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PORTLAND, OREGON
September 1952

Bulletin N o. 1116-2

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




PORTLAND, OREGON
September 1952




Bulletin No. 1116-2
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. - Price 2 0 cents




Contents
Page
1
1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ..............................
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,

INTRODUCTION.............................................
THE PORTLAND METROPOLITAN AREA ...........................

Letter of Transmittal

1

TABLSSs

Washington, D. C., January 21, 1953.

Average earnings for selected occupations studied cn an area
basis A-l
Office occupations ...........................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations.......
The Secretary of Labors
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations..... .
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
I
have the honor to transmit herewith a report on occu­
pational wages and related benefits in Portland, Oreg., during
occupations ................
September 1952. Similar studies are being conducted in a number
Average earnings for occupations studied on an industry
of other large labor-market areas during the fiscal year 1953o
basis * These studies have been designed to meet a variety of govern­
mental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide earnings
Union wage scales for selected occupations information for many occupations common to most manufacturing
C-15 Building construction ..........
and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries of selected
supplementary wage benefits.
Whenever possible, separate data
C-205 Bakeries .....................................
C-27 Printing......................................
have been presented for individual major industry divisions.
C-4.1 Local transit operating employees .............
C-42 Motortruck drivers and helpers ...............
This report was prepared in the Bureau*s regional of­
fice ih San Francisco, Calif., by John L. Dana, Regional Wage
Supplementary wage practices
and Industrial Relations Analyst.
The planning and central
D-l
Shift differential provisions .................
direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau’s Divi­
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours ............... ••••••••
sion of Vfetges and Industrial Relations.
D-3
Paid holidays .................................
D-4
Paid vacations..........
Ewan Clague, Commissioner.
D-5
Insurance and pension p l a n s .................

3
5
6
7

9
9
9
9
9

10
10
H
H
13

Hon. M a r t i n P. Durkin,

Secretary of Labor.




APPENDIX
Scope and method of s u r v e y ........ ..... •••••••.....

14

I N D E X ....................................................

I6

* NOTE: Earnings data for occupations that
are characteristic of particular local in­
dustries are presented, when studied, in
Series B tables. This additional cover­
age, however, was omitted from the survey
of the Portland, Oreg., area.
An occupa­
tional earnings report is available, on
request, for power laundries (June 1952).




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE

P O R T LA N D , 0 R E G
Of the 143,000 wage and salary workers in nonmanufacturing
industries, more than two-fifths (62,000) were in wholesale and re­
tail trade. Transportation (including railroads), coramunication,
and other utilities gave employment to about 32,000 workers and the
service industries utilized another 23,000.
Finance, insurance,
and real estate establishments accounted for 10,000 workers, and
the building construction industry employed approximately 16,000.

Introduction
The Portland area is one of several important industrial
centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently con­
ducting occupational wage surveys. Occupations common to a variety
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis. Cross-industry methods of sampling were thus
utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types of occu­
pations: (a) office; (b) professional and technical; (c) mainte­
nance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping#
In presenting earnings information for such jobs (tables A-l through
A-4) separate data have been provided wherever possible for indi­
vidual broad industry divisions#

Among the industry and establishment-size groups repre­
sented in the Bureau's survey of September 1952, almost S5 percent
of the plant workers were employed in establishments having written
contracts with labor organizations.
Unionization was virtually
complete in the utilities group of industries and in manufacturing.
Collective bargaining, in large part, is of the multi employer, in­
dustry-wide, master-agreement type in Portland.
Notable examples
of these types of collective bargaining are in the paper and pulp,
limbering, and metalworking industries in manufacturing; and in milk
and dairy products, and the maritime industry in nonmanufacturing.

Earnings information for occupations characteristic of
particular, important local industries have been presented, when
studied, in Series B tables. This supplemental coverage was omitted
in the survey in the Portland area. Union scales (Series C tables)
are presented for selected occupations in several industries or
trades in which the great maj ority of the workers are employed under
terms of collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or mini­
mum rates are believed to be indicative of prevailing pay practices.

The proportion of office workers employed under union
contract provisions was substantially less than that of plant work­
ers. About one-fifth of the employees worked in offices under the
terms of collective-bargaining agreements.
The majority of the
unionized office workers were employed in nonmanufacturing indus­
tries.

Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such
as vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension
plans.

