50

44

15

151

.
-

44

17
26
12

3. 10

1

-

85
~Tb
19

and
3 .5 0 o v e r

3 .0 0

1

11

2 10

26

2 .8 0

3

5
5

8
5

166
44
15
18

43
38
5

3
3

83
15

135
39
96
3
91

1

-

134
4
130
47
45
38
-

109
106

11

1

_

6

-

-

2

4
— 4“
-

19
9

12

-

-

15
14

50
28

10

12

2

1

22

10
8

16
16

-

_
-

-

8
1

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

_

-

1

68
10

4
104
-

19
24
15

2

28
-

7
7

-

-

-

------ 65” T I T "
1, 365
1, 306

2 .2 0

236
183
53
41
4

44
41
3

21

2 .3 6
2 .3 6

P lu m b e r s , m a in ten a n ce -------------------------M an u factu rin g -------------------------------------N o n m an u factu rin g ___________________
F in a n ce ** _____________________________
S e r v i c e s ____________________________

20

$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
t
$
9
2 . 30 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3. 10 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .5 0

$

8

68

2 .2 9
2 .3 3
2 .0 1

78
22
56
6

353
134
219
115
73
27

-

2 .3 0
2 .3 4
2 . 19
2 .2 8
1 .97

1 ,3 7 3
24T "
1, 127
104
108
380
535

T o o l and d ie m a k e r s ---------------------M a n u factu rin g -----------------------------

68

51

2

2 . 19

P a in t e r s , m a in t e n a n c e _________ _______
M an u factu rin g _________________________
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g
----------------P u b lic u t ilit ie s * ___________________
R e ta il tr a d e 2 „
----------- i
-----------F in a n ce ** ________________________
S e r v ic e s ____________________________

63

93
25

2 . 10

2
2

1 , 821
631
1, 190
56 I
387
15 1

N o n m an u factu rin g

66

2 .0 0

2 .2 0

2 . 10

12
10

39
28

48
48

41
14

31
17

7

40
40
23
15

18

10
2
8

17

56

60

3

2

14

54
45

81
32
49
31
14

35
9

11

235
19$

382
374

101
21

9
45
26

7
7

4

14

3
3

11

4

-

-

>

12

14

47

6

5

23
14

137
---- 9 - "TJT~ 132

138
132

5

IT 24
24

9

135

1

4

-

1

22

8

16

18
18

2

18
18

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

-

-

-

56

4

-

2
2

-

-

2
2

-

4

6
2

10

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

10

"

■

“

"

20
20

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

-

-

11

155
155

92
90

38
36

-

O ccu p a tion a l Wage S u rv ey , N ew Y o r k , N. Y . , A p r il 1956
U. S. D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
B u rea u o f L a b o r S ta tis tics

12

Table A-4: Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(A v e r a g e h o u rly ea rn in g s 1 fo r s e le c t e d o c cu p a tio n s 2 studied on an a r e a b a sis
in N ew Y o r k , N. Y . , by in d u s try d iv is io n , A p ril 1956)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O ccu p ation and in d u stry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
1
$
Under 1*1.00 1. 10 1 .2 0
and
$
1 .0 0 under
■1.00 1 .2 0 1 .3 0

$
$
$
$
S
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
S
$
S
1. 30 1 .4 0 1. 50 1. 60 1. 70 1 .8 0 1 .90 2 .0 0 2. 10 2 .2 0 2. 30 2 .4 0 2. 50 2. 60 2. 70 2. 80 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3. 10 3 .2 0 3. 30 3 .4 0
1 .4 0

1. 50

1. 60

834 1266
3
13
831 1253
10
42
184 1049
180
605

81
18
63
8
38
3

94
15
79
40
4
24

E lev a tor o p e r a t o r s , p a s s e n g e r
(m en) --------------------------------------------------------M anufacturin g --------------------------------------N onm anufacturing -------------------------------R eta il tra d e 3 ------------------------------------F in a n ce * * -----------------------------------------S e r v ic e s -------------------------------------------

5, 756
2 76
5 ,4 8 0
249
3 ,9 6 1
1,0 8 0

$
1 .5 8
1 .7 9
1 .5 7
1 .4 6
1 ,6 3
1.3 2

44
44
44

39
39
39
“

97
97
7
90

E lev a tor o p e r a t o r s , p a s s e n g e r
(w om en) --------------------------------------------------N onm anufacturing --------------------------------S e r v ic e s -------------------------------------------

858
854
521

1 .4 1
1 .4 1
1 .3 6

10
10
"

7
7
■

35
35
~

268
268
236

257
257
221

67
67
1

36
33

191
2
189
_

49
2
47
_

199
30
169
3
14

161
22
139
26
81

158
40
118
14
75

485
45
440
202
190

1330
442
888
10
56
316
32
474

1744 2790
336
336
1408 2454
150
45
110
102
2 74
265
750
57
826 1283

1561
300
1261
167
99
300
162
533

2187
216
1971
134
63
149
646
979

358 1351
---- 33“
52
325 1299
25
111
88
381
188
761

1704 6314
c'l
21
O
j
1683 6261
81
96
516 4163
1C 51 1831

606
7Q
577
56
177
73

149
56
93
17
50
23

G uards -------------------------------------------------------M anufacturin g --------------------------------------N onm anufacturing -------------------------------P u b lic u tilitie s * ----------------------------F in a n ce ** -----------------------------------------

4, 007
--------535"
3, 172
434
1,8 7 3

1 .6 6
1. 76
1 .6 4
1 .6 9
1.81

212
212
_

J a n itors, p o r t e r s , and c le a n e r s
(m e n )---------------------------------------------------------M anufacturin g --------------------------------------N onm anufacturing -------------------------------P u b lic u tilitie s * -----------------------------W h oles a le t r a d e ------------------------------R eta il trade 3 ---------------- ,-----------------F in a n ce ** ----------------------------------------S e r v i c e s ---------------------------------------------

18,911
4 ,4 1 4
1 4 ,4 9 7
1 ,4 1 5
634
2, 126
4, 678
5 ,6 4 4

1 .4 9
1 .5 2
1 .4 7
1 .6 1
1 .4 8
1 .3 1
1 .6 5
1 .3 6

3 79
44
335
171
164

J a n itors, p o r t e r s , and c le a n e r s
(w om en) --------------------------------------------------m anuxacturing ----------------------- ---------------N onm anufacturing --------------------------------R eta il tra d e 3 ----------------------------------F in a n ce
--—- - —— — ---------------------S e r v ic e s -------------------------------------------

1 0 ,8 5 3
347
1 0 ,5 0 6
451
5 ,4 8 4
3 ,9 8 5

1 .3 0
1 45
1! 30
1 .2 9
1 .3 3
1 .2 5

94

L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g ------------------M anufacturin g --------------------------------------N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g --------------------------------------------P u b lic u tilitie s * -----------------------------------------W h olesa le tra d e ----------------------------------------R eta il trade 3 ----------------------------------

O rd er f i l l e r s ----------------------------------------------M anufacturin g --------------------------------------N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g -------------------- -----------W h olesa le tra d e -----------------------------R eta il tra d e 3 -----------------------------------

11.981
1 .6 8
" 6 ,6 1 9 1 i . i i .....
1 .6 3
5 ,3 6 2
804
1 .8 2
1 .7 5
1 ,669
2, 733
1.51

4 ,6 7 7
1 ,4 7 7
3 ,2 0 0
2, 567
561

1 .7 6
1 .6 4
1.81
1 .7 8
1 .9 2

*

94
23
71

76

1311
397
914
4
304
_
606

805

6 2 " ” 52T

14

281

878
590
488

1257

_

_

.

-

_

12
265

126
361

62
353

134

156
46
110
98
12

133
94
39
30

14

12
12
12

54
21
33

861

525

436
2
113
319

225
19
15
188

9

531
108
115
234

346
37
309
292
17

280
105
175
142

537
209
328
323

33

3

See foo tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
* T ra n sp o rta tio n (exclu d in g r a ilr o a d s ), co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s
** F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e sta te .




1086

300

821

436

1

1. 70

1. 80

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

310 2339
28
47
282 2292
48
38
167 2183
54
45

452
75
377
17
306
28

143
26
117
26
5

47
41
6
4
2

10
10
“

37
37
7

113
113
49

17
17
6

10
10

■

335
51'
284
17
204

730
318
412
32
354

540
403
1 57 : 109“
246
431
53
2
224
364

and
over

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 . 50

2. 60

2. 70

2. 80

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3. 10

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

-

-

*

"

-

-

“•

"

-

-

1
'

■

"

-

"

“

■

~

"

■

-

-

-

392
10
382
85
2 75

25
25
23

120
48
72
66

4
1
3
1

2
2
2

!
1
-

_
-

.
_

.

