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NEW YO RK, N. Y.
M A R C H 1955

BLS Bulletin No. 1172-13

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary



BUREAU O F LABOR STATISTICS
Aryness Joy Wickens, Acting Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey




NEW YORK, N.Y.
March 1955

B ulletin No. 1172-13
June 1955

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Aryness Joy Wicken*, Acting Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

-

(c
NSS^ T tt
SSs

Price 15 cents

J




CONTENTS
Page
I N T R O D U C T I O N --------------------------------

1

TABLES:
A:

B:

APPENDIX:

Occupational earnings * A - 1: Office o c c u p a t i o n s --------------------A-la: Central offices----- -----------------------------------------A - 2: Professional a n d technical occupations ____________________
A - 3: Maintenance a n d powerplant o c c u p a t i o n s ___________________
A-4: Custodial a n d material m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s --------------

3
8
9
10
12

Establishment practices a n d suppl e m e n t a r y
w a g e provisions B- 1
: Shift differential provisions * _______________________
B-2:
M i n i m u m entrance rates for w o m e n office w o r k e r s -------B-3: F r e q u e n c y of w a g e p a y m e n t _________________ ; _______________
_
B-4:
Scheduled w e e k l y hours *
B-5:
Pa i d holiday provisions * ___________________________________
B-6: Paid vacations * _____________________________________________

14
15
16
16
17
18

Job descriptions_________

21

* NOTE:
Similar tabulations (also covering health, insurance, a n d pension plans)
are available in the N e w Y o r k City ar e a reports for April 1951, J a n u a r y 1952,
F e b r u a r y 1953, a n d F e b r u a r y 1954.
T h e 1954 report also provides tabulations of
w a g e structure characteristics, l a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t a g r e e m e n t s , a n d o v e r t i m e p a y
provisions.
A directory indicating date of study a n d the price of the reports, as
well as reports for other m a j o r areas, is available u p o n request.
C u r r e n t reports on occupational earnings a n d s u pplementary w a g e practices in
the N e w Y o r k City area are also available for m a c h i n e r y industries (January 1955)
a n d for m e n ' s an d boys' dress shirts ( M a y 1954).
Un i o n scales,
indicative of
prevailing p a y levels, are available for the following trades or industries: Building
construction, printing, local transit operating e m p l o y e e s , a n d m o t o r t r u c k drivers.




(iii)




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY, NEW YORK, N. Y.

I n t r o d u c tio n

Estimates are presented, therefore, as relating to all establish­
ments in the industry grouping and area, but not to those below
the minimum size studied. 3

The New York City area is one of several important
industrial centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics has
conducted surveys of occupational earnings and related wage ben­
efits on an areawide basis. In each area, data are obtained by
personal visits of Bureau field agents to representative establish­
ments within 6 broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; trans­
portation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; w holesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and s e r v ice s . * M ajor industry groups excluded from
1
these studies are government institutions and the construction
and extractive industries. Establishments having fewer than a
p rescrib ed number of w orkers were also omitted since they fu r­
nish insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion. 2 W herever possible, separate tabulations are p ro ­
vided fo r the individual broad industry divisions.
These surveys are conducted on a sample basis because
of the unnecessary cost involved in surveying ail establishments,
and to ensure prom pt publication of results.
To obtain appro­
priate a ccu ra cy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large
than of sm all establishments is studied. In combining the data,
how ever, all establishments are given their appropriate weight.

* This report was prepared in the Bureau!s regional office
in New York, N. Y . , by F rederick W. M ueller .under the d ire c­
tion of Paul E. W arwick, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst.
1 Central offices are classified to the appropriate industry
division.
In ea rlier studies in New York City data for central
offices w ere presented separately, and were not included in the
individual industry division estim ates.
In the current study the
m ajority of central offices were classified in manufacturing; the
rem ainder w ere in retail trade, public utilities, and wholesale
trade.
Earnings estim ates for some occupations and for sup­
plem entary benefits in these divisions and “nonmanufacturing"
are, therefore, not entirely comparable with those in previous
studies of the New York City area.
The estimates for retail
trade, although exclusive of lim ited-price variety stores, include
central o ffice s of such stores. A special tabulation of office o c ­
cupational earnings in central offices appears on page 8 of this
bulletin.
2 See follow ing table for m inim um -size establishment co v ­
ered by study.




(i)

Occupations and Earnings
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of
job descriptions designed to take account of inter establishment
variation in duties within the same job (see Appendix for listing
of these descriptions). Earnings data are presented for the fo l­
lowing types of occupations: (a) Office clerica l; (b) professional
and technical; (c) maintenance and powerplant; and (d) custodial
and m aterial movement.
Data are shown for full-tim e w orkers, i. e. , those hired
to work a fu ll-tim e schedule for the given occupational cla s s ifi­
cation. Earnings data exclude premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. . Nonproduction bo­
nuses are also excluded, but co s t-o f-liv in g bonuses and incentive
earnings are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as for
office cle rica l occupations, reference is to the work schedules
(rounded to the nearest h alf-h ou r)for which straight-tim e salaries
are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have been
rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
Occupational employment estimates refer to the total in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed. Because of differences in occupational
structure among establishments, the estimates of occupational
employment obtained from the sample of establishments studied
serve only to indicate the relative importance of the jobs studied.
These differences in occupational structure do not m aterially
affect the accu racy of the earnings data.
Establishment P ractices and Supplementary
Wage Provisions
Information is also presented on selected establishment
practices and supplementary benefits as they relate to office and
plant w orkers.
The term , “ office w ork ers” , as used in this
bulletin includes all office cle rica l employees and excludes ad­
m inistrative, executive, professional, and technical personnel.
“ Plant w ork ers” include working forem en and all nonsupervisory
3
An exception is made in the tabulation of minimum en­
trance rates for women office w orkers which relates to provisions
in establishments actually studied.

2

w orkers (including leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice
functions. Adm inistrative, executive, professiona l, and technical
em ployees, and fo rce account construction em ployees who are
utilized as a separate work fo rce are excluded. Cafeteria w orkers
and routemen are excluded in manufacturing industries but are
included as plant w orkers in nonmanufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are lim ited to manufacturing in­
dustries.
This inform ation is presented both in term s of (a)
establishment p o lic y 1 and (b) effective provisions for w orkers
4
3
*
actually employed on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Tabulations relating to establishment p olicy are presented in
terms of total plant w orker employment; estimates in the second
tabulation relate only to those w orkers actually employed on the
specified shift.
Supplementary p ra ctices, other than minimum entrance
rates for women office w orkers, and shift differentials, are
treated statistically on the basis that these are provided to all

w orkers employed in offices or plant departments that observe
the practice in question. 5 Because of varying eligibility r e ­
*
quirements, the proportion actually receiving the sp ecific benefits
may be sm aller. M oreover, a practice was considered as ap­
plicable to all office or plant workers in an establishment if it
applied to a m ajority of such w ork ers.
Because of rounding,
sums of individual items in these tabulations do not n ecessa rily
equal totals.
The summary of vacation plans is lim ited to form al
arrangements, excluding inform al plans whereby time off with
pay is granted at the discretion of the em ployer or the super­
v isor. Separate estimates are provided according to em ployer
practice in computing vacation payments, such as time payments,
percent of annual earnings, or flat-sum amounts.
However, in
the tabulations of vacation allowances by years of se rv ice , pay­
ments not on a time basis were converted; fo r example, a payment
of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as the equivalent
of 1 w eek’ s pay.

4
An establishment was considered as having a p olicy if it
5
Scheduled weekly hours for office w orkers (first section
met either of the following conditions: (l) Operated late shifts
of table B -4) are presented in terms of the proportion of women
at the time of the survey, or (2) had form al provisions covering
office w orkers employed in offices with the indicated w eekly hours
late shifts.
for women w ork ers.

Establishments and Workers Within Scope of Survey and Number Studied in New York, N. Y ., 1 by Major Industry Division, March 1955

Industry division

All divisions4 ___

_

__ __

Manufacturing _
_ _
_ __
__ __
Nonmanufacturing
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public utilities5 ___________
Wholesale trade
Retail trade (except lim ited-price variety stores)____
_
Finance, insurance, and real estate___________________
Services7 _
__ .

Minimum size
e stablishment
in scope of
study 2

Workers in establishments

Number of establishments

Within scope of study

Within
scope of
study

Studied

4,387

539

1,338,500

-

1,338
3,049

175
364

425,800
912,700

101
51
101
51
51

174
954
350
678
893

43
78
58
78
107

192,700
133,600
183,900
223,000
179,500

.

101

Total3

Office

Studied
Plant

Total3

397,900

630,400

562,790

78,700
319,200

264,500
365,900

141,780
421,010

42,600
56,000
26,400
154,700
39,500

86,300
34,600
132,000
6 20,200
92,800

147,790
22,640
88,470
105,930
56,180

1 The New. York City Area (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties, N. Y .). The “workers within scope of study" estimates shown in this table pro­
vide a reasonably accurate description of the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey. The estimates are not intended, however, to serve as a basis of
comparison with other area employment indices to measure employment trends or levels since (l) planning of wage surveys requires the use of establishment data compiled
considerably in advance of the pay period studied, and (2) small establishments are excluded from the scope of the survey.
Includes all establishments with total employment at or above the minimum size limitation. All outlets (within the area) of companies in such industries as trade,
finance, auto repair service, and motion-picture theaters are considered as one establishment.
3 Includes executive, technical, professional, and other workers excluded from the separate office and plant categories.
4 In earlier studies central offices were treated as a separate division in this tablQ, and in the "A " and nB" tables. In the current study central offices are included in
the industry division corresponding to the establishments* normal industrial classification.
Also excludes taxicabs, and services incidental to water transportation included in earlier studies.
Estimate relates to real estate establishments only.
7 Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit membership organizations; and engi­
neering and architectural services.




3

A : Occupational Earnings
Table A-l: Office O ccupations
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings1 for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in New York, N. Y. , by industry division, March 1955)
Avbbagb
S ex, o ccu p ation , and industry d iv is io n 2

Num
ber
of
w
orkers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

$

$
&
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
W
eekly
W
eekly
3 5.0 0 3 7.5 0 4 0.0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0.0 0 5 2.5 0 5 5.0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5.0 0 $6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5.0 0 80.00 85.0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5.0 0 100.00
earnings Under and
houre
and
(Standard) (Standard) $
under
35.00
3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 45. 00 4 7.5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7.5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5.0 0 6 7.5 0 7 0.0 0 7 5.0 0 8 0.00 85.00 9 0.0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00 over

M en
C le r k s , a ccou n tin g, c la s s A --------------------M anufacturing — — - —
-----—
N onm anufacturing — — —
— — —
P u b lic u tilities * ___ ___ ______________
W h olesale t r a d e -------- ----------------------______
__ —
R eta il t r a d e 5
F inance * * _________ ______ __________
S e rv ice s --------------------------------------------

4 ,0 2 0
819
3,201
484
925
266
1,013
513

3 6.5
36.0
36.5
‘ 3 7.0
3 6 .0
3 9.5
35.5
3 6.5

4
79.5 0
80.50
79.0 0
85.00
82. 00
7 4 .5 0
7 6.50
7 7.0 0

C le r k s , a ccou n tin g, c la s s B ____ ______ __
M a n u fa ctu rin g ___________ -________ _____
N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g _______________ _______
P u b lic u tilities *
. . .
W h olesa le t r a d e ________ ___ ______ __
R eta il trade 5 ___________ ____________
F inance * * __:____________
S e r v ic e s . . . .
____
_______

2 ,4 7 4
545
1,929
169
373
168
1,006
213

3 6.0
3 6 .0
3 6.0
3 7.0
3 6.5
39.5
3 5.5
3 7.0

6 1.00
6 2.5 0
6 0.5 0
6 7.5 0
7 0.5 0
6 0.0 0
57.0 0
55.5 0

C le r k s , o r d e r __
___
_ _
M a n u fa ctu rin g __________________ _______
N onm anufacturing —-------- ------------- --- , ---W holesale trad e - - __

1.822
465
1,357
1,232

3 7.0
3 6.5
3 7.0
3 7 .0

C le r k s , p a y r o ll__________________ ___ ____ __
M anufacturing-----------------------------------------N onm anufacturing
. __
___
P u b lic u tilities * ----------__------------------W h olesale trade
. . . .
— -

705
248
457
. 136
153

O ffice b o y s — _
—
M anufacturing _
N onm anufacturing ___________—___ ___ __
P u b lic u tilities *
W h olesa le trade
__
R e ta il trad e 5 __ ___ __________________
F inance **
______
S e r v ic e s __
__ __
T abulating-m ach in e o p e r a t o r s ___________
M anufacturing _
_
__ _
N onm anufacturing
P u b lic u tilities *

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

3
3
_
_
_
_
3

35
35
3
11
16
5

54
54
11
6
_
19
18

30
30
3
13
1
3
10

87
87
1
26
1
59
-

269
56
213
23
85
28
55
22

158
21
137
19
26
4
74
14

224
49
175
7
38
9
67
54

224
33
191
15
82
4
64
26

485
160
325
18
35
65
116
91

595
123
472
65
111
74
149
73

423
79
344
73
106
32
76
57

510
97
413
91
98
9
159
56

298
91
207
40
46
20
67
34

_
_
-

_
-

14
.
14
.
.
14
-

5
_
5
1
_
4
-

30
1
29
2
_
1
23
3

135
25
110
3
2
4
73
28

107
27
80
_
4
1
62
13

247
70
177
5
12
14
117
29

105
24
81
14
4
32
31

300
50
250
10
24
38
147
31

256
55
201
9
37
4
125
26

411
60
351
17
49
56
215
14

115
18
97
24
6
46
21

171
60
111
10
29
6
60
6

67
21
46
4
12
16
14
-

160
55
105
29
24
16
30
6

175
41
134
12
81
2
38
1

89
12
77
11
60
6
-

38
17
21
11
6
_
4

38
4
34
1
33
_
-

388
237
41
69
196
319
16 3 99
126
127
8
46
43
n i
39
i
1
7
4
i !
4
|
6 i
.
6 i
_
- 1
_
_
-

7 4.0 0
7 0.0 0
7 5.5 0
76.0 0

_
_
-

-

.
-

_
-

_
_
-

20
20
20

21
.
21
21

75
32
43
40

98
5
93
93

125
33
92
92

178
34
144
127

49
34
15
14

113
22
91
83

86
12
74
74

251
105
146
129

236
113
123
93

161
51
no
77

161
8
153
151

21
9
12
-

171
48
1
4
167
47
45 « 167

37.5
3 7 .5
37.5
3 7 .0
3 7.0

72.0 0
7 5.5 0
7 0.5 0
75.00
70.00

_
.
.
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
.
_

4
2
2
_

9
6
3
_
-

45
.
5

18
9
9
2
-

27
13
14
2
5

29
10
19
10
1

26
5
21
1
17

65
40
25
20
-

40
11
29
4
19

100
9
91
31
31

142
52
90
33
38

49
31
18
7
-

30
8
22
4
6

32
16
16
14
-

23 ;
!
6
17 i
7
3

36
26

-

28
2
26
.
21

45

-

2
2
_
-

7,959
2 ,1 4 4
5,815
355
1,481
182
2 ,486
1,311

3 6.5
3 6.0
3 6.5
36.5
37.5
3 7.5
3 6.0
36.5

4 4 .0 0
4 5 .0 0
4 3 .5 0
4 7 .0 0
4 4 .0 0
4 2 .0 0
4 4 .0 0
4 1 .0 0

214
4
210
.
28
51
7 131

749
133
616
_
98
27
205
286

869
323
546
13
163
27
217
126

1961
470
1491
112
487
72
619
201

1088
211
877
68
98
10
557
144

1175
335
840
33
215
23
343
226

468
162
306
16
113
10
65
102

686
248
438
33
120
9
203
73

156
81
75
18
33
.
12
12

266
68
198
21
78
2
87
10

68
19
49
19
1
1
28
-

131
25
106
15
23
68
-

53
8
45
7
24
_
14
-

11
8
3
_
_
3
-

42
35
7

6
6
-

13
6
7

1
_
1

_
.
.
-

_
_
_
_
.
-

_
....
_
-

36.5
3 5.5
3 7 .0
3 8.5
3 7.0
37.5
3 6.5
3 6.0

6 8.0 0
7 0.0 0
6 8.00
7 7.5 0
7 7.0 0
6 2.5 0
64.0 0
7 4.0 0

5

14
14
_
_

____

2 .221
358
1,863
205
261
106
1,167
124

37
_
37
_
_
2
35
-

53
6
47
_
4
43
-

60
2
58
_
2
2
46
8

79
8
71
1
14
3
52
1

65
.
65
2
.
12
46
5

193
62
131
5
1
13
112
-

100
1
99
6
3
76
14

207
37
170
7
8
13
134
8

102
11
91
8
3
6
68
6

181
29
152
7
40
15
82
8

B ille r s , m achine (billin g m a c h i n e ) ______
M anufacturing . . .
_ __
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g______________________
W holesale t r a d e _______________ _____
F inance **
_
- —
-

1.703
526
1, 177
568
389

3 6.5
36.5
36.5
36.5
3 5.5

60.0 0
6 0.5 0
60.0 0
59.00
6 0 .0 0

2

62
20
42
19
18

48
12
36
1
14

200
16
184
113
55

84
17
67
16
39

270
105
165
55
70

169
78
91
34
21

345
117
228
180
37

88
27
61
29
11

166
58
108
59
47

W h o le s a l e tr a d e

R e ta il trade5- —
F inance ** — —
_
S e rv ice s
—

—

_
_
-

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

5

-

-

-

_

_

_

.

_

_

.
_

_

5

_
-'
_

_

14
-

8/
2
6
6

4

10
1
7

-

-

-

-

-•
7
-

-

-

_
7
-

1
-

2
2
.
.
“

118
5
113
18
6
8
77
4

291
66
225
19
20
20
153
13

215
64
151
22
19
2
98
10

249
26
223
54
79
2
72
16

141
17
124
53
44
_
23
4

55
15
40
2
9
_
29
-

25
1
24
1
7
1
2
13 8

31
2
29
16
1

103
48
55
46
5

63
18
45

4

6
2

20
3
17

22
_
22

3
_
3

31
8
23
_
9
_
14

W om en

2

-

-

_

_

-

"

~

”

10

2

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
*
Finance,
Digitized for* FRASER insurance, and real estate.



14
_
14

_

27

7
3

4

-

.

_

_

-

4

4

17

4

3

i ______
_

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y. , March 1955
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4

Table A-1: Office Occupations - Continued
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in New York, N. Y. , by industry division, March 1955)
Average

S e x , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s t r y d iv is io n 2

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly U n d e r
Weekly
3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 . 00 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) $
3 5 .0 0 u n d e r
3 7 . 5 0 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 5 0 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 50 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 . 0 0

s

i

$

7 0 .0 0

7 5 .0 0

7 5 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

$
t
$
9 0 . 0 0 9 5 . 0 0 1 0 0 .0 0
and
9 0 . 0 0 9 5 . 0 0 100. 0 0 o v e r

$
8 0 .0 0
8 5 .0 0

8 5 .0 0

1
i

W om en - C on tin u ed
B i l l e r 8 , m a c h in e (b o o k k e e p in g
m a c h in e ) .
M a n u fa c t u r in g _________
N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g .
R e t a il t r a d e 5
S e r v ic e s

1 ,4 7 8
369
1 ,1 0 9
317
134

3 6 .0
3 5 .5
3 6 .0
3 8 .0
3 6 .5

$
6 0 .0 0
5 8 .0 0
6 0 .5 0
5 6 .0 0
5 9 .5 0

_
_
_

.
_
.