Occupational W age Structure
Portland area wages increased 6 to 11 percent in a ma­
jority of plant occupations studied between June 1951, the date of
the Bureau's last comprehensive wage survey in the area, and Sep­
tember 1952. During the same period, salaries advanced 4 to 9 per­
cent in a majority of the office classifications studied. Although
formal adjustments on a general or across-the-board basis were usual
practice, many workers were advanced on an individual or informal
basis. Notable among the general increases occurring during the
period were those in the lumbering, paper and pulp, metalworking,
and maritime industries.

The Portland Metropolitan Area
The population of the four-county Portland Metropolitan
Area (Clackamus, Multnomah, and Washington Counties in Oregon and
Clark County in Washington) was more than 550,000 at the time of
the Bureau's survey.
About two-thirds of the population lived in
the city of Portland.
Wage and salary workers (excluding those in agricultural
pursuits and government) in the area numbered about 210,000 in the
fall of 1952. Manufacturing establishments, with 67,000 employees,
accounted for approximately a third of these workers. Metalworking
industries, including foundry operations and the fabrication of
metals into finished products such as tin cans, hardware, structur­
al steel, machinery, and transportation equipment, had 16,000 em­
ployees. At the time of the survey, the food industries employed
somewhat less than a fifth - about 14,000' - of the manufacturing
workers. Other important manufacturing industries were lumber and
wood products with 12,600 workers, paper and allied products with
7,000, and textiles and apparel with 5,400. Other manufacturing
industries, including furniture and fixtures and printing and pub­
lishing, gave employment to another 12,200.




Formalized rate structures for time-rated plant workers
were largely predominant in the Portland area. Only in wholesale
trade was there any appreciable proportion of workers whose rates
were set on an individual basis. The single-rate system was typical
in manufacturing and services, with range-of-rate structures most
common among firms in the utilities and wholesale trade groups, Among office workers, nearly two-thirds were employed in establish­
ments having formal structures of the rate-range type.
In most
other establishments, office salaries were determined on an indi­
vidual basis.
Only a small number of office workers were employed
in establishments having single-rate wage structures for individual
office occupations.

a)

Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing industries
were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing. In 13 of 1A
office classifications permitting comparison, salaries of workers in
manufacturing plants exceeded those of workers in nonmanufacturing.
Average hourly earnings for plant workers studied in all industries
were slightly higher in manufacturing for 12 of 19 job categories
for which comparisons were possible.

More than four-fifths of the plant workers in Portland
area manufacturing industries were employed in establishments having
provisions for late-shift work in September 1952, In a large ma­
jority of these establishments, extra-shift workers were paid shift
premiums - usually a cents-per-hour differential over day-shift
rates. More than a fourth of all
manufacturing plant workers
were actually engaged in extra-shift work at the time of the sur­
vey, with two times as many on second shifts as on third or other
shifts. Nine of every 10 women employed in Portland offices were




on a AO-hour weekly schedule. The AO-hour workweek was also general
practice for plant workers.
Almost all office workers and a large majority of plant
workers were employed in establishments providing paid holidays.
Six or 7 days annually was the typical pattern.
Similarly, va­
cations with pay were allowed both office and plant workers almost
universally. For office workers, a majority received 2 weeks* va­
cation after 1 year of service $ and for plant workers, most re­
ceived a 1-week vacation after a like period of service. After 5
years of service, almost all office and plant employees were granted
2 weeks* vacation.
Insurance or pension plans whereby the employers paid all
or a part of the cost were common for Portland workers. Fully four**
fifths of both office and plant workers were employed in establish­
ments which provided life, health and welfare insurance, or retire­
ment pensions, or some combination of these benefits.

3

A* Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Portland, Qreg., by industry division, September 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME;WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Average
Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
Weekly
Weekly
e r i g 30.00
a n n s and
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
32.50

$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
i
$
$
$
$
$
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50
35.00

37.50

40.00

“

-

42.50 45.00

-

47.50

50.00 52.50

55.00

57.50

4
4

18
18

60.00 62.50

$
s
s
S
75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
95.00

65.00

67.50

2
2

24
24

3

14

3

5

2

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

5
5

3
2

3
3

2
1

2
1

1
1
-

1
1
-

-

_
_

_
-

-

_
~

_

_
_

_
-

_
_

■ _
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

~

10
10
-

_
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

_
-

_
_
_

_
_

-

_

_
-

_

70.00 72.50

75.00

80.00 85.00

90.00

95.00

100.00

Men

188
33
155

40.0
40.0
40.0

1
69.50
83.50
66.50

~

Clerks, payroll .............................

