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CLEVELAND, OHIO
October 1952

Bulletin N o. 1116-3

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




CLEVELAND , OHIO
October 1952




B ulletin N o. 11116,-3
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 20 cents




Contents

Page

Letter of Transmittal

1

THE CLEVELAND METROPOLITAN A R E A ........................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ............................
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C., January 29, 1953*

INTRODUCTION .............................

1

TABLES:

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations .......................
The Secretary of Labor:
A -2
Professional and technical occupations ...
A-3
Maintenance and power plantoccupations ....
I
have the honor to transmit herewith a report on
A-k
Custodial, warehousing, andshipping
occupational wages and related benefits in Cleveland, Ohio, dur­
occupations .............................
ing October 1952. Similar studies are being conducted in a
number of other large labor-market areas during the fiscal year
1953* These studies have been designed to meet a variety of
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide
industry basis earnings information for many occupations common to most manu­
B-2333 Women’s and misses* dresses
.............
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries
B-2851 Paints and varnishes .....................
of selected supplementary wage benefits. Whenever possible,
B-35
Machinery industries .....................
separate data have been presented for individual major industry
B-7211 Power laundries ..........................
divisions.
Union wage scales for selected occupations This report was prepared in the Bureau1s regional of­
C-15
Building construction ....................
fice in Chicago, 111., by Woodrow C. Linn under the direction
C-205
Bakeries .................................
of George E. Votava, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
C-27
Prin t i n g.................................
C-4l
Local transit operating employees ........
Analyst. The planning and central direction of the program was
carried on in the Bureau*s Division of Wages and Industrial
C-l+2
Motortruck drivers and helpers ...........
Relations.
Supplement ary wage practices D-l
Shift differential provisions ......... ....
Ewan Clague, Commissioner.
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours ...................
Hon. Martin P. Durkin,
D-3
Paid holidays ............................
Secretary of Labor.
D-i*
Paid vacations ...........................
D-5
Insurance and pension plans
.............




3
5
5
6

8
8
9
13

1^

lb
lb
15
15

l6
l6
17
17
20

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey .........................
INDEX

21
23




U L L U K A IIU N A L WAGE bURVEY - CLEVELAND, OHIO
Introduction

were employed in the area 18 diversified manufacturing industries,
many of which contribute directly to the requirements of the Nation­
wide armament program* Important among such products are: ordnance,
iron and steel, metal stampings, forgings, castings, machine tools
and accessories, cutting tools, industrial machinery, electrical
equipment, motor vechicles and parts, aircraft parts, and other
fabricated metal products*
Some 8 5 ,0 0 0 of these workers were em­
ployed in the machinery industries; about 5 0 ,0 0 0 in both the trans­
portation equipment industries and the primary metals industries;
and more than 3 6 ,0 0 0 in the fabricated metal products group of
industries*

The Cleveland area is one of several important industrial
centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently con­
ducting occupational wage surveys®
In such surveys, occupations
common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries
are studied on a community-wide basis*
Cross-industry methods of
sampling are thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the fol­
lowing types of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional and tech­
nical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, ware*housing, and shipping® In presenting earnings information for such
jobs {tables A - l through A- 4 ) separate data are provided wherever
possible for individual broad industry divisions® 1 /

Nonmanufacturing industries in the area employed approx­
imately 3 3 5 ,0 0 0 workers, including more than 1 2 0 ,0 0 0 in wholesale
and retail trade*
More than 48,000 workers were employed in the
transportation, communication, and other public utilities group of
industries and more than 2 0 ,0 0 0 were employed by finance, insurance,
and real estate establishments*

Earnings information for characteristic occupations in
certain more specifically defined industries is presented in series
B tables* Union scales (series C tables) are presented for selected
occupations in several industries or trades in which the great ma­
jority of workers are employed under terms of collective-bargaining
agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are believed to be
indicative of prevailing pay practices*

Among the industries and establishment-size groups sur­
veyed by the Bureau, more than 85 percent of the plant workers were
employed in establishments having written agreements with labor or­
ganizations*
Union coverage was most extensive in manufacturing
plants, applying to nine-tenths of the workers*
Proportions of
covered plant workers in other major industry divisions ranged from
more than four-fifths in the services group to somewhat more than
half in retail trade establishments* The proportion of office work­
ers employed under the terms of collective—bargining agreements was
substantially lover than that of plant workers* Only in the public
utilities group of industries, in which slightly more than half the
office workers were covered by contract provisions, was there any
appreciable degree of unionization among offices*

Data are collected and summarized on shift operations and
differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as
vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension plans*

The Cleveland Metropolitan Area
Total population of the Cleveland Metropolitan Area (Cuya­
hoga and Lake Counties) was estimated at more than 1,465,000 try the
1950 census, with the population of Cleveland exceeding 90 0 ,000 *
Situated on the south shore of Lake Erie, this seventh largest city
of the United States is one of the leading ports on the Great Lakes*
It has strategic access to important raw materials, including iron
ore and coal, and is centrally located in terms of important mar­
kets*

Occupational W age Structure
Wage changes in the form of "across-the-board” increases
were general in Cleveland industries between October 1951 - the
date of the Bureau’s last comprehensive survey in the area 2/ - and
the present study* Based on an examination of data from the larger
manufacturing establishments (employing 200 or more workers) nearly

In late 1952 total nonagricultural industries gave employ­
ment to more than 6 6 5 ,0 0 0 workers, surpassing the employment peak of
World War 31 reached in June 1943* Approximately half these workers

2/ The construction and extractive industries and government
institutions were excluded from the study; see appendix for dis­
cussion of scope and method of survey*




2/ See Occupational Wage
1951 - BLS Bulletin No* 1056*

(1)

Survey,

Cleveland, Ohio,

October

all plant workers were found to have received general wage in­
creases; about half these workers received one or more adjustments
based on changes in the cost of living* The average hourly increase
per worker was in excess of 9 cents; however, amounts of increases
varied widely among establishments©
It should be noted that general wage changes did not ac­
count for the full wage movement which took place in either the
manufacturing or the nonmanufacturing industries©
In addition,
changes based on merit, length of service,
and progression within
rate ranges affected the total wage change picture©
Wages of approximately three-fourths the plant workers in
the area were based on a time-rate system©
Virtually all these
workers were employed in establishments having a formalized wage
structure©
Plans providing a range of rates for individual plant
occupations were somewhat more prevalent than those that establish­
ed a single rate for a given occupation, when considered on an all­
industry basis©
Public utilities and finance were the only broad
industry divisions studied in which single-rate plans predominated
for plant workers©
Incentive methods of wage payment, applicable
to a fourth of all plant workers, were most significant in manufac­
turing, applying to approximately 30 percent of the total employ­
ment in this industry division©
Salaries of office workers in the area were determined
generally on the basis of formalized plans that provided rate ranges
for individual occupations©
There were, however, substantial num­
bers of workers in each major industry group whose earnings were
individually determined; earnings of more than half the office
workers in retail trade were so established©
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing were higher
generally than those of workers employed in comparable occupations




in nonmanufacturing© Average salaries were higher in manufacturing
for 17 of 19 office jobs for which comparisons were available and
for 16 of 20 plant occupations permitting comparisons©
Nearly 30 percent of the manufacturing plant workers in
the area were employed on extra shifts at the time of the study©
Second-shift work accounted for a fifth of the total plant work
force in manufacturing and third or other shift work accounted for
a tenth of the total© Virtually all these extra-shift workers were
employed in establishments providing a premium above day rates©
The amount of these premiums varied considerably among the estab­
lishments studied©
However, cents-per-hour differentials of
6,
or 7 cents \& re most commonly reported for second-shift work,where­
as 7,9, or 10 cents-per-hour additions were most frequently report­
ed for third-shift work©
Four-fifths of the women office workers and more than twothirds of the plant workers studied in October 1932 were scheduled
to work 40 hours a week©
About a tenth of the office workers were
employed on work schedules of 37^ or less hours a week, whereas a
similar proportion of all plant workers were on weekly work sched­
ules of 43 hours©
Six paid holidays were granted annually to the vast ma­
jority of both office and plant workers© Holiday provisions tended
to be most liberal in the finance,
insurance, and real estate di­
vision with approximately a sixth of the workers receiving as many
as 10 holidays©
Nearly all workers received vacation benefits.
Office workers most generally received a 2-week vacation after a
year of service, whereas the greatest proportion of plant workers
received a week*s vacation after a similar period of service© Plans
providing insurance or pension benefits for which at least a part of
the cost is borne by the employer, affected the greater proportion
of both plant and office workers©

A* Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A - l :

O ffiO B

3

6 koH fkd U oH < L

(Average straigh t-tim e weekly hours and earnings 1/ f o r se le cte d occupations studied on an area
b a sis in Cleveland, Ohio, by industry d iv isio n , October 1952)

See footnote a t end o f ta b le .
*
T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, insuran ce, and r e a l e s ta t e .




NOTE:

Data fo r nonmanufacturing do not include information fo r department s to re s;
the remainder o f r e t a i l trade i s ap propriately represented in data fo r a l l
in d u stries combined and fo r nonmanufacturing.

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1952
D.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f labor S t a t is t ic s

k
O

Table A - l :

ffic e Ch c t€ p a f i OH dr G o H & H H e ti

(Average straig h t-tim e weekly hours and earnings 1/ fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area
b a sis in Cleveland, Ohio, by industry d iv isio n , October 1952)

Sex* occupation* and in d u stry d iv is io n

of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Average
„
$
W
eekly
W
eekly 30.00
(Standard) (Standard)
32.50

$
32.50

$
35.00 37.50

35.00

37.50 L0.00 U2.50 U5.00 U7.50 50.00

t o . 00

$
$
$
$
$
$
U2.50 U5.oo U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00
52.50

55.00 57.50

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
»
57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
and
"
60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 -5YW

Women - Continued
_

6

-

-

U7.00
U7 I 50
U6 .5 0

13
13

6
6

U0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5

51*.50
56.50
U9.50
50.50
U8.00

1

1U6
105

1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5

1*2.50
U2.50
U2 .0 0

Vfiolesale trade ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finance «* . . . . . . . . . y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.302
1,1*36
866
209
231
268

39.5
UO.O
39.5
39.5
39.5
38.5

67.00
68.00
65.50
71.00
65.00
63.50

Stenographers, general ................. ..
M anu facturing................................
Nonmanufacturlng ..................... ...............................
Public u t i l i t i e s * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wholesale trade ..................... ..
nance *» . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.691
1,673
1,018
18U
383.
326

1*1.0
U2.5
39.5
1*0.0
39.5
38.5

56.00
57.50
5U.oo
5U.oo
53.50
5U.50

989
77JU
215
62

Key-punch operators ................................................
Manufacturing

O ffice g i r l s ............. ...............................A . . . . ......... ..
Nonmanufacturing
S ec retarie s
.............
Manufacturing ........................../ . ............. ..............
Nonmanufacturlng................. ...................................

57.50
58.00
55.50
55.oo

199
71

Duplicating-machine operators ................................
Manufacturing ......................... .................................

Uo.o
u o.o
l*o.5
39.0
1*0.0
" 1*676'“
1*0.0

U8?
3Ub
11*5
1*1*
71

I f1

2
2
-

6

-

_

1

-

-

-

j

Switchboard o p era to r-re ce p tio n ists . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufactuning ............................. ..
Nonmanufacturing ................................................ ..
VlinV.<e1f> trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

571*
3
1*1*
230
102

39.5
u o.o
39.5
39.5

51.50
53.50
U8.50
U8.50

Tabulating-machine operators • ........... .................. ..

106

1*0.0

383
222
161

39.5
UO.O
39.5

! 52.00
52.00
52.00

-

T yp ists, c la s s A ........... ............................................ ..
M anufacturing............. ................................. ..
Nonmanufacturlng.....................................................
Finance « -*...................................... ....................

1.2 2 1
227
97

Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5
39.5

5U.50
55.00
53.00
52.00

_
-

T yp ists, c la s s B ...........................................................
Manufacturing „ • ............. ..
Nonmanufacturtng
Public u t i l i t i e s * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.127
1,3 17
810
137
299
201

U0.0
UO.O
39.5
39.5
UO.O
38.0

U7.00
U
8.00
U5.50
U5.oo
li7.00
U5.oo

?o
33
17
3
10

9

7

Finance

............................. .................. ..

279

99h

1*0.0

1*1.0 1 52.50
" 3 9 . 5 " 56.50
1*2.0 ; U9.50

___ 2-\
-

1
!




U
2

8

|
!
1

220
87
133
U0;
5 1!
37l
2

95
50
U5
12
6
16

!

iU i

28
1*
2U
20
l5
5
u

33
28

15
29

-

n

5U
2U

_

-

-

_

-

”

i
60
27

8

_ 25_
_
3
22

2lf
13
11

75
55

___ L_
U

8

-

U

iU

6

15

6
6

10
3

U
1

8

?1
1*5
U6

19U
23

70
59

“

u

2

7
21

165
71
9U
15
U5

336
173
163
18
7U
U2

29?
17U
125
12
80
29

18

7

32

6

26
11
15

3
-

Ul
21
20

62
33
29

97 1 10 1
U8
59
U2
U9
16
19

9U
75
19
16

22

52
3U
18
1

3 !
28

6

5 i
Uo
32

5
T

5U
U9
5
u

30
23
7
1

29
29
-

39
39
-

n
n
-

5
3
2

- ____ L
3
2
*

_ 1----- —

-

-

-

-

-

-

U5
38
7
3

7
7

12
12

_

.

