View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
October 1952

Bulletin No. 1116-6

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




BALTIMORE, M A R Y L A N D




October 1952

Bulletin No. 1116-6
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. - Price 25 cents




Contents

Letter of Transmittal

Page
INTRODUCTION...........................................
THE BALTIMORE METROPOLITAN AREA ........................

The Secretary of Labor:
I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on
occupational wages and related benefits in Baltimore, Md., dur­
ing October 1952* Similar studies are being conducted in
number of other large labor-market areas during the fiscal year
1953# These studies have been designed to meet a variety of
governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide
earnings information for many occupations common to most manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries
of selected supplementary wage benefits. Whenever possible,
separate data have been presented for individual major industry
divisions.

a

This report was prepared in the Bureau's regional of­
fice in Atlanta, Ga., by Louis B. Woytych, Regional Wage and
Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and central direc­
tion of the program was carried on in the Bureau's Division of
Wages and Industrial Relations.
Ewan Clague, Commissioner,
Hon. Martin P. Durkin,
Secretary of Labor.




1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ............................
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C., February 16, 1953#

1

l

TABIES;
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations ........................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ••••
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ...
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations........ ••••••••••..........

3

5
6
7

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis B-35
Machinery industries.........
B-7211 Power laundries ••••••••.............

9
10

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ........
C-205
Bakeries ..................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g ..................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ••«••••••
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers .........

11
11
12
12
12

Supplementary wage practices D-i
Shift differential provisions •.••••••••.••
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours •••••••••.«••••.••••
D-3
Paid h o l i d a y s ....... ......................
D-4
Paid vacations •••••••••......
D-5
Insurance and pension plans ..........

13
13
14
14
17

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey ................ .

IB

INDEX

20




O CCUPATIO N AL W AGE SU RVEY - BALTIMORE, MD.
Introduction
The Baltimore area is one of several important industrial
centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently con­
ducting occupational wage surveys. In such surveys occupations
common to a variety of manufacturing and nonraanufacturing indus­
tries are studied on a community-wide basis. 2/
Cross-industry
methods of sampling are thus utilized in compiling earnings data
for the following types of occupations: (a) office; (b) profession­
al and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodi­
al, warehousing, and shipping. In presenting earnings information
for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate data are provided,
wherever possible, for individual broad industry divisions.
Earnings information for characteristic occupations in
certain more specifically defined industries is presented in Series
B tables. Union scales (Series C tables) are presented for select­
ed occupations in several industries or trades in which the great
majority of the workers are employed Tinder terms of collective­
bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are be­
lieved to be indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data are collected and summarized on shift operations and
differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as
vacation allowances, paid holidays, ani insurance and pension plans.

Manufacturing employment in the area was, to a large ex­
tent, concentrated in the metalworking industries, with the primary
and fabricated metals, transportation equipment, and machinery industries employing a total of nearly 110,000 workers. Food process­
ing industries had about 23,000 employees, and more than 18,000
workers were employed in the apparel industries. Wholesale and re­
tail trade with 25,000 and 80,000 workers, respectively, had nearly
a third of the nonmanufacturing employment in Baltimore. Trans­
portation. communication, and public utilities (including interstate
railroads) and the services industries, each with about 55,000 em­
ployees, accounted for another third of the total. Contract con­
struction employed nearly 40,000 workers in October 1952.
Among the industries and establishment-size groups within
the scope of this survey, 70 percent of the plant workers were em­
ployed by firms having written agreements with labor organizations.
Among manufacturing industries, nearly 85 percent of the plant work­
ers were employed in unionized establishments, whereas in the trans­
portation, communication, and public utilities industries, 7 out of
10 workers were in establishments having labor-management agreements
covering nonoffice workers. Only the public utilities group of in­
dustries had any appreciable degree of unionization among office em­
ployees. More than a third of the clerical workers in this group
were employed in establishments having union agreements covering
office workers. In all industries combined, only a tenth of the
office workers were employed by firms with union contracts covering
office employees.

The Baltimore Metropolitan Area
The Baltimore area, an important East Coast manufactur­
ing, trading, and shipping center, has a population in excess of
1.300.000 inhabitants. Nearly a million people reside within the
corporate limits of the city of Baltimore.
The Metropolitan area, including Baltimore City and Balti­
more and Anne Arundel Counties, had 539,000 nonagricultural wage and
salary workers in October 1952. g/
Manufacturing plants employed
199.000 of this total; nonmanufacturing industries accounted for
340.000 of which about 58,000 were on the rolls of local, State,
and Federal government agencies.

1/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.
Differences between the scope of this survey and the last previous
survey (June 1951) are indicated in the appendix table.
2/ Maryland Department of Employment Security in cooperation
with the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Nonfarm Wage Earners and Salaried Workers, November 1952.




Occupational Wage Structure
Wage and salary levels in the Baltimore area advanced
noticeably between June 1951 - the date of the Bureau's last previ­
ous survey in the area - and October 1952. A substantial proportion
of this increase was the result of general wage adjustments made by
a number of establishments. Based on an analysis of the larger
firms (employing 200 or more workers), more than two-thirds of the
manufacturing plant workers received one or more formal wage adjust­
ments during the period. Such increases generally ranged from 7 to
16 cents an hour. General wage adjustments for office workers were
less prevalent than those for plant workers. Office workers in the
larger manufacturing establishments frequently were granted in­
creases comparable with those received by plant workers. However,
pay raises for office workers in smaller establishments generally
were made on an individual basis.
Established minimum entrance rates for plant employees
with no previous work experience were a part of the formalized rate
structure of Baltimore area firms employing virtually all plant

(i)

2

workers* Although entrance rates ranged from less than 75 cents to
more than * 1 *60 an hour, $1 or more was reported as the minimum rate
in establishments giving employment to more than half the workers*
In manufacturing industries, 3 of A workers were employed in es­
tablishments with entrance rates of $1 or more*
Salaries and wages in manufacturing industries were sub­
stantially above levels in the nonmanufaoturing group for most
occupations studied. The relatively high proportion of workers in
the primary metals, transportation equipment, and other durablegoods manufacturing industries contributed in part to these earn­
ings differentials. In nonmanufacturing industries, average earn­
ings in wholesale trade and the utilities group were generally
higher than in retail trade or finance.
Virtually all employees in the Baltimore area were employ­
ed by firms providing pay for holidays not worked. The most liberal
provisions were in the public utility and finance groups where more




than four-fifths of the office workers were granted 8 or more paid
holidays a year. Similar paid holiday provisions prevailed for over
half the plant workers in the public utilities group of industries.
In manufacturing, at least 6 paid holidays were granted to over
95 percent of the office employees and 85 percent of the plant
workers*

Paid vacation provisions were more liberal for office
clerical workers than for plant workers. The majority of the office
workers were entitled to a paid vacation of 2 weeks, after a year
of service, whereas only about 1 in 8 plant workers had similar
benefits. After 5 years of service, virtually all office workers
and four-fifths of the plant workers were eligible for 2 weeks'
vacation. Approximately 90 percent of the plant workers in manu­
facturing establishments received at least a week's vacation after
1 year of service, while nearly two-thirds of the office employees
received
2 weeks' paid vacation for the same length of service.

3

A ' Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
|nder 30.00

Weekly
Weekly
erig
anns
hours
( t n a d ( t n a d 10.00
Sadr) Sadr)

s
$
s
s
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50
32.50 35.00 *37.50 1*0.00 1*2.50 k5.00 J

32.50

35.00

-

-

37.50

ho. 00 i*2.5o

U5.oo

1*7.50 50.00

52.50

55.00

13
12

9
6

2
2
5

67.50 70.00

6

$

s

$

$

S
95.00
and
over
90.00 95.00
BS..Q0

70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

57.50 60.00

62.50

7
3

-

7
7

6
5

8
8

2
-

15
lk

3
2

10
10

10
10

7
7

11
2/ 11

65.00

75.00

80.00

Men

Clerks, order ..............................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

ilk
Id

«
39.0 _ 69.00
70.50
39.5

Clerks, payroll ............................
Manufacturing ...........................

220 _
177

iiO.O
kO.O

70.50

_

_

70.50

-

"

Office boys ................................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

212
89
123

39.0
39.5
39.0

36.00
3U.50

16
1
*
12

53
13
*
10

Tabulating-machine operators ................
Manufacturing....................... .
Nonmanufacturing ........................

128
60
68

39.5
39.5
Uo.o

Billers, machine (billing machine) ..........
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade ......................

37.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

2
2

. j
- !
-

_

_
-

1
1

3
3

3
3

3
3

7
7

20
lk

1

19
18

1
-

lk
lk

6
5

7
k

6
k

19
10

a
3k

2k
21

13
13

17
17

11

2*
1
9
15

52
11
hi

£1
h
17

15
9
6

3
1
2

1
*
2
2

8
6
2

16
16

_
-

_
-

_
•-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
“

_
-

_
"

_
“

13

5
2
3

k
k

k
k

8
8
*
*

1
1
-

1
*
2
2

15
9
6

16
12
k

k
k
-

6
3
3

8
7
1

1
1
-

5

6
7

7
3
k

2
2

_
“

8
k
1
*
2

_
-

1
1
-

lk
2
12
12

10
8
2
2

k
2
2
-

2
2
-

1
1
-

_
-

8
8
8

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3
3
3

7
6
6

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

36
27
9

30
23
7

12
12
-

20
lk
6

8
k
k

1
1
“

_
-

_
-

_
-

k
k

_
-

2
- |
2

12
7
5
5
-

15
5
10
9
1

6
1
5
5
-

2
1
1
1
-

1
1
-

1
1
-

1
1
-

1
1
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

35
15

52

10
9

18
10
8
2
6

13
7
6
6
-

15
9
6
5
1

1$
12
3
3
-

16
5
11
8
3

7
7
k
3

-

“

“

-

3
3
2

10
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

-

~

7

2
2
-

2
-

1
1
-

2
2
-

_
-

2
2
“

_
-

_

-

-

.
“

7

2
2
2

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"
“

58.50

_

7

-

_
-

1

63.OO
5U.oo

-

-

1

7

u

13

26k
7U
190
7k

39.0 ;i*h.00
39.5 ! k6.oo
39.0 | 13.50
*
1*9.00
39.5

2
2
-

8
8
-

_
-

21
5
16
6

6U
15
19
*
12

33
7
26
6

lh
1
*

hi
11*

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ......
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Retail trade .........................

150
90
73

IiO.O j hi.00
1*0.5 ! 39.50
j
1*0.5 | 39.50

2
2
2

15
15
10

10
10
10

lh
11
*
11
*

2*
1
2
2

3k
23
19

3
3
2

22
2
2

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ......
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

169
98
71

39.5
1*0.0
39.5

52.00
53.00

«
.
-

k

1

_

l

-

6
1
*
2

1
*
1
*

16

1

6
6

11

n

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ......
Manufacturing ..... ......................
Nonmanufacturing........................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail t r a d e .................... .
.
Finance * * ................ '.........

677
93
58k
67
69
1*22

39.5
38.5
39.5
39.0
1*0.5
39.5

39.00
1*7.50
37.50
1*7.00
1*2.00
35.50

18

116 ; 113

118

65

36

16

13

3*
1

25
25

53
30
23
11
5
3

3

116

31
8
23
1
*
8
9

16

18
18

72
8
6*
1
10

20
7
12
1

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer tvoe) .......................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade .........................

665
298
367
87
2k5

39.5
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
39.0

).9.5o
53.00
1*7.00
57.50
kk.50

2
2
-

13

Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) .............
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Finance * * .................. ........

176
160
103

39.5
1*0.0
39.5

h3.50
1*3.00
39.50

Clerks, file, class A ......................
Nonmanufacturing........................
Finance #* ............................

115
83
65

16
39.5 _ I .OO
1*6.00
39.5
1*3.00
39.5

_
-

_
-

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
1*0.0
39.0

36.50
1*0.50
36.00
11
**.00

85

Manufacturing.........................
Nonmanufacturing .................. .
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade ................ ........
Finance «* ...........................