32

40.5

71.00

.

Office bovs .......... ................. *....
Nonmanufacturing .........................

_ 51
39

40.0
40.0

42.00
42.50

-

Tabulating-aachine operators ............. .
Nonmanufacturing .........................

52
U3

40.0
40.0

69.00
69.50

Billers, machine (billing machine) ...........
Manufacturing ....... .....................
Nonmanufacturing .........................
Public utilities * ....................

143
25
118
60

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

50.00
54.00
49.00
52.50

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) .......
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing.... .....................
Retail trade ..........................

140
42
98
42

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

49.00
55.00
46.00
43.00

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A .......
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing .........................

114
26
88

40.0
~4 o 75
40.0

Clerks* or d e r...... ...... ...... ........ .
Manufacturing ......................... . ...
Nonmanufacturing .........................

2
2

-

6
6

~

-

11
_
11

15
15

28
28

13
4
9

7
_
7

27
4
n r --- T T
12

2
8
17
_ ---- T ----- r
17
-

!
.

2

—
9
4

1

-

-

“ j

-

2
2
“

-

7
7
7

5
5
5

-

-

4
4

15
13 —

8
7
3
<r ---- ST ---- T —

4
r

“

“

-

-

-

-

":
"

3
1

1
1

2
-

3
3

5
3

15
15

1
1

6
6

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

19
19

ii
_
ii
-

21
3
18
18

4
-

31
10
21
7

25
5
20
20

4
4
2

7
2
5
5

7
3
4
4

5
2
3
3

16
16
7

4
4
-

29
_
29
14

14
_
14
8

23
13
10
-

9
8
1
1

5
2
3
-

13
5
8
-

14
14
-

1
_
1
-

4
-

-

3
_
3

11
11
*

16
_
16

1
1

27
27

23
12
11

1
_
1

4
4

7
7

5
2
3

“

2
2
-

5
1 —
4

9
r
i

1
1

2
2

15

-

Women

-

4
4
_ i

-

58.00

6 .0
70

-

55.50

-

!
i

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B .......
Manufacturing ....................... .
..
Nonmanufacturing .........................

402
91
311

40.0
40.0
39.5

49.50
53.50
48.50

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) .....................................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing.........................
Retail trade ...........................

468
13i*
354
113

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

51.50
55.00
50.00
46.00

_
-

53

40.0

53.50

71
54

40.0
40.0

51.50
53.00

228
38
190
25

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

43.50
46.00
43.50
49.00

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer t y p e ).... ......... ..... .

..

Clerks, file, class A .......................
Nonmanufacturing .........................

Jlerks* file, class B .......................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing...................... . ..
Public utilities
......

4

_
-

-

15
15

29
29

29
29

49
49

45
13
32

43
5
38

105
30
75

28
18
10

9
3
6

12
11
1

6
2
4

18
18
18

19
19
13

21
21
9

28
9
19
12

89
3
86
11

51
9
42
11

87
31
56
10

56
30
26
12

28
10
18
11

15
7
8
6

13
11
2
“

11
5
6
”

18
12
6
-

6
5
1
-

4
2
2
-

16
16
-

8
8

“

_
~

-

-

-

-

-

6

12

_

9

2

6

6

4

4

2

2

-

-

-

_

-

4
4

22
8

4
1

18
18

9
9

4
4

■

3
3

4
4

“

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

14
r
6
5

8
4
4
2

6 ---- r
16
5
5
---- r
5 --- 1”
11
4
4
5
4
3

_

-

_

- ‘

-

-

-

~ !

_
-

17
17

j
i

' "
10 j
10

38
38

50
6
44

50
12 —
38
9

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

9
-

9

-

15

_
-

~

_
-

2
j______ i
See footnote at end of table.
★ Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Qreg., September 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABCR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Occnf xa/ i o*ti -G o*U**utm
d

Table A-l:
:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Portland, dreg., by industry division, September 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVINGi STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Average
Number
of
workers

S e x , o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
.go 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 $42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 $55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00. 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 * 95.00

3
0

under

32.50

35.00 37.50

40.00

42.50

45.00 47.56

50.00

52.50

8

19

62.50 65.00

55.00 57.50

60.00

67.50

70.00

31

6

6

-------- T --------- T ------- 2T

2

2

5
5

5
5

6
b

~

32
3
29

31
25
6
4
1

41
21
20
12
2

6
4
2
1
•

36
14
22
16
“

3
3

2

72.50

75.00 80.00

85.00

9 .0
00

95.00 100.00

Women - C ontinued

55

U o.o
” 5070

$
52.56
55.06

C le rics , p a y r o l l ............................................................................
M anufacturing .........................................................................
Nonm anufacturing ..................................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ........................................................
R e t a i l t r a d e ....................................................................