_
_
_

-

“

-

25
10
15
10
5

32
15
17
12
5

40
15
25
17
1

90
57
33
27
-

111
45
66
49
8

114
26
88
52
28

127
33
94
22
1

1 68
27
141
7
24

18 4
35
149
71
9

81
2
79
6
21

206 |
35 !
171
22
4

69
13
56
6
25

193
24
169
10
3

6
4
2
2

"

”

5
4
1
1 i

1
1

-

“

-

_
-

' ”

-

13
9
4
1
3

-

!

B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s A _______ __ _______________ „
M a n u fa ctu rin g .
N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g .
W h o le s a le tra d e
R e t a il tr a d e 5 ----F in a n ce * * .
S e r v i c e s ______

2 ,0 8 4
377
1 ,7 0 7
265
154
1 ,0 9 7
100

3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
. 3 7 .0
3 8 .5
3 6 .0
3 8 .0

6 4 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
6 3 .0 0
6 9 .0 0
6 0 .0 0
6 1 .5 0
6 6 .5 0

B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s B ___ _________________________
M a n u fa ctu rin g .
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g __
W h o le s a le tra d e
R e t a il tr a d e 5
F in a n ce ** —
S e r v ic e s

6 .2 0 4
688
5 ,5 1 6
877
196
4 ,0 4 6
308

3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 8 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .5

5 5 .5 0
6 2 .0 0
5 4 .5 0
6 0 .0 0
5 6 .5 0
5 3 .0 0
6 1 .0 0

C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A .
M a n u fa c t u r in g -------------------N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g .
P u b lic u t ilit ie s * .
W h o le s a le tra d e
R e t a il t r a d e 5 ----F in a n ce * * ______
S e r v i c e s ----------- -

3 .0 5 7
776
2 ,2 8 1
1 83
594
320
564
620

3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5
3 8 .0
3 5 .5
3 6 .0

C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B .
M a n u fa ctu rin g —
N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g .
P u b lic u t ilit ie s * .
W h o le s a le tr a d e .
R e ta il tra d e 5 ____
F in a n ce * * _______
S e r v i c e s --------------

5 .9 6 6
1 ,1 8 3
4 ,7 8 3
420
910
1 ,1 3 0
1 ,4 9 0
833

C l e r k s , f i l e , c la s s A .
M a n u fa c t u r in g _____
N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g .
P u b lic u t ilit ie s * .
W h o le s a le tr a d e
F in a n ce * * ______
S e r v i c e s ________

2 .5 2 8
572
1 ,9 5 6
187
415
948
342

_

216
35
181

2
40
16

118
6
112
1
2
19
71
19

75
9
34
63

1 64
9
155
9
43
23
46
34

“

132

12 0

132
23

120

395
8
387

566
22
544
66
7
443

488
18
470
6
3
458

I

_

-

15 9
74
85
18
2
64
1

21
19
2

9
6
3

1

-

10
7
3

3

-

1

-

3

528
266
262
15
91
64
56
36

306
64
242
26
32
46
31
107

249
78
171
23
68
6
35
39

154
47
107
47
20
2
21
17

1 15
35
80
21
23

26
20
6

.

-

3

1
50

27
9

3

16

-

-

63
31
32

18
9
9
2
4
1
2

162
44
118
7
40
13
13
45

69

4
29

~

_

292
44
248
9
58
47
45
89

33

"

_

1

1 98
31
167
2
10
46
74
35

6
6

“

_

350
89
261
11
79
43
41
87

3

829
14 5
684
144
18
420
93

“

-

-

183
40
1 43
82
16
32
6

417
44
373
34
9
297
31

1
17

_

15 7
3
154

~

191
25
16 6
72
18
54
20

726
75
65 1
150
47
443
10

2

_

17

393
50
343
133
4
129
70

566
54
512
9
10
467
1

125

125
2
20
102
1

_

226
26
200
59
3
113
22

766
70
696
81
47
517
45

18
18

_

60
13

-

3
142
9

2
2

37
19
18
1

159
51
108
24
10
67
5

116
27
89
14

_
_
_
_
_

92
7
85
6

282
46
236
131
11
88
6

244
43
201
6
26
14 8
6

_
_
_
_
_

_

87
31
56
22
1
10

19 4
11
183
1
14
145
2

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

299
85
214
36
13
97
57

252
39
213
21
52
139
1

_
_
.
_
_
“

_
_
_
_
_

-

62

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
384
1

6 9 .5 0
7 2 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
7 6 .5 0
7 1 .5 0
6 6 . 00
6 6 .5 0
6 6 .5 0

_
.
_
_ .
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
24

3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 6 .0
3 8 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .5

5 5 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
5 4 .5 0
6 3 .5 0
5 6 .5 0
5 0 .0 0
5 3 .0 0
5 5 .5 0

_
.
_
_
_

55
2
53

122
3
11 9

28
1
20
4

14
78
24
3

337
24
313
1
42
170
64
36

295
42
253
6
35
60
131
21

513
10 0
413
3
69
123
160
58

483
49
434
13
28
1 46
138
1 09

823
135
688
20
86
209
270
103

452
145
307
13
18
85
10 3
88

713
1 98
515
56
114
63
153
129

379
39
340
38
99
36
95
72

580
163
417
48
126
80
124
39

255
43
212
20
45
17
80
50

308
95
213
32
95
25
33
28

139
30
1 09
29
9
29
28
14

313
49
264
12 5
52
4
41
42

111
22
89
14
38
1
21
15

8
1
2
21

3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5

5 9 .5 0
6 4 .0 0
5 8 .5 0
6 7 .0 0
6 0 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
5 9 .5 0

8

25

8

25

88
5
83

1 79
37
142

1 09
12
97
1

316
60
256
6
37
186
22

239
42
197
16
43
78
36

255
50
205
28
64
98
9

196
40
15 6
4
88
50
10

300
90
210
17
61
100
28

90
18
72
10
5
41
14

192
27
165
19
44
73
28

79
37
42
11
3
16
12

203
56
14 7
22
35
40
49

80
23
57
24
20
8
4

80
18
62
28
7
6
20

_

-

_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

10 9

-

_
_

8

"

9
111

_
_

12
13

_
_

56
25

_

_
_
_

_
102
40

_
_

.

63
20

_

69
11

_

_

-

-

— _____ i
S ee fo o tn o te s at e n d o f t a b le .

* Transportation (excluding-railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




8
8 -

18
15
3
3

6
5
1

-

-

!
1

1

"

2

_

- '

-

-

- i

1

_
-

j

7
5 !
2

6
4
2

-

1
1

-

1

71
4
67

-•

_
_
_
_

1

42
29
13
1
6
3 I
3 1

j

-

-

-

1

-

20
8
12

5
5

22
15
7

-

2
1
9

_
.
-

_________

_
.

7

5

Table A-l: Office Occupations - Continued
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 1 f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , b y in d u s t r y d iv is io n , M a r c h 1955)
Averagx
Sex,

o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s tr y d iv is io n *

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

s
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
t
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly
Weekly U n d e r 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 . 50 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 . 50 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 50 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 50 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 50 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 50 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 50 7 0 . 0 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 . 0 0
9 5 . 0 0 1 0 0 .0 0
earnings
hours
ana
(Standard) (Standard) $
and
under
3 5 . 0 0 3 7 . 50 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 . 50 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 50 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 50 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 50 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 50 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 50 7 0 . 0 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 00 9 0 . 0 0 9 5 . 00 1 0 0 .0 0
over

W o m e n - C o n tin u e d
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B _______________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ______________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _______________ _______
R e t a i l t r a d e 5 ___________________________
F i n a n c e * * _______________________________
S e r v i c e s ________________________________

9 .0 2 4
1 ,7 1 8
7 ,3 0 6
552
1 ,0 4 1
613
4 ,4 4 7
653

36. 5
3 6 .0
36. 5
3 7 .5
3 7 .0
37. 5
36. 5
36. 5

$
4 6 . 50
5 0 .0 0
4 5 . 50
5 2 . 50
4 9 .0 0
4 5 .0 0
4 3 . 50
4 6 .0 0

C l e r k s , o r d e r __________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________
R e t a i l t r a d e 5 ___________________________

2. 298
794
1, 504
1 ,0 4 7
401

3 7 .0
36. 0
37. 5
3 7 .0
38. 5

5 7 . 50
6 0 . 50
5 6 .0 0
5 6 . 50
5 4 .0 0

C l e r k s , p a y r o l l ________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______ _______________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ______________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________
R e t a i l t r a d e 5_____________________________
F i n a n c e * * _______________________________
S e r v i c e s ________________________________

2 .6 9 0
1 ,0 5 6
1 ,6 3 4
161
376
364
378
355

37. 0
37. 0
36. 5
36. 5
3 6 .0
3 8 .0
35. 5
36. 5

6 5 .0 0
6 5 .0 0
6 5 . 00
6 1 .0 0
6 8 . 50
6 1 . 50
6 7 .0 0
6 5 . 50

C o m p t o m e t e r o p e r a t o r s ___________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _ ---------------------------------------N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ______________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________
R e t a i l t r a d e 5 _________________________
F i n a n c e * * ______________________________
S e r v i c e s ________________________________

4 ,8 5 8
1 ,0 9 7
3 ,7 6 1
322
1 ,0 6 7
1 ,0 5 8
960
354

36. 5
36. 5
3 6 .0
3 7 .0
36. 5
35. 5
36. 5

6 0 .0 0
6 3 . 50
5 9 .0 0
6 4 . 50
6 0 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
5 9 .0 0
58. 00

D u p lic a tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
( m i m e o g r a p h o r d i t t o ) ____________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _____________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________

405
131
274

3 6 .0
36. 0
36. 0

K e y - p u n c h o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------M a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------------------------N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------------P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * _______________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ---------------------------------R e t a i l t r a d e 5 ---------------------------------------F i n a n c e * * _______________________________
S e r v i c e s -------------------------------------------------

4 ,6 8 3
705
3 ,9 7 8
444
442
342
2 ,4 9 0
260

O f f i c e g i r l s -------------------------------------------------------M a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------------------------N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------------P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ---------------------------------F i n a n c e * * ----------*
------------------------------------

1 .9 9 3
336
1 ,6 5 7
435
1 , 10 2

330
19
311
28
30
212
41

647
78
569
41
459
69

1499
170
1329
14
229
126
871
89

1328
231
1097
27
67
10 6
763
134

1592
399
1193
100
11 7
97
759
12 0

985
175
810
71
175
58
435
71

808
137
671
11 7
155
31
345
23

410
110
300
56
39
39
146.
20

340
67
273
52
68
34
81
38

253
78
17 5
38
80
9
32
16

11
-

-

-

8
2
6
6

13
-

-

-

13
2
3

11
6
5

17 5
22
15 3
92
60

200
2
198
130
68

293
94
199
141
58

177
26
151
116
30

469
204
265
209
56

17
1
16
-

42
17
25
7

96
51
45
24

40
2
38
18

128
30
98
8
32
32
7
19

318
318
28
287
3

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

2
2
-

-

-

-

2
-

-

-

5 1 . 50
5 2 . 50
5 1 .0 0

-

3

-

-

"

3

36. 5
36. 0
36. 5
38. 5
36. 5
37. 5
36. 5
3 6 .0

5 4 . 50
5 9 . 00
5 3 . 50
5 6 . 50
5 9 . 00
5 2 . 00
52. 00
5 7 .0 0

10
10

10
10
_
-

36. 0
3 5 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
36. 0

4 3 .0 0
4 4 . 50
4 3 . 00
4 3 . 50
4 2 . 50

-

1
-

71
41
30
12
18

314
167
14 7
17
47
15
20
48

164
51
113
4
21
27
43
18

345
161
184
5
31
42
69
37

162
114
48
32
11

31
31
22
9

161
48
113
3
7
57
14
32

18 6
97
89
13
11
22
15
28

2
2
10

13
10
3
_
-

4

3

4
3
1
1
_
_
_

3
3
_
_
_
_

2
2
_
_
_
_

3
3
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

• 12 6
44
82
65
17

97
43
54
29
-

7
1
6
2
4

7
7
-

1
1

16
16

6
6

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

16 9
65
104
3
41
17
7
36

258
97
161
8
10
45
23
75

346
106
240
32
10 3
4
82
19

17 4
6l
113
4
20
31
38
20

74
34
40
4
19
11
6

22
9
13
_

8
2
6
_

8
2
2

3
-

24
17
7
l
2
4

1

3

-

6

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

17
4

12
7
1

5
5
-

26
4
22
-

64
1
63
-

4
1
-

21
1

39
.2 4

499
50
449
11
117
141
102
78

454
60
394
7
146
n o
82
49

571
113
458
27
17 0
11 6
129
16

372
78
294
42
89
101
42
20

654
13 9
515
42
107
119
168
79

409
140
269
50
68
53
84
14

466
123
343
31
158
50
72
32

297
1 43
154
37
66
18
25
8

366
110
256
19
63
53
1 00
21

185
53
132
30
26
36
29
11

43
18
25
3
8
13
1

3
3
-

1
1
-

*

16 9
22
147
6
14
57
66
4

61
24
37
10
8
19
-

-

205
19
186
7
24
99
34
22

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

30
4
26

38
4
34

107
52
55

37
10
27

23
7
16

59
11
48

20
8
12

8
3
5

17
8
9

6
2
4

23
19
4

6
3
3

4
4

17
-

-

-

-

_
-

_
_

-

-

-

-

41
2
39
_
-

298
12
286
25
2
28
230
1

453
35
418
81
30
293
14

417
28
389
42
10
24
29 1
22

600
n o
490
8
17
42
392
31

480
56
424
48
25
40
253
58

533
94
439
56
34
54
27 9
16

429
76
353
13
58
26
232
24

354
72
282
28
84
21
11 3
36

235
23
212
41
34
19
101
17

19 9
78
121
19
48
6
39
9

112
24
88
18
19
2
41
8

1 50
56
94
33
28
3
15
15

76
20
56
16
9

18
9
9
1
7

4
2
2
_

2
_

28
3

366
20
346
15 3
18 5

414
94
320
120
188

108
28
80
5
49

73
36
37
1
13

21
15
6
1
3

1
1

3
2
1

3
3

3
3

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

“

-

~

■

-

72
20
52

92
26
66

-

-

14 6
21
1 25
1
114

667
67
600
154
416

S ee f o o tn o te s at en d o f t a b le .

* T ran sp or
 t a t io n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) ,
* * F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .


331
130
20 1
165
24

35
28
7
3
_
-

3
3

55
27
28
11
6
1
5
5

8
10

-

59

97
41
56
24
32

84
42
42
6
30
-

-

1
-

12
27

52

46
20
26
12
_

13
2
1

1
-

10

10
-

90
55
35
12
6
2
10
5

121
40
81
10
21
19
24
7

239
1
238
11
63
34
127
3

-

179
61
118
32
41
9
30
6

.

c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilit ie s

-

1

23

-

-

1

23

-

-

-

1

22

”

_

17

-

23
7
16
4
2
1
6
3

-

6
_

2

2

3
j
!
i

3

i

3
-

_
_
_

_

_

-

-

-

_

1

-

2

_

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

Table A-l: Office Occupations - Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and e a rn in g s 1 fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area b asis
in Mew Y ork , N. Y. , by industry d ivisio n , M arch 1955)
NUMBER OF W ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E WEEKLY EARNING S 0 F -

s
[s
1
$
$
|
s
$
:$
|
$
!$
Is
$
$
U n d er 35. 00 137. 50 140 . 00 j 4 2 . 50 4 5 . 00 4 7 .5 0 1 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 1 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 1 6 7 .5 0 70. 00 175. 00 180. 00 8 5 .0 0 9 0 . 00 9 5 .0 0 100 .00
$
. and
and
-ic n n : u n d e r
,
i
67. 50 I7 0 . 00 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 '8 5 .0 0 QO. 00 95 . no
5 0 .0 0 I52. 50 155. 00 157. 50 6 0 . 00 62 . 50
^ * U 3 7 .5 0 40 . 00 !4 2 . 50 145 -00
U
j$

S e x , o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s tr y d iv is io n 2

Weekly | Weekly
hours
| earnings
(Standard) j (Standard)

!$

$

j$

$

$

W om en - C on tin u ed

$
2 8 ,9 2 1

36. 0
35. 5

__—

8 ,2 5 6
2 0,6 6 5
1 ,71 5
5 ,331
1,26 0

F in a n ce * * ----------S e r v ic e s _________

6 ,32 5
6 ,0 3 4

36. 0
36. 0

1 8.140
5,27 1

3 6 .0
35. 5
36. 5
36. 5
36. 5
37. 0
36. 0
36. 0

M a n u fa c t u r in g ______
N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g ---P u b lic u t ilit ie s *
W h olesa le tra d e .
R e ta il txade®

S ten ograp h ers, gen eral
M an u factu rin g .
N o n m a r .u fa c tu r in g -----P u b lic u t ilit ie s * __
W h o le s a le tra d e __
R e ta il tra d e 5 _____
F in a n ce * * _________
S e r v i c e s -----------------'.b io g r a p h e r s , te c h n ic a l
.M a n u fa c tu rin g _________
N n n m a rm fa ctu rin g _____
P u b lic u t ilit ie s * ----F in an ce * * ----------------

S w itch b oa rd o p e r a t o r s ------------M a n u fa c t u r in g ______________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g --------------P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ____
W h olesa le tra d e ------R eta il tra d e 5 _______—
F in a n ce * * -----------------S e r v i c e s _______ ______

1 2 ,8 6 9
1 ,387
3 ,2 4 1
670
5 ,7 5 5
1 ,8 1 6
1 .0 4 0
358
682
115
227

6 .0 5 4
815
5 ,2 3 9
489
1 ,0 0 9
612
1 ,6 2 3
1 ,5 0 6

36.
37.
36.
37.

35.
35.
35.
37.
3t

0
0
5
5

5
5
5
5
0

37. 0
3 5.5
37. 5
38. 0
37. 0
39. 0
36. 5
38. 0

74. 00
7 7 . 50

|7 3. 00
1 8 0.5 0
7 5 . 00
! 6 9 .0 0
I 7 2 .5 0
! 7 0 .0 0
i
|5 9 .5 0
| 6 3..00
I 5 8 .5 0
15 8 .5 0
i 6 1 .5 0
j 5 6 .5 0
5 6 . 50
5 8 . 50
6 9 .5 0
7 0; 00
6 9 .0 0
7 3. 00
6 6 .5 0

5 9 . 00
6 4 .0 0
5 8 . 00
6 1 .0 0
6 2. 00
5 5. 50
5 8 . 50
5 5.0 0

_ i
|

-!
>!

_ |
_ :
- i

—
- 1
1
;

71

-!
-

i

i
j

_

|

_ j

-

;
!

43

-

|

- 1
_'
_ i

-

!
j

j
1

_

99

164
190 :
8

_j
!
!
5^
!
2 1
669

i

21

261
26
235

2

6

14

1 69
500
29
28
45
344
54

-

97
23

-

3541

7

7 ;,

5

136

43

-

!