-

_
_

_

-

-

-

-

'

2. 10 2 .2 0

“

_

_

_

"

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

■

-

_

"

1560 4477
629 1074
931 3403
124
589
60
60
165
149
368 2160
214
445

1048
3 54
694
126
62
24
402
80

287
97
190
56
11
3
83
37

161
130
31
14
6
10
1

38
31
7
2
5
~

12
3
9
5
2
2

26
25
1
1
■

“

■

“

-

94
l6
78
73

30
10
20
16
2

23
23
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

“

■

-

“

-

■

“

-

~

-

■

130
54
76
42
20
713
3 74
339
44
106
167

5

1245
684
561
108
218
233

-

-

•

“

66

1129
$25
604
2 74
228
101

614
482
~3W ~rrr
235
248
224
233
180
225
17
40

235
42
193
163
23

384
160

1029

467
562
170
302

594
193
401
71
233
97

523
107
416
-

96
318

703
198
22 — 54“
681
144
657
42
22
61

-

-

-

”

“

295
219
1 7 8 ' ' 268
41
27
8
27
16
17
283
283
277

2
2
2

“
1

“

32
32

574
574

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-'

-

-

-

-

-

”

■

-

"

-

-

~

“

-

■

"

15
15
14

1
1
-

147
147
147

15
15

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

_

_
_
-

80
8o

-

_

_
-

-

60

60

_

-

_

O ccu p a tion a l W age S u r v e y , N ew Y o r k , N. Y. , A p r il 1956
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s

13

Table A-4: Custodial and Material Movement Occupations - Continued
(A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in gs 1 fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s 2 stu d ied o n an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N. Y . , b y in d u stry d iv is io n , A p r il 1956)

Number
of
workers

O cc u p a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

NUMBER OP
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
Average
hourly Under 1 . 0 0 1 . 1 0 1 . 2 0 1 .3 0 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0
earningp
and
$
under
1 .0 0
1 . 10 1 . 2 0 1 .3 0 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1. 70 1 .8 0 1 .9 0

5, 520
3 ,0 4 0
? 480
1 247
1043

$
1.5 2
1.51
1 53
1 53
1.51

36
36

102

36

102

43

702
261
441
342

1 .4 0
1 .42
1 .3 8
1 .3 6

-

37
12
25
25

16
16

1. 78
1. 94
1 .7 0
1 .8 6
1 54
1. 64

35
4
31
_
31

83
20
63
_
63

S e r v i c e s ____________________________

2 ,0 4 1
682
1 ,3 5 9
486
741
57

Shipping c le r k s -------------------------- __ __ _
M a n u fa c t u r in g ---------------------------------- _
N on m an u factu rin g _________________ _
W h o le s a le t r a d e ___________________
R e ta il tra d e 3 ---------------------------------

1 ,0 4 5
411
634
303
310

1 .8 7
2 .0 1
1. 78
1 .8 5
1 .6 7

Shipping and r e c e iv in g c le r k s _______ _
M a n u fa ctu rin g ------------------------------------N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g -------------------------------W h o le s a le t r a d e ___________________

1 ,0 1 0
458
552
295

1 .82
1.7 2
1. 91
1.91

_
-

T r u c k d r iv e r s 4 -------------------------------- j.--------M a n u fa c tu r in g 5 — ------------------------ _
N on m an u factu rin g ____________________
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ________________ _
W h o le s a le t r a d e ___________________
R e ta il trade 3 ______________________
S e r v i c e s ------------------------------------------

1 2,600
4 ,3 2 0
8 ,2 8 0
3 ,9 9 5
2 ,6 4 1
1 ,2 4 5
3 70

2 .3 6
2 .4 7
2 .3 1
2 .2 7
2 .3 2
2. 53
1 .9 6

_
_
_
_

_
.
_
_

-

-

-

T r u c k d r i v e r s , lig h t (under
lVz ton s) ____________________________
M a n u fa c t u r in g ____ ____________ _
Nnnma m ifartn rin g
P u b lic u tilitie s * _______________

991
545
446
228

2 .0 7
2. 16
1 .9 7
2 .0 3

.
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

2 . 30
2 .4 5
2 .2 1
2 .2 5
2 .2 2
2 .0 7

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

2
2
-

40
26
14
-

62
62
_
_ ,
-

11
11
.
_
_

66
28
38
21

P a c k e r s , sh ippin g (m en ) _____________
M a n u fa c tu r in g ______________________

_
_

R e ta il tra d e 3 ______________________

P a c k e r s , sh ippin g ( w o m e n ) _____________
N on m an u factu rin g ___ ______________
R e ta il t r a d e 3 __ ________ __ __ _

R e c e iv in g c le r k s __ __ _______________ _
M a n u fa c tu r in g ______________________ _
N on m a n u fa c tu r in g ___________ _____ _
W h o le s a le t r a d e ___________________

T r u c k d r i v e r s , m e d iu m (IV 2 to and
in clu d in g 4 t o n s ) . _______________ _
M an u factu rin g 5 ____________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g _________________
P u b lic u tilitie s * ______________
W h o le s a le tra d e _ __________ _
R e ta il trade 3 ___________________

6, 164
2 ,3 7 7
3 , 7o <
1 ,6 7 1
1 ,6 8 2
288

165
64

609
366
243
189

_
_

16

-

_

_

_
-

14
14
_

-

_
2
2
.
-

-

-

706
488
21 fi
114
82

635
406

549
321
228
82
129

437
210
213

139
33
106
101

151
159
56 ~ 7 T
95
81
76
34

123
52
71
57

139
2
137
_
12 3
14

280
60
220
147
71
2

76
4
72
24
44
4

137
12
125
2
1 11
11

24
24
_
24

115
7
108
56
52

63
6
57
4
53

21
20
1
-

16
16
-

40
26
14
_
_
14

-

229
149

74

62
62

_
«
_
_

S ee footn otes at end o f ta b le .
* T r a n s p o rta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i lr o a d s ) , c o m m u n ica tio n , and o th er pu b lic u t ilit ie s .




376
164
?1 2

136
50

397
220

177
109
68

2 . 10

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

375
275

136
49
87
47
36

92
51
41
12
29

16
2

100

32
66

14
14

2 .4 0

2. 50

23

1

22
1

-

2 . 60

2 . 70 2 .8 0

2 . 90

-

13
13

~

■

32
28
4
-

44
17
27
27

8
1
7
-

1
1
-

$
$
$
$
$
3 .0 0 3. 10 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0
and
3 .0 0 3. 10 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 o v e r

2 .9 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

“

*

“

-

-

_

-

1
1
-

-

_
_

4
4
-

4
4
-

.

4
-

"
477
6470
7
7
-

1

1

1

8
6
2
2

154
54
100
1
85
6

190
87
103
24
77
2

109
31
78
29
41
3

160
109
51
14
32

122
60
62
25
37

140
31
109
50
59

27
23
4
_
4

63
31
32
18
12

117
87
30
21

78
55
23
6

80
12
68
40

202
88
114
69

119
50
69
43

19
17
2
2
_
_

82
28
54

245
169
76
8
21
37
6

338
198
140
4
126
2
6

368
224
144
25
_
30
85

6
6

16
_
16

44
6
38
8

45
36
9

205
131
74

3

-

180
163
17
_
_
15

166
162
4
_
_
2

145
87
58
13
_
30

21
_
33

68
24~
44
30

658
304
354
153
114

2 .0 0

-

-

>

733
296

WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OP—
$
s
$
f
$
$
t
$
$
$
1 .9 0 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 . 70 2 .8 0

1
1

-

~

149
71
78
55
10
11

208
88
120
97
14
1

116
39
77
60
g
2

97
36
61
6
27

73
30
43
39
4

107
67
40
29
8

60
27
33
28
5

86
56
30
29
1

97
33
64
.
48

10
7
3
_
3

5
5
_

39
18
21
21

2
2
2

2
2
2

2
2
-

-

-

68
15
53
16

82
45
37
2

89
26
63
33

32
5
27
27

41
5
36
23

11
2
9
9

25
18
7
6

-

12
12

_
-

_
-

*

3
3
■

•

"

_
-

214 1305
63
81
151 1224
71
676
387
5
45
68
26
90

2803
749
2054
963
798
214
71

1092
178
914
596
280
18
16

515
217
298
262
13
23

2196
1049
1147
1083
4
60

391
104
287
83
99
105

412
10
402
45
357
_

686
73
613
55
543
15

709
32
677
39
638

105
71
34
34
_

100

146
128
18
18
_

167
150
17
17
_

126
122
4
4
_

149
7
142
132

229
214
15
8

70
_
70
53

23

3
3

50
50

36
36

6
6

27
27

3
3

-

-

-

-

_

442
78
364
186
164
14

172
125
47
47
_

662
584
78
76
_
2

84

100
28
72
55
2
15

61
22
39
39

72
38
34
34
_

63

79
20
59
24

76 1046
30
50
46
996
461
1
>
387
45
66

1738
293
1445
582
751 r
98

18
13
5
4

1

-

-

97

3
3
_

_
-

4

-

23

-

84
83
_
1

410
8
402
45
357

-

60

3
3
_

98
80
18
18
-

101
84
17
17
_

78
289
74 7282
7
4
7
4
_
-

14

Table A-4: Custodial and Material Movement Occupations - Continued
(A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s 2 studied on an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , b y in d u stry d iv is io n , A p ril 1956)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

O ccu p a tion and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

Avenge
hourly
earnings

S
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
S
*
$
S
t
$
$
*
$
$
U nder 1 .0 0 1 .1 0 1 .2 0 1 .3 0 1.4Q 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0
and
and
$
under
1 .0 0
1 .1 0 1 .2 0 1 .3 0 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 o v e r

T r u c k d r iv e r s 4 - C ontinued
T r u c k d r iv e r s , heavy (o v e r 4 to n s ,
t r a ile r typ e)__ _____________ ________ __
M an u factu rin g _ _
___ _ __
N onm anufacturing

1 ,6 8 6
312
1 ,3 7 4

$
2 .3 4
2 .3 6
2 .3 3

_

3 ,0 8 5
TO
2 ,0 8 9

2 .6 3
2 .7 6
2 .5 7

T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (fo r k lift )
__ __ __
M a n u fa c tu r in g __________________________
N onm anufacturing
_ _

945
595
350

2 .0 8
2 .0 5
2 .1 3

T r u c k d r iv e r s , h ea vy (o v e r 4 to n s ,
oth er than t r a il e r type) _ ___
M an u factu rin g 5 *_____
_
8
7
_____
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

_____

-

-

126

-

-

60

"

“

126

"

~

60

87
77
10

61
14
47

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

6
3
3

622
138
484

300
56
244

10
10
-

4
4
“

13
13
"

6
6
■

104
104
~

188
136
52

137
. 63
74

150
136
14

_
“

156
28
128

_

_

_

.

12

2

65

51

32

7

_

2

395
10$
287
46
29
64
22
126

338
124
214
14
6
43
92
59

235
12$
107
1
46
33
12
15

297
25
272
48
15
97
18
94

212
76
136
18
4
20
63
31

741
92
649
93
14
23
507
12

159
44
115
3
4
2
98
8

183
80
103
62
3
3
35

102
28
74
44
20
6
2
2

30
14
16

32
4
28

16
-

28
_

-

-

-

-

"

“

■

“

-

-

-

-

-

_
“

_

-

-

_
-

■
.

