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KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI
October 1952

Bulletin No. 1116-4

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU

OF

LABO R

S T A T IS T IC S

Ew an C la g u e - C o m m issio n e r




KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI
O ctober 1952




Bulletin No. 1116-4
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin
Secretary
BUREAU

OF

LABO R

S T A T IS T IC S

Ewan C la g u e - C o m m is sio n e r

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 2 5 cents




Contents
Letter of Transmittal

Page
INTRODUCTION .............................................
THE KANSAS CITY METROPOLITAN AREA ......................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E .............................
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C., February 6 , 1953.

1

l

T ABIES 1

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-i
Office occupations ........................
I
have the honor to transmit herewith a report on
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ....
occupational wages and related benefits in Kansas City, Mo.,
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ...
during October 1952. Similar studies are being conducted in a
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
number of other large labor-market areas during the fiscal year
occupations •••••••.....
1953* These studies have been designed to meet a variety of
governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis earnings information for many occupations common to most mano*
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries
B-35
Machinery industries
of selected supplementary wage benefits.
Whenever possible,
B-7211 Power l a u n d r i e s .... ..................•••••
separate data have been presented for individual major industry
Union wage scales for selected occupations
divisions.
G-15
Building construction •••••••••••••••••••..
C-205
Bakeries ...........
This report was prepared in the Bureau 1s regional of­
C-27
Printing .................................
fice in Chicago, 111., by Woodrow C. Linn under the direction
C-41
Local transit operating employees •••••••••
of George £. Votava, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ..........
Analyst. The planning and central direction of the program was
carried on in the B u r e a u s Division of Wages and Industrial
Supplementary wage practices Relations.
D-l
Shift differential provisions •••••••••••••
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours ...................
Swan Clague, Commissioner.
D-3
Paid holidays ...••••••.............
D-4
Paid vacations ..••••••............
Hon. Martin P. Durkin,
D-5
Insurance and pension plans ••••••••••••••••
Secretary of labor.
The Secretary of Labor*




3
$
6

7

8
8
9
9
9
10

10
11
11

12
12
14

APPENDIX*
Scope and method of survey

15

I N D E X ................................................... .

17




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY - KA N SA S CITY. MO.
equipment and ordnance groups which employed nearly half the work­
ers. Other durable-goods industry groups of substantial importance
included fabricated-metal products and electrical machinery. In
the nondurable-goods segment of manufacturing, food processing plants
accounted for more than a third of the workers. Other important
groups included chemicals and allied products; paper, printing, and
publishing; and textiles and apparel.

Introduction
The Kansas City area is one of several important indus­
trial centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently
conducting occupational wage surveys* In such surveys, occupations
common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries
are studied on a community-wide basis. X/ Cross-industry methods
of sampling are thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the
following types of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional and
technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, ware­
housing, and shipping. In presenting earnings information for such
jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate data are provided wherever
possible for individual broad industry divisions.

An estimated 248,000 wage and salary workers were on the
payrolls of Kansas City area nonmanufacturing establishments in
October 1952. About 97,000 workers were employed in retail and
wholesale trade activities. Another 43,800 were employed by the
various branches of the transportation and other public utilities
industry, including railroads. The service industries employed
38,500 persons in such diverse fields as automobile and other re­
pair shops, laundries and cleaning establishments, hotels, theaters,
radio and television stations, and business service establishments.
Federal, State, and local government agencies reported employment
of 30,000 workers in the area, and approximately 19,700 persons were
employed in finance, insurance, and real estate establishments.
Building construction provided jobs for nearly 19,000 workers in
October.

Earnings information for characteristic occupations in
certain more specifically defined industries is presented in Series
B tables. Union scales (Series C tables) are presented for selected
occupations in several industries or trades in which the great ma­
jority of the workers are employed under terms of collective-bar^
gaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are believed
to be indicative of prevailing pay practices.

Among the industry and establishment-size groups studied
by the Bureau, virtually all manufacturing plant workers were em­
ployed under union-agreement provisions. In nonmanufacturing in­
dustries, the proportion of nonoffice workers covered by union agree­
ments ranged from three-fifths in retail trade to nearly all in the
transportation, (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities groups. Unionization was far less significant among
Kansas City office workers, with less than 15 percent of the workers
employed under the provisions of collective-bargaining agreements
in October 1952. The highest proportion of office workers covered
by union-agreement provisions was reported in transportation (except
railroads), communication, and other public utilities; more than
two-thirds of the office workers in this industry group were em­
ployed under the terms of union contracts.

Data are collected and summarized on shift operations and
differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as
vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension plans.

The Kansas City Metropolitan Area
The Kansas City Metropolitan Area, consisting of Johnson
and Wyandotte Counties in Kansas, and Clay and Jackson Counties in
Missouri, ranks seventeenth in size among the standard metropolitan
areas of the Nation. The total population of this area is now esti­
mated at 861,000, a gain of about 20 percent since 194-0.
During
this period, the population of Kansas City, Mo., proper increased
about 15 percent, to an estimated 4-69,000.

Occupational Wage Structure

Diversified manufacturing, marketing of farm products,
transportation, and distribution dominate the business activities
of the Kansas City area, measured in terms of employment. Nonagricultural wage and salary employment in the Kansas City area totaled
approximately 358,000 workers in October 1952. Manufacturing es­
tablishments employed an estimated 110,000, divided almost equally
between firms producing durable and nondurable goods. Employment
in the durable-goods industries was dominated by the transportation

In October 1952, gross hourly earnings (including pay for
overtime and night work) for manufacturing plant workers in the
Kansas City area averaged $1.76,12 cents above the average reported
for October 1951, the date of the Bureau*s first community wage sur­
vey in the area. g/ A substantial part of this increase can be at­
tributed to company-wide wage adjustments made during the 12-month
period.

X/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.
Differences between the scope of this survey and the last previous
survey are indicated in the appendix table. The construction and
extractive industries and government institutions were excluded from
each study.




g/ Estimates prepared by the Missouri Division of Employment
Security in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Labor*s Bureau
of Labor Statistics.

(1)

2

Wage rates for nearly all Kansas City area plant (non­
office) workers were determined on the basis of formal rate struc­
tures. For time-rated jobs, plans specifying a single or flat rate
for each occupation were somewhat more common than wage progression
plans which provide a range of rates for each job. Among the indus­
try groups studied, single-rate plans were typical of manufacturing,
whereas rate-range plans predominated for plant jobs in nonmanu­
facturing industries. Piece-rate or bonus incentive payment plans
covered plant jobs in which a fifth of all factory workers in manu­
facturing industries were classified. Such plans were either non-­
existent or relatively insignificant among the nonmanufacturing in­
dustries, with the exception of retail trade in which nearly 30 per­
cent of the nonoffice workers were employed in selling jobs paid on
a commission basis.

Virtually all formal wage plans reported for office occu­
pations provided a range of salaries for each job; few office work­
ers were paid salaries based on single-rate plans. About 30 percent
of the office workers in the area were employed in establishments
that determined salaries on an individual basis.
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing industries
were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing. In 11 of 15
office classifications permitting comparison, average weekly sala­




ries in manufacturing establishments exceeded those in nonraanufacturing. Wage rates for selected plant occupations averaged higher
in manufacturing industries for 16 of 21 jobs where comparisons
were possible.
Establishments employing about six-sevenths of the total
manufacturing plant workers in the area had formal policies per­
taining to the payment of work performed on late shifts. These pol-f
icies generally specified additional payment for night work and
were most frequently expressed in terms of a uniform cents-per-hour
differential over established day rates-although percentage differ­
entials were also reported. Differentials of 5, 6, and 7 cents and
5 percent were most common for sectDnd-shift work whereas 7 cents and
7i percent were most typical for third-shift work. Less than a
sixth of the manufacturing plant workers in the area were actually
employed on extra shifts at the time of the study. Virtually all
these received premium pay for night work, usually expressed in
terms of cents-per-hour additions to day rates.
A regularly scheduled 4 0 -hour workweek was common for twothirds of nonoffice workers in October 1952; most of the others were
on longer schedules. Four of five plant workers in manufacturing
industries were scheduled to work 40 hours. Forty-hour weekly
schedules also existed for 80 percent of the women office workers,
with most of the others on shorter work schedules.