291
H5
145
49
60

40.0
40.5
40.0
40.0
40.5

55.56
56.00
55.00
59.56
56.56

D u p licatin g -m ach in e o p e r a t o r s .........................................
Nonm anufacturing ............................................................

57
50

40.0
40.0

46.00
44.50

-

Key-punch o p e r a to r s ..................................................................
N onm anufacturing ..................................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ......................................................

160
125
40

40.0
40.0
40.0

52.00
51.50
52.00

~

O f f ic e a i r l s ....................................................................................
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
N onm anufacturing ..................................................................

171
38
143

39.5
40.0
39.5

40.00
46.00
39.00

-

S e c r e t a r i e s ......................................................................... ..
M anufacturing ..........................................................................
Nonm anufacturing ..................................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ......................................................
R e t a i l tr a d e .........................................................

439
177
262
69
71

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0

64.50
65.50
63.50
70.00
57.50

881

40.0

C le rk s , o r d e r ................................................................................
W o n m an u factu rin g ..........................................................

S te n o g ra p h e rs , g e n e r a l ....................... .........................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .............................................................
N onm anufacturing ..................................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ......................................................
R e t a il t r a d e ............................................................... . .

S w itchb oard o p e r a t o r s ....................... ............................. ..
N o n ra a n u fa ctu rin g ..................................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * .............................................

Sw itchboard o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t i o n i s t s ........................
M an u factu rin g ..............................................................
N onm anufacturing ..................................................................
R e t a il t r a d e ....................................................................

T ab u latin g -m ach in e o p e r a to r s ............................................
N onm anufacturing ..................................................................

120
“

T S S ----- ” 4075

54.00
' 55.TXT
“
53.50
55.00
49.00

593
118
47

40.0
40.0
40.0

218
194
58

40.5
40.5
40.0

48.00
48.00
55.50

301
120
62

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

49.50
52.50
48.00
42.00

46
25

40.0
46.6

56.00
55.00

181

3
~

_
-

1

8
4
4

20

_
_

-

•

_

“

-

1

4

4
4

9
9

4
4
~

4
4
“

54
1
53

-

-

~

36

21

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

~

~

~

2

”

_

_

5

4

32

-

-

5

4

32

-

-

-

-

~

5

-

8

.
_

26

-

-

22
22

13
r

7

20
14
6
1
5

11
5
6
3
2

14
14

5
4

8
8

•

~

5
2

8
7

-

1
1

9
9
-

9
8
“

7
7
1

17
13
10

9
5
2

29
25
6

16
12
11

19
15
5

12
4
-

9
6
1

21

19
11
8

9
4
5

16
-

8
5

3

2
1
1

3
1
2

4
5
5 ---- T
1
3

_

16

2

2
-

4
1

15

-

_

1
_

-

5
-

_

30

-

_

----- 25”
""
**

13

7

- [

7
7

_

39

- —

5i
5
2
2

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




16

3 ----------S' —

“

13

i
i

_

31
12

2
2

-

20

3
3

81
37
1 ----- 22"
36
59
2
7
2
14

53
45
6

25
25
7

24
6
18

46
22 r
24
14

li t

4
4

_

33
17 --16
5
8

58
25

-

21
4
17
1

1

8

8

12

57
6
51
9
3

190
92

102 !
37
65
26

106
30
76
13

8

1
1

-

15

98
23
7

31

36
29
5
10

-

-

-

29
20
3

11
9
9

9
9

i

64
18
46

-

1

15
14
1
1

42
24
18
1

3

2

3
1

5

4

4

--------- ?

