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PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
October 1952

Bulletin N o . 1116-5

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




PHILADELPHIA. PENNSYLVANIA




O c to b e r

1952

Bulletin No. 1116-5
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. - Price

cents




Contents

Page

Letter of Transmittal

The Secretary of labor:
I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on
occupational wages and related benefits in Philadelphia, Pa.,
during October 1952. Similar studies are being conducted in a
number of other large labor-market areas during the fiscal year
1953. These studies have been designed to meet a variety of
governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide
earnings information for many occupations common to most manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries
of selected supplementary wage benefits. Whenever possible,
separate data have been presented for individual major industry
divisions.
This report was prepared in the Bureau*s regional of­
fice in New York, N. Y., by Norman J. Samuels
the direc­
tion of Frederick W. Mueller, Regional Wage and Industrial Re­
lations Analyst. The planning and central direction of the pro­
gram was carried on in the Bureau* s Division of Wages and In­
dustrial Relations.

under

Ewan Clague, Commissioner.
Hon. Martin P. Durkin,
Secretary of Labor.




1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E ............................

Bureau of labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C., February 10, 1953.

1

THE PHILADELPHIA AREA .........................

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT O F LABOR,

INTRODUCTION...........................................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations .......................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ....
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ...
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations .............................

3
6
7
3

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis * B-2251
Full-fashioned hosiery ••••...............
B-2333
Women*s and misses* dresses •••••••.......
B-2851
Paints and varnishes ••••.................
B-7211
Power laundries ..........................

11
11
12
12

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction....................
C-205
Bakeries .................................. •
C-27
Printing ..................................
C-41
Local transit operating em pl o y e e s ......
C-42
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s ...........

13
13
13
13
13

Supplementary wage practices D-l
Shift differential provisions...........
D-2
Scheduled weekly h o u r s ...................
D-3
Paid holidays .............................
D-4
Paid vacations ...........................
D-5
Insurance and pension p l a n s ..... ........

14
14
15
15
13

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey ......... ...............

19

I N D E X ...................................................

21

* NOTE:

In addition, occupational earnings information
for the machinery industries (January 1953) is
available upon request to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY - PHILADELPHIA, PA.

Introduction
The Philadelphia area is one of several important indus­
trial centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently
conducting occupational wage surveys0 In such surveys, occupations
common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries
are studied
on a community-wide basis. 1/ Cross-industry methods
of sampling are thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the
following types
of occupations!
(a) office;
(b) professional and
technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, ware­
housing, and shipping.
In presenting earnings information for such
jobs
(tables A-l through A-4)
separate data are provided wherever
possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Earnings
information for characteristic occupations in
certain more specifically defined industries is presented in Series
B tables.
Union scales (Series C tables) are presented for selected
occupations in several industries or trades in which the great ma­
jority of the workers
are employed under terms of collective-bar­
gaining agreements,
and the contract or minimum rates are believed
to be indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data are collected and summarized on shift operations and
differentials,
hours of work,
and supplementary benefits
such as
vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension plans.

The Philadelphia Area

Manufacturing plants provided more than 600,000 jobs and
were engaged in producing a hignly diversified group of products.
The metal-i/orking industries
carried more than a quarter million
workers on their payrolls.
The textile
and apparel industries em­
ployed about 125,000.
Additional employment of 50,000 was provided
by the food-processing industries;
60,000 by the oil and chemical
industries;
and 35,000 by the printing and publishing industries.
The importance
of the Philadelphia area’s' factories is
matched by the significance
of the area as a center of trade and
commercial activities.
Wholesale and retail trade outlets employed
about 250,000, and in the fields of finance, insurance, and real es­
tate there were about 60,000 workers. Approximatelv 100,000 workers
were employed in the transportation, communication, and other public
utilities industries*
The various services industries gave employ­
ment to about 150,000 workers.
Among establishments within scope
of the current study,
collective-bargaining agreements between management and labor organ­
izations were in force
in firms employing more than 80 percent of
the plant workers. In manufacturing, establishments employing near­
ly 90 percent of the plant workers had union agreements.
Among the
nonmanufacturing industries, 85 percent of the plant workers in the
public utilities group were in unionized firms; 60 percent in whole­
sale trade; 50 percent in retail trade; and 85 percent in services.
Contracts covering office workers we re not nearly as prevalent as
those applying to plant workers. ^ Less than 20 percent of the cleri­
cal workers were in establishments with contracts covering office
employees.
Only in the public utilities group were an appreciable
number
of office workers
covered by union contracts.
About twothirds of the office workers in this division worked under the terms
of collectively bargained agreements.

More than 3.5 million people live in the eight counties
comprising the Fhiladelphia-Camden Metropolitan area, of whom 3 mil­
lion reside
in the counties of Philadelphia and Delaware in Penn­
sylvania and Camden in New Jersey - the industrial nucleus of the
area.
This survey was limited to these three counties.
Employment was at a high level in the entire metropolitan
area in October 1952.
Approximately 1.2 million workers (excluding
agriculture,
construction,
and government) were employed in the
a r e a fs factories, stares, and offices.

l/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.
Differences between the scope of this survey and the last previous
survey (October 1951) are indicated in the appendix table.




Occupational Wage Structure
Area wage and salary levels had risen between the time of
the current study and the date of the Bureau’s last survey (October
1951),
continuing an upward trend.
General wage rate changes, af­
fecting groups of workers rather than individuals, contributed sub­
stantially to this rise.
Based on an analysis of the larger firms
in the area
(those employing 200 or more workers) more than threefourths of the plant workers in these establishments had received
one or more formal wage adjustments during the period. The propor­
tion of workers whose earnings were so affected was higher in

a
)

2

manufacturing than in nonmanufacturing industries.
Formal increases
for plant workers were usually on a cents-per-hour basis and most
frequently ranged from 5 to 10 cents.
However,
approximately a
fourth of the plant workers in the larger manufacturing establish­
ments received percentage increases, which in most cases ranged be­
tween 3 and 8 percent. Virtually all the office workers in manu­
facturing, as compared with slightly more* than half in nonmanufactur­
ing firms, received general wage adjustments during the period.
Most of these increases were percentage additions to weekly salaries,
most frequently from 3 to 5 percent.
A number of workers in the Philadelphia area received wage
increases as a result of industry- or company-wide bargaining agree­
ments completed during the past year. For example, national agree­
ments reached with the steel workers and the electrical workers af­
fected large numbers of employees in the area.
In transportation,
general wage increases were granted
to railroad employees
on the
basis of escalator clauses geared to the Bureau1s Consumer Price
Index.
The maritime workers received a 6.2-percent increase as a
result of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast agreements. Local negotiations
in textile manufacturing - one of the important industries in the
area - resulted in general increases of 10 or 12 cents
an hour;
commercial printers negotiated new agreements calling for increases
of 11^- cents for men and 8 cents for women.
About 12,000 workers
in local transit received increases of 2 cents an hour.

Wage rates for time workers were determined according to
formalized rate structures in firms employing more than 85 percent
of the plant workers and 70 percent of the office workers.
The es­
tablishment of a single rate for each occupation was reported in
firms employing 50 percent of the plant workers and was
the pre­
dominant formal type of rate payment in all industry divisions ex­
cept retail trade.
The majority of the clerical workers,
on the
other hand, were employed in offices which allowed for the upward
movement of weekly salaries within an established range
of rates*
However, firms employing 60 percent of the clerical workers in serv­
ice industries and nearly 50 percent in wholesale trade had no
formal rate structure.
Salaries were individually determined in
these establishments.
Formalized rate structures included provisions for the
payment of minimum entrance rates to inexperienced plant employees
in nearly all instances.
In plants employing more than half the
workers, this minimum was over $1 an hour.
In manufacturing, where
the practice was universal,
firms with more
than 1,000 employees




had higher minima than the smaller establishments* Among the smaller
factories, more than half the workers were employed in establishments
having minimum hourly rates of $1 or less, with a particularly heavy
concentration at 75 cents* A similar proportion of workers in the
larger manufacturing establishments were employed in firms with mini­
mum rates ranging from $1.05 to $1.25. Among nonmanufacturing indus­
tries, more than half the workers in the public utilities group and
in wholesale trade were in establishments with minimum rates of $1
or more; on the other hand, about 50 percent of the workers in retail
trade and 85 percent in services industries were employed in firms
with minimum rates of 75 cents or less.
Wages and salaries were generally higher i n manufacturing
than in nonmanufacturing industries.
Average salaries for office
workers were higher in manufacturing in 23 out of 26 occupations for
which comparisons could be made.
However, clerical salaries in the
wholesale trade and public utilities industry divisions were as high
or higher than in manufacturing for nearly half the comparable occu­
pations.
Straight-time average hourly earnings
for plant jobs
followed a similar pattern with 23 out of 26 comparable occupations
at higher rates in manufacturing industries than in nonmanufacturing.
Establishments employing more than 85 percent of the manu­
facturing plant workers had provisions for the payment of late-shift
work, with about a fifth of the workers
actually working on extra
shifts in October 1952. Nearly all shift workers were entitled to
a differential over the day (first) shift rates. Shift pay practices
were
about equally divided between provisions for percentage and
cents-per-hour differentials.
The most
common practice
in firms
providing differentials in the form of cents-per-hour additions was
5 cents for second-shift work and 10 cents for third shift. Approxi­
mately two-thirds of the workers in establishments providing uniform
percentage differentials received 10 percent over the base rate for
all extra-shift work.
Virtually all workers included in the survey were eligible
for paid vacations after a year of service.
Provisions were gener­
ally more liberal for office workers than for plant workers.
A ma­
jority of the office workers were eligible for 2 weeks after 1 year
and 3 weeks after 15 years.
The predominant practice for plant
workers was 1 week's paid vacation after 1 year,
2 weeks
after
5 years,
and 3 weeks after 20 years
of service.
The 4.0-hour week
was the schedule applying to 80 percent of all plant workers but
to slightly less than half of the
office workers.
Shorter of­
fice hours were predominant in the public utilities and finance
groups of industries.




A* Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1952)

3

A

Tabi. A-i! O ffto* Qaoitp d i&U-GiM ttimtmi
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1952)

Average
Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry' d iv isio n

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

W
eekly Under
W
eekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) %
30.00

t
30.00
3 2 .5 0

3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0

$
3 7 .5 0

3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0

1*0.00

1 2 .5 0

»
«
$
$
I
S
s
*1*7.50 5 0 .0 0 *52.50 5 5 .0 0 *57.50 60.00 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 *67.50 70. (X) 7 2 .5 0 * 7 5 .0 0 * 8 0 .0 0 *65.00 * 9 0 .0 0
and
over
50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.oo 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 70.00 7 2 .5 0 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0

s
no. oo *12.50 * 5 .0 0
n5.oo nv.5o

Women - Continued
Calculating-m achine op erators
(Comptometer type) ................................................... ..
Manufacturing .................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................

'

Wholesale trad e ......................................................
R etail trad e 2 / .......................................................

Calculating-m achine op erators (o th e r than
Comptometer ty p e) ...........................................................
M an ufacturing.............. . .................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................

ft
3 9 .0
1 7 .5 0
1,269
372 .....S K r f W
3 v .o
1*6.so
8y?
5 3 .0 0
)*9
3 7 .5
1*9.50
231
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
1*6.00
538
3 7 .0
3 8 .5 0
73

1
|
i*
li
1
*
-

27
------F ~
25
10
15

37
29
22
7

83
38
us
nb
i

181
59
122
o
23
vn
1

an
51
33
7
23
■

121
[,8
73
5
30
36
~

52
10
n?
21
5
If
"

25
13
12
2
n
5
“

17
5
12
2
7
3
-

18
5
13
in
3
-

7
6
l
l
■

9
6
3
1
2
“

■

1
1
~

3
2
1

-»
-

-

-

1
1
-

"

•
j

3

l
2

17
2
15

6
1
5

1C
2
8

9
6
3

?7
10
17

6
3
3

.32
3

3
3
~

3.9
16
3
1

lg
18
28
25

65
11
51*
20
33

116
5i6?
7
32

6lx
3
56
18
3n

89
31
58
21
26

8
n5
30
6

.39
pc:
* in
9
5

53
?n
29
10

31*
?3
11
6

25
15
10
5
n

20
9
13
7
2

27
23
n
3

k
■
3
1
“

7
i
3
1

m
i*i
3
38

1*68
29
1*39
3
66
3?o

270
19
?51
5
U3
161*

1*1*2
61
381
h6
11
1269

2h!
52
189
28
31
PL

275
116
159
56
18
69

151
n li
37
5
3
9

89
53
36
5
1
3

116
26
90
m
i

69
21
1*8
6
-

30
18
12
2

.7
n
3
■

1
1
■

2
1
1
1
-

7
7
1
-

1
1
”

.
"

9

39

68
5
63
57

77
27
50
33

79
26
53
a

121
73
ne
ue

68
35
33
n

82
1*5
37
2

7
6
l
l

36
19
17
2

23
23
-

in
6
8
8

u*

21
7
m
-

2
2
-

_
"

53
1.1
1?
_
11
_
1

85
56
33
22
9
_
2

169
105
6n
29
_

176
135
m
h
_

17
8
10

23
2
12

11x2
90
52
20
12
13
6
1

172
91
81
16
35
11
8
11

202
11*5
57
11
7
21
n
m

68
50
18
h
2
6
6
-

156
131
25
6
3
«
6
-

59
1*3
16
7
6
3
-

92
60
32
5
Hi
5
8
■

3n
26
8
3
5
-

-

26
21
5
2
2
1
“

1
1

6
6

18
10
8

69
no
29

32
12
20

37 .... 22
16
23
6
in

m
3n
7

8
8
-

25
21
n

3
2
1

n
3
•1

2
1
1

_
-

30
2
28
1
15

53
8
U5
3
1
1*1

119
3n
85
1
-

116
• 27
89
3
10
76

m3
62
81
18
1?
6'
1*5

126
70
56
9
1
3
n3

mi
66
75
1
32
19
22

83
65
18
1
*
3
11

52...
38
m
5
7
1
1

22
18
n

678
276
liO?
121
192

38 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .0

1)7.50
1*9.00
1:6.00
J*7.50
U j .5'0

_
-

2,210
s ir '
1,691*
170
209
969

3 8 .0
"39 T
3 7 .5
3 9 .5
l*o.o
3 7 .0

3 8 .0 0
111.50
3 6 .5 0
h o.50
3U.80
3U.50

C lerks, o r d e r .........................................................................
Manufacturing ..................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................
R etail trad e 2 / ......................................................

717
31a
376
2Uh

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
1*0.0

nn.50
1*9.50
1*0.00
3 7 .0 0

9
9

C lerks, p ayroll ....................................................................
Manufacturing ..................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s - * ................................................
Wholesale trad e ......................................................
R etail trad e 2 / ......................................................
Finance
. . 7 ...........................................................
Services .......................................................................

