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MINNEAPOLIS-ST. P A U L, MINNESOTA
November 1952

Bulletin No. 1116-7

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




M IN N EA PO LIS-ST . PA U L, M IN N ESO TA




November 1952

Bulletin No. 1116-7
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin
Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

For sale o/ tha Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents




Contents
Letter of Transmittal
Page
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of la b o r S t a t i s t i c s ,
W ashington, D. C ., February 20, 1953*
The S e c re ta ry o f Labor:
I have th e honor to tran sm it h erew ith a re p o rt on
o ccu p atio n al wages and re la te d b e n e fits in M in n eap o lis-S t. P au l,
Minn*, d u rin g November 1952. S im ila r stu d ie s are being conducted
in a number o f o th e r la rg e labor-m arket a re a s d u rin g th e f i s c a l
y e a r 1953* These s tu d ie s have been designed to meet a v a rie ty
o f governm ental and nongovernm ental uses and provide area-w ide
earn in g s in fo rm a tio n fo r many occupations common to most manu­
fa c tu rin g and nonm anufacturing in d u s trie s , as w ell as summaries
o f s e le c te d supplem entary wage b en efits* Whenever p o ss ib le ,
se p a ra te d a ta have been p resen ted fo r in d iv id u a l m ajor in d u stry
d iv isio n s*
T h is re p o rt was prepared in the B u reau 's re g io n a l of­
f ic e in C hicago, 1 1 1 ., by Woodrow C. Linn under th e d ire c tio n
o f George E . V otava, Regional Wage and I n d u s tr ia l R e latio n s
A n aly st. The planning and c e n tra l d ire c tio n o f th e program was
c a rrie d on in th e B ureau's D iv isio n o f Wages and I n d u s tr ia l
R elatio ns*
Ewan Clague, Commissioner.
Hon. M artin P. Durkin#
S e c re ta ry o f Labor*




INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................

1

THE MI NNSAPOLIS-ST • PAUL METROPOLITAN AREA............................
OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE....................................

1
1

TABLES:

Average earn in g s f o r s e le c te d occupations stu d ied on an
a re a b a sis A -l
O ffice o c c u p a tio n s ..................... *.............................
A-2
P ro fe ssio n a l and te c h n ic a l occupations ••••
A-3
M aintenance and power p la n t occupations •••
A-4
C u sto d ial, w arehousing, and shipping
occupations • • • • • ....................................
Average earn in g s fo r se le c te d occupations stu d ied on an
in d u s try b a sis B-35 M achinery in d u s trie s *................................................
B-7211 Power la u n d rie s ..................................................• • •••

9
10

Union wage
C-15
C-205
C-27
C-41
C-42

11
11
12
13
13

s c a le s fo r s e le c te d occupations B u ildin g c o n s tr u c tio n ............*...............................
B a k e r ie s ..............................................................................
P r i n t i n g ..............................................................................
Local t r a n s it o p eratin g employees • * . * • • • • •
M otortruck d riv e rs and h e l p e r s .......................•••

3
6
6
7

Supplem entary wage p ra c tic e s D -l
S h ift d if f e r e n tia l p r o v is io n s ........................... • 14
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours • • * . • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • 14
D-3
P aid h o lid ay s .........................................................................15
D-4
Paid v a c a t i o n s ...............*............................. ................ 15
D-5
In surance and pension p lans .................................. 18
APPENDIX:
Scope and method o f su rv ey .................................................... 19
I N DEX

21




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL. MINN
work fo rc e were employed in th e fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u c ts, food
p ro c e ssin g , p ap er, p rin tin g and p u b lish in g , t e x t i l e s , and ap p arel
in d u s trie s .

Introduction
The M in n eap o lis-S t. Paul a re a is one o f se v e ra l im portant
in d u s tr ia l c e n te rs in w hich th e Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s i s c u r­
r e n tly co n d uctin g o ccu p atio n al wage su rv ey s. In such surveys occu­
p a tio n s common to a v a rie ty o f m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing
in d u s trie s a re stu d ie d on a communitywide b a s is . 1 / C ro ss-in d u s­
t r y methods v f sam pling a re thu s u tiliz e d in com piling earn in g s d a ta
o
fo r th e fo llo w in g ty p es o f occupations: (a) o ffic e ; (b) p ro fe s s io n a l
and te c h n ic a l; (c ) m aintenance and power p la n t; and (d) c u s to d ia l,
w arehousing, and sh ip p in g . In p re se n tin g earn in g s Inform ation fo r
such jo b s ( ta b le s A -l through A-U) sep arate d a ta a re provided w her­
ev er p o s s ib le fo r in d iv id u a l broad in d u stry d iv is io n s .

cub

E arn ing 6 inform ation fo r c h a r a c te r is tic occu p atio n s in
c e r ta in more narrow ly d efin ed in d u s trie s is p resen ted in S e rie s B
t a b le s . Union s c a le s (S e rie s C ta b le s ) are p resen ted fo r s e le c te d
o ccu p atio n s in se v e ra l in d u s trie s o r tra d e s in which th e g re a t ma­
j o r i t y o f th e w orkers a re employed under term s o f c o lle c tiv e - b a r ­
g a in in g ag reem ents, and th e c o n tra c t o r minimum r a te s a re b e lie v e d
to be in d ic a tiv e o f p re v a ilin g pay p ra c tic e s .
D ata a re c o lle c te d and summarized on s h if t o p eratio n s and
d i f f e r e n t i a l s , hours o f work, and supplem entary b e n e fits such as
v a c a tio n allo w an ces, p aid h o lid ay s,a n d insurance and pension p la n s .

Th« Minneapolis - St. Paul
Metropolitan Area
The M in n eap o lis-S t. Paul M etrop o litan A rea (Anoka, D akota,
H ennepin, and Ramsey C ounties) has an estim ated t o t a l p o p u latio n o f
more th a n 1,11*5,000. A pproxim ately th re e -fo u rth s o f t h i s t o t a l liv e
in M inneapolis o r S t. P a u l.
N o n a g ric u ltu ra l wage and s a la rie d w orkers in th e Minne­
a p o lis - S t. P aul a re a numbered approxim ately U l6,000 in November
1952. M anufacturing in d u s trie s accounted fo r n e a rly 121,000 o f th e se
w o rk ers. About a f i f t h o f a l l fa c to ry w orkers were employed in ma­
c h in e ry p la n ts ; o th e r s u b s ta n tia l segments o f th e t o t a l fa c to ry

21,500.

Among th e in d u s trie s and e sta b lish m e n t-siz e groups stu d ­
ie d , more th a n 80 p e rc e n t o f th e w orkers in n o n o ffice jobs were em­
ployed in estab lish m en ts having union agreem ents. V irtu a lly a l l
p la n t w orkers in th e p u b lic u t i l i t i e s and se rv ic e s group o f ind u s­
t r i e s were covered by u n i o n -c o n tra c t p ro v is io n s , and in manufac­
tu r in g and w holesale tra d e th e p ro p o rtio n o f p la n t w orkers in union
estab lish m en ts exceeded 85 p e rc e n t.
U n io n izatio n was f a r le s s ex ten siv e among o ffic e w orkers.
L ess than a te n th o f th e o ffic e w orkers in th e T w in-C ities a re a
were employed under term s o f c o lle c tiv e -b a rg a in in g agreem ents. Only
in th e p u b lic u t i l i t i e s group was th e re any ap p reciab le degree o f
u n io n iz a tio n among o ffic e w orkers; about h a lf th e o ffic e w orkers in
t h i s in d u stry group were employed in estab lish m en ts having unionc o n tra c t p ro v isio n s co vering o ffic e w orkers.

Occupational Wage Structure
Gross h o u rly earn in g s (in c lu d in g pay fo r overtim e and
n ig h t work) o f M inneapolis m anufacturing p la n t w orkers averaged
$1*71 in November 1952; earn in g s o f p la n t w orkers in S t. Paul manu­
fa c tu rin g in d u s trie s averaged $ 1 .8 0 . 2 / A y ear e a r l i e r , when th e

l / See appendix fo r d isc u ssio n o f scope and method o f su rv ey .
D iffe re n c e s betw een th e scope o f th is survey and th e l a s t p rev io u s
survey (November 1951) are in d ic a te d in th e appendix ta b le . The
c o n s tru c tio n and e x tra c tiv e in d u s trie s and government in s titu tio n s
were excluded from each stu d y .




Nonm anufacturing employment in th e T w in-C ities area was
e stim ated a t about 295>000 in November - more than tw ice th a t in
m anufacturing - and r e f le c ts th e im portance o f th e a rea
a cen ter
o f commerce, d is trib u tio n ,a n d fin a n c e . R e ta il tra d e firm s accounted
fo r 80,000 w orkers, and an a d d itio n a l 3^>000 were employed in whole­
s a le tra d e o u tle ts . The s e rv ic e in d u s trie s employed 1*5 >000 persons
in such d iv e rse f ie ld s as autom obile and o th e r rep**- ohops, la u n ­
d rie s and d ry clean in g e sta b lish m e n ts, h o te ls , th e a te rs , ra d io and
te le v is io n s ta tio n s , h o s p ita ls , and b u sin ess se rv ic e e stab lish m en ts.
The v ario u s branches o f th e tra n s p o rta tio n in d u s try , in clu d in g r a i l ­
ro a d s, provided employment fo r 36>000 and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s
employed n e a rly 12,000. More th an 26,000 persons were employed in
fin a n c e , in su ran ce , and r e a l e s ta te esta b lish m e n ts; and F e d e ral,
S ta te , and lo c a l government ag en cies re p o rte d employment o f alm ost
1*1,000 in th e T w in -C ities a re a . B u ildin g c o n stru c tio n gave jobs to

2 / E stim ates p rep ared by th e M innesota D iv isio n o f 'Employment
S e c u rity in co o p eratio n w ith th e U. S. Departm ent o f L ab o r's Bureau
o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s .

(«

2

Bureau conducted i t s i n i t i a l community wage survey in th e a re a ,
gross h o u rly earn in g s averaged $1.62 and $1 .67, re s p e c tiv e ly , in th e
2 c i t i e s . 3/ A s u b s ta n tia l p a rt o f th e in c re a se can be a ttr ib u te d
to g en eral wage in c re a se s made d u rin g th e 12-month p e rio d .
Wage r a te s fo r n e a rly a l l p la n t (n o n o ffic e) jobs in th e
T w in-C ities a re a were determ ined on th e b a s is o f form al r a te s tr u c ­
tu r e s . In m anufacturing e sta b lish m e n ts, p la n s sp e c ify in g a sin g le
ra te fo r each tim e -ra te d job c la s s if ic a tio n were somewhat more
common (m easured on an employment b a s is ) than p lan s p ro v id in g r a te
ran g es. R ate-range p la n s , however, were predom inant in th e p u b lic
u t i l i t i e s and r e t a i l tra d e in d u s try groups. P ie c e -ra te o r bonuswage in c e n tiv e payment p lan s a p p lie d to p la n t jobs in which n e a rly
a fo u rth o f th e w orkers in m anufacturing p la n ts were c la s s if ie d .
They were e ith e r n o n e x isten t or r e la tiv e ly in s ig n ific a n t among th e
nonm anufacturing in d u s trie s , w ith th e ex cep tio n o f s e rv ic e e s ta b ­
lish m ents and r e t a i l s to re s in which many s e llin g job s were p aid on
a commission b a s is . V irtu a lly a l l form al wage p lan s re p o rte d fo r
o ffic e occupations provided a range o f s a la r ie s fo r each job; n e a rly
Jj-5 p ercen t o f th e o ffic e w orkers were employed in e stab lish m en ts
th a t determ ined s a la r ie s on an in d iv id u a l b a s is .
S a la rie s o f o ffic e w orkers in m anufacturing in d u s trie s
were g e n e ra lly h ig h er than th o se in nonm anufacturing; in 18 o f 21
o ffic e c la s s if ic a tio n s p e rm ittin g com parison, average w eekly s a la ­
r ie s in m anufacturing estab lish m en ts exceeded th o se in nonmanufac­
tu r in g . Wage r a te s fo r s e le c te d c u s to d ia l, w arehousing, and s h ip ­
ping occupations averaged h ig h er in m anufacturing in d u s trie s fo r 10
o f 13 jobs where com parisons were p o s s ib le . Among m aintenance and
3/ I n te r c ity d iffe re n c e s in gross average h o u rly earn in g s
fo r an in d u stry group may be due to a com bination o f fa c to rs includ­
ing d iffe re n c e s in in d u s tr ia l com position, o ccu p atio n al re q u ire ­
m ents, p ro p o rtio n s o f men and women employed, method o f wage pay­
ment, e x te n t o f e x tr a - s h if t o p eratio n s and s h if t d if f e r e n t ia ls ,
amount of overtim e worked, and s tra ig h t-tim e r a te s o f pay fo r com­
p arab le work. In re p o rtin g s tra ig h t-tim e earn in g s info rm atio n fo r
s e le c te d jo b s,b y sex , as in th e accompanying ta b le s in t h i s re p o rt,
th e in flu en ce o f th e se f a c to rs , as a group, has been m inim ized.




power p la n t jo b s, however, average r a te s in nonm anufacturing in d u s­
t r i e s were h ig h er in 5 of 6 jobs fo r which com parisons could be made.
P ro v isio n s r e la tin g to e x t r a - s h if t o p e ra tio n s were r e ­
p o rte d in estab lish m en ts employing more th an 85 p e rc e n t of th e p la n t
w orkers in th e M inn eap o lis-S t. Paul a re a . V ir tu a lly a l l th e se e s ­
tab lish m en ts p aid premium ra te s fo r work on l a t e s h i f t s . S h if t
d if f e r e n tia ls were predom inantly ex p ressed in term s o f c e n ts -p e rhour a d d itio n s to day r a te s ; most o f th e o th e rs were ex p ressed as a
percen tag e a d d itio n . A lthough th e amount o f premium pay fo r n ig h t
work v a rie d g re a tly , s u b s ta n tia l numbers o f th e w orkers were con­
c e n tra te d in r e la tiv e ly few c a te g o rie s - ty p ic a lly 5 and 10 cen ts
fo r s e c o n d -sh ift work and 10 and 12 c e n ts fo r t h i r d - s h i f t work.
About a f i f t h of a l l m anufacturing p la n t w orkers were a c tu a lly work­
ing on l a te s h if ts in November 1952.
Paid v acatio n s were g ran ted to n e a rly a l l p la n t and o ffic e
w o rk ers. V acations u s u a lly amounted to 2 weeks a f t e r 1 y ear o f
se rv ic e fo r o ffic e w orkers; p la n t w orkers ty p ic a lly re c e iv e d 1 week
a f t e r 1 y e a r. A 2-week paid v a catio n fo r p la n t w orkers was n o t
g e n e ra lly ap p licab le u n til a f t e r 3 y ears o f s e rv ic e . A fte r 15 y ears
o f se rv ic e a m ajo rity o f o ffic e and p la n t w orkers were g ran ted a
th ir d week o f v acatio n w ith pay.
V irtu a lly a l l p la n t and o ffic e w orkers re c e iv e d some p aid
h o lid a y s, th e predom inant number fo r b o th groups b ein g 6 h o lid ay s a
y e a r.
Insurance b e n e fits , co vering l i f e , h e a lth , o r h o s p i t a li ­
z a tio n , were provided by estab lish m en ts em ploying more th a n fo u rf i f t h s o f th e p la n t and o ffic e w orkers. The number o f w orkers a f ­
fe c te d by th e v ario u s typ es o f b e n e fits v a rie d c o n sid e ra b ly . In
many in sta n c e s the em ployers p aid a l l th e c o s ts fo r one or more o f
th e p o lic ie s . Pension or re tire m e n t p la n s were re p o rte d by employ­
e rs of 60 p ercen t of th e o ffic e w orkers and more th a n 40 p e rc e n t
o f th e p la n t w orkers.
A m a jo rity of th e p la n t and o ffic e w orkers were scheduled
fo r a ^0-hour workweek during November 1952. Most o f th e rem ain­
ing p la n t (n o n o ffice) w orkers were on lo n g er sch ed u les; n e a rly a l l
o f th e o th e r o ffic e w orkers were scheduled to work le s s th an Uo
hours a week.