193
$1
142
12
2
4
_
124

T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (oth er than f o r k li f t ) ___

188

1 .9 9

.

_

W a tc h m e n __________________________________
M an u factu rin g
_ ...... _
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ______________________
P u b lic u tilitie s * ____________________
W h olesa le trad e
R etail trade 3 _______________________
F inan ce **
S e r v ic e s _____________________________

3 ,1 7 9
932
2 ,2 4 7
357
190
312
849
539

1 .5 3
1 .4 6
1 .5 6
1 .6 4
1 .6 8
1 .4 4
1 .7 0
1 .3 0

27
27
_
_
27

235
158
77
16
3
17
_
41

-

-

-

46
$
41

~

~

~

■

-

504
4
500

642
4
638

6
6
-

34
34
"

48
48
~

_
_

_
~

_
-

87
87

-

.
-

~

-

.
-

.
-

-

.
-

9

4

.

4

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_

_
_

_
.

_
_

_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
>
_

_
_
_

18 1215
16
146
2 1069

71
52
19

112
76
36

316
316

186
2
184

62

28
28

8
54

1 E x clu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r tim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and late s h ift s .
2 Data lim it e d to m en w o r k e r s e x c e p t w h e re o th e r w is e in d ica te d .
3 E x clu d e s l im i t e d -p r i c e v a r ie t y s t o r e s .
4 In clu d es a ll d r iv e r s r e g a r d le s s o f s iz e and type o f tru ck o p e r a te d .
D r iv e r s o f m o r e than 1 type o f t r u c k , f o r m e r ly c la s s if ie d to the m a jo r type
ge n era l a v e r a g e fo r t r u c k d r iv e r s .
Data fo r individ ual ty p e s m a y t h e r e fo r e not be s t r ic t ly c o m p a r a b le to the e a r l ie r stu d ie s .
5 A ll w o r k e r s earn in g $3 an h o u r o r m o r e w e r e paid under bonu s p la n s .
* W o r k e r s w e re d is trib u te d as fo llo w s : 122 at $ 3 .4 0 to $ 3 .5 0 ; 118 at $ 3 .5 0 to $ 3 .6 0 ; 80 at $ 3 .6 0 to $ 3 .7 0 ; 150 at $ 3 .7 0 and o v e r .
7 W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u te d as fo llo w s : 92 at $ 3 .4 0 to
$ 3 .5 0 ; 60 at $ 3 .5 0 to $ 3 .6 0 ; 44 at $ 3 .6 0 to $ 3 .7 0 ; 86
at $ 3 .7 0 and o v e r .
8 W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u te d as fo llo w s : 30 at $ 3 .4 0 to $ 3 .5 0 ; 58 at $ 3 .5 0 to $ 3 .6 0 ; 36 at $ 3 .6 0 to $ 3 .7 0 ; 64 at $ 3 .7 0 and o v e r .
* T r a n sp o rta tio n (ex clu d in g r a ilr o a d s ) , co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r pu b lic u t ilit ie s .
** F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




2
2

o f tru ck op era ted ,

"

“

-

66
48
188
66 — 48“ 8 188
■
.
-

a r e now in c lu d e d on ly in the




15

B: Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Table B-l: Shift Differential Provisions1
*
P e r c e n t o f m a n u fa ctu rin g plant w o r k e r s —

Shift d iffe r e n tia l

(a)
In e sta b lis h m e n ts having
fo r m a l p r o v is io n s f o r —
S e co n d sh ift
w o rk

T h ird o r o th e r
sh ift w o r k

(b)
A c tu a lly w ork in g on—

S econ d sh ift

T h ird o r oth er
sh ift

T o t a l ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6 4 .1

4 9 .8

10. 7

2. 7

W ith sh ift pay d iffe r e n tia l --------------------------------------------------------

6 2 .5

48. 8

1 0 .6

2 .4

U n iform cen ts (per hour) ----------------------------------------------------

35= 1

2 2 .2

8. 1

1 .5

.5
.4
.7
.2
t
1. 7
.8
3 .1
t
.6

. 1
.3
.6
.1
.5
t

5 cen ts -----------------------------------------------------------------------------6 o r 69
/io cen ts ----------- ----------------------—— — - —--------------7 o r 7 V2 cen ts --------------------------------------------- -------------------8 c e n t s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------9 c e n t s -------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------10 cen ts ----------------------------------------------------------------------------12 o r I 2 V2 c e n t s --------------------------------------------------------------l 3 3 4 cents ------------------------------------------------------------------------/
*
15 cen ts ----------------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 15 cen ts ------------------------------------------------------------------

4 .9
3 .0
2 .4
1 .0
.3
1 0 .0
4 .9
6 .2
.9
1 .5

2 .0
.9
1. 1
1.9
8 .9
.6
5 .0
1. 7

U n iform p e r c e n ta g e -------------------------------------------------------------

2 6 .2

17. 8

5 p e r c e n t ________________ ______________________ ______
7 p e r c e n t --------------------------------------------- —-------------------------2 p e r c e n t ----------------------------------------------------------------------10 p e r c e n t -----------------------------------------------------------------------12 o r I 2 V2 p e r c e n t ----------------------------------------------------------15 p e r c e n t -------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 .6
1 .9
.6
1 6 .9
1. 1
4 .0
.

.

2 .4

.2

1 .9
.6
9 .8
5. 5

.2
.4
t
1 .3
.2
.4

_
t
.2
“

_

_

F u ll dayJs pay f o r re d u ce d h ou rs --------------------------------------O ther ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 .2

1 .5
7 .3

. 1

t
.7

No sh ift pay d iffe r e n tia l ------------------------------------------------------------

1 .6

.9

.1

.2

1 Shift d iffe r e n tia l data a r e p r e s e n te d in t e r m s o f (a) e s ta b lis h m e n t p o l ic y , and (b) w o r k e r s a c tu a lly e m p lo y e d on late
shifts at the tim e o f the s u r v e y . An e s ta b lis h m e n t w as c o n s id e r e d as having a p o l ic y if it m e t e ith er o f the fo llo w in g c o n d i­
tio n s: ( l ) O perated late shifts at the tim e o f the s u r v e y , o r (2) had fo r m a l p r o v is io n s c o v e r in g late s h ifts ,
t L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t.

O ccu p a tio n a l W age S u rvey, New Y o rk , N. Y. , A p r il 1956
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
B u rea u o f L a b o r S ta tis tics

16

Table B-2:

Minimum Entrance Rates for Women Office Workers1

N u m ber o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith s p e c ifie d m in im u m h irin g rate in—

M in im um rate
(w eek ly s a la r y )

E sta b lish m en ts s t u d i e d -------------------------

A ll
in d u st r ie s

544

N um ber o f e sta b lish m e n ts w ith s p e c ifie d m in im u m h ir in g ra te in—

N onm anufacturing

M an u factu rin g

M anufacturin g
A il

B a se d on stan dard w e e k ly h o u rs 2 o f—
A ll
sch ed­
u le s

177

35

XXX

3 7Vz

XXX

40

XXX

A ll
sch ed­
u les

367

tr ie s
35

XXX

36>/4

XXX

37Va

XXX

40

XXX

544

A ll
sched­
u les

177

$ 3 2 . 50
$ 3 5 . 00
$ 3 7 . 50
$ 4 0 . 00
$ 4 2 . 50
$ 4 5 . 00
$ 4 7 . 50
$ 5 0 .0 0
$ 5 2 .5 0
$ 5 5 .0 0
$ 57. 50
$ 6 0 .0 0
$ 6 2 . 50
$ 6 5 .0 0
$ 6 7 . 50

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

286

93

50

17

14

1
15
7
27
7
17
4
7
3

_
5
1
4
2
5
_
-

1
1

5
4
18
3
9
3
5
2
1
-

-

3
5
1
_
1
3
1

193

75

21

54

1
3
7
28
21
67
20
35
5
6
-

1
1
11
12
28
3
15
3
I
-

-

-

”

-

2
4
3
5
3
2
2
“

2
6
6
19
6
11
1
3
"

u nd er $ 3 5 . 00 --------------under $ 3 7 . 50 --------------under $ 4 0 . 00 --------------un d er $ 4 2 . 50 --------------un d er $ 4 5 . 00 --------------u nd er $ 4 7 . 50 --------------u nd er $ 5 0 .0 0 --------------under $ 52. 50 --------------un d er $ 55. 00 --------------und er $ 57. 50 --------------under $ 6 0 .0 0 --------------und er $ 6 2 . 50 --------------und er $ 6 5 . 00 --------------und er $ 6 7 . 50 --------------o v e r -------------------------------

1
3
8
43
28
94
27
52
9
13
3
3
1
1

E sta b lish m en ts having no s p e c ifie d
m in im um —*-------------------------------------------

109

34

XXX

XXX

XXX

75

XXX

XXX

XXX

E sta b lish m en ts w h ich did not e m p lo y
w o r k e r s in this c a t e g o r y ------------------

147

50

XXX

XXX

XXX

97

XXX

XXX

Data not a v a ila b le ----------------------------------

2

-

XXX

XXX

XXX

2

XXX

XXX

3

-

*

35

XXX

40

37Va

XXX

XXX

30

311

100

49

22

16

1
2
1
4
10
7
4
1
-

1
15
16
78
42
88
21
22
12
12
4
-

.
1
4
27
8
26
6
11
5
8
4
-

1
14
5
12
2
6
3
3
-

.
1
2
3
1
7
4
3
1
-

7
5
4
-

367

35

XXX

36V4

XXX

37Va

XXX

40

XXX

3

-

-

-

"

59

38

_
3
5
17
11
17
-

1
3
2
4
4
14
8
1
1
-

211

75

1
14
12
51
34
62
15
11
7
4
-

6
1
16
14
24
3
6
4
1
-

1
1
8
3
3
3
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

"

“

“

■

_

21

_

2
2

2
-

“

■

“

XXX

111

39

XXX

XXX

XXX

72

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

120

38

XXX

XXX

XXX

82

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

2

-

XXX

XXX

XXX

2

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

1 L o w e s t s a la r y rate f o r m a lly e s ta b lis h e d f o r h ir in g in e x p e r ie n c e d w o r k e r s f o r typing o r o th e r c le r i c a l jo b s .
2 H ou rs r e fl e c t the w o rk w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t-t im e s a l a r ie s . Data a r e p r e s e n te d fo r a ll w ork w eek s c o m b in e d , and




A ll
sch ed­
u le s

F O R O TH ER IN E X P E R IE N C E D C L E R IC A L W O R K E RS

F O R INIE X PE R IE N C E D TY P IST S

E sta b lish m en ts having a s p e c ifie d
m inim um ----------------------------------------------

N on m an u factu rin g

B a sed on stan d ard w e e k ly hour s 2 o f----

f o r the

m ost

com m on

w o rk w e e k s r e p o r t e d .