65

i

30

loU

_

1

8
9
1 ---- 9l
_
7

“

_
_

4
2
2
2

1
1

~

_

-

-

2
2
“

_

-

49
23
26
7
9

67
20
47
14
2

21
21
39

2
2
2

_

_

~

1

~

~

1
1

-

-

3
2
2

3
3
-

_

“

3
3
~

5
5

“

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

—

—

-

59
27
32
4
9

38

48
27 —
21
5
4

1

45

ar
21
7
2

30
23
4— i r
19
6
15
1
1

12

8
8

8

-

-

8

2
2

4

8
8

10
_

_

4
3

-

10

16

-

-

-

-

5

2
2
2

1
1
1

1
1

-

5
3
2

-

-

-

-

3
~

6

1

3
3

_

6

-

“

16

15
5
10
4

7
4
3

-

-

• '•
“

-

_

•-

-

_

_

.. ~

_
-

5

3
2
2

~

*_

•

_
_

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

-

-

-

_

_

-■

-

-

-

*

1

1

1

1

—

3

“

13

13
3
10
5

•

-

“

-

12
26
5

2
20
4
17 ------- 2 ------ 2 ~
2
3

2

24
4
20
13
1

—

rm
.

“

1

-

2

“

*53
51
11
1

---------r

~

_
_

-

1

5

Table A-ls

O ffice OccupatioH Contin u ed
dr

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Portland, dreg., by industry division, September 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly
hours
(Standard)

Weekly
earnings
(Standard)

$
$
$
32.50 35.00 37.50

$
40.00

37.50 40.00

42.50

W
under
32.50 35.00

$

4 .5
20
4 .0
50

$
$
45.00 47.50

$

47.50 50.00

52.50

50.00

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
s
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00

9 .0
00

55.00 .57,50 60.00

62.50

65.00 67.50

70.00

-

-

5
2
3

3
2
1

13
1
12

3

_

1

3

»

, 1

“

72.50

75.00

80.00 85.00

$
95.00

90.00 95.00 100.00

Women - Continued

I
Transcribing-machine operators, general .......
127
Nonmanufacturing............ ......... • “ 169
.

Tvoists. class A ............................
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing .........................

Typists, class B ............................
Manufacturing.............................
Nonmanufacturing .........................
Public utilities * ....................
Retail trade ..........................

32U

40.0
40.0

40.0

W

237

40.0

718
T

\ 40.0

40.0
40.6"
40.0
40.0
40.0

2 -6

598
76
105

_

!
'
:

5 .0
30
5 .6
36
5 .0
30

4 .0
30
4 .0
20
1 41.50

!
' 16. oo
'
i
; 49.50

i
1

_

'

*
, 51.50
! 5 ' 56“
5.
1

'

_

i
"!
"1

~

28
28
4

58
97
- --- 5“
92
58

58
58
10

!4

98
3r

66
13
16

18

14

108

58
12“
46

26
13
13

64

—W

17
37
32 --- 16" —

30
I2-1—
18

T

119
9 —
110

2
r —

15
15“

21
52
4
- --- 1“ --- 2“ ---- --- I T —
39
3
19
3

-

J

_
1____
1/
*

U

*
■

5

i
-

16
16

14

2
* j

38
3
35
27

18
a?
1 ----T
17
8
8
2

— 18“
46
8
9

63

12
18

13
I T 1—

4
0
2
9

7

41
14
27

2
1

18
2
16

1
1
_

n

4

r

_

~

”

~

-

_

_
-

-

-

-

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

~

“

*

-

7ec/uuocU O cCtifuUiO Hd

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Portland, Creg., by industry division, September 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage
Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

o
f
workers

Weekly
hours
(Standard)

Weekly
earnings
(Standard)

$
$
$
52.50 55.00 57.50
ana
57.50 60.00
$ 8

%

60.00
62.50

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00

65.00

67.50 70.00

72.50

75.00

8

13
IT

29
24

43
38

7
r

_

2
------- T

4
3

5

2

2

3

2

80.00 85.00

90.00

95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00

Men
183
Manufacturing .............................

40.0

167

"io;o

$

82.50
j“ 8T.6"0

1
“

4
“ —

-

6

T ---- 6~ —
x

r ---

46
45

18
17

12
12

2

1
1

“

-

2

j
Manufacturing ..............................

45
27

40.0
16.6

40
34

41.5

69.00
^ 73.00

2
—

J

2

4

4
—

i

15
14

“

8
8

11
$
------ I T ------ T" —

1
1 —

3
r

_ W en
om
i .