3
A s Cross-Industry

O c c u p a t i o n s

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Average
Number
o
f
wres
okr

Weekly ^0.00 J2.50
Weekly
erig
anns
and
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)

55.00

3 2 .5 0 35.00

Sex, occupation, and industry division

37.50

^37.50 $1*0.00 S2.50

fe.oo V . 5 0 $5*>.oo %2.50 $
55.oo *57.50 lo.oo

%2.50 *65.00 *67.50 * 70.00 * 2 .5 0
7

*75.00 S80.00 %5.oo ^0.00 *95.00
and
over

!
1( . 5 0 1*5.00
2

1*0.00

1*7.50

5 0 .0 0 1 5 2 . 5 0 55.oo

57.50

60.00 62.50

65.00

67.50

70.00

53

72.50 7 5 .0 0

80.00

85.00 90.00

95.00

Men

j
Clerks, order ..............
Manufacturing ..... .....
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••
Wholesale trade ••••.••

Clerks, payroll ......... .

2hh

39.5
1*0.0
39.5
39.0

*
61.00
62.50
60.50
60.50

50

lfi.O

63.50

U80
1*1
329

Office boys ........... .
Manufacturing ••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ........

211
83
128

38.50
39t5
1*0.0 j 38.00
39.5 j 39.00

Tabulating-machine operators
Manufacturing «••••»•».•••
Nonnanufacturing •••••••••
Finance * » .... .

178
67
111
7U

1*0.0 1 63tQQ-_
1*0.0
68.50
60.00
1*0.0
1*0.0 ; 57.00

-

“

_

13 |
20 j

-

u*
30

1
1

25
7

1(
5
19
26

18

12
1
11

3
•

28

1?
6
9
8

_

i

____
-

28
20

.

___ 25. _ 33J ___ y*
_
18
7

-

11*
11*

“

2
.2
2

1
*

3
3

1
*
1
*

-

-

-

21
19

16
1
15
11

3a
IB
16
10

71
35
36
19

58
20
38
33

1*0
10
30
29

61
21
1*0
18

8

u*
-

-

-

“

-

3

1

6

10

7

• —

2
r

•

29

8

12
7
5

9
1
8

2
1
1

2

6
6
1
*

3

8
8
8

7
3
1
*
3

3
2

lh

13

39
3a

2
11
a

3

2

2

-

-

3
2

22
12
10
6

17
15

1

3

3

•

17

-

2
-

2

T

2

----

*

”

-

2

1

1

-

-

.

-

-

8
10
r ---- 51 —
3
a
1

7
a
3

2
• ---- T
.
.

•
•

•

2

12
3
9

12

a

16
5
11
8

5
5

6
6

11
2

3

9

3

3

a
r

2

6

- —

12
10
7 ----- S'—
5
a
3

3

.

15
1

ia

15
6

9

39
19
20

7

ia

1
1

Billers, Machine (billing machined ... .
Manufacturing .•»•••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing o«.
Retail trade ....... ...........

3ii3
117
226
53

liQiQ.J 1*5.00
1*6.00
1*0.0
1*0.0
l*5.oo
1*0.5 | 1*1.00

Billers, machine (b ook k eep in g machine)
Nonmanufacturing •••••.•••••••••••••

105
100

39.5
39.5

-;

A 1 __25_
_
!

71*
31
1*3
10

33
15
5

1*
8
26
22
6

2li
1
*
20
3

1*5
20
25

&

16
15

10
8

10
9

28
28

11
10

2
2

3
3

39
1
*
35
9

21
20

27
21

15

26
19

13
12

13
9

10

21
9

31

a

85

12 3
31
92

I#

79

32
12

51
36
15
5
3

27
10
17

28

8

6
22
11
1

6 —
2

8
r
.

19
1
18

25

9

IB

.
.

.
.

.
.

.
.

.
.

_
•

_
_

1
1

■

•

*

•

•

•

• --- 5“

•

•

“

•

1
1
.

-

.

.

•
.

•
.

*

8
7

'

■

■

a

i
l*9t5Q —
[5 0 .0 0

.
“

i___ 1_
_
"

1

-!

r --- T

i
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A
Nonmanufacturing ..................

195
127

i*o.o

ijo.o

51*.00
S3.oo

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B
Manufacturing ••••••..... ••••.....
Nonmamfacturing..... •••••••••••••
Wholesale trade ......... ......
Finance ** ............ .

750
162

39.5
1*0.0
39.5

tS.00
50.50
1*3.50

1*0.0

1*7.00

39.0

la.oo

...............................................

588
122
317

-

—

21

-

1*
0
3
37
-

20

____ 3_
3

37

21

11
**
2

12
*
•
38

72
1
71
7
51

9
76
5
37

21
61

16
119
50

18
*

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer

Manufacturing ........... •••••..... .
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••
Public utilities * •«••••••••••••..••
Wholesale trade .«.••••••••..... .
Retail trade
Finance «* ........... ...... .

1,089
28U
805
51*

260
278

59

■3i.-5_ M * 5 f l _
1*0.0 5 0 .0 0
39.5
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
38.5

1*8.00
1*9.00
1*8.50
1*7.50
1*7.50

-

-

2 ___ 23_ ___ iiL
•
9
5
2
18
32
•
10
8
7
1
9
13
2
1

?6
10
86
5

168

31*
31*

7

1*9

182
52

-

16
51*
17

11

1
7
k

20
1
*
7

1 (0
1
28

33
1*
11
5

112
1
*

119

130

3

10

11
11
*
11

1*
9

1*7

36

26
11

55
7

16
*
8

10 2
38

6a
3
27
31
3

2
1

67

20
a7
a
23

6
9

iT

a
r

2

2

?
5
-

6

•

2

3a
12

16
a

22
2
10
5

12
5
5
2

19
10 —
9

1
3

22
u"

0

11
2
_

.

9

.
.

2
2

*

,
.

.1—
.

_

.

1

r

_

.

.
'

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

u
Table A-l*

|^yy|

~

(Average straight-time veekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis In Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., by industry division, November 1952)

A
verage
Sax, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

80.00 $85.oo *90.00 *95.00
32.50 35.00 37.50 *10.00 *1*2.50 1*5.00 * *
1 7.50 *50.00 *52.50 *55.00 *57.50 *6 0 .0 0 *62.50 *65.00 *67.50 *70.00 *72.50 *75.00 $
and
t5.oo 1*7.50 50.00 58.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over
3 2 ,5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 10.00

under

Women - Continued

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type)..............
‘ Manufacturing ••••••••............
Nomanufacturing
Finance **

217
89
128
67

K>.Q
39.5
k >.o
1*0.0

1
WL50
1*9.50
1*8.00
1*6.00

•
“

-

darks. file, class A
Manufacturing •
Nomanufacturing •
<

161
£
110

1*0.0
39.5
10.0

1*8.00
5i.oo
1*6.50

“

"

1.230
326

39
175
166
19
*0

39.5
39.5
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.5
39.5

Clerics, order ......
Manufacturing ..<
Nonaanufacturing

323
153
170

39.5 I 1*7.00
39.5 1 50.00
10.0 Ul*.oo

Clerics, payroll ........
Manufacturing ••••••..
Nomanufacturing....
Public utilities »

559
255
301*
63

1*0.0 52.Op
1*0.0 ! 51.50
1*0.0 1 52.00
1*0.0 50.50

Duplicating-machine operators
Manufacturing ..«••..»••••<
Nonmamfacturing •••••••••<

1 1*
7
75
99

1*2.50
39.5
39.5 ! 1*5.00
10.00
39.5

Kay-punch operators .
<
Manufacturing ••••<
Nonmanufacturing •
<
Public utilitlei
Wholesale trade
Finance #* ••••<

565
193
372
18
*
59
222

39.5
11.
** 50
1*0.0 1*6.00
Uh.OO
39.5
10.0 j 1*5.50
10.0 ! 1*5.50
39.5 1*2.50

Office girls .......... ............ .......
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Retail trade
Finance * * ........ ••«•»••••••••.....

527
130
397

39.5
10.0
39.5
10.0
39.0

Clerks, file, class B .............. *.....
Manufacturing
....
||n n « .m if » fttu H n g . . . . . • • » . » • • • • • « « . . » . . • . .
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ................. ......
Finance «* .... ......... *.... •••••..

Secretaries ........
Manufacturing ....
Nonmanufacturing •
<
Wholesale trade
Retail trade
Finance *•* ....<

9
0
k

60

19 *
1
1,1*96
652
8 **
11
16 *
1
186
2 1*
3

T
L

39.00 ___
! 10.00
! 38.50
71
! 1*1.00
•
i 1*2.50
2
! 38.50
68
j 37.00

7
1
6
5

23
10
13
12

___ 23 ___ 23
17 ___ 11 _ 22_ ___12.|
_
6
10
8
18
8
k !
17
7
31
9
15
5
8
11
7
7
3
7

-

20
•
20

2*
1
2
22

20
6
u*

1?
3
16

9
3
6

213
65 !
1* 1
18
2
29
10
76

!?3
67
126
20
25
15
59

120
10
80
1
*
7
11
*
28

71
29
12
*
1
1*
1
1
16

69
11
58
3
50

20 !

29

13
*
23
20

38

27
11

23
12
11

61
30
31
10

81
il
**
37
10

2 *1
l
21
1

20
1$
5

25
11
H*

16
12
1
*

75

86
29
57
8
10
31

59
26
33 !
5s
10 1
15

19

16

m

19

2
1*
1

-

88
33
55
5
21
18

Igl
55
96
28
21
33

210
232
68
10
172
192
6
2
23 ! 13
36
31
112
126

m m

___ SS_

.

-

•

20

-

•

k

X ____ i_ ___ 3k.___ 18 ___ 35
6
11
8
1
28
27
7
9
9

6
6

9

.
•

-

6

6

37.00 ___ Zi
12
37.50
66
37.00
37.50
5
61
3l*.50

87 j
16
71
13
5
17
*

1* j
15
32
113
13 1
69

m

35
7*
1

68
13
55
6
11
31

83
28
55
7
20

53
2*
1
29
3
2
22

5?
12
17
*

23

52
1
10
10

u
6
8

13

1

63
10
53
3
11
7

Uf
3
11

16
11
5

6
1
*
2

1
•
1

•

10

6
1
5

-

-

-

l
9

5

29
22
7

2»
j
2*
1
10

27

2
1
1

•

i
t
9

27

15
5

“

“

-

-

-

-

k

•

•

“

_
•

_

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
6
2

«
7
1

5

•
•
5
1

“

•

“

-

.
•
*

-

5

t
o

21

6

8|
_
____ SI ____ Z j __
27
1*0
30 1
1
*

\k
8

1

1
*

67
3*
1
33
2

6
13

38
1

25 ____21
6
it
11
23
3
5!

1
1

«
,

23J

20
11
9
3
2
1
*

-

•

57 ____ 4
8
30
27
7
1
6

-

5

17 ____ 12.
2 !
9
11
8
1
1
*

_

2
•
6

-

-

2

k k

1
*

1
*
1

1
*

-

2

-

_

-

-

”
.
-

2

-

-

1
1

-

-

5

6

1

_

_

-

-

6
2
1
3

1
1

-

-

-

•

•

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_
!

6
6

2
"

•

*

-

-

_
j

17
6
1
3
2
j
1
1
-

3

5
1
2

“

_

*

_

2
1

-

6

32
2
30

6
2
1
*
”

3

3
5

19

3*
1

8 ____ I
7
1
*
1
3
1
3

i

39.5 59.50
J S c T 60.00
59.00
39.5
10.0 ' 58.50
10.0 i 55.50
39.0 | 59.00

_
.
- j

.
•
•

- !
- i
- |

!
i

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and real estate.




29

. ____ k.___ 1Z_i
____ 1 4 .
16
1
16
26
7
7
•

•

_

•

10
15
*

28
11
17
3

i

•
-

5!
-!
•
>

-

2

127
17
*
80
1?

2
k

28

21
2*
125
99
25
3*
1
30

183
82
101
27
36
26

____«

78
72
20
13
23

8|
J
75
15
12
2*
1

l

37
27
6
5
10

1 6 ____ S3
*
30
15
31
23
5
5
1
3
9
5

2?
10
15
5

71
23
18
*

-

3
6

3

-

>
1
i5
21*
2
-

9

11
5
6
1

k

1

1
3

1

-

-

1

2

•

5

Table A-i:

(S flic e C h c H fia tio H d .- C a n /tH u e d

(Average straight-tin* weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., by industry division, November 1952)
A
vebaqe
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF
s

$

$

$

Weekly
Weekly 30.00 *32.50 35.00 37.50 $
10.OO $1*2.50 f*5.oo * *7.50 5 0 .0 0 52.50 55.00 57-50 60.00 *62.50 65.00 *67.50
1
hus
or
erig
anns
( t n a d ( t n a d under
S a d r ) S a d r ) and
jiufo 35.QQ 37.50 10.00 J&t50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00

s

s
70.00 72.50

$
*
1
75.00 80.00 *85.00 90.00 1
*95.00

72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00

and
ever

Women - Continued
$
Stenographers, general.... •••••...... .••••••
Manufacturing ••••••••......................... ..

Finance «* •••••••.... ....... ••••••••••

Stenographers, technical.... ••••••........ .

2.957
881
1,676
253
110
**
363

m

39.5
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
39.5
10.0
39.0

1*8.50
1*9.50
1*8.00
52.00
1*8.00
1*6.00
1*7.50

117

ho.o

li5.50
53.00
11.0
**0
51*.oo
1*2.50
1*7.00

310
53
257
10
76
106
53

J0
.2
67
335

18
8

-

20
5
16

8
.

1

18

22

70
3
67
5
22
2

18
*6
179
307
23
67
63
72

363
135
228
30
71
35
88

318
1*
17
171
10
12
*
7*
1
28

176
79
97
22
17
13
25

123
35
88
30
3*
1
9
15

i
*

2*
1

27

17

11

9

10

1

1
*

75

122
17
105
22
16
25
39

2*
18
106
1*
12
22
10
25
16
*

2

6*
1
21
13
*

52.50

)>n.n

18
-

3*
1
7
27
1
*
9
5

33
8
25
1
*
5
1*
1

39
7
32
3
19
9

31
12
19
2
6
6

1*
1
5
9
1
1
*
2

27
10
17
9
1
*
1

8
2
6
2
2

19
8
11
10

1
*
1
3
2

-

.

-

•

1

1

1

1*
2
9
5
5

5

115
20 —
95
22
17
2
18

87
W

12
*
10
10
3
19

30
11
19
6
7
3
3

55
12
13
*
26
8
.

9

15
9
6
1
*
1

11
2
9
1
*
5

6
3
3
1
1

-

.

1

7
5
2
2

2
1
1
1

-

“

1

1
1
.

h
e

138
52

10.0
lo.o
1*0.0
1*0.5
39.0

•
“

22

18
-

I
t

17
1

1

75
1
16
*
8

-

“

8

2
1
1

3

2
2

3
3

-

•

“

- i

-

-

1
1

•

“

-

-

-;

-

*

Manufacturing....... •••••••••............

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

'

*

'

'

8
3

i
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

!

Switchboard operator-receptionists ...... •••••
Manufacturing

Tabulating-machine operators ....... •••••«••••

566
229
337
112

l1
8i
135
62

19.5
L6.50
39.5 1*7.50
39.5 ! 1*6.00
10.0 1*7.00

39.0
39.0
38.5

51.50
1*8.50
1*6.00

-

307
33
8
25 i 53
8 | 26

10

3
-

A

10
7

3
*

5
5
5

Hi
H*
10

*
Transcribing-machine operators, general •••••••
Manufacturing ....................... .