758
78
660
88
73
373

161
2
159
36

1
*

2
3

t

Women

See footnotes at end of table.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




50.50

33.00
32.50

1 10

-

-

116

13
10

___ L _ ___ 1 _ _
1
*
7
h
5

85
8
2/77

119

63
H

10
6

—

11
i
9
6

6
8
I T --- 5 1
3
-

-

t

1
*
109

118
2
8
101*

22
2
20
11

h5
5
10
*
2
30

35
1
3*
i
30

k5
3
12
*
3
37

6?
11
**
21
1
17

51
22
29
3
25

57
27
30
3
25

93
52
a

19
22

66
52
1*
1
7
7

21
21
18

15
15
13

18
18
17

15

26
26
2*
1

20
9
5

10

It

t
1

17
17
1

3
3
1

7
7
-

_
.. n
.
11
11
-

20
15
H*

15
9
6

16

it

5
k
3

3
2
2

1
*
1
-

k
-

100

87
11
76
16
2
19

Ilk
26
88
22
6
2

Ik .
.
.

21

7
7
1

9

10
10
k

113

115
13

102
5
95

8
92
11

16
61

!
!
|

■55
6

11

12
20
15

9
9

t

t

29
16

16
6

3
2

0
3
-•

20

c

1
2
2

6
5

7
6

32
20
11
9

_

1
2
2

-

_

-

_
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Mfl.# Ootober 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF IABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4

O&fciH- H4 €d
cllUOlGo t4 e
U

Table 1-1:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Baltimore, Md., by in3ustry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
$
$
$
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 U0.00

$
Weekly
Weekly Under
erig
anns
hours
(St n a d ( t n a d *
adr) Sadr)
30.00

37.50 U0.00 U2.50

35.00

32.50

$
$
$
i
$
$
s
$
s
s
$
$
$
s
s
U2.50 $U5.oo U7.50 $ 0.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
and
U5.oo U7.50 $0.00 $2.50 s;.oo 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
over

Women - Continued
Clerks, order .............................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Retail trade .........................

2
lil
115
126
101

Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o

$
Ui.oo
U6.00
36.$0
35.00

"

5U
5U
5U

9
9
5

22
2
20
19

22
8
6

Clerks, payroll ............................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing .............. .........
Public utilities * .................. .
Retail trade .........................

U66
25>U
212
68
73

39.5
Uo.o
39.5
39.5
39.5

52.50
53.00
5i.5o
55.oo
U7.5o

_
-

_
-

7
1
6
U

20
5
15
2
12

15
2
13
3
7

Duplicating-machine operators ..............
Nonmanufacturing ........................

126

UO.O
Uo.o

' U0.00
| 38.00

___ 6_j 13
6 !
13

12
8

22

79

Key-punch operators ........................
Manufacturing...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * ...................
Finance #* ...........................

393
108
28$
51
197

39.5
Uo.o
39.5
39.5
39.5

1 UU.50
$1.00
U2.00
; U6.$o
38.00

6 ! 17
- i
6
17
6
17

32

58

!

32
-

52
5o

!

32
6
6

17

19
1U

2
2

U

_

_

10 1 21
10 1 21
2
10
U
6
9

25

92 i 106
188
U8
5 i lU
1U0
! 92
87
8 ! 17
22 1
9 i 16
86
63 1 73

151
5U
97
lU
5
66

2a
88
153
19
10
78

! 13U
1 80

6U
8
56
25
8

35
. 22
13
2
5

32
8
2U
13
8

21
9
12
5
5

2U
11
13

55
16
39
18

37
21
16
2

20
5
15
U

20
19
1
1

2}
17
6
U

16

16
8
8

s

_

Office girls ..............................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

81
62

Uo.o
Uo.o

36.00
3U.00

-

Secretaries ............................ ..
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade .........................
Finance ** ...........................

1.238
605
633
10$
103
271

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
UO.O
39.5

60.00

-

Stenographers, general .....................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing........................
Wholesale trade ..................... .
Retail trade .........................
Finance
...........................

1.663
96 9
186
103
U89

39.5
UO.O
39.0
39.5
39.5
38.5

U6.50
$2.00
U6.$o
5U.00U6.00
| U2.C0

Switchboard operators .................. .
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Retail trade .........................
Finance

U16
122
296
111
52

U0.5
UoTo
Ui.o
Uo.5
39.5

1 UU.00
U8.50
U2.50
Ui.oo
U2.C0

Switchboard operator-receptionists .........
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade ......................

266
125
138
53

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0

U5.50
U7.00
UU.00
U6.50

Tabulating-machine operators ...............
Nonmanufacturing ........................

106
80

39.0
39.0

U9.50
U7.50

Transcribine-machine operators, general.....
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Finance
...........................

169
60
109
62

39.5
39.0
Uo.o
Uo.o

U7.00
52.50
UU.00
U0.00

** .......................................

*#

6 9h

t

-

i

, -28
- 1 28
- !
- ! 1
23

,

!

Ui
8
1

_

1

-

6

-

-

1

_

&

-

25
11
lU
2
6

53

10
2

7
2

5

37

15

26
26
8
16

U5

u

U6
13
33
12

“
-

(

50
16
3U ■
22
7

i

31
3

28
15

-

8
8

6
6

3
3

2
2
2

-

6

6
U3
22
21
10

6
6

-

6
6

13

16
3
13
12

-

-

_
-

-

! 13

j
See footnote at end of table,
# Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1

25
2
23
9
7

-

28
19
9
5

a

iu

-

u

_

59
3U
25
12
3

a

2

31
31
U
1
26

i

18

27
2U

13

8
_
8
2

2U
7
6

6

_

62.00
57.50
63.00
$2.00
$2.00

26
26

1

32
21
11
3

1}

13

U

U

12
3
9
17
15 1 5
17

|

i

2

25
3
7
15

11
11

U

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

38
13
25
3
7

19
11
8
3
5

5U
37
17
6
5

7

22
11
11
8
3

7
6
1
1
-

2U

u

3
2
1
1
-

5
3

3

1
1

1

_

_

1

-

-

-

-

10
5
5

7 !

3

2

1

- 1
-

3
-

6
3
3
1
-

6
.
6
_

31
18
13
2
9

7

22
1U
8
3
1

U
3
2

15
13
2
1
1
-

1U7
58
89
10 i 13
12
8
51 : U6

U9
13
36
i 12
U
' 18

lU2
85 !
57
1 i
21
31

; 107
! 6$
U2
! 17
|
7
8

116

15
1ST

10
9
1
1

1
1
_

-

_
_

—

2
2
-

2
2
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

16
8
5
1

U
u

_
_

_

_
_

-

-

_
_
-

_
_
_ I
_

_

-

-

3
1
-

_

3

;
i
j
:

-;

-

-

-

-

3
1
2
2
-

2

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

■ -

2
_

_

-

75
16
59
U ;
15
Uo |

"

1
-

_

6
-

7
1

-

29
21
8
'3
1

6
8
1 ~ r ~

28
1U
12

15

8
3
5
2

U9
“ IT"
2
$
17
3
U
8
9

17

k 12
h --- 5“

2
2
_

9
8
1
1

i5
3
3

-

-

-

-

-

69
35
3U
5

73

100

58
15
8
2

67

16

171
115
56
12
9
15

76
60
16
5
3
5

82
U6
36
1 1
1 1
!

99
61
38
15
_
5

108
88
20
10
1
5

51
2U
27
15
_
6

29
5
2U
22
-

13

65
51
8
11
6

-

37
13
2U
5

ll
6
5
-

U
3
1
-

7
7
-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

26
15
11
5

10
3
7
1

9
2
7
6

7
7
-

1
1
-

8
2

7
7

7

7
2

k

28
21

9
2
7
1

86
9
77

!

$h

\
\

U
5
33

IS

U

137
82
55
ll
8
11

-

3

7
1

-

j

2$
10
15

2
2

-

—r
7
1
6
1

i_ ___ i__ —

2

6
2

u
2

33
1 ;
5
ll

~

-

23
13
10
U

u

uu
18
26
16
1
2

23
10
13
12
1

-

"

9
U
5

5

3
3
-

_
.
-

5
8
2

1

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

2
_

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_

-

_
_
_
.

-

-

-

“

-

2
2
2

1

U
3

3
1

2
2

3
2

-

2
2

3

_

_

2

_

_

-

-

-

2

3
1

-

!
1 ___
_

12
12
-

-

-

-

_

_

2

_

-

u

1
-

-

9

_

19
2
17

-

_

-

u

22 !
—
r 1 -- 2
2
lU
1
3
;

.

_
_
-

_
.
'

5

O ffic e C k o u fu c J fo n l-Q a n fc tu tie d i

Table A-i*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earrings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

Weekly
Weekly
hours
erig
anns
(tnad (tnad
Sadr) Sadr)

30.00

35.00 37.50

32.50

Uo.oo

$

s
$
$
U7.50 5o.oo 52.50

$

U2.50 U5.00

55.oo

57.50

60.00

62.50 65.00

U5.00 U7.5o

50.00 52.50 55.00

57.50

60.00

62.50

65.00 frs&P. 70.00

75
6l
lU
_
6

51
uo
11
1
_

29
25
U

s

$
%
$
$
$
lender 30.00 32.50 35.oo 37.50 Uo.oo
U2.50

$

$

s

$

$

67.50

s

$

$
$
I
$
80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
and
75.00 ■ J.00 85.00 90.00 . 25-jOO. over
-

70.00 75.00

1.007
Uo6
87
77
205

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
Ul.5
39.0

Typists, class B ...........................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * ...................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade .........................

1,395
505
890
55
83
155
570

39.5
Uo.o
39.5
39.0
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5

Finance

**

............................................................

601

1
/
y
y

8

Women - Continued
Typists, class A ............................................................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * ...................
Retail trade .........................
Finance
...........................

50.00
U2.50
1 U5.oo
UU.oo
1 38.50

i

1 39.50
UU.OO
37.00
U3.50
i U5.oo
; 39.00
3U.50

!
i_ _ _ _ _

- '
|

“

5
5
!
5 |
1U2

2U

I

:

i 17U
1 77
| 97
i 31
16
! U6

67
"T3
2U
7
6
11

123
75
U8
15
22
10

125
111
lU
8
6

10U

-

-

151

85

10U

95

61

11
5
6
_

15
8
7

-

-

75
s
75
11
6U |

;

207
17

1U2 ; 190
2U
U
2
21
19
2U 1 123
163

70
11
59
11
1
U7

305
153
73
57
80
2U8
12 ;
6
9
7
U2 !
7
50
18U

2U !
2U
2
22

;

1
l

r - g r — So"
U3
uu
u
5

66
5
10
20
15

§u

16
23

16
12
ll

-

91
13
u
6

us-

56
UU
12
U
1

~

33
23
10
U
6
_

-

-

6
6
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

2
5

_
_

2

16
9
7

2
5

u
-

-

10
3
7

11
11
_
_

U
U

-

2
2
_
_

_

-

-

-

6
U
2
2

6
U
2

_

_
_

_
_
_

-

-

"

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

2
_

_

_

-

_

1
1
_
_
1

i

2

.

_
_1
_!

_
_

_
_

_1

_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

-

-

"

-

-

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows* 9 at $95 - $100; 2 at $100 - $105.
Workers were distributed as follows: 31 at $25 - $27.50; J| at $27.50 - $30.
L6
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, October 1952)

A
verage
Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

W
eekly
W
eekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

667
U58

Uo.o
Uo.o

Draftsmen, junior ..........................
Manufacturing ...........................

209

$
i 80.00
: 81.50

Uo.o
UO.O

xoB
58
58

1/

y

55.50
ii.W

_ Uo.o
Uo.o

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) .............
Manufacturing..... ......................

to . 00

$
52.50

$
$
$
U5.oo U7.50 50.00

U
2.50 U5.oo

U7.5o

5o.oo 52.50

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5
s
$
$
s
s
s
$
55.oo ! 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 L10.00 115.00 120.00

55,.QQ .51,5Q. ! 60.00

.62,50 65.00

70.00

75.00

53.50

-

-

-

_ i
-

18 ___ 12_____ 1 _
2/ 13
13
3
_
-

_
-

_ '
- ;

- ,

_
-

_

16
10

1
1

9
F

19
6

10
9

17
11

6
2

7
7

8 !
8

20
20

5

u

5

h

1
1

----T —

2

2
10
2 ------- 8"

11
7

2
1

17
16

- i
16 I
3

-

i

13

8




90.00

95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 L15.00 120.00

56
3U

69
57

L.6
Ui

22
lU

9
9

19
9

81
Uo

57
U6

133

7U

128
102

17

35
3

2U
22

10
9

1
1

3
3

-

-

-

6
r

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

18

39
37

3
2

-

-

~ T ~

6

and
over

6
6

11
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

- —

E“ j

-

-

j
125
109

Uo.o
uo.o

6U.00
65.00

-

j

-

"

“

_

16

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows* 6 at $35 - $37.50; 7 at $37.50 - $U0.