_

-

-

_

_

_

_
_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

-

-

-

“

-

-

*

-

-

17U
102
72
10
3U
31

205

132
7U
58
3U
IU
10

208
159
U9
IU
n
22

17U
105

52
37
15
12

2k
16
8
8

UO
3l*
6
5
1

23

173
132
Ul
9
5
lit

216

161

161
55

121

28
18
10
1
1
8

13
12
1

9
9

1

-

3
1

- ;

“
361
226
135
33
23
U5

28 !
27
1

1

.

3U3
209
13U
2U
55
33

21*5
168
77
13
17
3?

1*13
3U0
73
3U
20
18

70
12
20

7

15

7

iu

26
U
22

ui*

!

6
31

n

$

20

1U0

152

105

127

35
13

25

103
82
21
8

1
0

I
; 17 7 | 151
122 ' 128
23
55
6 j
7 :
l
U2
13 '
|
5
3

!

1
3
7

1

Hours r e f le c t the workweek f o r which employees rec eiv e t h e ir reg u la r straig h t-tim e s a la r ie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other p u blic u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and re a l e s ta t e .

6 :
6

-

1

31
30
1

59

25

58
32
26

3

57
U7
10
2

U8
n

2U5
1U0
105
15
31
31

10

20
17

1

13»*
4

12

226
71

5
rl

122
79
U3
10
6
19

3

1I
8

65
1*7
18
6

u

112
52
60
2
UO
7

1*
U
2

297

2 11

9

3

12

29U
211 '
83
16
31
25

UP5

-

u

31

268
1U6
122
12
U3
U7

90 !
60
18
20 i

6

97
72
25
10

ift
58
U6

96
20

3U1
no

287
11*2
11*5
25
U2 i
j 31

U

i
!

U3
53
3U ^ 3 9 I
9
IU i
2 i
8
2 ;
5

108
9U
IU
U

U
U

8 ___ 12____ 2< _ 150
2'
16

7

163
119

21

8
8

U3
36

27

$8
U6
22
12

5

68
ui

1

8

- !

8

1
!

13
10

20

-

-

10
12
9 — r —
1
u

22 ;

5
-

iu
13
1

11 !
u 1

20

uu

10

■
1/
*
**

Uo
32
8

1

96
22
7U

10

iu

1

9

8

1

it !

1
2 I

9
9

1 59.50

Transcribing-machino operators, general . . . . . .
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing • • . • • • • . • • . . . . . . . . . • • • • a . .

l

;

7

59.50

139
1*80

6

5

6

*

16
10
6

1?

1
1

2

7

“

28
22
6

22 !
9
13

!

1*5
19
26

5
1
u

T

-

1

Switchboard operators ................. ................ .............
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturlng

60
28
32

29

2

-

38
19
19
6
13

9
3 i
6

10 ___ 28...... 1*5 ,
22
21
7
3
6
2U

“

U8
3U
IU
6
8

10
2
8

1

Stenographers, t e c h n i c a l ......... ........................ ..

10

31
7
21*
7
10

n6

23

15

U7
29
18

93
79
IU
2

U6
35

55
Ul
iu

.

_

9U
7i
23
8

33 j
a !
11 i
2 j

3
3 :
-

13U
71
21
16

10
29
16

2
29

81
U6
35
13
2
20

IU

16

11

1?

6

u

U9
29
20

20
12
8

6
5

6
6

9
5
u

1
- :
1

8
29
23 -------F
6

22
22

U
u

22
39
8

1

32
23

69

9

IU
30

16 f
IU |
187 !
169 ;
18 1

5 j
19 !
16
3
3 !

“

UO
9

5

8
7
1 *

6
3

U

16

it
12

U
8

2

3

U7
1*2
5
1

9
5
u

1

5
-------«n—
- |

i

!

\

3

80
71
9

1

7

-

1
1

10
10

-

5
r

-

-

"

3 j
|
t

7
2

3

5

3

11
10

l
1

‘
-

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

-

—

r -

8

u

1
1

! ----- —
-

i

I

-

1
_

_

_

_

2
_
2

_

_

“

_

_
-

_

_1

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

•

"

-

U

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

"

-

-

5

PstofadAioHai and VecAmocU OocutfusltOHd

Table A-2

(Average s tra ig h t-tia e weekly hours and earnings 1/ f o r se le cte d occupations studied on an area
basis in Cleveland, Ohio, by ind ustry d iv isio n , October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

A verage

Sex, occupation, and in d u stry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

Weekly
earnings
(Standard)

Weekly
(Standard)

52.50

55.0 0 57.5 0

^ 7 .5 0

*60.00 £2.50

1 5 .0 0

60.00

6 2.50 65.0 0

6 7.5 0

$ -

S 7.50 *70.00 75.00
6

10 .0 0

85.00 *90.00 *9 5 .0 0 100.00

110.0 0 1 15 .0 0 *120.00 L25.00 130.00 13 5 .0 0

70.00

85.00

90.00

1 1 5 .0 0 120.00 12 5.0 0 L30.00 135.0 0

5

20

and
75.00 80.00

95.00 100.00 105.0 0

a

5
Under ^0.00 $ 2 .5 o 15 .0 0
and
f o .o o under

over

Men
1

Draftsmen, c h i e f ....................................... ................... ..

239
228

u

a

3
Draftsmen, ju n io r .....................................................

-

.

“

“

"

.

•

5
5 |

li
b

27 i
23 1

s ir

•

•

.

;

2
2

3

” 1

b

l

b ------- IB ~

32

25

----- S T

2li
9
9 --------S T

la

--------5 ? —

W

27
27

20
20

_

llx
lb

16
16

8
8

25
2
J>

|

|

M an u fa ctu rin g ............. ......................................... ..

. ;
*

.

1 0 7 .50
108.00

liO.O
bO.O

1 8 7.50

2

j 88.00

1

"

26
20

13 i
13 \

1 .3 9 li
1,3 10 ;

bO.O
b0.0

807

766

bO.O
b0.0

j

310
297

bO.O
bO.O

1 6 6.50
6 6.50

70.00
70.00

^

12

Ib6

22
9
21 ----- 6

1x3
37

bO
39

78
67

192
178

239
237

19 1
189

188
179

lb6

&

kh

1*0

107
98

62
61

99
99

10b
lOb

72
72

*>

la
1a

29
28

3
2

1
£

38
37

3b
32

36
32

6
6

_1

52 ,

33
31

_

1x9

89

119
119 —

1x8

21

nr—

ill

11
11

“

8

3

“

~

•

“

“

”

Women

M an u fa ctu rin g ...........................................................

_

_

;

5

8
8

5

hz

50

b
2

_

■

1/

_

■

_

'

_

1
1

'

Hours r e f le c t the workweek fo r which employees receiv e t h e ir regu lar straigh t-tim e s a la r ie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

Table A-3:

M tU n teH G H C e G *u t P oW & l P la n t C faC 4 4 fL cU iO *ld

(Average hourly earnings 1/ fo r men in se le cte d occupations studied on an area
b asis in Cleveland, Ohio, by industry d iv is io n , October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and in d ustry d iv is io n

N umber
of
Workers

Average
earnings

E le c tr ic ia n s , maintenance • • • • • • • • . ................
Manufacturing .................................... ..
Nonmanufacturing • • • • • ........... ...................... .
P u b lic u t i l l t l s s ♦

1 .7 1 1
1#523
188
112

-

2.10
2.10
2 .1b
2.23

.
-

308
176

2.09
2.13
2.01

-

Firemen, s ta tio n a ry b o ile r
Manufacturing ......... .....

775
615

1.79
1.78

" 21

Xj/st

1 .8 3

Leo

1.85

1.90

1.9 5

1.00

$
$
2.05 2 .1 0

*2.15

1.55

1 .6 0

1.6 5

1.70

1.7 5

1.80

1.8 5

1.90

1.9 5

2.00

2.05

2 .in

2 .15

2.20

-

-

-

27
12
15

10
5
i;

11
10

25
19
6

22
17
5;

67

60

bi
bo

67
6*
2

8b
8b

b6
b5

2b
20

25
25

10
10

30
30
-

35

82
80
2

106
305
1

156

183

27

17
8

177
157
20
2

b5

28

26

bo

35
30

2

26

25
1

39
1

11
n

17
1?

b
12

E ngineers, sta tio n a ry ....................................
Manufacturing .........................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................... ..

b6b

1.50

%

2.09
2.06
2.2 1

i.70 L w

and

1.L5

668
560
108

u

i.bo U s 1.50 i .5 5

l.bO under
Carpenters, maintenance ............................. . . • • • •
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • ................
•••••••••••••••« •••••••••

i .60

16

Under

3/22
1

.
-

lb
1

-

.
__ 1 _
1

.
-

17
8
9

-

.

-

*

50

39

50

39

b

15
15

— l f — b$_,
it

36
12

XJ

-

30

7

5

7

5

99
91
8

50
W
2

8
*
J

9

6~
3
8b
71
XJ

59
12
102
96
b

2

152
b

ij

77
25
52

10
10

b2

la

62

•

1

11

10 b

66

99
5

63

b9
Uo
1

ft

1
J

73

b3

v sr

22

8
lb

$

2 .2 0

*2.25

$
2.30

*2.35

$
$
$
$
$
2«li0 2.b5 *2.50 2.60 2*70 2.80
and

2.25

2.30

2.35

2 .L 0

2,1*5

2.50

2 .6 0

2.70

b8
r

15
15

17
12
c
2

12
12

22

lb
lb

9
— r

b

1

b —

I

87
bo

161
160
1

153
152
1

25
2b
1

1x3
Sx
29
O
Q

12
12
-

10

15
IT

16
9
7

35

17
-

13
13
-

.
-

-

-

-

15
6 r

257
238
19
lB

hi

b6

—

1
r

_
-

17

35
8
--- 8“

30

lb
13

12

2.80

.
-

-

1

ll
l
-

-

2/35
2

J

1
1

.

-

-

over

•

•
See footnotes a t end o f ta b le .
*
T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other p u blic u t i l i t i e s .




NOTE:

Data for nonmanufacturing do not include information fo r department sto re s;
the remainder o f r e t a i l trade i s ap pro priately represented in data fo r a l l
in d ustries combined and fa r nonmanufacturing.

Occupational Wage Survey, C leveland, Ohio, October 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s

6

Maintenance. and Pome* Plan t ChcnpxiiioHl-Continued

Table A-3

(Average hourly earnings V f o r men in se le cte d occupations studied on an area
b a sis in Cleveland, Ohio, by ind ustry d iv isio n , October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
Workers

Average
earnings

2 ,63 9
2,509
130

1 .7 5
1 .7 7
1 .5 1

1 ,3 3 5
1 ,3 3 5
991
969

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ....... .

1*87
11*2
31*5
2 17

$
1 .7 0

$
1 .7 5

$
$
1.8 0 1 .8 5

$
1.9 0

$
1 .9 5

1 a55_ 1 .6 0

i . 6 i _ 1 .7 0

1*75

1.8 0

1 .8 5

1.9 0

1 .9 5

2.00

2t 05

2 tlQ

375
1*27
371* r i r
1
3

229
221

520
520

12
12

13 3
“o r

-

“

-

“

20

-

-

66
T

65
65

2 71
2 71

115
n r

150
150

59
59

10 1
10 1

81*
61*

17
17

1*
1*

1*
1*

11
11

65
59

8

31*

1*9

57
10
1*7
16

56
18
38
2

111
ll*
27
27

$
1 .5 5

106
95
11

213
19 7

16

133
123
10

115
112
3

1*
1*

12
12

8
8

3®
30

37
37

12
12

1 .9 0
1 .9 3
1.8 9
1 .9 2

Machine-tool operators, toolroom .............
Mamfacturing ................ ........ ...

Nonmanufacturing ....................

$
1 .6 0

89
57
32

2.08
2.0 8

Helpers, trades, maintenance
Manufacturing
................. ............... ..

15
9

31
31

S

11
r“ IT -

3
3

81
8T"

7

k

1

7

1*
1*

1

$3
83

55

18

16

27
27

59
59

11 3

37

?1*
r

98
98

115
112

76

73

10 7
10U

81
30
51
31

21
19
2

127
7
120
115

5
5

15

1*5
35

126
120

96
76

57

2
2

19
19

26

65
65

37

16

55

Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and
Workers were d istrib u te d as fo llo w s:
Workers were d istrib u te d as follo w s:
Workers were d istrib u te d as follo w s:
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) ,

507
313
191*

2.00
2.01*
1.91*
2.08
2.08
2.02
2 .02

1,681*
1,681*

Tool-and-die makers

1 .7 7
1 .7 7

111*
111*

........... ..........