106
7;

1
j

-

!

_ 1
-!
_

5

'

4311 .157

-

:

1

"I

-

_ i

_

I

6

2
214
13

!
- i
9 !
20
70
948
147
801
40

|
j

'!

64
34
569
94

5^
33
53 !
|
911

353 I 1141!
306 ;
8 35 i

39
314
16
7
50
90
151

1895 | 1574
i
435 | 313
1460
1261
190
226
1 95
116
77
121
7 9 0 :: 627
164 I 215

!

43 1
67 ;
55
210 !
460 I

925

249 0; 1437 ; 3095 1725
582
317 i
326
722!
1908 i 1120 ! 2373
1399
123
78j
72 i
148:
354
32 1 4 4 9 1
188 ;
595

120
805
19
70
228
456

1 2239
!
438
| 1801
215

1549
520

442

61
415
130

i
!
:

303

126 I

i
j
i

!

1029

120

683
33 5

134
534
7 13 |

65
342
453

: 2 5 3 8 ! 1499
1
j
7 6 5 | 394
1 1 7 7 3 !1 1 0 5
192i
105

!
;

459
519
57 !
44
740 i 338
325
|
99

|

1 71 !

1

872:

4 4 6 2 ! 4447 j 30031 1835
936 ! 602
1219 | 1351 :
1233
3243! 3096 ■ 2067
144
2 5 0 1 257
140
840 i 397
836: 1075 ;

100
442
380

163i
11711
823|

170
859
735

741
! 1606!
I
5361
302
1070 1 439
77 |
57
560 i 124
5
39 !
255 ; 183
!
70
139
:

1430:
607;
823;
841
285|
47 |
314
93

568 j
338 j
230 :
32 1
77 j
8|
88 1

567 j

1
|

25

!

91
46
45
13
18

i
!
!
i
|
!
j

113
604 i
370 i

66
356

270

! 1158
408:
:
| 750
123
:
• 181!
!
:

225

86 ;

121

61
25

!
i

4
14
4

!

104

6
23

2
45
28

1

745

1625

363

T s T

382
43

22!
237 1
1 87

9

109

,

15
125
90

1

64
35

20
20

29

-

2•
18 ;

839
251
196
19
180
193
28
23
5
-

-

- ;
3:

-

2

6

-

-

6
6
-

2
2
-

1

-

-

22
5
17
1
- j

2
2
-

3
3
_

-

13 !
3 ;

i
|

-

-

-

“

3

1

168
26
142
52
13

48
15
33
-

!

24

,

23

31
17
14
-

52
22
30
-

-

17
-

3

i
..

1

_

j

-

-

j

4
-

2
_

|
|

-

-

28
_

38
.

28
>
-

38
-

-

_
_

12
-

35
3

-

-

16

-

_
_
_

3
_
3

4

2

3

2
.

-

68
3
65
3
-

151
24
127
20
14
31
31
31

20
31
11

!
!
1
i
:

623
30
593
13
3
26
126
425

85:
46 i

1
;
j
i
:
1

3 ;
1 1
-:

15
3
12
7

1 |
!

4

4

5

i
|

872i
492
1
23
52 !
820;
469
53
20
96|1
47
136 j
i
32
2 0 6 i 185

:
!
;
1
!
i
1

362 |

39 1
5 |

152

21 |
1

89
11
78
13

j
:

13

76 5 ! 4 0 2
74
721
693 : 3 28
41
82:
75
167;
41
106:
2 15 | 13 5
36
123

'
1
'
!
;
'

166
68
98
7

!
,

!

43
4

;
:

15

|

! -34 7
!
47
1 300
!
33
1 10 1

|
.
|
i
;

616 j
94!
522 !
72 1
178 j

!

1
i
j

24!
196;
52 |

1
i
22 •

602
1 09
493
68
83
40
214
88

87
11
7 6 :
3 |

68
25

;

24
98
44

51 1

85
42
43
2
23

275
56
219
12
69
5
55
78

93
31 i
6 2ii
91j
28!!
i
:
450 1
108 !
342
28 ;
12 1 i
76
1
71 !
46

215 !
74T
141
43
38
4
38
18

1
1
!

- !

i

6

I4 1

!

i

7

7

1

-

-

j
S w itch b o a rd o p e r a t o r s - r e c e p t i o n is t s
M a n u fa c t u r in g ______________________
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g _________________
P u b lic u tilit ie s * _________________
W h oles a le tra d e ________________
R eta il tra d e 5 ___________________
F in a n ce * * _______________________
S e r v ic e s _________________________

2 .5 0 8

T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s — ___
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g _________________
F in a n ce * * _______________________

1 .0 2 5

899
1 ,6 0 9
15 1
541
14 5
290
482

37. 5
37. 5
37. 0
37. 0
36. 5
3 8 .0
37. 0
37. 5

5 6 . 50
5 7. 00
5 6 . 50
63. 00
5 6.5 0
54. 00
5 4. 00
5 6 . 00

36. 5
36. 5
3 6 . 5-

6 2.5 0
6 1.5 0

_

_
_
-

|6 0 . 5 0

48

2

_

48

_

-

4
4

29
13
14

-

16 1

442
149 1
293
1 i
94
15
62
121

42
119
2
45
15
24
33

169
39
130
7
33
14
63
13
1 05
105
68

!

l

_

-:

-

9

2
2
2

-

44
2

24
24

2

-

138
81
57
1

55

_

-j

j
-

|

55
-

_

i1

-

!
929
638

2
_

_

"

35
35
33

2

39
39

i

134:
134

37

1

87

Fin an ce * * ______ __________________

2 ,4 5 2
518
1 ,9 3 4
579
1 ,0 4 9

3 6.0
36. 0
36. 0
36. 5
35. 5

5 9 . 00
6 0 . 50
i 5 8. 50
16 0 .0 0
i 5 7.0 0
i
i

_ •

_

1
211
2 i

52

_
_

_:

_
_

19!!
_ i

52
_

16

43

i
i

!
*i!

:

See fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le .

* Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), com m unication, and other public u tilities.
** F inance, in su ra n ce, and rea l estate.




-

j
!
!

19
93

166
23
143
_

,

64

130

:

112

1

!

324 !
54!1
270 !
134107

!
1

!
;
1
j

140
28
112
34
62

j

140
56
84
7

1
|
,

1 26 1
2 0 !
5 !

24
14

i

;
i
-

36

!

33
33

i
■

209 j
265 ;
16 J

9 8

1

117;
112!

i

j

3 j

8 21

I

1
T r a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
g e n e r a l _______________________________
M a n u fa c t u r in g ____________________ _
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g _________________
W h o le s a le t r a d e _______________

474 :

!
1

i
1

!

19!

211
36
2 0 6 ; 175
48
52 ■
106
115;
269]
63*

]
1

282
111
1
171 i
66
50 ,
6 j
43 i
6 1

|

117
112
10 1

i
|
!

63
7
56
7
23
15

j
1
;
:
:

3 i
8 |
51
44

!
!

32

!
i
;

i
4 2 3 1 - 3 -13
108
35
315
178
1 35
42
1 37
119

j
I
!
!

j

-------------- L

i
235 i
79 ,
156 ;
3
38
15
20 !
80
87
74
45 ,

96
52
44

84

1

102
26
76
23
28

-

-

9
34

10
15

60
44
15

81
57 ;
22 |

-

31
53
18
35
_

;

-

j
1

|
i
j

;
59 ;
66

!

-

17 i

I

-

17

1
- ■
- •
1

42
31
13

i
!

I
;
;

- j

_ !

!

-

1
1

-!!
!

-

i
i

_ !
:

" ;
34
26
11

!

8
8

163 *
30
133
47
56 i

122
49
73
15
30

137
46 i
—
91 i
38 |
39

53
r r r
39
17

1
!

!

1 0 1

1

1

18
8
10 1
3
6 1

|

-

i

j

-

1

:

8 ;

^ !

4

6

i

i

51

-

-

j

4
4

1

6

20
3
17
14

3
_

2
_

3
_

3
-

2
-

3
-

2

2

2

3

Table A-1: Office Occupations - Continued
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 1 f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n , M a r c h 1955)
Average
Sex,

o c c u p a t io n ,

and in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n 2

N u m ber

of

w orkers

W e e k ly
h ou rs
(S t a n d a r d )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S ta n da rd )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
;
U nder 35. 00 37. 50 4 0 .0 0 4 2 . 50 4 5 .0 0 47. 50 5 0 . 0 0 |52. 50 5 5 .0 0 57. 50
and
$
u n d er
35. 00 37. 50 4 0 .0 0 4 2 . 50 4 5 .0 0 47. 50 5 0 .0 0 52. 50 55. 00 57. 50 6 0 .0 0

S T R A IG H T -T IM E

W EEKLY

E A R N I N G S OF-

$
I
$
is
<
$
i$
$
$
■
!s
6 0 .0 0 62. 50 6 5 .0 0 I6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 57 5 .0 0 ] 80. 00 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 $ 95.00|$
100. 00
and
62. 50 6 5 .0 0 67. 50 17 0 .0 0 75. 00 8 0 .0 0 ! 85. 00 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00 o v e r
i
I

i

W o m e n - C o n tin u e d

T y p is t s , c l a s s A ___________________________
M a n u f a c t u r in g ____________ 1_____________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ______________________
P u b lic u t ilit ie s * ------------------------------W h o le s a le t r a d e ____________________
R e t a il t r a d e 5 ________________________
F in a n c e * * _
_ __
_
S e r v i c e s _____________________________

7. 882
1 ,7 4 3
6 ,1 3 9
742
882
183
3 ,3 2 2
1 ,0 1 0

3 6 .0
36. 0
3 6 .0
36. 0
37. 0
37. 0
3 6 .0
36. 0

$
57. 50
6o. 00
5 7 .0 0
56. 50
63. 00
56. 50
5 4 .0 0
61. 50

T y p is t s , c l a s s B
_
M a n u fa c tu r in g _
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g
P u b lic u t ilit ie s * ____________________
W h o le s a le t r a d e ____________________
R e t a il t r a d e 5 __ _____________________
F in a n c e * * ____________________________
S e r v i c e s _____________________________

1 3 ,6 2 5
2 ,3 3 4
11,291
710
1 ,9 8 2
627
6 ,9 0 0
1 ,0 7 2

36. 5
3 6 .0
36. 5
3 7 .5
36. 5
3 7 .0
3 6 .0
36. 5

50. 50
54. 00
49. 50
54. 00
54. 50
4 8 .0 0
47. 50
51. 50

.
36
-

36
-

-

12
12
12
-

57
17
40
5
-

79
4
75
-

185
23
162
1

-

-

12
24

8
67

-

22
130
9

-

-

24
11

65
2

634
128
506
190
25
12
276
3

1040
71
969
3
20
81
829
36

1502
131
1371
37
17
66
1223
28

2372
314
2058
112
230
117
1462
137

112
5
107
40
-

635
78
557
80
35
5
405
32

1233
198
1035
79
38
36
761
121

1634
75
1559
62
156
82
1081
178

2198
461
1737
159
343
125
890
220

826
89
737
63
43
29.
515
87
1223
268
955
82
229
21
424
199

912
202
710
44
98
32
348
188

691
183
508
41
56
8
306
97

760
255
505
19
168
23
172
123

432
109
323
21
53
20
182
47

605
180
425
16
154
11
156
88

1 235
i 91
| 144
!
1 28
I 55
|
2
32
27

1490
377
1113
99
385
59
394
176

502
89
413
30
195
8
159
21

574
197
377
28
220
9
105
15

208
71
137
13
80
1
29
14

218
70
148
10
49
8
72
9

126
87
39
16
8
3
9
3

260
89
171
10
76
5
50
30

123
26
97
9
15

• 153
47
106
42
38
3
1
22 |

31
17
14
13

6
67

l
-

1
_
l ______
1

185
29
156
95
12
_ j
3 !
46
27
26
1
1
_
-

86
29
57
34

55
11
44
_
20
_

I
j

2

3
20

3 !
21

3
-

24
4
20
2
12
_
1
5

1
1
_
_
1
-

1
9
------ 4
!
5

i 20
i 20
_
_
1
.
-

2
i
!

_
_

2
_
_
-

,
j
!
j

H o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e ir s t r a ig h t - t im e s a l a r ie s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
D ata f o r c e n t r a l o f f i c e s w h ic h w e r e p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly in e a r l i e r s tu d ie s a r e in c lu d e d in the a p p r o p r ia t e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n . F o r p u r p o s e s o f c o m p a r is o n w ith e a r l i e r s tu d ie s s e p a r a te data f o r c e n tr a l
o f f i c e s a r e p r e s e n t e d in the f o llo w in g t a b le . T he e f fe c t o f in clu d in g c e n t r a l o f f i c e s on a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s w a s the g r e a t e s t in m a n u fa c tu r in g e s t im a t e s .
T h o s e e s t im a t e s w e r e in c r e a s e d an a v e r a g e o f $ 1 .
S e e a l s o fo o tn o te 1 p a g e 1.
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o ll o w s : 46 at $ 1 0 0 to $ 1 0 5 ;
17 at $ 1 0 5 to $ 1 1 0 ;
24 at $ 1 1 0 to $ 1 1 5 ; 12 a t $ 1 1 5 to $ 1 2 0 .
4 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o ll o w s : 34 at $ 1 0 0 to $ 1 0 5 ;
58 at $ 1 0 5 to $ 1 1 0 ;
33 at $ 1 1 0 to $ 1 2 0 ; 2 at $ 1 2 0 and o v e r .
5 E x c lu d e s l i m i t e d - p r i c e v a r i e t y s t o r e s .
8 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o l l o w s : 16 at $ 1 0 0 to $ 1 1 0 ;
91 at $ 1 1 0 to $ 1 2 0 ;
30 at $ 1 2 0 to $ 1 3 0 ; 30 at $ 1 3 0 and o v e r .
7 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o ll o w s : 84 at $ 3 0 to $ 3 2 . 50; 47 at $ 3 2 . 50 to $ 3 5 . 9
6
8 A l l w o r k e r s w e r e at $ 1 0 0 to $ 1 0 5 .
9 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o l l o w s : 96 at $ 1 0 0 to $ 1 0 5 ; 60 at $ 105 to $ 110; 28 at $ 1 1 0 to $ 1 1 5 ; 26 at $ 1 1 5 to $ 1 2 0 ; 41 at $ 1 2 0 and o v e r .
* T r a n s p o r t a t io n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
* * F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




Table A-2a: Central Offices
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in New York, N. Y. , March 1955)
N U M B E R O P W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E

W EEKLY

E A R N IN G S O F —

1

Number
of
workers

O ccu p a tion a n d s e x

$
|
$
$
$
l
$
$
Weekly 3 0 .0 0 1 2 .5 0 § 5 .0 0 ^ 7 .5 0 l o . 00 I 2 . 50 I 5 . 00 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 52 . 50 55. 00 57. 50 l o . o o 6 2 .5 0 ! 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 . 00 7 2 .5 0 7 5 . 00 1 0 . 0 0 1 5 . 0 0 tao. oc
Weekly
earnings
hours
and
j and
(Standard) u n d e r
(Standard)
3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 . 00 4 2 . 50 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 55. 00 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 , o v e r
j

M en

C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A ----- — — —
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t in g , c la s s B ______________
O ffic e b o y s __ __ — _____
__
__ _____
T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ___________

535
220
989
280

35. 0
3 5 .5
3 5 .5
3 6 .0

$
7 7 .0 0
6 4 . 00
4 5 .5 0
6 7 .5 0

3
-

20
“

62
-

253
“

176
-

2
185
2

4
80
1

291
299
440
338
947
185
998
578
244
4 ,2 2 4
3 ,5 9 3
311
428

3 5 .5
3 5 .0
35. 5
3 5 .5
3 5 .5
35. 5
3 5 .5
3 6 .5
3 5 .0
3 5 .5
3 5 .5
3 5 .0
35. 5

6 3 .0 0
7 2 .5 0
6 0 .0 0
6 6 .5 0
5 2 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
6 2 . 00
5 8 .0 0
4 4 .5 0
8 2 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
6 2 .5 0

.
2
.
_

_
_
_
4
.
_
„

.
35
9
12
_

1
63
1
4
28
88
4
2

_
2
_
92
_
4
28
59
.
17
_
2

5
12
4
201
1
36
19
33
6
81
14

3 5 .5
3 5 .5
3 5 .5

6 2 .0 0
6 2 .0 0
5 4 .5 0

-

-

_
2

_
27

1
69

6
35
164

22
74
10

6
13
53
6

13
20
38
53

11
16
8
4

56
30
22
43

35
13
2
13

36
41
5
26

40
5
4
18

6
22
10
119
_
27
16
21
8
105
.
12

27
51
19
87
6
73
77
19
9
218
3
22

13
2
39
42
49
1
71
54
6
7
278
3
17

31
7
71
34
32
18
102
43
.
52
264
46
42

27
8
43
24
44
17
88
50
.
35
380
9
60

46
44
77
28
58
7
160
55
_
144
558
51
56

22
32
19
14
53
18
91
33
2
92
301
22
32

24
28
36
15
13
11
109
68

21
26
68

21
61
145

25
74
87

28
87
105

26
128
36

78
171
114

43
46
37

88
27
_
36

47
9
4
26

253
358
5
39

29
30
9
27
27
24
48
38
2
149
205
20
42

30
46
17
42
23
12
93
39
.
643
348
32
34

42
91
16

32
61
36

31
56
32

20

42
14
_
7

23
40
13
24
28
21
39
13
_
793
260
49
37

6
14
19
11
8
16
31
5
_
525
108
25
13

24
5
24
3
22
22
3
_
373
61
15
3

_
17
_
6
3
1
_
_

16
20
11

8
21
9

3
23
4

i
i
7 j
1
_
1

63
2
_
6

52
1

39
_
8

W om en

B o o k k e e p in g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s B __ __ __ __ __ „
. __ _____
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A ______________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B ______________
C l e r k s , f il e , c la s s A _ __ __ __ __ _____
C l e r k s , f i l e , c la s s B _ __ _____
_______
C l e r k s , p a y r o l l _____________________________
C o m p to m e te r o p e r a t o r s
— _ __ __ __
K e y -p u n c h o p e r a t o r s „ __ __ __ __ __ __
O ffic e g i r ls __
__ ________ __ __ __
S e c r e t a r ie s
__
__
„ ___________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l __
_ „ _____
S te n o g r a p h e r s , t e c h n i c a l --------------------------__ ____ _______
S w itch b o a rd o p e r a t o r s __
T r a n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
g e n e r a l _____________________________ ________
T y p is t s , c la s s A ------------------------------------------T y p is ts , c la s s B ---------------------------------------------

i

381
917
964

_
2
4
3
_
4
5 i
9
2 !
3
_ j
9
_
!
i
231 2553
20
15
6
2
_

351
12
23
1
_ j
9 1
;

4

_
4

2

i

_______

1 H ou rs r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t - t im e s a l a r ie s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
2 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o ll o w s : 309 at $ 1 0 0 to $ 1 1 0 ; 155 at $ 1 1 0 to $ 1 2 0 ; 53 at $ 1 2 0 to $ 1 3 0 ; 36 at $ 1 3 0 and o v e r .