243685 0 - 53 - 2

80.00 85.00

1

Men
Draftsmen ..................................
Manufacturing ...........................

facers ....................................
Manufacturing ............... ...........

$
Under Uo.oo U
2.50

6
15
lU ------5 ~

_

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., October 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6

Table

a-

M a in te n a n c e a n d P o w e b P la n t C fa c n p a tio n A

3:

(Average hourly earnings V for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
o
f
Workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
hou l
ry
erig
anns

$
Under 1.05
$
1.05

1.20

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

1.20 1.25

1.30

1.35

1 .1 0 1.15
*

$

$
1.10 1.15

1.10 1.15

$

$

$

$

1 .1 0 1.15
*
i.5o

$

1.50 1.55
1.55

$
$
1.60 1.65

1.60 1.65

$

$

$

1.70 1.75

1.70 1.75

$

1.80 1.85

1.80 1.85

$
$
$
$
1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05

1

$

$

$

$

2.00

29
26
3
O
C
1

17
*
37
10

13
*
il
*
2

2

67

33

2.10 2.20

2.30

2.1 0 2.50
*

22
22
_

6
5

1

12
12
_

-

-

-

12
9
3

la

19
*

1

32 ~ ~ W
9

1

1*
1

1
*

1

ii
*
_

h
-

8

_

_
_

2

la

2.30

_

1.95

2.20

-

1.90

2.10

2.05

2.1 0 2.50
*
and
over

$
Carpenters, maintenance ....................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Retail trade .........................
Electricians, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonnanufacturing ........................

637
391*
21*3
?7
75
___ 111—
579

1.78
1.82
1.70

12

-

17
11
6

-

11
1

-

18
18

11

-

6
5

17
5T
12

-

-

6

-

1

-

7

1

1

_
-

6
5

1

1
1

1
*

-

11
11
-

1

13
5
8
1

_
-

11

15
*
15

17
*

1

72
50
19 — i n
22
53

1.86
-

132

1.88
1.76

Engineers, stationary........... ..........
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonnanufacturing.................... .
Retail trade .........................

673
1*93
180
62

1.66
1.68
1.60
1.61*

_ L_
_

Firemen, stationary boiler .................
Manufacturing ........................ .

332
211
**

1.51*
1.5U

Helpers, trades, maintenance ...............
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
p i K ir nhn Ti+ipr *
-i*
/
I...ITTT1____ TI

1.231*
936
298

150

1.50
1.55
1.36
I.3I
*

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ...........
Manufacturing ...........................

11*9
11*9

2

-

9

6

5

5

15
15
-

26
15

1
*

12
1
11

12
*
31
11

29
25
1
*

26
2*
1
2

55
53
2

1*
1

25

8

19
*
18

20
20
“

12
12
12

151*
151*
-

5
1
*

28
8
20

-

10
*
3*
1
6
3

5

5
6
3

63
11
**
19
1

50
12
*
8
2

13
*
2*
l
19
9

88
77
11
1

22
15
7
7

27
25
2
2

32
30

10
10

25
20

1
*
2

3
1

8
6

20
7

17
2

5

27
12

25
25

22
22

1
*
1
*

32
20
12
10

95
66
29
21

62
20
12
*
33

112
98
11
*

96
10
*
58

7l
*
7*
l
-

13
*
33
10

38
13
25

52
-

235
209
26

1*
1
l*
l
-

18
17 —
1

7
7

-

23
23

15
15

17
17

10
7
3

5
5

53
52

18
18

67
61

1.88
1.88

Machinists, maintenance ....................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
pnW| i
n+-| T i + i o c

1.133
1,081
52

2.05

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) .........
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * .............................................................
Wholesale trade ......................................................................

1.75
1.7ll
1.76
1.73
1.96

. .

8k6
180
666
U05
107
132

Mechanics, maintenance ....................................................... ...
Manufacturing .....................................................................................

1.225
1,022

1.78

Millwrights ........................ ...........................................................................
Manufacturing .....................................................................................

21*5
2U5

1.72
1.72

-

-

Oilers ...................................................................................................................
Manufacturing .....................................................................................

1*69
1*83

1.58
1.58

_

2

-

2

Painters, maintenance ......................................................................
Manufacturing .....................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

1*36
235
201

1.73
1.81
1.63

3
-

12

3

Pipe fitters, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing ....................................................................................

505
1*92

1 .9 3
-

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance...........
Manufacturing ...........................

125
121

1 .9 1

1.92

Tool-and-bie makers ........................
Manufacturing .................................................................................. .

227
227

1.97
1.97

P fi+ a il

1/
?/
*

US

2.06

_
"

1

15

1
1

15
-

18
2

12
12 "

8
6

_
-

53
30
23
8

11
1
13
28
8

50
35
15
2

29
16
13
12

1
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

-

2
2

23
18
5

_

U

11

_

_

-

-

-

1
-

-

1
1

-

-

-

13

-

-

2

5

3

5

2
2

5

1

3
3

5
1
*

-

1
*

-

-

-

13
9
1
*

1
1

2
2

1
1

1.92

-

-

35
33

7
-

11
11

27
22
5
-

6

26
10
16
1
*
1

-

-

21

11

1
52

-

27
2*
1

62
12
*
20
1*
1
1

1
1
25
l*
l

11
1
*

1

.

1
1

2
_
2

0
c

23
12
11
-

27
13
ll*

10
10

l * 2 /1 0
l
3*
i
3*
i

_
-

12
12

_
-

-

-

_
_

_
_

2

_
_

1
*
u-

-

5

6
6
_
-

5

-

-

_
_

-

10
10

31
31

-

2*
1
2*
1

7
7

12
12

-

-

-

-

62
11
*
21
21

82
77
5

86
86

52
50
2
O
c

18
*
17
*
1
X

1la
139

ll*7
134
11

298
298

13
13

31
31

5
5

-

_

155

12
3
9

3*
1
30

1*
4

12

11
**

2

3
9
3

12
*

6

17
7
10
6
2

16

1
*

3
6

33
8
25
12
11
2

T

-

28
19

_

15
i5

9
9

9
9

21
21

7
7

15
15

9
9

??

139
139

9
9

32
32

-

16
*

16

-

-

-

15
15

2*
1
2*
1

17
17

26
26

36
36

29
29

lli
9

29
21
8

11

50
12
38

10
*
11
29

11
**
33
11

19

1

9

1

7

9

12

1

9

1

10
7
3

5
2

7
2

7
5
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
27
27

-

-

5
6

9

33

I*

39

9

32

1
*

39
19
18

-

1
*

13
*
22

12
12

-

-

22
15

3
3

-

-

5*
1
30

_

_

n

11**
1
130
1

-

39
25

11
11

-

-

11*3
125

1
1

-

-

96
9*
1

66
66

-

-

135
135

21
21

68
66

55

-

-

6

23
20
3

193
190

55

5

6?
<
66

-

1
*
1
*

20
71
17 “ S r
3
3

6

10

_

6
6
80
7
73
10
2
6l

5

-

-

70

63

211
15
196
188
3

17

12
12

-

77

5

5

1
-

-

30
29

_
25

32
5

27

15

_

_

-

2*
1
6

2

_

_

2*
1

3

1.67

15

7

59
11
**
15
7

50

]_

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Workers were distributed as follows:
0 at $2.50 - $2.60; 2 at $2.80 - $2.90.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




15
*

11

1.89
1.91

1.76

22
16
6

1*
1
2
12

25

1.87
1.81*

12
*
56
27 ~ T 3 T
12
15
0
1
X
2
2

19

3
3

___L _

-

_

10
10

_

36

2
2

-

_

3
3

_

1
*
_

_
_

_
_

16

1
*

_

_

3

31
31

_

1

_

-

1

-

-

-

-

_

16
_

65

8

199

la

50

2

176

9
9

1

27

6

1

27 — r

20
20

_
-

22

25

1 5

25
-

22

-

-

2

-

5

-

11
*

16

-

15
*
15
*

32
32

17
17

60
59

9

75

8

7*
1

11
9

37
35

20
15

3*
1
31
*

6

13
13

13
13

9

19
19

9
9

13
12

1
1

16
16

1
*
1
*

5°

5
5

10
10

25

5o

12
12

18
18

_

9

2*
1
2*
1

-

_

7
8

5

1
*

15

18
18

'1 5

_

1*

18
18

2

-

-

-

3*
1
30
1
*

66

1
*

66

h

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

31
31

22

-

22

_

1

1

-

1

1

2
2

1
1

_

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., October 1952

u .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

7

Gu&toduU, %G/teJuHi4iMs(f,a*ul SUiftfUHf QcCtifuUiOHl
2/

Table A-Ut

(Average hourly earnings V for selected occupations
studied on an area basis
in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

o
f
W rkers
o

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
hul
o r y Under 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05
erig $
anns
0.65
.80
.90
.70 .75
.85
.95 1.00 1.05 1 .10
$
1.51
1.51*

Guards ........................ .........
Manufacturing .........................

702
576

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) .... .
Manufacturing.........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * ........ .........
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................
.........................
Finance

2 .h la
1,259
1,182
160
67
60k
211

1.09
1.28
.88
1.18
1.22
.79
.79

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ....
Manufacturing .........................
Nonnanufacturing ......................
Ro+.aTl ft'aHo
US nanpo

91*
8
212
736
209
326

.82
1.03
.76
.72
•nn
f1

-

-

"

223,-112- . 1 7
— *

1
"

15

17
*
ll
i*

5

133
5
128
3
8*
1
ia

165
66
99
_
_
59
35

1*
18
76
72
1
*
1
*
37
11

125
66
59
k
2
13
*
10

lkl
59
82
25 .
8
23
6

16
3

88
12
76
12
*
28

113
65
18
*
9
25

66
3*
i
32

22
7
15
k

17
*
12
35
17

1
71*
89
85

653
629
2*
1

223 119
1
58
3 56

17
*
_
_
30
8

102
26
76
2
6
32
36

!tA?6

16
*

136
60
22

16
*
12
3*
l

100
100
19
25

221
11
210
11
**
152

18
*

15

?k

22
72

122
66
56

-

65
23
1*2
7

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.ko 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 1 0
.*
and
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.ko 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.k0 over
12
12
52
28
2k
8
_
16
-

93
56
37
11
2
3
-

11
7
k
2

ko
10
30

16
16

3?7
189
208

371
307
6k

106
6k
12
*

6,859
^018
1,8141
380
616
8k5

1.2k
1.26
1.19
1.38
1.19
1.11

2*
1
2*
1

18
*

15

231
138
93

_
2*
1

_
18
*

15

73
20

36
36

19
37

78
7

13
11

78
130

_
6k

13
29

Order fillers ...........................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing................. .....
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................

9i
i6
385
561
296
265

1.29
1.38
1.22
1.22
1.23

_
-

_
-

_
-

15
15
8
7

3

3*
1
16
18
1
*
1*
1

16
16
11
5

17
17
13
k

83

3
3

16
16
6
10

Packers, class A (men) ....................
Manufacturing...... ......... ........

3ko
191

1.35
1 .1*0

_

_

-

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

10
-

-

Fackers, class A (women) ..................

65

1.22

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

Packers, class B (men) ...................
Manufacturing.... .................. ..
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Retail trade .......................

U5U
376
76
52

1.26
1.30
1.07
.95

"

-

-

8
8
8

7
7
7

12
12
12

Packers, class B (women) ..................
Manufacturing................. ........

1.01*7
950

1.06
1.09

2

1

17
-

59

-

Receiving clerks .........................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Retail trade .......................

222
105
117
82

1.35 .
1.1*3
1.28
1.21

_
“

_
-

_
-

2
2
2

Shipping clerks ..........................
Manufacturing................... .
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Retail trade .......................

265
Ik5
120
66

1.1*8
1.56
1.38
1.1*2

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
“

1
-

Shipping-and-receiving clerks .............
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

192
--106

1.53
1.6l
117
.*

_

_

_

1

“

-

1

Truck drivers, light (under li tons) .......