O ccu p a tion a l W age S u r v e y , N ew Y o r k , N. Y . , A p r il 1956
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u rea u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s

17
Table B-3:

Scheduled W eekly Hours

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS*EMPLOYED IN—

W e e k ly h o u rs

A ll w o r k e r s _______ ________________________________
U nder 35 h ou rs ______________ __ __ _ _____
35 h ou rs
__
________________ _ ----- _ __
O v e r 35 and under 36 7* h o u r s __________________
367* h o u r s __ ___
_____________ — _____ _
O v e r 36V* and und er 3772 h o u r s _______________
3772 h o u r s -- -------- -------- ----- ----O v e r 3772 and und er 40 h o u rs
_ ___ _ _
40 h ou rs __ __ ___________ _____ __ __ __ ____
O v e r 40 and u n d er 45 h o u r s ____ __ ______________
45 h ou rs __ __ __ __
— -------- .... —
----- _
O v e r 45 and u nd er 48 h ou rs
48 h ou rs __ _
_ _
O v e r 48 h ou rs
1
2
3
t
*
**

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade2

100

100
t
71
t
4
_
14
t
7
t

100
_
64
t

100

t
50
t
0
5
18
t
13
t
t
_
-

t
15
t
20
_
-

•

*

PERCENT
Finance**

100

100

_

_

50
_
12
t
26
3
9

16
_
13
3
37
5
25
t
_
_
-

3
43
3
13
13
11
t
12
t
_
_

_
"

Services

All
,
industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

_

t
7
t
5
t

13
3
9

50
t
7
t
24
t
n

_

OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Public ^
utilities*

100
_
_
_

>
_

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade2

Services

100

100
_
4

100
5
fI

3
t
16
4
53

_
_
t

t
h
t

t

5

7

t
72
t
5
t
t
1

69
t
t
t
t
t

90

86

5
_

_

_

_

-

-

Services

All .
industries3

Manufacturing

Public ^
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade2

Services

100

_
-

_

14
_
5

+

83
t
5
3

D ata r e la te to w o m e n w o r k e r s on ly.
E x clu d e s l im it e d -p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e s .
In clu d es data f o r r e a l e s ta te in add ition to those in d u stry d iv isio n s show n s e p a r a te ly ,
L e s s than 2. 5 p e r c e n t .
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a ilr o a d s ) , co m m u n ica tio n , and oth er p u b lic u t ilitie s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te .

Table B-4: Paid Holidays1
PERCENT OP OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Item

A ll w ork ers
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
paid h olid a y s
L e s s than 6 h o lid a y s
6 h olid a y s ___ _______
F u ll days on ly
P lu s 1, 2, o r 6 h a lf days .
7 h olid a y s ,
F u ll days o n l y ___
P lu s 1 n a if d a y __
P lu s 2 h alf d a ys _
P lu s 4 h a lf days
P lu s 3 o r 5 h a lf days —
8 h olid a y s __________________
F u ll days o n l y __________
P lu s 1 h a lf d a y _________
P lu s 2 h a lf d a y s _______
P lu s 3 h a lf days
9 h olid a y s
F u ll d ays o n l y __
P lu s 1 h a lf d a y __
P lu s 2 h a lf days
P lu s 3 h a lf days
10 h o lid a y s .
F u ll days o n ly .
P lu s 1 h a lf d a y ___________________
P lu s 2, 3, o r 4 h a lf days _______
11 h o l i d a y s ___________________________
F u ll days o n l y ___________________
P lu s 1 h a lf d a y __________________
P lu s 2, 3, o r 4 h a lf d a y s ______
12 h o l i d a y s __________________________
F u ll days o n l y ___________________
P lu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s --------------13 h o l i d a y s __________________________
F u ll days o n l y ___________________
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
no paid h o l i d a y s _____________________

All
industries

Wholesale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99

100

100

100

98

98
4
16

99
7
19
17

99

99

Retail trade 2

Finanoe**

i:

1.

100

99

r
r
*
•

-

-

-

-

-

t
t

5
5

t
t

t
t

t
t

7
7

**
1

+

ll

13
13

19
19

59
58

_
-

29
18
4

2$
24

t

t
t
T

7
3

-

t
-

1
8

t
t
t

t
-

26
19
5
3

4
3

-

t
t
t

1
r
1
r

3
t

t
9
7
1
[

-

-

21
18

5
5

+

+

4:
36

21
17

71
69

1

3
t
t
t
t
-

1

-

7
1
1

12

t

18
14

(>
\
1
t)

t
i&

-

13
11

t

-

25
24

26
25

t

-

-

74
62
3
7

t

t

t

6

8
3

t
t
t

18
18

14
13

25
22

5
5

12
11

t
t

t
t

t
t

14
9

_

t
t
t
t

12
12

-

11
9

4
3

5
4

t

t

t

-

t
t

t

-

f

-

22
16

11
5

12
12

8
4

9
6

-

-

3
-

3

14

12

9
3

5
7

t

t
t
t
_

-

t
t
t
t

-

-

21

22
22

T

-

t
3
t
t

14
8
6

_

-

t
t
t

5

t

42
42

-

24

-

3

3
3

t

8
6

t
t
t
t
-

16

-

95
8

94

-

6
6

3

-

3
t
9

_
_
-

t

t

_
_
_

-

t
t
t

11
10

t
+

-

t

t

65
52
12

22

ll

11

33

20

17

3
_

5
5

7
7

t
t
t
t
t
t
t

9
t
t
t
t

67
67

t
t
t

_

_
t
t

t

T

20
17

4
4
_

-

3
-

t

-

-

t

T
t
5
5
t

-

-

-

-

t

8

11
10

31

_

-

-

t
t

-

3

-

-

-

3

-

_
-

t

t

t

5

6

1 E s tim a te s r e la te to fu ll-d a y h o lid a y s p ro v id e d annually, as in e a r l ie r s tu d ie s .
T h e se a r e fu rth e r d iv id e d b etw een w o r k e r s w ho r e c e iv e m e r e ly the in d ica ted nu m ber o f fu ll-d ay h olid a y s , and
th o s e w ho r e c e iv e 1 o r m o r e h a lf h o lid a y s in addition.
2 E x clu d e s lim it e d -p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e s .
3 In clu d es data fo r r e a l e s ta te in add ition to th ose in d u stry d iv isio n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
t L e s s than 2. 5 p e r c e n t .
O ccu p a tion a l W age S u rv e y , N ew Y o r k , N. Y. , A p r il 1956
* T r a n s p o r t a t io n (e x c lu d in g r a ilr o a d s ) , c o m m u n ica tio n , and o th er pu b lic u tilitie s .
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
* * F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te .
B u rea u o f L a b o r S ta tistics




18

Table B-5: Paid Vacations
PERCENT OF OFFICE W0RKER8 EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy

W
holesale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Public .
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Ail
Industrie*

100

A ll w orkers

M
anufacturing

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
99

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
100
-

99
99
-

100
99

-

100
100
-

99
92
3
4

100
85
5
9

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
97
3
-

99
96
t
-

t

~

"

"

"

~

t

_
6
t
92
t

t
99
t
-

_
t
97
t
-

_
49
4
47
-

>
t
98
-

_
50
4
46
_
-

_
81
t
16
t

_
99
t

_
99
t

_
3
90
7
-

_
t
97
t
t

_

.
20
33
45
t
t

Public ^
utilities *

Retail trade1

Finance **

Services

All 2
industries

M
anufacturing

Retail trade1

Services

METHOD OF PAYMENT
W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid vacations _ _
_____ _
__
L ength-of-tim e payment __ _ ___ _ __
Percentage p a ym en t________________________
Flat-sum p a ym en t__________________________
___
_ ______ _ __ __
Other ___
W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid vacations _ _______ __

t

t

t

-

t

t

■

T

~

_
12
t
88

53
t
37

t

t

-

5

■

AMOUNT OF VACATION PAY
A fter 1 year of serv ice
Under 1 week
- _ _ ...
........
1 week
. ...
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s _____________________
_ _
- 2 weeks
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
.. 3 weeks --------------------------------------------------------------

_
7
t
92
t
t

t

26
3
9

_
13
82
t
4

_
32
61
5
t

r
28
14
44
3
9

_
8
_
88
t
4

_
7
4
82
5
t

94
6
-

_
_
_
96
t
4

_
5
4
84
5
t

_
88
10
t

96
t
t

_
_
_
87

t

_
_
76
7
18

93
t
3

t

60
t

After 2 years of service
Under 1 week
__ . _
1 week ..........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
__ _
2 weeks ________________________________________
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
__ _ _
3 weeks __
~ .

_
t
t
96
t
t

_
t
t
95
4

_
t
5
91
t
3

t

16
13
62
3
5

t

A fter 3 years of service
Under 1 week
....... ........ .
1 week
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s _____________________
2 weeks
_
.
_
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks .. _
_

_
t
t
95
t
. 3

_
t
t
91
8

94
t
5

_
_
75
t
24

_
_
87
t
12

_
99
t

t
86
11
t

_
_
97
t
t

_

96
t
3

_
_
_
67
20
13

_
_
_
65
6
29

t

t

t

8
4
78
4
5

16
9
60
3
9

t

t

_
3

A fter 5 yea rs of service
Under 1 week
...........
1 week . . . . . . .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks

.
.