O c c u p a t io n a l W age S u r v e y , N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , M a r c h 1955
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u re a u o f L a b o r S t a t is tic s

NOTE:

T h is ta b le i s p r e s e n t e d f o r c o m p a r is o n w ith e a r l i e r s tu d ie s an d t o e n a b le the r e a d e r to e s tim a te the e f f e c t o f the p o l i c y in t r o d u c e d in
th is y e a r fs stu d y o f in c lu d in g c e n t r a l o f f i c e s in t h e ir a p p r o p r ia t e in d u s t r y g r o u p . See a l s o fo o tn o te 1, p a g e 1, an d f o o tn o te 2 , t a b le
A -l.
T h e data a r e n o t e x a c t ly c o m p a r a b le to p r e v io u s s tu d ie s in that c e n t r a l o f f i c e s in m a n u fa c tu r in g , p u b lic u t ilit ie s , a n d r e t a il
t r a d e e m p lo y in g b e tw e e n 51 and 100 w o r k e r s , in c lu d e d in the e a r l i e r s t u d ie s , w e r e e x c lu d e d f r o m the p r e s e n t stu d y.

9

Table A-2: Professional and Technical Occupations
( A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s an d e a r n in g s 1 f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d o n an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , b y in d u s t r y d iv is io n , M a r c h 1955)
Average
Sex,

o c c u p a tio n ,

a n d in d u s tr y d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OP WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Weekly
Weekly U n d e r 5 0 . 0 0 5 5 . 0 0
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) $
5 0 .0 0 u n d e r
5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0

$
$
s
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
t
* 9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 . 0C 1 1 0 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 2 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 4 0 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 6 0 .0 0 1 7 0 .0 0

l o . 00

6 5 .0 0

7 0 .0 0

7 5 .0 0

1 0 .0 0

85. 00

9 0 .0 0

6 5 .0 0

7 0 .0 0

7 5 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

8 5 .0 0

9 0 .0 0

9 5 . 0 0 1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 2 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 4 0 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 6 0 .0 0 1 7 0 .0 0

and
over

M en

534
210

3 9 .0
38. 5

$
1 4 4 .5 0
1 4 1 .0 0

____________
D r a f t s m e n , s e n i o r ______ __
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _ __ _____ _____ ________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________ ________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * __ ____________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _______________________
R e t a i l t r a d e 2 _____ _________ _
_ —
S e r v i c e s __________________________________

2 .6 7 8
1, 148
1 , 530
89
93
79
1 ,2 5 3

3 8 .0
37. 5
38. 5
3 6 .0
37. 5
3 6 .0
3 9 .0

1 0 5 .5 0
1 0 0 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0
116.5 0
1 0 3 . 50
1 0 2 . 50
1 0 9 .5 0

________
_______
D r a f t s m e n , j u n i o r ____
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________ _________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * _______________________
S e r v ic e s _
_
_
_
_______

1 .1 2 7
*678
449
87
292

38. 5
38. 5
38. 5
36. 5
3 9 .5

7 1 .5 0
7 2 . 50
6 9 .0 0
6 7 . 50
6 9 .0 0

9
6
. 3
2

1 13

3 9 .5

6 0 .5 0

10

647
237
410
84
53
79
151

37. 5
3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
35. 5
38. 5
3 6 .0

7 8 . 00
8 0 .0 0
7 6 . 50
7 8 . 50
7 9 . 50
7 2 .0 0
7 6 . 50

-

D r a f t s m e n , l e a d e r ______
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ____ „

T r a c e r s ___

_

_____________ __
___________________

__________

__

.

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

1
1

6
5

10
5

5
2

_

_

-

-

3
2
1
-

-

1

43
34
9
8

67
48
19
1
6
10

120
65
55
9
10
-

-

23
14
9
1
8

35

169
107
62
3
3
5
50

300
163
137
3
10
11
113

147
89
58
8
9
37

359
162
197
5
10
13
168

360
151
209
15
16
11
163

278
103
175
9
15
10
139

43
26
17
6
6'

148
89
59
23
30

199
90
109
25
78

125
89
36
4
29

135
57
78
12
60

12 3
93
30
2
12

121
65
56
2
34

123
85
38
2
30

50
37
13
6
6

25
15
10
5
5

16
16
-

10
10
-

_

-

-

12

31

12

19

27

2

_

_

„

_

_

13
13
3
-

16
6
10
8
-

51
25
26
6
-

35
16
19
10
-

14
6
8
-

11
5
6
-

11

122
34
88
23
28
12
21

64
25
39
14

2

11 6
29
87
6
1
20
57

131
56
75
11
15

4

51
l6
35
1
6
12
15

2
7

1
1

2

_
-

-

_
-

-

14
6
228
84
144
12
21
4
107 •
_
-

19
16

58
23

58
38

95
42

14 0
48

109
21

18
3

247
33
214
-

101
34
67
11
-

15 7
48
109
_

53
9
44
5
.

2
54

2
107

4
35

6
1
5
5
_

_

2
212

17
1
16
10
_
6

-

|

_

_

;

-

.
-

_

-

-

1

-

-

_
!
;
_

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

6
4
2
-

.

W om en

N u r s e s , i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g i s t e r e d ) ____________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g _________________________
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * _________________ ____
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e _____ ________________
R e t a i l t r a d e 2 ________________________ _
F i n a n c e * * ________________________________

7

8
29

3
5
9

17
15
2
2
-

3

-•

.

.

.

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

!
j

2
j

1
2
*
**

H o u r s r e f l e c t th e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e th e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t - t im e s a l a r ie s and th e e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d t o t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
E x c lu d e s l i m i t e d - p r i c e v a r i e t y s t o r e s .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




O c c u p a tio n a l W a g e S u r v e y , N ew Y o r k , N. Y . , M a r c h 1955
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s

10

Table A-3: Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 f o r m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
in N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , b y in d u s t r y d iv is io n , M a r c h 1955)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O cc u p a tio n and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

C a r p e n t e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e ------------------------M a n u fa c t u r in g ----------------------------------------N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ---------------------------------R e ta il tra d e 2 -----------------------------------F in a n ce * * -----------------------------------------S e r v ic e s _____________________________

E l e c t r ic i a n s , m a in te n a n c e _______________
M an u factu rin g __________________________
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ---------------------------------P u b lic u tilit ie s * ------------------------------R eta il tra d e 2 -----------------------------------F in a n ce * * -----------------------------------------S e r v ic e s _____________________________

Number
of
workers

1 .3 0 9
364
945
359
209
221

1. 587
584
1 ,0 0 3
155
147
306
366

$
$
Average
hourly U nder 1 .5 0 1 .5 5
and
earnings
$
und er
1 .5 0
1 .5 5 1 .6 0

$
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
1.

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

19
19
19
34
17
90

25
39
18
26
30
21
07

$
1 .6 0

$
1 .6 5

$
1 .7 0

$

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

.

.
-

84
84
84

$
1 .8 5

$
1 .9 0

$
1 .9 5 j i . o o

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

40 ____X L ___ 2 1
40
12
21
_
.
2
_
.
40
11
19

___ k s _____ L ____1 1
65
13
1
.
.
.
65
13
“
1

.
.

-

1 .7 5

$
1 .8 0

5
5
5

.

42
19
23
.
2
18

11
11
6
4
1

41
10
31
.
24
4

1

1 .1 0

! . 15 1 .2 0

$
„
2 .2 5

1 .3 0

1 .3 5

1 .4 0

1 .5 0

1 .6 0

I . 70

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

1 .0 0
and

2 .0 5 ' 2 . 1 0

51
40
11
2
7

1 .0 5

2 .1 5

2 .2 0

2 .2 5

2 .3 0

2 .3 5

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 . 70

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0
1

over

94
53
41
17
22
“

50
21
29
7
17
-

151
88
63
58
“

-

-

E n g in e e r s , s ta tio n a r y ------------------------------M a n u fa c t u r in g ---------------------------------------N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ______________________
R e ta il tra d e 2 ________________________
F in a n ce * * -----------------------------------------S e r v ic e s ---------------- --------------------------

1 .5 6 4
520
1 ,0 4 4
156
283
523

F ir e m e n , s ta tio n a r y b o i le r --------------------- .1 ,0 3 5
378
M an u factu rin g ---------------------------------------657
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ---------------------------------345
S e r v ic e s ---------------------------------------------

2. 30
2. 50
2. 20
2. 37
2. 31
2 .0 8

1.
2.
1.
1.

86
07
74
65

114
8
3 106
4 63

" :
- !
- ;
* •
*
88 i
88 1
87 j
i

_

S
!

50
13
37
37

52 !
10 !
42 1
42
1

H e lp e r s , t r a d e s , m a in te n a n c e ---------------M a n u fa c t u r in g __________________________
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ---------------------------------P u b lic u tilit ie s * ____________________
R eta il tra d e 2 -----------------------------------F in a n ce * * -----------------------------------------S e r v ic e s ---------------------------------------------

M a c h in e -t o o l o p e r a t o r s , t o o l r o o m --------M a n u fa c t u r in g __________________________

1 .7 9 1
716
1 ,0 7 5
443
82
375
148

171
171

_ 1. 75
_
1. 77
1. 74
1 .7 7
1. 82
1 .7 7
1. 51

2. 32
2. 32

184
5 89
95
3
17
6 75

53
10 :
43
_
23
20

43
26
17
9
2
6

|

-

-

-

1. 222
978
244

2. 31
2. 29
2. 38

M e c h a n ic s , a u to m o tiv e ( m a in t e n a n c e ) __
M an u factu rin g ___ _______________________
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g _______ ______________
P u b lic u tilit ie s * __ ________________

3 .0 8 6
440
2, 646
1, 525

2. 15
2. 22
2 .1 4
2. 10

.

_

_

-

“

-

.
.

.
-

___66
66.

.
_

1

20
20

-

10

_
_

-

2

2

_
_

4
2
2

11
5
6
6

-

16

35

59
51
8
8

25
4
21
1
4
2

109
59
50
20
6
18
1

117
68
49
2
15
16
16

84
44
40
4
36
~

100
bl
39
18
4
12
3

102
10
92
3
8
80
1

81
19
62
35
12
1
12

63
32
31
12
6
13

258
79
179
57
43
5
68

70
30
40
17
8
15

68
1
67
40
27

12
12
1
3
8

47
44
3
3

15
15
2
11

25
25
2
23

44
44
7
37

117
1
116
21
1
94

18
2
16
1
14

35
18
17
2
15

82
17
65
1
13
49

70
54
16
3
6
5

78
29
49
7
40

75
13
62
6
9
45

59
22
37
5
24
8

151
29
122
4
91
5

93
35
58
9
34
11

32
22
10
6
1

154
29
125
50
11
31

197
68
129
7
50
68

114
64
50
36
12
2

40
4
36
8
6
17

59
55
4
2
2

46
32
14
5

16
6
10

26
18
8
*

214
52
162
34

36
28
8
“

49
7
42
“

62
40
22
12

65
53
12
*

38
9
29
24

31
31
2

37
13
24
24

18
12
6

-

-

16
16
”

-

-

-

*

-

-

1 255
142
1 113
| 79
5
i
19
10

173
52
121
66
1
30
24

?6 5
116
249
113
4
120
12

103
42
61
41
1
19
-

59
47
12
1
9
2
-

120.
68
52
44
1
1
-

36
24
12
1
11
-

41
2
39
3
36

38

5
5
.
5
-

_
-

_
_
_

1
7 !
16 !
15 1
I

1
6 —
6

2_
2

-

-

1
1

38
1
.
30
-

1
!
1
!

!
s|'
5

6
6

I
1
4 i
- i
1
4 !
i
;

- !

23
23

; .....7
6
1
I
1
5 L 18
2
5
16
. 1
5
!
i

_
-

1

19
18
1
1

6
6
-

45
45
-

75
69
6

15

80

55&

15
11

80
33

558
543

1
38 L 94 ! w
38
94 j 248
!
“ |

18

335_
213
122
113

47
5
42
42

450
32
418
367

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le .

* T ransportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), com m unication, and other public utilities.
** F inance, insurance, and rea l estate.

8
8
_
_ '
24 1
24

[
i

74|
57 i
i
1

-

.
_

-

. |
.

-

-

!
-

14
14 j

|

I
_

•

48
46
2 !
.
2 j

72
65
7
7

127 ; 758
22
4
105
754
105
69

1




77
12
65
49
11

57
24
33
5
27
1

!

_ !
:

1

239
6
233
107
27
22

16
16
2
2
12

|
M a c h in is ts , m a in te n a n ce ____________ __
M a n u fa c t u r in g __________________________
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g
____________________

42
5
37
24
3

85
10
75
6
8
39
22

i
-

68
16
52
45
5

48
13
35
13
1
21

45

68
19
49
42
1
5

190

23
167
40
3
110
-

87
22
65
31
27

43
6
37
2
2
4
29

46
46
-

-

- i
”

128
34
94
51
,

-

19
19
1
18

‘
_

14
3
11
9

28 ;
26 1
2;
i
119
48
71
66

:
.
:
i
|

20
20

12
12
!

37
36
1 !
1
24
8
16
14

97

55
42

1 140
!
1
,
' 139
! 41
1

2
2
_

■
139
27
|
112 j

1
38
4 |
34

3

44

3

43
1

U. S. DE P A RT M EN T OF LA BO R
B ureau o f L a b or S tatistics

13
12
1
1

53
53
-

1
1
-

-

-

>
_
_
_
_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

i

18 j
18

O c c u p a t io n a l W age S u r v e y , N ew Y o r k , N. Y . , M a r c h 1955

6
6
-

“

“ j

17
17

115
93

6
6
-

_

-

115

29

25
6
19
3

54
52
2
2
-

_

i
1
11 I
11 '

134
18
116
21

2

12

12

2
2

;

_

159
159

-

_

_

57
57

_
_

11

Table A-3: Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations - Continued
(A verage hou rly earnings 1 fo r m en in s e le cte d occupations studied on an a rea basis
in New Y ork, N. Y . , by industry d ivisio n , M a rch 1955)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

O ccupation and ind ustry d ivision

N um ber
of
workers

A verage
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
Under 1.50 1 .55 1.60 1.65
and
$
under
1.50
1. 55 1.60 1.65 1 .70

$
$
1. 70 1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

$
1 .90

1.95

$
2 .0 0

1. 75

1.85

1.90

1.-95 2 .0 0

2 .0 5

1.80

s

$
2 .0 5

$
s
$
$
$
$
S
2. 10 2. 15 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2 .4 0

s
$
$
$
2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2. 70 2 .8 0

2 .1 0

2. 15 2 .2 0

2 .2 5

2 .3 0

2 .3 5

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

75
35
40
13
11

118
111
7
1

131
100
31
.
-

53
7
46
_
13

60
24
36
16
6

95
16
79
10
32

25
13
12
2
“

2
2

21
21

37
37

9
2

6
2

4
2

-

-

2 .9 0

2. 70 2 .8 0

2 .9 0

32
20
12
12
-

38
38
_

48
48
-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

42
42

2
2
-

!
1
"

14
14
-

34
34

4
4

$
3.00
and

3.00 iover

j
M ech a n ics, m a in te n a n c e -----------------------M a n u fa c tu rin g ------------ ----------------------N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g-----------------------------P u b lic u t ilit ie s * ----------------------------S e rv ice s ----------------------------------

1 .8 1 0
1, 331
479
127
184

$
2 .2 7 .
2.31
2. 14
2 .2 0
1.96

1

4

1
1

4
4

M illw righ ts --------------------------------------------M anufacturing -----------------------------------

118
105

2.21
2. 19

-

-

Q ile rs _____________________________________
M a n u fa c tu rin g -------------------------------------

422
268

1.83
1 .9 4

76
16

11
8

P a in te rs, m aintenance -------------------------M a n u fa c tu rin g ------------------------------------N onm anufacturing — -------------------------P u b lic u t ilit ie s * ----------------------------R eta il trade 2 ---------------------------------6
5
4
3
F in a n c e * * ---------------------------------------

1.383
271
1, 112
97
104
349

2 .0 8
2 .2 6
2 .0 4
2.22
2 .3 0
2. 10

18
18
-

85
85
-

P ip efitte r s , m aintenanc e —--------------------M anufacturing -------------------------------------

244
180

2 .31
2 .3 3

-

36
16
20
20

P lu m b e rs, m aintenance -----------------------M a n u fa c tu rin g ------------------------------------N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g -----------------------------F in a n c e * * ----------------------------------------------------------S e r v i c e s ---------------------------------------- ----------------------

381
65
316
102
131

2 .0 6
2 .2 7
2.01
2 .0 5
1.80

S h eet-m eta l w o r k e rs , m a in te n a n c e --------M anufacturing -----------------------------------------------------

_ . 152
65
1.325
1,252

2 .4 7
2 .4 7

16
16

41
6
35
35

19
12
7
6

14
14
-

82
60
22
22

-

39
36
3
2

260
127
247
64
13 | 63
1
60
2
“

116
92
24
6
13
i

“

-

“

-

-

18
18

•

8
8

11
11

“

8
8

11
11

54
21

32
31

113
86

21
12

8
7

-

40
25

-

1
1

5
“

32
4
28
-

104
5
99
-

120
4
116
-

10
10
3'
6
1

67
4
63
1
5
1

49

20
29
18
2
6

45
3
42
14

133
13
120
.
120

23
20
3
1
2

34
24
10
6
4

15
4
11
1
3

167
33
134
5
18
111

20
14
6
4
2

60
48
12
7
5

34
34
5
2
26

2
2
1
1
“

2
2
2
-

180
15
165
51
40
45

40
8
32
22
9

8
8
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

6
3

12
12

33
22

21
21

31
31

30
16

20
14

6
-

-

21
-

-

17
16

-

2

32

3
3
2

4
3

7
5
2

59
4
55

-

-

“

"

*

*

*

73
27
46
34
8

11

32
22
8

13
2
11
8

_

2

18
7
11
9

6

-

5
2
3

4

-

10
6
4
2
1

7

-

2

12
12

10
9

16
9

42
2

2
2

13
10

13
3

2
2

26

-

1
1

8
8

35
35

44
42

24
20

84
83

64
62

131
126

1
62

12

15

4

6

-

-

-

-

-

62

12

15

6

-

1
5

4
1

-

-

!

4

5

17
6
11
1
10

“

*

-

61

_

12

"

.

-

1

.
1
L ____

“

1
2
2
8
8

14
14

-

7
1
3

-

-

6

254
254
_

22
22
-

-

-

-

-

2

3
3
3

88
83
5
5
-

-

2 .2 5
2 .2 2

T o o l and die m ak ers -----------------------------M a n u fa c tu rin g -------------------------------------

16
13
3
2

16

- |

.

118
38
80
“

“

-

-

2
2

-

2
2

-

11

-

-

-

-

.