Finance ** ........................

Typists, class A ••.•••••••••••...... .

Manufacturing •«••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

575
2l
0t
371
155

16
*1
173
288
65
93

39.5 J*Zafl£L_
39.5 1*7.00
39.5 1*7.00
39.0 1*7.00

10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
39.5

h
1
*

1*8.00
50.50
1*6.50
1*8.00
U3.50

30
9
9

98
29
69
6

18
13
6

15
12
8

a^ A
^

1

^

■
#1

a

2.066
617
1119
,**
221;
283
605

39.5
10.0
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.5
39.0

l*i«oo
1*3.50
1*0.00
l*i.5o
39.50
39.00

12
*
Ut
28

11
1
*
7
7

16

12
2
10

11
11
6
e
5

-

87
6
81
15
66

27
10
17
16 !

21
18
11

6 !
1
*

17 !
10
7 i
7

9 i
8 !
7

10

7*
1
27
17
*
10

55
13
12
*
6
15

79
27
52
20

78
13
65
9
3*
1

128
37
91

h
O

on
31 1
59
8
10

76
35
ia
16

u* !
-

16
r

22
15
7

2
--- 2~

5
2

5
3
3

-

2
i

n

|

i

1
1
-

2

17
*2
113
359
62
18
*
123

286
91
195
10
33
58

177
97
80
a
1
*
2*
1

28
10
18
8

11
**
22
22
9
8

65
32
33
13
11

1201
!
5*
1
5
36
17

1

15
2
13
12

15
5
30
6

7
1
6
*

-

-

i

'

-

-

-

27
2T —
3
1

18
*
19
29
11

i

8
r
3
1

2
-

2
“

“
'

1
*
1
*
--- T

h

.

’

.

.

•

i

|

P
52
21
3
7
3

15
T"
7
1

28
16
12
7

13 ____kJ____ 1
9
!
i
U
1
*
2
1

I
t

2

3

i

i

1/
*

Hours reflect the workweek for which enployees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

**

Finance, insurance, and real estate.

-

*

3

'

1
i
157
105
252
10
65
9*
1

120 | 327
36
2*
1
96
291
32
11
1 83
139

i
30 |
13
17
9

6*
1
29
35
7

j




H*

*

|
Typists, class B •••••••••••••••••••»••••••••»•

82
50
32
12

68
5
63
11

1
____ I
I

-

15
15
8

12
11
8

85
37
18
*
12

1
1

*

*
- '

-

-

-

-

-

6

Table A-2:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 3/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kinneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.,“by industry division, November 1952)

1G
AE
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

s
Weekly
35-oo S7.50 io .o o V . 5 0 lt5.oo i7 .5 0
Weekly $
hus
or
erig
anns
am
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
M*Q0_ Jt2_._£Q li5.00 ■17.50 50.00

$
5o.oo $52.5o j$55.oo 17.50
52.50

55.00 ! 57.50 60.00

,

9

60.00

62.50

62.50

$

s
s
5
9
65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75-00

65.00

67.50 70.00

72.50

75.00 80.00

80.00

$
$.
.
85.00 $90.00 95-00

85.00

90.00

100.00 $1Q5.00
and
95.00 100.00 105.00 over

!
!
Men
Draftsm en..................... ..................................................

__SIS__

i
j

.
llQaO I.75*00

!
3

Draftsmen, ju n io r ...................................................... .

m

_

hQ
O
*

61.50

8

l
j

i

8

3

10

26

I
t

20

31

22

lt8

30

s

5

lt
i

9

27

26

11

8

9

I
t

i
t

h

13
9

6
5

lit
10

23
22

5
3

11
9

3
2

5
I
t

7
5

25

109

23

71 ___ 59

17

11

1

1
W en
om
Nurses, in d u strial (reg istered ) .........................
Manufacturing •••••..................... .............................

___ 2 L
73

iiO tp lfo aSO
liO.O 6it.00

2

1

• 1
i

i
t

----- i

•

”

----- i ----

______ 1 _____
_

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

Maintenance and Paiuesi Plant ChcdifuUianl

Table A-3:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ far men in selected occupations studied on an area basis
• in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and Industry division

Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings

131t

2 .0 9
2 .0 9

U9
369
177

Carpenters, maintenance ...... .
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing ...................

235

10 1

*U 35

\ .5 0

* 1 .5 5

*L .60

1 .5 0

1*55

1*60

1 *6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1
1

11
10
1

5
3

6
2

18

•

8
8
“

35

•

2

it

27

12
6

1
1

6

.

•

“

5

5
5

21
8

1

*

13

5

5

9
3

3 _

2L
20

5

5

6

8
8

6

16

23

^L.65 * 1 .7 0

and

1 .3 5

1 .L 0

i ,L 5

•

-

•

“

-

-

“

m
-

■

-

-

.
*

2.02

-

•

-

192

1.91*

“

-

Firemen, stationary boiler .................

ii27

1 .7 0

20

9

18

18

60

Helpers, trades, maintenance
Manufacturing ••••••••••••...... •••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ........... ............

63it
U32
202

1 .6 L
1 .6 3
1 .6 5

$
3
3

6
6

12
11

29
23
6

89
16
60
80
109
lit “ I T ~W ~ T T —w
36
2
17
25

Machine-tool operators, toolroom..... ••••••
Manufacturing •••••• ....................

188
S s

1 .9 3 ....
1 .9 1

See footnote at end of table.




1 .9 8

1 .7 5

and
under

“
_

* 1 .8 0 * 1 .8 5 * 1 .9 0 * 1 .9 5 * 2.00 * 2 .0 5 * 2 .10 * 2 .1 5 * 2.20 * 2 .2 5 * 2 .3 0 * 2 .3 5 * 2 . 1(0 * 2 .5 0 $ 2.60 * 2.70

* U l (0 * U i 5

-

2 .1 1

Engineers, stationary ••••••••••••..... •••••
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••..........................
Nonraanufaoturipg .................•••••••

$
1 .3 0

*
2 .0 9
1 .9 0
2 .2 3

399
280

Under

* 1 .3 0

-

-

-

l

-

•
-

•

16
3
13
35

____ L
7

5
5

8

2.00

2 .0 5

2 .10

h
O

8
it
it

2
1
1

6

2 -1 5

2 . hO

2 .5 0

2.60

2 .7 0

o v er

1

6

-

3
3

17
it
13

51t
5it

2
2

*

1
1

26
-

16

27

3

5

26

11

26
1

2
1

_

.
-

.

15

-

2.20

2 .2 5

2 .3 0

2 .3 5

5

11

3lt

1 .9 5

2
2

9

-

1

2

“

it

3
3

6 _____7
6
5
2
”

62

72

59
3

20
52

•

3

1

21 ___3 5 .
20
35
1
*

77

37
35

2

23
12
11

51
21
30

8
6
2

18
l6
2

10

15

16

58

•

-

2

13 _ 3 0
13
it

1

12
12

1 9 _ i L ____ t
8
19
ii5

3

lit

11
66

27

1*3

3?

9

8?
75
30

121
lilt
77

1
1

11
11

6
1
1 -------T

1
1

9
9

8
8

3it

. . - . 3 7 ......2 2
21
32

10 ____2 7
8
2 it
2
3
1

13
13

Ut

12
2
10
it

-

6
it

.

.

“

_

1
lit

*

-

.

2

Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-3:

Maintenance. and Pawe/i Plant QccHfvattonA-Gontbtued

7

~y

(Average hourly earnings
for men in selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Wor e s
kr

$
$
$
Aeae
vrg
.
hul
o r y Under 1.30 1.35
erig $
anns
and

1 10 1.1*5
*

under
1.35 I.I O

1

1.30

$

$
$
$
$
$
1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65

i.l*5 1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

-

-

-

-

30

-

1

29

229

6

10

20
17
3

1.70

%

holi
380

2.08
2.07

Mechanics* automotive (maintenance) •••••••••

67h

1.81

Mechanics, maintenance •••••••••••••••••••••.
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••••.

20
5

1*13

163

1.96
1.93
2.00

329
317

2.00

-

220
215

1.65
1.65

2
li3
87
156

2.02

Painters, maintenance
Manufacturing .......... •••••••.........

Pine fitters, maintenance •••••••••••«•••••••

302
---- Bl

525
517

1/

1.75

1.80

-

-

•

-

1

”

-

2

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

?h

,6

-

21*

11
11

-

-

-

-

-

2
"

6

_

2.16
2.23

11

1.95

20
.0

2.05

2.10

2.15

2.20

2.25

26

18
17

11
11

5
3
17
*

33
32

190
120

20
20

36
36

7
7

67

129

35

86

Hi

16

63

1

ll
i
39
h

11
11
"

32
6
26

82
71
11

16
*
12
*
h

18
16

16
*
37
9

29
9
20

Hf
IT —

68

1

29

30

3
3

2
2

66

30
30

22

6

1
1

13
33

5
h

5
5

13
33

-

1

5
5
“

-

8
5
3

15
3
12

15
i*
l
1

2
2
13
9

16
l6
“

3

5

6
9

h
3

~

23

2.16
2.12

_

-

$
$
.3 $
2 0 2.25 2 0 2.35
.2

$
$
$
$
2.05 2.10 2.15

1.90

1.85

6

.

1

“

“

11

2

.

_

1.99

2

$

.0
1.95 2 0

10

Manufacturing ••••••••.•••••••••••.... ...

Millwrights...... ..... •••••.... .
Manufacturing

$
$
$
$
$
1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90

25
16

6

-

1
----

8
5"

2

28
1*2
53
19
*
9
~ W
9 “ I r “ ir ~ W
“

.

3

3
2
3
2

2.18

2.16

_

I
f
1
*

13
12

22
22

7

30
30

7
#

12
12
3
1
2
8
g

33
33

.

20
.3
18
17

•

2
2

161
161

33
31

6

20
.5

2.60

2.70

and
over

5
5

5
1

-

-

_

_

_

“

“

•

2

1
*

7

1

hi

1

2
2

7

1

hi

1

16

1*
1
5
r ~ a -

_

-

-

2.1*0

.

1

_

56“—

2.35

$ , $
$ , $
2.hO 2.50 2.60 2.70

-

2
1
1

2
2

3
3

-

68

I
f

20

4
8

11

Q
y

3 3 133
I9 3 10
Q
5

2
7

h
.

5f
i
5T

1
“

_

"
8

h

.

.

.

-

-

I

*

.

-

-

3
1

k

.

-

65

7

.

7

2

-

-

5

6
0

-

-

•

“

.

lf
i

m

39
39

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
G u & t o d u U , % Q A e J t fH 4 A in X f,G * u i S lU p fU H X j, Q c C n fL a t io n d .

Table A-A:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

Aeae
vrg
& .8 0 l>.85 f>.90 *0.95 1 . 0 0
hul
ory
erig $
a n n s Under and
0 .8 0

1*70
Manufacturing ............................

380

90

1.05 i. 1 0

.90

.95 1 . 0 0

1.15 1 . 2 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.27

18

29

h8

158

212
12

h8

158

13
6
U

93
12

9
l
6

-

87

29

2

19

8
16

2

850
119
731

1.07
1.21
l.Oh

60

29
12
17

. 2 — k? - 38 _ J 8 _
5
- 45
8
8
38
36
3h
38
hh

hl3
10
h03

S ee
*

fo o tn o te s a t en d o f t a b le .
T ran sp o r t a t io n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) ,

-**

F in a n ce ,

in s u ra n ce ,




and r e a l e s t a t e .

c o m m u n ic a tio n ,

-

60

and o t h e r

p u b lic

.......
u tilitie s .

76
7

hO

52
-

1

18

200
lh
10
3h6

___ L
h

1.18
1.38
1.22
1.11
1.25

l.hl

1.25 1.30 ia5- l.hO l.k5

l

t
1.51*
1.56
1.
1*8

619
296

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) •••••

o

2
1.70 *U75 \.80 $
1.85 \.90 *1.95 $ . 0 0 $2.05
1.55 \ . 6 0 \.65 $
\.U5 \.5o S

and

1.05 1 . 1 0
9

.85

58
13
h5
1
36
1

261
106

\.3S I a

under

31
h
27

2.1*63
962 “
1,501

i.3 0

i.15 i . 2 0

325

12

16

75
9
16
3h

309
3
8
3..
11
11 6
*

h3

2h
13
11

h3

5

I6 h
71
93
22
5
38
28

22h

3
3

87

137
60
3
32
38

2

25 — g L
61
18
2
7

_J5L_ 178
117
239
61
118
3h
35
32
9
22
5
8
lh

26
15
19
ST"
14 — «*
2
3

1.50 1.55 1 .6 0 - 1.65 1.70 -l>-75_ 1.80 1 .8 S 1 ^ 0 - 1.95 2 . 0 0
w
h

36
lhh

153
19

lh
1
U

118
26
26

-

lf
lB
IhO
8

$5

20

35
26
2
3
h

57

82
6*
1
18
9

18
9
9
8

c

2

9

h
h

-

-

*

8

33
19
lh

-

-

-

9

2,05

over

-

-

-

12

-

Jc
L

26
26

1

-

-

-

-

“

”

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

1

0

3
1

10
16
10 — n r
2

Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8

Table A-4:

Gu&toduU,TVaAehcHiAUuf,and SUififUtuj, OccufuUioHi-Continued
(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., by industry division, November 1952)

Number
of
Workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
Under 0.80 0.85
and
$
under
0.80
.90
.85

$
0.90

$

$

1.05

1 .1 0

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.15 1.20 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .3 0 1.85 1.90 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2.05

1.05

1.10

1.15

1 .20

9

50
13
. 37
9

24

$

$

$

0.95

1 .0 0

.95

1 .00

3

5

%

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1 .65

1.70

1.75

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1.90

72

176
35
141
85
22
34

227
157
70

452
365
87

821
116
705
496
179
30

68
68
-

-

-

-

-

-

68
10

719
114
605
196
343
66

195
190
5

4
66

820
363
457
67
131
259

46
25
21

-

509
348
161
15
142
4

50
12
38

-

317
201
116
7
101
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

21

-

-

-

-

-

22

78
49
29
26
3

113
42
71
56
15

193
144
49
43
6

394
88
306
139
159

559
70
489
329
156

140
39
101
83
18

62

12

32
9
23
12

21

_

_

_

21
-

83
2
81

-

2J-.
15
8

255
7
248

12
12
-

28

24
1
8
11

8
23

1?0
55
75
5
21
49

61
8
53
47

104
16
88
7
81

28
3
25
7
18

21
3
18
7
11

178
20
158
17
141

40
27
13
11
2

4

_

_

8

8

-

-

8

8

2Q
9
11

14

4

14
14
-

14

30
28
2

A.761
2,111
2,650
881
1,038
691

1.53
1.53
1.54
1.60
1.56
1.45

Order fillers .............................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade ............................................ ..

2.217
518
1,699
785
855

1.46
1.49
1.45
1.57
1.33

Packers, class A (men) ..............................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................................................

609
181
428

1 .5 8
1.61
1.56

Ackers. class B (men) .....................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

699
496
203

1.39
1.39
1.39

Ackers. class B (women) ...................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing........................... .................................

1.090
671
419

1.17
1.19
1.15

Receiving clerks ....................................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................................................

443
198
245

1.65
1.67
1.63

ShiDoing clerks .................................. T........................
Manufacturing...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................

443
234
209

1 .6 8
1.71
1.6 4

Shipping-and-receiving clerks ..............

166

1.62

Truck drivers, light (under 14- tons) ........

993

1.70

1.276
256
1,020
657
224

1 .6 8
1.71
1.67
1.66
1*67

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer tvoe) ......................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................

386
370

4-69
1.6 8

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
other then t r a il e r tvoe) ............................................