....

__ _
__

_ ...

t
74
9
16

See footnotes at end o f table.
* Transportation (excluding ra ilroa d s), com m unication, and other public u tilities.
** Finance, insurance, and re a l estate.




NOTE:

_
_
_
95
t
3

_
f
62
8
29

3
t

75
6
14

7
t

67
6
16

t

12

80
5
15

Occupational Wage Survey, New Y ork, N .Y ., A p ril 1956
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f L abor Statistics

In the tabulations of vacation allow ances by years of s e r v ic e , payments other than 1 length of t i m e ,”
1
such as percentage o f annual earnings or flat-sum paym ents, were converted to an equivalent tim e
b asis; for exam ple, a payment of 2 percent o f annual earnings was considered as 1 w eek's pay.

f
■

Table B-& Paid Vacations - Continued
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation p olicy

A ll w ork ers

_ _

_

100

___

M
anufacturing

100

100

100

100

.

.

51
t
41
7

77
t
18
t
t

.
60
t
38
"

.

t
43
7
47
t
t

t
43
54

24
17
59
-

42
t
50
8

t
14
t
80
t
5

11
t
77
11

7
_
91
t
t

19
t
80
“

11

7

-

_

18
t
79

58

-

-

-

11

23

Public ^
utilities *

W
holesale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

All
industrial

Retail trade 1
2

Finanoe**

100

Services

100

All
industries *

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade1

' Services

100

100

100

100

100

100

t
3
60
4
30

73
3
21
3

t
67
t
31
-

t

t
7
52
5
34
t

50
47
3

t
90
t
6
t

4
32
t
58
4

9
29
3
56
3

5
r
91
3

t
24
t
74
“

32
60
8

4
32
t
57

9
29
3
54

5
t
90

t
23
t
72

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17

5

5

3

t

10

t

9
29
3
52
7

5

23

32

t

t

-

AMOUNT OF VACATION PA Y - Continued
A fter 10'yea rs of se rv ice
Under 1 week
1 w e e k _____
2 weeks
..... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks
Over 3 and under 4 weeks
4 weeks and over

.

-------

__

_

-

3

-

.

A fter 15 yea rs o f s e rv ice
Under 2 weeks
.... _
_ _
2 weeks
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
...............
3 weeks
..........
... ...... .............. _
Over 3 and under 4 weeks
4 weeks and over
_ -----

t
29
66
4

9
t
86
t
3

28
t
59
13

,

t
69
t
27
t

A fter 20 yea rs o f se rv ice
Under 2 weeks
_
_ _
2 weeks _ .
....
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ______________________
3 weeks
...
. .
.... _ _
__
Over 3 and under 4 weeks
4 weeks and over ......... _
_
_ ...........

t
13
t
72
t
15

75
-

14

91
t
t

3

t
29
-

_

7
t
69

.

28
t
55

32
-

58

t
69
t
27

A fter 25 yea rs o f se rv ice
Under 2 weeks
.... ............... . ...................
__r T
„ r
_
__ ...
2 weeks
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ^
3 weeks
...
.
......
4 weeks and over

„

.

11

7

18

28

4

26

4
31

t

-

-

-

-

57
32

90
3

t

t

t

t

44
44

60
22

1 E xcludes lim ite d -p rice variety stores.
2 Includes data fo r real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately,
t L ess than 2. 5 p ercen t.
* Transportation (excluding ra ilroa d s), com m unication, and other public utilities.
* * F inance, insurance, and real estate.




_

11

t

29
42

23
73

46
28

50
12

90
3

t

56
18

33
35

t

64
t

32
t

20

Table B-6: Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type o f plan

A ll w orkers __

All
industries

100

____

Manufacturing

100

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

100

100

Retail trade3

100

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Finance*4'

100

Services

100

All
2
industries

100

Manufacturing

100

Public
utilities *

100

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade1

100

100

Services

100

W orkers in establishm ents providing:
Life insurance
__ __ — __ __
-----Accidental death and dism em berm ent
insurance
__ _
__
__ „
Sickness and accident insurance
o r sick leave o r b oth 3
__ _
Sickness and accident in su ra n ce________
Sick leave (full pay and no
waiting period ; 4 ____________________ __
Sick leave (partial pay or
waiting p e r i o d ) ________________________
Hospitalization insurance
Surgical insurance __
M a d ir a l in s u r a n c e

...........

_

Catastrophe insurance
Retirem ent insurance _
O th e r__ __ __ „ __ „ _ __
No health, insurance, o r pension
p la n ________________________ __

.

__

__

__

_

92

89

98

86

79

40

40

37

51

36

98

84

91

95

96

96

83

87

37

43

40

36

40

56

37

54

87
41

86
42

91
20

86
47

86
51

89
44

84
35

85
68

81
78

99
28

93
64

83
67

84
75

74

70

79

4
75
70
49
14
78
4

5
79
75
50
5
75
t

8
47
45
35
5
93
t

72

44

81

72

24

14

34

67

29

21

t
69
70
47
7
71
t

11
85
81
54
14
57
-

3
83
74
52
27
85
8

t
63
57
46
t
64
t

10
86
83
55
t
69
t

3
94
89
59
t
70
3

48
53
45
31
3
92
t

11
78
78
48
8
74
t

4
94
92
62
3
59
t

4
83
82
55
t
68
t

t

t

t

t

t

t

3

t

4

4

8

'

1 Excludes lim ited -p rice variety s tores.
2 Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
3 Unduplicated total o f w orkers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below .
4 Includes form al plans which, how ever, neither specify minimum conditions fo r qualification nor maximum benefits,
t L ess than 2 .5 percen t.
* Transportation (excluding ra ilroa d s), com m unication, and other public u tilities.
** F inance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, New Y ork, N. Y. , A p ril 1956
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f L abor Statistics

Appendix: Job Descriptions

21

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau*s wage surveys is to
assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under
a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment
and from area to area. This is essential in order to permit the grouping of occupational wage
rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and
interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau’ s job descriptions may differ signifi­
cantly from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In
applying these job descriptions, the Bureau*s field representatives are instructed to exclude work­
ing supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped workers, part-tim e,
tem porary, and probationary w orkers.

O f f i c e

BILLER, MACHINE
P repares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other
than an ordinary or electrom atic typewriter. May also keep records
as to billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work in­
cidental to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers,
machine, are cla ssified by type of machine, as follows:
B iller, machine (billing machine) - Uses a special billing
machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott Fisher, Burroughs, etc. , which
are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and
invoices from customers* purchase orders, internally prepared
orders, shipping memoranda, etc. Usually involves application
of predetermined discounts and shipping charges and entry of
necessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the
billing machine, and totals which are automatically accumulated
by machine. The operation usually involves a large number of
carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a
fanfold machine.
B iller, machine (bookkeeping machine) - Uses a bookkeeping
machine (Sundstrand, Elliott Fisher, Remington Rand, etc. , which
may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare customers*
bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally
involves the simultaneous entry of figures on customers* ledger
record .
The machine automatically accumulates figures on a
number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints auto­
m atically the debit or credit balances. Does not involve a knowl­
edge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of
sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott
Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register, with or with­
out a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions.




BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR - Continued
Class A - Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of
and experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with
the structure of the particular accounting system used. Deter­
mines proper records and distribution of debit and credit items
to be used in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated
reports, balance sheets, and other records by hand.
Class B - Keeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections
of a set of records usually requiring little knowledge of basic book­
keeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll,
customers* accounts (not including a simple type of billing described
under biller, machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc. May check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A - Under general direction of a bookkeeper or account­
ant, has responsibility for keeping one or m ore sections of a com ­
plete set of books or records relating to one phase of an establish­
m en ts business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing
subsidiary ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or a c­
counts payable; examining and coding invoices or vouchers with
proper accounting distribution; requires judgment and experience
in making proper assignations and allocations.
May assist in
preparing, adjusting, and closing journal entries; may direct class
B accounting clerks.
Class B - Under supervision, perform s one or more routine
accounting operations such as posting simple journal vouchers,
accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher registers;
reconciling bank accounts; posting subsidiary ledgers controlled
by general ledgers.
This job does not require a knowledge of
accounting and bookkeeping principles but is found in offices in
which the m ore routine accounting work is subdivided on a func­
tional basis among several w orkers.

22
CLERK, FILE
Class A - Responsible for maintaining an established filing
system. C lassifies and indexes correspondence or other material;
may also file this m aterial. May keep records of various types
in conjunction with files or supervise others in filing and locating
material in the files.
May perform incidental clerical duties.
Class B - P erform s routine filing, usually of material that
has already been classified, or locates or assists in locating m a­
terial in the file s. May perform incidental clerical duties.
CLERK, ORDER
Receives customers* orders for material or merchandise by
mail, phone, or personally. Duties involve any combination of the
following: Quoting prices to custom ers; making out an order sheet
listing the items to make up the order; checking prices and quantities
of items on order sheet; distributing order sheets to respective de­
partments to be filled. May check with credit department to deter­
mine credit rating of custom er, acknowledge receipt of orders from
custom ers, follow up orders to see that they have been filled, keep
file of orders received, and check shipping invoices with original
orders.
CLERK, PAYROLL

KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory resp on si­
bilities, records accounting and statistical data on tabulating cards
by punching a series of holes in the cards in a specified sequence,
using an alphabetical or a numerical key-punch machine, following
written information on record s.
May duplicate cards by using the
duplicating device attached to machine.
Keeps files of punch cards.
May verify own work Or work of others.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
P erform s various routine duties such as running errands,
operating minor office machines such as sealers or m ailers, opening
and distributing mail, and other minor clerica l work.
SECRETARY
Perform s secretarial and cle rica l duties for a superior in an
administrative or executive position. Duties include making appoint­
ments for superior; receiving people coming into office; answering
and making phone calls*; handling personal and important or con fi­
dential mail, and writing routine correspondence on own initiative;
taking dictation (where transcribing machine is not used) either in
shorthand or by stenotype or sim ilar machine, and transcribing dicta­
tion or'the recorded information reproduced on a transcribing machine.
May prepare special reports or memoranda for information of superior.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL

Computes wages of company employees and enters the n eces­
sary data on the payroll sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers*
earnings based on time or production records; posting calculated data
on payroll sheet, showing information such as worker*s name, working
days, time, rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. May
make out paychecks and assist paymaster in making up and d is­
tributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.