3

A ; Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-i*

Office OcCHfUt/iOHd

1/

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings
for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1952)

See f o o tn o te a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




O ccu p atio n al Wage S u rv e y , Kansas C i ty , Mo., O ctober 1952•
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

u




Table A-li

C ttficm QoOHfn t i OHi -G o H t i HM td

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings V for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City* Mo., b y industry division, October 1952)

5

Table A-2*

P*cfal<UnHai a n d

^ecUndceU OcatpxUioHd

(Average s t raight-time w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s l / f o r se l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u died o n a n a r e a
b a s i s in K a n s a s City, Mo., b y i n d u s t r y div i s i o n , O c t o b e r 1952)

Av e r a g e

Se x , o c c u p a t i o n , a n d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours
(Standard)

Weekly
earnings
(Standard)

w

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME i W EEK LY EARNINGS OF
i
*

$

42.50
45.00

u nder
42.50

$
!$
4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 5 0 j 5 0 .00

$

4 7 . 5 0 50 . 0 0 ! 5 2 .50

s

$
|
$
$
$
$
$
|
52.50 55.00
57 . 5 0 | 0 . 0 0
$6
62.50 65.00 1 67.50
70.00 72.50
5 5 .00 5 7 . 5 0 1 6 0 . 0 0

62.50

65.00 67.50

70.00

72.50 75.00

$

s

i

s

75.00

80 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0

$
90.00

$
$
9 5 .00 100.00 1 0 5 . 0 0

80.00

85.00 90.00

95.00

100.00 105.00 1 1 0 . 0 0

|

!
K m

D r a f t s m e n ............................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................................... ...

D r a f t s m e n , j u n i o r ...... ...........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....................................

162
135

40.0
40.0

75
53

40.0
40.0

1
1

$
78 . 0 0
78.00

64 . 0 0
61 . 5 0

-

'

_

-

12
“

"

2

9

2

;

5
5

“

*

!
!

^

;

7
7

14

22
20

4

6

1

4

3

19
18

17

3
1 !

4
2

4
1

6
6

9
8

12
10

15
13

7

10

5

6

3

7

4

5

43
38

10
6

6

11

7

5

5

5

11
10

6

2
-

-

2

7

7
i

4
3

7

•

-

i
i
90

40.0
40.0

64.00

i65 . 0 0

1

1
1

1
-

!

'

1/

i

‘

7

1

Women

N u r s e s , i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g istered) ............... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................ ...................

i

1

7
4

3
3
i_________
_

|

4

7
7

_

7
6

4
3

1

i_________

!

H o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o r k w e e k f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e sa l a r i e s and the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d t o t h e s e w e e k l y hou r s .




O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Su r v e y ,

Kans a s City, Mo., O c t o b e r 1952.
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F LABOR
B u r e a u of Labor Sta t i s t i c s

6

M CU *U e4U Z41Ce G S td P<HU£A P lc O it O cC U fu U lO H d

Table A-3s

(Average hourly earnings V for m e n in selected occupations studied on an area
basis i n Kansas City, Mo., b y industry division, October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation a n d industry division

Average
hourly
earnings

f.35

Luo

f i r f.5o

Us

1 .6 0

f.65

1.70

f.75

1 .8 0

Us

f.90

i.95

1 .0 0

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1.15

1 .2 0

1.25

1.30

1.3 5

Sfto

1.U5

1.50

l.ko

1.U5

1.50

1 .6 0

1.65

1.70

1.75

1 .8 0

1.85

1.90

1.95

2 .0 0

2. 0 5

2 .1 0

2. 1 5

2 .2 0

2.25

2.30

2.35

2 JiO

2ft5

2.50

2 .6 0

1*

Under
*
L.30

l
$.30

1.35

Number
of
Workers

7

22
10
12
8

57
Uc

1?
1

11

16

6

?

u

-

ft

1

3

i
*
i

11

1

1
1
1

15
13

1
*

13
3

f
t
-

l

7
U

12
12

6

1
6

8
6
2

17

u
-

1
1

and
1.55

$
251

2 .0 0

95
39

1.97
2 .0 k
1.96

lit

.
-

-

•
-

-

-

.
-

Electricians, maintenance
Manufacturing ••••••••••..... ...... .
Nonmanufaotaring .............. .
Public utilities *••••••••••••••••••••••

515
1*08
107
65

2 .0 1
2 .0 2

-

1.98

-

-

.
-

-

.
-

.
-

2 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

Engineers, stationary ••••••••••••••••••••••..
Manufacturing ••••••..... •••••••••..... ••••
Nonmanufac t u r i n g ..... ...... •••••••••••••••

228
132
96

1.95

2

2

Firemen, stationary b oiler •••.•••••«•••••••»«
Manufacturing ....................... ••••••••

1&2

219

1

_

-

1.65
1.69

7

18

5
5

16

2
2

53
52

6
6

2?

21
21

5

3

8
8

12

2

2
2

_

16

-

7

23

52

10 1

8

2l
*
28

32
69

1

2
2

7

ft
9

Nonmanuf ac turing ........ .................. .
DtiKI 4 m n
14
a
t ____ ____ ...
_______

U 8U
71
U13
297

Mechanics, msintenanss ...........
Manufacturing ................... .
Nonmanufac turing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••

513
U30
83

1.91
1.89

M i l l w r i g h t s ......................................

2 ft

10
10

1
*
2
2

?8
18 “
20

2 .1 0
2 .1 0

90

2 .0 k

13^
52

1.99

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

.

_

_

.

-

2

-

22
21
1

97

68

-

29
28

15
15
-

6
1*
2

2

20

8

18

-

-

-

2
2

•

-

1

1

-

-

-

-

_
-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

ft
ft
-

.

6
6

1

-

.
.

-

-

l

1

l

1

-

1

-

2

13
-

3U
3U

-

.

-

U3
23

U

12
12

-

62

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

19
19

18
18

3

3

2
2

-

-

-

3
3

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

62

37

67
67

u
k

5

31

18

76

5

31

3

73

-

27
21*

3

21*

3k
5
16
16

2
2
2

.

.

.

1
1

28

5

37

it
9

39
36

55
52

60

58

3k

9?

87
5

1*5

26

55

3k

33

98
73

82
82

1*5
ft

1*
3
1
1

6

58

19
l6
3

78
75
3

h

5

67

11
10
1

22

1

66
1

53
38
15

1*8

1

lf
*t
-

9
13

1

_

7
7

ft

5

ft

ft

5

ft

5

3

6
6

-

-

6
2
1
*

21*

6

9
15

5

•~ 5 5 T

1*5

1U
11*

28
28

11
**
1*3

6

5

2
2

10

13
13

12
12

I
t

27
13

.

-

.

.

1*3
1*3

W

1*

2.23
2.23

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

26

5

2
2

1
1

2
1
1

13

2

12
1

2

.

12
12

1
1

-

_

1*

-

5

18
7

35
35
-

1?

ft

-

_

8
8

2$
19

50

16

___ £ _

7
7

?

6
6

ft
ft

2

2
2

___ lu_ ___ 1 —
-

_

5

1

1

f
t

3
3

25
25

2 .1 2
2 .1 2

321
321

_

7
7

UP
Uo
-

6

over
___ 1 —

12

6
6

2 .1 6

1.98
1.98

1?
17
JT "if-

1

-

10

1.58

11.7

26
26

1U

_

-

1.57

190

~W ~

9
3
-

6
6

16

1.82

2 .0 2

7

3

29
25
1
*
1
*

16

1 .9 6

160
12 3

i i t t M T i t i - T i i r i T i i m i i m i i

2

6

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ••••••••••
Mami m f ii 4n « y ________________ _______ ____ ___
» »

ffM Tm f mmfn v*| *i g

3
3

.

6

2 .0 6
2 .0 6

Tool-and-die makers

h
h

33
27

-

358
311

122

9

20
20

9

Machinists, maintenance ••••••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing

awetHsetal workers, maintenance .♦ ............. ..
Manufacturing •
•

5

17
8

2 .0 8
2*0 8

268

9
-

9
-

18L
18U

— IS —

6
1

-

9

Machine-tool operators, toolroom •••••••••••••

Pipe f i tte r s , maintenance ••••••••••••......... ..
fa r i t i m a t11 i u i i i i M i i i m t

21+
20
1
*

-

2U

3

.....

22
12
10

-

-

2
1

...

6

16

2

7

UAM t^am «4v ..................... ..
iam
^ii v iiv

1

-

2f
t
13
15
7

2

6
1

Painters, m a i n t e n a n c e .....
Manufacturing ........ ••••••••••••••.......