1.586
1,083
503
152
81*
lli7
69
51

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 7 .0
3 9 .0

5 0 .5 0
5 0 .0 0
5o.5o
50.00
5n.oo
1(8.50
5n.oo
U5.50

-

5
_
-

Duplicating-machine op erators .............. ..
Manufacturing ..................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................

270
171
99

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1*1.50
U3.00
39 .5 0

Key-punch op erators ...........................................................
Manufacturing ..................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ...............................................
Wholesale trad e ......................................................
R e ta il trad e £ / ......................................................
Finance * * . . 7 ...........................................................

1 .2 9 5
565
730
70
91
71*
157

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 6 .0

1*6.00
1*8.50
nn.oo
1*9.00
5 6 .5 0
1*5.00
111.oo

-

39
39
5

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




256
61^
195
87
95 '
12

3

8 0 .5 0
5 3 .5 0
1*7.0':

■

69
153
32 ------ TT
121
7/*
6
6
38
13
62
1x3
12
13

1
1

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5

C lerks, f i l e , c la s s B ......................................................
Manufacturing ..................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................
Wholesale trad e ......................................................
R etail trad e 2 / ......................................................
Finance * * . . 7 .................................................... ..

Ii8
7

36
r
33
3
25
5

-

-

131
66
65

C lerks, f i l e , c la s s A ......................................................
Manufacturing ..................................................................
Norunanufacturing ...........................................................
Wholesale trad e ......................................................

67
IT
57
2

5
55

168
Sh
nn
7
16
91

132
62
70
5
8
57

u
2 —
?

ii*
-

-

3
1

6
T"
2

6

"

"

~

“

■
*

-

"

2
2
1

9
3
6
n
2

1
1
1

1
3
“

- ‘
~

.
“

_

_

_

-

-

“

“

_

6
3
-

_
-

_

- T
“

■

i
~

29
29
”

“

n2
15
27
3
1
11
1?
~

18
6
12
9
3
■

13
10
3
1
1
1
~

27
189
8
1
“

1
1
”

1
1

_

~

-

_
-

1*5
21*
21
11
9
-

26
17
9
6
3
-

~

21
16
5
-

1
*
1

—

r

13
2
11
11
-

1
1
-

1
-

3
3
2
1

16
- -------TT
“

11
e
3
I
1
1
~

25
22
3
1
2
~

_
“

-

-

1
1
1
-

3
3

2
2
2
”

_

-

_

5
5
■

"

.
-

"

.
-

-

-

-

3
-

-

-

-

5

Table A-l:

2/

(Average straight-time meekly hours and earnings
for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING -STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Sex, occupation,

Number
of

a nd i n dustry d i v i s i o n

$

$
Weekly

Weekly

(Standard) (Standard)

Under

3 0 .0 0

*32.50 *35.00

3 7 .5 0

$
ao.oo $li2.50 * U5.oo 1 7 . 5 0

$

$

5 0 .0 0

5 2 .5 0

5S.00 57.00

$
60.00

62.50 *65.00

52.50

5 5 .0 0

57.00 60.00

62.50

65.00 67.50

*67.50 * 7

0 .0 0

2 .5 0

*75.00

7 5 .0 0

80.'JO

*7

*80.00 *85.00 *90.00
»nH

30.00

32.50

35.00

37.50 ao.oo

as.oo

a2.5o

a7.50 50.00

70.00

72.50

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

85

.no

9 0 .0 0

over

W o m e n - C ontinued
t

Office g i rls .................................... ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............. ....................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .......................... .
Retail trade 2/ ............................

i-22
179
2U3

38.5
39.0
38.0
39.5

35.50
37.00
3ii.50
35.00

31
31
3

87
13
7 k

22

97
^ E T
33
6

82

U6
10
36
6

U3
39
10

33
19
ia
1

12
9
3
1

21
9
12

8
7
1

5

-

nil
17

260

158

33
227
-

k 2

-

91
23
68
-

9

1

_

_

_

_

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

a
ai

1

-

-

-

316

a*a

-

_

_

-

-

-

13a
96
38
21

86
58
28

5

S e c retaries .......................................
M a n u f acturi ng . .................................
N o n m a n u facturing ..............................
Public utilities * ........................
W holesale trade ............................
R e t a i l trade 2/ ...........................
F i n ance
. . 7 ..............................
Services ....................................

h S h 9

2,225
2,32U
171
509
339
1,103
202

S t e n o g r n p h e r s , general .................. ...... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................................
N o n r c a n u f a c t u r i n g ....... ......................
Public util i t i e s # ........................
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ............. ............ .
Retail trade 2/ ...........................
F i n a n c e * * ..7..............................

U,863
2,196
2,367
383
503
330
1,053

Services ...........................

98

Stenographers, technical ..................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

157
105
52

Switchboard operators ....................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail trade ? . / ...........................
Services

1*207
297
910
268
119
185
198
iho

....................................

92li

Manufacturing ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Public utilities * ........................
Wholesale trade .......................... .
Services.................... ............ .
Tabulating-macbine operators ............ .
Manufacturing .................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................ .
Public utilities * ................ .
.
Finance ** .........................
Transcribing-machine operators, seneral ....
Manufacturing ................... ......
Nonmanufacturing ................. .......... ..
Wholesale trade ...........................

Finance

* * .................................

” T3?"
392
31
195
99

.

553
1 90
363
75
1 37

- -?80
io5
575
255
195

38.5
39.0
38.0
38.0
3 y .5
Uo.o
36.5
38.5

38.5
39.0
38.0
38.0
38.5
39.5
37.0
39.0

39.0
39.5
38.0

6 1 .0 0

55.00
57.00
73.00
56.50
58.50
55.00
56.50

-

5
11

2
50

-

-

-

“

83

63
20

?l*v

l

77
-

li3
2

205

7
1

-

53.50

-

k3.S0

-

57.50
59.00
5U.00

-

1
1*0

69

-

-

-

-

lh
Il
l

la

-

18
-

38.0
'38.0"
38.0

L6.00

_

1*7.50

39.5
38.0

it7.50
U3.50
a5.oo

-

39.5
39.0
39.5
37.0
);0.0

38.5

38.5
39.5
38.0
38.5
36.5

hk.00

52.5°
58.50
U9.5o
55.oo
ii8.00

I1
'

_

38

la

38
8

9

3
10
-

17

29
U5
108
6

2

a?
72

1 75
13
16
13
133

-

10

_
108
10
98
11’
6

_
ay
6

ai

63
151
11

-

1
1

2

-

Ui3
10

165

133
35
1

161
106

k

?a

b
2
6

17

569
362

20?
36
25
25
107

a
9

83
aa
196
22

3a
17
7
31
7

li
>

13

5
2

37
22

3

15

105
26
79
13
1U
11

89
33
56
2

a
a7

7
8

li
i

27
ia

3)i
5

23

266

7
7U
32

78
ao
38
22
1
11

1 1

67

8

38

h5
20

D ’
2
58

101
58

93
I
-

9
29
■-

16
_

22

6

-

7

3

11
.

16

39

3

11

a
12

38

39

66
6
60

56
6
50

12

1
10

20

2a
19

73
21
52
a

20

19

an
_

1;3
1

16

tia

-

2k

2a
3

5

_.

19

26

86

ii8

19
-

6
20

5 0 .0 0

-

13
73
25

19
29
6

la . 00

■

18

30

20

1

16

_

1

a5
■

6

129
U3

105
ao

86
10

65
31
23

3 k

115
121

121

65

22

61
22
39
2
20
5
9

86
85
1

);2
U2
1

-

1 1

■

a

79

18

52

a7

62

8
22

15

a9

n

35
20
15

1
11

?

270

70

187
83
21
18

as
a*

17

9

123
12
21
30
a9
11

1 9 a
126
6b
17
25
a
17
5

231
136

iaa

96

§5

58

16

71

69
27
5
20

56

aa
ia

9

3

18

16

13
5

15
1

173
10
26
aa
aa

a3
27

9

387
252
135
22
38
13
59
3

81
31
50

95
56
25

-

} k

}

231
112
6
ia
2a
59

73
2

a

29

283
160

1).

a
16

-

-

-

2

13
5
8

13
13
-

9
9

“

203
92
111
8
aa
15
39
5

29
19
10

■

9

92
15
5
16

?v

aa

ia

5
1

8

12

1

7
33
a

a
n
2

~

27

a

13

1

7

ia

7

5

10

2

2

a

3

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

“

_

_
■

5

ia

a

2

13

2

1

-

1

2

1

-

n

-

“

~

-

“

~

-

21

a2

11

23
19

20
20
-

1
1

1
1
-

8
2
6

A

-

-

-

6
-

3

6

7

2

3

6

7

2

10

10

?
3l
5
3

20
—

r

'

ia

66
29
37

2a

9
15

*

28
20
8

10
7
3

7
7

21

12
1

1

9

3

-

8
8

1

5U
15
39
30

119

18

28

16

51

9
9

3

2

22
6
6

12
a
a

63

-

5

3

68

■

2

_

-

_

7

-

1

-

6

- -

_

-

-

~

-

7

3
9
-

-

3

-

-

a

a

-

-

9

■

3

?

_
-

-

10

2

-

7
5

_

10

37
-

ia

5
T

1

inK
117
38
18
8
-

_
-

30
20
10
1
9
-

&
22
12

19
3
a
2

■

37
23
ia
5
3
-

79
29
50
16

-

1

218
126

a?2
266,
206
10
21
37
121

3

a2

16

ia
7
7

300

130
17C
6

251

7

29
63
61
50

8
8
-

93

60

302
206
96

5

51
ai

125
193
10
10!*
10

573
357
216

13

1

U5.50

233
35
a6
28
116
8

670
381
289
28
30
65
3 U2

53

35

53

-

5 0 .0 0

395
162

31
ia

17

i
l

-

38.5
39.5
37.0

1 69
i
109
360
2U
1 11

3 16
1

9
15
25
6

3

3
2
1
-

U7.50

9
51
7

15

65
8

73
17
115
22

21

-

38.5
39.0

97

555
201

2^
1

k

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Jl
il

_

2

)t7.50
58.50
U5.00
1*6.00
52.50
1:3.00
)*6.50
37.00

39.0
39.5
39.0

52

-

it7.00

L5 . 0 0
h3.50

16
_

_
-

-

5 0 .0 0

52

_
-

U9.00
5 1 .5 0

16
-

_
-

-

1

_

_

_

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

-

_
-

-

■

1
T

_
-

_

3

13

_

1

1

13

2

_

1

2

-

-

_

-

-

-

7

a
3
3

_
_

_

_
_

_

_
_
_

-

*

-

O coM p a t i o H ir C o H t i w

d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGIIT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF -

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
$
$
!
$
30.00 32.50 35.00|
37.50
32.50

Weekly Under
Weekly
erig $
anns
hours
(tnad (tnad
Sadr) Sadr)
30.00

$
Uo.oo
U

35.00

37.50 Uo.oo
I

20
.5

f
,
I
*
$
$
s
$
U5.ooiU7.5o 50.00 52.50 j 55.00 57.50

6 .0
00

U2.50

U5.00 ! U7.5o

Typists, class A ,

Manufacturing ,
Nonmanufacturing .....
Public utilities ■
*
Retail trade 2/ ...
Finance ** ........ .
Services ..........
Typists, class B «

Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing ...
Public utilities
Wholesale trade .
Retail trade 2/ .
Finance ■** ......
Services .......

l,53U
81U

70
2
112
57
U77
55

U,870
1,827
3,0U3
67
U
3U7
1,910
259

6
0

38.5
39.5
37.5
37.5
Uo.o
36.5
38.0
38.0
39.0
37.5
38.0
39.0
39.5
36.5
39.0

- !
- 1
-

1.0
0
80
.0

Uo.oo
’ U3.00

3 .5
80
UU.0
0

Ui.oo
! 39.50
;
Uo.oo

3 .0
70

-

10
10
_
_
10
-

6
3

15
12
3
1
2

1 U96
90
U
.
35
! 35 i
| 282 !
! 5U

397
63
33U
1
22 ;
32

0
6

1

82
23
59
U
u

1U
U9
3
23
22
lj

20
6
19

16

19U
77
117
17
7
65

5
0

1
!

1

789'
1#;
633
u
70!
Ul;
502 :
i

712
227
U85
3
U6
6U
32U
U8

52.50

57.50

55.00

6 .0
00

62.50

65.00

67.50

70.00

i
i

Women - Continued

$
U7.5o
U9.00
U6.00
, 50.50
1U
: U5.00
|U

5 .0
00

$
$
$
$
$
s
62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00

1

19
?59
U
551
25
136
71
282
37

0
8

|
!
'
|

U72
219
253
U
52
56
109
32

222
165
57
U
5
U6

2
26
0

12U
82
12
2U
3
27
16

17U
98
76
1U
3
53
6
151
132
19
6
1
3
9

87
6U
23
9
1U
-

39
29
10
_
9
1
-

9U
61
33
17
6
10

62 i
UO
22 !
9
i
_ j
- i
3 :

1U5
95
5o
13
5
31
1

U5
39
6
6
i
- !
i

10

29
19
10
8
-

'
!

8
6
2
_
-

8
U
U
2 I
!
“
_ 1

12
5

7
2j

1

6
U
2
2

U
u
-

!

- !
-

5

!
(
I

3
2
1 i
1

!
;
!

2

2
2
“

3 i
2 1
1
1
~

i
j

i
i

1

-

1/

*

- ;

!
;

;
!
i

.
-

-

‘
!

-

_
-

-

- :
-

-

,
!
|
1

!
!
;

i
------1

L
_____

"2/

90.00
and
over

i

10
5

9
Ul
U3
111
22

$

1

1U9 i 256
UU 1 129
! 127
12
7
1
8
: 107
83
!
6
2

5
10
28U
26
2

8 .0 |8 .0
0 0$ 5 0
.0 0 0 5 0 0 0
72.50 ! 75 0 8 .0 ' 8 .0 19 .0

Houys reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

( H id 7 e c U * U C c U C h C H fU cU iO H d

Table A-2t

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W EEK LY EARNINGS O F Number
of
workers

Weekly

Under
Weekly
earnings $
(Standard) Uo.oo

(Standard)

$
Uo.oo

U5.oo 50.00

5 5 .0 0

60.00 6 5 .0 0 170.00 ; 7 5 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

85.00

U5.QQ

Sex, occupation, and industry division

5Q.00 55.0Q

60.00

65.QQ 7 0 .0 0 175.00

8 5 .0 0

90.00

“U O "

■*155"

Uo.o
uo.o

~W Zo

136
132

UO.O
UO.O

U9.50
U9.00

Draftsmen ......................... ................

67

3 9 .5

6 9 .0 0

Draftsmen, junior . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing ................... ••••

3 9 .5

5 7 .5 0

101

18

Uo.o

58.00

~T5

Tracers ..............
Manufac t u r i n g .....

Nurses, industrial (registered )
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...... ..........

Nonmanufacturing .....................
T r a c e r s ........ .....................................

1
/

270

2,131

Uo.o

371

39.0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

39 .0

U9.00

~2ST

73
63
j

139
131

12

1
19

1
11

15

I 11
n

!