276

1.70

5

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including
A tons) ......... ...................... .
Manufacturing......................... .
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * .................................................
UKa I Aflftl 5

.......... (

...

Truckers, cower (fork-lift) ..........................................
Manufacturing....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing.................................. .........................

367
177
190

1.62
1.58
1.66

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ...............
Manufacturing...................................................................

182
165
383
219
164

1.40
1.48
1.29

— 13

_
-

-

2

_

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

•
-

-

-

13
-

7
4

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

8

-

-

-

5

-

-

3

5

25

9

74

36

49
49

74
74

36
36

_

2

-

53
8
45

_

3

49

-

-

.

9

-

-

a

31
-

1/
2/
3/
*

5
5

4
34
-

-

62
41
15

12
9
-

-

2 .0 5

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

62 — 71
71
23
39
-

_

_

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

1

2,

43

67
67
-

62
35
27

5?
24
31

40
21
19

_

_

_

_

_

1

“

-

-

-

45

3?
35
-

-

-

84
81
3

-

4

21
8
13

_

13

126
117
9

-

1

15
9
6

-

1

15
8
7

4

8

35
20
15

_

-

1

116

-

”

7
3
4

4

34
3
31

48
45
3

3?
27
6

33
20
13

154
34
120

45
12
33

188
85
103

249
239
10

104
84
20

8?
69
20

46
13
33

20
16
4

9
7
2

5
4
1

_
-

7
7
-

4
3
1

_

2
2

2

_

“

1

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

1

2

-

1

3

5

16

8

-

-

24
20
4

39
13
26

60
34
26

76
22
54

36
33
3

41
2
39

23
6
17

14
-

9
9
-

-

-

8

61
28
33

_

16

14
14
-

_

5

17
3
14

“

-

4
4

_
-

?4
28
26

pi

“

1
1
-

29
22

56
21
35

??
22
31

114
49
65

27
14
13

7
3
4

20
20
-

10
10
-

18
18
-

14
13
1

14

28

«

47

14

11

20

18

8

4

_

11

15

3

31

44

151

655

10

18

2

79
29
50
40

685
56
629
584
45

243
37
206
8
115

36
28
8
8

9

58
39
19
4
15

58
42
20 ~ i r
38
29
8
25

-

-

11
7

214
214

134
133

16
16

2
-

_

214

5

15

32

1

4

*

20
2

*59
16
143

17
3
H

7
7

IQ

..

_

-

“

13
13

16
16

_

«.

-

-

_

-

4

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

_

_

2

1

14
2
12

2

_
-

71

18
-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

8
8

9

18
18

12

-

9

-

3

.

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

3
3

4
4

_

5
5

25
25

-

5
3
2

34
34
-

59
40
19

-

2
2

2

56
56

1
1

4
1

49
49

23
23

10
10

23
9

34
18
16

40
28
12

88
44
44

14
8
6

29
26
3

17
11
6

42
36
6

-

2

3

_

3

3
3

6

5

6

5

6

3

6

_
-

3

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," reported in the November 1951 study.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




-

22
10
12

-

1.95

-

1.53
1 .52

Watchmen ..................................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

___ 2 _

-

and
over

1.30

Laborers, material handline 3/ ..............................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * .......................................
Wholesale trade ........................................................
Retail trade........................

_

2 .0 0

1.25

IQ
10

4

U

-

4

11

39
9
30

-

”

1

h

1

-

-

1

15
15

-

-

_

16

32
_
_
-

_ 2_
_

-

8
S

-

-

5
3
2
2

-

6

-

*

-

.

-

n
11

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

_

3

-

3

n
11

-

-

_

_
-

10

-

_

-

_

_
-

9

B s Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table b-S i

Occupation 2 /

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns
y

M aaltutesuf SnduAjt'ueA- y
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 .8 0 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2 .1 0

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

$
i.U o

$
1.U5

$
1 .5 0

$
1.55

1.25

1.30

1.35

l.U o

1.U5

1.50

1 .5 5

1.60

1 .6 5

1.70

1.75

1 .8 0

_

-

_
72
-

_

1

276

60
-

70
-

230
-

118
21

l!i
56
5U

20

-

$
under 1.2 0
$
1 .2 0

*
Assemblers, class B Ua/ ....................
Assemblers, class C Tta/....................
Electricians, maintenance U a / ..............
Inspectors, class A U a / ............. ......

783
771
58
215

1 .8 1

1.51
1.99
1.92

_
-

73
-

7
-

5
-

157
-

2
22

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B Ua/, b j ..........................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class B U a / .................... ......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B Ua/ ..................
athA
aop J ||p/ .(
3
Milling-machine operators, class-B Ub/ ....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B Ua/ .......

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C Ua/, 6/ ..........................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class C Ua/ ...........................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C Ua/ ..................
Engine-lathe operators, class C Ua/ .......
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class C Ua/ .......

Machine-tool operators, toolroom Ua/ .......
Tool-and-die makers (other than tool-ana-die
jobbing shops) k& / .......................
Welders, hand, class A Ua/ .................
Welders, hand, class B ta/ ............... .

1.U3
1.50

2

3
18

2
1

26
29

U3
15

5o
18

97
166

1 ,8 1 1

1.96

-

-

-

-

-

-

250
156
27U

1.97
1.91
1.97
1.93

-

-

-

-

-

-

369

1.9U

U03

1.82

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

3U

1.88

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

U5
59
3U

1.80
1 t77
1.87

75

1.90

382

1.52

-

2U

1

7

12

55

3U

61

20

1.U9

-

-

-

-

-

10

U

-

131
26

1.53
1.59

-

20
-

1

-

2
-

2
-

15
l

U
-

U7

1.5U

“

1

“

2

1

2

6

126

1.9U

18 5

131
5U5
197

22
21

27

“

1.90

1.95

P #4
)
*7 ,
75

16

286

2

21

16

6

15

9

7

35

6

51

7

8

O
/
6

21

17
0

27
7

1

3
52

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

3
3

19

105

1 .8 5

2 .0 0

2.05

2 .1 0

2

12

k

5

-

*
*

Uo

3

160

138

10

-

-

1

1

2

29

59

337

190

858

21

29

22

30

26

26

U1

33

25

U5

36

-

-

-

-

-

2

8
1

2

88

1

1
2

3
1
1

1
3

2
2
3
2

U
U
9
2

2

7
1

5
2
3

1

129
85
159

U
5
1

6

U5
5
12

1
2

1
2

3
1
6

7
1
U
3

7

7

6

5

8

6

U

1

5

9

9

17

U7

7U

15U

1

17

57

62

91

3U

1U

8

19

7

5

7

9

9

6

U

6

2

9

7

-

U

-

1

3

1

-

-

3

-

2

1

1

-

2

3
8
5

16

8
22
3

1

2

-

-

2
1

-

1

2

-

2

1

1

1
1

-

1

1
1

1

2

1
1
3

-

2

9
15
8

-

1

1
1
1

1

6

13

20

3

1

5

7

1

1

u

U

2

1

1

U

”

1

37

78

58

8

7

1

3

2

10
7

7
-

31
10

30
8

2

7

10

7

8

10

7

3

11
3

1

2.13
1.88
1.73

3
3

U9
58
21
71

Cl
\
UA

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A Ua/, 6/ ...........................................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class A U a / ...........................
Engine-lathe operators, class A Ua/ ......
Grinding-machine operators, class A Ua/ ...
Milling-machine operators, class A Ua/ ••••
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class A Ua/ .......

26U
589

1
12

Janitors, porters, an3 cleaners Ua/ .........
Laborers, material handling la/,*!>/.........

-

U7

$
$
$
$
$
$ . s
2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2 .U0 2.50
and
2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2.30 2.35 2 .U 0 2.50 over

5

1

10

1U

28

1U

5

7

8

12

1

5

1

5

1

2

_

13
178

9
1

11
8

19
-

18
-

18
1

18
3

8
13

17

-

5

u

1

9

U

1

-

10

Uo
50

19
37

91
66

5

77

95
27

y

The study included establishments employing more than 20 workers in the machinery (nonelectrical) industry (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19A5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments employing more than 7 workers were also included.
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1952
Data limited to men workers.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Title change only, from “Stock handlers and truckers, hand," reported in previous studies.

6/

Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.

1/
2/
2/
y




10

Pou/esi Jlatu u $/u e-i i
/

Table B-7211:

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2 /

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
4
$
$
1
*
1.10
1.00
1.20
1 .0 5
0.95
1.15

$
0.7 5
and
under
.8 0

$
0 .8 0

*
0.85

.85

.90

•95

-

-

-

-

$
1.25

*
1.30

$
1.35

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.1*0

1

1
5

2
12
1

l
l

-

-

$
0 .9 0

1.00

1.10

1.15

2
-

1 .0 5

7
15

1.20

Men
E x tractor operators 3/ ............................................
Firemen, statio n ary B o ile r 3 / .............................
Washers, machine 3/ ............. 7 ..................................

*
1.09
1.32
1.1 9

33
13
28

16
-

1
'

1
*
5

‘

W
omen
C lerks, r e t a i l re ce iv in g 3/ .................................
F in ish e rs, flatw ork, machine 3/ ........................
Id e n tifie r s
.............................7 .............................
Markers y ......................................................................
P ressers, machine, s h ir t s : T o tal ....................
T im e................
Incentive . . .
Wrappers, bundle 3/ ...................................................

303
29
70
196
108

Occupation

Number
of
workers

.8 6
.81*

22
-

.8 6
.89
•8 *
1
.91*
.86

96

-

.86

88

h2

6

-

7
11*
-

28
126
105
21
30

1
13

3

1*
*1
6
20
35

15
270

1
*
-

5

-

3U

6

1
*

3

8
2
6

31*

6
5
1

5

1

l

_
-

i
-

_

2

2

-

-

2

2

_

_

11*
11*

-

-

1

3

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Average

$

Routeraen, r e t a i l (d river salesmen) 5/

50.00

52.50

&
55.00

and
under

-

-

-

5 2 .5 0

weeklyearnings
h/

5 5 .0 0

57.50

60.00

1

6

6

$

237

78.70

13

*
57.50

*
60.00

t

„

6 2 .5 0

t

6 5.0 0

-

-

-

62.50

6 5 .0 0

6 7 .5 0

12

8

19.

67.50

$

70.00

$
72.50

70.00

-

-

72.50

75.00

19

2

11

75.00
80.00

33

£
80.00

8 5.0 0

-

-

85.CO

90.00

22

29

$

90 .0 0

95.00

25

«

95.00

¥

100 .0 0

*

„

10 5 .0 0

• and

-

-

100.00

10 5 .0 0

over

10

11

10

V The study covered establishm ents employing more than 20 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard In d u stria l G la s s ific a tio n Manual {1 9 h 9 ed itio n ) prepared by
the Bureau o f the Budget. Data r e la te to a June 1952 p ay ro ll period. ,
2 / Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and n ight work.
3/ In s u ffic ie n t data to permit p resen tation o f separate averages by method of wage payment; a l l or a m ajority o f workers were paid on a time b a sis.
U/ Straigh t-tim e earnings (in clu des commission earn in g s).
3 / Routemen normally work 5-day weekly schedules.
Occupational Wage Survey, M inneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s




n
O

U n io n

W a g e

S c a le s

(Minimum wage rates and m a x i m u m straight-time hours per we e k agreed u p o n through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect o n dates indicated. Additional
information is available in reports issued
separately for
these individual industries or trades.)

Table C-15*

B

u llc lU

Table C-20$:

u j, C o H d J ^ U ic llO H

B rick lay ers
Carpenters .................................
E le c tr ic ia n s
P ain ters
Plasterers ,, r......., .. ........ .......... . .
Plumbers rt.,.......... .......... ...........
Building la b o rers ........................................ ..

Rate
per
hour
$3.0$0
2.$$0
2.6$0
2.U00
2.900
2.700
1.820

Hours
per
week
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao

Table C-20$:
Ju ly 1 , 1952
C la s s ific a tio n

Hours
per
week

Minneapolis
Bread and cake - Hand shops:
$ 1 ,6 2 0
Foremen ........................................ •................. ....
1 .5 0 $
M ixers, overmen, bench h a n d s .......................
1.2l*0
Wrapping-machine operators .................. ..
Helpers:
.90$
F i r s t 6 months ...............................................•
.9 8 0
Second 6 months •••••••••••••..............
1 .0 $ $
Third 6 months .••••••...............................
Fourth 6 months
............
1 .1 3 0
1 .2 0 0
F ift h 6 months . . .......................................... ..
Sixth 6 months .••••••••............ ••••••
1.35$
Female workers (fin is h in g , ic in g , wrap­
ping and packing):
.9 6 0
F i r s t 3 months .................................................
1 .0 2 0
Second 3 months ...............................................
A fter 6 months .................................................
1 .0 7 0
A fter 1 y e a r ................................................... ..
1 .1 3 0
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Foremen ................................................................
1 .8 6 0
1 .6 9 0
Doughnut-machine operators .......................
1 .6 9 0
Icin g and b a tte r m i x e r s .............................
Sponge and dough m ixers, oven
1 .6 9 0
operators and overmen ............................
D epositors, and/or dropl .$ 8 0
machine o p e r a to r s ................ ..
D ividers, molders, bench hands,
l .$ 8 0
bun-machine o p e r a t o r s ......... ........ ..........
l .$ 8 0
Cake ingred ient sc a le rs .............................
Traveling-oven feed ers and dumpers,
doughroom men, s lic in g - and wrappingl .$ 8 0
machine operators ......................................
Foremen (women), tw is te r s , dough
1 .370
panners, oven and bench helpers ••••
J e l l - or icing-m achine o p erato rs,
cake wrappers, and semiautomatic
1 .370
cake w ra p p ers..................................••••••




£ c iJ z e /U e d , ~ G o H & 4 U € e c £

Ju ly 1 , 19$2

January 2 , 1953
C la s s ific a tio n

Table C-20$:

/^ d J z e /U e d . ~ S o 4 > ttl4 tH B c £ r

15
*
15
*
15
*
15
*
a$

1*5
a$
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
JiO
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao

ao
ao

ao

C la s s ific a tio n

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

ftate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$0,800
.81*0
.870

1*0

Minneapolis - Continued

Minneapolis - Continued
Bread and cake - Machine sh o p s - Continued
Agreement B:
Foremen ........................ .................................... $1,680
l .$ 7 0
M ixers, overm en............. ..................... ..
1.280
Wrapping-machine operators ....................
Helpers:
1.220
F i r s t 8 weeks .............................••••••
1.370
A fter 8 weeks ..........................................
W
omen employees:
F in ish e rs, wrappers, packers:
1.020
F i r s t 8 weeks ...................................
1.120
A fter 8 weeks ••.••••••................
Hebrew baking:
Hand shops:
l.$ 8 6
General cakemen, m ixers, overmen ••••
Bench hands, machinemen ...........................
1.533
Machine shops:
General cakemen, m ixers, overmen ••••
1.713
Bench hands, machinemen...................... ..
1.6$3
Crackers and cookies:
Baking department:
1.U60
Sponge mixers ........................................
Sweet mixers .............................................. ..
l.U0$
1.21*0
A ssistan t sweet mixers .................... ..
Sponge department:
1.5U0
Overmen •••••........................ ..................... ..
1.520
P eelers .............................................................
1.1*0$
Laminator operators, machinemen . . . . .
1.1*00
Lead oven m en ..............................................
Take-out men ........................................
1.31*0
1.31*0
Laminator sheet feeders ........................ ..
1.280
Stackers .................... .. .......................... •••••
Sweet department:
1.1*0$
Overmen and machinemen ................ ............
Overmen'8 helpers and r e l i e f ................
1.31*0
Inexperienced workers (men):
1.0$0
F i r s t 30 days ..........................................
1.100
Second 30 days ........................... .......... ..
1.180
A fter 60 d a y s ......................................
Icin g department:
M ixers, machinemen........................... .. ..
1.1*0$
1.080
Packers ( c h i l l room) ..........................................
1.060
Packers ••••••••••••••••••............ ..
.970
Weighers and baggers •••••..........................
Miscellaneous g i r l s ....................
.930
Inexperienced workers (women):
.800
F i r s t 30 days • .• • • • • • ............ •••••••
.81*0
Second 30 days .......................
.870
Third 30 days ••••............... ...........................
Packing department:
1.360
Wrapping-machinemen . . . . • • • • • • .................
Helpers - men:
.950
F i r s t 30 d a y s ..................................
1.000
Second 30 days ........................................
1.0$0
A fter 60 d a y s ........... ..............................