1

32
30

-

1.70

23U

10

21*
18
6

-

1.75
1.61

12

13

39
5

18
18
-

-

158

5U
1*9
5
U

1*U

1
16

29

-

60

17

2

5

1
1

1

U3
17
5

23
23
-

-

U72
m

..........

11
6
2

21*

1
1

2 .0 2

Helpers, trades, maintenance •••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ....... •••••..................
ITnimmnierin f u nt gin ................ .... ..... .
r

m*

11
11

1.87

1. 8 0
1.80

\.60

-

2
2

7

8
8

18
18

7

3

2U

l

1*
—

25

h

25

6

1

n
n

3
3

18

—1 8 “
8

ft
ft
ft

33
33

U3

19
19

-

r ir

7
7

6

-

35

-

“

-

-

5
5

-

106
106

11
11

21
21

38
38

10

1
*

1
1

-

3

3

7

50

9

1

u

ll

i*

16

2

35
35

1*
it

flcj

i*

V?

ft

ft

13

8
3

13

- l o ­ — r - ....

9

-

1

5

m

35

1x2
U2

1
1

2
2

1*8
U8

%

7
7

5

■—

-

-

-

-

60

19

25

60

19

25

8
8

-

-

________ 1

1/

Excludes premium p a y for overtime and night work.

*

Transportation (excluding r a il r o a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .




Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas C ity , Mo., October 1952
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

7

Table A-Us

C u s t o d ia l, 74jG /ieA(U 4Ai+U f,f G Std £ U iflfU 4 U f O cC U fLcU iO fitl

(Average hourly earnings V for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Kansas City* Mo., by industry divisionj October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

N ber
um
of
W
orkers

O ccu p a tio n and in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

A
verage
h rly Under §•75 0.80 1.85 S.90
ou
and
earnings $
0.75

U81
535
67

1.67
1.73
1.28

J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s (n an )
M a n u fac tu rin g
N onm anufacturing

•••••••

2,851
tag—
i,bbo
23?

1.20
1.39
1.02
1.22

199

?5

199

95
15

J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s (women)

369
63

1.01

1

.95

.90

.
.

M a n u fac tu rin g
Nonm anufactaring

•••••
—

Order f i l l e r s • • • • • • • • • • .................. ...................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ........................................................ .
N onm anufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • •

1.095
U6o
635

.95

U*5
1.1*7
1.1*2
1.62

UB9

lJi5
' lU?
l.bb

P a c k e r s , c l a s s A ( m e n ) ............• • • • .............. ..
M a n u fac tu rin g .......................... • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
fln ir sn iif nr tiji l

250
100
150
627
3*A"
70
1/

lJil
1.1*6
1^00
Jt#U7

P a c k e r s , c l a s s B (woman) .......................... ............ ..
N onm anufactu ring • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .

619
2?1

1.17
1.03

R e c e iv in g c l e r k s ..................... ..
M a n u fa c tu rin g ........... ••••..... ••••••
Jfpfiffinnfl
T^
~ ng t t t f i t t t t r t t t t n i i n t i t t t

219
EH3
91

1.68
i:72—
1.62

S h ip p in g c l e r k s ••••••••••••••••••••••..... .
M a n u fac tu rin g ............. .......... .

165
120

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35 L b O

U s

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

l.bO

1.1*5

1.50 1.55

1
1

b

10

1
1
68
b8
20
6

8

5

12

3

3 -IZ-

8

5

12

3

3

3

116
b7
69
5

H*2
75
67
•p

117
7b
b3
£

b

1

38
32
6

259
165
9b
b8

99
U5
53
31

69
29
bO
31

?$*
191
93
38

28

lb

9

lb
12

5
5

7
1
6
6

5
5

28
28

lb

2

1
*

b

-

2

b

.

-

-

73
15
58

127
12
115

122
2b
98

179
22
157
g

20?
52
157
0

150
81
69

2$
2

3Q

139
12

28
6
22
2

?2

37
6
31
8

lb

50
5
U5

88
b5
b3

52

-

b6
10
36
9
9

19_ -U8-.
20
n
28
7
7
-

6

7

6

9

SI . 2 1 . .1
2b
50
67
6
-

6

16
6
10

52

8
5
1

371
— 1&—
209

.

0
y

2b
12
12

&
6b

21

-

1.
1

.

.

.

-

18

.

_

-

Truck d r i v e r s , medium ( l £ t o and in c l u d in g
h to n s ) ............................................... ..
M a n u fac tu rin g .........................................
Nonm anufacturing ............... ....................... ............
piiKI 4r
14^ ac 4 t i i i i t ' T T T i i i i i i

875
300
575
391

1.66

-

1.65
1.65

-

Truck d r i v e r s , h s a v y ( o v e r U to n s ,
t r a i l e r ty p e ) • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
M a n u fac tu rin g • • • • • • • ..........• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
N onm anufacturing
PliVil4e nf4l444ml 4 ........................
L
..

678
13b
5bb
U98

1.6b
1.52
1.68
1.68

_
n a ______________ _ _ _____

U73
297
176

t r u c k e r s , power ( o t h e r th an f o r k - l i f t ) • • • • • •
M a n u fa c tu rin g • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

135
128
—

I/
V

8
8
•

12

69

27
13
lb

12b
100
2b

12

12

79
60
19

103
91
12

39
19
20

87
33
5b

25
22
3

156
15
lbl

15b
36
118

58
19
39

27
21
6

12

38
35

39
39

12

12

9
9

316
16

-

-

-

-

3

11

3

11

-

6
.
5

21
15
5

79
79

7
7

b
b

1
1

b
b

_
-

2
.
2

9

-

j

_

_

_

_

_

1.95

2.00

over

12b
12b

1
1

7
7

bb
bb

bb
bb

-

-

-

.

152
125
27

83
83

5

-

5

.
-

-

2
.

1
1

2b
2b

2

-

•
•

_

-

_

-

12
12
-

-

-

-

_

-

•

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

15

2
2
-

2

-

•

2

-

-

15

•

19
18

9

-

-

18

-

16

5

16

3
2

11

7

.

-

-

7
7

70

68

10
3

-

2

7

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

_

39
19
20

.

30
2T~

25

6

16

25

23
23

5
2
3

57
5b

72
72

?6
96

1?
13

13
13

b
b

13
13

6
6

-

-

12
12

J

80
70
10

11
1

7
7

7
7

2?
23

-

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

12
-

bo
-

?9
9" —
30

9
r
x

- ? r

12
11

-

6
9
3 - 5“
3
3
11
10

b
b

1

2

6

-

6
6

15

-

-

2

b3
33
10

b
3
1

3
3
12
9

21
“ T93
15
15

16
9

28

18

1

16

13

7
13
5“ ~ i r
2

9
2

5b
38

13
6

6
6

W

~

17
13

m

8
b
b

3b
16
18

25
12
13

bl
lb
27

95
22
73

6?
37
32

32
21
xx

20
20

32
3X
x

3b
13
21

30
27
3

5
b
1

9
8
1

7
b
3

9
6
3

6

9
7
2

lb
lb
-

21
1
20
1

3bl
13
328
31b

7b
13
61
5

68
15
53
n

U8
32

83
78
5
3

3?
15
2b
2b

3

199

.
-

.

28

27

28

3
3

17
17

15

110
95
15

_
.
-

b6
b6

-

5
2
3

13
1
12

61
52
9

328
12
316
3*6

2
2

28
28

11
10
x

37
37

33
27
6

15?
b5
lib

12
12

12
12

-

-

2?

6
6
_

15
“ ir

-

2
-

6 ___ fi_

27

8

-

-

_

16

16

_

-

6

6

-

-

-

_

67
19
b8

2

.

.

-

_

b6
b6

17
16

-

.

b5
16
29

16

-

-

18
9
9

2

2

1.90

10
10

2

13
13

9

2.00

6
6

69

lb
10

Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand", as reported in previous study.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




151
lb6
3

12b
86
38
2

1.76
1.76

.................... ..

_

-

162
b9
113
112

1.68
1.70
1.6b

N onm anufacturing

277
277

•

8b
60
2b

12
12
-

s

1.85

Ij

-

^

IP
10

U6?
50
bl3
176

1

_

1.23
1.27
1.11

58
56
2

231
5b
177
122

b

l.li?
1.50
1.1*3

377
275
102

bo
32
8

275
lb2
133
70

1

197
103
9b

...................................