17
*2

1.1*8

_

_

_____ L .

S ee f o o t notes a t e n d o f table.
*
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c l u d i n g r ailroads), communication, and other public utilities.
**
Finance, i n s u rance, a n d r e a l estate.




lk
13 —
180
128
52
31
11
k
2
5
k —
1

k
r

38
25

ko
ko

71
63

lko
61
59
50
_
9
-

72
66
6
6
-

56
k2
lk
_
lk
-

5
r
-

5
r —
-

171
86

138
138

50
50

60
60

361
336
25
_
10
15
-

35
19
16
lk
2
"

160
i56
2
_
2
-

2k
2k
_
_
-

_
_
>
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
-

10
10
-

3
3

lk
lk
-

-

-

-

279
lfe
9k
38
18
38

z6*
502
263
20k
25
3k

553
k7k
79

98
75
23

180
171
9

105
89
16

kl
38

23
-

9
-

29
lk
15
8
7

3k
3T

-

-

-

-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

50
lk
36

27
i5
12

-

-

-

-

16
-

36
-

12
-

_

_
-

_

_

-

9
9
-

2
2
2
"

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
"

_
-

lh

26

Laborers, material handling 5/ ............
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
ir* 11+
+iac 4
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................

_

2
2

205 lokk
137
68
156

357
32k
33

k
6k

107
k9

12
21

961
6k0
321
138
3
180

15
15
10
5

17k
37
137
116
21

68
36
32
20
12

29
1
28
26
2

y?

83
20
63

kl
33
8
6
2

10
25
16
9

25k
157
97
lk
83

106
72
3k
16
18

21
10

lk
-

?8
3k

31
20

2k
12

35
3k

k
-

2k
22

8k
k

13
13

3
3

22
22

3
3

lk
lk

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1

3

2

6

27

1

8

9

_

8

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

5

3

5
3

3
3

36
2*
1
12
1
*

32
29
3
3

36
29
7
7

25
25
-

1
1
1

61
61
-

61
60
1
1

95
92
3
3

9
9
-

26
10
16
-

9
9
-

27
27
-

1
1
-

-

-

"

-

-

-

6
-

15
11

327
325

?6
35

lk7
lk6

27k
27k

1
1

_

2
2

58
58

33
33

65
65

k
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

10

1

6

9

11

10
8

1
1

6
6

9
7

11
11

1
1
1

k
2
2
1

8
6
2
2

lk
11
3
1

38
28
10
10

16
16
7

5
3
2
2

19
7
12
2

kl
2k
17
16

21
16
5
1

7
6
1
1

1
1
1

k
2
2
2

_
-

k
k
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1

_
-

_
-

2
2
2

10
10
1
*

3
1
2
"

10
7
3
2

lk
5
9
9

6
6
2

15
6
9
1

17
1
16
8

13
7
6
5

35
29
6
-

67
k3
2k
18

31
lk
17
13

15
11
k
-

8
6
2
1

2
2
"

11
10
1
1

1
1
-

2
2
-

_
-

_
"

1 _ I_H
_

6

2

1
*

_

2

-

-

8

-

9

-

k

2

-

8

9

k

2

10
k
6

16
11
5

6

-

8
6
2

_

l
*

17
11
6

-

2

20
16
k

-

6

13
9
k

k

7

25
lk
11

2

1

27
15
12

k

-

6

_

_

8

7

6

1

1

32

2k

35

20

8

16

179

6

86

2k

10

_

3

_

_

_

_

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., October 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8

Table A-b:

GuitodtfU, 7VcfteJtJ044AA^,G*ul SkipfUtUj, QaUlflcMo4lA-GoH&Hd4ed
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, October 1952)

Number
of
Workers

Occupation and industry division

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.bo i.5o 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
hourly Under 0.65
earnings $
and
0.65

Truck drivers, medium (if to and
including b tons) .....................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................................

PnViT t n n f i H f i o c -If-

.

(

Wholesale trade .............................................................

Ttaha'iT trarip . . . . . . . t . T..........................T. . . . .

Truck drivers, heavy (over l tons,
i
trailer type) ..............................................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................................

$
1.080
485
595
69
186
338

l.hi
1.51
1.3li
1.514
l.bb
1 .2J
U

.80

.75

.95 1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

-

-

-

80
12
68

32
22
10

76
11
65

20

8

_

_

_

e

_

.85

.90

-

12

8

6

-

13
5

12

8

6

_

_

_

_

12

.70

8

6

-

-

66

■a

j

6
1

8

57

-

20
2
8
10

1 .2£_ 3^30- 1 . 1 - l.bo 1,50. 1.60
J

37
22
15

86
7b
12

b3
27
16

2
12

2

16

]_

]_
9

. *20— 1.80
1

1.90

2.00

2.10

2.20

57

8

8

8

8

10

_

8

2

8

_

306
2b
282
282

68
b
6b

46
16
30

39
13
26

42

166

16

12

2b

42

166
b

16

12

2b

50

116

2

88

26

3b

b

_

_

_

-

b
b

-

-

-

-

7
7

-

4
4

“

-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

150
31
119

2
2
2

34
li
23
3

30
26
b

370

59
7
52
52

28
91

126
116
10

r

r

_

1.77

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

b

-

-

12
12

1

5i
36
15

b

1.49
1.83
1.62

-

_
-

722

1.57

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

16

8

_

-

_

-

-

-

Truckers, power (fork-lift)............................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

955
880
75
3b

1.5b____
1.55
1.142
1.52

-

-

-

-

-

-

22
22

12
12

-

22
22

12
10
2

10
10

22
11

57
57

23
19
b

29

25
b

287
254
33
16

79
77
2

80
61
19
18

10
10

286
286

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ....
Manufacturing ........................

248
215

1.59
1.62

26
18

lb
lb

51

49
49

6

6

49
49

28
2e

5

35

Watchmen ...............................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................................

601
27l
i
327

1.05
1.2 1
.91
1.25

53
37

32
30

63

7

2

2

■ 7

-

16

49
lb

8
3
5

2

_
-

_
-

_

5

1

_

_

n

n+i 1 t +.*5 o c -St

Truck drivers, heavy (over b tons,
other than trailer type) ................................................

PnV\^ i r»

li+ioc

At

pnW] n r> n+.*^ T +.-i mo At
.....
.....................................................................

Retail t r ade

36
n o

113

|

i

n

-

9

30

_

30

-

.88

_

_

.79

5/2 6

2li

9h

5b

2b

72

h

5b

8
8

32
20

28

11

21

15

22

b2
8
3b
4

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for overtime and n i g h t work.
D ata l i m i t e d to m e n w o r k e r s e x c e p t where otherwise indicated.
„
W o r kers w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d as follows* 1 at $0.45 - $0.50; 57 at $0.50 - $0.55; 63 at $0.55 Wor k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d as follows* 6 at $Q.bO - $0.45; 10 at $0.45 - $0.50; 63 at $0.50 Title change only, f r o m " Stock handlers
a nd truckers, hand", as repo r t e d i n p r e vious study.
W o r k e r s w ere d i s t r i b u t e d as follows*
26 at $0.60 - $0.65.
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e xcluding railroads), communication, a n d other p ublic utilities.
Finance, insurance, a nd r e a l estate.




-

8

25
3

35
2b

5

22

11

3

b
10

7

_
3

4

33
20
13

8

?

5

6

9

_

3

3
2

6b
57
7

10
5
5
2

5
2

$0.60; 5b at $0.60 - $0.65.
$0.<>5; 36 at $0.55 - $0.60; 21 at $0.60 - $0.65.

lb

6

_
-

over

_
-

196
61
135
5
70
60

853
1 U2
711
291

PnV\l

2.40

20
18
2

43
22
21
5
10
6

-

2.30

-

_

_

_

4

9

B : Characteristic Industry Occupations
Tabi«

Occupation 2/

Assemblers, class A 4a/ ...................
Assemblers, class B 4a/ ...................
Assemblers, class C 4g/ ...................
Electricians, maintenance 4a/ ...........................................
Inspectors, class A 4a/ ...........................................................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners £a/ ..........................
Laborers, material handling 4a/. £/ ..........................

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 4a/. 6/ ............................................................................
Drill-press operators, radial,
a la ss A i\\ f
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class A £a/ .............................
Engine-lathe operators, class A Aa/ ..................
Grinding-machine operators, class A 4a/ ...
Milling-machine operators, class A 4a7 . . . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class A 4b/ ......

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 4a/. £ / ...................*....
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class B 4a/ .........
Engine-lathe operators, class B 4a/ .....
Milling-machine operators, class B 4a/ . . . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B 4a/ ................

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 4a/. 6 / ........................................................
Drill-press operators, radial,
at aeo C / a f
.
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class C 4a/ ......................
Grinding-machine operators, class C 4a/ . . .
Milling-machine operators, class C 4b7 . . . .

Number
of
Workere

Average
hourly
earnings

u
%

115
102
38
20
47
138
206

1.74
1.52
1.32
1.82
1.86
1.17
1.25

507

1.80

17

50
45

1.64
1.72
1.87
1.73

133

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

%
l.oo

278

1.65

$
$
1.70 1.75

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

6
9

12
28

19
3

4
3

30

26

12

4

-

-

1

-

3
7

2
2

2
3

-

7
2

-

-

-

2

-

-

10

2
3

1

3

2

1

5

49

33

39

66

83

42

13

18

31

21

6

~

-

5

10

4
2
2
9

8
6
7
4

4
4
21
13

6

6

-

-

1
2

-

-

45
3
2

-

1
6

-

-

-

5

13

8

—

—

—

1.05 1.10 1.15

1.51
1.48
1.48

49

1.20

1.25 1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

2

3
3

1.50 1.55

1.47
1.29
1.36

-

10

-

-

-

1
17
3
1

-

20
a

19
35

25
34

1
2
10

15
5
1
6

2
29

3

1

-

-

1

“

7

17

28

13

-

-

-

9

21
12

7

~
-

-

318

n o

1.80 *1.85 1.90

1.95

$
$
$
$
$
2.00 2.05 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40

and
1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 over

5

-

6

-

n

-

1
22
7

5

-

40

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

1

3
4

2
8
3
4

5

3

7

7

3

11

4

14

33

13

7

3
9

5
14

4
2

8

-

“

~

3

3

-

1

10

28

20

28

51

40

26

1

6

35

10

6

2

6

~

1

-

—

3

3

-

-

2
5

20
6

2
4

2
4
6

2

4
-

~

1
“

-

5

11
2
4

2
-

-

1
-

4
-

-

-

-

1

5

24

4

5

1

1

8

28

32

19

29

6

7

11

6

7

6

3

-

-

~

1
1
1

8
1
1

5

13
3

2

2

-

7
-

-

2

1

2

1
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

4

10
12

29
19

55
23

103
7

12
25

43
24

13

24

6

3

1

1.22

54
45
15

18
25

-

2

1.36

31

2

-

-

1.58

326

-

“

1.56

34
49
24

12

$

1.60

1.85

n o

-

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55

-

"

6

23

57

-

-

6

-

19

11
2
10
4

3
6
1

n

1

“

-

-

-

-

3

~

2

8

-

63

9

4

9

‘
Machinists, production 4 a / .....................................
Weldors, hand, class A 4 a / .......................................

M o c U in & u f U n d ittb U e i. 1 /

1.73

34

Under
$
1.00

b- 3 5 :

'

2
2

n

2

1.87
1.86

1/

2
6

-

T h e s t u d y co v e r e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g mo r e than 20 workers in nonelectrical m a c h i n e r y industries (Group 35) as de f i n e d in the Standard Industrial C l a s s i f i c a t i o n Manual (1945 edition) p r e p a r e d b y the Bure a u of the
Budge t ; m a c h i n e - t o o l a c c e s s o r y e s t abli s h m e n t s employing more than 7 workers were also included. D a t a rel a t e to a November 1952 p a y roll period.
Occu p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey, Baltimore, Md., October 1952
D a t a l i m ited t o m e n w orkers.
U.S. D EPARTMENT OF LABOR
E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r ov e r t i m e a n d ni g h t work.
Bur e a u o f Labor Statistics
Insu f f i c i e n t d a t a to p e r m i t pres e n t a t i o n of separate averages b y method of wage payment.
u
(a) A l l o r p r e d o m i n a n t l y time workers.
(b) A l l o r p r e d o m i n a n t l y incentive workers.
T i t l e chan g e only, f r o m " S t o c k h a ndlers
and truckers, hand", as reported in previous study.