Nurses, in d u stria l (re g istere d ) ...........................

a . 5

64.50
64.00

2

T

|
1/

3
2

3
3

1 _____
_

‘

_

_

1_____
_

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




_

-

i
______

Ptoje& U aHcU W

-

8
8

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Table a-2:

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oreg., September 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

-

6

Table A-3: M o U t t e n O H C e O r t d p Q W e * P l a n t 0 c C 4 4 fu U lO H > i
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Portland, Oreg., by industry division, September 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
Workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
ho r y
ul
erig
anns

|
$
$
Under |l.40 1.45
and
*
under
1.40 1.45

1.50

Carpenters, maintenance ....................
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing........ ...............

194
153
41

*
2.25
2.25
2.24

Electricians, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing ..........................

268
247

2.13
2.12

Engineers, stationary............... ......
Manufacturing................. .........
Nonmanufacturing ........................

233
152
81

2.11
2.08
2.16

-

Firemen, stationary boilar .................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

230
186
44

1.92
1.91
1.95

-

Helpers, trades, maintenance ...............
Manufacturing ..........................

376
326

1.81
1.81

6
6

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ...........
Q.^tTtrin£
■ , ■
■
, ■■■■■i«

48
36

159
140

2.15
2.15

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

$ '
1.75

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60 2,70

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

“

1
1
*
*

4
4
~

1
1

.

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

-

3
3

6
4
2

12
12

4
4

6
-

9
9

12
10
2

16
16
-

2.07
2.05

Machinists, maintenance ....................
Manufacturing ..........................

$
1.50

_
-

-

~

_
-

-

-

-

4
4

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
9

-

_
-

1
1

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

-

"

Mechanics, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

331
“ 295
35
28

1.99
1.98
2.05
2.02

-

_
-

Millwrights ...............................
Manufacturing ..........................

208
208

2.21
2.21

“

Oilers ....................................
Manufacturing ..........................

113
105

1.79
1.77

6
6

_

-

.
.
-

3
1
2

10
6
4

12
12
“

28
28

41
12

163
163

19
19

19
15

2.35

2.40

2.45

2,50

~

11
_
11

7
_
7

_
-

36
32
4

39
30
9

-

83
7
83 ---5"

19
18

69
69

8
8

35
29

1
-

-

1
-

3
-

4

28
16
12

28
16
12

58
34
24

42
26
16

21
20
1

_

_

.

-

“

2
2

“

5
4
1

-

-

-

*

11
8
3

10
•
10

109
7<r~

18
18

5

8
8

4
4

4
4

-

-

-

_

_

'.

.

-

10
10

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

_

2
2

1
1

-

_
-

-

3
3

-

18
6

-

1
1

-

1
1
-

11
10
1
1

11
2
9
1

4
4

6
6

31
31

-

_
-

10
10

-

-

_
-

36
36

2
3

_

-

20

8
6

6
6

■
i-y

16
16

3
■
jj

2
-

23
16

32
29

10
10

6
6

51
51

-

-

19
5
14
2

14
4
10
8

83

8~
-

83
76

725
18
707
474

42
38
4
-

20
12
8
7

34
20
14
14

7
7
7

13
2
11

8
8

20
20

24
10
14
14

15
14
1
1

118
117
1

14
5
9
f

76
73
3

8
8
-

4
4
*
*

2
2

20
20

8

6
"“ 5“ '

2.80

_
•

“

4

7

2
2

-

2n6Q

11
9

5

7

25
18

-

_
_
-

2
2
2

_

4
4

-

4
4
4

1
.
1
A

_
„
_

-

-

r
-

_
-

.

-

-

-

-

8
8

-

-

4
4

~

9
9

2
2

115
115

6
6“

4
4

-

2
2

2
2

4
4

8
8

30
30

15
14

4
4

15
14

1
1

6
-

“

-

5
5

9
9
~

-

14
14
-

25
24
1

2
2
~

11
10

22
22

-

10
10

-

-

34
34

4
4

2
2

-

•

-

-

4
4

-

•

-

-

7
2
>

26
18
8

-

-

_

-

_

11
11

_

-

-

-

8

20
.2

2.20
79
"
T 9 --- ” 2 .20—

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




2
2

2.30

12
12
“

-

2.17

1/
*

14
14

2.25

45
43
2

-

2.08
2.09

Tool-and-die makers .......................

3
3

2.20

15
15
“

-

102
2.18
70--- _ t : 7
t
32

32

14
14

_

-

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ........... .

1
1

-

2,15

15

2.03
2.02
2.03
2.03

91
84

.

2.70

2.10

2

-

994
120
874
596

Pipe fitters, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing ..........................

~

...

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ........
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ...................