23U

2
nr

3

U
U
d

21
20

6

U7
36

52
15

12U
97
27

255

232

21 _^257
25U

2U3 ' 226

1
$
-

| and

over

27

u r

23U

229

225

! 216

j 136

HIT

27
105

"lOT

9U

w

19
i

ft
U9

62
16

_19_
19

3$

— jr

j

20
21
6

10

19

11

1
$

2

6_____ L .

17

6 3 .5 0
6 0 .5 0

128

M _____ 3 8 -,._.lj
38
19

I f

13

63.00

85

20

_13_

6

I
_2L_

10

8 7 .5 0

$

-21-00 100.00105.00 1 1 0 .0 0 115.00:12Q .0Q ll25-.00 1 3 0 .0 0 1U0.00 150.00160.00
!

$
117.00
116.00

Draftsman ................... ..
Manufacturing . . . . .

s

95.ooioo.oo 105.00!110.00! 115.00120.00 125.00 130.00 lUO.odl50.00 160.00
-

8 0 .0 0

M
en
Draftsmen, chief . . . . .
Manufacturing •...<

90.00

T~

j

l

~

1

56

35

22

12

U9

30

9

5

20
2

10
2

18

37

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

7

Table

M

a -3:

a in t e n a n c e a n d P o w e * P la n t C k c M fu U ia n l

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$

Carpenters, maintenance........... ....... .
Manufacturing.......................... .
Nonmanufacturing.................. .....

1.15

1.20

1.25

-

.
___2_ ___L_ ___ 3_
2
h
3

198

2.51*

-

-

-

-

-

1.851*

2.02
2.03
1.99
2.31

-

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

2
2
-

1.81*
1.88
1.77
1.98
1.67
1.56

_
-

O

s r

1*01
82
53

Firemen, stationary boiler....... ..........
Manufacturing ......... •••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing....... ............ ..
Di KI 1r* +
i
+
x
Retail trade 2/ ......................

1,095
879

11
*
75

1.57
1.62
1*39
1.61*
1.53

Helpers, trades, maintenance ................
Mlimitacturlng..... ...............
Nonmanufacturing ........................ .
DiiKl+s*
jl
Retail trade 2j ......................

2,723
1,902
821
561*
127

1.63
1.68
1.52
1.55
1*52

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ............

1*70

10
8

162

2
16

_ 2_
_
3
3

1.30
2
2
-

$
1.30

$

1.35

1.10 1.U5
*

1.35

1.1*0

1.1*5

9

1
1

$

_
.

-

-

-

22
_
22

15

7

10
1
*

15

7

6

6*
1
18
*
16

.50
26
2*
1

1
*
1
*
-

3

-

-

1

-

15
7
8

9
7
2

33

13
1
*
9
g

-

26
20
6

7
1

-

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ........ .
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Piihl 1p nf-TH-Mec »
WVinl j»ea1a froHa
net ^

1.1*53
272
1,181
51*7
152
po

1.78
1.86
1.77
1.76
x.yo
1.62

Mechanics, maintenance ........ .............
Manufacturing...........................
Nonmanufacturing....................... .
Retail trade 2/ ......................

2.118
1,697
1*21
70

1.96
1.97
1.93
1.83

Millwrights
Manufacturing ...........................

1*79
1*75

1.93
1.92

-

Oilers .....................................
Manufacturing ................ ...........

531*
526

1.52__„
1.52

$
5

Painters, maintenance..................... .
Manufacturing................. ........ .
Nonmanufacturing ........................
P»KMr»
-n I■Mos *

896
513
383
11 0
.
XI+7

1.88
1.9U
1.80
1 Rj

1.70

1.80

1.90

2.00

81
58
23
10
6

255
203
52

202
176

168
138
30
JO
1*
1

5*
1
11
**
10

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.!*0

18
+
39
9

23
1*
1
9
8

8
2
6

-

7

-

-

7

-

7

6

15
3
12
10

6
6
-

18
*
23
25
22

83
5*
1
29
9

189
131
58
-

366
307
59
g

392
357
35
15

211
193
18
1
*
2

137
102
35
1

-

_
1
-

jo

15

*
J*

2
6

11
1
*

J

-

33
1
-0
L
9

7

23
8
15

7
1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

._
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
-

68
-

19
*
1
18
*
36
12

9
3
6

221*
170
5*
1
2
1
*
18
*

93
18
*
15
*
3*
1
11

195
103
92
28
12
11

21*0
159
81
29
2
1*
1

119
76
13
*
5
1
*
-

101*

-

2
6
5
2
1
_
1
2
0

35
3
2
1

76
20
73 “ IT"
5
3
5
1
-

19
10
9

93
72
21

37
33
1
*

73
66
7

30
26
1
*

137
86
51

233
209
2*
1

12
*
32
10

78
78

19
19

1*
1
1*
1

11

38

12

131
113
18
15
3

69
5U
15
f
1

12
*
21
21
16

233
161*
69
12
16
*

709
1*03
306

11*8
99
19
*
11
*
6

12
*
20
22
17
xf
5

131
125
6

10
*

1*93
305
188
172
6

6

_
.
-

-

'-

2
2
_
_

-

-

1
1
-

1$
15

i
t

1
3

59

96

11*1

8

100
S
33
2
7

7

_

6
_
6

1
*
1
*
_
_
-

I
t
1
*

171*
136

38
20

6
6

13
8

18
18

.

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

_ 9
9

1
1

21
21

8
8

7?
73

37
37

_

16

6

5

2

h

5
5
-

16

6

5

2

25
25

10

26
3

7
7

138

1x\

h

22
2
20

50
11
39

5

17
10
7

-

-

17
!1
•

2

2

119

-

11U
5

7

-

-

~

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

-

-

_
-

8
16

_
-

28
11*0

_
-

-

-

5

-

-

12
5

-

17
*
31
16
15

1
*
1
*
-

129
118
11
11

la

3
8
3
3

1
*
i
*
-

33
12
21
21

-

30
30
-

12
*
12
*

11*5
18
127
£1
1f
i
XU

0
7
5

121
in

6
0
15
2
152

10
*8

306
306

-

-

-

186
277
276 T 5 5 “
1

307
212
95

158
11*7
11

187
11
**
11*3
HI
XXj

79
15
6*
1
OQ
‘7

0\

la

118
117
1
16
12
1
*
k

15
*
ll
**
1
1

1
1

-

-

1
*
1
*
1
*
“

-

5
5
5
-

211*
150
6*
1
39

396
306
272 T*o5“ ~2hS~ “ 3 T 1
150
3*
1
16
2
1
*

13
13
2
7
2
6

8
8

15
15

6+
1
6*
1

100
93

so
so

39
39

30
13
17

10
1
*
6

103
18
*
55

119
80
39
16

10
*
10
*

33
21
12
6
-

10
31
9 — r
1
1
n
-

2
3
3
9

7
7

32
32

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

3*
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

3
0
3
0

.
-

166
91
75

7
1
*
3

31
31
1

11
11

1
11
11

16
16
-

-

_

1

2
1
2
1

35

19
*
359
121
12
12

330
87
2
1*3
120
12
*
11

10
5
7
7

-

6
9

6

19
*6
9
1
1
8 13
9 8

8 85
0
6
7
2 18
9

137

87
^8T

32
32

27
27

88
70
18
2

162
62
100
75

6*
1

7
3

5
5
63
T o
23

2
6
38
33

17
x1

-

20 20 20 20
.6 .7 .8 .9

91 ..J.g_ ___ 5_
32
91
5

$
$
2.90 3.oo
and
3.00 over

1

23

7

9

-

5
.
-

s

$

20 2 20
.6 .70 .6

6

10
8
10
*

12
_
12
6
_
6

18
17
1
.
_

2.21
1.57
2.10
2.10

1.60

8

.
_

2.05
2.05
2.08

958
909

$
$
$
$
$
1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20

-

1

2.50

1.8
0

9

16

s
$
$
2.1*0 2.50

$
1.70

$

-

23

1.88

77
96

i.5o

20
.3

1.60

$

1.50

$

16
*
26
20

5
5
.

$

1

22
_
-

1,577
1,390
187




3

_
•
-

Machinist, maintenance.... ................ .
Manufacturing..............••••••••.•••••
Nonmanufacturing ............ ............

Pipe f i t t e r s , m aintenance....................................... ..
Manufacturing ............................................................

1.20 1.25

_
-

1.336
819
517
98

R e ta il trade 2/ ..................................................
Fi nflnr*A

$

*
2.01*
1.96
2.22

Engineers, stationary
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Retail trade 2J ........... ...........
Finance ** ..7..........................
Services......................... .

1
1

$
1.15

$

Average Under $
hul
ory
erig $
anns
1.00

1,225
— W "
357

Retail trade 2/ ......................
Electricians, maintenance................
Manufacturing ............ .
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Retail trade 2/ ......... ............ .

1.0 1.0
0 5

$
1.10

1.05 1.10

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Workers

6

1*7

12
8

6

11*
11

-

21*
21*

1*6
1*5

1*2
39

181
176

200
188

-

2
2

-

“

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

1
1
1

-

-

_

1
1
1
_

_

2
1*2
2
l*2
-

■

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
35
- ~ i r
6

23

81*
82

8
8

165
161*
1

_

61
61
-

73
30
13
*

39
39

5

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

_

la

_

5

_

-

-

-

■

*

“

53
50

*

1
1

5

8
8

73

1

5?
56

_

_

61
61

50
27

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LAB®
Bureau of Labor Statistics

165

“

~TST T

1*
*1

-

_

M aU U + H O H C *

Table A-3:

(Aver&ge

Average
hourly
earnings

1 / ta r

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

117
53
6h

Sheet-metal workers, m a i n t e n a n c e ........ ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................................

200

1 .9 4 9
1 ,9 4 7

1.0 0

$

$

$
i .o 5

1 .1 0

$
1 .1 5

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

i* iS

2. l h
2 * lh

1/
y

233

1.2 0

$
1 .2 5

$
1 .3 0

$
1 .3 5

$
l .h o

1.2 0

1 .2 5

1 .3 0 1 .3 5

l.h O

i.lt 5

2

1 .9 9

Tool-and-die m a k e r s ..............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................................

$

Un d e r

9

1

3

2

9

1

3

-

-

10
2
8

-

8
8

_

_

-

-

-

-

6
6

6
6

^ 5 “

-

1
1

108
10 8

CD
CD

P l u m b e r s , maint e n a n c e ................... .
Manu f a c t u r i n g ....................... .........
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ......... .................. .

P la n t 0 cC44fLat4O>Hl~G o*U i *U 4 e<l

hourly earnings
men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1952)

1.0 0

O c cupation and i n d u s t r y d ivision

Number
of
Workers

G * t d flo€U*%

1 .9 9
1 .7 9

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

-

_
"

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.1(5 i . 5o 1.60 1 .7 0 1.8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .3 0 2.10 2 .5 0 2.60 2 .7 0 2.80 2 .9 0 3.0 0
anri
i t 5o i . 6o 1 .7 0 1.80 1 .9 0 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .3 0 2. hO 2 .5 0 2.60 2 .7 0 2.80 2 .9 0 3.0 0 over

-

-

2.00

$

■

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

li
_

n

26

10
8
2

17
9

16

52
72
3B“ ““ 5 5~
91
91

11
6

5

232
232

7
— IT
3
19
n r

323
321

2
6
2 — T

6
3

h
4

-

-

3

15
l ii

15
7

1

-

528

161
161

3
3

$
1.65

$
1.70

[

W

h

If
-

7

-

-

-

“

-

-

4

-

_

6

390
390

5

1

-

_

1

15
i5

_

-

-

70

_

70

$
1.75

“

-

-

_

-

h2
h2

-

-

$
1.80

1
1.90

$
2.00

$
2.10

-

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r overtime and n i ght work.
E x c ludes limi t e d - p r i c e variety stores.

Q u U o d ic U , 7 V a *e A o 4 4 A 4 4 tf,G * u l £ U iftfU 4 U j> O cC U fu U iO H i

Table A-h:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ f or selected occupations 2/ studied on a n area
b a s i s in Philadelphia, Pa., b y i n dustry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation a n d i n d u s t r y d ivision

Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Under

720
668

$

$

0 .8 0

0.85

0 .9 0

$
0.95

$
1.00

$
1.05

$
1.10

$
1.15

$
1.20

$
1.25

$
1.30

601
599

.8 0

1.832
1,392
h ho
381

l.h7
1.5h
1.2h
1.21

Janitors, porters, and c l e aners (men) ....... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....... .......... ...............
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............ ....... .........
Publ i c ut i l i t i e s * ........................
W h o l e s a l e trade • • • • • • . . . .................
Re t a i l trade 3 / ...................................................................
TM g n r a gjf
5 n

7,009
3,67h
3,135
582
36h
87h

691

1.2h
1.32
1.15
1.39
1.19
1.09
1.18

62h

•95

1.00

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

.95

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.50

l.hO

1.45

19
19

54
5 T

20
20

.90

_

_

_

_

.
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

,-41,

1 3 2 . 126
52
65

-125
79
2h6
-

5

24

57

11

56
11

5
5

2h
2h

h6
h6

h5
h5

28 0
87
193
-

h3
-

80
-

61
-

lh

10

3

36

30

6

29

2h
1C

118

13

60

22

20h

lh
25

95
h2
53
2
32
1
18

517
lh9
368
he
2h
58
32
206

112
55
57

5o
13
37
37

513
1 00

-

h!3
22
32

10
36
6

27h
75
10

5

“

63
52
21
21

5h6
172
37h
11
31
101
223
g

See f ootnotes at e n d of table.
Occupational W a g e Survey, Philadelphia, Pa.,
*
T r a ns p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, a nd other p ublic utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
B u r e a u of L a b o r Sta t i s t i c s




$
l.h5

19
19

.85

-

98
8h
lh
lh

232

1.79
1.79

Gua r d s .............................................
Manu f a c t u r i n g .......... .......................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ......................... .
Finance «* .................................

*
l.hO

$
i.5o

$
1.55

$

1 .6 0

$

2 .2 0
and

$
1.68
1.68

Crane operators, e lectric bridge
(20 tons a a d over) ............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..... .......... .................

$
1.35

$
0.75

Crane operators, electric bridge
(under 20 tons) ................................

$
0.75

5?
7
52
32

6h2
252
390
22

9?
ho
57
57

547
391
156
32

33

30

80

61
2h

212
h3

95
57
38
38

710
538
172
13
91
20
h8

119
109
10
10

671
558

113
62
27
18

6

57h
539
35
21

7
2
$

-

2lh
18
18

521
312
209
197
12
-

9

October 1952
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R

1.70

1.7 5

I .8 0

52

26

96

23

25

89

43
43

21
21

13
13

9h
92

11
11

121
120
1
1

2lf6
222

106

1.5 5

1 .6 0

1.65

126
117

llh
llh

11
11
233
186
h7
15

208
97
111
lOh
-

7

109
93
16

2h
18

93
89
h

5

3

9

1

2

1.90

54

2.10

2.00

15

~W

IT

11
11

—

2.20

over

6
89
53 ---- 5"

7

32

-

7

82
BT

291

106
-

39
39
-

6
6
-

1
_

125
12 5

1

-

_
-

-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

h2
8

175
1 70

3h
3h
-

5

1

3
1

“

-

291

21
20
1
1
-

7
6
1
1
.