-

_

-

-

11

-

-

-

14
14

“

-

-

-

~

339
328

154
153

-

8
2
6
2

4

-

-

248
201

123
123

48
48

I

1 E xclu d es p rem iu m pay fo r ov e rtim e and fo r w ork on weekends, holid a ys, and late shifts.
2 E xclu d es lim it e d -p r ic e v a rie ty s to r e s .
3 W o rk ers w ere d istrib u ted a s fo llo w s : 1 at $ 0 .8 5 to $ 0 .9 0 ; 17 at $ 0 .9 0 to $ 0 .9 5 ; 6 at $ 0 .9 5 to $1; 3 at $1 to $ 1 .0 5 ; 4 at $ 1 .1 0 to $ 1 .1 5 ; 2 at $ 1 .1 5 to $ 1 .2 0 ; 2 at $ 1 .2 0 to $ 1 .2 5 ; 1 at $1.25 to $1 .3 0 ; 24
at $ 1 .3 0 to $ 1 .3 5 ; 2 at $ 1 .3 5 to $ 1 .4 0 ; 3 at $ 1 .4 0 to $ 1 .4 5 ; 41 at $ 1 .4 5 to $ 1 .5 0 .
4 W o rk ers w ere d istrib u ted as fo llo w s : 15 at $ 0 .9 0 to $ 0 .9 5 ; 3 at $ 0 .9 5 to $1; 3 at $1 to $ 1 .0 5 ; 1 at $ 1 .3 0 to $ 1 .3 5 ; 1 at $ 1 .4 0 to $ 1 .4 5 ; 40 at $ 1.45 to $ 1 .5 0 .
5 W o rk ers w ere d istrib u ted as fo llo w s: 6 at $ 1 .0 5 to $ 1 .1 0 ; 2 at $ 1 .1 0 to $ 1 .1 5 ; 13 at $ 1 .1 5 to $ 1 .2 0 ; 24 at $ 1 .3 0 to $ 1 .3 5 ; 14 at $ 1 .3 5 to $ 1 .4 0 ; 17 at $ 1 .4 0 to $ 1 .4 5 ; 13 at $ 1 .4 5 to $ 1 .5 0 .
6 W o rk ers w ere d istrib u ted as fo llo w s : 22 at $ 1 .2 0 to $ 1 .2 5 ; 1 at $ 1 .2 5 to $ 1 .3 0 ; 16 at $ 1 .3 0 to $ 1 .3 5 ; 20 at $ 1 .3 5 to $ 1 .4 0 ; 16 at $ 1 .4 5 to $ 1 .5 0 .
* T ra n sp ortation (exclu d in g r a ilr o a d s ), com m unication, and other public u tilitie s.
* * F in a n ce, in su ra n ce, and re a l esta te.




12

Table A-4: Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(Average hourly earnings 1 for selected occupations * studied on an area basis
in New York, N. Y . , by industry division, March 1955)
N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and industry d ivision

Number

of

workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
Under 0 .9 5 1.00 1.05 1 .1 0
and
$
0 .9 5 under
1.00 1.05 1.10 1 .15

3.871
949
2,9 2 2
442
1,923

$
1.62
1.67
1.60
1.65
1.67

6
6
-

Janitors, p o rte rs , and clea n ers
(m en)
... . _ 18.279
Manufacturing
4 ,3 2 3
Nonmanufacturing
13,956
Public utilities *
„
1,396
W holesale t r a d e ____________________
639
Retail tr a d e 3
_ _ 2,1 6 8
Finance **
4,5 8 6
S ervices -----------------------------------------5,167

1.41
1.46
1.39
1.58
1.43
1.28
1.56
1.23

447
113
334
. _
120
_
214

Janitors, p o rte rs , and clea n ers
(wom en)
. .
.......
Manufacturing _
_ ......... ,
Nonmanufacturing
W holesale trade _ _
Retail trade 3_______________________
Finance **
_
_
. , _
S ervices

10.312
371
9 ,941
155
457
5,4 0 5
3 ,435

1.23
1.39
1.22
1.12
1.23
1.28
1.12

637
7
630
_
21
18
591

L a b o re rs, m aterial handling ____________
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities * ____ ____ __ __
W holesale trade ___________________
Retail trade 3

12.594
6 ,8 6 4
5,730
763
2,2 1 2
2,6 2 8 '

1.62
1.65
1.58
1.79
1.72
1.41

334
311
23
_
19
156 :
138
18
18 :

M a n u factu rin g_______
_ _ _
Nonmanufactur ing
Public u t ilit ie s * ____________________
F in a n ce**

66
_
66
-

56
8
48
-

58
3
55
-

177 1397
254
39
138 1143
42
14
98
57
_
_
67 1003

16

$
$
$
$
§
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.35 1 .40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .80 1 .90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0

1 .2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1 .4 5

1.50

107

52
22
30
1
13

96
2
94
87

172
52
120
1
108

206
_
2Q6
33
159

1291
259
1032
39
76
165
325
427

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

151
38
113
14
87

324
31
293
205
46

195
38
157
7
123

169
31
138
12
108

442
259
183
2
127

i

107
_
-

78
38
40
32

882
176
706
10
247
_
449

1203
208
995
15
_
235
205
540

966
206
760
34
18
182
3
523

740
91
649
51
112
51
55
380

856
195
661
37
25
177
322
100

650
187
463
61
29
172
145
56

888
125
763
18
50
204
60
431

684
78
606
92
19
101
269
125

879
140
739
66
14
108
369
182

840
373
467
96
29
35
144
163

2
4
29 1350
21
29
4
20
| 352
4 , 949

205
16
189
38
59
8
84

730
40
690
19
66
388
216

297
4
293
7
35
43
208

266 2214 3455
22
54
6
244 2160 3449
_
30
5
36
52
39
150 1379 2701
36
698
545

597
25
572
1
38
211
47

188
28
160
_
48
70
42

58
19
39
_
12
11
4

146
80
66
_
20
37
8

57
17
40
_
2
18

120 ; 463
81 | 250
39 I 213
_ |
_ ! 21
39 | 192

552
350
202
42
160

! 348
! 152
i 196
i
|
I 196

421
229
192
_
_
183

540
340
200
_
21
179

672
412
260
_
58
184

360
113
247
3
68
176

394
222
172
9
19
139

412
209
203
17
33
120

489
336
153
30
15
105

i 24 I 62
!
3
55
7
1 21
_
i .21

27
13
14
14
-

155
36
119
113
6

143
25
118
112
6

282
22
260
255
5

229
160
69
54
15

276
68
208
186
22

216
217
240
240
54
119 ; 159 : 130
163
97 i 8 1 i 110
21 ! 82
21 i 69
142
28
49
6

159
87
72
21
51

415
228
187
160
16

309
182
127
88
39

529
375
154
100
54

97
56
3 9 ! 41
27
34

74
_
74
69

103
24
79
79

32
2
60 | 32
3
2
54
28
3
2

208
43
165
132
33

33

4.7 3 8
1,611
3, 127
2,5 2 7
529

1.65
1.54
1.71
1.68
1.83

P a ck e rs, shipping (m en)
Manufacturing
__
_ __
Nonmanufacturing
...... .
W holesale trade
_
_ _ _
_
Retail trade 3

5.387
2 ,857
2 ,5 3 0
1,240
1,126

1.47
1.48
1.46
1.47
1.45

P a ck e rs, shipping ( w o m e n ) ________ _______
Manufacturing
....
..... _
N onm anufacturing______ __ __ __ _
Retail trade 3 ______________________

778
348
430
373

1.27
1.26
1.29
1.29

-

26

R eceiving cle rk s _________________________
Manufacturing ________________________
N onm anufacturing_____________________
W holesale t r a d e ___ _______________
Retail tr a d e 3
__ _
_
S e r v ic e s __________ _

2.1 1 7
734
1,383
468
776
76

1.70
1.80
1.64
1.83
1.49
1.62

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
-

I
! l3 5 2

21 j
6
15
_ I
15 j

30 i 15
_ '
30 1 15
-

30
1 15
! 28
2
2

36
26
10
10

-

7

52
39
13
13

17 !
3 i
14 J
-

85 !
27
58 :
58 !

32

74
4
70
_
70
-

63
18
45
_
45
-

2

30
_
30
-

See footnotes at end of table.
* T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), com m unication, and other public u tilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and rea l estate.




1.30

$

16
3

O rder fille r s _____________________________
M anu factu ring_________________________
Nonmanufactur ing ____________________
W holesale trade __________________
Retail trade 3_______________________

_

$
$
$
1 .1 5 1.20 1 .2 5

68

12
2
10

_
8
2

62

-

667
91
576
55
505

221
53
168
90
64

1535 2030 2301
476
457
1059 1335 1844
553
48
211
12
31
102
83
16
99
373 1105 1170
38
135
262

294

113

207
65
51
12
38
41

47
10
2
5
1
29

38
_
38
_
33

80
45
35
_
30

61

17
TP —
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

_
_
.

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
.

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

6
6
_
.
-

52
52
_
_

75
75
_
_
_

642
4642
_
_
_

_

-

1
_
1
_
-

_

747
436
311
14
228
68

545
252
293
25
236
30

1543
686
857
124
544
168

1215
574
641
365
223
51

541
127
414
74
159
180

526
135
391
43
276
72

182
96
86
_
12
74

468
412
56
10
45

176
65
111
100
9

206
64
142
133
7

166
34
132
126
3

261
137
124
114
9

201
149
52
48
4

812
348
464
455
6

374
123
251
225
20

165
22
143
84
58

777
102
675
326
301

11
11
_
8

15
15
14
-

262
117
145
51
94

261
151
110
87
19

356
145
211
102
107

208
47
161
19
122

348
131
217
88
61

294
152
142
61
78

473
227
246
120
109

464
347
117
74
39

174
92
82
34
47

151
98
53
34
19

| 23
16
i
7
!
6 !
II
1

79
62
17
17

93
48
45
26

10
6
4
4

43
9
34
34

5
3

18
14
4
4

_

2

2

2

2
_
-

_

-

2

_
2

95
25
70
_
50

82

56

2 0

2

80
3
77
-

2

54
1

46
7

69
27
42
4
32
6

1

89
32
1

27
4

1

2

2

_
_
_
-

21

84
29
55
27

24

11

99
44
55

10

_
_
_
_
-

-

504 •443
206
160
283
298
35
14
116
96
148
144

196
114
82
42
27
5

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

_
-

195
79
116
36
72
8

24
22
2
_
_
_
2

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

95
46
49
_
48

_
_
-

-

r

3
_
3
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

121

_
_
_
-

-

4

31
31
_
_
_
_
-

2

2
1
1
-

2

3
_
_
1

6
1
5
3
_
2
-

105
36
69
15
45

o v e r .

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

—

18
_
18
2
_
15
-

2

$
2 .6 0
and

_
_
_
-

14
8
6
_
4

15
7
_
5
2
-

3

2 .5 0

Q
1_»8Q Jb-2Q_ 2 t,Q 2 , IQ 2^2.0-r Z J i S L Z. -4Q_ 2 .5 0 .2t 6Q„,

655
229
426
22
394

22

s

2

_
2 2 2
101
121
1 00

17
4

O ccupation al Wage S u rvey, New Y ork , N. Y. , M arch 1955
U. S. D E P A R T M E N T OF LA BO R
B ureau o f L a b o r S tatistics

1

3
_

_
_
_
-

_

-

-

-

147
_
147
147

15
15
_
_
-

_

_

_

_
_

.
_

2
-

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_

17

18
17

3

102

8
94
48
25
_

39
27
12

6
5
1

12

5
_
1

_

1

_
1
_

39
5
34
27
_

13

Table A-4: Custodial and Material Movement Occupations - Continued
(Average hourly earnings1 for selected occupations 2 studied on an area basis
in New York, N. Y . , by industry division, March 1955)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

O ccupation and industry d iv ision

Shipping c le r k s ___________________________
Manufacturing ___ __ ____ __ _ __
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g__
_______ __ _
W h olesa le trade ____________________
R etail trade 3 ________________________
Shipping and re c e iv in g cle r k s
____
M anufacturing _
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g_____________________
W h olesa le trade ____________________
T ru ck d riv e r s. light (under l 1!* tons) __
M a n u fa c tu rin g _________________________
N o n m a n u fa ctu rin g_____________________
T ru ck d riv e r s , m ediu m ( l l l z to and
including 4 tons)
M a n u fa ctu rin g _________________________
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g_____________________
P u b lic utilities * ___________________
W h olesale trade
R eta il trade 3 ________________________

Number
of
workers

1,043
461
582
285
275

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
Under 0.95 1 . 0 0 1.05
and
$
0 .9 5 under
1 .05 1 . 1 0
1 .0 0

$
$
s
$
1.25 1.30 1 .35 1.40

1.15

1 .2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

580
174
406

_

T ru ck d riv e r s, heavy (o v e r 4 tons,
tr a ile r type) _
M anufacturing
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g_____________________

1.568
234
1,334

2.22

T ru ck d riv e r s, heavy (o v e r 4 ton s,
other than tr a ile r type)
Mitnufa rturing
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g_____________________

3 .375
1,072
2,’ 303

1.44
1.41
1.45
1.57
1.59
1.35
1.57
1.24

24
12
12

2

9

18
92
42
50

-

-

14
14
-

_

-

_
-

_
-

_
"

22
1
21
21

.

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

22

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

30
30

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

_
.
.

3
9

14
4

1.50

10
1

51
18
33
23

9

10

2

2

_
2

1 .60

1.65

93
io
73
_
73

1 .70

32
23
9
2

7

100

58
42
23
19

48
19
29
26

43
24
19

5

16

-

5

16

16
16

2
2

10
6

47

i

31
29

-

-

4

U

7

2

_

_

•

-

-

-

15

5

-

-

_
4

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

147

58
58
-

49
32
17
_
-

6
6

22

4
4

-

47
32
15

50
50
-

18
18
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

1 .5 5

23
15
8

-

41
33
8
6

104
44
60
18
23
23

8

,

94
55
39
23
34

148

•yx-' " m

22
12

2 .0 6

3.449
1,072
2,3 7 7
348
210
341
849
629

110

21
12

-

2 .0 3

212

21

-

-

1 .45

T ru ck e rs , p ow er (fo rk lift) ______________
___ __ _
M anufacturing ___ __
N onm anufacturing __
_ _
W atchm en ____ ____ __ ____ __ __ __
M a n u fa ctu rin g _________________________
Nonm anufactur ing
P u b lic u tilities * ___________________
W holesale trade ___________________
R etail trade 3 _______________________
_____
Finance ** __ __ _______
S e rv ice s ______ ________ __ ______

2 .29
2 .2 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

1 .80

114
70
44
29
15
182
34
148
112

108
63
45

2.0 2

_

198
127
71
12
_
34
_
25

31
27
4
_

136
6
130
24
_
8
98

2

2
_

50 i 253
6
15
44
238
12
_
9
3
4
_
115
41
98

|
l

104
36
68

62
3

•"

147
60
87
2

5
6
15
59

-

1

-

2
1
1

12
12

3
_
3

-

-

-

_

4
4

_

-

-

-

40
82
49

34
I
33
33

44
17
27

15)

22

6

L

22

3
19

61

.

12

_
_

120

105
49

5
5

35

270
A
264

74
60
14

3
3

4

5
2

10
9
1

710
203
507

398
56
342

368
368

3
99
71
28

42
42
-

115

36
36
-

_
_

88
31
57
39
14

28
14
14
_
12

2

2

_
_

_
2

_

_

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

2
2

10
10

2
2

8
8

39
39

59
59

145
103
42

66

_

160
68
92
_
18
15
_
59

187
64
123
17
15
56
6
29

162
77
85

159
85
74
_

80
15
65
1
36
12
13

182
46
136

250
84
166
46
17
38

222

402
39
363

394
103
291
23
32
21
205
10

157
68
89
60
6
3
16
4

19
4
15
62
4

740 2514
265
89
651 2249
259 1417
282
719
38
19

115
3

28
_
28

22

532
362
170
165
5
-

10
i
>

_
_
-

477
420
57
54
_
3

1?

19

64
16

48
48
_
-

934
103
831

E xclu d es p rem iu m pay fo r ov e rtim e and for w ork on weekends, h olidays, and late shifts.
Data lim ited to m en w o r k e rs excep t where otherw ise indicated.
E xclu d es lim it e d -p r ic e v a riety s to r e s .
W o rk ers w ere d istrib u ted as fo llo w s : 642 at $ 2 .8 0 to $ 2 .9 0 .
W o rk ers w ere d istrib u ted as fo llo w s: 30 at $ 2 .7 0 to $ 2 .8 0 ; 39 at $ 2 .8 0 to $ 2 .9 0 ; 3 at $ 2 .9 0 to $ 3 .
W ork ers w ere d istrib u ted as fo llo w s : 6 at $ 2 .6 0 to $ 3; 58 at $3 to $ 3 .5 0 ; 244 at $ 3 .5 0 to $ 4; 92 at $4 to $ 4 .5 0 ; 10 at $ 4 .5 0 and o v e r .
W ork ers w ere d istrib u ted as fo llo w s : 309 at $ 2 .6 0 to $ 2 .7 0 ; 15 at $ 2 .7 0 to $ 2 .8 0 .
W o rk ers w ere d istrib u ted as fo llo w s: 99 at $ 2 .8 0 to $ 2 .9 0 .
T ransp ortation (exclu din g r a ilro a d s ), com m unication, and other public u tilitie s.
F inance, in su ra n ce, and rea l esta te.




1

_

_

31
10
21
21

-

. 72
S 72

386
_
386
27
359
-

35
35

-

207
138
69
69
_
-

36
36

-

_
_
_
_
_

305

826

734

20

305

806

6 410
7 324

23
_
23

_
-

99
* 99
-

_

_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

..

'
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
*
**

18
17

31

35

-

32

-

3

-

33

2

24
45

-

3

_
_

345
. 69
276

147

15
15

28
28
_
_

149
59
90

-

1
332
6

58
31
27
9

297
183
114
18
77

-

22
2

2

2

-

4

63
61
5
56

149

-

_
41
18
73

$
$
$
$
2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0
and
2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 o ve r

2

-

44

1

30

-

-

75
60
15
14

122

-

14
24
20
27

53
49
39
7

2.20

2.20

57
26
31
14

-

69
153
81
_
20
52

102

2 .10

123
36
87
23

-

132
65
67
5
_
13
1
48

2 .0 0

s

2 .10

28

2.88

2 .4 0

1 .90

_

-

$

$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1 .4 5 1 .50 1.55 1 .60 1 .6 5 1.70 1.80 1 .90 2 . 0 0

2 .5 5

745
533

-

_
-

2 .1 4
2 .1 4
2 .1 5
2 .16
2.20
1.8 8

_

-

1.9 6
2.20
1.8 6

-

1 .40

2

2

-

1.8 8

1 .74
1.78
1.65
1.73
1.64
1.80
1.78

1,948
4,1 6 2
2 ,1 8 0
1,494
255

1.2 0

$
1.80

1.075
450
625
345

6 .110

$
1 .1 5

$

1.10

$

'

'

14

B: Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Table B-l: Shift Differential Provisions 1
Percent of manufacturing plant workers-

Shift differential

(a)
In establishments having
form al provisions for—
Second shift
work

Totai________________________________

Third or other
shift work

(b)
Actually working on—

Second shift

Third or other
shift

62.6

49. 7

10. 1

2. 6

With shift pay differental ----------------------------------------------------

61.4

4 8.8

10 .0

2 .4

Uniform cents (per hour) --------------—
--------- ---------- — -------

33.5

19.2

7.5

1.5

5 c e n t s -------— ---------------- — --------------------------------- -----6 c e n ts ------------------------------------------------------------------------7 or 7% c e n t s ----------- -----------------------------------------------8 or 8 7 3 c e n t s ------------------------------------------------------------9 c e n ts ------ ------------------------------------------------------------------1 0 c e n t s ----------------------------------------------------------------------1 1 c e n t s ----------------------------------------------------------------------1 2 or 1 2 % cents -------------------------------------------------------13% c e n t s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------14 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------■
15 c e n t s ----------------------------------------------------------------------Over 15 c e n ts --------------------------------------------------------------

4,8
1.9
1.9

2.0

1.1
1.0
10 .2
1. 1

-

.3
.3
.4
.3

3. 1
5. 7

-

1.0

1.9
7.5
_
.4

.2

1.5
.4
.6

_
-

A
-

.3
.7
_
A

2.9

-

-

.6

-

1.2

1.4

5 .7
-

.1
.6

.1
.4
-

Uniform p e r c e n ta g e ---------- ----------- -------------- -------- — -------

2 6.4

2 0 .2

2 .4

.2

5 p e r c e n t ------------ --------- --------------- -------------------- —
------7 p e r c e n t --------------------------------------------- — ------------------7 7 2 p e r c e n t -------------------------------------------------------------- —
1 0 p e r c e n t --------------------------------- — -------------------- --------1 2 or 1 2 % p e r c e n t -----------------------------------------------------15 p e r c e n t -------------------------------------------------------------------

1.8
2.6
.6

.2

A

Full day’ s pay for reduced h o u r s --------------—
------------------Paid lunch period (not given firs t-s h ift w o r k e r s ) ---------O ther 2 ---- -------------------------------------------------------- --------------No shift pay d iffe r e n t ia l---------- -------------------------------------------

16.2

-

_
2 .6
.6
10 .0

1.2

-

4 .0

6.9

_
1

.1
.4

1 .1

.4
A
1.2

A
.5

_

.5

-

_

A

-

.7

1

.2

-

8.9
.9

.2

.