%

£

Inclu d e s d a t a f o r o p e r a t o rs o f ot h e r m a c h i n e tools in a d d ition to those shown separately.




10

Table B-7211:

P o W & l J*C U U ld/U *A r 1 /

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF
Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
Workers

Aeae $
vrg
$
hul
ory
0.45
e r i g 0.40
anns
and
under
2/
.50
•45

$
0.50

$
$
0.55 0.60

$
0.65

1
$
$
$
0.70 0.75 j
0.80

S
0.85

$
I
s
0.90 0.95

$
1.00

.80 ! .85

.90

.95 1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

!
!
i 33
1 1
1

7
1
5

8
8
7

6
2

2

2

1

_
_

_

.60

.65

.70

.75

_

.55

2

6

2

s
$
1.05 1.10

s
1.15

S
1.20

1.20

1.30

$
s
$
1.30
1.40 1.50

s
1.60

1.60

1.70

1.40

1.50

$

s

1.70
1.80

1.80
and
over

Men

Fireman, stationary boiler 3 a / ....... .
Washers, machine 3a/ .......................

79
38
57

*
0.84
1.22
1.04

98
528
246
282
130
100
30
106
77
29
359
69

.72
.65
.60
.68
.65
.62
.74
.67
.64
.76
.75
.62

_

1

~ :

7
2
6

n
16

3
2
2

5
8

%
J

1
X
2

6

1
X

X

Women
Clerks, retail receiving 3 a / ............. .
Finishers, flatwork, machine: Total ....... .
Time ......
Incentive ...
Identifiers: Total .......... ........... ..
Time .....................
Incentive .................
Markers: Total.... ............... ......
Time ..................... .
Incentive ....................
Pressers, machine, shirts 3 b / ............. .
Wrappers, bundle 3 a / ... ................. .

2
_
8
8

i 2
1 —'
I

!
i
;

6
6

57 j
56
1
9
8
i

1
17
40
91
18
82
22
9
_ ; 43
43
30
27
3
52
19

:

I
6

|

I

_

8

26
225
90
135
37
30
7
25
18
7
43
28

13
no
no
15
6
9
28
22
6
95

n

14
3

8

3
6
2

_
7

L

7
1

_
4
2
2
3

1
41

3
54

10
4
6
64
7

1
1
_

1

1

1
1

!

1

_

z

I

1

1
10

„
1
1

1
1

|
_____ i
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF$
$
$
$
$
$
%
s
$
$
$
$
»
$
$
s
$
s
$
s
s
s
Under 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 j 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00
$
and
45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 i65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 no. oo 115.00
!
120.00 over
_____ i ____
1
_

Occupation

Number
o
f
W rkers
o

Av r g
eae
wel
eky
erig
anns

u

j
Routemen, retail (driversalesmen) j j j : Total....................
6-day workweek.... ....................

%
370
196

74.00
77.00

2

22
2

8

26
24

9
!

19
9

12
2

25
20

!

2
1

15
4

8
5

34
6

24
23

27
17

29
18

31
22

19
10

16
5

13
7

15
8

8
8

x
x

j

/
4

|

1/

T he st udy c overed e s t a b l ishments employing more than 20 workers in the p o w e r laundries industry (Group 7211) as d e f ined in the Standard Industrial Class i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l (1949 e dition) p r e p a r e d b y the B u r e a u of
the Budget.
D ata rela t e to a Jun e 1952 payroll period.
2 / Excludes p r e m i u m p a y f o r overtime and night work.
O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Sur v e y , B altimore, Mi., O c t o b e r 1 9 5 2
Insufficient d ata to p e rmit presentation of separate averages b y method of wage payment.
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
(a)
All or p r e d o m i n antly time workers.
B u r e a u o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s
(b)
A ll or p r e d o m i n a n t l y incentive workers.
S t r aight-time earnings (includes c ommission earnings).
£/
Includes 2 r o u t e m e n on a 3^-day workweek, 32 r o u t e m e n on a 5-day workweek, and 90 rout e m e n o n a 5^-day workweek.

2/
ij




1
1

O Union Wage Scales
(Minimum wage r a te s and maximum s tr a ig h t-tim e hours per week agreed upon through c o l l e c t i v e bargaining
between employers and tra d e -u n io n s. Rates and hours a re those in e f f e c t on d a te s in d ic a te d . Addi­
tio n a l inform ation is a v a ila b le in re p o rts issued s e p a ra te ly f o r these in d ivid u al in d u strie s o r t r a d e s .)

B * u ld U *U f.

Table C -205:

Jan u ary 2 , 1953
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Bricklayers ............ .. .................. $3,200
Carpenters..... .. ..... .. ...... ..
2.580
Electricians ........................ ..
2.875
Painters . f ............. ................ .. ...........
2.250
Plasterers . . . . . . T . . . . . ....... .............................. t 2.375
Plumbers .............. .. .......... .. .......
2.300
Building laborers .............................................. ..
1 .4 9 0

Table C -205:

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

JS g A e /U e d

J u ly 1 , 1952
Classification

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Agreement A:
Dough mixers, ovenmen.......... .
Benchmen ..................... .......
Agreement B:
Dough mixers, bakers .......... .
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread department:
Mixers, oven operators (bread
trays) ....................... ..
Ingredient scalers .............. .
Bench hands .....................
Wrapping setters ............ .....
Divider operators, molder
operators ........... ...........
Bread wrappers, machine ........ .
Mixers' helpers, oven feeders,
oven dumpers, oven helpers ......
Pan greasers .................. .
Bread packers ................... .
Cake and sweet department:
Mixers, ovenmen' (first class) ••....
Ingredient m i xers ............ .
Bench h a n d s ...... ................
Icing mixers ......................
Cake decorators ...................
Ovenmen (second class) ............
Dividers (depositor
operators) ......................




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$2,000
1.933

45
45

1.230

48

1.460
1.435
1.430
1.385

40
40
40
40

1.325
1.250

40
40

1.225
1.163
1.150

40
40
40

1.460
1.435
1.430
1.460
1.460
1.360

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.300

40

& d Js e /U e d .~ O o S ttlH tte d

Table C -205:

__________________ J u ly 1 . 1952__________ r—
r
Rate
Hours
C la s s if ic a tio n
per
per
hour
week
Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement A: - Continued
Cake and sweet department: - Continued
Oven feeders ................................................... $1*200
Pan g r e a s e r s .............. .................................... 1 .1 6 3
Packers .............................................................. 1 .1 5 0
Bakery h elp ers .............................................. 1 .1 1 3
Cake i c e r s (women) .....................................
.9 4 5
Cake wrappers (women) ..............................
.9 4 5
Agreement B:
Bread department:
M ixers, ovenmen...........................................
1 .4 4 0
Dividermen ....................................................... 1 .3 1 0
1 .2 3 0
M oldermen......................................................... 1 .2 0 5
Bake-shop h e lp e rs , pan
1 .1 5 0
g re a s e rs .......................................................
Wrapping-machine feeders
( women) ....................................... ............... ..
.9 3 5
Cake department:
1 .4 4 0
M ixers, ovenmen............................................
In g re d ie n t s c a le r s ..................................... 1 .2 3 0
Oven du m p ers.............................................. .. • 1 .1 5 0
Packers and shippers ............................ ..
1 .0 9 0
Pan g re a s e rs ................................................... 1 .0 5 0
Wrappers and i c e r s (women) ...................
.9 3 5
Agreement C: General u tility m e n ............................................ 1 .4 5 0
Mixers ....................................................................... 1 .4 0 0
Ovenmen
...........................
1 .3 7 0
Bread wrapping-machine o p e ra to rs,
1 .3 5 0
d e p o sito r o p e ra to rs, bench hands . . . .
1 .3 0 0
Oven lo ad ers and dumpers ................ ..
In g red ien t s c a l e r s , bread panners and
ra c k e r s , m ixers' h elp ers ....................... .. 1 .2 5 0
Pan g r e a s e r s ......................................................... 1 .1 0 0
Hand i c e r s (women) ............................................ 1 .0 8 0
Checkers, packers and wrappers
.9 8 0
(women) .................................... ...........................
Agreement D:
Bread department:
Oven o p e ra to rs , dough m ixers ..............
1 .5 3 5
Molder o p e ra to rs, d iv id e r o p e ra to rs,
wrapping-machine o p e ra to rs ............... 1 .4 8 5
In g red ien t s c a l e r s , oven feed ers
and dumpers, m ixers' h e lp e rs ,
icing-m achine o p erators .....................
1 .4 3 5
Pan g r e a s e r s , m oldsrs' h e lp e rs ,
bread packers ....................... .................... 1 .3 8 5

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
o o

Table 0 -1 5 :

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

/io A & t fe d . Q o ^ U h U B c
£
J u ly 1 . 1952

C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement D: - Continued
Bread departm ent: - Continued
Panners and f i l l e r s .................................. $ 1 ,1 4 5
Agreement E :
B akers, f i r s t c l a s s . ....................................... 1 .3 2 5
B ak ers, second c l a s s ................................
1 .1 2 5
General h elp ers ..............................
.9 5 0
Women w o rk e rs .............. ........................ ...............
.8 2 5
Agreement F:
Dough m i x e r s .........................................
1 .4 5 5
D ivider o p e ra to rs ............................, . ............... 1 .3 8 0
Molder o p e ra to rs ............................................... 1 .3 3 0
M ixers' h elp ers ......................................... ..
1 .2 5 5
Wrapping-machine f e e d e r s .......................
1 .1 7 5
P ie and p a s try :
Doughnut shops:
Agreement A:
Doughnut-machine o p erators, enrobers,
glazing-m achine o p erators ................
Packers (women) ............................................
Agreement B:
M ixers, machine o p erators
Bakery h elp ers ..............................................
Packers and h elp ers (women) ............ ..
C rackers and co o k ies:
Mixing departm ent:
M ixers .............................................. ........................
M ixers' h e l p e r s ................................ .................
F lou r dumpers .......................................................
Baking department:
B akers, p e e le r s , in g red ien t
s e a l e r s ............ ...................................................
Cuttermen
...........................................
Ovenmen and reliefm en ................................
R o lle rm e n ................... ........................
Pan c le a n e rs , pan feeders ............................
Icin g department:
Machine o p e r a t o r s ........................................... ..
Enrobing-maehine o p e r a t o r s ................ . . . »
Icin g m ixers .........................................................
Machine o p e ra to rs (women), weighers,
d e p o sito r feed ers .........................................
Other women help ( a f t e r 30 days) ............
Packing department:
Checkers ............................ ••••••........................
Wrapping-machine o p e r a t o r s .........................

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1 .2 3 0
.9 3 0

40
40

1 .3 2 0
1 .0 9 5
.9 6 0

40
40
40

i .4 5 0
1 .2 5 0
1 .0 7 5

40
40
40

1 .4 5 0
1 .4 2 5
1 .3 5 0
1 .3 2 5
1 .0 7 5

40
40
40
40
40

1 .3 5 0
1 .3 0 0
1 .1 0 0

40
40
40

.9 8 0
.8 8 0

40
40

1 .1 3 0
1 .1 0 0

40
40

Occupational Wage Survey, B altim ore, Md., October 1952
U .S. D
EPARTM T OP LABOR
EN
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

12

Tb e C27: PbUUbUf ~G
al a**t*H €ed
4

Tbe C205: feaAe/ued. ~GaH&*U£ect
al -

Table C -42:

A fo ta ^ U u c A

1% * lu e * d

a * t d < ^ e lp e A A -G a + $ lU t* € je c £

Jl 1,1952
uy
C asfcto
l siiain

Ju ly 1 . 1952

Rt H u s
ae o r
pr pr
e
e
h u we
o r ek

Cakr ad cois - Cniud
rces n oke: otne
Pcigdprmn: - Cniud
akn eatet otne
Sog pces cro fres
pne akr, atn omr,
11.080 40
set pces ..........
we akr
Wihr ............... .980 40
eges
Saes cdi fres ....... . .930 40
clr, ade omr

____________ July 1, 1952
Rate

Classification

Hours

per

Newspapers: - Continued
Pressmen-in-charge - d a y work

per

hour

week

......................

$2,573
2.757
2.520

S t e r e o t y p e r s - n i g h t w o r k ........ ...........

2.700

Pressmen-in-charge - night work
Stereotypers - day work

............