2.02
2.02

736
711*

Painters, maintenance
Manufacturing

1.2 0 9
1,2 0 9
572
572

Millwrights ..... ..........................
Manufacturing
.... .... •

2 .0 6
2 .0 6

2 .2 6
2 .2 6

6
6

1
1

_ J l_
i

9

2

7
2

:

62
62

1*3
1*3

93
93

3

36
6
30

60

191
l8 o

16

269

“ 259“

1
1

2.30

2 .3 5

20

121;
212
1 5 TT 212

90

18
17
1

5

38
77
3B~” r i r
20
20

20

-

-

21

1
*

19 7
19 7

52
52

261*
~251T

79
79

71*

“ n r

100
100

15
13
2

31
29
2

8
r
3

57
57”

1*7
1*7

92
92

136

132
332

20
20

30
30

58
53

69
68
1

17
33
It

73
73

5
93
93

26
21*

89
8y

169
158

11*

k

117
116

1
1

13
12

1
1

21*
21*

6

2

2

1*
2
2

372
372

ID

28
28

23
23

2
1
-----2“ — T "

—

8
2
39
5 ~ “ S T ---- ET
9
9

19
19

~

53

“ 5r

15

20

S T

36

-----5~

3r

228
228

16 6
16 6

10 1
10 1

10

u
ir

31
1*
27

:

:

11
2
9

11

6
6

3
3

----- 6~ — r -----2“

10
9
1

2
2

6
sn

38
38 —

—
239
239

r

3
3

11

-

1*3
1*3

1

10
7
5
— 5“ — T - I B -

31*

~W

6

ll*

1*
1*

15
15

12

1*
1*

3
3

20

60
59

2
2

3T
W~ ----- 8~ — 55“ ~ ~ W — T

17
13

21*9
217

9
9

1
1

2 .2 5

81
102
8I~~

90
90

8

3

2 .1 5 _ Jk-20

-

88
88

8

60
21*
15

__ Z_j

-

9
9
27
3
21*

10
10

9

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2.00 2.05 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2.2 0 2 .2 5 2.3 0 2 .3 5

1*1*
1

8

;
Is 995
1 ,9 0 7

s
$
s
$
$
$
2.1*0 2.1*5 2.50 2.6 0 2.70 2.8 0
and
2.1*0 2.1*5 2 .5 0 2 .60 2 .7 0 2.80 over

$
1 .6 5

$
1 .5 0

60
21*
36

2.01*
2.01*

Machinists, maintenance
Manufacturing ...................

%
$
Under 1.1*0 1.U 5
and
1.1*0 under
1 .5 0

3
—

r~

209
209

367
367

201
201

3
3

6
6

.

1* 1*

nigh t work.
31 a t $3 - 3.10 ; 1* at $3.10 and over.
1 under $1.25; 9 a t $1.25 - 1.30; 12 a t $1.35 - 1.1*0.
1 under $1.2 5; 6 a t $1.25 - 1.30; 19 a t $1.30 - 1.3 5 ; 28 a t $1.35 - 1.10 .
communication, and other pu blic u t i l i t i e s .

Table a-/+
:

G nitodial, f Jaf
k teJuuUiHfrand StupfU nf GcatpxUianl

(Average hourly earnings 1 / fo r se le cte d occupations 2 j studied on an area
b a s is in Cleveland, Ohio, by ind ustry d iv isio n , October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and ind ustry d iv isio n

Number

Average

Workers

earnings

of

Is
Under!0,75
$
! 0.75 1

.80

i
1.51*5
1,21*1*
porters*

ftiyf

clR4/i6rs (men)

•••*•«••

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) . . . o . «
Nonmanuf acturing ................................................................




Finance

* * .............. ....................... ..

See footnotes a t end o f ta b le .
** Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .

1 .5 9
1 .7 0

!.1
*1

1 .no

3,028
1,12 3
135
286
2.215
663
1,552
1,020

.

$
0.80

$
0.85

.35

0.90

,90

,95

1 .5 0
1 .0 8

127 ! 135

23

1.33
3.19

-

.96
.95

30

32

30

32

NOTE:

$

$

1.15

1 .2 0

1.25

1 ,1 5

1 .2 0

1,25 ,i.3 0 _ 1.35

U8

5

1.30

s

$

$

1.65

1 .7 0

s
1.75

$
1.35

$

$

s

1.1*0

1.1*5

1.50

1.5 5

1 .6 0

1 . 1*0

1.1*5

1 ,5 0

1,5 5

1 .6 0

1.65 JLaIO . I*25__ 1 .8 0

M*

69
!
|

22

23

22

21

12

57

1*5

!

!
!

39
6
33
27

21*

979
:

2U

17
962

LZL

12*3
3i*
109
3
36

216
90
126

70

35
35

1 l!
1

226 1 207
66
25
11 ! 75
1 5 1 i 182
55
1*8 i 85 ! 77

j m

!

121
98
23
1

13
3

16

17
1?

325
125

56
56

_

5

|

23

1.05

s

1 .1 0

$

$

$

$

Is

Is
2.1C

1 .8 0

1.85

1 .9 0

1.85

1.90

2.0 0 ! 2 .1 0 i over

31*
2?

377
366

20
17

73

10
10

-4 | i5

2.00

and

_ i
1
127 j 135

1 .2 6

$

1.05
1 .1 0

no

$

1 .0 0

1 .0 0

35

$

$
0.95

$

1*5
3
1*2
11
6

117
1*2
75
17
30

233
155
78
25
23

220
112
108
2li
32

127
78
1*9
1
*

36
35
1
1

7U

8

7
2
2

“

1

U1
37

1
*

■

16

189 _ 3 # _3?U
261
315
159
30
91*
9
5
35
5
20
12

378
366
12
6

U32r

13
13

1*7
i*7

i*

11
11

192
181*
8

250
2l*9

2

352
9
2
1

21*
2l*

1*8
1*8

Hi 8
11*8

135
12?

-M L
696
1

ll*
ll*

!

-|7

87

73

hi
22
-

62
62
6
6

i
“
-

:
1
1

-

19

-

-

-

•

-

-

1?

-

-

_
1 ___

Data fo r nonmanufacturing do not include information fo r department sto res;
the remainder o f r e t a i l trade is ap propriately represented in data fo r a l l
in d u strie s combined and fo r nonmanufacturing.

Occupational Wage Survey, C leveland , Ohio, October 1952
(
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s

Table A-£:

Gudl& lU ilf tyjG/ieAo44Ai+Uf, CL+ul SU ipfU H tf GcC*4f2xUdOHi-GoHiiHi€ect
(Average hourly earnings 1/ fo r se le cte d occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in C leveland,- Ohio, by ind ustry d iv is io n ,“ October 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and ind ustry d iv is io n

Number
of
W
orkers

$
0.80

$
0.85

$ •
0.90

$
0.95

$
1.00

$

$

$

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

$
1.20

$
1.2 5

$
1.30

$
1.35

$
$
1.1*0 lJ*5

.80

.85

.90

.95

1.00

1.05

1.10

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

1.2 5

1.30

1.3 5

1.1*0

1.1*5

.

39

18

13

1?

13

12

13
2
11

96
1*1
55

3?
lU
18

188
58

18

37
1*
33

llif

30

lib
8
36

130

256
158
98

$
Under 0.75

Average
hourly
earnings

D.?5
6.9U2

1.50

1.5 5

73U
???
137 " W
396
1*50
389
ii*5
11*5
53

611*
287
327
255
65

Wholesale t r a d e ................................................

732

1.56
i.S i
1 .U 8
1 Ij8
1.U5

-

-

-

1*

8

-

12

8

1*0

33

13

21

93

1? 1
127
61*
12
35

Order f i l l e r s ..................................................................
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................
Vhole sa le t r a d e ......... ................................... ..

1,8 15
1,012
803
610

1.61*
1.76
1.U9
1.1*9

_
_
-

_
_
.
-

_
_

_
_

1

1*

15

??

?8

-

1
1

U
1*

15
15

35
31

38
32

15
1*
ll

-

23
3
20
11*

26
10
16
9

33
18
15
13

Uo

-

_
_
-

1.69
1.76

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

36
5

95

l.U l

-

-

-

-

-

12
1*
8
8

Uf

u tr

_
.

ii*
n*

Packers, c la s s B (men)
M an u factu rin g............................ ..
Nonmnufacturlng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

890
71U
176

1.63
1 .7 1
1.29

_
-

_
-

_
-

3

_

18
3
15
12

Packers, c la s s B (woman) ........... .................. ..
Manufacturing

592
uoo

1.25
1.35
l.Gt*

_

1*
l*

5§
55
*

Receiving c le r k s ............. ....................................... ..
Manufacturing ..................... .........................

$12
U10
10 2
8$

1.68
1 .7 1
1.56
1.5U

-

-

363
----- 276

1 .7 6

87
80

1.62
1.59

501
267

23L

1.7U
1.7 7
1.70

127

1 .6 2

58U

1.68
1 .7 1
1.62

2,U?6

Nonmanufacturing......... ............................... ..

5n

Packers, c la s s A (men) ........................................ ..
Manufacturing ............... ....................................... ..
Wholesale trade ................. ..

,

,

8

...................... .

Shipping c le r k s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

UAnma
4 w
- t
Nonimnu^a^turin^^ .......................... .
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k s ..........................
Manufacturing .................................................
Nonriariufac ta rin g ................... ..
Viao le 33le trads . . . . . . . . . . o , . . . . . . . . . . . .
Truck d riv e rs , ligh t, (under l i tons)
Manufacturing ......................... .............
Nonmanufacturing ..................................

371

213

-

.

$7

57

U

h

-

-

-

-

1*

-

18
1*
H*

ih

?8
17
21
16

7

3

-

1*2
21*
1 ft
iO

55
23

39
16

6
2
k

-

-

-

-

-

-

lU

-

7

11

8
l*
1*
1*

26
8
8

12
6
6

1?
7
12

%

23

6?
9

32
10
22

1*
-

U
U
3l*
10

-

-

-

-

-

1
22

m

$
$
1.60 1.6 5

$
1.70

s
1.7 5

$
s
$
$
$
1.80 1.85 1.90 2 .00 2.10

1.6 5

1 .7 5

1.80

1.8 5

761*
619
659
755
697 “ 5 S T ~V 3T]
62
330
58
99
8
i*6
1*0
21
15

1*67

1*37

$
$
1.5 0 1.55

ll

1.60

103
1*9
5U
1*6

205
99

8
321*
200

HIT
28
17
32
20
12
12

Ilf
1U

67
8
1*

31

11
5
6
6

-

3

61
1*6
15

?8
22
36

$0
18
32

36
35
1

32
32
-

116
116
-

56
56

19
79

j*
U

-

21
21

1*6

Ul*

20

20
20

106

106

1.70

68

211*
~H2Tm 113
101
17
15
lU

11*8
~ i9 r T T
16
1*5
27
16
19
1*5
225

5

?h

37
3
3

u
1

93
1
l

29
29

57
57

-

-

8
8

-

i

31*

6U
2

37
21*
13
13

U2
1*0
2
2

20
20

78
19
59
53

21
10

1*7
30
1?
9

23
2
21
10

83
12
71

63
1

201
152
1*9

16

6

15

8

6

ll*

996
3 ir
962
873
68

3

h°

- — n r ---- T

1*6
1*0

?2
25

3?

7
7

1

11
11

_
-

over
12
ET
.

Ul

-

ISO
58
129
53
123 ~ W ~ w r r ^ r
6
3
3
6
2
3
-

Ul
25
16
-

7

17

17
17

15
i5

16
15
1
1

-

-

81
Bi
-

73
73
-

80
9
9 ~ 85“
-

-

36
36

1*
1*

35
35

2

SP

2
2

22
68
31
$h
W “ “S T ““ 58“ — T T T T —
2

6U
61*

28
28

-

-

35
55“
-

U
U
uu
-

-

10
10

5

13

29

ll*
15
15
1*

IT

n
-

62

r

9
U

1

51
1*2
9
9

3J
18
13
13

1$

Ilf

3*

ll*

1
1

h?
1*3
6

23
23

*

21

33

50

1*6

101

10

12

38
6

l*o
6
6

07

23
18

30
30

18
W

“

-

92
77
15

20
20

-

3U
26
8

51
12
39
17
22

161*
96
68
33
35

288
135
153
21*
92

261*
116
11*8

23
19

168
37
131

311

6
3
3

2 .1 0

U7
1*3
38“ “ t H
1*1
5

10

6
38
10
37
6 ~ 15“ ~ W ~ — 58“
13
10
9
10

1.73

2.00

ho

25
25

9
1

31

1.90

1*2
19
23

278

30
21

261

9

180
179

21*8
22i*

33
33

11
1*9
159
~W T
W~T

w

16

1*
“

21
13
5

-

8
13

iU

13
1

12

i

U

11
1

_
-

12
U
8

Truck d riv e rs, medium ( l l to and in clu din g
Nonmanufacturing ........ ... .....................
4n ir+AT1 t.lAA * __________ ____ * _
_

1,993
---- It66
1,533

9$1
352

Truck d riv e rs , heavy (over U tons,
t r a i l e r type) ................................................ ..