Prim ary duty is to take dictation from one or m ore persons,
either in shorthand or by stenotype or sim ilar machine, involving a
normal routine vocabulary, and to transcribe this dictation on a type­
w riter. May also type from written copy. May also set up and keep
files in order, keep simple record s, etc.
Does not include transcribing-machine work (see transcribing-m achine operator).

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR

STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL

Prim ary duty is to operate a Comptometer to perform mathe­
matical computations. This job is not to be confused with that of
statistical or other type of clerk, which may involve frequent use of
a Comptometer but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to
performance of other duties.

Prim ary duty is to take dictation from one or m ore persons,
either in shorthand or by stenotype or sim ilar machine, involving a
varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or
reports on scientific research and to transcribe this dictation on a
typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up and
keep files in order, keep simple record s, etc.
Does not include
transcribing-machine work.

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory respon­
sibilities, reproduces multiple copies of typewritten or handwritten
matter, using a mimeograph or ditto machine. Makes necessary ad­
justment such as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed.
Is not required to prepare stencil or ditto m aster. May keep file of
used stencils or ditto m asters. May sort, collate, and staple com ­
pleted material.



Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard.
Duties involve handling incoming, outgoing, and intraplant or office
calls. May record toll calls and take m essages. May give infor­
mation to persons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders.
For workers who also act as receptionists see switchboard operatorreceptionifct.

23
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
tion
type
This
time

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL - Continued

In addition to perform ing duties of operator, on a single posi­
or monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and may also
or perform routine cle rica l work as part of regular duties.
typing or cle rica l work may take the major part of this w orkerT
s
while at switchboard.

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates machine that automatically analyzes and translates
information punched in groups o f tabulating cards and prints trans­
lated data on form s or accounting records; sets or adjusts machine;
does simple wiring of plugboards according to established practice
or diagram s; places cards to be tabulated in feed magazine and starts
machine. May file cards after they are tabulated. May, in addition,
operate auxiliary machines.

included. A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype
or similar machine is classified as a stenographer, general.
TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies of various material or to
make out bills after calculations have been made by another person.
May do clerica l work involving little special training, such as keep­
ing simple records, filing records and reports or sorting and dis­
tributing incoming mail.
Class A - P erform s one or more of the following: Typing
material in final form from very rough and involved draft; copy­
ing from plain or corrected copy in which there is a frequent
and varied use of technical and unusual words or from foreignlanguage copy; combining material from several sources, or
planning layout of complicated statistical tables to maintain uni­
formity and balance in spacing; typing tables from rough draft in
final form . May type routine form letters, varying details to
suit circum stances.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
Prim ary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal
routine vocabulary from transcribing machine records.
May also
type from written copy and do simple clerical work. Workers tran­
scribing dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabu­
lary such as legal briefs or reports on scientific research are not

Professional

DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR
(Assistant draftsman)
Draws to scale units or parts of drawings prepared by drafts­
man or others for engineering, construction, or manufacturing pur­
poses. Uses various types of drafting tools as required. May p re­
pare drawings from simple plans or sketches, or perform other duties
under direction of a draftsman.
DRAFTSMAN, LEADER
Plans and directs activities of one or more draftsmen in
preparation of working plans and detail drawings from rough or p re­
lim inary sketches for engineering, construction, or manufacturing
purposes. Duties involve a combination of the following: Interpreting
blueprints, sketches, and written or verbal orders; determining work
procedures; assigning duties to subordinates and inspecting their work;
perform ing m ore difficult problem s. May assist subordinates during




Class B - P erform s one or more of the following: Typing
from relatively clear or typed drafts; routine typing of form s,
insurance policies, e tc .; setting up simple standard tabulations, or
copying m ore complex tables already set up and spaced properly.

and

Technical

DRAFTSMAN, LEADER - Continued
em ergencies or as a regular assignment, or perform related duties
of a supervisory or administrative nature.
DRAFTSMAN, SENIOR
Prepares working plans and detail drawings from notes,
rough or detailed sketches for engineering, construction, or manu­
facturing purposes. Duties involve a combination of the following:
Preparing working plans, detail drawings, maps, cross-section s, etc.,
to scale by use of drafting instruments; making engineering computa­
tions such as those involved in strength of m aterials, beams and
trusses; verifying completed work, checking dimensions, materials
to be used, and quantities; writing specifications; making adjustments
or changes in drawings or specifications. May ink in lines and letters
on pencil drawings, prepare detail units of complete drawings, or
trace drawings. Work is frequently in a specialized field such as
architectural, electrical, mechanical, or structural drafting.

24
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) - Continued

A registered nurse who gives nursing service to ill or injured
employees or other persons who becom e ill or suffer an accident on
the prem ises of a factory or other establishment.
Duties involve a
combination of the following: Giving first aid to the ill or injured;
attending to subsequent dressing of em ployees1 injuries; keeping records
of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or
other purposes; conducting physical examinations and health evaluations
of applicants and em ployees; and planning and carrying out programs
involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant

environment, or other activities affecting the health, welfare, and
safety of all personnel.

Maintenance

TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others, by placing
tracing cloth or paper over drawing and tracing with pen or pencil.
Uses T-square, compass, and other drafting tools. May prepare
simple drawings and do simple lettering.

nd

Powerplant

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

ENGINEER, STATIONARY

P erform s the carpentry duties necessary to construct and
maintain in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins,
cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings,
and trim made of wood in an establishment. Work involves most of
the following: Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, draw­
ings, m odels, or verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenter^
handtools, portable power tools, and standard measuring instruments;
making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work;
selecting materials necessary for the work. In general, the work of
the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training and experience
usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent train­
ing and experience.

Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation
of stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to sup­
ply the establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrig era ­
tion, or air conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining
equipment such as steam engines, air com p ressors, generators, m o­
tors, turbines, ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers
and boiler-fed water pumps; making equipment repairs; keeping a
record of operation of machinery, temperature, and fuel consump­
tion. May also supervise these operations. Head or chief engineers
in establishments employing m ore than one engineer are excluded.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
P erform s a variety of electrical trade functions such as the
installation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generating,
distribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Installing or repairing any of
a variety of electrical equipment such as generators, transform ers,
switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers, m otors, heating units,
conduit systems, or other transm ission equipment; working from blue­
prints, drawings, layout, or other specifications; locating and diag­
nosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working standard
computations relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical
equipment; using a variety of electrician ls handtools and measuring
and testing instruments. In general, the work of the maintenance
electrician requires rounded training and experience usually a c­
quired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.



FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which
employed with heat, power, or steam.
Feeds fuels to fire by hand
or operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; checks water
and safety valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom equipment.
HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE
Assists one or m ore workers in the skilled maintenance
trades, by performing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such
as keeping a worker supplied with m aterials and tools; cleaning work­
ing area, machine, and equipment; assisting worker by holding ma­
terials or tools; performing other unskilled tasks as directed by jou r­
neyman. The kind of work the helper is permitted to perform varies
from trade to trade: In some trades the helper is confined to sup­
plying, lifting, and holding m aterials and tools, and cleaning working
areas; and in others he is permitted to perform specialized machine
operations, or parts of a trade that are also perform ed by workers
on a full-tim e basis.

25

M A C H IN E -T O O L . O P E R A T O R , TO O LR O O M

M E C H A N IC , M A IN T E N A N C E

S p e cia lize s in the o p e ra tio n o f one o r m o re types o f m achine
to o ls , such as jig b o re rs , c y lin d ric a l o r surfa ce g rin d e rs , engine
la th e s , o r m illin g m ach in es in the c o n s tru c tio n o f m ach in e-sh op to o ls ,
gauges, jig s , fix tu re s , o r d ie s . W o rk in vo lve s m o st o f the fo llo w in g :
P la n n in g and p e rfo rm in g d iffic u lt m ach in ing op eration s; p ro ce ssin g
ite m s re q u irin g c o m p lic a te d setups o r a hig h degree o f accu ra cy;
using a v a rie ty o f p re c is io n m e a s u rin g in s tru m e n ts ; s e le ctin g feeds,
speeds, to o lin g and o p e ra tio n sequence; m aking ne ce ssa ry a d ju s t­
m en ts d u rin g o p e ra tio n to ach ieve re q u is ite to le ra n ce s o r d im e n sio n s.
M ay be re q u ire d to re co g n ize when to o ls need d re s s in g , to d re ss to o ls ,
and to s e le ct p ro p e r coolants and cu ttin g and lu b ric a tin g o ils . F o r
c ro s s -in d u s try wage study p u rp o se s, m a c h in e -to o l o p e ra to r s , to o lro o m ,
in to o l and die job b in g shops a re excluded fro m th is c la s s ific a tio n .