78

11 — 4 b
5
6
1

1265
1192
73
1

23
15
8

1.69
1.71
1.69

b
2
2

1.80

287
25b
33

12
5
7
1

_

32
27
5

1.75

6b3
372
271

11
1
12
2

-

27
21
6

1.70

53
15
38

11
8
3

-2 b -

1.65

285
bo
2b5
2

1

9

1.60

b3
28
15

1
10
10

Truck d r i v e r s , l i g h t (under 1& t o n s ) • • • • • • • •
M a n u f a c t u r in g ................ • • • • • • ...................
N onm anufacturing ....................................... ..

T r u c k e r s , power ( f o r k - l i f t )

1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95

10?
51
58
2

1.62
1.62

S h lp p in g -a n d -r s o e iv in g c l e r k s .............................
M aim faAtiivfng m i t t t t t t i t m t n i i t i t i i m
K m a a m i f jn g
»t .

9

1

_

1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65

and

1.57
1.5b
1.59

P a c k e r s , c l a s s B (men) • • • • • • • • • • • • ....................
M a n u fa c tu rin g • • • • • • • • • • • • • ..................

1.00 1.05

i.15

2

|
j

U.662
2,717
l,9b5

1.05

8.95

2

f£)

L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d lin g 2/ • • • • • • • • • • . • • «
M a n u fa c tu rin g • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
N onm anufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
PkiKl4a n H U M a s 4 i m i r r r i r i i i i i r i i r r
1

1.00

L10

under

.80

1

$

-

1?

9

5

9
9

lb

“

-

_

10
10

.

9

-

2

3

6
18
*

2

-

I*

.

.

-

8

-

-

25
25

b
-

22
22

-

b

-

_

2

_

-

-

.
•

.
-

8
8

199
18b

6
-

9
9

6
8

56
56

2?
29

bo
bo

lb
lb

68

-

-

1

2

I

68
_

„

-

lb
lb

-

.

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

1

2
-

.
-

?
2
6

6

b2

b2
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mo., October 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8

B : Characteristic Industry Occupations
S n d u ib u to L

Table B-35:

1/

N U M BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVIN G STRAIGHT-TIM E H O U R LY EA RN IN G S OF—
Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
Workers

Occupation 2/

2/

Assemblers, class B ............ ...........

Janitors, porters, and cleaners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Laborers, material handling
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Machine-tool operators, production,

y

169
240
33
. . 51 .
. .
. . 42 .
. .

. . . .
. . . .

$
1.68
1.46
1.83
. 1.33 .
. . . .
1.40 .
. . . . .

1.25

1.30

E3T

1.30

$
1

1.35

t—

1.40

. . .
. . .

1
. .
. . . .

0

4
.4 .
.

7
- !
1 !
2

29
39
66

2.10
1.80
1.67

-

49
10
8

36
2
1
"I1

!

_

_

1.62

$
1.55

$
1.60

1.55

1.60

1.65

26
13
-

n
50

!

5
33
5

6

32
36
-

$
1.70

$
1.75

1.70

2
6
-

1.65

$
1.85

s
1.90

$
1.95

!S2.00

1.75

1.80

1.35

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

31
6

62
3
-

11
-

5
-

4

-

-

- !

-

3

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

_

1

8

4

30

15

_

2

3

1

“ |
10

4
6

j

-

i

2

-

!

7

1

8

$
1.30

9

7

l

-

s

-

1
i

"
-

-

1.50

1.45 I 1.50

!
. 23. .
.
. .7 .
.

[ -----

:S

$
1.45

$
1.35 1.40

. . . . 58. . . . . . 1.84. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
. . . .

62
Tool-and-die makers (other than
tool-and-die jobbing shops) ..............
Welders, hand, class A .....................
Welders, hand, class B .....................

$
1.20
and

-

i

1

.

1

I

9

prepared b y the B u r e a u of the Budget;
2 / Data limited to m e n workers;
3/

y

(nonelectrical)

industry

2 !
16
30

12 1
“ |

_
_

as

|

! 2.20

2.25

j

-

j

-

1

-

j

-

-

j

_

-

-

_ |

_

6 |
-

14
-

_

1

1

-

!

_

-

2
6

2
-

- |

-

:

_

i

I

_

_ !
- j

5
-

i
j

------1

( G r o u p 35) a s d e f i n e d i n t h e S t a n d a r d

-

-

i

establishments manufa c t u r i n g m a c h i ne-tool accessories with 8 or m ore workers w ere also included.
all or a m a j ority of workers in e a c h occupation studied were paid on a time basis.

Exclu d e s p r e m i u m p a y for overtime a nd n ight work.
T i t l e c h a n g e o n l y , f r o m " S t o c k h a n d l e r s a n d t r u c k e r s , hand",

2.20

_

29

i

_

! _____I
_
The study covered establishments employing more than 2 0 workers in the m a c hinery

2.10 12.15

$

i

j

1/

|
$
*2.05 |*2.10 ! 2.15

------ i_

Industrial Classification Manual

_

____i

__

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

(1945 edition)

D ata relate to a N o v ember 1952 pa y r o l l period.

r e p orted in previous study*

Table B-7211:

Po<Ate>i J*<uutd/Ue&

y

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and sex

Number
of
Workers

Average $
s
hourly
0.60
0.65
saroings and
under
2/
.70
_ .65_

s
0.70

Washers, machine 2/ ••••••••••••••••*•••••••••

$
0.75 0.80

$
0.99
.94
1.38
1.03

65
586
87
83
292
242
50
98

.87
.72
.76
.79
.77
.76
.82
.72

—
_

_

_
_

_

_

_

Women
Clerks, retail receiving 2 / .................
Finishers, flatwork, machine 2 / ..... ....... .
Identifiers % / ............. *................
Markers 2 / ..........................
Pressers, machine, shirts: Total ...........
T i m e .........
Incentive ....
Wrappers, bundle 2 / ..........................

_
_
1

_
2

-

_

i
3
_
-

!

“

i

- ;
5
572
U
_
71
_
6
- i
1
95

$
1.05

1.05

1.10

2
3

17

9
73
264
242
22
2

2
8
8
—

1

$
1.15
-

1.20
-

$
1.25
-

%
1.30
-

1.25

1.30

1.35

$

1.20

1

43

4

4

2

.

47

j

1
$
J 1.35

s

$
1.45
-

I
s
1.50
! _

i
s
1.55
:_

1
$
11.60
i_

1 1.40 - 1 45 , 1 50
—
,

^1 55

i ftn

i A;
*

1
1

i
i
16 i

2
2

|

1.40
-

4
"

3 |

"

“ ;
- 1

“
-

“ ;
- ■

-

1 |

"

,

"

2

—

“

-

* 1

“

“ !

“

j

1
_ '

!

!

_ '

-

2
|

2

“
10

q
s

4

!
_ i

-

16
—

|

“
“

3

4

O

4
3
i

7
|

s
1.10
1.15

4

i

18

!
j

1.00

$
1.00
“

j

1
!
4

$
0.95

j “
*
_* 9 0 _
.95

|
12
60
15
56

$
|0.90

s
0.85

>80 - a g &

_.?5

Men
Clerks, retail receiving 2 / •••••••*•••••••••.
Extractor operators 2 / •••••••••••••••••••••••

$

-

2
• !

•

_,
" i

_

-

-

_ 1

_ ;
_ :

-

_
_
-

_
!

-

_
‘

|

-

-

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME1W E E K L Y EARNINGS OFOccupation

Number
of

Workers

Average $
weekly
earnings 4Znl°
y

Routemen, retail (driver salesmen) 2 / --------

1/

The

283

§3.28

52.50
8

s
$
s
$
$
s
$
S
S
1
;
$
^
j
s
1
$
60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 | 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00! '90.00 | 95.00 1 0 0 . 00 H1 0 .0 0 1 2 0 . 0 0 ! 1 3 0 . ooj 1 4 0 .0 0
S
“ ! “
*
"
- i and
57.50 60.00 i62.50 65.00 67.50 7 0 .0 0 72.50 75.00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 90.00 ! 95.00!
100.00 110.00120.00 130.00 140.00 over

s
$
$
$
50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50

14

j

55.00
9 j

2

5 ,

12

9

25

s t u d y c o v e r e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g m o r e t h a n 2 0 w o r k e r s i n the p o w e r l a u n d r i e s i n d u s t r y (Gr o u p 7 2 1 1 )

the B ureau of the Budget.
D a t a r e l a t e to a J u n e 1 9 5 2 p a y r o l l p e r i o d .
2 / E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d n i g h t wo r k .
Insufficient d ata to p e rmit presentation of separate averages b y method of wage payment;

2/
y
y

|

S t r a i ght-time earnings (includes commis s i o n earnings).
Routemen normally work a 6 -day workweek.




u

20

8

21

i

23 |

17 |
2 5

a s d e f i n e d i n the S t a n d a r d

1

______ L

7
1 9

i

23

6

8

8

______L

Industrial Classification Manual

(1949 edition)

prepared

by

all o r a ma j o r i t y of workers were paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey,

Kansas City,

Mo.,

October 1952

U.S. D E P A RTMENT O F LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

_

_

9

C! Union Wage Scales
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straigh t-tim e hours per week agreed upon through c o lle ctiv e bargaining
between employers and trade-unions* Rates and hours are those in e f fe c t on dates indicated. Addition­
a l information i s available in reports issued separately fo r these individual industries or trad es.)