32

15
i5

-

_

_

_
-

.
_

•

9

Table A-4:

G u it o d ia i, T O a /u Ju u U i* tf,a * td S U ift p in f

1/

(Average hourly earnings
for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings

%

0 .9 9

Janitors. Dorters, and cleaners (women) ....
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................

3.534,
717
2,817

Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade 2 / ....................
Finance ** .........................
Services ...........................

99
396
1,630
528

1.16
.94
1 17
1.03
.90
.96
.84

laborers, material handling
.... ........
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Public utilities * .......... ........
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade 2 / ....................

12,590
7)3A5
5,243
1,133
1,921
2,166

Order fillers ...........................
Manufacturing.........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade 2 / ....................

2,124
M7
1,307
790
366

t
j

Packers, class A (man) ...................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Retail trade 2 / ....................

888
S20~
268
130

147
52
95
1
6
88

102
336
119 112
83
13 ---5T - 8J ---7T ---5£
56
70
48
51 253
2
3
23
19
25
23
195
22
21
31
55
51

20
13
7
6
1

101
51
50
7
28

50
64
23
- ---IT - 2
42
39
23
20
27
14
12 ' 22
9

_
-

11
11
5

8
8
~

15
8
7
7

65
50
15
6

26
25
3
3

1.43
1.48
1.37
1.47
1.38
1.32

7
7
7

11?
14
99
6
81

133
49
84
84

1.41
1.42
1.40
1.43
1.32

_
•
~

4
4
-

1.45
1.54
1.23
1.16

_
“

“

2.609
2,239
370
201

1.19
1.21
1.03
.91

Receiving clerks .........................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................................................................
Wholesale trade ....................................................................
Retail trade 2 / ....................................................................

835
4^5
370
114
241

1.53
1.61
1.42
1.58
1.34

Shipping clerks

732
519
193
79
80

1.68
1.71
1.59
1.45
1.57

368
234
134
89

1.56
1.61
1.46
1.49

a

0

1

1

f

?

1

3
g

M anufacturing............................................................
Nonmanufacturi n g ........................
Wholesale t r a d e ................

2
5

7
15
50

Packers, class B (women) ..................
Manufacturing........ ................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Retail trade 2 / ....................

%
/

141
71
70
1

13
11
45
90

1.34
1.37
1.22
1.25

.....................................................................................

40
12
28
21

94
27
57

1.737
1,332
405
319

159

130
67
63
36
4
9
14

99
26
73
1

Packers, class B (man) ....................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade ....................

Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade
....................

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35
1
0.75
.80
.90
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40
.85

159

_
-

~

~
_
-

71
71
71

471 1247
50
59
412 1197
7
A
6
9
106
195
905
19
274
84

26
506
24

T

_
*
■

14

10

-

10

231
178
53
1
31
21

971
448
523
3
476
44

597
400
197
9
188

57 128
- — 54
57
64
40
27
30
24

27
1
26
21
5

83
20
63
62
1

15
2
13
13

24
10
14
14

75
2
73
23

16
2
14
14

33

66
6—
60
28

55
52
43
21

25

254
“ T95
56
25
21
56

35
30
5

»
36
14
14

66
51
15
15

276
258
8
8

650

38
--- 2
10
36
6
10
29

22
22

40
l>
t
24

27
7
20

22
22
22

126
114
12
12

488
483
5
5

3
1
2

6
5
1

13

10

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

”

-

-

2

13

1

13

2
2

-

_

-

2
2

-

43

14
14

-

1922 1585
1020
627
902
958
21
534
234
133
799
134

947
867
80
64
16

444
207
237
177
35
25

265
246
19
6
13

300
205
95
1
90
4

32
9
23
21
2

935
751
184
7
171
6

165
164
1
1

20
8
12
12
“

18
18
-

122
43
79
25
54

36
36
30
6

128
1
127
126
1

16
1
15
15

10
8
2
2

62
59
3
3

1
1
1

1
1
1

62
60
2

14
14

_
-

4
4

_
-

46
46

_
-

5
5

~W
~

14
14
“

5?
38
15
14

?
5
“

_
-

9
9

_
-

28
28

-

-

-

6
6
-

-

-

132
93
39
27
11

212

167
115
52

312
374
8I- 226
148
231
220
9
11
4

50
50
-

167
99
68

138
138
-

52
52
-

52
&
-

53
45
8
6

a

V
T

86
85
1
1

182
180
2
2

30
29
1
1

20
13
7

-

1
1

-

-

T
T

77
5T
20
3
16

96
70"
26
6
18

106
35”
71
66
4

59
29
30
6
24

36
11
28 — ier
8
1
2

56
36
26
14
12

84
80
4
3
1

27
27
-

66
28
38
38

15

75
51
24
24

32
29
3

17
10
7
7

~ W—
~
51

50

25
— I0T
29
15
7
8
29
7.
r

12
-

8

21
7
14
7

34
33
1

15

7

-

32?
530 325
120

3

8

-

109
107
2

2

14
14

-

282
240
42
42

31
16
15
7

15
7

-

254
240
14
14

10
6
4

14

11
11

”

W

22
5
17
15

8

-

85

5
2
3

- ---- 5
-

14
14

59
52
7
7

33
33

4
4

-

-

29
28
1
1

12

"

9
9

45
13
32
32

52
41
11
11

20

“

1

—W

22

1
-

105
13
40 — r
8
65
14
8
51

-

”

_

640
762 1604
330 "325“ “ 973T
310 237
633
360
2
196
56
93
142
77
254

22

-

~

-

15

-

_

-

-

50
21
29
14

-

-

16

3
66

2
11

91
43
48
30

1
1

“

40
26
14

180
152
28
14

*
»
-

“

82
72
10

32
3
29
28

-

-

I

96
80
16

40
6
34
33

-

_

10
21
3

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
and
1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 over

118
83
35
14
11

14
2

-

-

60
113
78 --- 6
35
54
1
41

28
14
14
14

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), coonunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




575
13
562
6

%

-

15

30

17
14
2

52
11
a
31
10

27

16
7
9

14
7
7
2

26

1
1

~

15
14

39
2

_

“

9
9
~
4
4
-

54

9
2

2

•

-

1

3

2

28
22
6
6

27
27
-

163
163
-

2?
20
3
3

18
16
2

7

17
17

?1
24
7
5

2

-

7
7

.
-

67

4

-

_
-

_

65

45

18
-

-

7
4
3
66
33
33
3

9
9
-

-

-

11
11

1
1

-

-

-

“

4 _ li_
_
12
3
1
1
1
1

-

9
9

-

10

Table A 4 :

G u &

t o d ic U

, T V tf t e Ju H

tfiH

t f' C U

td

S A

ip fU

H

f O c C H p ti/d O H d - G o n tiH U W

ct

(Average hourly earnings 1/ fo r selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
b a sis in Philadelphia, P a ., by industry d iv isio n , October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Workers

Truck drivers, light (under 1J tons) .......
-- Manufacturing 7...... ” 777:::“
.......

639
--- 176“

Truck drivers, medium ( - to and including
l£
4 tons) ..............................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Ave a e
rg
hul
o r y Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0
erig
anns
and
0.75
.90
.80
.85
.95 1 . 0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1 . 6 5 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 over

%

$
1.56
1.65

2,489
967“
1,522
307
1,015
198

1.65
1.71
1.56

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer type) .........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade 2 / .................................................

1.319
262
1,057
uo
168

2,803
434
2,369
1,043

1.49
1.49
1.50
1.55

16

5

-

-

-

-

-

1

6

_

_

_

_

18
r

6

2

—r
6

1

18
r

—W

6

Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade 2/ ....................

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ...............
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
....................
Retail trade

l
/

1 ,0 0 0

372
68

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) .....
Manufacturing .........................

540
535

Watchmen ...............................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * .......................................................................
Wholesale trade ..................................................................................
Retail trade 2 / ..................................................................................
Finance * * ........................
Services ..........................

2,472
1,278
1,194
346
189
356
181
122

1.69
1.70
1 .6 8

18
9
9

16
9
7

54
46

1.55
1.56
1 .2 0

1.29
1.10
1.11
1.14
1.14
1.15
.87

-

-

_

-

_

1

—

6

-




9
9
-

7
7

—

16
8
8

13

---6 ~

2

7

10

7

7

7

8
2

26
26

392
32

2

16

21

763

15

19

1

2

O

202
56 1
212

548
70
478

186
163

474

21
21

100

843
84
759
217
93

_

5
5
_
_

9
9

186 2008
8
167
178 1841

13
7
6

31
31
-

n r --- 2 ~

40
40
-

7

“

”

-

7
7

-

2
-

115
15

67
29
38

25
75

“

J

48
41

147
100

47
47

4

-

-

-

_

_

_ 2_
_
3

124

50

48

42
82

32
18

48

-

_

6
-

3

6

3

_

_

-

48
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

30
27
-

25

-

12
6

~

213

79
35
44

33
26
7

159
71
88
6

24
2
12
6

3
1
3

65
11
6

-

213
173
6
-

19
15

-

”

-

1/ Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.
Study lim ited to men workers except where otherwise Indicated.
2/ Excludes lim ited -p rice v arie ty s to re s .
L j T it le change only, from ’’Stock handlers and tru ck ers, hand", as reported in previous study.
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
* * Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .
2 j

11

2
2

-

23

1.67
1.78
1.65
1.61

1.372

—

“

1.73
1.77
1.71
1.87 .
1.60

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
other than trailer type) ................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
RnKHn irMH+Aoa *

2
2

5
~

-

-

1

1
1
1

_

57
6
42 - 6 "
15

_

1
1

6

123
32
91
1

200
10 2

99
43
51

78
12

12
85

112

81
31
-

14
16
1

235
123
112
23
42
36
11

77
77
"

-

98
1
-

5

-

6
29
10
6

130
129

8

11
11

232
38
144
“

191
92
99
29

71
71

30
28

20
20

52
52

76
37
39

150
75
75
52
15
6
2

151
96
55
46

126
122
4
4

8

1
1

-

51
5i
284
166

118
37
34
45
2

-

9
16
1
13

166
155

-

1
8

_

154
124
30

146

145
58
57
1
_

1
.

93
90
3
3

131
83
48
23

7

49
49
81
80
1
1
_
_
_

9
2

137
33
104
24
80

2
2

_
_

10

_

10

1
1

1

~

3
3
-

_
-

269

_

_

13
13
_
_

123
115
8
8

10
10

47
35
12

125
90
35

248
8
240

5

660
387
273

i

4

10

_

29
29

27
17
10
10

-

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

178
178

56
56

3
3

_
_
-

178

A

5
“

18
18
-

2

-

82
82
-

-

_
_
-

39
39

25
25

-

9
9

7
7

31
31

-

2
2

10

54
52
2

4

2

1

1
9

4

2
2

1

_

_
_
_

1
1

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

8
1

_
_

4

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

6
1

_

_

-

-

•

_

_

2

_
_
_

n
B : Characteristic Industry O c c u p a t i o n s

T b e B 2251
al - :

O c p t o ad s x
cuain n e
A l p a t o c p t o s T t l ........
l ln cuain: oa
Msn........
W m n ..........
oe
S l c e P a tOcotos
e e t d l n cuain
A j s e s a d f x r , k i t n m c i e (4 o
d u t r n ies nt i g ahns r
m r y a s e p r e c ) (e) 3 / .....
o e e r ' x e i n e mn a
B a d r ( e a d w m n } h / .........
o r e s mn n o e )
M n 2 V ............................
e
W m n 3 / ..........................
oe b
B x r ( o e ) 3 / .....................
o e s wmn a
E a i e s g e ( n p c o s hsey
x m n r , r y i s e t r , oir)
( o e ) 3 / .........................
wmn b
F l e s ( o e ) 2 / ....................
o d r wmn b
K i t r (e ) 3 7.l j ..................
n t e s mn b
5 g u e 3 s c i n 3 ..... ........
1 a g , 0 e t o s b/
6 g u e 3 s c i n 3 / .............
0 ag, 0 etos b
M n e s h n , f n s a d g e (o e ) .....
e d r , a d i i h n r y wmn
T m ............................
ie
I c n i e ........................
netv
M n e s h n , f n s (o e ) 3 / ......
e d r , a d i i h wmn b
M n e s h n , g e ( o e) ........
e d r , a d r y w mn
T m ...................
ie
I c n i e ................
netv
P i e s ( o e ) ................
arr wmn
T m ...................
ie
I c n i e ................
netv
P e o r e s ( e a d w m n 3 / .......
r b a d r mn n oe) b
M n 2 / ...................
e b
W m n2
o e b/..................
Sanr ( o e ) 3 / ..............
eres w m n b

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

$

erig
anns

U d r 0.35
ne
$

2 0.35
/
$
3,9 0 1.44 1 4
1
1,3 8 1.73 5
4
3
2
2 6 1.28 12
,5 2
2
a

39
4
5
0
29
9
2
4
15
8
10
6
73
2
29
7
18
4
26
2
7
2
14
5
16
1
10
1
4
4
6
6
46
2
6
0
36
6
22
6
9
2
10
7
46
1

2.28
1.58
1.56
1.58
1.19
1.11
1.33
2.00
2.04
2.06
1.32
1.16
1.40
1.37
1.28
1
.12
1.39
1.33
1.19
1.36
1.56
1.61
1.53
1.29

.90
17
3
3
0
17
0

$

0.90
.9
5
10
3
2
3
17
0

% $
0.95 1.00
1.00 1.05
13 22
2 0
1 3
9 1
19 11
0 7

$

1
.05
1.10
20
5
4
4
26
0

Jfoti&uf 1/
s

1.10
1.15
11
9
2
2
19
6

$

1.15
1.20
16
8
2
5
11
6

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$ ;' $ $
$
$
$
s $
$
$

1.20
1.25
18
8
1
9
19
6

1
1
-

1 - - - - 9 7 9
3 2 1
3 2
1 - - 3 2 8 4 7
4 1 - 8 1 1 - 4
8 0 6 6 5 1 6 7
6 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1
2 7 5
6
0
1 - 1 1 - - 5 1 1
1 - 3
2
1
2 - - 3 2 1 1 5 9
0 2 2 5
1 3
0
2
3 1 6 4 4 1
2 1 3 - 1 6 8 1 8
0
3
_
1 1 2 6 3 9 2 6
2
2 1 1 9 3 3 3
2
4
3
1 9 5 2 2
7
2
2 - 5 4 1 6 3
2
3 9 1 9 2 3 1 3 2
3 2 2 1 6 5 5
1
2
1
3 2
5
0 4 1 5 1
7
3 6 1 7 2 2 1 3 3
6
1 3 2 8 7 1 1
1 1 - 5
3
2 7 6 1 1
1
1
1 2 2 1 2 2 3 2 1
2 2 0 5 7 0 1 5 6
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.25
1.30
14
8
4
9
15
3