C la s s ific a tio n

U2J
1*2|
l*2j
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*5
1*5
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

ho
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

1*0
1*0

Crackers and cookies - Continued
Packing department - Continued
Inexperienced workers (women):
F ir s t 30 d a y s ...........................................
Second 30 days ..........................................
A fter 60 d a y s ......................
Sponge packers (cartons and 1 pound
K risp ie s), checkers and r e l i e f
(women) ...........................................................
Sponge p a c k e r s .......................... .....................
Graham packers ................................................
Sweet packers ..................................... ..
Carton form ers, caddy s t it c h e r s ,
sen ior (women)
Bundlers .......................................................

ho

1*0

1.110
1.090
1.090
1.060

1*0
1*0

1.01$
1.01$

1*0
1*0

h0
ho

S t. Paul
Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Foremen, supervising 6
or more w o rk e rs..............................................
Foremen, supervising $ or le s s
workers, f i r s t hands ...............................
Overmen, m ix e r s ....................................................
Bench hands .......................................................... ..
Wrapping-machine o p e r a to r s ..................•••••
Helpers:
F i r s t 6 m onths................................................
A fter 6 months ................................................
Bread and cake - Semimachine shops:
Foremen, supervising 6 or
more workers ; .................... ...................
Foremen, supervising $ or
le s s w o rk e rs..................................... ............ ..
Overmen, dough mixers
Bench hands ..................................................•••••
Wrapping-machine operators
Men help ers:
F i r s t 6 months ...•••••..........••••••••••
A fter 6 months ..............................• • ..........
W
omen hand workers:
F ir s t 6 months ................................................
A fter 6 months ..................................... ..
Bread - Machine shops:
Foremen .................... ............................................. . t
Sponge and dough,m ixers, overmen ................
Bench hands, d iv id ers, molders,
bun-machine operators ...............................
Oven feed ers and dumpers, s lic in g or wrapping-machine o p e r a to r s ........... ..
T w isters, panners, oven h elp ers,
bench helpers .....................................................
Helpers:
F i r s t 8 weeks .................................•••••••
A fter 8 weeks ..................................................

1.679

1*5

l.$ 6 8
l.$ 0 1
l.U$7
1.257

1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5

1.0$7
1.168

1*5
1*5

1.778

1*2^

1.660
1.589
1.5)42
1.331

1*2|
1*2|
l*2j
l*2|

1.119
1.236

i*2j
l*2j

1.072
1.189

l*2j
l*2j

1.860
1.690

1*0
1*0

1.580

1*0

1.580

1*0

1.370

1*0

1.220
1.370

1*0
1*0

Occupational Wage Survey, M inneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 19$2
U.S. DEPARTM T OF LABOR
EN
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

12

Table C-205:

/£ a Jie A A e d ,-G o 4 itU u 4 e d

Table C-27«

July 1, 1952
Hours
per
week

St. Paul - Continued
Bread - Machine shops - Continued
Women workers:
F o r e m e n ..... .
Finishers, packers, wrappers:
First 8 weeks .......... ..
After 8 weeks ........ .
Pies and doughnuts:
Doughnut-machine operators ••.•.
Fruit and kettle fryers ........
Cake - Machine shops:
F o r e m e n ........ ...............
Mixers, overmen, doughnutmachine o p e r a t o r s .......... ....
Depositors ....................... .
Ingredient s c a l e r s ........ .
Icing-machine operators, wrappingmachine operators, semiautomatic
Helpers:
First 8 weeks ................ .
After 8 weeks ................ ..
Women workers:
Finishers, wrappers, packers:
First 8 weeks ......... .
After 8 weeks
Crackers and cookies:
Foremen ................ .
Rollermen ......................... .
Machinemen,

Table G-27t

ed

_______ July 1. 19$2
Rate
per
hour

Classification

P /U 4 * U * U f - C o + l /i f i t H

Classification

U
O

1 .0 2 0
1 .1 2 0

UO
UO

1 .6 9 0
1 .5 8 0

UO
UO

1 .8 6 0

U
O

1 .6 9 0
1 .5 8 0
1 .5 8 0

uo
uo
uo

1 .3 7 0

UO

1 .2 2 0
1 .3 7 0

uo
uo

1 .0 2 0
1 .1 2 0

uo
uo

1 .7 U 0
1 .U 0 0

Uo
Uo

1 .U 6 0

Uo

1 .U 0 0

Uo

1 .1 0 0
1 .2 0 0
1 .2 U 0
1 .3 5 0

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .1 2 0

Uo

1 .1 0 0

Uo

.8 7 0

U
O
U
O
Uo
Uo

Book and job shops - Continued
Machine operators:
Agreement A ............................................
Combination machine, linotype
and intertyp e
Agreement B ............................................
Machine tenders (m achin ists):
Agreement A .................................................. .
Agreement B .................................................. .
M a i l e r s ......................................... ................ ..
P hotoengravers.................... ••••••••••••••.
Press a s s is ta n ts and feeders:
C y lin d e r...................... •••••.......... ••••••<
Miehle v e r tic a l or K elly A
P laten ..........................................
Pressmen:
Cylinder p resses:
1 or 2 sin g le cy lin d ers; 1 sin gle
cylind er and 1 platen .................. .
2 -c o lo r or double enders or
s in g le -r o ll r o t a r y ........................ .
P laten p resses:
1 p r e s s .................................................... .
2 presses ............................................
3 p r e s s e s .............................•••••••...
U p r e s s e s .................. .............. ................
Stereotypers ...................... •••••••••••••••.

Hours
per
week

Table C-27:

.9 5 0

1 .0 2 0
1 .0 6 0

P ^ U 4 it i4 U f

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Minneapolis
Book and job shops:
Bindery women ................ ...........
Bookbinders .............. ....... .
Compositors, hand:
Agreement A ...........................
Agreement B .......................... .
Electrotypers................... .




Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work:
Agreement A •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Agreement B ........................................................
Compositors, hand - night work:
Agreement A .......................... .....................
Agreement B ........................................ ..
Machine operators - day work:
Agreement A .......................................•••••••
Agreement B .......................
.«••••••
Machine operators - night work:
Agreement A .....................................................
Agreement B .........................................•••••••
Machine tenders (m achinists) - day work:
Agreement A .....................................................
Agreement B •••••••..•••••............. •••••
Machine tenders (m achinists) night work:
Agreement A ......................
Agreement B ........................................................
M ailers - day w o rk ...........................................
M ailers - night work ••••••......... ............ ..
Photcengravers - day w o rk ......... ...................
Photoengravers - night work ...................... ..
Pressmen, web presses - day work ........... ..
Pressmen, web presses - night work .••••
Pressmen-in-charge - daywork ....................
Pressmen-in-charge - night work
Stereotypers - day work .................................
Stereotypers - night work .............................

37$
37$

2.650
2.680
2.860

37$
37$
37$

Book and job shops:
Bindery women:
Agreement A .
,
Foreladies
Agreement B .
,

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$ 2 ,5 2 0
2.5UO

37$
37$

2 .6 5 0
2 .6 8 0
2 .8 6 0

37$
37$
37$

2 .6 5 0
2 .6 8 0

37$
37$

2 .6 5 0
2 .6 8 0

37$
37$
37$

Book and job shops - Continued

$ 2 ,6 5 0

37|

2 .7 7 5
2 .6 8 0

37$
37!

2 .6 5 0

37!
37$
37$
37$

2 .6 8 0
2 .U 1 5

2 .8 0 0
2 .2 2 0
1 .5 5 0

37$
37$
37$

2 .6 5 0

37$

2 .7 3 0

37$

1 .9 3 0

2 .7 5 1

37$
37$
37$
37$
U0

2 .9 1 5
2 .7 8 5

35
35

3 .0 5 5
2 .9 1 0

35
35

2 .9 1 5
2 .7 8 5

35
35

3 .0 5 5
2 .9 1 0

35
35

2 .9 1 5
2 .7 8 5

35
35

3 .0 5 5
2 .9 1 0
2 .U 5 0
2 .5 7 5
2 .9 1 3
3 .0 9 3
2 .7 5 0

35
35
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37 $
37$
37$

1 .7 5 0

2 .0 9 0
2 .3 0 0
2 .3 6 0

2 .8 7 0
2 .9 5 0
3 .0 7 0
2 .7 5 0
2 .8 7 0

St. Paul
$ 1 ,2 7 5
2 .5 5 0

f

St. Paul - Continued

sweet-oven men,

dr awine............................
Pan greasers, flour dumpers, dough
scalers, sweet-oven relief men,
cracker stackers ......... .
Helpers:
S t a r t ............ .•••••••••••.
After 3 months .............. .
After 6 months
.....
After 1 y e a r ..............
Women workers:
Cracker p a c k e r s .......... ... •
.
Wrappers, packers, crackermachine operators, checkers •
<
Helpers:
Start
After 3 months
After 6 months
After 1 year .
,

t t ilU

_______ July 1. 1952
ftate
per
hour

Minneapolis - Continued

$1,370

P b U

1 .2 2 0

1 .UU0
1 .2 7 0

37$
37$
37$

Bookbinders:
Agreement A ........................................................
Agreement B
C om positors, hand:
Agreement A ...................................... ..................
Agreement B ...................................... ..................
E l e c t r o t y p e r s .......... ............. ..................................
Machine o p e r a to r s :
Agreement A ....................................................
Agreement B ............................ ............... ..
Machine te n d e rs (m a c h in is ts ):
Agreement A ...................... ............. ....................
Agreement B .........................................................
M ailers .........................................................................
P h otoengravers:
Agreement A ............................. ..•••••••••
Agreement B ............................................. •••••
P re ss a s s i s t a n t s and f e e d e r s :
Agreement A:
C ylinder fe e d e rs ................... ..
P la te n f e e d e r s ........................ ..................
Agreement B:
C y lin d e r, p e r f e c tin g , web,
U -c o lo r p re ss f e e d e r s ............ ..
.
P la te n , C arver o r W aite fe e d e rs •• .
Pressmen:
Agreement A:
C ylin d er p re s s e s :
1 o r 2 s in g le ; 1 cy lin d e r and 1
p la te n ; 1 K e lly ; any 2 o f the
follow ing and 1 p la te n : K elly
M iehle, V e r t i c a l , Simplex,
H o riz o n ta l, o r M ille r HighSpeed ...............................................
P la te n p r e s s e s :
1 p la te n o r O s t e r l i n d .................
2 p la te n s o r 2 O ste rlin d s ..........
3 p l a t e n s ...............................................
R otary p r e s s e s ......................................
Agreement B:
C ylin d er p re s s e s :
1 o r 2 s in g le ; 1 s in g le c y lin ­
d e r and 1 p la te n ; any 1 o f
th e follow ing and 1 p la te n :
K e lly , M iehle, V e r t i c a l ,
H o riz o n ta l, M ille r HighSpeed; 2 o f th e follo w in g :
H a rris im p rin t, K e lly A o r
B; v e r t i c a l Miehle
P la te n and C arver p r e s s e s :
1 o f each type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 o f each type ................... ..
3 o f each t y p e ...............................
U o f each type .....................................
Agreement C:
C ylin d er p r e s s e s :
Miehle v e r t i c a l ........................
R o tary p re s s e s :
"A" pressmen - s p e c ia l r o ta r y ..
"Bw pressmen - s p e c i a l r o ta r y . . .
Agreement D:
R otary p r e s s e s ................. ...........................
S te re o ty p e rs :
Agreement A ............................... ............... ..
Agreement B .......... ................................

2.U8U

2 .8 0 0

37$

3 .0 0 0

37$

2 .2 0 5
1 .5 7 0

37$
37$

2 .2 1 0
1 .5 U 0

2 .6 5 0

37$

1 .9 U 0
2 .2 0 5
2.3UO
2 .7 5 0

37$
37$
37$
37$

2 .6 6 0

37$

1 .9 3 0

2 .0 9 0
2 .2 6 0
2.U1C

37$
37$
37$
37$

2 .U 7 0

37$

2 .5 9 0
2 .5 1 0

37$
37$

2 .7 1 0

37$

2 .5 5 7

37$
37$

2 .6 0 0

13
Table C -27:

Table C-U2:

P ^ U n t in f - C o n t in u e d

A fo ta d to U c A

^ U a e^ d

Table C -u2:

A fo t a d b U c A

3 > 4 U *e 4 d

and cJfelpeM* -Continued
J u ly 1 , 1952

'""HaTe.... Hours
per
per
week
hour

C la s s ific a tio n
S t. Paul - Continued

$2.B$0
3.060
2.850
3.060

35
35
35
35

2.850

35

3.060
2.372
2.5U5
2.863
3.067
2.550
2.730
2.817
2.997
2.557
2.738

35
37$
37$
3?$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$

Jiooal 7 tenU t

October 1 , 1952
Rate
per
hour

C la s s i f i c a t i o n
2-man c a r s :
F i r s t 9 months .......................................... . . . . . • •
Second 9 months .........................................................
A fte r 18 months ...................................... ••••••••
1-man c a r s and b u sses:
F i r s t 9 m o n th s ...........................................................
Second 9 months ........................................ •••••••
A fte r 18 months ........................

Table C-U2:

M

o ta d k U c A

Hours
p er
week

$ 1 ,5 8 0
1 .6 1 0
1.61*0

Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .6 7 0
1 .7 0 0
1.7U0

Uo
U
O
Uo

S t fiu e /M

and dfelpe/U
C la ssifica tio n

R a t e " Hours
p er
per
week
hour

M inneapolis
Bakery:
R e ta il
W holesale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B eer:
D is tr ib u to r :
R egular r o u t e ...................................... ..
H elpers ....................................................................
H elpers .....................................................................
B u ild in g :
C on stru ctio n :
Bituminous d i s tr i b u t o r .......................... ..
Dump




____________ J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 2 ___________

I1.U 50
1 .5 7 0

Uo
Uo

1 .7 5 0
1 .5 7 5
1 .8 2 5
1 .7 7 0

U
O
Uo
Uo
uo

1 .8 5 0
1 .8 0 0

Uo
uo

B uild ing - Continued
E x c a v a tin g :
Under 0 cu . y d. ................... ..
6 - 8 cu . yd............ ..
8 - 1 6 cu . yd. .••••••••............ ••••••••
16 cu . yd. and o v e r ...................................
Tank tru ck and dumpster ...............................
B u tte r - C ity s a l e s ......................•••••..................
Cheese - F r e i g h t ............ ....................
Department sto r e ••••••.................................••••••
F lo u r and feed m ill:
Agreement A .......................... ..................................
H elpers ............................................................. ..
Agreement B ...................................................... •••••
Agreement C:
C ity ...........................................................................
Agreement D ................................. ••••••••..............
Agreement E •••...••••••...............••••••••••
F u rn itu re :
R e ta il:
Agreement A ..........................................................
H elpers ................................................. •••••
Agreement B •••••••.••••............ ••••••••
W holesale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G eneral:
Package d e l i v e r y .......... •........................................
F re ig h t - T ra n sfe r:
C om m ercial........................................ •..................
H e l p e r s ........................ ....................................
Household ••••.•••••••••••••............ ••••
H elpers .............................................................
Heavy hauling
H e l p e r s ............................................. ............. ..
Car h a u l i n g ................................. ..
C ity pick-up ................... .•••••••••••••••
H e l p e r s .................................................
G rocery - Wholesale ••••••••••••••••••••••••
H elpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I c e cream:
Agreement A:
F i r s t 1 2 weeks ....................................................
A fte r 1 2 weeks ..........................
Agreement B:
F i r s t 1 8 w e e k s ................................. ..
A fte r 18 w e e k s ...................................................
I n d u s tr ia l supply ..........................................................
Laundry:
Fam ily, w holesale and rug ••...............••••••
R ural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Liquor •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
H elpers
Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meatpacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Milk - Depot:
F i r s t 2 6 w e e k s ...........................................................
A fte r 2 6 w e e k s ............................................. ••••••
O il and g a so lin e :
Agreement A:
Under 2 ,1 0 0 g a l , :
S t a r t ..................................................................
3 - 6 months . . . .......... ............. ..
A fte r 6 months .................................. . . . .
2 ,1 0 0 g a l , o r o v e r:
S t a r t •••....................
3 - 6 months
A fte r 6 months .............................................
Agreement B:
T r a n s p o r t ............ ...........................................