Table C-15:

B

t t ild

iH

f

Table 0 -2 0 5 1

G o H itA u a t ia H

January 2 , 1953

B r ic k la y e r s ........... —...................................................
C a rp en ters.....................................................................
E le ctricia n s .............................. .................................
P ainters .........................................................................
P lastere rs .....................................................................
Plumbers .........................................................................
Building laborers ......................................................

Table C-205:

Hours
per
week

O
*3 .5 0 0 A
2.550 A
O
2.800 A
O
O
2.A50 A
O
3.175 A
2.900 A
O
1.880 A
O

S o A e /tie d

Ju ly 1 , 1952
C la s s if ic a tio n
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Foremen ......................... .............. ........
Overmen, draw ers, m ixers, spongers ............
Bench hands ................................................................
A u xiliary fo re m e n ...................................................
Foremen (women) ......................................................
Wrappers, ingredlentm en, ic in g makers,
head c h e c k e r s ..........................................
Men help ers ................................................................
Women h elp ers .........................................
Crackers and co o k ies:
Agreement A:
Head machlnemen .................................
Overmen, m i x e r s ................................................
M ixers' help ers ................................................
Rollermen, wrapping-machine
o p erators .........................................................
Cracker packers ................................................
Sweet-work wrappers and bundlers
(women) ..............................................................
Cooky packers .....................................................




Table c-205 :

BaAedded -G ofU intied

Ju ly 1 . 1952
Rate
per
hour

C la ssific a tio n

B o A e /U e d

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

*.0
205
180
.8
170
.8
1A0
.8
135
.8
135
.6
120
.5
110
.6

A
0
A
0
A
0
A
0

150
.0
1A0
.0
130
.0

A
O
A
O
A
O

120
.A
110
.0

A
O
A
O

110
.0
100
.6

A
O
A
O

A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O

C la s s if ic a tio n
Crackers and cookies: - Continued
Agreement B:
Bake shop (sp on ge):
Machlnemen, head sponge mixers . . . .
Overmen...........................................................
Sponge m ixers .............................................
M ixers' help ers • • • • • • .................... ..
Dough f e e d e r s .............................................
T a lly cle rk s ................................................
Sack cle a n e rs, m iscellaneous
f lo o r w o rk e rs..............................
Bake shop (sw e e t):
Machlnemen, head mixers
Overmen ...........................................................
M ixers' help ers .........................................
Dough feeders ..............................................
M iscellaneous workers ...........................
Icing department:
Machlnemen, cooks .....................................
Icin g m i x e r s ................................................
Packing department:
Sponge packing:
P a c k e r s ...................................................
Caddy workers .......................................
Sweet packing:
Floormen tru ck ers ..............................
Graham p a c k e r s .............. ......................
Regular packers, hand
ca rto n formers ...........................
T a lly c le r k s , ce llo -b a g
o p e ra to rs, supply g i r l s ,
s c a le r s , machine o perators
(fem ale) .............................................
Caddy s t i t c h e r s , general
workers, repackers .......................
Label room:
Machlnemen .............................................
A ssista n t machlnemen •••••••..••
Truckmen, supply men .......................
S ca le rs .......................................••••••
B u n d le rs .................................. ...............

Rate
per
_ hour

*1 .5 8 5
1 .5 5 5
1 .5 3 5
1.A15
1 .3 5 5
1.3A5

Hours
per
week

A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
AO

1.2A5

A
O

1 .5 8 5
1 .5 5 5
1.A15
1 .3 5 5
1.2A5

A
O
AO
A
O
A
O
A
O

1 .5 1 5
1.A65

A
O
A
O

C la ssific a tio n
Crackers and cookies: - Continued
Agreement B: - Continued
Packing department: - Continued
Label room: - Continued
Closing-machine operators,
machine operators and
feeders ................. ...........................
Stack caddies, general workers
(c&sers, hand wrappers) ...........
Shipping department:
Carloaders, order f i l l e r s ,
packers, checkers, stockmen .........
Receiving and warehouse:
Requisition clerk s, paper
c u tte rs, car unloaders ....................

Table C-27>

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

*1.135

A
O

1.015

A
O

1.365

A
O

1.365

A
O

Rate
per

Hour 8
per

P d U ftU u ^

________ Ju ly 1. 1952
1.1 8 5
1 .1 6 5

A
O
A
O

1 .3 5 5
1 .1 8 5

A
O
A
O

1 .1 6 5

A
O

1 .1 3 5

A
O

1 .0 1 5

A
O

1 .5 6 5
1 .5 1 5
1 .3 5 5
1 .3 1 5
1 .1 5 5

A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O

C la ssific a tio n

. hgar , JffSR..
Book and job shops:
Bindery women ..............................
Bookbinders ..................................
Compositors, hand ......................
Electrotypers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Machine operators ......................
Machine tenders (m achinists)
Mailers ...........................................
Photoengravers
Press a ssistan ts and feeders:
Cylinder ..................................
Platen ......................................
R o ta r y ......................................

*1.A00
2.500
2.600
2.A53
2.600
2.600
2.227
2.613

37*
37*
37! r
3737*
37*
37*

2.020
1.6A0
2.060

37*
37*
37*

37 *

Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas C ity, Mo., October 1952
U.S. D RTM T OF LABO
EPA EN
R
Bureau o f Labor S t a tis tic s

10

Table C-27:

P ^U

h

IU

u^

-C

o h

IIH U B

Ju ly 1, 1952
C la ssifica tio n

Table C-£U

cI

Hours
per
week

h a n d - d a y w o r k .....

Machine tenders (machinists) d a y w o r k ............. .............. .
Machine tenders (machinists) n i g h t w o r k .................. ........
M a i l e r s - d a y w o r k ...................
M a i l e r s - n i g h t w o r k ............... .
P h o t o e n g r a v e r s - d a y w o r k ...... ...
P h o t o e n g r a v e r s - n i g h t w o r k ...... .
P r e s s m e n , w e b p r e s s e s - d a y w o r k .,
Pressmen, web presses - night wor k
P r e s s m e n - i n - c h a r g e - d a y w o r k .....
P r e s s m e n - i n - c h a r g e - n i g h t w o r k ...
S t e r e o t y p e r s - d a y w o r k .............
S t e r e o t y p e r s - n i g h t w o r k .........




M o t& U b U c A

Ju ly 1. 1952

C la ssifica tio n

tJmirs
per
week

$1,605
1.625
1.6a5
1.660

-

C la ssific a tio n
Furniture

............................... .

H e l p e r s ............... .................
Ge n e r a l - Freight:
L o c a l p i c k - u p a n d d e l i v e r y ......... ..
Helpers

Table C -42: M o to b fr U ic A

S b t lu e b d

Grocery:
Wholesale

C la ssifica tio n
$ 2,600

37$

2.680

37*

2 . 1-20
2.£30

37$
37$

2.6UO

37}
37}
37$

2.670
2.600

2.U93

2 . 6U0

2.1:93

2.61:0

37}
37}
37}
37$

2.1:93

37$

2.61:0
2.227

37}
37$
37$
37$
37}
37}
37}
37}
37}
37}
37$

2.360

2.866

3.027
2.607
2.753
2.71:0
2.887
2.657

2.800

ttate
per
hour

.............................. .

T r a n s f e r ..................................
H e l p e r s ............ ............ .