—

~

-

_

_

Painters, maintenance ......................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

-

2
2

7
---1“
6

4

38
4
---2~ ~ W

1
1

14

4

16
16

16

16

7
7

10
20
20

23
23

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oreg,, September 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP IABOR

Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c ?

Table A-4s G u d la d ic U , 7 i/o A e Ju U 4 A iH (f,C i* u l S U

ififU

w

f C h o U flc U d O H l

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Portland, Greg., by industry division, September 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, e le c tr ic bridge (under
20 tone) . . . . . . ........................................ . . . . . . . . . . .

N ber
um
of

$
0.95

$
1.00

$
1 .0 5

$
1.10

$
1 .15

$
1 .2 0

$
1.25

$
1 .3 0

$
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

$
1 .5 0

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
$
$
1 .7 0 1.75 1 .8 0

$
1.85

$
1 .90

$
1 .9 5

$
$
2.00 2.05

1.00

1.05

1 .1 0

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1 .35

1 .4 0

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1,70

1.75

1 .8 0

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

2

$
A
verage
hourly
earnings Under 0.9 0
$
.95
0.90

8
8

17
17
if

4
1
.

_

60
Av
n
O

164
72
92
11

7

8

6

7

8
8

4
5

157
------335“

*
2.21
2.22

foards ...................................................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................... ..

........ 74
71

1.60
1.60

Jan ito rs, p o rters, and cleaners (men) ............... ..

1.052
498
554
184
199

1.38
1.49
1.28
1.44
1.21

6

12

n

1

62

12

11

41
12
29

42

6

42

1

7

12

11

1

58
4
24

94
6
86

Ja n ito rs, p o rters, and cleaners (women) . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing
Public u t i l i t i e s * .................................... ..
R etell trade ..................... r ____T.............. T. . r

140
116
61
29

1.13
1.14
1.23
.96

7
5

6
4
— 5~" —
1
11
4
3

9
7
6
1

45
37
13
4

24
18
16

5
1

Laborers, m aterial handling 4 / ......... .......................
Manufacturing ..................................................... ..
Ijopaenifaeturing .............................. ................................... ...
P»e»1 i 4 uijd 1 Atd aa * r ............... t . . T___ T.
*
Bata* 1 trade ........................................ ..

1,881
' ■ 643
1,238
489
236

1.65
1.57
1.69
1.83
1.45

Order f i l l e r s ....................................................................
Manufacturing TT. ................... !•,«•»•
Nonmanufacturing ...................................... ..
R etail trade ................... .........................

888
241
61*7
140

1.63
1.68
1.61
1.59

Peekera . olaaa A ..............................................................
ng #r-----T--r-TTTr-TtrTT-T-tT ■
Nonnanufartu id na
...
. . .

258
78
180

1.63
1.64
1.63

Public u t i l i t i e s * ............................................. ..
Hetail trade t . . . . I . r . . TTTTTT, T. - « . . . . T. 1
,

Packers, cla ss B ..............................................................
172
Nonaanufacturing ....................................................... ------- 58“

1.49
1.51

RectiVink clerks ..............................................................
IfAmi fi nfviwt n0 .
Hovmiiifimfiiwlne
__

94
28
66

185
87
98

1.71
1.82
1.61

5

13
ll

L

94

1

3.05
36
69
11
41

71
31
40
32
5

1?8
111
47
36
g

5
5
5

12
12
11
1

7
7
7

5

21
16
5

14
9 ----- 2 j
14 — r ~

42

8

7

2

42

8

7

2

157
"145“
15

41

8

7

2

15

1

6

3

4

3

1
1

6
6

3
3

4
4

3
3

_

5
2
3

5

40
30
10
5
1

_

_

6
5

1
1

l
1

_

2

_

2
2

15
2
13
1

15
g
7
1

_

2

4

2

2
2

1
1
1

22
16
4

102
_

_

9
2
7

12
12

8
8

?6
26
30
30

1

6
6

6
6

73
70
3

81
81

4
4

48
1748

14
5
14“ — F

27
8
19
19

6
£

8
6

2
2
2

88
22
173
75“ ....'20 U“ 5 T
2
12
124
2
7
2
19

1
1

4

88
28
60
31
3

1
— r~

3

Sea footnotes at end of table.
♦ Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,




72
49
23
10

3

1.79
1.84
1.77

Shinninc clerks..................... .....
M f t m t f R i b f > ni» . .
iiv 4
Nonmanufacturing............................, .................. ..