C la s s ific a tio n

fiate
oer
hour

tfours
per
week

$ 1 .5 6 h
1.5 8 U
I.6 3 U

Uo
UO
Uo

1 .5 0 0
1.U 0 5
1 .2 9 0
1 .6 5 0
1 .5 0 0
1 .7 8 6
1 .5 3 0

U0
Uo
UO
Uo
Uo
uo
uo

1 .3 8 0
1 .U 0 0
1 .8 6 5
1 .7 8 5
1 .7 U 0

5U
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .8 2 0
1 .8 0 0
1 .9 5 0
2 .0 5 0
2 .1 5 0
1 .8 0 0
1 .6 2 5

Uo
UO
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .8 5 0

Uo

2 .0 U 0
1 .9 9 0
1 .8 0 0
1 .7 0 0

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .5 U 0
1 .U 8 0
1 .6 2 5
1 .5 U 0
1 .5 8 0
1 .U 8 0
1 .6 0 0
1 .5 U 0

Uo
UO
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
UU
UU

1 .6 2 0
1 .5 6 0
1 .6 6 0
1 .6 1 0
1 .6 1 0

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .6 1 0
1 .5 6 0

Uo
Uo

Minneapolis - Continued

Minneapolis - Continued

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day w o rk ................ ..
Compositors, hand - n ight w o rk ..................
Machine operators - day w o rk .................... ....
Machine operators - n ig h t w o rk ..............
Machine tenders (m achin ists) day work .................................................................
Machine tenders (m ach in ists) n ight w o rk ...................................... ................... ..
M ailers - day w o rk ............................................ ..
M ailers - night work ..........................................
Photoengravers - day work •••••.....................
Photoengravers - n ig ht work ...........................
Pressmen, web presses - day w o r k ................
Pressmen, web presses - n ight work ............
Pressmen-in-charge - day work .••••••••••
Pressmen-in-charge - n ig ht work ..................
Stereotypers - day work ....................................
Stereotypers - n ight work .................... ....

Table C -U l:

and dfdpeAA -Continued

______________J u ly 1 , 1952___________ '
H T O - Hours
C la s s i f i c a t i o n
per
p er
hour
week

$ 1 ,8 0 0
1 .9 5 0
2 .0 5 0
2 .1 5 0
1 .8 0 0
1 .5 9 0
1 .6 2 0
1 .5 7 0

Uo
U
O
U
O
U0
Uo
Uo
uo
uo

1.6U 0
1 .5 9 0
1.6U 0

uo
uo
Uo

1 .3 1 0
1 .6 1 0
1.6U 0

Uo
Uo
Uo

O il and gasoline - Continued
Agreement C:
S ta r t
6 - 1 2 months ...................................................
A fter 1 year .....................................................
Paper - Wholesale:
Agreement A ...................... ......................................
Agreement B .............................................................
Helpers ........................................................... ..
Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Railway express ................................. ...................
Tobacco and c a n d y ...................... ................................
S t . Paul

1 .5 7 0

Uo

1 .5 1 0
1 .5 1 0

1 .5 7 0

Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .5 7 0

Uo

1 .7 0 0
1 .6 5 0

1 .U 8 0

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
U2
U2
Uo
Uo

1 .6 8 0
1 .7 3 6

Uo
Uo

1 .7 5 5

Uo
Uo
Uo

1.7U 0
1 .6 9 0
2 .1 3 0
2 .0 8 0
1 .8 3 0
1 .6 6 0
1 .6 1 0

1 .5 7 0

1 .8 1 1

1 .5 7 0

1 .5 8 0

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

I .6 7 U
1 .8 1 U

Uo
Uo

1 .6 0 5
1 .6 7 5

Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .5 7 9
1.6U3
1 .7 2 0
1 .6 2 0
1 .5 7 0

1 .7 U 5
1 .6 3 0
1 .7 0 0

1 .7 7 0

Uo
Uo
Uo

1.7U5

U8

Bakery:
R e lie f d rivers - R e ta il ...................................
Transport - W h o le sa le .......................................
Beer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C ity d eliv ery .........................................................
H e lp e rs .................... .............. ............................
Building:
Construction:
G e n e r a l.................... ..........................................
Under 6 cu. yd..................................................
6 - 8 cu. yd....................................................
8 - 1 6 cu. yd........................
1 6 cu. yd. and o v e r ................................... ..
Service truck - 3/U t o n ............. ............ ..
Concrete-mixer truck - 3 yds....................
Hauling:
Concrete and machinery ........................
Heavy:
Winch .......................................................
H e lp e r s ...........................................
Tank truck ............................................
Helpers ............................................
M aterial:
Concrete b l o c k ............................ ..
Helpers ..................................................
Sand and g r a v e l .......................................
Lumber............................................ ...............
C o a l ...................................................................................
Helpers .
F u r n itu r e ............... . . » ......................... ..
Helpers .............................................. ..
General - Freigh t:
Local t r a n s f e r ...................... ...................••••••
H e lp e rs ...............................................................
C ity pick-up and deliv ery ......................
Package d eliv ery ............................... ..................
Helpers • • •• .»................................. ..............
Grocery:
W h o le sale.................................................................
Helpers .......................................................
Ic e :
R e ta il ........................................................ ............ t
Wholesale .................................................................
Laundry and dry cleaning - Linen suoply . . . .
Meat:
Wholesale ............................................................... ..
Newspaper ..................................................................... ,
Country d r i v e r s ......... ...........................................
Paper - Wholesale .......................................................
H e lp e rs ..................................................................
Railway e x p r e s s ................................... .....................
S o ft d r i n k ....................................................................

1 .3 5 0
U8
1 .5 0 0 : Uo
Uo
1 .5 8 0
1 .7 8 5
1 .9 3 0
1 .9 8 0
1 .5 3 0
1.U 7 5
1 .7 8 6
1 .5 7 5

Uo
U5
U5
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

lh
D :

S u p p le m e n ta ry

Table D -ls

^ i^ e A

W a g e

e tU

ic U

P ra c tic e s

ftd U M A id d O d tl

1/

P ercent o f to ta l plant employment
£3
By estab lishm ent p o lic y in
A ll m anufacturing
Machinery in d u s tr ie s
in d u s tr ie s 2 /
2d s h i f t
2d s h i f t
3d o r o th e r
3d o r o th er
s h i f t work
work
s h i f t work
work

S h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l

----------,-------------------------------------------------------------------------------A ctu a lly working on e x t r a s h i f t s in A ll m anufacturing
Machinery in d u s tr ie s
in d u s trie s 2 /
3d or
3d o r
2d s h i f t
2d s h i f t
o th e r s h i f t
o th e r s h i f t

A ll w o r k e r s ................................. ....................................... ..

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers in estab lish m en ts having
p ro v isio n s f o r l a t e s h i f t s ......................................

8 6 .0

6 8 .1

9 6 .7

7 4 .5

1 3 .9

5 .2

1 6 .4

2 .0

8 2 .6
6 6 .2
4 .6
1 3 .4
8 .2
1 3 .4
1 6 .2
3 .6
6 .8
1 5 .8
2 .1
9 .3
4 .4

6 7 .4
5 1 .0
2 .5
1 2 .8
1 1 .3
1 1 .8

7 4 .5
5 2 .3
-

1 2 .6
9 .7
1 .1
1 .4
1 .7
.8
2 .2

5 .2
2 .7

1 6 .4
1 0 .5
1 .2
2 .9
1 .3
5 .1
-

1 / 2 .0

.6
3 .4

3 .7
5 .5
3 .4
1 5 .8
2 .1
4 .4
9 .3
.6
.7

9 6 .7
7 4 .2
1 2 .0
1 0 .4
1 2 .1
3 9 .7
2 2 .5
.3
6 .7
1 5 .5
-

1 4 .0

3 1 .9

3 .3

With s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ...........................................
Uniform ce n ts (per hour) .................................
4 c e n ts ............................................................... ..
5 ce n ts ...................................... ...........................
6 ce n ts ..................................................................
7 , 7 ^ o r 8 c e n t s .............................................
10 ce n ts ...............................................................
12 ce n ts ............................................................ ..
12^ ce n ts ..............................................................
Over 12-^ and under 15 c e n ts ...................
15 ce n ts ................................................................
25 c e n t s ...............................................................
Uniform p ercen tage ............................................ ..
5 p e r c e n t ...........................................................
7% p ercen t ...........................................................
10 p ercen t ...........................................................
12-£ p e r c e n t ........................................................
Other 2 / .......................................................................
With no s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ....................................

-

-

Workers in estab lish m en ts having
no p ro v isio n s f o r l a t e s h i f t s ...............................

1 0 0 .0

XXX

XXX

-

5 .8
1 1 .5
1 4 .5

-

.3
.3
.8
.9

-

-

-

-

.1
.2
.1
2 .4
-

.5
2 .0
2 .7
.1
2 .3
.3

2 0 .5
2 2 .2
1 5 .5
6 .7

5 .9
2 .0
3 .9

.2
1 .3

(V )
(V )
2 .4
.1
(£ /)

XXX

XXX

-

-

-

2 5 .5

XXX

XXX

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

_

-

_

-

-

XXX

XXX

1/ S h ift d if fe r e n t ia l data are presented in terms o f (a) establishm ent p o licy , and (b) workers actu ally employed on la te s h i f t s a t the time o f
the survey. An establishm ent was considered as having a p o licy i f i t met any of the follow ing conditions! ( l ) operated la te s h i f t s a t the time of
the survey, (2) had union-contract provisions covering la te s h i f t s , or (3) had operated la te s h ifts within 6 months p rior to the survey,
2/ Includes data fo r machinery in d u stries also shown sep arately .
2/ In s u ffic ie n t number o f workers to warrant d etailed presen tation o f d ata,
4/ Less than 0 ,0 5 p ercen t.
2/ 8 hours* pay fo r 7 hours* work.
Table D -2:

S c h e d u le d

fy J e e J tU y

J fo

u

/t i.

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS l / EMPLOYED IN -

Weekly hours

ah
0 / anufacturing
industries £ / M

A ll workers ............................................................

1 00.0

Under 37^ hours ...................................................
372 hours ...............................................................
Over 37^ and under 40 h o u r s .........................
40 hours ..................................................................
42 hours ..................................................................
42^- hours ................................................................
Over 42^- and under 48 h o u r s .........................
48 h o u r s .............................................................
Over 48 hours .......................................................

1 .8
1 0 .0
8 .1
7 6 .2
2 .1
1 .3
.4

-

.1

Public
utilities •

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.3
5 .6
1 4 .5
7 8 .5

2 .7

5 .9
5 .0
86 .1
3 .0
-

-

.7
.4

-

-

9 6 .7
-

.6

_

2 .8
1 .3
80.3
1 1 .6
2 .3
1 .2
-

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Finance •
•

Services

anufacturing
industries^/ M

100.0

100.0

100.0

.8
2 4 .1
14.2
6 0 .8
.1
-

.5
3 .9

.9
7.2

7 1 .8
4 .2
3 .1
7 .1
3 .7
5.7

73.3
-

—

-

-

6 .5

3 .4
8 .7

Public
utilities •

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

100.0

1 00.0

100.0

_

8 2 .6
2 .8
6 .8
7 .8

97 .2
2 .8
—

Services

_

-

60.9
1 7 .6
9 .9
6 .4
5 .2

~

1/ Data r e la t e to women workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, M inneap olis-St. P aul, Minn,, November 1952
2/ Includes data fo r serv ices in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep arate ly .
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
3/ Includes data fo r r e a l e s ta te and serv ices in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep arate ly .
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
* * Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s t a te .




Table D -3:

PERC EN T OF OF

Number o f paid holidays

A ll workers ............................................................
Establishm ents providing paid
holidays 2 / .................................................
Under 6 days ...................................................
6 days ................................................................
7 days ................................................................
8 days ................................................................
9 days ................................................................
10 d a y s ................................................... ..
11 days ..............................................................
12 days ..............................................................
Establishm ents providing no paid
h o lid a y s .................................................

Ail
/
industries ±J Manufacturing

P

a id

J to

U

d

a fi

E WORKERS EM PLOYED I N -

Public
utilities **

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

PERCEN T OF PLANT W ORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance

•
•

100.0

100.0

100.0

00.0

100.0

100.0

99.7

100.0

100.0

0.0

100.0

(4/)
74.1
13.7
3 .1
5 .9
1 .4
1 .3

.
2
.3

_

58.6
4 1 .4

7 9 .5

11 .7
3 .9
4 .9
-

AH
industries

Services

1

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

100.0

100.0

9 4 .8

97.9

97 .5

100.0

89.2

2 .6
79 .7
11 .5
.5
.4

97.0
3 .0
-

.7

-

.8

-

_

-

-

Services

100.0

.2
2/ 66 .7
9 .7
4 .0
17 .9

8 .8
9 .3
-

-

•

100.0

-

-

Public
utilities

100.0

5 ..0
~ .3

-

Manufacturing

100.0

_

-

.

84.7
11 .6
.9
.7
_
-

.
1

5.2

~

. 2 .1

15.9
56.2

3.3

80.8
16.7
_
_
-

2 5 .4

-

-

7 9 .3

6.1
_
•
-

2.5

-

10 .3

2 .5

1/
2/

Includes data fo r serv ices in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep arately .
Includes data fo r r e a l e sta te and serv ices in addition to those industry d iv ision s shown sep arately .
2/ Paid holidays o f le s s than a f u l l day have been omitted.
4/ Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
2/ Estim ates published in the November 1951 study indicated th at some establishm ents provided 11 paid holid ays. Banks previously granted 11 holidays but reduced the number to 6 when they
adopted a 5-day work schedule. Corrected estim ates fo r November 1951 are? 6 days, 54.9 p ercent; 11 days, none. A ll-in d u stry estim ates should read: 6 days, 70.3 p ercent; 11 days, 1.1 percent.
*
T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
**
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .

Table D-li:

P

a id

V

g jc &

U

o s

U

{ ty o A m

a l P A jO d U U a n d )

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Vacation p o licy

M
anufacturing

O

100.0

99.3
9 6.9
3 1.6
65.3
1 .9
.2
_
1 .7

100.0
94.1
18.7
75.4
5.9
.8
5.1

O
O
H

A ll w o r k e r s ...............................................................

A
H , ,
industries 1 /

....

Public
utilities •

W
holesale
trade

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0
9 5 .2
68.1
27.1
_
_
_
4 .8

Finance ••

Retail trade

_

100.0
100.0
38 .4
6 1 .6
-

100.0

_

Services

A
ll _ ,
anufacturing
industries 2/ M

10 0 .0 . ___________ ____100*0___ ,,

100.0
85.3
72 .9
1 0 .4
2 .0
12.0
7 .5
4 .5
2 .7

W
holesale
trade

10Q--0

100.0
100.0
100.0
.
-

Public
utilities •

Retail trade

Servioes

100.0

A f te r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts p rovid ing
p aid v a ca tio n s ....................................................
L en gth -of-tim e payment ...............................
1 w e e k ..............................................................
2 weeks ...........................................
O t h e r ......................................................... ..
P ercen tage payment 4 / .................................
2 p e rc e n t ................. ..................
Over 2 but l e s s than 3 p e rce n t . . .
4
p e r c e n t ....................................... ..
Other .......................................................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts pro vid in g no
paid v a c a tio n s ............................... ....................