Ju ly 1, 1952

Newspapers:
Compositors,

Rate
per
hour

1-man cars and busses:
F ir s t a months ............... .....................................
5 to 8 months . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9 to 12 months ................................
After 1 year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pressmen:

C o m p o s i t o r s , h a n d - n i g h t w o r k ....
M a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s - d a y w o r k ..... .
M a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s - n i g h t w o r k ...,

Table C-42;

October 1 , 1952

Rate
per
hour

Book and job shops: - Continued
Cylinder presses:
1 cylinder with Upham attachment
(when Upham attachment i s in
operation); 1 Double Ender or 2
cylind ers: 1 o ffs e t 17 x 22
in . or over; 1 cylinder and 1
hand-fed platen; 1 cylinder and
1 automatic platen; 1 automatic
29 to h2 i n . ; 1 "C" K elly or 1
Miehle ”29”; 1 new M ille r Sim­
plex; 1 new No. 1 Kelly, without
assista n ce, (under a foreman) . . .
1 2-co lo r cylinder (under a
foreman) ................................................
Platen presses (hand-fed):
1, 2, or 3 p r e s s e s ........... .....................
h or 5 presses .........................................
Rotary presses:
1 s in g le -r o ll (under a foreman) . . .
1 double-roll (under a foreman) . . .
Stereotypers .........................................................

JiaccU Vsi& &U
h

Hours
per
week

per
hour

Hours
per
week

$ 1,720

Uo

bate

1.660

U0

1.615
1.565
1.615
1.565

a5

U5
U5
U5

1.715
1.785

ao

1.260

ao

d r i v e r s ............................
H e l p e r s ................................

1.130

I c e a n d f u e l - R a i l r o a d c a r - i c i n g ......
H e l p e r s ....................................

1.1U0
1 .0 9 0

ao
ao
ao
ao

................................ .

C h a i n s t o r e .......... • • • • ...........
H i d e .......................................... .

as

Ice:

Bakery - B isc u it:
Agreement A ...................................................
Agreement B ........... ..
Building - M aterial:
Heavy excavating, heavy hauling
and "A” frame truck, wreck truck
and fork truck .................................................
T ransit Mix:
Under 5 yds.......................................................
5 yds. and o v e r .................................. ..
D istributor t r u c k .............................................,
D p truck:
um
Under 10 yds.
10 yds. and o v e r .................................. ..
Flat-bed and pick-up ................................ ..
Semi truck and s te e l truck ..................... ..
Lumber ........... .............. •••••••••.............. ..
Department store .......................................................
Helpers .....................................................
Flour - M illing:
Agreement A ................. .................................
Helpers .............................................................
Agreement B ................. .........................................
Helpers .................................. ...........................
Agreement C ......... ................................................
Agreement D ...........................................................
Agreement E ......... .................................................

$1.1:20
i.a8o

a7
a7

2.015

ao

1.915
2.015
1.915

1.765
1.715

ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao

l.a90
l.aao
i.a9o
l.aao
i.5ao

ao
ao
ao
ao
ao

1.815

1.890
1.815
1.890

1.1,85

1.620
i.a 9 o

ao

ao

W h o l e s a l e a n d retail:
Special delivery,

cube

and supply

1 .0 8 0

Ice cream:

1.U90
1.750

ao
ao
ao
ao

1.830
1.675

ao
ao

1.1*75
1.525

ao
ao

1.725
1.675
1.575

ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao
ao

................................

1.510

S p e c i a l d e l i v e r y ........................
T r a n s p o r t t r u c k . • • • • • . ................
L i q u o r - C i t y d e l i v e r y .............. ... ..

1.UU0

Tank truck

Meat:
P a c k i n g h o u s e ...... . . . . • • ...........
W h o l e s a l e ............. ................. ..
Milk:
W a r e h o u s e a n d s u p p l y ...................
T a n k t r u c k ........ ...................... ,
Moving:
T r a c t o r ............ ............. .........
H e l p e r s • • • • • • . • • • ............... .
P a p e r h o u s e ..................................
P r o d u c e .............. ................. .......
R a i l w a y e x p r e s s ........................... .

1.260

R u g ....................... .....................

1.779
1.720

S o f t d r i n k - S e m i t r a i l e r ........ .

1 .3 0 0

11

D: Supplementary Wage Practices
j b i ^ e A & * U * a l P ' U U M d i O M i 1/

Table D-l:

P e r c e n t of t o t a l p l a n t e m p l o y m e n t -

(a)
By establishment policy in All manufacturing
Machinery
ind ustries 2/
ind ustries
2d s h ift
3d or other
2d s h ift
3d or other
work
s h ift work
work
s h ift work

a im v U x ex till U JL
JLl
J.H

100.0

A ll workers
Workers in establishments having provisions
fo r la t e s h ifts •••••••••............. •••••............ ..
With s h i f t d iffe r e n tia l ............. ••••••.................. ..
Uniform cents (per hour) •••••••••••••••••••
3 or i cents ••••••••............. ..
t
5 cents .............................................. ....................
6 cents •••••......... ..
6 .3 cents ................... ...........................................
7 c e n t s .............................................. .................. ..
7 .5 , 8, or 9 cents ............................................
10 cents ••••••...........
Over 10 cents ••••................... ...................... ..
Uniform percentage ...............•••••»••..................
5 percent ............................................................
7 .5 percent ...........................................................
10 percent •••••••..............................................
F u ll days'pay fo r reduced hours .......................
O th e r......... •••••.................... .......................... ..
With no s h ift d iffe re n tia l .................................. .
Workers in establishments having no provisions
fo r la te s h ifts •••••••••...................................... ..

-----------------------------------------nn-------------------Actually working on extra s h ifts in All manufacturing
Machinery
ind ustries
ind ustries £/
3d or other
3d or other
2d s h ift
2d s h ift
s h ift
s h ift

100.0

100.0

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

76.2
75.1
51.0
U.o
5.8

85.5
82.U
56.U
5 .3
16.0
11.0
.9
12.0
6.U
3.9
.9
23.9
15.9
U.6
3.1i

100.0
99.3
99.3
61.2
.
lU.2
5.7

99.3
99.3
61.2
8.U
5.7

11.6
10.9
7.9
.7
1.5
2.2
.U
.8
1.9
•
U
2 .3
.9
1.2
.2

3.2
3.2
3.1
(3/)

7.0
7.0
U.2
1.0
-

0 .6
.6
-.
-

-

2.1
3.1

13.1
12.7
6.8
6 .6
21.5
19.0
2.5
(3/)
2.6
1.1

1U.5

-

•
k f 25.8
15.5
< 29.2
29.2
8.9

23.8

Q/)

5 .8
V 9.1
32.2
- ■
-

8.9
29.2

•

-

.7

.7

7k

.3
l.U
.2
.8
.1
.1

~
-

k / 3.2
-

-

-

1.7
1.7
1.1

.7
.7

-

-

-

_

-

-

XXX

XXX

XXX

-

XXX

•

.6

f

1
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l d a t a a re p r e s e n t e d i n t e r m s of (a) e s t a b l i s h m e n t p o l i c y a i d (b) w o r k e r s a c t u a l l y e m p l o y e d on l a t e s h i f t s a t t h e t i m e o f t h e s u r v e y .
A n e s t a b l i s h m e n t w a s c o n s i d e r e d as h a v i n g a p o l i c y i f i t m e t a n y of t h e f o l l o w i n g c o n d i t i o n s :
(1) o p e r a t e d l a t e s h i f t s a t t h e t i m e o f t h e s u r v e y , (2) h a d u n i o n c o n t r a c t p r o v i s i o n s c o v e r i n g l a t e s h i fts, or (3) h a d o p e r a t e d l a t e s h i f t s w i t h i n 6 m o n t h s p r i o r t o t h e s u r vey.
Includes d a t a for machinery industries also shown separately.
3y
L e s s t h a n 0.0*> p e r c e n t

2/
k/

All

at

7.5

c ents.

Table D-2:

S c h ed u l e d 'I V e e M if d to u /U

P e r c e n t of o f f i c e w o r k e r s 3 /

employed

in -

Percent

of p l a n t w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d i n -

W e e k l y hours
All

Manufacturing

industries 2 /

All workers

................. • • • * • • • • • • • • ....... .......... .

37$

Under
h o u r s .......................................... .
h o u r s • • • • • ..... ............................... .........
Over
and under
hours ••••«••.•.••••••••••••••••

37i

37^

UO

UO

h o u r s ......... ............... • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . ....... .
Over
a n d u n d e r 1 1 h o u r s ............................... .
**

UO

U: hours

........................ • • • • ...................... .

U5

h o u r s • • • • • • • • ..... ................... • • • • • ....... .
O v e r kS a n d u n d e r
h o u r s • • • • • • • • • • ......... •••••••••

U8

18 h o u r s ............ ..................................
*
O v e r U8 h o u r s ......................... ......... ...........
1

f

Data relate

Includes
separately.