1.30
1.35
12
8
3
9
13
4

1.35
1.40
12
5
3
1
11
2

1 1 1
0 4 8
3 3 7 1 1
1 8
1
8 7 8
1 1 7
4
1 5 2
2 2
1
7 - 6 1 1
4 1
_
6 1 1
4 1
0
5 1 6
1 4 5
1 4 5
3 2 2
2 2 2
1 2 9
3 2
1
9
3
1 1 1
8 4 1
9
3 6 6
1 8 1
5
3
4 3 2
6 9 2
-

1.40
1.45
11
5
2
7
14
2

1.45
1.50
17
4
2
7
10
2

1,50
1.55
18
4
3
5
13
1

2 4 3
1 3 1
1 7 1
2 3 3
0 » 0
6
_
2
7
4 6 6
1
6
4
1 3 1
6
1 - 1
7
1 1 1
3 _ 8
3
3
1 1 1
0 7 5
1 9 8
1
2 8 1
0
0
2 8 1
2 2 1
9 0 6
0 6
2 2 1
9 6 1
2 1 0
5
1 5 4
4
1 1 6
1 1
2 1 1
2 5 6

1.55
1.60
8
7
3
0
5
7

1.60
1.65
13
0
3
1
7
2

1.65
1.70
12
4
4
8
9
4

1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50
1.70 s $ $ $ $ $ $ $
1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 o e
vr
1 0 1 8 1 6 12 2 5 1 3 3 6 1
8 6 5 6 1 0 9
9
9 1 0 16 1 9 1 3 1 0 3 6 1
7 0 1 1 9 0 7
8
8 6 4 4 2 3 2 3 8 0 3 2
1

1 3
1 1 4 4 2
3 8 6 7 8
6
3
4 1 2
5 _ 1 _
1 1 4 3 2
3 _ 2 _ 6
_
1 5
0
1 2 7
1
7 _
4 2
4 2
1 _
3 2
3 2
1 2
1 3
1 2
1 3
1 8
5
4 2
1 6
1
6 1
6

2 _
2 6
1 2
1
1 1
7 8
_
5
5
_
2
_
3
_ 3
2 2
1 6
2 2
1 6
2 1
2 5
8 7
1 8
4
0
5 1

7
7
8
2
4
1
6
_
_
_

_
4
4

2
5
9
1
6
1
1

1
1 5 1
7
9 1 2 1 1
5
1 1 _ 1 _
_
8 1 2 _ _
1
4
_
1
2 1 _ 1 _
1 9 1 0 17 9 3
0 1 6 3 0
6 5 7 4 4
5 9 0 0
1
8
_
_ 1
1 9 4 3 _
2 7 1 1
_ _
1 7
2
_
1 3 _ _ _
1
1 4
_
1 4
5 2 3 _ _
5 2 3 _ _
3 8
9 1 6 _ 6
1
6
2
9 1 2 _ _
3 6 9 2
-

1 51
/2
_ _
_
_
_ 1
_ _
4 1
_
2 1
_ _
_
_
_
_ _
_ _
_ _
_ _
_
_ _
1 _
1 _
_ _
_

“

1 T e st d c v r d e t b i h e t e p o i g 2 o mo e w r e s pr m r l e g g d i k i t n , d e n , o f n s i g f l - a h o e h s ery ( r u 2 5 )a defi e i t e S a d r I d s r a C a s f c t o M n a (1 4
/ h u y o e e sal s m n s m l y n 1 r r o k r i a i y n a e n ntig yig r i i h n u l f s i n d o i
Gop 2 1 s n d n h t n a d nu t i l l s i i a i n a u l 9 5
e i i n p e a e b t e B r a o t e B d e . D t r l t t a N v m e 15 p y o l p r o .
d t o ) r p r d y h u e u f h u g t a a e a e o o e b r 92 a r l e i d
2 Ex l d s p e ium p y f r o e t m a d n g t w r.
/ c u e r m a o v r i e n i h ok
2 I s f i i n data t p r i p e e t t o o s p r t a e a e by m t o o w g p y e t
/ nufcet
o emt r snain f eaae vrgs e h d f ae amn.
ij
2
/

() A l o p e o i a t y t m w r e s
a l r r d m n n l ie okr.
() A l o p e o i a t y i c n i e wr e s
b l r r d m n n l n e t v okr.
I c u e d t f rw r e s n t s o n sprtl.
n l d s a a o o k r o h w eaaey
W r e s w r d s r b t d a f l o s 8 a $ . 0 2 a $ - $ . ;2 a $ . .
o k r e e i t i u e s o l w : t 2 5 ; t 2.80 3 00 t 320

T b e B 2333
al - :

O fu i A fU d ed ' 1% 4eddM

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O c p t o ad sx
cuain n e
A l p a t o c p t o s T t l ........
l l n cuain: oa
Men........
W m n ......
oe
S l c e P a tOcotos
e e t d l n cuain
C t e s a d m r e s (e) 3 / ........
u t r n a k r mn a
I s e t r , f n l (xmnr)
n p c o s i a eaies
( o e ) 2 / .................
wmn &
P e s r , h n ( e a d w m n ........
rses a d mn n oe)
T m ............................
ie
I c n i e ................ .......
netv
M n ^ / ............................
B b
W m n 3 ..........................
o e b/
S w r , h n (1 m n a d 1 4 w m n .......
e e s a d 7 e n 4 oe)
Time......... .....................
I c n i e ..........................
netv
S w n - a h n oeaos scin sse
e i g m c i e prtr, eto ytm
(1 men a d 1,3 4w m n ...............
8 n 6 oe)
T m .....................
ie
I c n i e ..................
netv
S w n - a h n oea o s sn l hn
e i g m c i e prtr, ige ad
(alr s s e ( e a d wmn 3
t i o ) y t m m n n o e ) b/....
M n2
e b/...................
W mn3
o e b/..................
T r a t i m r ( l a e s ( o e) 3 / ...
h e d r m e s c e n r ) w mn a
W r d s r b t r ( o e ) 2 / ........
o k i t i u o s w mn a

0 ).8 0.90 0.95
1.10 0
1.75 $.80 f 5 $ $ Loo $ 1.2
ad
n
udr
ne
2 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.0 1.10 1.2 1.30
/
0
0
$
3
,598 1.44 20 1 5 1 0 15 9 35 30 39
2 0 4 7 9 9 1 5
56 2.03 3 8 1 9 7 1 4 1
7
6
7
3 2 1.32 13 9 1 4 1 6 9 33 22 39
,02
2 6 0
8 7 2 6 2 8 8 4

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

12
1
5
4
30
7
9
3
39
4
16
1
23
6
11
6
2
9
12
3
1,382
2
8
1,354
79
9
17
3
62
6
11
8
2
2

Aeae
vrg
hul
ory
erig
anns

2.44
.97
1.56
1.2
4
1.59
2.47
1.17
1.40
1.0
0
1.49
1.30
1.23
1.30
1.74
2.29
1.63
.96
.99

1.30 1.40 $ $ , $ 1.80 1.90 $.0 $.10 $.2 * $ $ $.6 *2.80 *.0 $.2 $ *.6
1.50 1.6 1.70
2 0 2 2 0 2.30 2.40 2.50 2x0 - 3 0 3 0 3.40 3 0
0
ad
n
1.40 1.50 1.6 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 0 2 2 0 2.30 2.40 2.50 2 0 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 o e
0
.0 .10 .2
.6
vr
23 2 7 2 5 1 7 1 5 1 2 8 6 8 7 4 6 5 4 4 1 6 1 2
8 1 0 9 4 3 5 7 1 8 6 3 8 0 2 8
2 0
6 2 0 2
1 1 1 3 2 2
3 5 0 2 2 7
5 3 5 3 3 0
5
2 0 22 15 15 1 3 1 5 8 1 4 2 1 .3 1 10 3 16 6 1- 2
7 0 9 6 2 0 4 5 5 6 6 1 4 3 7 2 - 2 0
1 2
8 0
1

1
0
3
6
1
3
5
3
6
4
4
7
6
2
7
4

3
11
0
9
1
0
7
5
2
3
0
3
0
5
_
5
2 2
9
2 5
3
-

4
2
1
2
19
2
1
3
_
3
5
3
2
5
1
1_
0
1
0
1
9
1

1
6
25
7
2
2
2
7
9
4
5
60
6
0
6
_
6
1
4
4

2
11
1
1
0
11
9
7
2
4
8
2
4
6
1
2
1
2
4
-

“

5
3
8
1
4
2
4
3
8
1
5
9
6
19
5
3
16
5
3
6
_
3
6
5
8
8

4
1
7
1
7
1
1
6
1
6
1
6
13
7
6
17
6
4
3
_
4
3
1
5

1
0
2
5
1
2
4
1
2
4
2
2
4
1
8
18
7
3
15
7
5
7
4
5
3
9
4

1
9
1
9
2
1
7
1
2
1
2
14
5
2
12
5
6
2
1
6
1
5

4
4
4
1
5
1
5
11
0
2
9
9
7
0
8
6
2
2

1
5
1
1
4
1
1
4

n
l
i

16
0
16
0
5
9
5
5
4
_

3
9
3
9
1
8
2
1
1
0
1
0
7
0
4
6
6
6
2
11
5
1
1

2
0
2
0
11
9
3
3
4
2
2
4
0
6
4
6
5
8

_

1

1
6
1
6
4
12

4
4
2
2
1
0
1
0
2
4
2
4
4
5
2
4
3

6
6
4
2
3
3
2
3
_
2
3
3
2
8
2
4

-

4
7
4
7
5
6
1
7
3
9

1 3 11 2 2 1
0 8 3
9
6 8
6 8
8
4 _
2
2
2 _
1 3
3
_
1 3
3
4 2
3 4
1 1
5
2 2
8 3

6 7 2 9
6 7 2 9
6 _ 2 9
_ 7 _
_ 2 _ _
_ 2 _ _
1_ 5 5 _
0
2
1 5 5 2
0
1 2 2 1
3 8 1 2
7 4 8 4
6 2 1 8
4 3

3

4

1
2
8
1
2
4
4
_

2
2
2
4
4
_

_

_

2
1
1
8
3

5
5

3
3
3
_

4
4
4
_
_
_
_ _
_ _
_
8
_
8
_ _

1
2
1
2
1_
2
_
_
_
_
_
5
5

\ The s u y c v r d r g l r (ni e a d c n r c s o s e p o i g 8 o m r w r e s p i a i y e g g d i t e m n f c u e o women'3 a d m s e ' d e s s ( r u 2 3 )a d f n d i t e S a d r I d s r a C a s f c t o
/
t d o e e e u a is d ) n o t a t h p m l y n r o e o k r r m r l n a e n h a u a t r f
n iss rs e Gop 3 3 s e i e n h tnad nutil lsiiain
M n a (1 4 e i i n p e a e b t e B r a o t e B d e . E t b i h e t m n f c u i g h u e r s e , a r n , s o k , h o e s a d n r e ' a d m i s u i o m ( r u 2 3 )w r e c u e f o te s u y D t r l t t a
a u l 9 5 d t o ) r p r d y h u e u f h u g t s a l s m n s a u a t r n o s d e s s p o s m c s o v r , n u s s n a d ' n f r s G o p 3 4 e e x l d d r m h td. a a e a e o n
A g s 15 p y o l pro.
u u t 92 a r l eid
% Excludes prem u p y f r o e t m a d n g t w r .
/
i m a o vrie n i h ok
O c p t o a W g S r e , P i a e p i , P . O t b r 15
c u a i n l a e u v y h l d l h a a , c o e 92
2/ I s f i i n d t t p r i p e e t t o o s p r t a e a e b m thod o w g p y e t
n u f c e t a a o e m t r s n a i n f eaae v r g s y e
f a e amn.
US D P R M N C L B R
.. E A T E T F A O
() A l o p e o i a t y t m w r e s
a l r r dmnnl ie okr.
B ra o LbrSaitc
u eu f ao ttsis
() A l o p e o i a t y i c n i e w r e s
b l r r d m n n l netv okr.




12

P o U tti & 4 id V a S U tU lte l U

Table B-2851:

Number
of
Workers

O c c u p a t i o n a nd s ex

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

%
0.90

$
0.95

$
1. 0 0

$
1.05

$
1.10

$
1.15

$
1.20

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.15

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.7 0

$
1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

$
1.90

.95

Average
hourly
earnings

1 .00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

8

3

8

7
4
1

2/

1.9 5

1 .95

2.00

2.10

s
2.20

$
2.30

2.20

2.10

3
6
1
_

%

$
2.00

2.30

2.40

20
1

$

Men
Labelers and p a c kers ............................
Maintenance men, g e n e r a l u t i l i t y ..............
M i x e r s ....... ................................... .
Tec h n i c i a n s ............ ............................
Tin ters ...........................................................................................................
Var n i s h m a kers .......................................................................................

$
1.45
1.9 0

75
49
128
61
69
27

1

4

4

5

8

1.55
1.7 6
1.81
1.66

-

-

-

-

4
-

6
-

7
-

-

4
-

-

3
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

33

1.13

-

3

6

3

3

9

5

-

4

-

-

3

11

5
1

5
8
8

3
1
2
1
3
5

3
17
3
6

7
3
10

3

-

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
18
.

3
21
3
3

5
-

5
_

5

15
_

12

_
_

5
1
1

_

13

_
1

1

-

•

5

15
_

19

_

2

5

18

-

-

2

-

Women
Labelers and packers ........................... .

i/

The study c o vered e s t a b li s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g 8 or more w o r kers pri marily e n g aged in the m a n u f acture of paints, varnishes, lacquers, japans, enamels, a n d shellac

(Group 2 8 5 1 ) a s d e f i n e d i n t he S t a n d a r d I n d u strial

Cl a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l (1945 edit ion) p r e pared by the B u r e a u of the Budget.
Data relate to a June 195 2 payroll period.
2 / E x c ludes p r e m i u m p a y for overtime and night work; a ll or a m a j o r i t y of wor k e r s in ea c h occ u p a t i o n r e p orted w er e paid o n a time basis.

Table B - 7 211:

P oiU G fl J lcU U u t/U £ A 1 /
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

N um ber
of
W orkers

O c c u p a t i o n a nd s ex

s
0.70

$
0.75

$
0.80

s
0.85

$
0.90

$
0.95

$
1.00

i ----$
I
S
1.10
j 1.05

$
1.15

$
1.20

$
1.25

.70

.75

.80

.85

.90

.95

1.00

1.05

11.10

1.20

1.25

1.30

“

1
-

12
“
12
12

13
1
4

$

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

$
$
1.30 1.35

$
1.40

s
1.45

1.40

1.45

1.50

4
2
—

2
”

s
1.50

$
1.55

s
1.60

s
1.65

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

s

$
1.70

1.75

under

2/

1.15

1.35

1.75 i 1.80

Men

%
0.94
1.30
.91
1.20
.75

72
45
30
106
17

Ext r a c t o r o p erators 3 a / ....... .
Firemen, stati o n a r y bo i l e r 3 a / ,
Identifiers 2 a / .................
Washers, m achine 3 a / ............
Wrappers, bundle 3 a / ............