1 .7 1
1.7 7
1.68
1.63
1.78

Nonmanufacturing ..................... ...............................
Pu blic u t i l i t i e s * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9lil
138
803
261
1.206
1 ,13 7

$37
523

la 81
1.8 1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

1,

1.71*
1.7 5

Truckers. Dower (other than f o r k - l i f t ) ........... ..
Manufacturing

3

_

1.81*
1.8 1
1.85

Truckers, power ( f o r k - l i f t ) ............................
Manufacturing ...........................................................

3

_

watchmen ............................................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
Wholesale t r a d e ______ T. _____T___
1
Mnaiw>p

V
y
i/
*
**

- . T. - TTTrtTTTTrT1TTTTTTTJtTT,

—

922
m ~
U3U
69

122

5 5255
255

1 .7 1

1.26
1.29
1.23
I .1 3
1.28

-

_

_

_

-

_

*
_

_

_

_

_

-

_

8
8

1
1

_

_

23
23
9

2?
3
22

7
7

66
75
56 ~ 1*2
21*
19
8
12

7

22

32

7
Ji

22

32

1

2

_

li

k

37

in

99

26 ~ 5 T “ f i r
n
56
51*
5
ll*
2
12
50

5?
U2
11
5

33
30
3
2

37
37

_

1
*

ii
1

93
93

97
97

28
58“

12
12

68
68

1*8
39
9

1*6
10
36

If 8
2l*
21*

9

J

29

11

63
23

23
23

26

2
2

~ a r

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work,
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand", as reported in previous study.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

28
21
7

5
1

106

ic e

3

197
197

33
.

1*

88

189

77

178

3
J

91
91

$2
52

32

60

_
25
_ ~ t r
_
.

_

1*

131

51*

m

5U

-

33
9

2
2

ll
I4

76

6

~ ir

1U
1U

ll*
55“ “ I T

_

d

- inaracxerisTic industry Occupations
J O o m & l 'A

Table B-2333:

G * u l A f U U l ' j b 'i e M M

l/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number

Occupation and sex

o
f

Workers

earnings

y
All plant occupations:

Total ...............
M e n ..............
Women ............

1 ,U18
210
1,208

s
0.75 0 .8 0
and
under

0.90

$
0.95

$

0.85

1.00

$

1.05

$

$

1 .10

1.15

1.2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

* .
1 .1*0

1.U5

1.50 $1 .60

$
$
$
$
1.70 *1.80 1.90 *2 .00 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 *2 .30 *2 . |0 *2 .5 0 *2 .6 0
i
and

.80

.85-

.90

•?5

1.0 0

1.05

1.1 0

1.15

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1.30

1.35

l.ho

l.ii5

1.50

1 .6 0

1.70

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

1.31
1.77
1.23

53

66

123
13

77

2

7k

U3

17

U6

32
9
23

20

7U

51
7
Ui

1|
0
10

75

19
:
5
li
ii

37

110

97
5
92

56

51

76
3
73

71

66

80
6

52

-

90
18
72

1|
8

2

78
78

7
13

1

_

_

_

2
6

%
3
U5

6

6
65

6

2

Hi

6

50

35

60

37

.

_

_

_

_

2

1

1

3

1

2
1
1

30

2 .3 0

2 .6 0

orer

5

3
2

38
35
3

1

1

16

_

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

7

_

_

9

2 .2|0 2 .5 0
11

11
6

27
23
I
:

1

5

6

7
3
U

Selected Plant Occupations
Cutters and markers (53 men and
2 women) 3/ a . ..............................
Inspectors, final (examiners)(1 man and
39 women) 3/a . .............................
Preseers, hand (8 men and
7k women): Total .........................
Time ...................... .
Incentive ..................
Pressers, hand and machine (19 men and
8 women) V b ..............................
Sewers, hand (women): Total ................
T i m e ..............
Incentive .........
Sewing-machine operators, section system
(1 man and 507 women): Total .............
Time ...........
Incentive ......
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand
(tailor) system (lii men and
173 women): Total ........................
Time ......................
Incentive .................
Thread trimmers (cleaners)
(women): Total ............ ...............
T i m e ..................... .
Incentive ................ .
Work distributors (women) 3 / a ........ .......

55

2 .20

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

iD
i

1.06

-

2

10

3

l

6

3

1

3

3

2

82
16
66

1.26

2

U

9

7

2

_

_

2

2

2

2

1
6

•

1.30

3
5

-

k

2

-

5
3

8

1.08

5
3-

2

6

27
78
U7
31

2.06
1 ,2 k
1.21

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

2
2

2

3

-

2
2

1
16

18

1.29

-

-

-

2

508
67

36

Uo
5
35

32

kkl

1.17
1 .1U
1.17

187
31
156

1.70

1

-

1.82
1 .6 8

1

-

U2

1 .0 U

-

6
2

9

.99

33
55

1.05
1.12

k

32

2

10
1

7

9
.

3

1
2
1
1

3
1
2

1
1

-

2

13
3

U
5

k

31

20

U7

31

21

2U

It

111

18

8

21

28

23

3
17

18

37

20

13

-

-

-

-

k

8

h

"

It

7

3

k

2
2

1
1

20

9

«
,

3

1

2
>
j■
1
2

1
6

_

2

u

6

3

6

13

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

1

3

_

_

«

1

1
2

_
_
_
_

2

_

2

17
g

10

8

3

3

3

18

17

25

15

9

7

3

3

3

11
2

23

13
3

29

9

6

2

17

10

111

2
_

5

6

9

15

7

2

5

6

_

_

_

_

2

k

6

3

k

5

7

6

20

_

_

.

6

8
1

9

3

h

5

7

9

7

6

3
17

1

k

k
2

5

1

1

1

_

1

k

.

1
7
J

U

U

k

1

-

-

2

it

7

5

5

5

_

27

2

3

_

1

20
3

k
1

_

21

k

1

7

_

6

2

30

1
3

3

_

k

U

_

1

27

1
1

_
_

_

3

k3

k

_
_

1
1

3

3
3

3
18

5

_
_

_

3U

3

5
1

-

k

_
_

_
1

_

_
_

"

k

3

3

k

3

3

_

_

-

3 .

.
1Q52

^he

2/
2/

covered regular (inside) and contract shops with 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of women's and misses' dresses (Group 2333) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
P£®Pared *y
Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing house dresses, aprons, smocks, hoovers, and nurses' and maids' uniforms (Group 2334) were excluded from the study. Data relate to an August

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly* incentive workers.

Table B-2851:

P U l l G"d V S t l e
<4t
oUUtl

l/

1/ Hie study covered establishments with 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of paints, varnishes, lacquers, japans, enamels, and shellac (froup 2851) as defined in the standard industrial Glassification
Manual (19U5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all workers in the occupations reported ware paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




9

M a c itU te s iy S n d u d ts U e l 1/

Table B-35;

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number

Occupation and sex

-4L.

Average

h
ourly

earnings

2/

$
Under $ „ 1.30
1.25
and
$
under
1.25 1.30 1.35

$ .
1 .1*0

1 .5 0

$
1.55

1 .6 0

$
1.65

$

1.1*5

1 .70

1.75

1 .80

1.85

$
*
^ $
1.90 1.95 2.00

1 .1*0 1.1*5

i.5 o

1.55

1 .6 0

1.65

1.70

1.75

1 .8 0

1.85

1.90

1.95

2 .0 0

61

100

70
67

125

1.35

2.10 $2.15
*2.05 $

$

2.20

$

2
2 .3 0 $ .1*0 $2.50

$

2.60

$
2.70 $2 .80
and

2.15

2 .20

30
15
15
92
1
91
2
58
71
9
2

1*8

59
67
2

30
17
13
17
*
7
1*
0
1
19
38
15
7

2.05

2 .10

2.30

2 .1*0 2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

over

Machinery 3/
Men

2 .1 0
*
Assemblers, class B:

Total .................
T i m e ...............
Incentive ..........
Assemblers, class C h/& .............. .......
Electricians, maintenance l^a ............... ..
Inspectors, class A U/a .................... ..
Inspectors, class B C/a .......................................................
Inspectors, class C li/'a........ .............
Janitors, porters, and cleaners k /i .........
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 5/t Total ........................

............................... *
Automatic-lathe operators, class A ij/a . . . .
Drill-press operators, radial.

A*

1

^7_*............... ............ .
T

593
506
1,1*33
853
580
1*65
226
537
538
137
599

1.97
2.25
1.92
1.73
2.20
1.62
2.05
1.99
1.92
1.79
1.53

5,296
3,1*36
l,86o
110

2.09
1.97
2.32
2.01

331
128

20
20

20
20
_
_
_

_
_
-

_
.
_

1

8

32

.
-

3*
1

_
_
_

87
87

66
66

29

17

69

.

n
n

.

1*2
5

-

-

17

-

-

17

7

_

_

-

-

65

8
1
37

2
89

I
19
11*3

_

_

_

85
75
10
57
3
1
*
11*
15

_

-

-

1
11
**

1

_

-

I lk

131
131
-

35
-

h
27
3
23
_

la
28
13
23
1
-

21
18
6

1
T

........................ * .......... .
. .* *

,,

.............. .
*

Milling-machine operators,
class At T o t a l ...... ..................
.
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class At Total ........................

Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class Bt Total ................
T i m e ......... .
Incentive ••••«••••

See footnotes at end of table*




587
115
18

1*86
373
113
1

1*93
U2
81
25

355
188
167
28

53

16

702

U16
379
37
16

2.11*
1 O?
'
2#27

1
1

1
1

8
6
2

39
35

1*
8
31
17

26
23

222
39
183

2.16
1.85
2 t2 ^

1
1

2*
1
22
2

17
3

n

658

2.11
2.01
2.32

j.1,9
216
907
621*

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2.13

I4
1
*

5
3

S56
f
x
pt ;
fc
CO?

2.13

i5o
7U
7A
fO

2.20

* 8

-

-

•

•

-

-

-

-

-

ll*

H
*
-

_

_

-

.

28
21*8
165
83
1*35
221
21k

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

2*30
-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

21
*
20

2.11

2 I20
1.92

-

-

■

$
“

"

5h
1
l

8
g

“

8
g

1.89

1 80
2! 6
o
1.9l*
1.72
2.16

55

29
29

25
2U
1

123
97
26

"

168
132
36

*

2
2

n

9

16
12

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

1
*
1
*

12
12

8
8

5
5

1*
8
29
19

la
28
13

31
27
1
*

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,

125

89
1

125

8

31

15

13

6

2

1
*

1

6

27

31

15

13

6

2

1
*

19
*
1*
3
6

62
51*
6

65
33
32

21
8
13

80
17
*
33

51
13
38

22
k

20

9

9

12

18

20

9

9

12

53
25
28

17
1
*
13

52
31
21

36

55
6
19
*

32
6
26

17

23

12
*

17

23

12
*

21
*
1
23

17
*
ll*
33

31
1

29

22

15

2

23

30

29

22

15

2

23

16
7

2

3

1

3

10

17

9

2
1
1

2

3

1

3

10

17

19

8
2
6

2
2

7

10
10

17

13
*
20
23

3

59
52
7

100

9fe
6

k7

589
5U1
18
*
1
*

357
301
56

la

5

la

g

16
1

201
116
35
218
19U
2*
1
5

20

10
*
38
2

17

3

25
20

18
13

6

5

5

37
21
16

89

27

1
*

5o
ll*

91*
91*

6

1*
2

9

178
6
172

21
1
20

27
22
$

6k

21*6
20
226

60

lit
l
13

63
36
27

27

287
227

1

93
88

n*

333
11*3
190
1

25
1
*
21

61
59
2

n

185
71
111*

1
*

19
*

26
15

-

1
*

19
*
1*8
1

n

-

1

12

77
57
20

30
19

7

-

-

-

3

-

12

11
**

n

2

3
1

-

2
-

-

16

10
2
g

“

3*
1
-

-

16

98

332
269
63
1
*

20
1

-

25

106
3

309
2€>9
10
*

27
3

-

25

101

180
153
27
2

76

33

3
8

96

39
2
8
2
7
-

33

109

8

12
*
7
10
17
28
-

23

203
182
21

52

50
1
36
18
12
-

23

57
55
2

k

2.31

15
3

76

1
*

*

1-23

25
3*
1

1
*

H
*

7

15

17
20

3

11
**
38
6

k

25

18
27

10

3

2 lO
i

17

1*
0

13

1*8
1*6
2

i

18

51
39

5

1
*

1*3

1*0

158
12
*

17
12

la

I4

210*
86

51

29
19
50

37

3

2

9

i*,i 5 o

11
**

k

55
19
*
6

Z*.k3

1,136

i ..............