3 7 1/2
35
37 1/2
35

J to c a l
Q p e tG tiH f C * * tfU o y e e 4 .

Table c-4 1 :

Tbe C 27: PdUUi+ttf
al ___ Jl 1,1952____
uy
C asfcto
l siiain

O c t o b e r 1.

Bo adjb sos
ok n o hp:
Bneywmn
idr oe:
J u n y o e .......... .
orewmn
$,4
100
Smsild
e i k l e ....... ...... .840
Usild ..............
nkle
.340
1.970
Bobnes ....... .... .
okidr
Cmoios hn ............ 2.220
opstr, ad
Eetoyes .............. 2.290
l crtpr
Mcie oeaos ............ 2.220
ahn prtr
Mcie tnes (ahnss .. .... 2.220
ahn edr mciit)
M i e s . ... ..... .
alr.
1.913
Poon rv r :
htegae s
Areet A .............. 2.640
gemn
AreetB ............. 2.947
g e mn
Pes assat ad fees
rs sitns n edr:
Pae o sal atmtc pess .. 1.450
ltn r ml uoai rse
Clne pess (vr31 ice) .•• 1.810
yidr rse oe
nhs ••
2- oo clne pess ....... 1.850
clr yidr rse
Pese, clne:
rsmn yidr
2-oo pess ...... ..... 2.320
clr rse
Sal atmtc pess
ml uoai rse
(pt 31 ice) ......... 2.060
u o nhs
Snl-oo pess
igeclr rse
(vr31 ice) .......... . 2.220
oe
nhs
Pese, p a e ............ . 1.890
rsmn l t n
Seetpr ............... 2.520
troyes
Nwppr:
esaes
Cmoios hn - d ywr ....... 2.646
opstr, ad a ok
2.782
Cmoios hn - ngt wo k. ..
opstr, ad ih r .
Mcie oeaos -d y wr ...... 2.646
ahn prtr a ok
Mcie oeaos- ngt wr ..... 2.782
ahn prtr ih ok
Mcie tnes (ahnss ahn edr mciit)
dy wr ........ ......
a ok
2.646
Mcie tnes (ahnss ahn edr mciit)
ngt wr ............... 2.782
ih o k
Mies -d y wr ........... 1.913
alr a ok
Mies -fih wr ........... 2.186
alr tgt ok
Poonrvr -d ywo k
htegaes a r .... .... 2.880
Poonrvr - ngt w r
htegaes ih o k..... . 3.040
Pese, wb pess -d y wr .... 2.373
rsmn e rse a ok
Pese, wb pess- ngt wr ... 2.543
rsmn e rse ih ok




1952
Rate

Rt Hus
ae or
pr p r
e
e
h u we
o r ek

per

Classification

Hours
p er

h our. _ w e e k
Operators and conductors:
1 -man cars

40
40
40
40
40
37 1/
2
40
40
40
37 1/
2
37 1/
2
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
37 1/
2
36 2/
3
36 2/
3
36 2/
3
36 2/
3
36 2/
3
36 2/
3
40
35
37 1/
2
37 1/
2
37 1/
2
35

and busses:
$1,520
1.620

42 1 / 2
42 1 / 2

1.670
1.720

42 1 / 2
42 1 /2

1.470

42 1 / 2

............................... .

1.570

42 1/2

• • • . . ....................... .

1.620

42 1 / 2

A f t e r 1 y e a r ................................

1.670

42 1/2

F i r s t 3 m o n t h s ......... ...................
4 - 6 m o n t h s ............... ................
7 - 1 2

months

...............................
A f t e r 1 y e a r ................................
2 - m a n c a rs:
First 3 months
4 - 6

months

7 - 1 2

months

T a b l e C -42:

.................... ........

M o ta ^ P u ic A S b titte b d ,
a t u l o V e lfz & to i
J u l y 1.

1952
Rate

Hours

per

per

hour

week

........................

$1,690

40

...................................

1.570

45

C o n c r e t e m i x e r s .......................
D u m p a n d e x c a v a t i n g .......................

1.465
1.450

40

Contractors'

1.450

Classification

Armored

ear

Bakery - Biscuit
Building:
Construction:

drivers

......................

E l e c t r i c a l ...... ................. .
Material:
A sbestos and pipe
Helpers
Asphalt

40
40
40

...............

1.350

40

....................... ...........

1.225
1.400

40
40

Pl u m b i n g and

covering

1.450

heating:

1 .4 0 0

40

............................ .

1.275
1.500

40

H e l p e r s ..... ....................... .
R o o f i n g ........ ............................ .

1.375
1.550

40
40

Scaffolding

.................................

1.600

40

..........................................

1.550

40

Agreement A
Helpers
Agreement B

Tile

...........................
...............................

40

C la s s i f i c a t i o n

Rate
per
hour

$ 1 ,4 0 0
Candy - Wholesale ................................................ ..
Coal and fu e l o i l d e liv e r y •••••••••••••••••• 1 .2 6 0
Helpers ..........................................
1 .1 2 0
Department sto r e ..................................................... .. ••. 1 .5 0 0
Helpers ..............................................................
1 .1 7 5
D i s t i l l e r y . . . . . . . . . . . r . . T. , . . . . . . T. Y. . . . . . . .
1 .8 1 5
F urniture - R e t a i l ................................ ......................... 1 .4 1 0
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 .2 9 0
General - F re ig h t:
Regular d riv e rs ................................................... ..
1 .5 4 5
E x tra d r i v e r s ............ .................................................. 1 .5 4 5
Helpers ........................................................
1 .3 4 0
G lass (b o t t l e s ) .................................................................
1 .4 1 5
1 .1 7 0
Helpers ...................................
G rocery:
R e ta il ...............................................................................
1 .7 0 0
Helpers . . r . ......................t ........... T....................... 1 .4 2 2
Wholesale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 .4 0 0
Helpers ...................................................
1 .2 2 5
Ice:
C ity tr a n s f e r :
Less than 9 tons ................................................. 1 .2 6 0
1 .2 6 0
9 tons o r over •. ••............................
Route d e liv e ry d r iv e rs ..........................................
1 .2 6 0
Helpers ................................................................ ..
1 .0 5 0
1 .3 6 0
Route fo re m e n ........................................................ ..
Meat:
H otel and re s ta u ra n t supply .......................... ..
1 .6 4 0
Packing house:
Chauffeurs, road ................................................. 1 .8 6 5
Helpers ............................ ..
1 .5 0 0
C hauffeurs, c i t y ................................................. 1 .7 9 0
H elpers .............................................. ............... 1 .5 0 0
C hauffeurs, ln tr a p la n t
1 .5 6 3
H elpers ..................................... ....................
1 .5 1 3
Milk and io e cream:
S p ecial d e liv e ry m e n ........................................ ..
1 .0 0 8
Can truck chauffeu rs .......................................... .... 1 .2 3 8
Newspaper - C ity .............. ............................................... 1 .7 8 7
Helpers ............................................ .................... ..
1 .6 2 7
O il:
Agreement A ................................................................
1 .5 5 0
1 .8 5 0
Agreement B ..................................... ....................
Agreement C:
Fuel o i l ................................................ ............... .. 1 .8 5 0
1 .8 5 0
Gasoline ...................................................................
Stake t r u c k .............................................. ..
1 .6 8 0
Agreement D:
S ta rtin g r a t e ................................. ......................
1 .5 2 0
A fte r 6 months ••••••............ ........................... 1 .7 1 5
A fte r 1 y e a r ........................................................... 1 .8 1 2
A fte r 2 y e a rs ........................................................ 1 .9 3 8
A fte r 3 y e a r s ....................................... ............... 1 .9 3 8
Paper - W h o le sa le .......................................... ..
1 .5 6 0
Railway e x p r e s s ....................................... ................. ..
1 .7 6 0
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 .6 0 0
Tobacco - Wholesale ............ .................................. ....... 1 .3 0 0

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
45
45
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
48
45
37*
37*
48
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

13

D ; Supplementary W age Practices
P*&ai&io**l 1/

T ata* D -it

P ercen t o f t o t a l p lan t employment
w
By establishmen t p o licy in .
A ll manufacturing
Machinery in d u strie s
in d u strie s 2 /
2d
2d
3d o r o th er
3d o r o ther
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
work
work
work
work

S h ift d i f f e r e n tia l

A ll workers .................................................. ........................

XXX

XXX

6 9 .9

6 9 .9

1 8 .7

1 0 .0

1 9 .6

1 2 .2

6 9 .9

6 9 .9

1 8 .5

9 .8

1 9 .6

1 2 .2

3 3 .0
2 3 .4
9 .6
-

3 3 .0
3 3 .0
-

1 0 .7
1 .8
2 .2
5 .6
.2
.9
-

7 .5
.5
.8
.4
.2
4 .0
.9
.7

9 .9
7 .6
2 .3

5 .1
5 .1
-

3 6 .9
3 .9
3 3 .0

3 6 .9
3 .9
3 3 .0

4 .0
.3
1 .0
.4
2 .3

1 .8
-■
.6
.1
1 .1

9 .7
.5
9 .2

7 .1
.3
6.8

-

3 .8

.5

-

-

-

.2

.2

-

-

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

Workers in establishm ents having
p ro v isio n s f o r l a t e s h if ts .....................................

8 1 .3

7 8 .9

With s h i f t d i f f e r e n tia l .........................................

7 9 .9

7 7 .5

Uniform cen ts (per hour) ................................
Under 5 cen ts ......................... ........................
5 c e n t s ............ ....................................... ..
6 c e n t s ........................................................... ..
7 o r 8 cen ts ....................................................
9 ce n ts ............................................................. ..
10 cen ts ..............................................................
Over 10 cen ts .............................................

4 4 .7
6 .4
1 2 .8
2 1 .1
1 .3
—
3 .1
-

4 4 .4
2 .3
4 .5
4 .1
3 .2
2 0 .1
5 .2
5 .0

Uniform p e r c e n ta g e .................................. ..
Under 5 p ercen t ..............................................
5 percen t ...........................................................
7 or 7£ percen t ..............................................
10 p e r c e n t ..................... ...............................

1 9 .4
1 .0
4 .4
3 .8
1 0 .2

1 7 .3
2 .9
5 .3
9 .1

Other 2 / ....................................................................

1 5 .8

1 5 .8

-

With no s h if t d i f f e r e n tia l ..............

1 .4

1 .4

-

1 8 .7

2 1 .1

Workers in establishm ents having
no p ro vision s f o r la te s h if ts .......... .

2.
J

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

(i >)
A ctu ally working or e x t r a s h i f t s in A ll manul'a ctu rin g
Machinery in d u strie s
Indus tr •ies
...
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
o th er
o ther
s h ift
s h ift
sh ift
sh ift

3 0 .1

3 0 .1

XXX

XXX

1 / S h ift d i f f e r e n tia l data are presented in term s o f (a ) establishm ent p o licy and (b) workers a c tu a lly employed on l a t e s h i f t s a t the time o f
th e su rv ey . An establishm ent was considered as having a p o licy i f i t met any o f the follow ing co n d itio n s! ( l ) operated l a t e s h i f t s a t the time o f
th e su rv ey , (2 ) had u n ion -co n tract provision s covering l a t e s h i f t s , or (3 ) had operated l a t e s h i f t s w ithin 6 months p rio r to the survey.
2 / Includes d ata f o r machinery in d u strie s a ls o shown s e p a ra te ly .
2 / Includes such provision s as 8 hours* pay f o r 7 o r ? £ hours worked; and ce n ts-p e r-h o u r d i f f e r e n t i a l s depending upon lab o r grad e.
Table

d-

2:

S ch ed u l e d

PERCENT OF O FFICE WORKERS[

Weekly hours

,

All
industries 2 /

Manufacturing

.

Public
utilities 2 / •

T V e e JU tf J lo u / U

EMPLOYED IN—

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance ••

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Services

All
industries

t^
f

Manufacturing

.

Public _
utilities 3/»

A ll w o r k e r s .......................... .....................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Under 37£ h o u r s .....................................................
3 ? £ hours ................................... ........................ ..
Over 37$- and under 4 0 h o u r s ...............................
4 0 hours ............................................... ......................
Over 40 and under 44 hours ..................................
4 4 h o u r s ......................................................................
Over 44 and under 48 hours ............................
4 8 hours ......................................................................
Over 48 h o u r s ................................................. ..