R e p a irs m a c h in e ry o r m e ch a n ica l equipm ent o f an e s ta b lis h ­
m en t. W o rk in v o lv e s m o st o f the fo llo w in g : E xa m in in g m achines
and m ech an ica l equipm ent to diagnose source o f tro u b le ; d is m a n tlin g
o r p a rtly d is m a n tlin g m achines and p e rfo rm in g re p a irs tha t m a in ly
in vo lve the use o f handtools in scra p in g and fittin g p a rts ; re p la cin g
b roken o r d e fe ctive p a rts w ith ite m s obtained fro m stock; o rd e rin g the
p ro d u c tio n o f a re p la ce m e n t p a rt by a m achine shop o r sending of
the m achine to a m achine shop fo r m a jo r re p a irs ; p re p a rin g w ritte n
s p e c ific a tio n s fo r m a jo r re p a irs o r fo r the p ro d u c tio n o f p a rts o rd e re d
fro m m achine shop; re a s s e m b lin g m ach in es; and m aking a ll ne cessa ry
a d justm en ts fo r o p e ra tio n . In g e n e ra l, the w o rk o f a m aintenance
m echanic re q u ire s rounded tra in in g and exp erie nce u s u a lly acq u ire d
th ro u g h a fo rm a l a p p re n tic e sh ip o r eq u iva le n t tra in in g and exp erie nce.
E xcluded fro m th is c la s s ific a tio n a re w o rk e rs whose p rim a ry duties
in vo lve settin g up o r a d ju stin g m a ch in e s.

M A C H IN IS T , M A IN T E N A N C E
P ro d u ce s re p la c e m e n t p a rts and new p a rts in m aking re p a irs
o f m e ta l p a rts o f m e c h a n ic a l equipm ent op erated in an e s ta b lish m e n t.
W o rk in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : In te rp re tin g w ritte n in s tru c ­
tio n s and s p e c ific a tio n s ; planning and la y in g out o f w o rk ; using a v a ­
r ie ty o f m a c h in is t’ s handtools and p re c is io n m ea su rin g in s tru m e n ts ;
s e ttin g up and o p e ra tin g s ta n d a rd m achine to o ls; shaping o f m e ta l
p a rts to close to le ra n c e s ; m a kin g standard shop com putations r e la t­
ing to dim e n sio n s o f w o rk , to o lin g , feeds and speeds o f m ach in ing ;
know ledge o f the w o rk in g p ro p e rtie s o f the com m on m e ta ls; se le ctin g
s ta n d a rd m a te ria ls , p a rts , and equipm ent re q u ire d fo r h is w o rk ; fittin g
and a sse m b lin g p a rts in to m e ch a n ica l equipm ent. In g e n e ra l, the
m a c h in is t’ s w o rk n o rm a lly re q u ire s a rounded tra in in g in m a ch in e shop p ra c tic e u s u a lly a c q u ire d throu gh a fo rm a l a p p re n tic e sh ip o r
e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e rie n c e .
M E C H A N IC , A U T O M O T IV E (M A IN T E N A N C E )
R e p a irs a u to m o b ile s , buses, m o to rtru c k s , and tra c to rs o f
an e s ta b lis h m e n t. W o rk in v o lv e s m ost o f the fo llo w in g : E xam inin g
a u to m o tiv e eq uip m en t to diagnose source o f tro u b le ; d isa sse m b lin g
eq uip m en t and p e rfo rm in g re p a irs tha t invo lve the use o f such handto o ls as w re n c h e s , gauges, d r ills , o r sp e cia lize d equipm ent in d is ­
a s s e m b lin g o r fittin g p a rts ; re p la c in g broken o r defective p a rts fro m
sto ck; g rin d in g and a d ju s tin g v a lv e s ; re a sse m b lin g and in s ta llin g the
v a rio u s a s s e m b lie s in the v e h ic le and m aking ne cessa ry a d ju stm e n ts;
a lin in g w he els, a d ju s tin g b ra k e s and lig h ts , o r tigh te nin g body b o lts .
In g e n e ra l, the w o rk o f the a u to m o tive m echanic re q u ire s rounded
tra in in g and e x p e rie n c e u s u a lly a c q u ire d throu gh a fo rm a l a p p re n tic e ­
ship o r e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e rie n c e .



M IL L W R IG H T
In s ta lls new m achines o r heavy equipm ent and d ism a n tle s and
in s ta lls m achines o r heavy equipm ent when changes in the plant la y ­
out are re q u ire d . W o rk in vo lve s m ost o f the fo llo w in g : P lanning and
la y in g out o f the w o rk ; in te rp re tin g b lu e p rin ts o r o th e r s p e cifica tio n s ;
using a v a rie ty o f handtools and rig g in g ; m aking standard shop co m ­
pu tations re la tin g to s tre s s e s , s tre n g th o f m a te ria ls , and centers o f
g ra v ity ; a lin in g and ba lan cin g of equipm ent; se le ctin g standard to o ls,
equipm ent, and p a rts to be used; in s ta llin g and m a in ta in in g in good
o rd e r pow er tra n s m is s io n equipm ent such as d riv e s and speed r e ­
d u c e rs . In g e n e ra l, the m illw r ig h t’ s w o rk n o rm a lly re q u ire s a rounded
tra in in g and e xp erie nce in the tra d e a c q u ire d th ro u g h a fo rm a l a p p re n ­
tic e s h ip o r eq uivale nt tra in in g and exp e rie n ce .
O IL E R
L u b ric a te s , w ith o il o r grea se , the m oving p a rts o r w ea ring
surfa ce s o f m e ch a n ica l equipm ent o f an e s ta b lish m e n t.
P A IN T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
P a in ts and re d e co ra te s w a lls , w oo dw ork, and fix tu re s of an
e s ta b lish m e n t. W o rk in v o lv e s the fo llo w in g : Knowledge o f surface
p e c u lia ritie s and types o f pa int re q u ire d fo r d iffe re n t a p p lica tio n s;
p re p a rin g surfa ce fo r p a in tin g by re m o v in g old fin is h o r by placing
p u tty o r f ille r in n a il holes and in te rs tic e s ; applying pa int w ith spray
gun o r b ru s h . M ay m ix c o lo rs , o ils , w hite lead, and oth er paint
in g re d ie n ts to obtain p ro p e r c o lo r o r c o n siste n cy. In ge n e ra l, the
w o rk o f the m aintenance p a in te r re q u ire s rounded tra in in g and e x ­
p e rie nce u s u a lly a c q u ire d th ro u g h a fo rm a l a p p re n tic e sh ip o r equiva­
le n t tra in in g and e xp e rie n ce .

26

P IP E F IT T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
In s ta lls o r re p a irs w a te r, steam , gas, o r o th e r types o f pipe
and p ip e fittin g s in an e s ta b lish m e n t. W o rk in vo lve s m o st o f the fo l­
lo w in g : L a yin g out o f w o rk and m e a s u rin g to locate p o s itio n o f pipe
fro m draw ing s o r o th e r w ritte n s p e c ific a tio n s ; c u ttin g v a rio u s sizes
o f pipe to c o rre c t lengths w ith c h is e l and ha m m e r o r oxyacetylene
to rc h o r p ip e -c u ttin g m ach in e; th re a d in g pipe w ith stocks and dies;
bending pipe by h a n d -d riv e n o r p o w e r-d riv e n m ach in es; assem b ling
pipe w ith couplings and fastenin g pipe to hangers; m aking standard
shop com putations re la tin g to p re s s u re s , flo w , and size o f pipe r e ­
q u ire d ; m aking standard te s ts to d e te rm in e w hether fin is h e d pipes m eet
s p e c ific a tio n s . In g e n e ra l, the w o rk o f the m aintenance p ip e fitte r
re q u ire s rounded tra in in g and exp erie nce u s u a lly a c q u ire d th ro u g h a
fo rm a l a p p re n tic e sh ip o r eq u iva le n t tra in in g and e xp e rie n ce . W o rk e rs
p r im a r ily engaged in in s ta llin g and re p a irin g b u ild in g sa n ita tio n or
heating system s are exclu d e d .
P L U M B E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
Keeps the plu m bin g system o f an e s ta b lish m e n t in good o rd e r.
W o rk in v o lv e s: Knowledge o f s a n ita ry codes re g a rd in g in s ta lla tio n of
vents and tra p s in plum bing system ; in s ta llin g o r re p a irin g pipes and
fix tu re s ; opening clogged d ra in s w ith a plu ng er o r p lu m b e rrs snake.
In g e n e ra l, the w o rk o f the m aintenance p lu m b e r re q u ire s rounded
tra in in g and exp erie nce u s u a lly a c q u ire d th ro u g h a fo rm a l a p p re n tic e ­
ship o r eq uivale nt tra in in g and e xp e rie n ce .
S H E E T -M E T A L W O RKER, M A IN T E N A N C E
F a b ric a te s , in s ta lls , and m a in ta in s in good re p a ir the sheetm e ta l equipm ent and fix tu re s (such as m achine gu ards, grease pans,
shelves, lo c k e rs , tan ks, v e n tila to rs , chutes, ducts, m e ta l ro o fin g )
o f an e s ta b lis h m e n t. W o rk in vo lve s m o st o f the fo llo w in g : P lan nin g
C u s to d ia l and