1

6

10
!

j

2
-

6
1

8

8

i
1

18
4

6
2
4
12

|
i
i
;

1
1
9

2
6
2
“

11
9

4
15
"
"

4
8
12

3
10
*

-

-

1
—

9
_

_

I

i

2

11
i ~

.
_

i

“

I

Women

1
55

s

.88
.71
.70
.74
.75
.75
.78
.84
.81
.85

17

17

-

116
85
31
118
110

27
12
15
5

2
1
1

8

86
12

8
7
30
16
16

.86
.76
.73
.85

“

33

13
13
32
27
5
16

16

2

17
87

22

14
129
29

18
4

46 !
15
31
93
98

15

-

1
1

8

2

2

277
167
110
38
30

369
329
40
12
10

2

3

805
595
210
205
177
28
197
57
140
682
188
141
47

Clerks, re t a i l r e c e i v i n g 3 a / ...
Finishers, flatvork,
machine
T o t a l ...............
T i m e .............
Incentive .......
Identifiers t T o t a l .............
T i m e ...........
I ncentive .....
M ar k e r s s T o t a l ..................
T i m e ...............
Incentive .........
Pressers, machine, shirts 3 b / ..
Wrappers, b undles
T o t a l .......
T i m e .....
Incentive

21
8

!

5
17
17
139
9
9

-

12

-

-

2

-

18
18
64

8

22

21
-

2

16
6
23

21
47

8

-

|

-

'

-

!

_

7
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

7

1 48

2
16

-

2

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

_

2

-

2

!
i

-

2

-

2

1

_

_

2

i

_

•
_

i

_________ 1
N U M BER
N um ber
of
W orkere

Occupation

A v e ra g e
w e e k ly
e a rn in g s

y
i
Routemen, re t a i l (driver-salesman)

,

765

$
:

$

40.00

45.00

45.00

50.00

18

15

—

88.77

$

$

50.00 55.00
55.00 60.00

20

21




S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y

E A R N IN G S O F -

$

60.00

65.00

70.00 75.00 | 80.00

85.00

s
s
s
$
s
s
s
S
90.00 95.00 LOO.00 105.00 110.00 115.OC 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00

65.00

70.00

75.00 80.00

90.00

95.00 t o o . o o L05.00 110.00 115.00 1 2 0 .O 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 1 5 0 . 0 0
C

23

56

92

$

$

$

$

s,

1 / The s t udy cov e r e d e s t a b lishments emp l o y i n g m ore t h a n 2 0 wo r k e r s in the c o ver laundries indus t r y
o f t he Budget.
D a t a re l a t e to a June 1952 p a y r o l l period.
2 / Exc l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for overtime a nd n i ght work.
2/
Insufficient d a t a t o p e r mit pres e n t a t i o n o f separate a v erages b y m e t h o d of wag e payment.
(a) A l l o r p r e d o m i n a n t l y time workers.
(b) A l l or p r e d o m i n a n t l y incentive workers.
Straight-time e a r n i n g s (includes commi s s i o n earnings).
2 / Rou t e m e n are n o r m a l l y o n a 5-day w orkweek.

ij

O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

67

85.00
72

$

72

49

s

s

$

60

24

25

21

26

36

(Group 7211) as def i n e d in the Standard Industrial C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l

17

10

13

13

3

and
over

12

(1949 edi t i o n ) p r e p a r e d b y t h e B u r e a u

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e S urvey, Phil a d e l p h i a , Pa., O c t o b e r 1952
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u r e a u o f La b o r S t a t i s t i c s

13

C : Union Wage Scales
(Minimum wage rates a nd m a x i m u m straight-time h o urs per week a greed u p o n t hrough eolleotiv e b a r g a i n i n g b e t w e e n
employers and trade-unions.
R ates and h o urs are
those in effeot i n P h i ladelphia C o u n t y o n da t e s indicated.
Additional i nformation is available i n reports issued
separately for these individual in d u stries o r trades.)

T a b l e C-15:

B m ld tH Q G o n d lt U o U tm

T a b l e C-205:

B a h & U e d -Q o^ U h M cI

P ^ U ttU U f> G o + d lH H jecQ

T a b l e C-27:

J a n u a r y 2, 1953
Rate
per
hou r

Classification

...................................
H*T*p«ntftTfl TTTT. . . T. . ................................................
El fifitri el a n s T. T. T. . . . . . . T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P a i n t e r s •••••••••••••••• .....
P IA R te ra ra
........ ................................................... ..
Plum bers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bui 1dl ng 1 s h o r e r s .............................................. ..

Bricklayers

T a b l e C-205I

Hours
per
week

$3,350
2.900
3.400
2.400
3.400

35
40
40
40
40
40
40

3.135
1.750

&G

________ J u l y 1, 1952
Classification

Rate
per
ho u r

B r e a d a n d cake - Mac h i n e shops:
A g r e e m e n t A:
H e a d o v e r m e n ................................ $2,025
1.845
D o u g h mix e r s, icing m i x e r s ................
1.845
T r a v e l i n g - o v e n feeders ....................
1.845
B e n c h a nd machinemen, steam-box tenders,
i n g r e d i e nt scalers .................... .
1.745
R o u t e packers, p astry packers, bread
w r a p p e r s and p a c k e r s ....... ............
1.745
Mix e r s ' h elpers, d o u g h punchers .........
1.655
F l o u r pilers, dumpers, b a king helpers,
1.540
p a n g r e a sers .............................
W r a p pers, icers (women) ...................
1.255
A g r e e m e n t B:
T r a y - a n d t r a v e l i n g - o v e n supervisors,
oil- o v e n men, reel- a n d rotary-oven men,
mix e r s , icing m a k e r s ....................
1.685
T r a y - a n d t r a v e l i n g - o v e n feeders ........
1.635
B e n c h hands, m a c hine operators, depositor
oper a t o r s , ingredient scalers .........
1.595
1.560
M i x e r s ' h e lpers ................... .
W r a p p i n g - m a c h i n e operators, route
p a c k e r s ...................................
1.535
B a k e r y helpers, wrappers, pilers,
h a n d l e r s , roll bag g e r s and wrappers,
p a n g r e a s e r s .............................
1.435
W r a p p e r s a nd icers (women) ...............
1.195
A g r e e m e n t C:
T r a v e l i n g - o v e n operators, tray-oven
o p e r a t o r s .................................
1.775
M i x e r s , h e ad cake d e c o r a t o r s .......... .
1.765
O v e n feeders, d e l i v e r y m e n .............. ..
1.715
D i v i d e r o p erators, moldermen, icingm a c h i n e operators, d e p o s i t o r operators,
i n g r e d i e n t scalers, be n c h m e n ..........
1.675
G e n e r a l b a k i n g helpers, p an greasers, pan
w ashers, dumpers, rackers, p an feeders,
1.530
br e a d packers ............................
H a n d icers. cake rackers, doughnut-tray
p a c k e r s (women) ..........................
1.325
P a n liners, cake-hand wrappers, roll
p a c k e r s (women) ..........................
1.285
A g r e e m e n t D:
D o u g h mi x e r s, overmen, ingredient
1.450
s c a l e r s ....... ...........................
B e n c h m e n .................................... .
1.310
D e p o s i t o r operators, icing-, cutting-,
1.310
w r a p p i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r ators .............
1.150
P a n grea s e r s' he l p e r s .....................
1.000
W r a p p e r s a nd icers (women) ................




Pie a nd p a s t r y shops:
A g r e ement A:
Mixers, overmen, first h ands .............
S e c o n d h a nds ................................
Packers ............ .................
T h i r d hands .................................
A g r e e m e n t B:
H e a d o r der packers, overmen, cooks,
do u g h mixers, custard m i x e r s ..... .
O r d e r packers, ingredient scalers ....••.
Cooks' helpers, overmen's helpers .......
Pie makers, shell make r s ..................
Dishwashers, helpers, wrappers ...........
Pie wrappers, crown m a k e r s .............. .

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40

40
40

40
40
40

40

40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40

Hours

$ 1,780
1.690
1.595
1.525

40
40
40

1.600
1.400
1 .400
1.300
1.200
1.050

40
40
40
40
40
40

P*r
week

Cl a s s i f i c a t i o n

C l a s s i fication

Rate
per
h our

Hours
per
week

New s p a p e r s - Co n t i n u e d
Pressmen, w e b presses - d a y work ............ $2,325
Pressmen, w e b presses - n i ght work .........
2.620
Pres s m e n - i n - c h a r g e - d a y w o r k ...............
2.512
Pres s m e n - i n - c h a r g e - n i g h t work .............
2.827
S t e r e o t y p e r s - d a y wor k ......................
2.427
S t e r e o t y p e r s - night w o r k ....................
2.480

40

T a b l e C-41:

Book and j o b shops:
B i n d e r y wo m e n .................................. $1,120
Bookbinders:
2.030
B e n c h workers ...............................
2 .080
M a c h i n e workers ••••. . . • ................ .
Compositors, hand .....................................................
2 .400
2 .970
Electrotypers ..................................
Ma c h i n e operators ........... ..................
2 . 400
2.507
M a c h i n i s t-operators ........................
2 . 560
M a c hine tenders (machinists) ................
Mailers:
A g r e e m e n t A .................................
1.813
A g r e e m e n t B .................................
2.053
3 .057
Photoengravers .................................
Press assistants and feeders:
Cyli n d e r press (68 i nches a nd under)
a s sistants ................................
2.144
Cy l i n d e r press (over 6 8 inches)
2.157
assistants .............................. .
2 - c o l o r cylinder and perfecting press
2.170
assistants ................................
Shee t - f e d r otary press assistants .......
2.191
R o l l-fed rotary press rollmen:
S i ngle-color ............................
2.191
S i ngle-color ( B a b c o c k ) ......... ........
2.495
Pressmen, cylinder:
Cy l i n d e r presses (68 inches and under) ..
2.459
Cy l i n d e r presses ( o ver 6 8 inches) .......
2.485
2 - c o l o r cylinder and perfecting
2.532
p r e s s e s ................. .................
Roll-fed rotary presses:
2.681
S i n g l e-color presses ...................
S i n gle-color presses (Babcock):
First pressmen
............
2.965
2.826
Second pressmen .....................
Newspapers:
2 .560
Compositors, hand - d a y work .................
2.693
Compositors, hand - night work ..............
2 . 560
M achine operators - d a y work ................
2.693
M a c hine operators - night work ..............
2.560
Machine tenders (machinists) - d ay work ....
2.693
Machine tenders (machinists) - night work...
2.187
Ma i l e r s - d a y w o r k ............... ............
2.386
M a i lers - night work ..........................
2.853
Photoengravers - d a y work ....................
2.987

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
35

38 3/4
38 3/4
38 3/4
38 3/4
3 8 3/4
38 3/4
38 3/4
38 3/4
38 3/4
38 3/4
38 3/4
38 3/4
37
37
37
37
37
37
37
35
37
37

3/4
1/2
3/4
1/2
1/2

JlocxU Vkanlii

O c t o b e r 1. 1952

P bU U bU f
fea-te
per
hou r

37 1/2
33
37
33
37
37

OpeA& ti+Uf C n u p lo feed
Classification

T a b l e C-27:

40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Classi f i c a t i o n

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

Rate
per
hour

Subway, elevated, a nd hi g h - s p e e d lines:
Operators:
F i r s t 3 m o n t h s .............................. $1,570
4 - 6 m o n t h s ............................ .
1.595
7 - 9 m o n t h s ...............................
1.620
1 0 - 1 2 m o n t h s .............................
1.645
A f t e r 1 y e a r ...............................
1.670
Conductors:
F i rst 3 m o n t h s .............................
1.470
4 - 6 m o n t h s ...............................
1.495
7 - 9 m o n t h s ..... ..........................
1.520
10 - 12 m o n t h s ............................
1.545
A f t e r 1 y e a r ............................. .
1.570
2-raan cars:
F i rst 3 m o n t h s ..... ........................
1.470
4 - 6 mon t h s ................................
1.495
7 - 9 mo n t h s ................................
1.520
1 0 - 12 mo n t h s ............................ .
1.545
A f t e r 1 y e a r ......... .....................
1.570
1 - m a n cars and busses:
F i rst 3 m o n t h s .............................
1.570
4 - 6 m o n t h s ........ .......................
1.595
7 - 9 m o n t h s ........ .......................
1.620
10 - 12 mon t h s ...................... ......
1.645
A f t e r 1 y e a r ...............................
1.670

T a b l e C-42:

Hours
per
week

44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44

M o to tU b lic k
a n d o tfe lp je b l
Jul y 1. 1052

Classification

Rate
per

h2Ur_
Beer:
B r e w e r y - Keg ............
He l p e r s ...............
Di s t r i b u t o r - Bott l e and keg
H e l pers ...............
Building:
Construction - Excavating
M a t e r i a l ............ .
Lumb e r ................
Plu m b i n g su p p l y ......
C oal ..........................
He l p e r s ...................
G e n e r a l ......................
Freight - Local .........
He l p e r s ................
M e a t and produce ............
R a i l w a y exp r e s s .............

$1,955
1.880
1.675
1.425

1.600
1.600
1.600

1.650
1.618
1.448

1 .6 0 0
1.600
1.425
1.600
1.720

Hours
per
.wagk__

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

O c c u p a t i o n a l Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., O c t ober 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B u r e a u of Labor S tatistics

lU

D: Supplementary Wage Practices
ftw H A it fo n l

Table D - l :

1/

Percen t of t o t a l plant employment (a )
By establishm ent p o licy in -

S h ift d if f e r e n tia l

(b)
A ctually working on e x tr a s h i f t s in -

A ll manufacturing in d u stries
2d s h i f t
work
All workers
Workers

...................................................

3d o r other
s h i f t work

100.0

shift

XXX

100.0

86.8

3d or o ther

2d shift

XXX

in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g p r o v i s i o n s

f o r l a t e s h i f t s ......... ..................................
W i t h s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l .................................
Uniform cents

(per h o u r )

79.0

32.4
-

17.3
6.8

3 o r 4 c e n t s .............................. ........
5 c e n t s . . . . • • • • ...... ............................
6 c e n t s .............................................
O v e r 6 a n d u n d e r 1 0 c e n t s ...... .......... .

74.0
73.2

36.4
1.7

............................

4.1

1 2 c e n t s ............................. ......... .
O v e r 12 c e n t s ......................................
U n i f o r m p e r c e n t a g e ........................... .
5 p e r c e n t ..........................................