1*0
121*
82
10

57
25
n
11*
1
*

639
571*
65
20

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
Time .......................
Incentive.......... .......
Machine-tool operators, production,
class R ?/( Total .........................
Time ...................... .
Incentive ...............
Automatic-lathe operators, class B U/a ....
Drill-press aerators, radial,
class Bt Total

26
6
2*
1
63
13
1

150
11a
9
27
1
*
23
1
15

192
152
1*0
11*
ll*
11*3
86
8

3

1*79
1*56
23

Engine-lathe operators,
At

120
21

68

19
*
51
95
61
31
*
1
*
1
*
26
69
21
*
1
*

125
107
18

6*
1

60

Drill-press operators, single- or multiple-

Grinding-machine operators,
class At T o t a l .........

102
99
3
52
7
1
*
2*
1
9
32

17
*
l*
l
iia

1
4

4-4

T i m e ............. ..........

35
3*
1

3

3

k
38

3

9
27

8

s

w

50

78

52

11
**

1*
3

56

77

58

30

31*

57
21

38

12
*

1*
0

.3

56

77

58

30

3k

19

53

n3

58

n9

87

81

81

9U

63

96

119

87

81

81

9U

63

96

3

lo
*

11
17
*

71
1
70

13

12

1

2

2

5

5

5

3

3

3

1

2

2

5

5

$

3

3

8
1
7

1
*

n

22

23

lit

1
*

n

22

23

ll*

9
9

9
9

6
3

10
10

9
9

3

ll*
11*

October 1992
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABCR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-35:

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

$
$
Under 1.25 1 .3 0
nnd
%
1.25 under
1J>0- 1 .35

M a c ltU te M f J w h t ils r ie l if -G a H & u e e d
N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVINGl STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$_ „
1.90 $
$
1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 $
1.95 2.00 2.05 $2.10 $2.15 2.20 2.30 2.40 *2.50 $2.60 2.70 *2.80

$
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

$
1.50

$
1.55

1.60

1,40

1.45

1.50

1,55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

2.10

2.15

2.20

2.30

2.40

-

-

-

8
8

1
1

4
4

25
25

11
6
5

20
16
4

43
35
8

33
31
2

14
12
2

34
29
5

20
13
7

13
-

10

18

12

13

11
4
7

10

18

12

and
2.60

2.70

2.80

over

24

14

25

9

12

24

14

25

9

12

2.50

Machinery 3/ - Continued
Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B
- Continued
Engine-lathe operators,
class B: Total ........................
Time ......................
Incentive .................
Grinding-machine operators,
class Bt Total ........................
T i m e ......................
Incentive .................
Milling-machine operators,
class Bt Total ........................
Time ......................
Incentive .......... .......
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class B £/a ............................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
class Bt Total ........................
T i m e ...... ................
Incentive .................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C £/t Total ........................
Tim*
Incentive .................
Drill-press operators, radial,
/ !a a t P / /a
* c
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class Ct Total ...............
Time .............
Incentive ...... ..
Engine-lathe operators, class C i j a ......
Grinding-machine operators, class C 4/a ...
Milling-machine operators, class C 4/a ....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
class Ct Total ........................
Time ....... ...............
Incentive .................
Laborers, material handling 4 /a, 6 / .........
Machine-tool operators, toolroom 4 /a ........
Machinists, production 4/a ..................
Tool-and-die makers (tool-end-die jobbing
shops) 4 /a ................................
Tool-end-die makers (other than
tool-end-die jobbing shops) £/a ...........
Welders, hand, class A £/a ..................
Welders, hand, class B 4 /a ..................

•
361
184
177

$
2.08
1.83
2.35

-

582
245
337

2.17
1.81
2.44

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
11
-

3
2
1

2
2
-

12
10
2

38
34
4

34
32
2

68
57
11

42
38
4

49
30
19

35
26
9

13
3
10

10

12

7

29

33

29

36

27

33

59

10

12

7

29

33

29

36

27

33

59

376
247
129

1.92
1.80
2.14

-

-

-

-

5
5

4
4

4
4

3
3

8
5
3

21
15
6

26
24
2

61
58
3

47
36
11

32
21
11

58
44
14

13
12
1

23
15
8

6
1
5

12

7

11

7

4

8

8

2

6

12

7

11

7

4

8

8

2

6

116

2.03

- ;

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

2

2

7

19

31

16

9

3

-

_

_

2

5

2

3

9

3

2

429
293
136

1.92
1.84
2.10

-

-

-

-

_
-

5
5
-

5
4
1

5
5
-

9
9
-

10
3
7

28
24
4

40
38
2

38
33
5

75
64
11

51
39
12

54
53
1

13
1
12

16
9
7

9
6
3

20

29

10

7

3

2

_

_

20

29

10

7

3

2

-

922
790
132

1.61
1.59
1175

-

21
21

23
19
4

20
19
1

60
57
3

87
83
4

92
88
4

100
98
2

126
120
6

94
70
24

121
88
33

90
76
14

54
47
7

10

13

4

2

3

_

•

1

6

13

4

2

3

_

_

1

-

_

_

_

_

1

35

1.62

1

2

1

2

5

g

234

1.56
1.52
1.76
1.63
1.59

6
6

10

2

2
1

2

20
12

16
19

5
5
-

10
2

9

7
3
4
3
15
14

9
7

3
15
4

24
24
9

31
30

-

27
27
-

37
35

4
-

37
37
-

5

12

1

1

2

2

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

17
17
193

11
10
1
318
6

1

1

-

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

16

1

10

11

1

4

-

5

—
-

—
38

—
-

2
1
1

1

22

14

30

320
130

1.63
1.61
1.70
1.58
1.99
1.98

538

2 .2 2

-

400
387
136

2.24
2.08
1.84

92
293
385

1.87
1.51
1.53

7/58

8

20
10

1.49

25

1

196
38
38
129
118

104
78

26
1 ,010

1 .66

-

-

-

1

-

7
4
3
85

-

2
6
12
15
15
85

-

-

1
1

-

12
13
9
4

10
6

12

1
8
26

19

12
26

4

8
6
2

17
9
50

76

6

20

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

-

1

12
8

3

-

-

1

-

4
81

3
9
14

-

-

1

-

I

4
65
33

27

42

6

5
18
25

11

n

56
13

24

7

30

19

34

5
42
4

7

7
4

7
53
47

18
35

2
2
1
6

-

4

•
1

47

122
6

-

5

_

3
23
52

2

20

6

1

38

13

1

102

6

13

6

4

7
5
3

17

23
31

3
3

15

25
7

2

10

11

8

20

12

1

1

8

9

20

19

11

12

14

2

-

4
1

32

39

33

100

77

82

39

21

_

-

8
10
1

25
28

71
4

135

85

12

1

1

5

-

18
"

9
"

2
10

2

3
12
1

2

6

31
13

2

-

Women
Assemblers, class B 4 /b .....................
Assemblers, class C £/a .....................
Inspectors, class C 4 /* .....................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 4 /b, 2 / ...........................
Drill-press operators, single- or multipleSpil2flJ.G, CXeLoo \ ! jc
j + l

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class C 4 /b .......

See footnotes at end of table,




180

_

40

1 J xx
!

1.79

”

-

_

_

-

20

6

18

10

47

40

21

30

31

24

19

11

1

17

1

14

_

7

1

1

~

'

“

“

4

10
2

8

-

3

“

1

_

_

4

4

2

1

-

-

-

1

2

1

-

-

-

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

—

1

“

8

_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

~

-

-

-

“

_
_
_
_

1

2

5

3
3

_

8

1

“

1

1

_

Table B-35*

M ackUt& uf SqduUsUeA y ~Ga**lUu€et£
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O c c u p a tio n

Number
of
Workers

Average
earnings

y

$
1 .3 5

$
$
U nder 1 . 2 5
1 .3 0
and
%
under
1 .2 5
1 .3 0
1 .3 5

$
1 .U 0

$
1 .U 5

$
1*50

$
1 .6 0

$
1 .5 5

$
1 .6 5

$

$
1 .7 5

$
1 .7 0

1 .8 0
1 .8 5

$

$

$
1 .8 5

$

$

$
2 .1 0

2 .0 0

2 .0 5

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

2 .0 5

2 .1 0

13

32
7

5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

1 .9 0

$

$

s

$

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

$ .
2 .U 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .U 0

2 .5 0

5

_
2 .5 0

S2 . 6 0

2 .6 0

2 .1 5

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

over

1

$

2 .7 0

$2 . 8 0
and

1 .U 5

_

_

1 .7 5

1 .5 5

i.5 o

1 .U 0

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

_

_

8

5

1

-

-

1 .8 0

2
16
£

21

5

12

20

29

30

29

3
3
19

6
11
1

_
2

61

12
11

2
19

u
3

13

2 .1 5

M ach in e T o o l s 8 /
, A
A s s e m b l e r s , c l a s s B U /b

.................... .

303

_

2 .1 6

_

_
7

_

u

U

8

7

31

2

133
2

2
3

5
6

9
3

1
-

u
51

lU

6
lU

20
33

13
2

-

-

-

-

-

“

51

7

T

Grinding-machine operators, class A l / b . . .
Milling-machine operators, class A U /b . . . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B U /b , 5 / ...........................................................................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class B U / b .......................................................... ..................
Milling-machine operators, class B U /b . . . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B 1/b ....................
Machine-tool operators, production,
m
oa n 1. /V

U6
119
75

1 .9 8
1 .9 U
1 .5 8

2

2

1

-

8

8

3

21

90U

2 .1 U

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Uo

66

100

112

1U9

61

88

52

25

22

31

28

2U

39

10U

2 .0 6

1

9

38

-

31

2

2

-

U

7

3

2

2

2

1

28

1 .9 U

12

10

-

3

-

-

-

-

l

-

-

“

1

“

l

90
61
29
138
169

2 .0 9
2.00
2.28
2 .1 7
2.1U

2
2

lU
10

17

13
12
1

3
3

2
2

9
9

9
2
7

7

2

6

-

u

1

l

2

_

u

3U
21

27
3U

6
2

7
6
U

1
8
1

l
13
7

165

Electricians, maintenance U / a .......................................
Inspectors, class A U /a . .T................................................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 1/a .........................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A i i / b , 5 / ...........................................................................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class A U / b ....................... .......................................
Drill-press' operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A U / b ......... .............
Engine-lathe operators,
class At Total ........................

2

U

2 .2 2

556

2 .0 8

53
92

1 .8 2
1 .9 9

-

-

1 .9 5

-

-

V

6U

C/

1
*
1

-

1 .6 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

U

6
11

u

5
11

2U
27

u

3
7

11

u

1
6

2

11

20

29

17

2

27

l

1

2

7

21

11

16

29

62

39

69

Uo

31

26

23

6

13

9

11

18

16

29

U9

2U

3U

1

-

5
6

U
10

2
8

12
7

10
10

10
11

1
6

6
-

3
3

2

2

3

3

-

U

8

6

1

1

1

-

-

3

12

-

11

10

11

-

-

1

-

1

3

2

5

2

2

-

29

2Q

c
2

3

5
3

10
12

9

18

2

3

-

3

-

“

10
3

2

-

1
2

1

3

1

c
2
(O

20
230
78
25

1 .9 8
2 .1 7

17
26
15

1 .9 7
1 .7 9
1 02

53

1 .U 1

1.
tt

530
56
220

2 .0 5
1 .9 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

57

1 .9U

2
6

2.q5

336

u

_

93

2 .0 3
2J.6

1 Co

3
7

2
2
8

6

6

JO

i,
u
1 .5 8

7

u

6
-

Drill-press operators, single- or multipleGrinding-machine operators, class C U / a . . .
Laborers, material handling i y a , 6/ . . . . . . . . . .
Machine-tool operators, toolroom E / a .........
Welders, hand, class A U / a .................................................

17

*

-

-

_

1

-

-

-

_

_

7
27

5
2

•
a
J
3

03
6

1

U

Machine-tool Accessories - Production
Shops B / , 9 /

Machine-tool operators, production,
c l a s s A 5 / ........................................................................................
Grinding-machine operators, class A .......
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 5 / ............ ....................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiple-

20
Grinding-machine operators class B .......
Milling-machine operators, class B .......
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B ...........

See footnotes at end of table,




105
75

1.88
2.12
1 .9 3
1 .9 3

Ul

1 .8 3

.
.

2

$
g
-a

2

1
3
•
a

2

1

22

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

u

5

27

15

2

U7

77

5
3

6
1

1U
1

16
15

22
22

81
18
33
8

5U
3

2

102
21
UU
13

67

1U

37
7

21
8

l

3
1

6
1

5

-

13

8

12

7

2

1

u

53

62

2U

15

U

7

9

2
15

1

1

1
2

Uo

u

2
_
-

_

1

_
-

-

-

_
-

-

1
2

2
1

1

2

6

2
1

5
8

9

19

10

12

2U
5

6

12

11

ll

1

u

2

6

5

9

5
5

2

2

-

1

3
2

3

1

1

11

1U

15

5

5

l
l

.