1 Shift differential data are presented in term s of (a) establishment p olicy, and (b) w orkers actually employed on late
shifts at the time of the survey. An establishment was considered as having a p olicy if it m et either of the following condi­
tions: (1) Operated late shifts at the time of the survey, or (2) had form al provisions covering late shifts.
2 M ostly a combination of uniform cents differential and pay for m ore hours than worked.
A Less than 0 .05 percent.




Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y . , March 1955
U .S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15

Table B-2: Minimum Entrance Rates for Women Office Workers 1
Number o f establishm ents with sp e cifie d minimum hiring rate in—
Nonmanufactur ing

Manufacturing
Minim um rate
(weekly salary)

A ll
industries

s tu d ie d _________________

539

Manufactur ing

B ased on standard weekly hours 2 o f—
A ll
schedules

E stablishm ents

Number o f establishm ents with specified minimum hiring rate in—

35

175

XXX

37Va

40

A ll
schedules

XXX

XXX

364

35

XXX

A ll
industries
37‘ A
s

XXX

40

XXX

I

539

FOR INEXP1SRIENC1£D TYPIS1’S
E stablishm ents having specified
m inim um
_ _
$ 3 0 .0 0
$ 3 2 .5 0
$ 3 5 .0 0
$ 3 7 .5 0
$ 4 0 .0 0
$ 4 2 .5 0
$ 4 5 .0 0
$ 4 7 .5 0
$ 5 0 .0 0
$ 5 2 .5 0
$ 5 5 .0 0
$ 5 7 .5 0
$ 6 0 .0 0

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 2 .50
$ 35 .00
$ 37 .50
$ 40 .00
$ 4 2 .5 0
$ 4 5 .0 0
$ 4 7 .5 0
$ 5 0 .0 0
$ 5 2 .5 0
$ 5 5 .0 0
$ 5 7 .5 0
$ 6 0 .00
$ 62 .50

_ __ _

__ ... __ _

297

100

_

48
_
1
4
11
7
9
1
6
4
4
1
-

24

17

_

1
1
19
29
79
37
80
11
25
6
6
2
1

6
5
26
12
24
5
10
4
6
1
1

E stablishm ents having no
sp ecified m in im u m ____________________

103

32

XXX

XXX

XXX*

E stablishm ents which did not
em ploy w ork ers in this
ca tegory
_

r. r , ....

135

41

XXX

XXX

Inform ation not a v a i l a b l e _______________

4

2

XXX

XXX

____________
____________
____________
__ __ _ __
_
____________
_
____________
____________
_

1
9
3
9
1
>
_
1
_
-

_
3
3
1
5
2
1

197
1
1
13
24
53
25
56
6
15
2
_
1
-

A ll
j
schedules!

175

3,5

XXX

3 7 V2

40

XXX

XXX

A ll
schedules

35

364

XXX

37 V.

40

XXX

XXX

FOR OTKtER INE>□PERLE]NCED C LERICAL WORKE;r s

73

57

_

30

325

1
1
2
4
6
2
9
3
2
-

1
5
40
42
107
33
62
8
13
8
6
-

107
_
13
9
34
9
21
3
7
5
6
_
-

4
4
17
4
9
1
2
4
3
_
-

_

48

_

28

18

_

5
8
23
14
16
2
5
_
_
_
-

2
7
11
6
23
_
6
2
_
_
-

71

XXX

XXX

XXX

98

31

XXX

XXX

XXX

94

XXX

XXX

XXX

112

35

XXX

XXX

2

XXX

XXX

XXX

4

2

XXX

1
_
1

Nonmanufactur ing

B ased on standard weekly hours 2 of—

4
3
8
3
6
1
_
1
2
_
-

4
1
4
1
5
1
1
>
1
_
-

218

74

60

40

1
5
27
33
73
24
41
5
6
3

_
2
8
9
27
12
12
1
2
1
_

.
1
8
10
24
4
8
_
3
2
_
_
-

1
1
4
6
7
4
14
2
1
.
_
_
-

.
-

-

XXX

67

XXX

XXX

XXX

77

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

2

X XX

XXX

XXX

XXX

1 L ow est salary rate form ally established for hiring inexperienced w orkers fo r typing or other c le r ic a l jo b s .
Hours re fle ct the workweek for which em ployees re ce iv e their regular straigh t-tim e sa la rie s. Data a re presented for all workweeks com bined, and fo r the m ost com m on workweeks




XXX

rep orted .

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y . , M arch 1955
U .S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor Statistics

Table B-3: Frequency of W a ge Payment
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

F requency o f payment

Wholesale
trade

AU
industries

Manufacturing

-------------- — --------- ----------------------—

100

100

100

100

100

W eekly—
- — ........................... ..................
B iw e e k ly -----------------------------------------------------------Sem im onthly -------------- ---------------— --------------------- —
----------M o n th ly ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

49
25
25
A

47
15
37
A

64
20
16

41
9
44
6

90
6
4

A ll w orkers

1
2
A
*
**

Public.
utilities*

Retail trade1

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Services

AU 2
industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

39
46
14

56
A
42

98
A
A
A

99
A
A

95
5
A

88
7
4
A

99
A

98
A
A

Finance**

Retail trade1

_

Services

Excludes lim ite d -p rice variety stores.
Includes data fo r rea l estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Less than 2 .5 p ercen t.
Transportation (excluding ra ilroa d s), com m unication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table B-4: Scheduled Weekly Hours
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

W eekly hours
All
industries

Manufacturing

A ll w o r k e r s ----------------- — — -------------------------- -------------- —

100

100

100

Under 35 h o u r s ----------- --------- ----------- — —----------- ——-----35 hours -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Over 35 and under 36V4 h o u r s ---------------------------------36*4 h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------Over 361 and under 3 7 l h o u r s -------------- ------ — —
/*
/z
3 7l hours ----------------------------------------------------------------------------/z
Over 371 and under 40 h o u r s ------------;---------------------/*
40 h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Over 40 and under 45 h o u r s ---------------- — ----------------45 h o u r s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Over 45 and under 48 h o u r s ---------------- ------ — ----------48 h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A
51
A
9
5
18
A
11
A

A
69
A
3

70
A

.
-

Public *
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Services

AU ,
industries4

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

49
3
7
A
25
A
13

A
6
A
5

12
3
9

.

-

36
7
28
A

3
46
3
14
14
10
A
8
A

A
A
71

.
_
_

.
_
-

5
A
74
A
5
A
3
A

Retail trade2

100

100

A
45

i6

.

-

16
A
8

11
A
28
A
11

13

A
12
A
16

.
.
_
.

.
.
-

.
.

.

.

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

_

Finance**

.
.
-

Public ^
utilities*

100

-

3
-

4 92

-

-

A
A
A
A

4
-

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade2

Services

100

100

100

5
A

6

4

-

_

-

A

A

A

-

-

_

16
4
55

A
A
83
A
5

6
A
86
.
.
-

-

13
_

_

6

A

* Data relate to wom en w orkers only.
Excludes lim ite d -p rice variety s to r e s .
^ Includes data fo r rea l estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Estimate differs substantially from that in previous studies, due to the exclusion o f taxicab com panies from the scop e o f areawide studies (see scop e table, page 2, footnote 5).
A Less than 2. 5 p ercen t.
* Transportation (excluding ra ilroa d s), com m unication, and other public utilities.
Occupational Wage Survey, New Y ork, N. Y . , M arch 1955
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
U .S . DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f L abor Statistics




17

Table B-5: Paid Holidays Provisions1
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Item

All
industries

A l l w o r k e r s ____ _____________ ____________________ ___

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

100

100
3
14
25
15
24
18

100
5
12

6
75

100
3
14
19
12
17
33

A

A
-

A
-

A
A

A

-

-

34
21
4

58
32
8

49
47

A

4
10
3

_
_
-

A

A

8
7

_

_

_

_

66

42

51

64

20

99
98

99
99

100
100

98
96

A

A

-

-

A
A
A

A
A

-

A

A

-

90
83
3

89
75
5

96
95

4
A
.

8

10

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

_

Wholesale
trade

Services

All .
industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

98
A
61
7
6
14
9
-

100
A
-

67
19

99
_
11
32
19
7
5
22
3

96
4
21
27
14
7
6
18

96
6
24
12
25
12
9
8

-

-

-

A
A

A
-

-

A

-

A

4

36
15
5

Public A
utilities *

78
69
3

10
6

A

30
10
9

4

-

A
-

4

Retail trade2*

Finance * *

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade2*

Services

100

100

94
8
10
66

-

99
_
3
23
14
8
12
35
4

_

A
_

4

A

A

6

6

81
26
44

86
19
54

79
46
33

66
14
29

75
45
25

80
11
53

A

8

11

A
A

A
_

_
_
_

16
5

6

4
6

_
_

11
4

A

_

A

_

_

_

A

A

90

70

15

11

21

34

16

11

98
98

100
99

A

94
90
3

94
77
12

94
83
3

99
88
12

99
92

-

A

90
76
10

92
53
35

A
A
-

-

-

A
-

. 4

5

_
A

5

4

A
-

_
-

4

A
A

A

-

-

5

3

3

-

90
81
3

92
83
4

90
88

A

A

81
73
7

90
45
33

88
28
45

_

7
_

5
-

A
.

A
_

11
A
A

15

A
11

4

10

7

10

19

7

10 0

100

N u m b e r o f p a i d h o l id a y s
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
p a id h o lid a y s
_ . ___ _______________________ n
U n d e r 5 d a y s _ __ __ ___
__ __ _____ _____
6 d a y s __ __ __ _____ ____ _ _____
__ —
7 d a y s ______ _______________ ____________ __________
8 days _______________________________________
9 days ............................................— ...............................
10 days _ __ ___
____ __
__ _ ___
11 H ays
12 days __ __ __ __ _ __ __
__ __ __ __
13 d a y s ___ ___ ___ ____________ ____________

W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid holidays
______
_

___

99
.
3
13
10
10
10
45
9 .

A
A

A
12

A

4

99

_
13
13
3
_
4 72
-

A
4

A
4
-

94

_

44
32
9

A
A
7

P rov ision s for holidays occu rrin g
on nonw orkdays9
With p rov ision s for holidays failing on
Saturday
_ . ....
_
_
_
Another day o ff with p a y _________ __________
Extra day's pay
Option o f another day o ff or extra
d a y's p a y ___________ ______________________
P rov ision s d iffer fo r variou s h o lid a y s _____
Other p r o v is io n s ____________________________
Saturday is a scheduled workday for all
w orker s ________ ______________ _____________
No p rov ision s (or no pay) fo r holidays
falling on Saturday
_ __
With p rov ision s for holidays falling on
Sunday
Another day o ff with pay
_ __ __
E xtra d ay's p a y _____________________________
Option o f another day o ff or extra
d a y's p a y _____________ ____________________
P ro v isio n s d iffer fo r various h o lid a y s _____
Other p r o v i s i o n s ________ _____ _____________
No p rov ision s (or no pay) for holidays
falling on S u n d a y ________; ____ __________ _____
_
With p rov ision s fo r holidays falling
during v a c a t i o n _____________ ______ ___________
A n o t h e r d a y o f f w it h p a y

E xtra d ay's pay
Option o f another day o ff or extra
P rov ision s d iffer fo r various h o lid a y s _____
Other p r o v i s i o n s __________ ______________ __
No p rov ision s (or no pay) for holidays
falling during vacation
__ _ _ ___
_

5

A

.

-

A

_

_
.

A

5

A

99
84
14

97
62
15

85
60
16

87
34
40

-

A
_

20
_

_
A

8

9
4

8

A

3

9

_

7

1 E stim ates include only full-day holidays provided a n n u a ll y ,
2 Excludes lim ited -p rice variety stores.
2 Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Estim ate d iffers substantially frorrv-that in previous studies, due to the exclusion of taxicab companies from the scope o f areawide studies (see scope table, page 2 , footnote 5).
Lim ited to provisions in establishments having a form al policy applying when holidays occur on nonworkdays; some of the estim ates would be slightly higher if practices determined informally as
the situation occurs w ere included.
A L e s s than 2 . 5 percent.
Occupational W age Survey, New York, N . Y . , March 1955
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.
U .S . DEPARTM ENT O F LABOR
* * Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




18

Table B-6: Pqid Vacations
PERCENT OP OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V a ca tion p o lic y

A ll w o r k e r s ___

__ _____ __ _____

All
industries
_ _

Manufacturing

Public .
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade1

100

100

100

100

100

99
99
A
-

99
99
-

100
100
-

100
100
-

A

A

-

_
6
A
93
A
A

8
A
91
_
A

_
A
99
A
-

A
_
97
A
-

_
A
A
97
A
A

_
A
A
97
_
A

_
_
_
99
A
-

_
A
A
95
A
3

_
A
A
90
_
9

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Services

All ,
industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

100
100
-

99
99
-

99
99
A
-

99
93
3
4

-

A

A

_
51
4
45
-

_
A
99
-

_
_
99
A
-

_
3
_
90
7
-

_
_
99
A

_
_
99
A

-

-

_
_
90
A
9

_
_
_
94
A
4

Public ,
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade 1

Services

100

100

100

100

100
87
5
8

100
96
4
-

100
100
-

100
97
3
-

99
96
A
-

A

-

-

-

-

A

_
12
88
A
-

A
55
A
37
A
4

A
63
A
25
4
8

_
11
_
84
A
5

_
30
3
63
A
A

55
4
41
-

_
82
_
17
A
-

_
A
98
A
A

_
A
5
91
A
A

A
19
12
61
3
4

A
33
13
41
4
8

_
7
88
A
5

_
9
_
84
5
A

_
94
6
-

_
24
34
40
A
A

_
A
_
86
11
A

_
_
96
A

_
A
_
97
A
A

A
10
5
76
4

A
19
11
57
4
8

_
95
A
5

_
7
_
86
5
A

_
_
_
89
9
A

_
10
_
89
A
A

_

_
68
19
13

_
68

A
4
A
79
5
11

A
9
A

_
89
A
10

_
_
91
5
5

_
-

Finance**

M ETH O D O F P A Y M E N T
W o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
p aid v a c a t io n s _______
___ _____ _____ _ ___ .
L e n g th -o f-tim e p a y m e n t __ __ _____
P e r c e n ta g e p a y m e n t __________________ ________
F la t - sum p a y m e n t ______
___ __ ______
W o r k e r s in esta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
no paid v a c a t i o n s _______________________________
AM O U N T O F V A C A T IO N P A Y
A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
Under 1 w eek
___
__ _____
1 w e e k _____ __ __
__________ _
O v e r 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______________________
2 w eek s
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

_

A ft e r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w e e k ________ ________________ ____ _____ ___
1 w eek
_
_ _
__
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s * ____ _
___ __ __
2 w eek s
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s
_
__
__ ___
3 w ee k s
_
_
_
A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w eek
______
1 w eek
_
__ ________
__ _
_
__ _ _
O v e r 1 and under 2 w e e k s ____ _ __ 1_ _ ___
2 w ee k s
.....
............... ...............
O v e r 2 and under 3 w eek s __
____ __
___
3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------

3

5

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w eek _______ _______
_____
_ ___
1 w e e k ..
_ .. ... _
_
O v e r 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______ __ __ _ ___
2 w e e k s ____ _____ __ ____
_______ _ __ ___
O v e r 2 and under 3 w e e k s
— _____ __________
3 w eeks
___ __
_

.
A
_
75
9
16

_
A
_
76

A
23

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and real estate.




A
64
7

27

3

29

72

6
11

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N . Y . , M arch 1955
’ U. S. D EP AR TM EN T O F LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

N OTE: In the tabulations of vacation allowances by years of service, payments other than "length of tim e ",
such as percentage of annual earnings or fla t-su m paym ents, were converted to an equivalent time
b a sis; for example, a payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 w eek's pay.

77

6
17

_
3

_
94
A
A

19

Table B-6:

Paid Vqcations - Continued

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V a c a tio n p o l ic y

A ll w o rk e rs

-----

__

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

___

__

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

A
48
7
42
A
A

A
58
A
35
_
6

_
81
A
17
A
A

_
61
A
37
A

A
52
45
A

_
29
17
54

_
44
A
48

A
4
66
4
24

A
9
60
6
25

A
17
A
77
A
5

A
17
A
71
_
11

7
93
A
A

25
A
72
_
A

A
37
_
59
4

A
16
A
70
A
13

A
16
_
71
A
12

6
_
93
A
A

24
A
71
_
4

A
34
_
54
10

A
14
A
45
A
41

A
16
_
56
A
27

6
_
.92
_
A

24
A
55
20

A
32
26
_
41

Public .
utilities *

W
holesale
trade

All
,
industries 23

All
industries

Retail trade1

Finance* *

Services

Manufacturing

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade1

Services

100

100

100

100

_
73
5
22

_
55

-

-

A

A

3
91
A
4
A

Public ,
utilities

A M O U N T O F V A C A T IO N P A Y - C ontinued

A ft e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e

U nder 1 w e e k
_
1 w eek
2 w e e k s ____ _
____
O v e r 2 and tinder 3 w e e k s _______________________
___ __
_______
3 w e e k s ____ _____
O v e r 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s ..
4 w e e k s and o v e r

-

-

-

-

-

7

A

A

76
A
20
A

9
A
85
A
3

37
A
54
_
8

4
41
A
50
_
3

9
38
4
47
A

3
A
94
_
A

35
A
62
_
A

48
>
45
_
7

6
A
70

4
39
A
50
A
4

9
38
3
45
A
3

3
A
94

35
A
61

22

37
A
53
10

40
_
51
_
9

4
27
69

37
A
37
_
26

4
38
A
44
A
11

9
37
3
44
A
6

-

43

A ft e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U nder 2 w eek s
.
_..
_
2 w e e k s __
___... _
O v e r 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w eeks
_ , ___
O v e r 3 and under 4 w e e k s
4 w e e k s and o v e r _
_
...