.8
39.3
6.8

5i

p e r c e n t ............................. ............
7 p e r c e n t ...........................................
O v e r 7 a n d w i d e r 1 0 p e r c e n t ....................
1 0 p e r c e n t ......... ......................... .
O v e r 1 0 p e r c e n t ................................ ..
Other
................................................
W i t h n o s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l .............................

.4
.1

.4
1 .1
.2

.9

_

.6
.2
1.5
( /)

2

.1

4.7

.6

.
3

4.5
23.2

25.4
-

.
3
5.0

.2
.9
.1
.9

_

1.9

3.3

.9

5.9

7.8

.8

1.2

13.2

Wo r k e r s in e s t ablishments h a v i n g n o provisions
f o r l a t e s h i f t s ............................. ........ .

.7

.1
7.6
1.6

34.9
.6
-

.4
4.7
2.0

2/

.5

14.1
.3
4.8
1.8

.9
-

5. 3
5.3
2.9

3.5
1.2

.4
6.9

3.7
5.2

1 0 c e n t s .................................. .........
O v e r 1 0 a n d u n d e r 12 c e n t s .....................

16.7
15.5
7.0

26.0

XXX

XXX

1 / S h ift d if f e r e n tia l data are presented in terms of (a ) establishm ent p o licy and (b) workers a c tu a lly employed on l a te s h ifts a t the time o f
the survey. An establishm ent was considered as having a p o licy i f i t met any o f the follow ing co n d itio n s: ( l ) operated l a t e s h if ts a t the time of
the survey, (2 ) had u n ion -co n tract provisions covering l a te s h i f t s , o r (3 ) had operated la t e s h if ts within 6 months p rio r to the survey.
2 / Includes such combinations a s : paid lunch period plus c e n ts ; cen ts plus e x tr a hours pay; and varied d if f e r e n tia ls f o r se le cte d o ccu p atio n s.
2 / Less than 0 .0 5 p e rce n t.

Table D-2s

S cU eM

d ed

a H o u /U

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS j/ E M P L O Y E D I N -

Weekly hours

A ll w o rk e rs ........................................................... ..
thder 35 hours .........................................................
35 h o u r s ............ .. ........................ .. .............................
Over 35 and under 37£ h o u r s ............................
37£ h o u r s .................................................................................
Over 37£ and under 40 hours ..................... .... •
40 h o u r s ............................................................................ ....
Over 40 and under 44 hours ........................... ..
44 hours ......................................................................
45 hours ...................... .............................................................
48 hours ................................................. ..................................
Over 48 hours .......................................................................

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public , »
utilities^

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 .3
1 1 .7
8 .3
2 0 .7
1 0 .1
4 5 .5
.5
1 .7
.2

2 .3
5 .6
1 8 .0
1 4 .5
5 6 .2
1 .3
1 .6
.5

1 1 .2
.7
5 7 .2

7 .8
1 4 .6
6 .7
5 .5
6 5 .4

5 .4

-

3 0 .9
-

•

-

4 .8
2 .1
7 8 .1
-

9 .6
-

Finance *»

1 0 0 .0
5 .0
2 9 .5
1 2 .7
2 5 .8
1 2 .3
1 4 .7
-

Services

1 0 0 .0

8 .8
2 9 .9
2 .2
6 .5
4 9 .4
1 .8
1 .4
-

All
.
Manufacturing
industries 3/

1 0 0 .0

.3
.3
1 .2
3 .0
1 .2
8 0 .5
1 .4
2 .7
i.l
5 .6
2 .7

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities

2

- 1 0 0 .0

/

*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
4 .0

-

1 .3
3 .5
1 .3
8 5 .7
1 .3
.7
1 .2
2 .6
2 .4

3 .1
-

(4 /)
-

5 8 .2
1 .4
-

2 6 .6
1 0 .7

-

1 .3
9 .2
-

8 0 .9
8 .6

-

1 .7
8 1 .5
3 .2
1 0 .5
-

3 .1

-

2 .6
5 .0
1 .4
4 1 .1
-

1 8 .2
6 .3
1 8 .1
3 .3

1 / Data r e l a t e to women workers.
2/
3/
4/
*
**

Estim ates are not comparable with those published in the previous b u lle tin s due to d iffe re n ce s in the method o f cla s s ify in g c e r ta in occupational groups.
Includes d ata f o r r e a l e s ta te in add ition to those ind ustry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
Less than 0 .0 5 p e rce n t.
Occupational Wage Survey, P h ila d e lp h ia , F a . , October 1952
Transportation (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication,
other public u t i l i t i e s .
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT OF tabor
Finance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




15

Table D-3:

Paid J toliAaifi

P E R C E N T O F O F F I C E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN—

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN—

,

Number of paid holidays
Public _ /
u ilities 1/*
t

All
industries

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

..........................

99.9

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

U n d e r 6 d a y s ............... .............

.1

.3
36.2

A l l w o r k e r s ..................................
Workers

jJ

25.9
25.0
20.2
3 .2
3.0

.................. ............

6 days

7 d a y s .................... .............
8 d a y s ......................... ........
9 d a y s .....................................
1 0 d a y s ........................ ..........
1 1 d a y s ...................................
12 d a y s

-

.

9.3
11.3
39.1
7.2
30.8
-

33.5
26.8
2.9
-

3.A
3.3
15.3

................... ......... .

1 3 d a y s .................................. .

AU
_
industries 2 /

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.0

Finance •*

97.9

99.2

89.1

98.6

100.0

86.6

5.6
53.0

6.2

_

_
29. A
50.6

9.3
69.9

79.7

19.5
1.3

3. A

Services

15.A
55.9
27.7
.2
.8

-

-

_

2.1'

51 . 3
12.0

2.9
.A
2.5
-

51.1

Wholesale
trade

A0.7
7.9
17.0
3.5
16.9
-

.3

.9
-

-

5.1
6.7
A.7
-

3 0 .A
10.6

-

-

2.0

-

1.9
.2

.3

.3
67.3
26.6

2.1

8.5
.3
-

9.9

26.7
9.8
1.0
1.5
-

25.9
-

11.5
60.0

.2

.1

.........................

Retail trade

Servioes

17.9
_
.7
-

(V)

-

.9

_
_

3.1

2.6

_

-

-

.8

10.9

l.A

13.A

E s t i m a t e s a r e n o t c o m p a r a b l e w i t h t h o s e p u b l i s h e d i n t h e p r e v i o u s b u l l e t i n s d u e t o d i f f e r e n c e s i n t h e m e t h o d o f c l a s s i f y i n g c e r t a i n o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s **

2/

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e a l e s t a t e in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e

3/
*

P aid h olidays o f less than a full day have been omitted*
Appro x i m a t e l y 10 percent of the plant workers in public utilities were reported as r e c eiving 13 paid holidays in the 1951 report;
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

**

Finance,

U

Public _ /
utilities 1 /

in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s pro v i d i n g

no paid holidays

l/

Retail trade

in establishments providing

paid holidays

Workers

Wholesale
trade

insurance,

industry divisions

shown separately*
these have since b een confirmed as unpaid holidays.

and r eal estate*

Paid. VoOcUiO*ti ty&UHal PAMlilO*tA)

Table D-i:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9

A ll w o r k e r s ....................................................

AU
industries £/

Public
.
utilities 1 /

.. holesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .0

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .1

7A.1
57. A
3 .5

6A.5
A9.2
A .5

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .1

1 0 0 .0

8 0 .7
-

6 8 .2
-

6 7 .A
6 2 .5

1 3 .2

1 0 .8

1 9 .3

1 9 .8
1 7 .3
2 .5
5 .1

2 8 .8
2 5 .2
3 .6
5 .5

3 0 .9

-

8 0 .7
2.A
1 6 .9

1 .0

1 .2

-

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .5
2 1 .9
1.A
7 5 .2
1 .3

9 6 .9
1 5 .9

1 0 0 .0
5 3 .7

1C 0.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .7

2 6 .2
-

7 5 .6
.9
2 3 .5

3 .7
5 .0
9 1 .3

2 1 .6

1 .2
.1
.1

2 .5
.3

.1

.3

.
1/

*

•*

Services

Manufacturing

Retail trade

Services

A fter 1 y ear o f se rv ice
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
paid v acatio n s .........................................
Len gth-of-tim e p ay m en t............« . . .
1 w e e k ....................... ........... ...............
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .........
2 w e e k s ................................................
Percentage payment 3 / ................ ..
2 p e r c e n t ............ ...............................
3 o r A p ercen t ................................
Other y .............. ............... ......................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s ................ .................

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f table.
*
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads),
**

Finance,




insurance,

8 1 .0

_

A6.3

'

7 3 .8

-

-

-

-

(* /)

-

-

-

-

•

-

2 .8

1 .5
7 3 .6

3 .3

-

-

and other public utilities.

a n d r e a l est a t e .

NOTE:

Estimates are provided separately, according to employer practice in computing
vacation payments (length-of-time, percentage, or flat sum); percentage and
flat-3 um payments were converted to equivalent time periods in earlier studies,

.
_

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey,
communication,

-

A.9

-

5 / 2 9 .7

.9

-

2 .9

F h i l a d e l o h i a , Pa., O c t o b e r 1 9 5 2
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F LABOR

16

Table D-A:

P a i d V c U X i t l O S U W & W t f U P A a 4 M d & 0 4 t l ) -6o*Ui*i44&(l

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

V acation p o licy

All
industries

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v acations ..................................................

9 9 .9

Length-of-tim e payment ..............................
1 week ...........................................................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s..............
2 weeks .........................................................
Over 2 weeks ..............................................
Percentage payment
................................
2 percent ....................................................
Over 2 but le s s than 3 percen t . . .
3 or A percen t .........................................
Other i j .............................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ......................................... ..

All w o rk e rs ........................................................... ..

Public , /
utilities 1/ *

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Public - /
utilities 1 / *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .0

9 8 .8

9 8 .5
5 .6
.5
9 0 .9
1 .5
1 .3
.A
.6
.3
.1

9 6 .9
5 .8
.8
9 0 .3
2 .8
.8
1 .3
.7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 .7
9 8 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
8.A
9 1 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 9 .3
1 .1
7 9 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
.3
9 6 .7
3 .0
-

9 6 .7
1 3 .6
62.A
2 0 .7
3 .3

7A.1
3 6 .7
l l .A
2 6 .0
1 9 .8
l l .A
2 .8
5 .6
5 .1

.1

.3

9 9 .9

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
3 .7
9 6 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
6 .9
9 3 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
9 7 .0
3 .0
-

—

—

Finance ••

Servioes

All
industries 2 /

Manufacturing

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Sendees

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .1

6A.5
3 7 .2
1A.6
1 2 .7
2 8 .8
1 6 .6
A .l
8 .1
5 .5

1 0 0 .0
3 8 .2
9 .7
5 2 .1
-

9 9 .1
A 5.5
5 .9
A7.7
-

1 0 0 .0
3 2 .3
1 .6
6 6 .1
-

1 .0

1 .2

—

.9

9 9 .0

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .1

7A.1
2 6 .2
1 1 .8
3 5 .2
.9
1 9 .8
9 .8
3 .5
6 .5
5 .1

6A.5
2 6 .8
1 5 .5
21.A
.8
2 8 .8
1A.3
5 .1
9.A
5 .5

1 0 0 .0
2 9 .9
9 .7
5 9 .0
l.A
-

9 9 .1
3 9 .8
5 .9
5 3 .A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 5 .7
8 2 .7
1 .6
-

67 .A
3 3 .7
3 3 .7
- ■
2 9 .7

1 .0

1 .2

_

.9

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 0 .3
8 8 .9
l.A
9 .7

9 9 .1
1 5 .3
8 1 .0
2 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
9 3 .7
1 .6
A ,7
-

—

.9

A fter 2 y ears of se rv ice

—

(6 /)

“

“

67.A
3 7 .1
3 0 .3
2 / 2 9 .7
2 .9

A fter 3 y ears o f se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v acations ..................................................
Length-of-tim e payment ..............................
1 w e e k ........................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...................
2 w e e k s.........................................................
Over 2 weeks ..............................................
Percentage payment 2 / •.............................
2 percent .....................................................
Over 2 but le s s than A percent . . .
A percent .....................................................
Other
..............................................................

9 8 .5
3 .7
.A
9 2 .9
1 .5
1 .3
.A
.6
.3
.1

9 6 .9
5 .2
1 .0
9 0 .7
2 .8
.8
1 .3
.7
-

1 0 0 .0
.5
9 9 .1
.A
-

Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ...........................................

.1

.3

(6 /)

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .5
.5
8 7 .8
A.9
5 .3
l.A
l.A
.1

9 6 .9
.A
8 5 .7
5 .3
5 .5
3 .1
3 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
9 6 .1
3 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 .6
87 .A
1 1 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 2 .5
7 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
89 .A
7 .2
3.A
-

•

1 0 0 .0
9 6 .7
1 2 .5
6 3 .5
2 0 .7
3 .3
“

-

C
J

2 .9

A fter 5 y ears o f se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v acations ..................................................
Length-of-tim e payment ..............................
1 and under 2 weeks ..............................
2 weeks .........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...................
3 weeks .........................................................
Percentage payment J j ................................
2 p e r c e n t .............................................
A p e r c e n t ................ ...................................
Other l j .............................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s .............................. .............

(6 /)

“

(6 /)

See footnotes a t end o f ta b le .
*
T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and o th er public u t i l i t i e s .
* * Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e .




1 0 0 .0
9 6 .7
5 .6
70.A
2 0 .7
3 .3

7 3 .3
2 .A
6 7 .2
1 .6
2 .1
2 0 .6
1 .1
1 9 .5
5 .9
.2

6A.5
1 .5
5 9 .3
2 .0
1 .7
3 0 .0
1 .6
2 8 .A
5 .5

9 7 .1
67.A
1 6 .3
5 1 .1
2 / 2 9 .7

1

2 .9

17

Tt*d-! Paid VacatiosU {^o^mai Paouiidond) -Continued
aa 4
P E R C E N T O F O F F I C E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN—

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Vacation policy

All
industries 2 /

All
industries

All workers

..................................

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.5

96.9
.2

100.0
-

100.0
1.6

100*0
-

100.0
-

96.7
5.6

75.3
.2

87.2
-

84.5
-

63*6
-

73.8

58.4
-

21.2
-

12.8
-

13.9
-

33.6

.2
1.4
-

3.1
-

1.1

Public,
utili i s 1/
te

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finanoe ••

Servioee

Manufacturing

.

Public
utilities 1 / •

Wholesale
trade

100.0.