3

7

11

29

-

1

2

5
1

12
15

1

l
9

8

2

2
U

7

7

8

5

1
*
2
9

1
*

J
*

1
*

3

1

6
3

1
2

U

l

6
1

-

-

-

u

2

5
6
1

3

1
2

MacJtUt&uf. 9ndu&L>Uel

Table B-35:

1/

G ostb su ted

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation

Number
of
Workers

Average
earnings

£/

$
$
Under 1.25 1.30
and
$
1.25 under
1. 10 1.15

$

$

$

$

$

1.35

l.bo

l.b5

1.50

1.55

1 .60

l.bo

l-W

1 .5 0

i-55

1.60

$

$

$

$

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

i.6«;

1.70

1.7S

1 .80

1.85

$

$

$

1.85

1.90

$
$
$
$
$
$
1.95 2.00 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2.2 0

1.90

1.9 ^

2 .0 0

s
$
$
$
$
$
2.30 2. bO 2 .5 0 2.60 2.70 2.80
and

2 .05

2.10

2 .1 ^

2 .2 0

2 .1 0

“

”

_

2 . hO

2.t£

2.60

2.70

2.80

over

Machine-tool Accessories - Production
Shops y , 9 / - Continued

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 5/ ................................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C .......................
Engine-lathe operators, class C ....................
Grinding-machine operators, class C ............
Milling-mach-* ne operators, class C ...............
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class C ......................
Tool-and-die makers (other than tool-and-die
jobbing shops) .........................................................

i

21*8

1.61

1

1

13

19

lb

26

39

b6

26

18

27

2

b

6

30
2i*
67
65

1.62

-

-

-

2

1

3

1

b
2

10

9
9

1

“

5

7

9

b

6
6

6
12

■

3
-

1

9

b

1 .6 7
1 .5 8
1 .6 b

-

1
1
11
12

-

-

1
5
7

2

-

2
2
b
b

1

~

9
3

3b

1 .6 1

-

-

1

-

1

b

10

-

b

1

1

15

2 .2 5

-

11

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1.
u
1

26

56
18
10
11

19
9

28

11
-

”

"

2

2

1

2

'

1

“

"

1

-

-

1
2

b

1

“

Machine-tool Accessories - Jobbing Shops 8 / , 9 /
•

Janitors, porters, and cleaners .............
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 5 / ............................ .. ............................................... ...
Drill-press operators, radial, class A ....
Engine-lathe operators,class A ...............................

2 #0J4
11
59

2 « l6
l.‘ b 2

2b 8
lb

2 .0 6
1 .9 b
2 .0 1

72

0 1R

2
1 0 /9

5

b

5

8

3

8

3

1

3

13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
2
5

b
1
2

11
2
1

28

3

3

6

13

u

}
7

0
7

O

2

3
8

b

7

28
6
3

16
-

100
2

77

g

6
-

6
-

-

-

-

1
.
h

-

-

-

-

39

21

_

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including

Grinding-machine operators, class B ......
wi lung-mac nine operators, cxass & ♦•••••••
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 5 / ................................
Engine-lathe operators, class C ..........
Machinists, production ..................... .
Welders, hand, class A ......................

131

07
22

i)
t
38

•

1 .7 6
1 .7 8
1 .8 0

1 lA

Uo

1 .5 1
1 .5 b
1 .9 5

17

1.92

9

b

2

1 .9 5

Machine-tool operators production,
class 3 5 / ..... .

16
2

1

7

26

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

2

2

2

-

-

2

-

6

6

8

3

*

*

*

2

29
3

9

11

n

2

b

1C

2

1

2

1

1

2
32

b
39

2
33

6

*

7
1

27

c
?

5

6

b

b
2b

7

3
19

5

g
3b

b

82

1 / ihe study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the machinery (nonelectrical) industry (croup 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19b5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the
Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were included. Data relate to a November 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
~V Includes establishments producing machine tools and machine-tool accessories for which separate data are also presented.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
5/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
%/ Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand", as reported in previous study.
7/ Workers were distributed as follows: 10 at $1.05 - 1.10; b at $1.15 “ 1*20; bb at $1.20 - 1.25*
"E/ Data limited to men workers.
2 / All or a majority of workers in each occupation studied were paid on a time basis.
f t / Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $0.95 - 1.00; 6 at $1.10 - 1.15; 2 at $1.15 - 1.20.




Table B-7211*

/W e* JtatuidtwL y
NUM B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF-

Occupation and sex

o
f

Average
hourly
2/

$
0i 8
under
.65

$
1.15

$
1.20

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

11
1
1

1
-

6

4
2

_
-

4
7

1
-

«
-

7

-

3

4
1
3
12

$
0.90

$
0.95

$
1.00

$
1.05

.90

.95

1.00

1.05

2
3

1
_

0.70

0.75

.70

.75

.80

.85

-

-

2

3
-

$

$

1.10

$
0.80 0.85

$
0.65

s

%

1.40

1.45

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

2
3

3

2
2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

1

5

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$

$

$

1.25

1.30

$
1.35

1.30

1.35

1.40

2
3
9

6
8

-

2
2

■ -

_
-

-

2
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

3
1
1

2

1
-

-

-

-

2
9

Men

Extractor operators 2/ ......................
Firemen, stationary boiler 2/ ...............
Washers, machine 2/ .........................

38
19
38

♦
1.02
1.25
1.24

-

—■
--

4
- ■

2
'

Women

Clerks, retail receiving 2/ .................
Finishers, flatwork, machine: Total ........
T i m e ......
Incentive ..
Identifiers: Total .........................
Time .......................
Incentive ..................
Markers: Total .............................
Time ...........................

Incentive............... .
.
Pressure, machine, shirts: Total ........
Time.......
Incentive ...
Wrappers, bundle: Total ...............
Time ............ .
Incentive ..........

19
291
153
138
90
51
39
61
41
20
197
30
167
51
44
7

.91
.73
.66
.82
.84
.79
.90
.87
.82
.98
.98
.90
.99
.76
.75

_

_
43
43
7

-

7

80
80
5
4
1

-

_
-

2
2

37
6
31
13
12
1
6
6

6
6

10
49
18
31 !
15
12
3
H
14

-

-

3
1
2
6
6

13
3
10
12 !
8

_

_

-

7
7
7
7

55
8
7
1
7
2
5
16
3
13
25
22

_

3

2
55

9
3
6
14
10
4
39
5
34

17
3
14
11
4
7
2
2
15

18
9
9

-

15

11
2
9
2
2
40
3
37

2
2
14
6
8

12

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

i

9

-

-

-

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Occupation £/

Routemen, retail (driver salesmen); Total . .
..
5-day workweek .....................
5$--day workweek ....................
6-day workweek .....................

Humber
of
worker*

189
96
30
63

Average
Under $
hourly
oamlags $
47.50 under
5/
50.00

♦
87.18
87.55
71.38
94.14

$

60.00

62.50

65.00 67.50

1

3
3

$
57.50

52.50

55.00 57.50

$
67.50

S
70.00

70.00

72.50

$

s
$
$
$
%
s
s
$
s
$
$
72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00

-

-

2
1

5

5

1

-

3
2

1

$
$
62.50 65.00

$
$
52.50 55.00

-

5

$
60.00

50.00

1

-

i

4
3
1

1

-

-

5
4
1

; n

i

6
3
2

3
3
-

10
4
4
2

75.00 80.00

6
2
-

4

13
12
1

85.00

14
4
4
6

90.00 95.00

15
5
-

10

27
18
3
6

and
over

100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00

9
5
-

4

21
10
3
8

7
2
2
3

11
5
_

6

_

10
4

6
4

6

2

l

1/ The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget. Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2f Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.
U Data limited to men workers.
5/ Straight-tine earnings (includes commission earnings).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1952
*
D.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




O

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.
Additional infomation
is available in reports issued separately for these individual industries or trades.)

Table 0-15:

B u d d L tU f. G o * iiu * c t* 0 * t

Table 0-205:

S a A & tie & -G o * J* H « ie d

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Brl delayers ................................. $3,120
Carpenters ....... .......... ............
3.075
Electricians..... ...........
3.075
Painters .............. ................. . 2.700
Plasterers ........................ .
3.075
Plumbers...........................
3.045
Building laborers ........................
2.325

Table C-205:

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

/£ake/U e&

July 1, 1952______
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Agreement A:
First hands ........................ $1,687
Second hands ..................... .
1.625
Male bake-shop helpers and shipping
1.250
clerks ..........................
.956
Women, all classes.................
Agreement B:
Overmen ......................... .
1.835
Mixers ........ ..................... 1.835
1.770
Benchmen ...........................
Bake-shop helpers ..................
1.354

48
48




July lt 1952
Rate

Classification

per
hour

Hours
per

and pastry shops:

Pie

48
48
48
48

1.550

40
40

1.380

40

1.280
1.030
1.060
1.010

40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Book and job shops: - Continued

Dough mixers, overmen .................. $1,550
1.280
Bake-shop helpers .....................
Wrapper girls ......................... 1.010

40
40
40

Hebrew baking:
Overmen and dough mixers...............
Bench workers .........................
H e l pers ................... ......... .
Cake icers and miscellaneous helpers,
women:
First 6 months ......................
After 6 months .....................

1.977
1.866
1.444

45
45.
45

.933
1.044

45
45

1.500
1.430
1.330
1.300
1.000

40
40
40
40
40

Crackers and cookies:
Mixers, overmen, peelers, cracker
overmen, machinemen .................
Rollers...................... .
Cake-oven helpers, mixers' helpers .....
Bake-shop helpers .....................
All other helpers (women) ..............

Table C-27:

p Ju ritU tff

’
'July 1. 1952______
Classification

1 .5 0 0

Classification

week

48
45

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Overmen, mixers, ingredientmen, cake
decorators .........................
Bench or machine hands, doughnut-machine
operators ..........................
Mixers' helpers, oven feeders, helpers
and dumpers, wrapping and slicer
adjusters ..........................
Bake-shop helpers, shipping-room helpers,
bread wrappers and slicers ...........
Pie-machine operators (women) ............
Hand icers (women) ....................
Women employees ....... ...............

Table C-27:

July 1, 1952

January 2. 1953

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Book and job shops:
Bindery women:
Hand .............................. $1,230
Machine ............................ 1.3 0 0
2.500
Bookbinders .......... ................
Compositors, hand ...................... 2.625
Electrotypers ......................... 2.740
Machine operators .....................
2.675
Machine tenders (machinists) ........... 2.675

37
37
37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

Mailers:
Agreement A ........................ $2,665
2.576
Agreement B ........................
Agreement C ........................
2.635
Photoengravers:
Agreement A ........... .
2.853
3.061
Agreement B (comic syndicate) .......
Agreement C (rotogravure) ...........
3.094
Press assistants and feeders:
Agreement A:
2.150
Cylinder ........................
1.912
Colt's Armory ...................
Platen............ .............. 1.857
1 Harris Claybourn multi-color .... 2.234
1 2-color, 1 perfecting or 1 singlecolor rotogravure .............. 2.190
1.970
Pressmen, cylinder:
Agreement A:
1 2-color or 1 press with color
attachment; 1 perfecting; 1 flat
or semirotary; 1 Kidder, Coy or
2.698
Meisel ........................
1 or 2 single cylinder; 1 single
cylinder and not more than 3 job;
engravers' proofing press; 2
single-color Harris; 1 or 2 Kelly,
Miehle, Vertical or Miller High­
speed with 3 or less job
2.625
presses .......................
Agreement B ....................... . 2.390
Agreement C ........ ...............
2.763
Pressmen, rotogravure:
1 single-color; 1 multi-color......
2.703
Pressmen, platen:
1 or 2 .......... ........ . ........ .. 2.378
2.487
3 or 4 ......... ...... ....... ......
2.587
2.816
Stereotypers ..........................

36 1/3
37 1/2
36 2/3
37 1/2
37 1/2
38 3/4
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

37 1/2
37 1/2

37 1/2

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work ...........
Compositors, hand - night work ..........

2.693
2.858

37 1/2
37 1/2

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor.Statistics

15

Table C-27:

P ^ U 4 iti4 i^ -Q o ^ § t£ H i4 e < i

Table C-42:

M o to ^ p U tcA & tia e b d

Table C-42:

a n d atfelpjeAA
July 1|_1952

July 1, 1952
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Newspapers: - Continued
Machine operators - day work .......... . $2,693
2.858
Machine operators - night work .........
Machine tenders (machinists) - day
w o r k .......................... .....
2.693
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
work ..................... ........... 2.858
Mailers - day work:
Agreement A ........ ...............
2.564
Agreement B ........................
2.403
Mailers - night work:
Agreement A ........................
2.831
Agreement B ........................
2.575
Photoengravers - day work:
Agreement A ........................
2.949
3.016
Agreement B ..... ..................
Photoengravers - night work ........... 3.303
Pressmen, web presses - day work:
Agreement A ................. ....... 2.603
Agreement B (art gravure) ........... 2.736
2.806
Agreement C ........................
Pressmen, web presses - night work:
2.807
Agreement A ......... ...............
Agreement B (art gravure) ...........
3.051
Agreement C ....................... . 3.087
Pressmen-in-charge - day work:
2.861
Agreement A ............. ........ .
Agreement B (art gravure) ...........
2.980
Agreement C ......... .................. . 3.006
Pressmen-in-charge - night work:
Agreement A .............. .............. 3.099
Agreement B (art gravure) ........... 3.327
Agreement C .............................
3.308
Stereotype rs - day work ................
Stereotypers - night work ..............
2 .8 7 4

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
36 2/3
37 1/2
35
35
37 1/2
37 1/2
35
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
35
35
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2

Classification

Bakery ......... ......
Helpers ...........
Transport .........
Part-time driver ....
Cracker.......... .
Pretzel.......... .
Yeast:
Agreement A:
First 3 months
After 3 months
Agreement B:
First 3 months
After 3 months
Beer - Keg and bottle:
Helpers:
Agreement A ....
Agreement B ....
Building:
Construction:
Excavating truck ...,
Special tractor type
Carry-all truck ..,.,
Material:
Agrameter operator .
,
Building supply ....,
Ready-mix truck ....
Semitractor...... .
Yard tractor .....