3
76
A
19
A

A ft e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e

U nder 2 w e e k s _______________ ____________________
2 w eeks
_ _
.. . _
O v e r 2 and under 3 w e e k s
3 w eeks
____
_ _
O v e r 3 and und er 4 w e e k s _____ ________ ________
4 w e e k s and o v e r _________________________________

-

-

A

A

3
A
94

34
A
49
_
15

3
76
A
19
A

A ft e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
U n der 2 w e e k s
........... ............................................
2 w eeks
_
. . ... _____
O v e r 2 an d u nd er 3 w e e k s
3 w eeks
_
. ..
. _ _ ... _
O v e r 3 and un d er 4 w e e k s _
4 w e e k s and o v e r __ _
____
_ _, T ____

1 Excludes lim ited -p rice variety stores.
2 Includes data for real estate in addition those industry divisions shown separately.
3 Data are not comparable to those in previous studies, due to the exclusion of taxicab companies and services
(see scope table, page 2 , footnote 5).
A L e ss than 2 . 5 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads),communication, and other public u tilities.
* * Finance,' insurance, and real estate.




incidental to water

-

A

transportation

from

40
27
_
33

3
74
A
21
_
A

the scope of areawide studies




21

APPENDIX: JOB DESCRIPTIONS

The prim a ry purpose o f preparing job d escrip tion s fo r the B ureau's wage surveys is to
a ssist its field staff in cla ssify in g into appropriate occupations w o rk e rs who are em ployed under
a variety o f p ayroll titles and different w ork arrangem ents fro m establishm ent to establishm ent
and from area to a rea .
This is essen tial in o rd e r to p erm it the grouping o f occupational wage
rates representing com parable job content.
Because o f this em phasis on interestablishm ent and
in terarea com parability o f occupational content, the B ureau's job descrip tion s m ay d iffer sig n ifi­
cantly from those in use in individual establishm ents o r those p rep a red fo r other p u rp oses.
In
applying these job d e scrip tion s, the B ureau's field represen tatives are instructed to exclude w ork ­
ing su p erv isors, ap p ren tices, le a r n e r s, b egin n ers, tra in e e s, handicapped w o rk e rs, p a rt-tim e ,
tem porary, and probationary w o rk e rs.

Office
B ILL E R , MACHINE
P re p a re s statem ents, b ills , and in v oices on a machine other
than an ordin ary or electrom a tic typew riter. May a lso keep re c o r d s
as to b illin gs or shipping charges or p erform other c le r ic a l work in ­
cidental to billin g operations.
F or wage study p u rp o se s, b ille r s ,
m ach in e, a re cla s s ifie d by type of m achine, as follow s:
B ille r , machine (billing m achine) - Uses a sp ecia l billing
m achine (Moon Hopkins, E lliott F ish e r, B urroughs, etc. , which
are com bination typing and adding m achines) to p rep are b ills and
in v oice s fro m c u s to m e rs ' purchase o r d e r s , internally p rep ared
o r d e r s , shipping m em oranda, etc.
Usually involves application
o f pred eterm in ed discounts and shipping charges and entry o f
n e ce s s a r y exten sion s, which may or m ay not be com puted on the
billing m a ch in e, and totals which are autom atically accum ulated
by m ach in e.
The operation usually involves a large number o f
carbon co p ie s of the b ill being prepared and is often done on a
fanfold m achine.
B ille r , machine (bookkeeping m achine) - Uses a bookkeeping
m achine (Sundstrand, E lliott F ish er, Remington Rand, etc. , which
m ay o r m ay not have typew riter keyboard) to p rep are c u sto m e r s'
b ills as part o f the accounts receiva b le operation.
G enerally
in volves the simultaneous entry of figu res on c u sto m e r s' led ger
record .
The machine autom atically accum ulates figu res on a
num ber o f v e rtica l columns and computes and usually prints auto­
m a tica lly the debit or cred it balan ces;
Does not involve a knowl­
edge o f bookkeeping.
W orks from uniform and. standard types o f
sa les and cre d it slip s.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
O perates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, E lliott
F is h e r, Sundstrand, B urroughs, National Cash R eg iste r, with o r with­
out a typ ew riter keyboard) to keep a r e c o r d o f business tran sactions.



BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR - Continued
C lass A - Keeps a set o f re co rd s requiring a knowledge of
and exp erien ce in b a sic bookkeeping p rin cip les and fam iliarity with
the structure o f the particular accounting system used.
D eter­
m ines p ro p e r re c o rd s and distribution o f debit and cred it item s
to be u sed in each phase o f the w ork.
May prepare consolidated
r e p o r ts , balance sh eets, and other re co rd s by hand.
C lass B - Keeps a re c o r d o f one or m ore phases or sections
o f a set o f re c o r d s usually requiring little knowledge of b a sic book­
keeping.
P hases or sections include accounts payable, p ayroll,
c u s to m e r s ' accounts (not including a sim ple type o f billing d escribed
under b ille r , m ach in e), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory con trol, etc.
May check or a ssist in preparation o f trial
balan ces and p rep are con trol sheets fo r the accounting department.
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
C lass A - Under general direction o f a bookkeeper or account­
ant, has resp on sib ility for keeping one o r m ore sections, o f a com ­
plete set o f books or re co rd s relating to one phase o f an establish ­
m en t's bu sin ess tran sactions. Work involves posting and balancing
su bsidiary led g er or led gers such as accounts receivable or a c ­
counts payable; examining and coding in voices or vouchers with
p rop er accounting distribution; requ ires judgment and experien ce
in making p rop er assignations and a llocation s.
May assist in
p rep a rin g, adjusting, and closin g journal en tries; m ay d irect cla ss
B accounting c le r k s .
C lass B - Under su p ervision , p erform s one or m ore routine
accounting operations such as posting sim ple journal vou ch ers,
accounts payable v o u ch ers, entering vou chers in voucher re g iste rs;
recon cilin g bank accounts; posting subsidiary led gers con trolled
by gen eral le d g e rs.
This job does not require a knowledge of
accounting and bookkeeping p rin cip les but is found in o ffice s in
which the m o re routine accounting w ork is subdivided on a func­
tional b a sis among severa l w ork ers.

22

CLERK, FILE
C lass A - R espon sible fo r maintaining an establish ed filing
system . C la ssifie s and indexes corresp on d en ce or other m aterial;
may also file this m a teria l.
May keep r e co rd s o f variou s types
in conjunction with file s or su pervise others in filin g and locating
m aterial in the file s .
May p e rfo rm incidental c le r ic a l duties.
C lass B - P e rfo rm s routine filin g, usually of m aterial that
has already been cla s s ifie d , o r loca tes or a ssists in locating m a ­
terial in the file s . May p e rfo rm incidental c le r ic a l duties.
CLERK, ORDER
R eceiv es cu stom e rs1 ord e rs fo r m aterial o r m erchandise by
m ail, phone, or p erson ally.
Duties involve any com bination of the
follow ing; Quoting p rice s to cu stom ers; making out an o rd e r sheet
listing the item s to make up the o rd e r; checking p r ic e s and quantities
o f item s on o rd er sheet; distributing ord er sheets to resp ectiv e d e­
partments to be filled .
May ch eck with cred it department to d e te r­
mine cred it rating of cu stom er, acknowledge re ce ip t o f o rd e rs fro m
cu stom ers, follow up ord e rs to see that they have been filled , keep
file of ord ers re ceiv ed , and ch eck shipping in v oices with original
o rd e rs.
CLERK, PAYRO LL
Computes wages o f com pany em ployees and enters the n e c e s ­
sa ry data on the payroll sh eets. Duties involve: C alculating workers*
earnings based on tim e or production r e c o r d s ; posting calcu lated data
on payroll sheet, showing inform ation such as w o rk e rfs nam e, working
days, tim e, rate, deductions fo r insurance, and total wages due. May
make out pay ch ecks and a s s is t paym aster in making up and d is t r i­
buting pay envelopes.
May use a calculating m achine.

KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no su p e rv iso ry r e s p o n s i­
b ilitie s, re co rd s accounting and statistical data on tabulating cards
by punching a se r ie s of holes in the cards in a sp e cifie d sequence,
using an alphabetical or a n um erical key-punch m achine, follow ing
w ritten inform ation on r e c o r d s .
May duplicate ca rd s by . using the
duplicating d evice attached to m achine.
Keeps file s o f punch ca rd s.
May v e rify own w ork or work of oth ers.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
P e rfo rm s various routine duties such as running erran d s,
operating m inor o ffice machines such as s e a le rs or m a ile rs , opening
and distributing m ail, and other m inor c le r ic a l w ork.
SECRETARY
P e rfo rm s secre ta ria l and c le r ic a l duties fo r a su p erior in an
adm inistrative or executive position.
Duties include making appoint­
ments fo r su p erior; receiving people com ing into o ffic e ; answ ering
and making phone c a lls ; handling personal and im portant o r c o n fi­
dential m a il, and writing routine corresp on d en ce on own initiative;
taking dictation (where transcribing machine is not used) either in
shorthand or by stenotype or sim ilar m achine, and tran scribin g d icta ­
tion or the re co rd e d inform ation reproduced on a tra n scrib in g m achine.
May p repare sp ecia l reports or mem oranda fo r in form ation o f su p erior.
STENOGRAPHER,

GENERAL

P rim a ry duty is to take dictation fro m one o r m ore p erson s,
either in shorthand or by stenotype o r sim ilar m achine, involving a
norm al routine vocabulary, and to tran scribe this dictation on a typ e­
w riter.
May a lso type fro m written copy. May a lso set up and keep
file s in o rd e r, keep sim ple r e c o r d s , etc.
D oes not include tran ­
scrib in g-m a ch in e w ork (see tran scribin g-m ach in e o p e ra to r).

COM PTOM ETER OPERATOR

STENOGRAPHER,

TECHNICAL

P rim a ry duty is to operate a C om ptom eter to p e r fo r m m athe­
m atical com putations.
This job is not to be confused with that of
statistical or other type o f cle r k , which m ay involve frequent use of
a C om ptom eter but, in which, use o f this m achine is incidental to
perform an ce o f other duties.

P rim a ry duty is to take dictation fr o m one o r m o re p erson s,
either in shorthand or by stenotype or sim ilar m achine, involving a
varied technical o r sp ecia lized vocabulary such as in legal b rie fs o r
rep orts on scien tific resea rch and to tra n scrib e this dictation on a
typew riter. May a lso type fro m written cop y . May a lso set up and
keep file s in o r d e r , keep sim ple r e c o r d s , etc.
D oes not include
tran scribin g-m ach in e work.

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Under general su p ervision and with no su p e rv iso ry resp on ­
s ib ilities, reprodu ces m ultiple cop ies of typew ritten or handwriting
m atter, using a m im eograph or ditto m achine.
Makes n e c e ssa r y ad­
justment such as fo r ink and paper feed counter and cylin d er speed.
Is not required to prepare sten cil o r ditto m a ster.
May keep file of
used stencils or ditto m a ste rs. May s o r t, co lla te , and staple c o m ­
pleted m aterial.




Operates a sin gle- or m u ltip le-position telephone sw itchboard.
Duties involve handling incom ing, outgoing, and intraplant or o ffice
c a lls .
May r e c o r d toll ca lls and take m e ssa g e s.
May give in fo r ­
mation to person s who ca ll in, or occa sion a lly take telephone o rd e rs.
F*or w ork ers who a lso act as receptionists see sw itch board o p e ra to rrecep tion ist.

23

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
tion
type
This
tim e

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL - Continued

In addition to perform in g duties o f op e ra to r, on a single p o s i­
o r m on itor-ty p e sw itchboard, acts as recep tion ist and may a lso
o r p e r fo r m routine c le r ic a l w ork as part o f regu lar duties.
typing o r c le r ic a l w ork m ay take the m a jo r part o f this w orker*s
w hile at sw itchboard.

TABULATING-M ACHINE OPERATOR
O perates m achine that autom atically analyzes and translates
in form ation punched in groups o f tabulating ca rd s and prints tra n s­
lated data on fo rm s or accounting re c o r d s ; sets o r adjusts m achine;
d oes sim ple w irin g o f plugboards accord in g to establish ed p ra ctice
o r d ia g ra m s; p la ces cards to be tabulated in feed m agazine and starts
m achine.
May file card s after they are tabulated.
May, in addition,
operate a u x ilia ry m achines.

included.
A w ork er who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype
or sim ila r m achine is c la s s ifie d as a stenographer, general.
TYPIST
U ses a typew riter to make cop ies o f various m aterial or to
make out b ills after calculations have been made by another person.
May do c le r ic a l w ork involving little sp ecial training, such as k eep­
ing sim ple r e c o r d s , filin g r e co rd s and rep orts or sorting and d istrib ­
uting incom ing m ail.
C la ss A - P e rfo rm s one o r m ore o f the follow ing: Typing
m aterial in final fo rm fro m v ery rough and involved draft; cop y­
ing fr o m plain or c o r r e c te d cop y in which there is a frequent
and v a rie d use o f technical and unusual words or fro m foreig n language copy; com bining m aterial fro m several so u rce s, or
planning layout o f com p licated statistical tables to maintain uni­
fo rm ity and balance in spacing; typing tables from rough draft in
final fo rm .
May type routine fo r m le tte rs, varying details to
suit circu m sta n ces.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
P r im a r y duty is to tran scribe dictation involving a norm al
routine v oca b u la ry fro m transcribing m achine r e c o r d s .
May a lso
type fr o m w ritten copy and do sim ple c le r ic a l work.
W orkers tran ­
scrib in g d ictation involving a va ried te ch n ica l o r sp e cia lize d vocabu­
la r y such as leg a l b rie fs or reports on scien tific r e s e a r c h are not

Professional

DRAFTSM AN , JUNIOR

Technical

em erg en cies o r as a regular assignm ent, or p erform related duties
of a su p erv isory or adm inistrative nature.
p rep ared b y d ra fts­
manufacturing p u r­
req u ired . May p r e ­
p e rfo rm other duties

DRAFTSM AN , LEADER
Plans and d irects a ctivities o f one or m o re draftsm en in
p rep a ra tion o f working plans and detail drawings fr o m rough or p r e ­
lim in a ry sketches fo r engineering, con stru ction, o r manufacturing
p u rp oses. Duties involve a com bination o f the follow ing: Interpreting
b lu ep rin ts, sk etch es, and written o r verbal o rd e r s; determ ining w ork
p ro ce d u re s ; assigning duties to subordinates and inspecting their work;
p erform in g m o re difficult p rob lem s. May a ssist subordinates during




and

DRAFTSM AN, LEA D E R - Continued

(A ssista n t draftsman)
D raw s to sca le units or parts o f drawings
man o r oth ers fo r engineering, con stru ction, o r
p o se s.
U ses va riou s types o f drafting tools as
pare drawings fr o m sim ple plans or sketch es, or
under d ire ctio n o f a draftsm an.

C la ss B - P e r fo r m s one o r m ore o f the follow ing; Typing
fr o m rela tiv ely c le a r o r typed d rafts; routine typing of form s,
insurance p o lic ie s , e t c . ; setting up sim ple standard tabulations, or
copying m o re co m p lex tables already set up and spaced p rop erly.

DRAFTSM AN, SENIOR
P rep a res working plans and detail drawings fro m notes,
rough or detailed sketches fo r engineering, construction, or manu­
facturing p u rposes.
Duties involve a com bination o f the follow ing:
P reparin g working plans, detail draw ings, m aps, c r o s s -s e c tio n s , etc. ,
to sca le by use o f drafting instrum ents; making engineering com puta­
tions such as those involved in strength o f m aterials, beam s and
tru sse s; verifyin g com pleted w ork, checking dim ensions, m aterials
to be used, and quantities; writing sp ecifica tion s; making adjustments
or changes in drawings or sp ecifica tion s. May ink in lines and letters
on pen cil draw ings, prepare detail units o f com plete drawings, or
trace draw ings.
W ork is ‘ frequently in a sp ecialized field such as
arch itectu ral, e le c tr ic a l, m ech an ical, o r structural drafting.

24

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) - Continued

A reg istered nurse who g iv es nursing se r v ic e to ill or injured
em ployees or other p erson s who becom e ill or suffer an accident on
the p rem ises o f a fa ctory or other establishm ent.
Duties involve a
com bination o f the follow in g: Giving fir s t aid to the ill or injured;
attending to subsequent dressin g o f em ployees* in ju ries; keeping re c o r d s
o f patients treated; preparing accident re p o rts fo r com pensation or
other purposes; conducting ph ysical exam inations and health evaluations
of applicants and em p loyees; and planning and ca rry in g out p rogra m s
involving health education, acciden t prevention, evaluation o f plant

environm ent, or other activities affecting the health, w e lfa re ,
safety o f all person n el.

Maintenance

and

TRACER
C opies
tracing cloth or
U ses T -sq u a re ,
sim ple drawings

nd

plans and drawings p rep ared by oth ers, by placing
paper over drawing and tracin g with pen o r p en cil.
com p a ss, and other drafting to o ls .
M ay p rep a re
and do sim ple lettering.

Powerplant

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

ENGINEER, STATIONARY

P e rfo rm s the carpen try duties n e ce s s a ry to construct and
maintain in good rep air building w oodw ork and equipment such as bins,
c r ib s , counters, benches, partitions, d o o r s , flo o r s , sta irs, ca sin g s,
and trim made o f w ood in an establishm ent.
W ork involves m ost o f
the follow ing: Planning and laying out o f w ork fr o m blueprints, draw ings, m od els, o f verbal in stru ction s; using a v a riety o f carpenter*s
handtools, portable pow er to o ls , and standard m easuring instrum ents;
making standard shop com putations relating to dim ensions o f w ork;
selecting m aterials n e ce ss a r y for the w ork .
In g en era l, the w ork o f
the maintenance carpenter req u ires rounded training and experien ce
usually acquired through a form a l apprenticeship or equivalent tra in ­
ing and exp erien ce.

O perates and maintains and m ay a lso su p ervise the operation
of stationary engines and equipment (m echan ical or e le c t r ic a l) to sup­
ply the establishm ent in which em ployed with p ow er, heat, r e fr ig e r a ­
tion, o r a ir-con d ition in g.
W ork involves: Operating and maintaining
equipment such as steam engines, air c o m p r e s s o r s , g en e ra to rs, m o ­
to r s , turbines, ventilating and refrigeratin g equipm ent, steam b o ile r s
and b o ile r -fe d w ater pumps; making equipment r e p a ir s ; keeping a
r e c o r d o f operation o f m achinery, tem perature, and fuel con su m p­
tion. May a lso supervise these operations. Head or c h ie f en gin eers
in establishm ents employing m ore than one engineer a re excluded.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
P e r fo rm s a variety o f e le c tr ic a l trade functions such as the
installation, maintenance, or rep a ir o f equipment for the generating,
distribution, or utilization o f e le c tr ic en ergy in an establishm ent.
W ork involves m ost o f the follow ing: Installing o r repairing any o f
a variety of e le ctrica l equipment such as g en era tors, tra n sfo rm e rs,
sw itchboards, co n tro lle rs, circu it b re a k e rs , m o to rs , heating units,
conduit system s, or other tra n sm ission equipment; working fro m b lu e­
prints, drawings, layout, or other sp ecifica tion s; locating and d iag­
nosing trouble in the e le c tr ic a l system or equipment; working standard
computations relating to load requ irem en ts o f w iring or e le c tr ic a l
equipment; using a variety o f electricia n *s handtools and m easuring
and testing instrum ents.
In gen eral, the w ork o f the maintenance
e lectricia n req u ires rounded training and exp erien ce usually a c ­
quired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and
exp erien ce.




FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
F ire s stationary b o ile rs to furnish the establishm ent in which
em ployed with heat, pow er, or steam .
F eed s fu els to fir e by hand
or op erates a m echanical stoker, gas, or o il bu rn er; ch eck s w ater
and safety v a lv e s.
May clean, o il, or a s s is t in rep a irin g b o ile r ro o m equipment.
HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE
A ssists one or m ore w ork ers in the sk illed m aintenance
tra d es, by p erform in g sp ecific or general duties o f le s s e r sk ill, such
as keeping a w orker supplied with m aterials and to o ls; cleaning w ork ­
ing a rea , m achine, and equipment; assistin g w ork er by holding m a­
te ria ls or to o ls; perform in g other unskilled task s as d ire cte d by jo u r ­
neyman. The kind o f work the helper is p erm itted to p e r fo r m Varies
fro m trade to trade; In som e trades the h elp er is con fin ed to sup­
plying, lifting, and holding m aterials and to o ls and cleaning working
a rea s; and in oth ers he is perm itted to p e r fo r m sp e cia liz e d m achine
op erations, or parts of a trade that are a lso p e rfo rm e d by w ork ers
on a fu ll-tim e b a s is .

25

MACHINE-TOOL, OPERATOR, TOOLROOM

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE

S p ecia lizes in the operation o f one or m o re types o f m achine
to o ls , such as jig b o r e r s , cylin d rical o r su rface g rin d e rs, engine
lath es, o r m illin g m achines in the construction of m a ch in e-sh op tools,
gau ges, jig s , fix tu res, o r dies. Work in volves m ost o f the follow in g:
Planning and perform in g difficult machining operations; p ro ce ssin g
item s requ iring com plicated setups o r a high degree o f a ccu ra cy :
using a v a riety of p re cisio n m easuring instrum ents; selectin g fe e d s,
sp eed s, tooling and operation sequence; making n e ce ssa ry adjust­
m ents during operation to achieve requisite tolera n ces or dim ensions.
M ay be req u ired to recogn ize when tools need d re ssin g , to d re ss to o ls ,
and to s e le c t p rop er coolants and cutting and lubricating o ils .
F or
cro s s -in d u s tr y wage study p u rp oses, m a ch in e -to o l o p e ra to rs, to o lro o m ,
in tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this cla ssifica tio n .

R epairs m ach in ery o r m ech an ical equipment of an establish ­
ment.
W ork in volves m ost o f the follow in g: Examining m achines
and m ech an ical equipment to diagnose sou rce of trouble; dismantling
or partly dism antling m achines and perform in g rep airs that m ainly
involve the use o f handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing
broken or d efective parts with item s obtained from stock; ordering the
production o f a replacem ent part by a m achine shop or sending of
the m achine to a m achine shop fo r m a jo r rep a irs; preparing written
sp ecifica tion s fo r m a jor rep a irs or fo r the production of parts ord ered
fro m m achine shop; reassem blin g m ach in es; and making all n ecessa ry
adjustm ents fo r operation.
In gen eral, the work of a maintenance
m ech an ic req u ires rounded training and experien ce usually acquired
through a form a l apprenticeship o r equivalent training and experien ce.
Excluded fro m this cla ssifica tio n are w ork ers whose p rim ary duties
involve setting up o r adjusting m ach in es.

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
MILLWRIGHT
P ro d u ce s replacem ent parts and new parts in making rep a irs
o f m etal parts o f m echanical equipment operated in an establishm ent.
W ork in volves m ost o f the follow ing: Interpreting w ritten in stru c­
tions and sp e cifica tion s; planning and laying out o f w ork; using a v a ­
riety o f m a ch in ist's handtools and p re cisio n m easuring instrum ents;
setting up and operating standard m achine to o ls; shaping o f m etal
p arts to c lo s e tolera n ces; making standard shop com putations re la t­
ing to dim ensions o f w ork, tooling, ie e jd e and speeds o f m achining;
knowledge o f the working p rop erties o f the com m on m eta ls; selectin g
standard m a te r ia ls , p a rts, and equipment req u ired fo r his w ork; fitting
and assem blin g parts into m echanical equipment.
In g en era l, the
m a ch in ist's w ork norm ally requires a rounded training in m ach in eshop p ra c tic e usually acqu ired through a form a l apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experien ce.

Installs new m achines or heavy equipment and dism antles and
installs m achines o r heavy equipment when changes in the plant la y ­
out are req u ired . W ork in volves m ost o f the follow ing: Planning and
laying out o f the w ork ; interpreting blueprints or other sp ecification s;
using a va riety o f handtools and rigging; making standard shop co m ­
putations relating to s tr e s s e s , strength o f m a teria ls, and cen ters of
gravity; alining and balancing o f equipment; selecting standard tools,
equipment, and parts to be used; installing and maintaining in good
o rd e r pow er tra n sm ission equipment such as drives and speed r e ­
d u cers. In g en era l, the m illw rig h t's w ork norm ally requ ires a rounded
training and experien ce in the trade acqu ired through a form al appren­
ticeship o r equivalent training and exp erien ce.
OILER

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
R ep a irs autom obiles, bu sses, m o to rtru ck s, and tra cto rs o f
an establishm ent.
Work involves m ost o f the follow in g: Examining
autom otive equipment to diagnose sou rce o f trou ble; disassem blin g
equipm ent and p erform in g rep a irs that involve the use o f such handto o ls as w re n ch e s, gauges, d r ills , o r sp e cia lize d equipment in d is­
assem blin g o r fitting p arts; replacing broken or defective parts fro m
stock ; grinding and adjusting valves; reassem blin g and installing the
variou s a sse m b lie s in the veh icle and making n e ce ssa ry adjustm ents;
alining w h e e ls, adjusting brakes and ligh ts, o r tightening body b o lts.
In g en era l, the w ork o f the automotive^ m echanic req u ires rounded
training and exp erien ce usually acquired through a fo rm a l app ren tice­
ship o r equivalent training and experien ce.




L u b rica te s, with oil or g re a s e , the moving parts or wearing
su rfa ces o f m ech an ical equipment o f an establishm ent.
PAIN TER, MAINTENANCE
P aint8 and red ecora tes w a lls, w oodw ork, and fixtures o f an
establishm ent.
W ork in volves the follow ing: Knowledge of surface
p e cu lia ritie s and types o f paint requ ired fo r different applications;
preparing su rface fo r painting by rem oving old finish or by placing
putty o r fille r in nail h oles and in te rstice s; applying paint with spray
gun o r brush.
M ay m ix c o lo r s , o ils , white lead, and other paint
ingredients to obtain p rop er c o lo r o r con sistency.
In gen eral, the
w ork o f the m aintenance painter req u ires rounded training and e x ­
p e rien ce usually acq u ired through a form a l apprenticeship or equiva­
lent training and ex p erien ce.

26

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE

SH E ET-M E TA L WORKER, MAINTENANCE - Continued

Installs or rep a irs w a ter, steam , g a s, o r other types o f pipe
and pipefittings in an establishm ent.
W ork in volves m ost o f the fo l­
low ing: Laying out o f w ork and m easu rin g to loca te p osition oit pipe
from drawings or other w ritten sp e cifica tio n s; cutting variou s size s
o f pipe to c o r r e c t lengths with ch ise l and ham m er or oxyacetylene
torch or pipe-cutting m achine; threading pipe with stocks and d ies;
bending pipe by h and-driven or p o w e r-d riv e n m ach in es; assem bling
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard
shop computations relating to p r e s s u r e s , flow , and size o f pipe r e ­
quired; making standard tests to determ ine whether finished pipes m eet
sp ecification s.
In g en era l, the w ork o f the maintenance pipefitter
requ ires rounded training and exp erien ce usually acqu ired through a
form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex p e rie n ce .
W orkers
p rim a rily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or
heating system s are excluded.

and laying out a ll types of sh eet-m etal maintenance w ork fro m b lu e­
p rin ts, m o d e ls, o r other sp ecifica tion s; setting up and operating all
available types o f sheet-m etal-w orkin g m ach in es; using a v a riety of
handtools in cutting, bending, form in g, shaping, fitting, and a s s e m ­
bling; installing sh eet-m etal a rticle s as requ ired .
In g en era l, the
w ork o f the maintenance sh eet-m etal w ork er req u ires rounded training
and exp erien ce usually acqu ired through a form a l apprenticesh ip or
equivalent training and experien ce.

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
Keeps the plumbing system o f an establishm ent in good o rd e r.
W ork involves: Knowledge o f sanitary cod es regarding installation o f
vents and traps in plumbing system ; installing o r repairing pipes and
#fixtures; opening clog g ed drains with a plunger o r p lu m b er's snake.
In gen eral, the w ork o f the maintenance plum ber req u ires rounded
training and experien ce usually a cqu ired through a fo rm a l a p p ren tice­
ship or equivalent training and ex p erien ce.
SHEET-METAL. WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F a b rica tes, in sta lls, and maintains in good rep a ir the sh eetm etal equipment and fixtu res (such as m achine guards, g rea se pans,
sh elves, lo c k e r s , tanks, v en tila tors, chutes, ducts, m etal roofing)
o f an establishm ent.
W ork involves m o st o f the follow in g: Planning

Custodial

and

GUARD

TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(D iem aker; jig m ak er; toolm aker; fixture m ak er;

gauge m aker)

C onstructs and repairs m ach in e-sh op to o ls , gau ges, jig s , fix ­
tu res or dies fo r forg in g s, punching and other m eta l-form in g w ork.
W ork in volves m ost ,of the follow in g: Planning and laying out o f w ork
fro m m o d e ls, b lu ep rin ts, draw ings, or other ora l and w ritten s p e c ifi­
cations; using a v a riety of tool and die m a k er's handtools and p re cis io n
m easuring instrum ents; understanding of the working p ro p e rtie s of
com m on m etals and a lloys; setting up and operating o f m achine tools
and related equipment; making n e ce ssa ry shop com putations relating
to dim ensions o f w o rk , speeds, feed s, and tooling o f m ach in es; heattreating o f m etal parts during fabrication as w ell as o f finish ed tools
and dies to achieve required qualities; working to clo s e to le ra n ce s;
fitting and assem blin g of parts to p r e s crib e d tolera n ces and a llow ­
an ces; selectin g appropriate m a teria ls, to o ls , and p r o c e s s e s .
In
g en era l, the to o l and die m a k er's work req u ires a rounded training
in m a ch in e-sh op and toolroom p ra ctice usually a cqu ired through a
form a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and exp erien ce.
F or c r o ss-in d u stry wage study p u rp o s e s , tool and die m ak ers
in tool and die jobbing shops are excluded fro m this cla ss ifica tio n .

Material

Move m e nt

JANITOR, P O R TE R , OR CLEANER
(Sw eeper; charwoman; ja n itress)

P e rfo rm s routine p o lice duties, either at fixed post or on
tou r, maintaining o r d e r , using a rm s or fo r c e w here n e ce ssa ry .
In­
cludes gatemen who are stationed at gate and ch eck on identity o f
em ployees and other p erson s en terin g.




Cleans and keeps in an ord erly condition fa cto ry working
a reas and w a sh room s, or p re m ise s of an o ffic e , apartm ent house,
o r c o m m e r c ia l or other establishm ent.
Duties involve a com bination

27

JANITOR, P O R TE R , OR CLEANER - Continued

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK - Continued

o f the follo w in g : Sweeping, mopping or scru bbin g, andpolishing flo o r s ;
rem oving ch ip s, trash , and other refu se; dusting equipment, furniture,
or fix tu re s; polishing m etal fixtures or trim m in gs; providing supplies
and m in or maintenance s e r v ic e s ; cleaning la v a to rie s, sh o w e rs, and
r e s tr o o m s .
W orkers who sp ecia lize in window washing are excluded.

paring r e c o r d s o f the goods shipped, making up b ills of lading, p o st­
ing weight and shipping ch a rg es, and keeping a file o f shipping re co rd s .
M ay d ire ct or a ssist in preparin g the m erchandise for shipment.
R eceiving w ork in v o lv es: V erifying or directing others in verifying
the c o r r e c tn e s s o f shipments against b ills o f lading, in v oices, or
other r e c o r d s ; checking fo r shortages and rejectin g damaged goods;
routing m erch an dise or m a teria ls to p rop er departm ents; maintaining
n e ce ssa ry r e c o r d s and file s .

LABORERS, M ATERIAL HANDLING
(L oad er and unloader; handler and stack er; sh elver; tru ck er;
stockm an o r stock h elper; warehousem an or w arehouse helper)
A w ork er em ployed in a w arehouse, manufacturing plant,
s to r e , or other establishm ent whose duties involve one or m o re of
the follow in g :
Loading and unloading variou s m a teria ls and m erch a n ­
dise on or fro m freight c a r s , tru cks, or other transporting d e v ice s;
unpacking, shelving, or placing m aterials or m erch an dise in p rop er
storage loca tion ; transporting m aterials or m erch an dise b y hand truck,
c a r , or w h eelbarrow .
Longshorem en, who load and unload ships are
ex clu d ed .
ORDER FILLER
(O rder p ick e r; stock se le cto r; warehouse stockman)
F ills shipping or tran sfer ord ers fo r finished goods from
stored m erch an dise in accordan ce with sp ecifica tion s on sales s lip s ,
c u s t o m e r s ’ o r d e r s , or other instructions. M ay, in addition to filling
o rd e rs and indicating item s fille d or om itted, keep re c o r d s o f out­
going o r d e r s , requisition additional stock , or rep ort short supplies
to su p e rv is o r , and p erform other related duties.*
P A C K E R , SHIPPING
P re p a re s finished products for shipment or storage by placing
them in shipping con tain ers, the sp ecific operations p e rfo rm e d being
dependent upon the ty p e, s iz e , and number of units to be packed, the
type of container em ployed, and method o f shipment. W ork req u ires
the placing o f item s in shipping containers and m ay involve one or
m o re o f the follow in g: Knowledge o f various item s o f stock in o rd er
to v e r ify content; selection of appropriate type and size o f container;
inserting en clo su re s in container; using e x c e ls io r or other m a teria l to
preven t breakage or damage; closin g and sealing container; applying
labels o r entering identifying data on container.
P a ck ers who a lso
make w ooden b oxes or crates are excluded.
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
P re p a re s m erchandise fo r shipment, or r e c e iv e s and is r e ­
spon sible fo r incom ing shipment of m erchandise or other m a teria ls.
Shipping w ork in v o lv e s: A knowledge o f shipping p ro c e d u r e s, p r a c ­
tic e s , rou te s, available means o f transportation and ra tes; and p r e -




F o r wage study p u rp oses, w ork ers are cla ss ifie d as follow s:
R eceivin g c le rk
Shipping cle rk
Shipping and receiv in g cle rk
TRUCKDRIVER
D rives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport
m a te ria ls, m erch a n d ise, equipm ent, or m en between various types of
establishm ents such as: M anufacturing plants, freight depots, w a re ­
houses , w h olesale and reta il establish m en ts, or between retail esta b ­
lishm ents and c u s to m e rs ' houses or p la ces of bu sin ess. May also
load or unload truck with or without h e lp e r s , make m inor m echanical
re p a ir s, and keep truck in good working o rd e r.
D riv e r-sa le amen and
o v e r -th e -r o a d d riv e rs are exclu d ed .
F o r wage study p u rp oses, tru ck d riv ers are cla ss ifie d by size
and type o f equipment, as follow s: (T r a c to r -tr a ile r should be rated
on the b a sis o f tra iler c a p a c it y .)
T ru ck d riv e r,
T ru ck d riv e r,
T ru ck d riv e r,
T ru ck d riv e r,

light (under IV2 ton s)
m edium ( 1V2 to and including 4 tons)
heavy (over 4 ton s, tra ile r type)
heavy (over 4 ton s, other than tra iler type)

TRUCKER, POWER
O perates a manually con trolled ga solin e- or e le ctric-p o w e re d
truck or tra cto r to tran sport goods and m aterials of all kinds about
a w areh ou se, m anufacturing plant, or other establishm ent.
F o r wage study p u rp oses, w ork ers are cla ss ifie d by type of
tru ck , as follow s:
T r u ck e r, pow er (forklift)
T ru ck e r, pow er (other than fo r k lift)
WATCHMAN
Makes rounds o f p re m ise s p e rio d ica lly in protecting property
against fir e , theft, and illeg a l entry.
☆

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1955 0 — 34819b




F o r the con v e n ie n ce o f u s e r s o f BLS data, c o p ie s o f b u lletin s m a y a ls o be p u rch a s e d fro m the
fo llo w in g s a le s o f f ic e s :
U. S. D ep a rtm en t o f L a b or
B u rea u o f L a b o r S ta tistics
341 Ninth A ven u e
New Y o r k 1, N. Y .

U .S . D ep artm en t o f L a b o r
B u reau o f L a b o r S ta tistics
105 W est A dam s S tre e t
C h ica g o 3, III.

U .S . D ep a rtm en t of L a b o r
B ureau o f L a b o r S ta tistics
630 S a n som e S treet
San F r a n c is c o 11, C a lif.

O ccu p a tion a l w age su rv e y s a r e b ein g con d u cted in 17 m a jo r la b o r m a rk e ts during late 1954
and e a r ly 1955. B u lletin s fo r the fo llo w in g a re a s a r e now a v a ila b le and m a y be p u rch a s e d fro m the
Su perin ten den t o f D ocu m en ts, G overn m en t P rin tin g O ffic e , W ashington 25, D. C . , o r fr o m any o f the
re g io n a l s a le s o ffic e s liste d a b o v e .

L a b o r M a rk et
B u ffa lo , N. Y.
C le v e la n d , Ohio
D a lla s , T e x .
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .
M in n e a p o lis -S t. P a u l,
M in n.
D e n v e r , C o lo .
San F r a n c i s c o O akland, C a lif.
N e w a r k -J e r s e y C ity,
N . J.
M e m p h is , Tenn.
St. L o u is , M o .
A tla n ta , G a .
L o s A n g e le s , C a lif.




S u rv ey P e r io d

BLS B u lletin
N um ber

S ep tem b er 1954
O cto b e r 1954
S ep tem b er 1954
N o v e m b e r 1954

1172-1
1 1 72-2
1172-3
1 1 7 2 -4

25
25
20
25

N o v e m b e r 1954
D e c e m b e r 1954

1 1 72-5
1 1 7 2 -6

20 cen ts
25 cen ts

January 1955

1 1 7 2 -7

20 cen ts

D e c e m b e r 1954
F e b r u a r y 1955
F e b r u a r y 1955
M a rch 1955
M a rch 1955

1 1 7 2 -8
1 1 72 -9
1172-10
1172-11
11 72 -1 2

20
20
25
20
25

P r ic e
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts

cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102