3/
*

Public

100.0

utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.0

a
.
-

1.6

U.6
.
3
.
3

91.2
-

3.0
.U

1.3
2.1

3.U

“

•

*

-

100.0

1C0.0

1.6

1.7
89.8
.
3
3.8

U.1
U.9
81.3

utilities *

1.7

1.3

Public

Manufacturing

industries

2.0

1.6
.

All

.

3.1
2.9

.
7

a
.
-

a
.

66.6

57.3
13.1

81.2

3.9
3.8
8.5
1.5
9.5
2.2

1.3
.
9
U.2

-

16.U

.

-

3.9
2.5

9.6
3.6

to w o m e n wo r k e r s *

d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e t rade;

r e t a i l trade;

finance,

insurance,

a n d r e a l est a t e ;

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e trade; r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n
Tra n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, and other p u b l i c utilities.

a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s
to t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s
Occupational Wage

shown

shown separately.
Survey,

K a n s a s C i ty,
U.S.

Mo.,

O c t o b e r 1952.

D E P A R T M E N T OF LAB C R

Bureau of L a b o r Statistics

12

Table D-3 *

P a id J to lid o fi

Percen t o f o ff ic e workers employed in Number o f paid holidays

A ll
in d u strie s

1f

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

Percent o f p lan t workers employed in A ll
in d u stries 2 /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

A ll workers ........................................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Workers in establishm ents providing paid
holidays ..........................................................................................

99.6

100.0

9 8 .8

91.5

100.0

79.5

.8

1.5
77.5
12.3
8.7
-

5 -9
62.5
12.6

3.1
67.9
11.7

U8.7

9-3
3.3

10.0

17.3

2.5

.5

-

3-9

1.2

8.5

“

20.5

Under 6 days ...............................................................................
6 days .............................................................................................
7 days ............................................. ..............................................
8 days ............................................................................................
Over 8 days .................................................................................

66.3
17.3
10.3
U.9

Workers in establishm ents providing no paid
holidays ..........................................................................................

1/

.k
2k .1
61.7

.k

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r -wholesale t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ;

finance,

insurance,

and real estate;

a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e

separately.
2/
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Table J> < t

P a id

industry divisions

industry divisions

_
2^.U

shown

shown separately.

V o C o iU u U t y o A m a l P a Ou LU m A )

Percent of office workers

e m p l o y e d in

-

Percent of plant workers employed

in

-

Vacation policy
All

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

99.6

99.6

1 0 0 .0

...............................

1 0 0 .0

1 w e e k ...............................................
2 w e e k s ..............................................

39-9
58.9
1.2

1 0 0 .0
67.9

1 0 0 .0

93.8

32. 1

k6 . 3

B k.2

89.9
83.7

63.8

6 .2

3 2 .6

industries l/

All workers

.................................................

All
industries 2 /

A f t e r 1 year of service
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g p a i d
v a c a t i o n s .................................................
Length-of-time payment

O t h e r .................................................
P e r c e n t a g e 3 / o r f l a t - s u m p a y m e n t ..................

53.7
-

-

-

-

W orkers in e s t ablishments p r o v i d i n g n o pa i d
v a c a t i o n s .................................................

-

-

9.5
.1
5.8

-

-

.h

.k

k

96.

-

-

9.7

3.6

-

A f t e r 2 years of service
W orkers in establishments p r o v i d i n g pa i d
v a c a t i o n s .................................................
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t ...............................
1 w e e k ...............................................
2 w e e k s ..............................................
O t h e r .................................................
P e r c e n t a g e j / o r f l a t - s u m p a y m e n t .................

100.0

100.0

100.0

99-8

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
18.6

100.0

93.8
U9 .6

9 6 .1
+

80.3
1.1

7^.0

3 .6




See

-

-

6.0

10.1

-

-

•

.2

8 3 .8

footnotes at e n d of table.
Transportation

-

1U.3

Workers in establishments providing no paid
v a c a t i o n s ...............................................

*

11.6

8 9 .9
5 5 .9
1 7 .9
1 6 .1

1.9

2 6 .0
-

Occupational Wage Survey,

(excluding railroads),

NOTE:

communication,

3 2 .6

Kansas City,

"

Mo.,

5 1 .6
-

■

October 1952

and other public utilities.

Estimates are provided separately, according to employer practice in computing
vacation payments (length-of-time, percentage, or flat sum); percentage and
flat-sum payments were converted to equivalent time periods in earlier studies.

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

13

Table D-^s

P aid VacaticuU tyobm al PaxwIU&hA)-Gon/Unumd
Percent of office workers employed in -

Vacation policy

A l l w o r k e r s ............................ * ........ .

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

100.0
9.3
90.7
-

89.9
29.6

96. U
2U.3
72.1
3.6

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100,0
6.U
92.1
1.5
-

100,0
7.5
92.5
-

All
industries 1/

Percent of plant workers employed in All
industries 2/

After 3 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
v a c a t i o n s ....... ................................ .
Length-of-time payment ................. * .........
1 w e e k ......................................... *
2 w e e k s ........................... ..............
Other ........................................... *
percentage 3 / or flat-sum p a y m e n t ....... .
Workers in establishments providing no paid
v a c a t i o n s .......................... .................

-

-

-

93.8
2U.7
63.6
5.5
6.0

-

-

.2

51.3
9.0
10.1

-

-

After 5 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
v a c a t i o n s ......... *...... ..........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

Length-of-time payment •••••••••••••••••••••«••••
1 w e e k .......... •....... ......................*

100.0
2.U
91.6

3 w e e k s ...... ...................................
O t h e r ...... ............ ••••••••...............
Percentage 2 / °** flat-sum p ayment *.....*....... *

2.9
3.1
-

100.0
2.1
95.8
2.1
•

100.0
2.6
9U.1
-

93.8
3.U
88.7
1.1
.6
6.0

89.9
1.3
88.3
.3
10.1

96.U
6.0
86.5
-

Workers in establishments providing no paid
v a c a t i o n s .......................... .................

-

-

3.3
-

-

-

.2

-

3.9
3.6

-

Aft e r 10 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
v a c a t i o n s ........ .............................. ..,*

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

Length-of-time payment ........ .................. *
1 w eek ..................................... .
2 weeks «.................*................. .
3 weeks
Other .......................................... *
Percentage 2 / or flat-sum payment •••••••*•••••••

100.0
2.U
88.8
U.7
U.l
-

100.0
2.1
95.2
2.7
•

100.0
2.6
9U.1
-

93.8
3.U
83. U
1.5
5.5
6.0

89.9
1.3
88.3
.3
10.1

96.24
6.0
86.5
-

Workers in establishments providing no paid
v a c a t i o n s ............. .............. ............... *

-

-

3.3
-

-

-

.2

-

3.9
3.6

-

After 15 years of service
W o rkers in establishments providing paid
vacations •••••••••••••......•••••••••..... •••••••
Length-of-time p a y m e n t ...........................
1 w e e k ................................. •••••••••
2 weeks ..............................*..........
3 w eeks ..............................•••••......
Over 3 w e e k s ......... ............. .............
Percentage 2 / or flat-sum payment ..•••.....•••••
Workers in establishments providing no paid
vacations * ......... *...... .............. ......... .

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

100.0
2.U
147.0
U8.0
2.6

100.0
2.1
U6.0
51.9
_

100.0
2.6
18.0
79.U
-

89.9
1.3
38.0
50.6
•

96.U
6.0
32.2
58.2
.

10.1

3.6

-

-

-

93.8
3.U
UU.3
la.i
5.0
6.0

•

“

.2

See footnotes’at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*




•

•

Table

d

4:

-

P aid Vaocdiani (fyosutud PAaoidtand)-C ontinued
Percent of plant workers employed in -

Percent of office workers employed in Vacation policy

All workers ............. .............. ............... .

All
industries 1/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities •
»

1C0.0

100.0

100.0

100,0

99.8

100.0

100.0

100.0
2.6

93.8
3.1*
1
*0.2
1*8.3
1.9

89.9
1.3
33.3
' 52.1
3.2

96.1*

10.1

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

1C0.0

1CO.O

100.0

100*0

100,0

100,0
2.1)

100,0
2,1
1
*2.6

All
industries 2/

'

After 20 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
vacations ....................... ............. ...... .
Length-of-time payment ........................... .
1 w e e k ............................ ............. .
2 weeks ............. ................ .
3 weeks .................................. .
Over 3 weeks ....................................
Percentage
or flat-sum payment ................
Workers in establishments providing no paid
vacations .................. ....... ................ .