July 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per

48

48
48
48
45
48

1.400
1.610

48
48

1.423
1.730

48
48

1.500
1.500

40
40

2.000
2.250

40
40
40

2.150
1 .8 5 0
1.750

1.850
1.850
1.750

40
40
40
40
40

JioocU ^ A O M d d i

Coal .............................
Helpers .......... ...... .......
Tractor drivers ...............

1.700
1.750

40
40
40

Furniture ........................
Helpers .......................

1 .6 0 0
1.550

48
48

1,620
1.700

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

1.615

Ice cream: - Continued
Special delivery:
First 15 days ...................... $1,605
Thereafter ......................... 1.705

48
48

Laundry:
Linen ............................ .
Rag supply

1.513
1.500

40
44

Milk:
Heavy transport............... .......
Special delivery ......................

1.730
1.630

48
48

1.745
1.695

48
48

2 .227

48

2 .398

45

1.913
1.910

40
40

1.610
1.686
1.760

40
40
40

1.477
1.497
1.596

40
40
40

1.750.

40

1.855

40

1.181
1.300
1.300

44
40
40

1 .330
1.430
1.0 3 0

40
40
40

1.500

40

Newspaper and magazine:
Agreement A:
Day:
Routemen ........................
Night:
Routemen ........................
Magazine:
Agreement A ..........................
Agreement B ....... ............
Oil transport:
City:
Starting ..........................
6 - 1 2 months ......................
After 1 y e a r ....... ...............
Lake County:
Starting .................... ......
6 - 1 2 months ............. .........
After 1 year .......................

48
48

Grocery - Wholesale .............. .

Table C-41:

Classification

Moving:
Local ......................
He!pers .ftTTTT.T......................

$1,733
1.570
1.870
1.610
1.690
1 .8 3 0

General:
Local trucking:
Single-axle unit ............
Trailer, truck and semitrailer

35
35
37 1/2
37 1/2
35

A 4 o to ^ tfU tcA

asut

40

1.650

Produce ............................. .

Soft drink:
October lt 1952
Classification

Rate
per
hour

1-raan cars and busses:
First 3 months ....... .......... ....... $1,700
4 — 12 months .......................... 1.730
After 1 year .......................... 1.750




Hours
per
week

4,
7
44
44

Ice:
Experienced route drivers
Helpers ............... .

1.677
1,286

44
44

Ice cream:
Transport ,
Deliveries

1.730
1.800

48
48

Helpers .................. •»•••••••••
Waste paper - City delivery:
Single trailer ........................
Semi ............. ............... .

16

D : Supplementary Wage Practices
Table D-l:

S h if t S b ift& u m t ic U P t& a td d a n l y

Percent of total plant employment «
•
(a)
By establishment
policy in -

Shift differential

Tb)
Actually working on extra
shifts in -

All manufacturing industries
2d shift
work
All workers................. .......................
Workers in establishments having provisions
for late shifts .................. ...... ........ TT.
With shift differential ..........................
Uniform cents (per hour)....•••••....... .
3, U cents ................................ .
5 cents ...... ........ ..... *•••••••••.......
6 cents ................ .............. .
6^ cents ..................................___
7 cents .............. ..................... .
cents ...................................
8 cents ................................... t
9 cents ........................... ....... .
10 cents .............................. .
Over 10 cents .............................. .
Uniform percentage................ ............
5 percent ..................................
7 percent ................................. .
percent .................................T
10 percent ........ .........................
15 percent .......................... .......

3d or other
shift work

3d or other
shift

2d shift

100.0

100.0

XXX

XXX

9U.1
91.3
6U.1
1.3
18.3
lU.U
.U
15.8
6.6
1.1

77.0
75.6
U8.3
.6
2.6
.7

21.2
20.6
15.5
•*
A
3.3
U.l
(2/)

8.2
8.1
7.0
.1
.2
(2/)

•k

hTk

8.5
2.9
2.3
12 .2
1 6 .6
1.5

6.2
26.0
1 3 .6
1 .6

S

’

1.5
•U
2.5
1.9

l.U

.1
U.8
2.2
.2

2U.U

1 .1

1 0 .8

3.1
7.U
13. U
.5

Other....................................... .

1 .2

2.9

.3

(2 / )

With no shift differential ......... .............. .

2 .8

l. U

.6

.1

23.0

XXX

XXX

Workers in establishments having no provisions
for late shifts................................. .

5 .9

•U

2.U
(2 / )

y Shift differential data are presented in terms of (a) establishment policy and (b) workers actually employed
on late shifts at the time of the survey. An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met any of the
following conditions: (1) operated late shifts at the time of the survey, (2) had union-contract provisions covering
late shifts, or (3) had operated late shifts within 6 months prior to the survey.
2/ Less than 0.05 percent.
Table D-2j

S c h e d u le d T V e e k ltf d fo u /U

Percent of office workers 1/ euployed in Weekly hours

All workers.............................. .
37i hours and under............. .............. .
Over 37i and under Uo hours .................... .
Over UO and under UU hours ............ ..........
UU hours ......... ........................... .
Over UU and Tinder U8 hours......................
U8 hours...................... ................
Over U8 and under 56 hours ...................... .

Information not available........ .......... ..

All
industries 2/
100.0
10.U
2.1
8U.3
.9
l.U
.U
.5
-

Manufacturing

100.0
5.2
1.1
91.2
2.0
.5
-

Public
utilities *

Percent of plant workers employed in All
industries 3/

Wholesale
trade

Finance

100.0

100.0

1CO.O

100.0

6,U
.2
92.9
•5
-

10.2
5.9
79.9
1.7
2.3
“

28.5
5.0
6U.2
1.7
.6
-

1.6
67.U
U.9
1.6
5.0
10.6
3.0
3.3
2.U

-

“

-

-

-

-

~
-

**

.2

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

2.0

_

Manufacturing

-

-

76.1
3.6
.9
U.U
6.0
3.8
.9
2.3

U9.6
io.U
31.6
8.U

-

-

80.0
2.9
6.6
1.5
5.7

3.3
-

1/ Data relate to women workers.
2/ Includes data for retail trade (except department stores) and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
3/ Includes data for retail trade (except departmertf, stores), real estate, and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1952




D.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17

P a id dfolidayA,

Table D-3:

Percent of plant workers employed in •

Percent of office workers employed in Number of paid holidays

All workers................... .............. .
Establishments providing paid holidays ..........
1 d a y ...... •••••......................... •
2, 3 days ...................................
5 d a y s ....... ..... ••••.................. ..
6 days .....................................
7 days .....................................
6 days .....................................
9 days .....................................
10 days ....................................
11 d a y s ................................... .
Establishments providing no paid holidays.... ..
Information not available....... .............

All
industries

9 9 .3
(3 /)
8979
6 .3
.7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .0
.1
9 6 .6
1 .1
1 .2

100.0

Manufacturing

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1/

Public
utilities *

1 0 0 .0
5 0 .1
U9.9
“

1 0 0 .0
97.3
2 .7
-

-

.2

1.0
"

1 .9
.3

*7
T

-

“

All
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
79.3
2 .9
1 .3
lt 2
i.

9 0 .8
l .lt
.8

9 7 .5
.It
1 .2
9 3 .6
1 .8

Finance «

.9

8U.2
3 .0
.5

2 .3

-

.5

9 .0

2.5

.2

"

8 8 .6
8U.0
lt.6
-

5 7 .0
■ ■
3 6 .8
1 9 .2
1.0
-

-

U3.0
“

ll.lt

Includes data for retail trade (except department stores) and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2/ Includes data for retail trade (except department stores), real estate, and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
3/ less than 0.05 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1/

P a id V a o cU io * t& (@ 0 4m cU P a o u M

Table D-U:

om A

)

Percent of 1 ffice workers employed in o

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Vacation policy
All
industries
All workers............. .................... ..

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Finance **

All
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
99.9
23.8
75.5
.6
.1

100.0
99.8
16.6
82.6
.6
.
.2

100.0
100.0
27.9
72.1
_
.
_

100.0
100.0
7.1
92.9

98.3
90.0
80.9
8.1
1.0
6.7
1.6

100.0
89.6
82.0
6.2
1 1*
.
8.I
t
2.0

89.8
89.8
85.0

89.9
89.9
69.0
20.9

1/

After 1 year of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations...............................
Length-of-time payment.................... . .
1 w e e k ............................. .....
2 weeks ..................................
Other................. ..................
Percentage payment 3 / ............ ..... .....
Other ......................................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations........................... .

~

•

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0
100.0
67.1
3t.3
.6

-

“

-

•

*
*

1.7

-

U .8

_
_
10.2

_
1 0 .1

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF L A B ®
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18

Table D-lt:

fic U ft V cU x U iO tU ty o SU H & l P * J0 4 M A i0 4 l£ )G o + U lH U e d
Percent of plant workers employed in -

Percent of office workers employed in Vacation policy

All workers ..................................

All
industries 1/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

1C0.0

100.0

100.0
99.9
9.7
_
88.6
1.6
.1

100.0
99.8
7.9
_
91.9
_
.2

100.0
100.0
26.1
_
73.1
.8
-

100.0
100.0
lt 2
i.
_
85.8
-

All
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0
1.9
98 .1
-

98.3
90.0
5U.9
13.8
21.3
6.7
1.6

100.0
89.6
59.1
17.1
13.U
8.I
t
2.0

6 9 .8
89.8
59.U
30.lt
-

89.9
89.9
35.5
3.0
5l.it
-

10.2

10.1

89.8
89.8
3U.6
8.I
t
U6.8
-

89.9
89.9
20.7
7.5
61.7
-

10.2

10.1

89.8
89.8
1.0
88.8
-

89.9
89.9
13.5
75.1
1.3
-

10.2

10.1

89.8
89.8
1.0
86.8
2.0
-

89.9
89.9
13.5
75.1
1.3
-

10.2

10.1

Finance

After 2 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations..... .......... ........ ......
Length-of-time Dayment ..... ..........
1 w e e k ...... ..... .....................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..... ....... .
2 weeks ................................
Over 2 weeks ............................
Percentage payment 3/ ......................
Other.............. ......................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations...........................

-

-

-

-

-

1.7

-

After 3 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations .............................
Length-of-time payment .....................
1 w e e k .................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks.............. ....... ........ .
Over 2 weeks ............................
Percentage payment 3 / ......................
Other .....................................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ...........................

100.0
99.9
U. 7
_
93.6
1.6
.1
-

100.0
99.8
6.7
_
93.1
_
.2
-

100.0
100.0
.6
_
98.6
.8
_
-

100.0
100.0
2.1
_
97.9
_
_
-

100.0
100.0
_
100.0
-

98.3
90.0
ltl.l
11.6
37.3
6.7
1.6
1.7

100.0
89.6
U6.5
lit.O
29.1
8.I
t
2.0
-

AfterS years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations.............................*
Length-of-time payment .....................
1 w e e k ................................ .
2 weeks ............................ .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .................
3 weeks.....*..........................
Percentage payment 3/ *.....................
Other .....................................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations...... *............. .

100.0
99.9
.5

95.9
1.6
1.9
.1
-

100.0
99.8
.3
99.5
_
.2
-

100.0
100.0
_
99.2
_
.8
_
-

100.0
100.0
2.1
9U.0
3.9
_
-

100.0
100.0
_
90.lt
3.1
6.5
-

98.3
90.0
2.U
8t)
1.t
1.9
1.3
6.7
1.6
1.7

100.0
89.6
1.2
85.9
2.5
8.I
t
2.0
-

After 10 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations................T.... ...... .
Length-of-time payment ......................
1 week .................................
2 weeks...... ...... .................. .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............... .
3 weeks ................................
Percentage payment 3 / ........ .............
Other..................... ...............
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ...........................

100.0
99.9
.5

89.7
2.2
7 .5
-

.1
■

100.0
99.8
.3
9 U .2

2.9
2.U
.2
~

See footnotes at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




100.0
100.0
_
92.6

100.0
100.0
2.1
9U.0

_

-

7.U

3.9
-

-

100.0
100.0
8it.l
3.1
12.8
-

98.3
90.0
2.3
78.6
5 .5

3.6

-

-

•

6.7
1.6

■

1.7

100.0
89.6
1.0
79.0
7.2
2.I
t
8.I
t
2.0

Table D-U:

P a id V a c a tio n * ty o b m a l P A a a iiia * iA ) - C o n tin u e d

Percent of office workers employed in -

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Vacation policy
All
industries 1/

All w o r k e r s ........... ...................... .