4 .9
9 .5
5 .9
7 6 .8
1 .8
.7
.3
.1

1 .7
6 .1
4 .1
8 5 .3
1 .6
1 .2
-

.8
4 6 .0
1 .1
5 2 .1
-

7 .6
9 .9
4 .8
7 4 .4
2 .8
.5
“

3 .4
2 .9
1 .5
8 3 .9
6 .0
2 .0
.3

8 .8
3 .9
1 1 .6
7 5 .7
-

1 .1
2 .9
.9
7 2 .3
3 .2
2 .4
5 .9
8 .3
3 .0

1 .1
3 .0

_
6 3 .7
1 6 .7
3 .5
9 .0
2 .5
4 .6

1/
2/
2/

U
*
**

K.

-

8 3 .7
-

1 .1
2 .3
5 .6
3 .2

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Servioes

3 .8
_

7 8 .8
1 .5
6 .4
9 .5

2 .4
6 .1
4 3 .4
4 .5
4 .2
1 6 .8
2 0 .4
2 .2

Data r e l a t e to women w orkers.
Includes d ata f o r s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to those industry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
E stim ates a re no t comparable with those published in the previous (June 1951) b u lle tin due to d iffe re n ce s in the method o f c la s s if y in g c e r t a i n occu p atio n al groups.
Includes d a ta f o r r e a l e s t a t e and se rv ic e s in add ition to those in d u stry d iv isio n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
T ran sp o rtatio n (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
O ccupational Wage Survey, B altim ore, Md., October 1952
F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABO
R
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




u

P a i d tM o l i d a t f i

Table D -3 :

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Number of paid holidays

All
industries 1 / Manufacturing

Public .
utilities 2 /*

All workers ..........................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays
...................

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .2

9 9 .U

3 .1
3 5 .2
2U.3

3 .7
U8.5
3 6 .7
5 .0
2 .9
1 .9
1 .3
-

_
9 .9
9 .3
3 2 .1

6 .7
1 7 .7
5 2 .0
3 .9
1 8 .9
-

1 0 .7
-

h
/

Less than 6 days ..................
6 days ............................
7 days ............................
8 days ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
9 d a y s ...................... .....
1 0 days •••••••.......••••••••••••••
11 d a y s ...........................
1 2 days •••••................... .
13 days ...........................
lit days ....................••••••••
Workers in establishments providing
no paid holidays ••••......••••••••••

1f

y
3/
V
5/
*
*#

8 .6

7 .5
5 .8

1.1*

1 .2

1*7.5

-

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 3 .7

9 7 .2

8 5 .1

8 0 . it

8 8 .0

8 .ii

3 .9
6 0 .7

1 6 .8

9 .8
2 3 .2
3 2 .1
9 .8
5 .5

Services

1 0 0 .0

5 2 .6

2 5 .8

2 2 .2

6 .3
1 .5
2 .7
•
-

.6

1 8 .2

1 7 .3

5 .5
1 .3
-

6 .3

-

.8

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

(5/)
1 .9
1 0 .3
1 1 .3
1 7 .9
3.1*
1 9 .7

-

-

Public ,
utilities 2 / .

1 0 0 .0

2 .7

-

Servioes

1 0 0 .0

8 6 .0

-

.1

Finance * .

1 0 0 .0

•

5 .0
U.6
U.U

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
All
industries 3 / Manufacturing

2 .8

8 .2

8 .5
2 3 .1
1 .9

2 .9

6 5 .0
2 0 .1
-

-

2 6 .6
-

-

-

-

lU .9

1 2 .0

1 9 .6

Includes data f o r se rv ic e s in add ition to those in d u stry d iv isio n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
E stim ates are not comparable w ith those published in the previous (June 195 1 ) b u lle tin due to d iffe re n c e s in the method of c la s s ify in g c e r ta in occu p atio n al groups.
Includes data f o r r e a l e s ta te snd se r v ic e s in add ition to those in d u stry d iv isio n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
Paid holidays of l e s s than a f u l l day have been om itted.
Less than 0 .0 5 p e rce n t.
T ransp ortation (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and other pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .

Table D-4s P < u d V G C C iii(U U W & U tu U

PERCENT OF O FFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

V acation p o licy

All workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

All
indu stries^

1 0 0 .0

Manufacturing

.

Public
utilities 2 / .

Wholesale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT W ORKERS EM PLOYED IN—
Finanoe

1 0 0 .0

.1 0 0 *0 ___

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

98.U

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

«*

Servioes

All
industries

y

Manufacturing

Public
utilities

,

y*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

.......1 00*9

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

8 1 .2

1 0 0 .0

9 1 .9
6 7 .9
lU.U
7 .6
2 .0
6 .3

......10p ,.0„,..

1 0 0 .0
6 8 .1
2 .0
2 8 .0
1 .9
-

7 8 .5
2 1 .7

1 0 0 .0
6 5 .2
V 2 0 .7
y llt .l
-

...

100, o _ H

A fter 1 year of serv ice
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
paid vacatio n s •••••••••••••••••••••••
Length-of-tim e p ay m en t..........................
1 week ..........................................••••••••
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s...................
2 weeks ••••••••••............ ............... ..
Other ..........................••••••••••••••••
Percentage payment 5 / •••••••••••••••
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s

9 9 .8
9 9 .8
2U.1
8 .2
6 7 .5

9 9 .8
9 9 .8
2 3 .6
1 5 .0
6 1 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1*9.3
.2
5 o .5

98.U
1 2 .1
8 6 .3

1 0 0 .0
6 8 .5
i7.«*
iu .i

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

1 0 0 .0
2 .8
' 9 7 .2
-

9 3 .3
6 6 .5
1 2 .8
12, U
1 .6
1*.3

-

5 6 .8
2 .7

m
.2

•2

1 .6

See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b l e .
*
T ransp ortation (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
* * Finance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .




y
y

9 7 .5

NOTE:

2.U

1 .8

1 8 .8

Occupational Wage Survey, B a ltim o re , Md., October 1952
U .S . DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

E stim ates a re provided se p a ra te ly , according t o employer p r a c tic e in computing
v a ca tio n payments (le n g th -o f -tim e , p e rce n ta g e , or f l a t sum); percentage and
fla t-su m payments were converted to equ ivalen t time periods in e a r l i e r stu d ies,

•

Servioes

15

Table D-4*

fic U ft ^ U cU X uti04t4> [ty o A JH C il

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

V acation p o lic y

A
ll , .
anufacturing
industries 1 / M

Public .
utilities 2 /*

|

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance ••

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................

9 9 .8

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .1

1 0 0 .0

Len gth -of-tim e payment ..............................
1 week .............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...................
2 weeks ...........................................................
Other ...............................................................
Percen tage payment £ / .................................

9 9 .8
1 0 .3
7 .1
8 1 .9
.5
-

9 9 .8
1 3 .9
1 6 .3
6 9 .6

1 0 0 .0
7 .1
9 2 .6
-

9 8 .1
5 .8
9 2 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
2 5 .7
7 1 .3
-

Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v a ca tio n s ............................................

.2

.2

Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................

9 9 .9

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

Len gth -of-tim e payment ..............................
1 week .............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Other ...............................................................
Percen tage payment * > /.................................

9 9 .9
5 .0
7 .2
8 7 .0
.7
-

9 9 .3
6 .6
1 6 .3
7 6 .5
.1
-

1 0 0 .0
.6
9 9 .1
-

9 9 .6
7 .0
9 2 .6
“

1 0 0 .0
1 0 .6
.2
8 9 .2
-

Workers in estab lishm ents providing
no paid v a ca tio n s ............................................

.1

.2

9 9 .9

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9
2 .1
.3
9 5 .1
2 .1
-

9 9 .8
.3
.1
9 6 .3
2 .8

1 0 0 .0
.6
9 9 .2
.2

9 9 .6
5 .3
9 3 .8
-

*
"

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 .6
.2
8 9 .2
-

.1

.2

-

9 9 .9

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9
2 .1
.2
9 2 .2
1 .1

9 9 .8
.3
.1
9 2 .3
2 .5
1 .3

1 0 0 .0
.1

9 9 .6
5 .8
9 3 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 .6
8 5 .1

Services

1 0 0 .0

A ll w o r k e r s .................•...........................................

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

I

industries^/
_

M
anufacturing

Public
.
utilities 2/*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .6

9 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

8 1 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
.1
9 7 .9
2 .0
-

9 3 .3
1 6 .5
1 5 .9
3 0 .0
.9
1 .3

9 1 .9
5 2 .9
2 3 .0
1 5 .0
1 .0
6 .3

1 0 0 .0
2 8 .3
6 9 .3
1 .9

1 0 0 .0
3 3 .7
6 6 .3
-

-

7 8 .5
1 6 .0
6 2 .5
2 .7

2 .1

1 .8

-

1 8 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .6

9 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

8 3 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
.1
9 7 .9
2 .0

9 3 .3
3 7 .2
1 5 .9
3 9 .3
.9
1 .3

9 1 .9
1 6 .3
2 1 .5
2 3 .1
1 .0
6 .3

1 0 0 .0
1 8 .6
7 9 .5
1 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 1 .7
2 .2
8 6 .1

-

8 0 .5
1 5 .5
_
6 5 .0
_
2 .7

2 .1

1 .8

-

1 6 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .9

9 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

8 3 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
.1
9 7 .2
2 .7
-

9 3 .6
6 .9
1 .0
8 1 .2
1 .5
1 .3

9 1 .9
2 .0
1 .0
8 7 .9
1 .0
6 .3

1 0 0 .0
9 .6
8 8 .5
1 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 1 .7
2 .2
8 6 .1

-

8 0 .5
1 3 .6
_
6 6 .9
2 .7

2 .1

1 .8

-

1 6 .8

A fter 2 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e

-

-

-

1 .6

-

-

-

-

A fte r 3 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e

-

.1

-

-

-

-

A fter 5 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................
Len gth -of-tim e payment ...............................
1 week .............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 weeks ............................................ ..
Percen tage payment j > / .................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v a ca tio n s ............................................

-

.1

j
i
i

-

-

_

A fter 10 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................
Len gth -of-tim e payment ...............................
1 week .............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...................
3 weeks and over .....................................
Percen tage payment _ g / .................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v a ca tio n s ............................................

1.0

i
!

-

9 9 .7

.2

-

.2

-

1 .3

-

“

.1

i

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T ran sp o rtatio n (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th e r pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .




9 2 .5
.7
6 .7

-

.1

-

.1
-

““

i
!

i
i

9 7 .9

9 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

8 3 .2

1 0 0 .0

9 3 .6
6 .1
.7
8 2 .6
1 .3
2 .6
1 .3

9 1 .9
2 .0
1 .0
8 5 .6
.9
2 .1
6 .3

1 0 0 .0
5 .0

8 0 .5
1 3 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 1 .7

2 .1

1 .8

«
.

8 9 .5
5 .5

_

6 6 .9
_

8 5 .0
3 .3

2 .7
1 6 .8

-

16

T»bie

d- 4

:

P a id

V a c a t io n * h a e m

a l P si a c i d i a n l ) - G o n t i w

d

PERCENT OF PLANT W ORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF O FFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Vacation p o licy

A ll workers ............................................................ ..

All
, ,
industries 1/

Manufacturing

Public - /
utilities 2/ »

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance «•

Services

All
.
industries 2 /

Manufacturing

Public .
utilities£ / •

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 ,0

9 7 .9

9 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

8 3 .2

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .0
.1
2 1 .1

9 9 .6
5 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 .6

1 0 0 ,0

9 1 .9

1 0 0 ,0

7 8 .8
“

6 3 .7
-

6 6 .7
2 2 .7
-

5 3 .2
4 4 .7
-

5 .0
3 0 .9
6 4 .1
-

8 0 .5
1 3 .6
3 1 .8
3 5 .1
2 .7

1 0 0 .0

2 .0

3 0 .1

9 3 .6
6 .4
4 5 .4
4 0 .4
1 .4
4 .3

“

2 .1

1 .8

1 0 0 .0

_

A fter 15 y e a rs o f se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v a ca tio n s ...................................................
Length-of-tim a payment ..............................
1 w e e k ............................................................
2 weeks ................................... ......................
3 w e e k s......................................... ...............
Other ..............................................................
Percentage payment *>/ ............................

4 6 .4
5 0 .5
.9
-

9 9 .8
.3
4 2 .8
5 6 .3
.A
-

Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ............................................