and laying out a ll types of s h e e t-m e ta l m aintenance w o rk fro m b lu e ­
p rin ts , m odels, o r other s p e c ific a tio n s ; s e ttin g up and o p e ra tin g a il
a v a ila b le types o f s h e e t-m e ta l-w o rk in g m a ch in e s; using a v a rie ty o f
handtools in cu ttin g , bending, fo rm in g , shaping, fittin g , and a s s e m ­
b lin g ; in s ta llin g s h e e t-m e ta l a rtic le s as re q u ire d . In g e n e ra l, the
w o rk o f the m aintenance s h e e t-m e ta l w o rk e r re q u ire s rounded tra in in g
and experience u s u a lly a c q u ire d th ro u g h a fo rm a l a p p re n tic e s h ip o r
eq uivale nt tra in in g and e x p e rie n c e .
TO O L A N D D IE M A K E R
(D ie m a ke r; jig m a k e r; to o lm a k e r; fix tu re m a k e r; gauge m a k e r)
C o n stru cts and re p a irs m a c h in e -sh o p to o ls , gauges, jig s , f ix ­
tu re s o r dies fo r fo rg in g s , punching and o th e r m e ta l-fo rm in g w o rk .
W o rk invo lve s m ost o f the fo llo w in g : P la n n in g and la y in g out of w o rk
fro m m odels, b lu e p rin ts , d ra w in g s , o r o th e r o ra l and w ritte n s p e c ifi­
ca tio n s; using a v a rie ty o f to o l and die m a k e rf s handtools and p re c is io n
m e a su rin g in s tru m e n ts ; u n de rstan ding o f the w o rk in g p ro p e rtie s o f
com m on m e ta ls and a llo y s ; se ttin g up and o p e ra tin g o f m a ch in e to o ls
and re la te d equipm ent; m aking n e c e s sa ry shop com p utation s re la tin g
to dim ensions o f w o rk , speeds, feeds, and to o lin g o f m a ch in e s; heattre a tin g of m e ta l p a rts d u rin g fa b ric a tio n as w e ll as o f fin is h e d to o ls
and dies to achieve re q u ire d q u a litie s ; w o rk in g to close to le ra n c e s ;
fittin g and assem bling of p a rts to p re s c rib e d to le ra n c e s and a llo w ­
ances; sele cting a p p ro p ria te m a te ria ls , to o ls , and p ro c e s s e s . In
g e n e ra l, the to o l and die m a k e r*s w o rk re q u ire s a rounded tra in in g
in m achine-shop and to o lro o m p ra c tic e u s u a lly a c q u ire d th ro u g h a
fo rm a l ap p re n tice sh ip o r e q u iv a le n t tra in in g and e x p e rie n c e .
F o r c ro s s -in d u s try wage study pu rp o se s, to o l and die m a k e rs
in to o l and die jobbing shops a re excluded fro m th is c la s s ific a tio n .

M aterial

E L E V A T O R O P E R A T O R , PASSENGER
T ra n s p o rts passengers betw een flo o rs o f an o ffic e b u ild in g ,
a p a rtm e n t house, d e p a rtm e n t sto re , ho tel o r s im ila r e s ta b lish m e n t.
W o rk e rs who operate e le v a to rs in c o n ju n ctio n w ith o th e r duties such
as those o f s ta rte rs and ja n ito rs are excluded.
GUARD
P e rfo rm s ro u tin e p o lice d u tie s, e ith e r at fix e d post o r on
to u r, m a in ta in in g o rd e r, using a rm s o r fo rc e w here n e c e s sa ry . In ­
cludes gatem en who a re sta tio ne d at gate and check on id e n tity of
em ployees and o th e r persons e n te rin g .



S H E E T -M E T A L W O RKER, M A IN T E N A N C E - C ontinued

Movement

JA N ITO R , P O R TE R , OR C L E A N E R
(Sweeper; charw om an; ja n itre s s )
Cleans and keeps in an o rd e rly co n d itio n fa c to ry w o rk in g
areas and w ashroom s, o r p re m is e s o f an o ffic e , a p a rtm e n t house,
o r c o m m e rc ia l o r oth er e s ta b lis h m e n t. D uties in v o lv e a c o m b in a tio n
o f the fo llo w in g : Sweeping, m opping or^ s cru b b in g , and p o lis h in g flo o rs ;
re m o vin g chip s, tra s h , and o th e r re fu s e ; du stin g e q uip m en t, fu rn itu re ,
o r fix tu re s ; p o lish in g m e ta l fix tu re s o r trim m in g s ; p ro v id in g sup plies
and m in o r m aintenance s e rv ic e s ; clea ning la v a to rie s , sho w e rs, and
re s tro o m s . W o rk e rs who s p e c ia liz e in w indow w ashing a re excluded.

27

L A B O R E R , M A T E R IA L H A N D LIN G
(L o a d e r and u n lo a d e r; h a n d le r and sta ck e r; s h e lv e r; tru c k e r;
stockm an o r sto ck h e lp e r; w arehousem an o r w arehouse h e lp e r)
A w o rk e r em p loyed in a w arehouse, m a n u fa ctu rin g p la n t,
s to re , o r oth e r e s ta b lis h m e n t whose duties invo lve one o r m o re o f
the fo llo w in g : Lo ad ing and unloading v a rio u s m a te ria ls and m e rc h a n ­
dise on o r fro m fre ig h t c a rs , tru c k s , o r oth er tra n s p o rtin g de vice s;
un pa ckin g, s h e lv in g , o r p la c in g m a te ria ls o r m erch an dise in p ro p e r
sto ra g e lo c a tio n ; tra n s p o rtin g m a te ria ls o r m erchandise by hand tru c k ,
c a r, o r w h e e lb a rro w . L o n g sh o re m e n , who load and unload ships a re
exclud ed .

S H IP PIN G A N D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K - C ontinued
o th e r re c o rd s ; checking fo r shortages and re je c tin g dam aged goods;
ro u tin g m e rch a n d ise o r m a te ria ls to p ro p e r d e p a rtm e n ts; m a in ta in in g
n e ce ssa ry re c o rd s and file s .
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s :
R e ce ivin g c le rk
Shipping c le rk
Shipping and re c e iv in g c le rk
T R U C K D R IV E R

ORDER F IL L E R
(O rd e r p ic k e r; sto ck s e le c to r; w arehouse stockm an)
F ills ship ping o r tra n s fe r o rd e rs fo r fin is h e d goods fro m
s to re d m e rch a n d is e in accorda nce w ith s p e cifica tio n s on sales s lip s ,
c u s to m e rs * o rd e rs , o r o th e r in s tru c tio n s . M ay, in a d d itio n to^ fillin g
o rd e rs and in d ic a tin g ite m s fille d o r o m itte d , keep re c o rd s of o u t­
going o rd e rs , re q u is itio n a d d itio n a l sto ck, o r re p o rt s h o rt supplies
to s u p e rv is o r, and p e rfo rm o th e r re la te d d u ties.
P A C K E R , S H IP P IN G
P re p a re s fin is h e d p ro d u c ts fo r shipm ent o r storage by p la cin g
them in shipping c o n ta in e rs , the s p e c ific operations p e rfo rm e d being
dependent upon the typ e , s iz e , and num ber of u n its to be packed, the
type o f c o n ta in e r em p lo ye d , and m ethod of shipm ent. W o rk re q u ire s
the p la c in g o f ite m s in ship ping co n ta ine rs and m ay in v o lv e one o r
m o re o f the fo llo w in g : K now ledge o f v a rio u s ite m s of sto ck in o rd e r
to v e r ify content; s e le c tio n o f a p p ro p ria te type and size o f c o n ta in e r;
in s e rtin g e n clo su re s in c o n ta in e r; using e x c e ls io r or o th e r m a te ria l to
p re v e n t breakage o r dam age; c lo sin g and sealing co n ta in e r; applying
la b e ls o r e n te rin g id e n tify in g data on co n ta in e r; P acke rs who also
m ake wooden boxes o r c ra te s a re excluded.
S H IP P IN G A N D R E C E IV IN G C L E R K
P re p a re s m e rch a n d is e fo r shipm ent, o r re ce ive s and is r e ­
sp o n sib le fo r in c o m in g sh ip m e n t of m erch an dise o r o th e r m a te ria ls .
S hipping w o rk in v o lv e s : A know ledge of shipping p ro c e d u re s , p ra c ­
tic e s , ro u te s , a v a ila b le m eans o f tra n s p o rta tio n and ra te s ; and p r e ­
p a rin g re c o rd s o f the goods shipped, m aking up b ills o f la d in g , p o s t­
ing w e ig h t and ship ping c h a rg e s , and keeping a file of shipping re c o rd s .
M a y d ire c t o r a s s is t in p re p a rin g the m erch an dise fo r ship m e nt.
R e c e iv in g w o rk in v o lv e s : V e rify in g o r d ire c tin g oth ers in v e rify in g
the c o rre c tn e s s o f ship m e nts ag ain st b ills of la d in g , in v o ic e s , o r



D riv e s a tru c k w ith in a c ity o r in d u s tria l a re a to tra n s p o rt
m a te ria ls , m e rc h a n d is e , eq uip m en t, o r m en betw een v a rio u s types of
e s ta b lish m e n ts such as: M a n u fa ctu rin g p la n ts , fre ig h t depots, w a re ­
houses, w ho le sale and re ta il e s ta b lis h m e n ts , o r between re ta il estab­
lis h m e n ts and c u s to m e rs ’ houses o r places o f b u sin e ss. M ay also
loa d o r unload tru c k w ith o r w ith o u t h e lp e rs , m ake m in o r m ech an ica l
re p a irs , and keep tru c k in good w o rk in g o rd e r. D riv e r-s a le s m e n and
o v e r-th e -ro a d d riv e rs a re e xclud ed.
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, tru c k d riv e rs are c la s s ifie d by size
and type o f eq uip m en t, as fo llo w s : ( T r a c to r - tr a ile r should be ra te d
on the ba sis o f t r a ile r ca p a city. )
T ru c k d riv e r (co m b in a tio n o f sizes lis te d s e p a ra te ly )
T ru c k d riv e r, lig h t (under IV 2 tons)
T ru c k d riv e r, m e d iu m ( 1 V2 to and~~including 4 to n s )
T ru c k d riv e r, heavy (o ve r 4 to n s, tr a ile r type)
T ru c k d riv e r, heavy (o ve r 4 to n s, o th e r than t r a ile r typ e )
T R U C K E R , POW ER
O perates a m a n u a lly c o n tro lle d g a s o lin e - o r e le c tric -p o w e re d
tru c k o r tra c to r to tra n s p o rt goods and m a te ria ls o f a ll kinds about
a w are ho use, m a n u fa ctu rin g p la n t, o r o th e r e s ta b lish m e n t.
F o r wage study p u rp o s e s , w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d by type of
tru c k , as fo llo w s :
T ru c k e r, po w er ( fo r k lift)
T ru c k e r, po w er (o th e r than f o r k lif t )
W ATCHM AN
M akes rounds of p re m is e s p e rio d ic a lly in p ro te c tin g p ro p e rty
ag a in st fir e , th e ft, and ille g a l e n try .
* U . S . GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1956 O -391638


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102