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

73.3
1.9
56.8

64.5
.8

90.3
62.2
-

15.3
81.0
-

11.9

53.4
2.5
7.0
.8
30.0

28.1
-

2.8
-

-

.8
20.6
1.1
16.3
3.2

1.6
23.8
4.6

5.9

100.0

Retail trade

Servioee

100.0

100.0

99.1

100.0

97.1

99.1

100.0
-

67.4
16.3
50. 2
_

After 10 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
p a i d v a c a t i o n s ............................
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t .......... ..
i w e e k .................................
2 w e e k s ................................
Over 2 and under
3 w e e k s .........
3 w e e k s .............................. *
O v e r 3 w e e k s ...... .............. .
P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t 2 / .................
2 p e r c e n t ..................... .
4 p e r c e n t ...................... .......
O v e r 4 p e r c e n t .......................
O t h e r 4 / ......... ......... .
Workers

•A
75.4
2.9
19.6

.3
.1

10.7
15.5
-

32.7
-

-

-

2.8
-

2.4
.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

3.3

-

(£/)

-

-

-

1.9

62.8
1.6
33.4
2.2
-

.9
_

-

-

-

-

-

5.5

9.7

-

-

0 /2 9 .1

-

-

.9

-

2.9

in establishments providing

n o p a i d v a c a t i o n s .......................

(6/)

.2

After 15 y ears of service
Workers

in establishments providing

paid vacations

........................ ..*

Length-of-time payment

................
1 w e e k ......................... .......
2 w e e k s ................................
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ..........

3 w e e k s ................................
O v e r 3 w e e k s .........................
Percentage payment
..................
2 p e r c e n t ............. ...............

y

4 p e r c e n t .............................
O v e r 4 p e r c e n t * .......... .
Other

ij

.................................

100.0

100.0

100*0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

99.1

100.0

98.5

96.9
.2

100.0
-

100.0

100.0
-

96.7
5.6

73.3
1.9

64.5
.8

90.3
-

99.1

11.3
-

35.4
-

44.6
3.0

57.0
-

67.4
-

88.7
-

47.8
-

61.8
2.8
-

52.4
-

34.1
-

36.3
1.5
32.8
.8

33.9
1.9
27.1
.8

16.2
-

15.3
48.0
-

100.0
-

29.1
.2

1.6
50.6
-

100.0
-

74.1
-

35.8
-

.4
35.0
.9
62.0
.2

-

-

1.5
1.6

—
-

- _

-

-

-

1.4
-

3.1
-

.7
.7
.1

52.3
1.6

-

20.6

30.0

-

-

-

-

-

1.1

1.6
16.0

-

-

-

-

-

3.3

9.7

-

-

5.9

12.4
5 .5

67.4
16.3
45.0
_
6.1
_

43.9
2.2
-

-

10.9
8.6

97.1

_

0/

29.7

Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations

After 2 0

.......................*

Workers in establishments providing
p a i d v a c a t i o n s ......................... .
Length-of-time payment

.................

1 w e e k ............... ..................
2 w e e k s ................... ............
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks

.2

(£/)

(6/)

..........

. . . . . . . . * .......... .

O v e r 3 w e e k s .........................
Percentage payment
..................
2 p e r c e n t ............. ...............
4 p e r c e n t ......................

y

6 p e r c e n t a n d o v e r ............... ..
Other
..................................

(J

Workers in establishments providing
n o p a i d v a c a t i o n s ........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.6

99.8

100.®

100.0

99.1

100.0

97.1

98.5
.4

96.9
.2

100.0
-

100.0
-

100.0
-

96.7

73.3
1.9

64.5
.8

90.3
-

99.1

100.0
J
-

26.3
.9
67.8

24.1
.2

11.3
-

100.0
1.6
49.8
-

32.6
-

21.4
3.0

31.3

27.5

88.7

46.2

56.0
11.4
-

68.3
7.3
-

-

1.4
20.6

1.5
33.9
.8
30.0

67,4
16.3
42.6
_

72.4

1.3
37.4

16.2
-

5.6
56.2
34.9
-

3.1

-

-

1.4

3.1

-

2.4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.1

1.6

.7
.7
.1

1.5
1.6

-

-

-

-

-

8.9
10.6

12.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.3

5.9

(6/)

“

*
*

“

-

-

(£/)

See fo o tn o tes a t end o f tab le*
*
T ran sp ortatio n (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and o ther public u t i l i t i e s *
* * Fin an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s ta te *




2.9

.9

y e a r s of service

.2

74.1
-

15.3
47.1
35.6

49.5
1.6
42.1
6.8
_
-

8.5
_

-

1.1
-

-

-

5.5

9.7

-

-

OJ 2 9 . 7

“

•

.9

-

2.9

15.5

.

.
-

Table D-As

P aid VcuxUiatU tyosuncU PmumAaohA) Go+tilHu ed

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Vacation policy
Public
utilities y *

Wholseale
trade

All
industries

All w o r k e r s ....... ....................

Manufacturing

100 j0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.5
.A
22.7
.9
55.9

96.9
.2
21.2
.2
66.A
8.9
3.1
1.5
1.6
-

100.0
•

100.0
1.6
A9.9

100.0

Retail trade

Finance

100.0

••

All
.
industries 2 / Manufacturing

Serviees

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
28.9
23.1
A8.0
-

100.0
16.8
3.0
A7.1
33.1
-

utilities l/*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Serrioee

1Q0.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

99.1

100.0

97.1

96.7
5.6
28.5

73.3
2.2
26.8
1.0
3A.1
.5
8.7
20.6
1.1
8.9
10.6
5.9

6A.5
1.3
23.2
1.2
33.6
.8
A.A
30.0
1.6
12.9
15.5

90.3

99.1
15.3
A7.1
-

100.0
39.1
1.6
19.3
.
AO.O

67. A
16.3
37.8
•

j

After 25 rears of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations....... ...............
Length-of-time payment ..............
1 week ...........................
2 weeks ..........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........
3 weeks ..........................
Over 3 and under A w e e k s ...... ..
A weeks and over ................
Percentage payment J j ...............
2 p e r c e n t ......... ..............
A p e r c e n t ........................
6 percent and over .......... ;...
Other y ...........................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ...................

-

18.6
l.A
.7
.7
.1

(6/)

11.3
-

-

88.7

26.3
22.2
-

-

-

■
*

-

62.6
-

“
-

3.3

-

.2

(6/)

55
.
“

-

16.2
7A.1
9.7

“

27.9
-

8.8
-

-

13.3
•
•
-

-

-

2 9 .7

.9

-

2 .9

-

-

1/
2/
2/

Estimates are not comparable with those published in the previous bulletins due to differences in the method of classifying certain occupational groups.
Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Percent of annual earnings.
i j Includes such combinations as flat-sum payments plus length-of-time payment or percentage of annual earnings.
£/ Consists of 1 week's pay plus $30.
6/ Less than 0.05
percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Table D-5:

fa d d iA U H C * .C U td P + H dlO H , P J a n i

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Type of plan
All
industries

Manufacturing

.

Public „
utilities 1/*

Wholesale *
trade

Retail trade

Finance

•
•

Services

AU
_ ,
industries 2/ Manufacturing

Public , /
utilities A/ *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

All workers....... ..................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Workers in establishments having
insurance or pension plans 3 / .......

93.0

9A.5

99.2

87.6

90.0

9A.0

69.6

91.A

95.7

98.2

61.8

90.8

38.1

90.A
85.0

9A.0
88.0

95.8
95.8

83.9
72.6

90.0
86.1

87.6
82.3

69.6
69.1

90.A
83.7

9A.9
87.3

9A.7
9A.7

56.2
A7.0

90.8
87.2

38.1
32.6

2A.6
A2.0
5A.2
A0.3
21.1
71.6

37.1
69.2
72.9
6A.6
36.0
69.6

11.5
31 .A
8.0
A.7
A.A
9A.6

3A.9
3A.9
52.5
2A.A
17.3
55.2

2.5
50.0
50.5
3A.2
11.1
59.6

12.7
3.3
A3.0
20.6
5.6
82.5

9.5
1C .A
25.1
23.0
20.7
22.6

31.9
69.5
65.6
55.A
35.5
55.5

A1.0
82.2
80.8
72 .A
A8.1
59.6

18 .A
36.0
22.9
12.2
5.A
85.7

30.6
26 .A
39.2
20.9
9.6
32.9

2.5
58.1
38.A
23.5
6.7
A0.7

10.3
19.9
11.3
6.5

7.0

5.5

.8

12 .A

10.0

6.0

30.A

8.6

A.3

1.8

38.2

9.2

61.9

Insurance plans 3 / ...... ..........
Life ...........................
Accidental death and
dismemberment................ .
Sickness and accident ...........
Hospitalisation............. .
Surgical .......................
Medical ........................
Pension or retirement plan .........
Workers in establishments having no
insurance or pension plans ..........

1/ Estimates are not comparable with those published in the previous bulletins due to differences in the method of classifying certain occupational groups.
2/ Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
3/ Unduplicated total.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1952
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and read estate.




-

2.9

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

19

A ppendix-Scope and Method of Survey
The B u r e a u ’s occupational wage
surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with avail­
able resources.
In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community.
Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure,
earnings,
and working conditions
among establishments.

such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation.
Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work.
Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons,
are included.
Where weekly hours are reported,
as
for office
clerical occupations,
reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid;
average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time workers,
i.e., those
hired to work the establishment’s full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the B u r e a u ’s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of inter establishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and
(d) custodial,
warehousing,
and shipping
(tables A-l
through A-4).
The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade;
retail trade;
finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also w a s obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions.
As indicated in
the following table,
only establishments above a certain size were
studied.
Smaller establishments were omitted because thqy furnished
insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant in­
clusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined
separately for each industry
(see following
table).
Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources.
Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however,
was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term "office workers” referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional,
and technical personnel.
"Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees)
engaged in nonoffice functions.
Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees,
and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded.
Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, these work categories are included as plant workers in non­
manufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions:
operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the H e l d visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

20

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

office workers
of the table
summarizing
scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements,
the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits m a y be smaller.

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables.
It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question,
except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans
is limited to formal ar­
rangements.
It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers In Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Philadelphia, Pa., 2 /
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, October 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions .....................................
Manufacturing ............................. ....
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .............. ...............
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ................................
Wholesale trade ............................
Retail trade, except limited-price
variety stores ...........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services j}/ .............. ..................

101
-

1,574
764
810

HI
179

320

615,900
384,800
231,100

354,140
215,980
133,160

62,360
29,660
32,700

101
51

86
264

28
36

57,800
37,400

47,920
6,940

8,120
2,080

101
51
51

95
173
192

31
45
39

69,800
40,900
25,200

52,940
22,480
7,880

6,100
15,460
940

21
8
8
21

42
65
38

16
28
17
19

4,231
3,916
3,180
6,350

2,868
2,174
2,675
2,813

100
77
364
124

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis U
Full-fashioned h o s i e r y .... ............... .
Women1s and m i s s e s 1 d r e s s e s .................. .
Paints and varnishes ••••........................
Power laundries ••••........ ................... ..

2/

64

Philadelphia Area (Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, New Jersey).
Total establishment employment.
The minimum size of establishment studied in the October 1951 survey was 21 workers in wholesale
trade; finance, insurance and real estate; and services, and 101 in the other major industry divisions.
2 / Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
2 / Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.

2j




21

Index
Adjuster and fixer, knitting machines
(full-fashioned hosiery), 11

Inspector, final (examiner) (women*s
and misses* dresses), 11

Bench hand (bakeries), 13
Biller, machine, 3
Boarder (full-fashioned hosiery), 11
Bookbinder (printing), 13
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3
Boxer (full-fashioned hosiery), 11
Bricklayer (building construction), 13

Janitor, 8, 9

Calculating-machine operator, 4
Carpenter (building construction), 13
Carpenter, maintenance, 7
Cleaner, 8, 9
Clerk, file, 3, 4
Clerk, order, 3, 4
Clerk, payroll, 3, 4
Clerk, retail receiving (power
laundries), 12
Compositor, hand (printing), 13
Crane operator, electric bridge, 8
Cutter and marker (women’s and
misses* dresses), 11
Draftsman, 6
Duplicating-machine operator, 4
Electrician (building construction), 13
Electrician, maintenance, 7
Electrotyper (printing), 13
Engineer, stationary, 7
Examiner (full-fashioned hosiery), 11
Extractor operator (power laundries), 12
Finisher, flatwork (power laundries), 12
Fireman, stationary boiler, 7
Fireman, stationary boiler (power
laundries), 12
Folder (full-fashioned hosiery), 11
Guard,

8

Helper (bakeries), 13
Helper, motortruck driver, 13
Helper, trades, maintenance, 7
Identifier (power laundries), 12
Inspector (full-fashioned hosiery), 11




Key-punch operator, 4
Knitter (full-fashioned hosiery), 11
Labeler and packer (paints and
varnishes), 12
Laborer (building construction), 13
Laborer, material handling, 9
Machine operator (printing), 13
Machine tender (printing), 13
Machine-tool operator, toolroom, 7
Machinist, maintenance, 7
Mailer (printing), 13
Maintenance man, general utility
(paints and varnishes), 12
Marker (power laundries), 12
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 7
Mechanic, maintenance, 7
Mender, hand (full-fashioned
hosiery), 11
Millwright, 7
Mixer (bakeries), 13
Mixer (paints and varnishes), 12
Molder (bakeries), 13
Motortruck driver, 13
Nurse, industrial (registered), 6
Office boy, 3
Office girl, 5
Oiler, 7
Operator (local transit), 13
Order filler, 9
Overman (bakeries), 13
Packer, 9
Packer (bakeries), 13
Painter (building construction), 13
Painter, maintenance, 7
Pairer (full-fashioned hosiery), 11
Photoengraver (printing), 13
Pipe fitter, maintenance, 7
Plasterer (building construction), 13
Plumber (building construction), 13

Plumber, maintenance, 8
Porter, 8, 9
Preboarder (full-fashioned hosiery), 11
Press assistant (printing), 13
Press feeder (printing), 13
Presser (women’s and misses*
dresses), 11
Presser, machine, shirts (power
laundries), 12
Pressman (printing), 13
Receiving clerk, 9
Routeman (driver-salesman)
laundries), 12

(power

Seamer (full-fashioned hosiery), 11
Secretary, 5
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women’s and
misses* dresses), 11
Sewing-machine operator (women’s and
misses* dresses), 11
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance, 8
Shipping clerk, 9
Shipping-and-receiving clerk, 9
Stenographer, 5
Stereotyper (printing), 13
Switchboard operator, 5
Switchboard operator-receptionist, 5
Tabulating-machine operator, 3, 5
Technician ( paints and varnishes), 12
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women’s and
misses* dresses), 11
Tinter (paints and varnishes), 12
Tool-and-die maker, 8
Tracer, 6
Transcribing-machine operator, 5
Truck driver, 10
Trucker, power, 10
Typist, 6
Varnish maker (paints and varnishes), 12
Washer, machine (power laundries), 12
Watchman, 10
Work distributor (women’s and
m i s s e s ’ dresses), 11
Wrapper (bakeries), 13
Wrapper, bundle (power laundries), 12
☆

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1953 0 — 243681







Office.

This report was prepared in the Bureau's Middle Atlantic Regional
Communications may be addressed to:
Robert R. Behlov, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
3^1 Ninth Avenue
Room 1000
New York 1, New York

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial
relations, employment, prices, labor turnover, productivity, work injuries,
construction and housing.

The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
New Jersey

New York
Pennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102