.1

.2

—

.4

9 9 .9

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .9

9 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

8 3 .2

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6
5 .8
2 6 .3
5 1 .7
1 5 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 .6

1 0 0 .0

9 3 .6
6 .4
3 9 .4

9 1 .9

1 0 0 .0

5 .0
1 4 .2

.4
1 .4
4 .3

3 9 .4
4 9 .5
1 .0
6 .3

8 0 .5
1 3 .6
3 0 .3
2 4 .7
1 1 .9
2 .7

1 0 0 .0

2 .0

3 6 .4
5 9 .2
1 .8
.4
-

9 9 .8
.3
3 7 .7
6 1 .4
.4
“

.1

.2

2 .1

1 .8

—

1 6 .8

Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v a c a t i o n s ....................... ...........................

99.9

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6

Length-of-tim e payment ...............................
1 w e e k ......................................................... ..
2 w e e k s............ ........................................ ..
3 weeks ..........................................................
4 weeks and over .....................................
O t h e r ..............................................................
Percentage payment %/ .................................

99.9
2 .1
3 3 .5
5 1 .7
1 2 .2
.4
-

9 9 .8
.3
3 5 .3
5 6 .5
7 .3
.4
-

1 0 0 .0
.1
1 5 .8
8 4 .1
-

9 9 .6
5 .8
2 4 .7
1 9 .0
5 0 .1
-

Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v a catio n s ............................................

.1

.2

2 .1

*

.1

2 .0

4 3 .5
4 5 .4
1 .0
6 .3

1 1 .7
7 1 .4
1 6 .9
-

1 6 .8

A fter 20 y e a rs o f se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v acatio n s ...................................................
Length-of-tim e payment ..............................
1 w e e k ..................... ......................................
2 w e e k s............................................
3 w e e k s.............. ...........................................
4 weeks and o v e r ...................................
O t h e r ..................................... ...................... ..
Percentage payment jj/ .................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s ............................................

2 .1

.1
1 5 .8
8 4 .1
-

6 0 .5
2 8 .9
-

.1
2 7 .7
6 9 .5
2 .7
”

.4

4 6 .0

8 0 .8
-

1 1 .7
6 1 .2
2 7 .1
**
“

A fter 25 y ears o f se rv ice

.4

1 0 0 .0

'

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .9

9 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

8 3 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 .6
6 0 .4
1 7 .0
1 2 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
.1
2 0 .7
6 2 .3
1 6 .9
-

9 3 .6
6 .4
3 9 .3
3 9 .6
6 .9
1 .4
4 .3

9 1 .9
2 .0
3 9 .4
4 1 .8
7 .7
1 .0
6 .3

1 0 0 .0
5 .0
1 4 .2
8 0 .8
-

8 0 .5
1 3 .6
2 7 .7
9 .9
2 9 .3
2 .7

1 0 0 .0
1 1 .7
6 1 .3
2 1 .2
5 .8
-

2 .1

1 .8

1 6 .8

l/ Includes data for services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2/ Estimates are not comparable with those published in the previous (June 1951) bulletin due to differences in the method of classifying certain occupational groups. In addition, estimates
in the earlier study relating to provisions after 1 year of service incorrectly included one establishment as providing 2 weeks' rather than a week's vacation.
2/ Includes data for real estate and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Estimates in the earlier study incorrectly included one establishment as providing 2 weeks rather than over 1 and under 2 weeks. Corrected data are as follows: Office workers - over 1
and under 2 weeks, 15.4 percent; 2 weeks, 14.6 percent; plant workers - over 1 and under 2 weeks, 20.7 percent; 2 weeks, 13.7 percent.
/ Percent of annual earnings.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

(
d




17

Table D -5 :

H iu o ce and. Pe+uU&n Pia*U
-H A M
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type o f plan

All
_ ,
industries

±/

A ll workers ...............................................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts having
insurance o r pension plan s y .......... ..

Manufacturing

Public /
utilities 2 / •

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance ••

Services

All 0 /
industries^/

Manufacturing

Public /
utilities 2 / *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .9

9 7 .7

9 7 .1

9 6 .4

8 7 .0

9 7 .1

8 9 .1

9 2 .2

9 7 .5

6 7 .7

8 5 .8

9 6 .9
9 6 .9

9 0 .0
8 6 .9

7 9 .9
7 9 .9

9 7 .1
8 5 .0

8 6 .3
8 2 .9

9 0 .8
8 6 .5

9 5 .5
9 5 .5

6 3 .0
5 7 .6

Services

7 5 .0
7 5 .0

Insurance plan s A / ...............................
L i f e ................. .. ..............................................
A ccid en tal death and
dismemberment ........................................
Sickness and a cc id e n t ..........................
H o s p i t a l i z a t i o n .......................... ...............
S u rg ic a l ........................................................
M e d ic a l ................................................. ..
Pension o r re tire m e n t p lan ......................

9 4 .5
8 6 .7

9 6 .9
8 7 .1

4 .4
4 1 .9
5 5 .8
3 4 .6
7 .9
6 7 .2

5 .9
6 4 .3
7 2 .2
5 2 .8
6 .2
6 9 .3

1 .4
1 2 .3
1 3 .8
1 8 .0
6 .2
8 4 .4

2 3 .8
3 7 .3
7 2 .1
1 7 .5
4 .1
8 0 .3

4 3 .0
3 0 .2
2 2 .5
6 .9
5 3 .2

8 .1
4 9 .0
2 6 .1
1 4 .4
7 0 .0

4 .5
6 0 .6
6 0 .7
4 4 .5
7 .0
6 4 .8

6 .0
7 2 .3
7 5 .1
5 5 .5
6 .9
7 1 .5

1 .4
3 0 .1
4 2 .9
4 6 .8
1 8 .3
6 7 .9

1 1 .8
2 8 .1
5 1 .6
1 2 .9
4 .4
4 9 .1

3 6 .4
1 9 .9
1 5 .1
2 .7
5 9 .1

Workers in estab lish m en ts having
no insurance o r pension plan s .................

4 .1

2 .3

2 .9

3 .6

1 3 .0

2 .9

1 0 .9

7 .8

2 .5

3 2 .3

1 4 .2

1/
3/

k/
*
**

-

In clu d es d ata f o r s e r v ic e s in addition to those ind ustry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
E stim ates are not comparable with those published in the previous (June 1951) b u lle tin due to d iffe re n ce s in the method of c la s s ify in g c e r ta in occu pational groups.
Inclu des d ata f o r r e a l e s ta te and se rv ice s in addition to those in d u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
Unduplicated t o t a l .
Occupational Wage Survey, B altim ore, Md., October 1952
T ran sp ortatio n (exclu d in g r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
U«S» D
EPARTM
ENT OF LABCF
F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s




18

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau’s occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a ranrinniTn 0f useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources.
In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community.
Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure,
earnings,
and working conditions
among establishments.
Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation.
Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.
With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau's
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and
(d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping
(tables A-l
through A-A).
The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade;
retail trade;
finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services.
Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table,
only establishments above a certain size were
studied.
Smaller establishments -were omitted because
they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cover­
ed were determined separately for each industry
(see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources.
Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons,
are included. Where weekly hours are reported,
as
for office clerical occupations,
reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e.,
those
hired to work the establishment's full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.
The term "office workers"
referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional,
and technical personnel.
"Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadxnen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions.
Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees,
and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded.
Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries,
these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

19

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller.

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Baltimore, Md., 2/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, October 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Nur b »r of
ae
establi shments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry,divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions............. *.......••••.... .
Manufacturing ••••••......................
Nonmanufacturing ................ ••••••••••
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities....... ••••••......... •••*
Wholesale trade.......... *•••••••••••••
Retail trade....*....... *......... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ...*..
Services 2/ ........ .........*...*.....

569
235
334

174
56
118

245,500
150,000
95,500

163,660
102,680
60,980

25,510
11,700
13,810

101
51
101
51
51

35
85
75
64
75

20
30
27
26
15

28,400
10,700
32,400
13,200
10,800

24,160
5,210
19,950
8,520
3,140

3,590
1,570
2,040
6,190
420

i/ 21
21

54
34

16
13

10,160
3,884

7,790
2,354

967
96

101
-

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis U
Machinery industries ................. •••••••
Power laundries.......... ...... •••••.......

2/ Baltimore Metropolitan Area (Baltimore City, Baltimore and Anne Arundel Counties).
2/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in the June 1951 survey was 21 workers in wholesale
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services; and 101 in the other major industry divisions*
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
2/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables*
sj Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included*




20

Index

Assembler (machinery), 9
Bench hand (bakeries), 11
Biller, machine, 3
Bookbinder (printing), 12
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3
Bricklayer (building construction), 11
Calculating-machine operator, 3
Carpenter (building construction), 11
Carpenter, maintenance, 6
Cleaner, 7
Clerk, file, 3
Clerk, order, 3, 4
Clerk, payroll, 3, 4
Clerk, retail receiving
(power laundries), 10
Compositor, hand (printing), 12
Draftsman, 5
Drill-press operator (machinery), 9
Duplicating-machine operator, 4
Electrician (building construction), 11
Electrician, maintenance, 6
Electrician, maintenance (machinery), 9
Engine-lathe operator (machinery), 9
Engineer, stationary, 6
Extractor operator (power laundries), 10

Identifier (power laundries), 10
Inspector (machinery), 9
Janitor, 7
Janitor (machinery), 9
Key-punch operator, 4

Laborer (building construction), 11
Laborer, material handling, 7
Laborer, material handling (machinery), 9
Machine operator (printing), 12
Machine tender (printing), 12
Machine-tool operator, production
(machinery), 9
Machine-tool operator, toolroom, 6
Machinist, maintenance. 6
Machinist, production (machinery), 9
Marker (power laundries), 10
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 6
Mechanic, maintenance, 6
Milling-machine operator
(machinery), 9
Millwright, 6
Mixer (bakeries). 11
Molder (bakeries), 11
Motortruck driver, 12
Nurse, industrial (registered), 5

Finisher, flatwork (power laundries), 10
Fireman, stationary boiler, 6
Fireman, stationary boiler
(power laundries), 10

Office boy, 3
Office girl, 4
Oiler, 6

Grinding-machine operator (machinery), 9
Guard, 7

Operator (local transit), 12
Order filler, 7
Ovenman (bakeries), 11

Helper (bakeries), 11
Helper, motortruck driver, 12
Helper, trades, maintenance, 6

Packer, 7
Packer (bakeries), 11
Painter (building construction), 11




Painter, maintenance, 6
Photoengraver (printing), 12
Pipe fitter, maintenance, 6
Plasterer (building construction), 11
Plumber (building construction), 11
Porter, 7
Press assistant (printing), 12
Press feeder (printing), 12
Press, machine, shirts
(power laundries), 10
Pressman (printing), 12
Receiving clerk, 7
Routeman (driver-salesman)
(power laundries), 10
Secretary, 4
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance, 6
Shipping clerk, 7
Shipping-and-receiving clerk, 7
Stenographer. 4
Stereotyper (printing), 12
Switchboard operator, 4
Switchboard operator-receptionist, 4
Tabulating-machine operator, 3, 4
Tool-ard-die maker, 6
Tracer, 5

Transcribing-roachine operator, 4
Truck driver, 7, 8
Trucker, power, 8
Turret-lathe operator, hand
(machinery), 9
Typist, 5
Washer, machine
(power laundries), 10
Watchman, 8
Welder, hand (machinery), 9
Wrapper (bakeries), 11
Wrapper, bundle (power laundries), 10
☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 - 1 9 5 3




This report was prepared

in the Bureau's

Southern Regional Offices

C o m m u n i c a t i o n s m a y be a d d r e s s e d t o :
B r u n s w i c k A. B a g d o n , R e g i o n a l D i r e c t o r
Bureau of Labor Statistics
50 S e v e n t h S t r e e t , N» V ,
Room 664
Atlanta
The

5, G e o r g i a

services of the Bur e a u

of

Labor

Statistics' regional offices

are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial
relations,

employment,

prices,

labor

tu rn o v e r,

productivity,

construction and housings

The Southern Regi o n includes the following States
Alabama

North Carolina

Arkansas
District of Columbia

Oklahoma
South Carolina

Florida
Georgia
Louisiana

Tennessee
Texas
Virginia

Maryland
Mississippi

West Virginia

w o r k injuries,


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102