.5
.7

-

-

_
_
-

See fo o tn o tes a t end o f t a b le .
*
T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
* * Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .




NOTE*

9 4 .8
9 4 .8
77.4
17 .4
-

-

5.2

9 9 .2
9 1 .1
7 2.2
17 .8
1 .1
6 .6
4 .2
2 .4
1 .5

-

.8

-

9 9 .4
9 9 .4
2/ 79.9
2/ 19.5
.6

100.0
100.0
72.6
2 7 .4
-

96.8
96 .8
62.3
34.5
-

-

-

-

-

3 .2

Occupational Wage Survey, M inneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1952

Estim ates are provided sep arately , according to employer p ra c tic e in computing
vacation payments (len g th -o f-tim e , percentage, or f l a t sum); percentage and
flat-su m payments were converted to equivalent time periods in e a r lie r studies,

U .S. DEPA EN OF LABOR
RTM T
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

16

Table D~u:

P aid Vacation^ tyoAmal PAaoidiand)-GatUisuted

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V acation p o licy

A ll w o r k e r s ...............................................................

A
H
.
anufacturing
industries 1 / M

Public
utilities •

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance •*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .6
9 .9
8 7 .A
.3
1 .9
.2
1 .7
.5

1 0 0 .0
9A.1
7 .8
8 6 .0
.3
5 .9
.8
5 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
9 5 .2
9 .9
8 5 .3
A .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 .5
9 1 .5
_
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 9 .5
8 0 .5
_

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_

Services

1

I

A
ll
.
anufacturing
industries 2 / M

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities *

W
holesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
A 2.0
5 8 .0
_
_

9 8 .1
9 8 .1
2 2 .6
7A .1
l .A
_
.

Retail trade

A fter 2 y ears o f se r v ic e
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
paid v a c a t i o n s ................ . ................................
Len gth-of-tim e p ay m en t...............................
1 week .............................................................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Other ...............................................................
Percentage payment i j .................................
2 p ercen t ......................................................
Over 2 but l e s s than 3 p ercen t . . .
A p ercen t ......................................................
O t h e r .....................................................................
Workers in estab lishm ents providing no
paid v a ca tio n s ....................................................

-

-

-

_
_

.
.
_

-

-

9 9 .5
9 1 .A
A3.5
A5.1
2 .8
6 .6
A.2
2 .A
1 .5
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .3
5 3 .0
2 8 .5
3 .8
1 2 .0
7 .5
A .5

9 9 .A
99 .A
2 1 .8
7A.1
3 .5

2 .7

_
_
.
-

- '
_
_

-

.6

-

1 .9

A fter 3 y ears o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lishm ents provid ing
paid v a c a t i o n s ...................................................
Length-of-tim e p ay m en t...............................
1 w e e k .......................................... ..................
2 weeks ...........................................................
3 weeks ..........................................................
Other ...............................................................
Percentage payment f j .................................
2 p e r c e n t ............................ ............. ..
3 p ercen t ......................................................
A p ercen t ......................................................
Over A but le s s than 6 p ercen t . . .
Other ......................................................................
Workers in estab lishm ents providing no
paid v a ca tio n s ....................................................

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .6
5 .0
9 1 .6
.8
.2
1 .9
1 .9
.5
-

1 0 0 .0
9A.1
6 .6
8 5 .7
1 .8
5 .9
5 .9
_
-

1 0 0 .0
9 5 .2
6 .8
8 8 .A
A .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
l .A
9 8 .6
.
.
.

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 .7
9 2 .9
l .A
_
-

-

_
_

-

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.
1 0 0 .0
.
.
.
.
.
•
-

9 9 .5
91.A
1 7 .A
6 8 .6
1 .5
3 .9
6 .6
.9
2 .A
.9
2 .A
1 .5
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .3
2 3 .A
5 5 .6
2 .1
A.2
1 2 .0
1 .6
A.2
1 .7
A .5
2 .7

9 9 .A
99.A
1 8 .6
7 7 .3
_
3 .5
_
_
_

.6

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 7 .0
79.A
•
3 .6
_
_
_
_
.
_
-

9 8 .1
9 8 .1
A .l
9 1 .2
l .A
l .A
_
_

1 .9

A fte r 5 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
paid v a ca tio n s ....................................................
Length-of-tim e p ay m en t.......................... ..
1 w e e k .............................................................
2 weeks ............................ ..............................
3 weeks ...........................................................
Other ...............................................................
Percentage payment £ / .................................
A p ercen t ......................................................
Over A but le s s than 6 p ercen t . . .
Other ......................................................................
Workers in estab lishm ents provid ing no
paid v acatio n s ....................................................

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .6
2 .A
9 0 .1
3 .7
l .A
1 .9
1 .9

1 0 0 .0
9A.1
2 .8
8 9 .2
1 .8
.3
5 .9
5 .9

1 0 0 .0
9 5 .2
3 .0
9 2 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 0 .7
9 .3
.
.

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 5 .A
.
A .6
-

_

_

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

.5

-

A .8

_

-

-

See foo tn o tes a t end o f ta b le *
*
T ran sp ortatio n (exclu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
Fin an ce, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e .




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.3
9 6 .A
3 .3
-

9 9 .5
9 1 .A
1 .2
8 5 .9
3 .1
1 .2
6 .6
A.2
2 .A
1 .5
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .3
1 .7
7 9 .6
2 .1
1 .9
1 2 .0
7 .5
A.5
2 .7

9 9 .A
9 9 .A
9 7 .7
1 .7
_

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.
-

9 8 .1
9 8 .1
.8
9 1 .6
5 .7
_
-

.

-

-

-

•

_

-

-

.6

-

1 .9

8ervioes

17

Table D-U*

P a u l fy o C & U oH A W a % m a l P A 0 4 aU 4O 4 U )

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN V acatio n p o lic y

A ll w o r k e r s .......... ................................

A
ll
.
anufacturing
industries 1 / M

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Public
utilities *

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance ••

Services

A
ll
.
industries^/

1 0 0 ,0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .6
2.A
7 5 .1
2 0 .0
.1
1 .9
1 .7
.2
.5

1 0 0 .0
9A.1
2 .8
7 0 .9
2 0 .1
.3
5 .9
5 .1
.8
-

1 0 0 .0
9 5 .2
3 .0
7 6 .2
1 6 .0
A .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 0 .9
1 9 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.3
8 5 .0
1A .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
7 6 .8
2 3 .2
-

9 9 .5
9 1 .A
1 .2
7 0 .6
1 8 .9
.7
6 .6
.9
5 .0
.7
1 .5

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities •

W
holesale
trade

_

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .3
1 .7
6 3 .1
2 0 .0
.5
1 2 .0
1 .6
9 .1
1 .3
2 .7

99 .A
99.A
7 0 .9
2 5 .0
3 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 9 .0
1 1 .0

9 8 .1
9 8 .1
.8
8 1 .1
1 6 .2
_
-

Retail trade

A fte r 10 T ears o f s e r v ic e
Vorkers in estab lish m en ts pro vid in g
paid v a c a tio n s ....................................................
L en g th -o f-tim e p ay m en t........................ ..
1 week ..............................................................
2 weeks ...........................................................
3 w e e k s ...........................................................
Other ................................................................
P ercen tage payment f j ..................................
A p e rce n t ................... •••••.................... ..
Over A but l e s s than 6 p e rce n t . . .
6 p e rce n t and o v e r .......... .......................
O t h e r ............................... ................................ ..
Workers in estab lish m en ts p ro vid in g no
p aid v a c a t i o n s ....................................................

“

“

.6

.5

~

1 .9

A f te r 15 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts pro vid in g
paid v a c a tio n s ....................................................
Length-of-^time p a y m e n t...............................
1 w e e k ............................... ••••••............. ..
2 w e e k s ................................................
3 weeks ...........................................................
O t h e r ......................................................... ..
P ercen tage payment ( J ...................... ..
A p e rce n t .......................................................
Over A bu t l e s s than 6 p e rce n t . . .
6 p e rce n t and over .................................
O t h e r .......... .....................................................
Workers in estab lish m e n ts pro vid in g no
p aid v a c a tio n s ....................................................

1 0 0 .0
97*
2 .A
2 8 .1
6 7 .0
.1
1 .9
1 .9
.5

1 0 0 .0
9A.1
2 .8
3A.3
5 6 .7
.3
5 .9
5 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
9 5 .2
3 .0
15.A
7 6 .8
A .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
A 8.0
5 2 .0
“

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.3
2 7 .3
72 .A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 .9
9 1 .1
-

9 9 .5
9 1 .A
1 .2
35.A
5A.2
.6
6 .6
.5
.2
5 .9
1 .5
.5

—

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .3
1 .7
2A.A
5 8 .1
1 .1
1 2 .0
1 .0
.A
1 0 .6
2 .7

99.A
99.A
2A .7
7A .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
AO.O
6 0 .0
-

.6

-

9 8 .1
9 8 .1
.8
5A.5
A 2.8
_
1 .9

A fte r 20 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts provid ing
paid v a c a tio n s ....................................................
L en gth -of-tim e p a y m e n t.............................
1 w e e k ................. ............................................
2 w e e k s ......................................................... ..
3 weeks ............................................................
A weeks and o ver ......................................
O t h e r .............................................................. ..
P ercen tage payment
. . . . ................... ....
A p e r c e n t ................................................
Over A but l e s s than 6 p e rce n t . . .
6 p e rce n t and o ver ..................................
O t h e r .......... ............................................................
Workers in estab lish m e n ts p ro vid in g no
p aid v a c a t i o n s ........................ ...........................

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .6
2.A
2 7 .5
6 5 .7
2 .0

1 0 0 .0
9A.1
2 .8
3 3 .3
5 8 .0
-

-

-

1 .9
-

5 .9
5 .9

-

1 .9
.5

-

1 0 0 .0
9 5 .2
3 .0
15.A
7 6 .8
-

A .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
A 8.0
5 2 .0
-

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b l e •
*
T ra n sp o rta tio n (exclu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in a n c e , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e .




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.3
2 7 .3
7 2 .3
.1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
7 .8
8 3 .9
8 .3
-

9 9 .5
91.A
1 .2
3A .3
5A.9
.2
.3
6 .6
.5
.2
5 .9
1 .5
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .3
1 .7
2 3 .2
5 9 .8
.6
1 2 .0
1 .0
•A
1 0 .6
2 .7

.

99 .A
99 .A
2A .7
7A .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
AO.O
6 0 .0
-

“
“
.6

9 8 .1
9 8 .1
.8
5A.5
4 2 .0
.8
“
1 .9

Servioes

Table d-4! P a id V acaiU uU W qsumU P axuUUohA) -Q a*tti*tu ed

18

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V acation p o lic y

A ll workers ........................................................... ....

A
ll
.
anufacturing
industries 1 / M

Public
utilities

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance •
•

A
ll
.
industries2/

Services

M
anufacturing

W
holesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .6
2 .4
2 6 .0
5 4 .9
1 4 .3
1 .9
1 .9
.5

1 0 0 .0
9 4 .1
2 .8
3 2 .6
5 8 .7
5 .9
5 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
9 5 .2
3 .0
1 5 .4
7 6 .8
4 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 2 .7
1 7 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.3
2 6 .5
4 3 .7
2 9 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
7 .8
6 0 .7
3 1 .5
-

9 9 .5
9 1 .4
1 .2
3 4 .1
5 1 .1
4 .7
.3
6 .6
.5
.2
5 .9
1 .5

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .3
1 .7
2 3 .2
5 9 .8
.6
1 2 .0
1 .0
.4
1 0 .6
2 .7

9 9 .4
9 9 .4
2 4 .7
7 4 .7
-

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities •

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 6 .6
5 1 .1
1 2 .3

9 8 .1
9 8 .1
. .8
5 2 .6
2 7 .5
1 7 .2
-

Servioee

A fter 25 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s ....................................................
L en gth -of-tim e payment ...............................
1 week .............................................................
2 weeks ...........................................................
3 w e e k s ...........................................................
4 weeks and over ......................................
O t h e r .......................... . ...................................
Percentage payment 4 / .................................
4 p ercen t ......................................................
Over 4 but l e s s than 6 p ercen t . . .
6 p ercen t and over .................................
Other ......................................................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing no
paid v a ca tio n s ....................................................

-

-

-

.6

.5

1 .9

1 / Includes d ata f o r s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to those in d u stry d iv isio n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
2 / Includes d ata f o r r e a l e s ta te and s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to those in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
3 / E stim ates published in th e November 1951 study in c o r r e c tly included one estab lishm ent a s providing 2 weeks' ra th e r than a week's v a ca tio n a f t e r 1 y e a r o f s e r v i c e .
f o r November 1951 a r e : 1 week, 7 9 .8 p e rce n t; 2 weeks, 1 9 .7 p e r c e n t. A ll-in d u s try e stim a te s should read* 1 week, 7 9 .2 p e rce n t; 2 weeks, 1 5 .9 p e r c e n t.
4 / P ercen t o f annual e a rn in g s .
*
T ran sp o rtatio n (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th e r pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .

Table

D -5 :

fa d U tOHCe G*ut P&nliO*l PJ&H/l

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type o f plans

A
ll
industries 1 /

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities *

C orrected e stim a te s

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED 'IN—

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance •
•

Services

A
ll
industries^/

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities *

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

A ll w o rk e rs .............................. ................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers in estab lish m en ts having
insurance or pension plan s 2 / .................

8 9 .4

8 8 .7

1 0 0 .0

8 8 .0

8 8 .1

9 7 .2

Servioee

8 3 .5

8 2 .6

9 9 .4

8 4 .2

7 7 .7

Insurance plan s 3 / ........................................
L ife ..................................................................
A ccid en tal death and
dismemberment ........................................
Sickness and acc id e n t ..........................
H o sp ita liz a tio n ........................................
S u rg ical .........................................................
Medical ...........................................................
Pension or re tire m e n t plan ......................

8 6 .9
8 2 .9

8 8 .7
8 5 .7

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

8 0 .3
7 5 .5

8 5 .7
8 3 .7

9 3 .8
8 5 .9

8 2 .1
7 7 .8

8 2 .6
7 6 .9

9 9 .4
9 9 .4

8 3 .1
7 6 .4

7 2 .5
7 1 .7

4 2 .6
4 6 .6
6 6 .5
6 1 .5
4 0 .6
5 9 .5

5 3 .8
7 2 .0
7 8 .9
7 4 .2
4 8 .6
5 9 .4

4 4 .8
4 7 .3
2 8 .2
2 3 .8
1 8 .4
7 8 .9

3 3 .1
3 9 .1
6 4 .5
5 9 .0
3 5 .3
5 3 .8

5 2 .1
7 1 .9
6 8 .2
5 6 .5
2 6 .9
3 7 .0

3 5 .5
1 0 .2
7 8 .1
7 5 .8
5 7 .2
7 9 .8

4 3 .5
5 8 .6
6 2 .0
5 8 .6
3 5 .7
4 1 .7

4 5 .8
6 8 .6
7 2 .4
6 9 .4
4 3 .2
3 8 .3

6 3 .0
5 3 .3
4 7 .1
4 4 .3
3 8 .9
8 0 .2

3 9 .7
3 4 .8
5 9 .6
5 1 .6
2 8 .1
4 6 .8

3 6 .0
4 9 .4
4 6 .2
4 4 .2
1 9 .8
3 7 .6

Workers in estab lishm ents having no
insurance or pension plans ........................