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
99.9
.5
50.9
.6

100.0
99.8
.3
52.2
1.0
U6.3

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
2.1
69.1
.
28.8

All
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0
-

98.3
90.0
2.3
U5.3
3.5
38.9
6.7

100.0
89.6
1.0
Ul.9
U.5
U2.2
8.U

89.8
89.8
1.0
UU.5
-

89.9
89.9
13.5
U 3 .1
-

UU.3

33.3

Finance **

After 15 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid v a c a t i o n s .................................. .
Length-of-time payment ..........................
1 w e e k ........................•••••••....... .
2 w e e k s ........... ...........................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ................... .
3 w e e k s ...................... ................
Percentage payment 3 / ...........................
Other .............................................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations .............. ..................

U7.9

.1

9.9
90.1

63.5
_
36.5

-

-

.2

-

-

-

1.6

2.0

"

”

"

•

1.7

“

-

-

10.2

1 0 .1

89.8
89»8
1.0
UU.5
-

89.9
89.9
13.5
Uo.o
-

UU.3

36.U

After 20 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ................................••••
Length-of-time payment .............. ...........
1 w e e k ........ .................. .............
2 w e e k s ...... ...................... ..........
Over 2 and under 3 weeks •
....... •••••••
3 w e e k s ........ ....... ....... ...............
Over 3 weeks •••••••.....................
Percentage payment 3/ ...........................
Other »••••.............. ..................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ............. ........ .

100.0

100.0

99.9
.5
U2.9
.

99.8
.3
I .i1
18
.

55.9

51.1

.6

.1

.2

100.0
100.0
.
9.9
.
90.1

.
-

100,0
100.0
2.1
66.0

100.0
100.0

31.9

72.0
U.5

-

*

23 .5 '
-

-

98.3
90.0
2.3
38.8
2.U
U6.5

100.0
89.6
1.0
3U.1
3.1
51.U

-

-

6.7

8.U

1.6

2.0

-

-

10.2

1.7

10.1

89.8
89.8

89.9

After 25 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid v a c a t i o n s .......... ...................
Length-of-tiae p a y m e n t ............. .
1 w e e k ................ ........... ......
2 w e e k s ............................... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .................
3 weeks .......................................
Over 3 weeks ........... .................
Percentage payment 3/ ........ ..............
Other •••••............ ................... .
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ...........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9
.5
Ul.7

99.8
.3
U8.U

100.0
-

-

.

53.5

1*6.5

U.2

U.6

.1

.2

9.9

90.1

-

100.0
100.0
2.1
63.0
-

33.7

1.2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
16.5

76.1
7.U

-

98.3
90.0
2.3
37.1
1.9
U5.8
2.9
6.7

100.0

1.6

2.0

1.7

1/ Includes data for retail trade (except department stores) and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2/ Includes data for retail trade (except department stores)} real estate, and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
3/ Percent of annual earnings.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads)} communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




89.6

2.5

1 .0
23.0
-

50.U

65.8

1.0
3U.1

1.6
8.U

10.2

69.9

13.5
Uo.o

22.6
13.8
1 0 .1

Table D-5:

S+tUlAOMCe G*tcl P&MdAOH. P lon l

Percent of 1 ffice workers employed in o
Type of plan

All
industries 1/

All w o r k e r s ......................................... •

Workers in establishments having insurance
or pension plans . V ........................... .
Insurance plans
...............................
Life .................................... ......
Accidental death and dismemberment ..........
Sickness and accident ........................
Hospitalization ...............................
Surgical .......................................
Medical ........................................
Pension or retirement p l a n ..................... .
Workers in establishments having no insurance
or pension plans .......................... ........
Information not available ..........................

1/
2/
!/

Manufacturing

100.0

h/

100.0

92.3
90.2
86.1
1*9.0
57.0
1
*9.0

95.6
92.3
90.9
57.2
73.5

1*5.1

58.0

Public
utilities *

62.2

2 1 .7

26.8

58.5

59.0

7.2
.5

U.O
.*
1

100.0

V

Wholesale
trade

100.0

Percent of plant workers employed in Finance **

100.0

51*.6

86.8
86.8
21.1

1
*5.2
1*9.5
Uo.5
il*.5
55.1

8.9
27.6
2 l*.0
10.9
1
*3.8

2.9

16.3

13.2

Manufacturing

100.0

86.8

97.1
97.1
63.6
5U.5
1*9.9
10.3
10.3
6 .1
*
87.1

83.7
83.7
83.7

All
industries 2/

U

95.1
87.3
8 U.6
50.5
76.1*
55.5
55.7
30.7
56.9

66.0
1
*6.1*
1
*6.6

25.7
51.5
9.3

3.9

1.2

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

89.5
83.5
80.1
1*3.9

Public
utilities *

V

100.0

71*. 8
71*. 8
58.3
39.1*

81.6
81.6
81.6

38.0
13.0
13.0

1*0.5
51*. 3
1
*1*.6

5.1*
1*5.1

1*2.9
5.9
39.2

25.2

18.1*

1.0

Includes data fo r r e t a i l trad e (except department s to re s ) and s e r v ic e s in ad d ition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra tely .
Includes data fo r r e t a i l trad e (except department s t o r e s ) , r e a l e s t a t e , and s e r v ic e s in add ition to th ose industry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
Unduplicated t o t a l .
k j L ife insurance p rov ision s reported fo r " a l l in d u strie s" and "p u b lic u t i l i t i e s " in th e October 1951 Cleveland Occupational Wage Survey B u lle tin (Number 1056 - p . 33) were in e r r o r .
Revised
estim ates are as fo llo w s : a l l in d u s tr ie s , o f f i c e - 8 2 .2 p e rce n t, p la n t - 8 0 .0 p e rce n t; pu b lic u t i l i t i e s , o f f i c e - 55.0 p ercen t, p lan t - 5 6.5 p e rce n t.
*
T ran sportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
O ccupational Wage Survey, C leveland, Ohio, October 1952
* * F in ance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .
U .S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




21

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey

The Bureaus occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources*
In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community*
Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments*
Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation*
Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.
With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau1s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and power
plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-4-). The industry groupings surveyed ares manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Inf ormation on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cover­
ed were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




such jobs were included only for films
ments of the broad industry divisions.

meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources.
Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included.
Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour; for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Bata are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishments full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.
The term noffice workers” referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, these work categories are included as plant workers in non­
manufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

22

in terns of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller.

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Cleveland, Ohio, X/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, October 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Numb*sr of
establijshments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study_

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In estat)lishinents
stvidled
Total

Office

1 8 5 ,6 0 0

2 9 ,2 2 0
16,370

4,320
1,930

Industrv divisions in which occupations were
surveved on an area basis
«
.

All divisions .................................
Manufacturing....... .......................
Nonmanufacturing ................... ...... .
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities.............. ...............
Wholesale trade ••••••.................. .
Retail trade (except department
stores)
..... ..............
Finance, insurance, and real estate .....
Services 2/ •............................

101
-

101
51

101
51
51

942

221

482
460

99

375,500
274,600

122

1 0 0 ,9 0 0

133,300
52,300

62
143

25
35

32,900
17,000

24,000
7,200

81
70
104

17
23

24,900

8,700

500

1 2 ,4 0 0

5,520

22

13,700

8 ,3 0 0
4 ,1 0 0

1,740
3,276
54,765

1,740
2,835
39,467
7,325

109
797
5,542

3,792
1,467
1,285

473
73
83

1 2 ,8 5 0

580

Industries in which occupations were
surveved on an industry basis 4/
Women’s and misses’ dresses ...................
Paints and varnishes ..........................
Machinery industries ..........................
Machine tools ...............................
Machine-tool accessories - production
shops .................... ........ .......
Machine-tool accessories - jobbing shops ....
Power laundries ............................ .

5/

8
8
21
21

10

10

31
247

17
80
9

8
8
21

19

13

4,052

62

20

2 ,6 6 2

28

15

2,054

12

8 ,2 3 0

888

2/ Cleveland Metropolitan Area (Cuyahoga and Lake Counties),
2/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in the October 1951 survey was 21 workers in wholesale
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services, and 101 in the other major industry divisions,
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
X/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.




23

Index

Assembler (machinery), 9, 10, 11
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery), 9
Bench hand (bakeries), 14
Biller, machine, 3
Bookbinder (printing), 14
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3
Bricklayer (building construction), 14
Calculating-machine operator, 3
Carpenter (building construction), 14
Carpenter, maintenance, 5
Cleaner, 6
Clerk, file, 3
Clerk, order, 3
Clerk, payroll, 3, 4
Clerk, retail receiving (power laundries), 13
Compositor, hand (printing), 14
Cutter and marker (women’s and
misses1 dresses), 8
Draftsman, 5
Drill-press operator
(machinery), 9, 10, 11, 12
Duplicating-machine operator, 4
Electrician (building construction), 14
Electrician, maintenance, 5
Electrician, maintenance
(machinery), 9, 11, 12
Engine-lathe operator
(machinery), 9, 10, 11, 12
Engineer, stationary, 5
Extractor operator (power laundries), 13
Fireman, stationary boiler, 5
Fireman, stationary boiler
(power laundries), 13
Froster (bakeries), 14
Grinding-machine operator
(machinery), 9, 10, 11, 12
Guard, 6
Helper (bakeries), 14
Helper, motortruck driver, 15
Helper, trades, maintenance. 6
Identifier (power laundries;, 13
Inspector (machinery), 9, 10, 11, 12
Inspector, final (examiner)
(women's and misses' dresses), 8
Janitor, 6




Janitor (machinery), 9, 11, 12
Key-punch operator, 4
Labeler and packer (paints
and varnishes), 8
Laborer (building construction), 14
Laborer, material handling, 7
Laborer, material handling
(machinery), 10. 11
Machine operator (printing), 14, 15
Machine tender (printing), 14, 15
Machine-tool operator,
production (machinery), 9, 10, 11, 12
Machine-tool operator, toolroom, 6
Machine-tool operator, toolroom
(machinery), 10, 11
Machinist, maintenance. 6
Machinist, production (machinery), 10, 12
Maintenance man, general utility
(paints and varnishes), 8
Marker (power laundries), 13
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 6
Mechanic, maintenance, 6
Milling-machine operator
(machinery), 9, 10, 11, 12
Millwright, 6
Mixer (bakeries), 14
Mixer (paints and varnishes), 8
Motortruck driver, 15
Nurse, industrial (registered), 5
Office boy, 3
Office girl, 4
Oiler, 6
Operator (local transit), 15
Order filler, 7
Overman (bakeries), 14
Packer, 7
Painter (building construction), 14
Painter, maintenance, 6
Photoengraver (printing), 14, 15
Pipe fitter, maintenance, 6
Plasterer (building construction), 14
Plumber (building construction), 14
Porter, 6
Press assistant (printing), 14
Press feeder (printing), 14

Presser (women's and misses' dresses), 8
Presser, machine, shirts
(power laundries), 13
Pressman (printing), 14, 15
Receiving clerk, 7
Routeman (driver-salesman)
(power laundries), 13
Screw-machine operator.
automatic (machinery), 9, 10
Secretary, 4
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women's
and misses' dresses), 8
Sewing-machine operator (women's
and misses' dresses), 8
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance, 6
Shipping clerk, 7
Shipping-and-receiving clerk, 7
Stenographer. 4
Stereotyper (printing), 14, 15
Stock handler (paints
and varnishes), 8
Switchboard operator, 4
Switchboard operator-receptionist, 4
Tabulating-machine operator, 3, 4
Technician (paints and varnishes), 8
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women's
and misses' dresses), 8
Tinter (paints and varnishes), 8
Tool-and-die maker, 6
Tool-and-die maker (machinery), 10, 12
Transcribing-machine operator, 4
Truck driver, 7
Trucker, hand (paints and varnishes), 8
Trucker, power, 7
Turret-lathe operator,
hand (machinery), 9, 10, 11, 12
Typist, 4
Varnish maker (paints and varnishes), 8
Washer, machine (power laundries), 13
Watchman, 7
Welder, hand (machinery), 10, 11, 12
Work distributor (women's and
misses' dresses), 8
Wrapper (bakeries), 14
Wrapper, bundle (power laundries), 13
' ☆

U. S. G O V E R N M E N T PRIN TING O F F IC E : 1953 0 —241603







Office.

This report
was prepared in the
Bureau's
Commu nic at i o n s m a y be a d d r e s s e d to:
A d o l p h 0.

North Central

Regional

Berger} Regional Director

Bureau of Labor Statistics
105 W e s t A d a m s Street
10th Floor
C h i c a g o 3)

Illinois

The services of t he
Bureau
of
Labor Statistics' regional offices
a r e a v a i l a b l e for c o n s u ltation on statistics r e l a t i n g to w a g e s a n d industrial
relations, employment,
prices, labor turn-over, productivity, w o r k injuries,
constr u c t i o n a n d housing.

The North Central R e g i o n i n c l u d e s the f o l l o w i n g S t a t e s
Illinois
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