UU.7
U9.9
3.0
-

52.7
2.1*

13.1*
81*.0
-

-

6.0

-

-

-

-

2
.

6,0
21.5
68.9
3.6

-

-

After 25 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
v a c a t i o n s .......................................... .
Length-of-time payment .............................
1 w e e k ..................... .....................
2 w e e k s ........................... ..............
3 weeks ......... ........ .......................
Over 3 w e e k s ....................................
Percentage 3/ or flat-cum payment
......
Workers in establishments providing no paid
v a c a t i o n s ................. ........ .................

1C0.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

100,0
2.1*
1
*0.6

100.0
2.1
1
*2.6

100.0
2.6

93.8

52.7
2.1*
-

89.9
1.3
33.3
52.1
3.2

96.1*.
6.0

l*l*.l
12.9
-

"■3.1i
1
*0.1
1*2.5
7.6

6.0

10.1

"

13.1*
71.5
12.5
-

-

.
2

21.5

58.6
10.3
3.6

“

•

1/
Includes data for wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown
separately.
2f
Includes data for wholesale trade; retail trade; real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
y
Percent of annual earnings.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Table D-5:

OudUAOHCe 04id PettMOU Pid4ti

Percent of office workers employed in Type of plan

All w o r k e r s ................ ................ ...........
Workers in establishments having insurance
or pension plans 3 ................................ .
Insurance plans 3/ ..................... ...........
Life .............................................
Accidental death and dismemberment ...........
Sickness and a c c i d e n t ..................... .
Hospitalization .................................
Surgical ................................ ........
M e d i c a l .........................................
Pension or retirement plan ........................
Workers in establishments having no insurance
or pension plans ....................................
Information not a v a i l a b l e ........................ .

f

All
industries 1/

Percent of plant workers employed in Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.3
97.3
97.3
87.0
80.3
55.1*
5U.9
1*5.0
81*.0

83.7
83.1
76.1*
1*5.3
59.6
58.7
56.8
1*5.0
ll.*
**l

93.2
92.1
81*. 8
51.5
71.8
73.0
72.2
51*. 7
60.7

9*0
i.
9U.0

2.7

11.1*

6.8

1*.9

~

6.0
“

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

1C0.0

100.0

89.1*
89.0
81*. 1
*
1*8.6
50.1
61*.9
61.0
1*9.7
61*.9

91*. 2
92.9
89.3
62.3
70.2
78.7
77.8
62.6
67.8

9.2
1.1*

5.8

All
industries 2/

9l*.0

78.9
78.0
56.1
50.5
1*3.1
68.9

1/ Includes data for wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown
separately,
2/ Includes data for wholesale trade; retail trade; real estate, and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately,
3/ Unduplicsted total.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t i M t ^ s
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mo,, October 1952
U.S, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




15

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey

The Bureau’
s occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources. In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community. Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.

such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment’s full-time schedule for the given
occupationcd classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau’s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office
clerical? (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-A). The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
re€il estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits fi&so was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above, a certain size were
s t u d i e d . S m a l le r e s t a b l is h m e n t s were om iuted b e c a u s e ’t h e y f u r n is h e d
i n s u f f i c i e n t em ploym ent i n th e o c c u p a t io n s s t u d ie d t o w a r r a n t i n c l u ­
s io n .
Among th e i n d u s t r i e s i n w h ic h c h a r a c t e r i s t i c j o b s were
s t u d i e d , minimum s i z e o f e s t a b ls ih m e n t and e x t e n t o f th e a r e a
cov­
e re d were d e te rm in e d s e p a r a t e l y f o r e ach i n d u s t r y (s e e f o l l o w i n g

table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of s f i l establishments
mil
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term ’office workers'* referred to in this bulletin
’
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries, these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufa cturing industries•
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or hfid a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

16

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller.

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Kansas City, Mo., 2 /
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, October 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied

3/

Number of
_______ establishments________
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In estat dishments
idled

a tv

Total

Office

Industry divisions i n which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
51
51
51

748
282
466

175
64
111

176,800
85,600
91,200

101,640
48,840
52,800

19,970
6,590
13,380

51
51
51
51
51

All divisions ............................ ........
Manufacturing Jj • •............................
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••.•••••••••..........
Transportation (excluding railroads)f
communication, and other public
u t i l i t i e s ......... ••••••...... .........
Wholesale trade .............. ..............
Retail t r a d e ............................ .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ••••••
Services 2 / ............. ..................

58
115
153
60
80

21
22
35
15
18

23,000
13,800
37,100
8,500
8,800

18,690
4,960
22,560
3,440
3,150

4,120
2,200
3,860
2,640
560

21
21

26

13
15

3,335
2,912

2,688
1,587

492

Industries in which occupations
were surveyed on an Industry basis i /
Machinery i n d u s t r i e s ...................... .
Power laundries ......................... ....... .

y

34

79

2/ Kansas City Metropolitan Area (Johnson and Wyandotte Counties, Kansas, and Jackson and Clay Counties, Mo.)
£/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in all divisions in the October 1951 survey was 21
workers.
2 / Excludes data for two ordnance establishments formerly government operated but now privately operated, omitted also from the
October 1951 study.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services,
i/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
£/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.




17

Index

Assembler (machinery), 8
Bench hand (bakeries), 9
Biller, machine, 3
Bookbinder (printing), 9
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3
Bricklayer (building construction), 9
Calculating-machine operator, 3
Carpenter (building construction), 9
Carpenter, maintenance, 6
Cleaner, 7
Clerk, file, 3
Clerk, order, 3, A
Clerk, payroll, 3, 4
*
Clerk, retail receiving (power
laundries), 8
Compositor, hand (printing), 9, 10
Draftsman, 5
Dupl±cating-*nachine operator, 3, 4
Electrician (building
construction), 9
Electrician, maintenance, 6
Engineer, stationary, 6
Extractor operator, (power laundries), 8

Identifier (power laundries), 8
Inspector (machinery), 8
Janitor, 7
Janitor (machinery), 8
Key-punch operator,

U.

Laborer (building construction), 9
Laborer, material handling, 7
Laborer, material handling
(machinery), 8
Machine operator (printing), 9, 10
Machine tender (printing), 9, 10
Machine-tool operator,
production (machinery), 8
Machine-tool operator, toolroom, 6
Machinist, maintenance, 6
Marker (power laundries), 8
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 6
Mechanic, maintenance, 6
Millwright, 6
Mixer (bakeries), 9
Motortruck driver, 10
Nurse, industrial (registered), 5

Guard, 7

Office boy, 3
Office girl, U
Oiler, 6
Operator (local transit), 10
O rder filler, 7
Ovenman (bakeries), 9

Helper (bakeries), 9
Helper, motortruck driver, 10
Helper, trades, maintenance, 6

Packer, 7
Packer (bakeries), 9
Painter (building construction), 9

Finisher, flatwork (power laundries), 8
Fireman, stationary boiler, 6
Fireman, stationary boiler
(power laundries), 8




Painter, maintenance, 6
Photoengraver (printing), 9, 10
Pipe fitter, maintenance, 6
Plasterer (building construction), 9
Plumber (building construction), 9
Porter, 7
Press assistant (printing), 9
Press feeder (printing), 9
Presser, machine, shirts
(power laundries), 8
Pressman (printing), 10
Receiving clerk, 7
Routeman (driver-salesman)
(power laundries), 8
Secretary, U
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance, 6
Shipping clerk, 7
Shipping-and-receiving clerk, 7
Stenographer, 4
Stereotyper (printing), 10
Switchboard operator, U
Switchboard operator-receptionist,

U

Tabulating-machine operator, 3, U
Tool-and-die maker, 6
Tool-and-die maker (machinery), 8
Transcribing-machine operator, U
Truck driver, 7
Trucker, power, 7
Typist, A
Washer, machine (power laundries), 8
Watchman, 7
Welder, hand (machinery), 8
Wrapper (bakeries), 9
Wrapper, bundle (power laundries), 8

• - U . S . G O V E R N M E N T P R I N T I N G O F F I C E : 1 9 5 3 0 —2 4 3 3 7 9
A







Office.

This report was prepared in the Bureau's
Communications may be addressed to:

North Central

Regional

Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
105 West Adams Street
10th Floor
Chicago 3, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial
relations, employment, prices, labor turnover,
productivity, work injuries,
construction and housing.

The North Central Region includes the following States:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Michigan
Minnesota

Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


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