1 0 .6

1 1 .3

1 2 .0

1 1 .9

2 .8

1 6 .5

1 7 .4

.6

1 5 .8

2 2 .3

1/
2/
3/

y
*
**

(£ /)

Includes d ata f o r s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to those in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
Includes d ata f o r r e a l e s ta te and s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to those in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly ,
Unduplicated t o t a l .
Less than 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.
T ran sp o rtatio n (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in an ce, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e .




O ccupational Wage Survey, M in n eap o lis-S t. P a u l, M inn., November 1952
U .S . DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

19

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The B u reau 's o ccu p atio n al wage surveys are designed to
p rovide a maximum o f u s e fu l and r e lia b le in fo rm atio n w ith a v a ila ­
b le reso u rces* In o rd e r to use reso u rces e f f i c i e n t ly and to pub­
l i s h r e s u l ts p ro m p tly , th e surveys d id n o t cover a l l e stab lish m en ts
in th e community* Although tho se stu d ied a re s e le c te d to provide
re p re s e n ta tiv e r e s u l t s , no sample can r e f l e c t p e rfe c tly a l l d if f e r ­
ences in o c c u p a tio n a l s tr u c tu r e , e a rn in g s, and w orking c o n d itio n s
among e stab lish m en ts*
Because o f th e g re a t v a ria tio n in o ccu p atio n al s tr u c tu re
among e s ta b lis h m e n ts, e stim a te s of o ccu p atio n al employment are sub­
j e c t to c o n sid e ra b le sam pling flu c tu a tio n * Hence, th e y serv e o n ly
to in d ic a te th e r e la tiv e num erical im portance o f th e job s stu d ied *
The f lu c tu a tio n s i n employment do n o t m a te ria lly a f f e c t th e accuracy
o f th e ea rn in g s d ata*
W ith th e ex cep tio n o f th e union r a te s c a le s , in fo rm atio n
p resen ted in t h i s b u lle tin was c o lle c te d by v i s i t s o f th e Bureau’s
f i e l d re p re s e n ta tiv e s to estab lish m en ts inclu d ed in th e study*
O ccupational c la s s if ic a tio n i s based on a uniform s e t o f jo b de­
s c rip tio n s d esig n ed to tak e account o f in te re sta b lis h m e n t v a ria tio n
in d u tie s w ith in th e same jo b ; th e se job d e s c rip tio n s are a v a ila b le
upon req u est*
S ix broad in d u s try d iv is io n s were covered in com piling
e arn in g s d a ta f o r th e fo llo w in g ty p es o f occupations s (a) o ffic e
c l e r i c a l ; (b) p ro fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l; (c) m aintenance and power
p la n t; and (d) c u s to d ia l, w arehousing, and sh ip p in g (ta b le s A -l
through A-4>)* The in d u s try groupings surveyed a re s m anufacturing;
tra n s p o rta tio n (ex cep t r a ilr o a d s ) , comm unication, and o th e r p u b lic
u t i l i t i e s ; w h o lesale tra d e ; r e t a i l tra d e ; fin a n c e , in su ra n c e , and
r e a l e s ta te ; and se rv ic e s* In fo rm atio n on work sch ed u les and supple­
m entary b e n e fits a ls o was o b tain ed in a re p re s e n ta tiv e group o f es­
tab lish m en ts in each o f th e se in d u s try d iv isio n s* As in d ic a te d in
th e fo llo w in g ta b le , o n ly estab lish m en ts above a c e rta in s iz e were
stu d ied * S m aller estab lish m en ts were om itted because th e y f u r ­
n ish ed i n s u f f ic ie n t employment in th e occupations stu d ied to w arran t
in c lu sio n *
Among th e in d u s trie s in which c h a r a c te r is tic job s were
s tu d ie d , minimum s iz e o f estab lish m en t and e x te n t o f th e a re a cov­
ered were determ ined s e p a ra te ly fo r each in d u s try (see fo llo w in g
ta b le )* A lthough s iz e lim its fre q u e n tly v a rie d from tho se e s ta b ­
lis h e d f o r su rv ey in g c ro s s -in d u s try o ffic e and p la n t jo b s , d a ta f o r




such jo b s were inclu d ed only fo r firm s m eeting the s iz e re q u ire ­
m ents o f th e broad in d u s try d iv isio n s*
A g re a te r p ro p o rtio n o f la rg e than o f sm all estab lish m en ts
was stu d ied in o rd er to maximize th e number o f w orkers surveyed w ith
a v a ila b le reso u rces* Each group o f estab lish m en ts o f a c e rta in
s iz e , how ever, was given i t s proper w eight in th e com bination of
d a ta by in d u s try and occupations*
The earn in g s in fo rm atio n excludes premium pay fo r overtim e
and n ig h t work* N onproduction bonuses a re a ls o excluded, b u t c o s to f-liv in g bonuses and in c e n tiv e e a rn in g s, in c lu d in g commissions fo r
s a le sp e rso n s, a re included* Where weekly hours are re p o rte d , as
f o r o ffic e c l e r i c a l occupations* re fe re n c e i s to work schedules
(rounded to th e n e a re s t h a lf-h o u r) f o r which th e s tra ig h t-tim e s a la ­
r i e s are p a id ; average w eekly earn in g s fo r th e se occupations have
been rounded to th e n e a re s t 50 cents* The number o f workers pre­
sen ted r e f e r s to th e estim ated t o t a l employment in a l l e s ta b lis h ­
m ents w ith in th e scope of th e stu d y and n o t to th e number a c tu a lly
surveyed. D ata are shown fo r on ly fu ll-tim e w orkers, i * e ., those
h ire d to work th e e sta b lish m e n t’ s fu ll-tim e schedule fo r the given
o ccu p atio n al c la s s ific a tio n *
The term wo ffic e w orkersw re fe rre d to in th is b u lle tin
in c lu d es a l l o ffic e c le r ic a l employees and excludes a d m in istra tiv e ,
e x e c u tiv e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l personnel* ttP lan t w orkers11
in c lu d e s w orking forem en and a l l nonsu p erv iso ry workers (in clu d in g
leadmen and tra in e e s ) engaged in n o n o ffice fu n ctio n s* A dm inistra­
t i v e , e x e c u tiv e , p ro fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l em ployees, and fo rc e account c o n stru c tio n employees who a re u tiliz e d as a sep arate work
fo rc e , a re excluded. Although c a f e te r ia w orkers, routem en, and in ­
s ta ll a t io n and re p a ir employees are excluded in m anufacturing indus­
t r i e s , th e se work c a te g o rie s are inclu d ed as p la n t w orkers in non­
m anufacturing in d u s trie s*
S h if t- d if f e r e n tia l d a ta a re lim ite d to m anufacturing in ­
d u s trie s and have been p resen ted both in term s of estab lish m en t
p o lic y and accord in g to p ro v isio n s f o r w orkers a c tu a lly employed
on e x tra s h if t s a t th e tim e of th e su rv ey . E stablishm ents were
considered as having a s h if t - d i f f e r e n t i a l p o lic y i f th ey met any of
th e fo llo w in g co n d itio n s t o perated la te s h if ts a t th e tim e of th e
survey; o p erated la te s h if ts w ith in 6 months b efo re th e f ie ld v i s i t ;
o r had a union c o n tra c t p ro v isio n f o r payment o f e x tr a - s h if t work*
P ro p o rtio n s in th e ta b u la tio n o f estab lish m en t p o lic y are presented

20

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

o ffic e w orkers of th e ta b le summ arizing scheduled weekly h o u rs.
Because o f e l i g i b i l i t y req u irem en ts, th e p ro p o rtio n a c tu a lly re ­
c eiv in g th e s p e c ific b e n e fits may be sm a lle r.

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary o f v a catio n p la n s i s lim ite d to form al a r ­
rangem ents. I t excludes inform al p la n s whereby tim e o ff w ith pay
i s g ran ted a t th e d is c r e tio n o f th e em ployer o r o th e r su p e rv is o r.
T ab u latio ns o f insu ran ce and p ension p la n s have been co n fined to
th o se fo r which a t l e a s t a p a rt o f th e c o s t is borne by the emplqyer.

E stab lish m en ts and Workers in M ajor In d u stry D iv isio n s and in S elected In d u s trie s in M in n eap o lis-S t. P a u l, M inn., 1 /
and Number S tudied by th e Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s , November 1952

Item

Minimum number
o f w orkers in
e sta b lish m en ts
stu d ied

u

Numbler o f
e s ta h li shments
E stim ated
to ta l
w ith in
S tudied
scope o f
study

E stim ated
to ta l
w ith in
scope o f
study

Employment
In e s ta b lish m e n ts
s tu d ied
T o tal

O ffice

In d u stry d iv is io n s in which occuD ations
were surveyed on an a re a b a s is
A ll d iv is io n s ............................................................................
M anufacturing ......................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...............................................................
T ran sp o rtatio n (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) ,
comm unication, and o th e r p u b lic
u t i l i t i e s ....................................................................
W holesale tra d e ..........................................................
R e ta il tra d e .................................................................
Finance, in su ran ce , and r e a l e s ta te ............
S erv ices 2 / ....................................................................
In d u s trie s in which occunations were
surveyed on an In d u stry b a s is (J
Machinery in d u s trie s .............................................................
Power la u n d rie s .................................................................

51
51
51

961
389
572

234
83
151

219,700
106,000
113,700

128,990
60,880
68,110

31,690
10,470
21,220

51
51
51
51
51

63
122
229
82
76

21
36
42
29
23

24,300
18,000
44,700
15,600
11,100

19,210
9 ,0 70
25,440
9,750
4 ,640

3,780
3,520
4,820
7,680
1,420

5 / 21
21

116
31

35
15

21,872
2,225

16,442
1,433

2,204
76

1 / M in n eap o lis-S t. Paul M etrop o litan Area (Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin* and-Ramsey C o u n ties).
2 / T o tal estab lish m en t employment. The minimum s iz e o f estab lish m en t stu d ied in the November 1951 survey was 21 w orkers in whole­
sa le tra d e ! fin a n c e , in su ran ce , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e rv ic e s , and 51 in th e o th e r m ajor in d u stry d iv is io n s .
2 / H o tels; p erso n al s e rv ic e s ; b u sin ess s e rv ic e s ; autom obile r e p a ir shops; ra d io b ro ad castin g and te le v is io n ; m otion p ic tu r e s ; non­
p r o f it membership o rg a n iz a tio n s; and en g in eerin g and a r c h ite c tu r a l s e rv ic e s .
(J In d u s trie s a re d efin ed in fo o tn o te s to wage ta b le s .
2 / E stab lish m en ts m anufacturing m achine-tool a c c e sso rie s w ith 8 o r more w orkers were a ls o in clu d ed .




21

Index
A ssem bler (m ach in ery), 9
Bench hand (b a k e rie s ), 11
B i l le r , m achine, 3
Bookbinder ( p r in tin g ) , 12
Bookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to r, 3
B ric k la y e r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
C alcu latin g -m ach ine o p e ra to r, 3 , 4
C arp en ter (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
C arp en ter, m aintenance, 6
C lean er, 7
C leaner (m ach in ery ), 9
C lerk , f i l e , 4
C lerk , o rd e r, 3 , 4
C lerk , p a y ro ll, 3 , 4
C lerk , r e t a i l re c e iv in g (power
la u n d r ie s ) , 10
C om positor, hand ( p r in tin g ) , 12, 13
D raftsm an, 6
D r ill- p r e s s o p e ra to r (m achinery), 9
D uplicating-m achine o p e ra to r, 4
E le c tr ic ia n (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
E le c tr ic ia n , m aintenance, 6
E le c tr ic ia n , m aintenance (m achinery), 9
E n g in e-lath e o p e ra to r (m achinery), 9
E n gin eer, s ta tio n a ry , 6
E x tra c to r o p e ra to r (power la u n d rie s ), 10
F in is h e r, fla tw o rk (power la u n d rie s ), 10
Firem an, s ta tio n a ry b o ile r , 6
Firem an, s ta tio n a r y b o ile r
(power la u n d r ie s ) , 10
G rinding-m achine o p e ra to r (m achinery), 9
Guard, 7
H elper (b a k e rie s ), 11j 12
H elp er, m o to rtru ck d r iv e r , 13
H elp er, tr a d e s , m aintenance, 6




I d e n t if i e r (power la u n d rie s ), 10
In s p e c to r (m achinery), 9
J a n ito r , 7
J a n ito r (m achinery), 9
Key-punch o p e ra to r, 4
L aborer (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
L aborer, m a te ria l h an d lin g , 8
L aborer, m a te ria l h andling
(m achinery), 9
Machine o p e ra to r ( p r in tin g ) , 12, 13
Machine ten d e r ( p r in tin g ) , 12, 13
M achine-tool o p e ra to r, p ro d uctio n
(m achinery), 9
M achine-tool o p e ra to r, toolroom , 6
M achine-tool o p e ra to r, toolroom
(m achinery), 9
M ach in ist, m aintenance, 7
M ailer (p r in tin g ) , 12, 13
M arker (power la u n d rie s ), 10
M echanic, autom otive (m ain ten an ce), 7
M echanic, m aintenance, 7
M illing-m achine o p e ra to r (m ach in ery), 9
M illw rig h t, 7
M ixer (b a k e rie s ). 11, 12
M older (b a k e rie s ), 11
M otortruck d r iv e r , 13
N urse, in d u s tr ia l ( r e g is te r e d ) , 6
O ffice boy, 3
O ffice g i r l , 4
O ile r, 7.
O perator (lo c a l t r a n s i t ) , 13
O rder f i l l e r , 8
Overman (b a k e rie s ), 11, 12
P acker, 8
Packer (b a k e rie s ), 11, 12

P a in te r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
P a in te r, m aintenance, 7
Photoengraver ( p r in tin g ) , 12, 13
Pipe f i t t e r , m aintenance, 7
P la s te r e r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
Plumber (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
P o rte r, 7
P o rte r (m achinery),-9
P ress a s s is ta n t ( p r in tin g ) , 12
P ress fe e d e r (p r in tin g ) , 12
P re s se r, m achine, s h ir ts
(power la u n d rie s ), 10
Pressm an ( p r in tin g ) , 12, 13
R eceiving c le rk , 8
Routeman (d riv er-salesm an )
(power la u n d rie s ), 10
S e c re ta ry , 4
Shipping c le rk , 8
S h ip p in g -an d -receiv in g c le rk , 8
S ten o g rap h er, 5
S te re o ty p e r ( p r in tin g ) , 12, 13
Sw itchboard o p e ra to r, 5
Sw itchboard o p e ra to r-re c e p tio n is t, 5
T abulating-m achine o p e ra to r, 3 , 5
T o ol-an d -d ie maker, 7
T o o l-an d -d ie maker (m achinery), 9
T ransoribing-m achine o p e ra to r, 5
Truck d r iv e r , 8
T ru ck er, power, 8
T u rre t-la th e o p e ra to r, hand
(m achinery), 9
T y p ist, 5
W asher, machine (power la u n d rie s ), 10
Watchman, 8
W elder, hand (m achinery), 9
Wrapper (b a k e rie s ), 11, 12
W rapper, bundle (power
la u n d rie s ), 10
tV

u. S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE :1953 O — 247196
.







This report was prepared in the Bureau’s North Central Regional
o ffic e . Communications may be addressed tot
Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor S ta tistics
105 West Adams Street
10th Floor
Chicago 3, Illin o is
The services of the Bureau of Labor S ta tistics* regional o ffices
are available for consultation on sta tis tic s relating to wages and industrial
rela tio n s, employment, p rices, labor turnover, productivity, work in ju ries,
construction and housing.
The North Central Region includes the following States t
Illin o is
Missouri
Indiana
Montana
Iowa
Nebraska
Kansas
North Dakota
Kentucky
Ohio
Michigan
South Dakota
Minnesota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102