8
8

12
1O
JL
x

$
$
2.10
2.X5
and
2.10 2.15
over

4
4

206
24
182
21

84
357
77
52T 111 — 55"
60
246
17
86
3
26
52
14

456
92
364
78

23
23
2

185
16
169
10

43
43

57
26
31

117
20
97

44
44

10
10

91
66
25
16

356
12
344
344

6
6

34
34
26

14

6
4

17
lo
7
7

35
4
00
24 r— I "
3
3

14
nr

9
9
7

16
16

3
3

3

8

23

7

3

8

19

7

1
1

48
2
46

50
19
31

10

L

51
3i
20

4

6

1
x

_

5
5

2
2

4
4

12
12

11
4
7

6
4

1

4

4

8
8

7

11

a

4
4

1

xx

,7

4
4

L
H

5
2

2
2

7
4
X

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oreg., September 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8

Table A-4*

GubtoduU, %G/ieAauA44Uf,and SUifxplHf Gkxzuft&UoHd Go+utt+tued
-

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied cn an area
basis in Portland, dreg., by industry division, September 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

N um ber
of
W orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Shipping-and-receiving clerks ..............
Manufacturing.......... ..............
Nonmanufacturing ................. ....

265
128
137
86

$
1.80
1.87
1.74
1.76

Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons) .......
Manufacturing ....... .................
Nonmanufacturing .................... .

298
185
113 .

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ ■ $
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
2 .1 5
Under 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10
and
$
over
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15
0.90

1.70
1.74
1.63

10
1
9

45
12
33

7
7

14
14
-

8
8

17
2
15

57
28

57

27
8
19
16

61
56
5

47
2
45

15
12

58
28
30
Oi
f

7
7
-

36
32
4

14
l4
-

16
16
-

3

6
8
_

_
-

?1
31

6
5°
50 ---T

20
12
3

6
6

-

-

_

_

“'
*

—

_

67
56
11
11
XX

15

3

“

Truck drivers, medium (li to and including
A tons) ..............................
Manufacturing .... ...................
Nonmanufacturing ............. .
PuKI ^i 11+4 ^4+
*
^ 1
(
| « f 41 f
ffi
. _

Truck drivers, heavy (over A tons, trailer
type) .............................. .
______ . . T,
- T, r T T , Tr - , ,
Nonmanufacturing... ............... ..

1.006
2A0
766
561
65

1.82
1.94
1.78
1.80
l.*77

345
164181
82

531
87
444
321

458
278
180

1.79
1.78
1.80

_

_

_

_

_

_

•

_

22

6

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

22

6

_

1?5
135
100

P i ih l 1 n

*

. r r i r r . . T . . T I . . I TT. I

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other
than trailer type) .......................... .................................................
M a r m f a r . t . u r i n g ............. .................... . .

1

_

_

1

-

_

32
32

24
5
19

1

i

Mi
JM

60

109
109
40

X

12
12

400
36
364

28
8
20
20

-

109
9
100
100

151
35
116
16

-

5

1.87
1.97
1.85
1.84

Truckers, power (fork-lift) .....................................................
Manufacturing........................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................................................

_

1.94
2.00
1.89
1.84

Nonmanufacturing ...............................................................................
p ^ |4 n
iW
^ f ^* * ^ , i i t i i t i
i
i
T- t

-

16
10
6

23

15
12
3

-

_
_

74
72
2

_

TL
AJ
L
,

Hi
12
2

18
16
2
2

_
_

A

108

•

.36

56
56

72

309
24
285
271

16
16

182
49
133

29
29

48
48

_

12
g
4

_

L

;

27

•
1

16

8

£

10

37
32
5

„.

43

0

1
XX_

8
g

26
22
4

16
16

12
19
XX

31

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift)
Manufacturing ............................................................ ...

.................

Watchmen ...............................
Manufacturing ................ ..... ...
Nonmanufacturing............. ........

108
92

1.47
1.52
1.27

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

_




15

V
9

2

11

4
_

4

-

-

11

-

_

2

5
4
1

36
28
8

19
17
2

7
5

2

23
16
7

2
2

9
9

4?
35 —
8

6

2

r

-

1
1

4
4

8
8

4
4

?4
34

-

6
6

33
30
3

16

2

23

-

8
8

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
V Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Workers distributed as follows: h at $2.25 - 2.30? 6 at $2.39 - 2.35; 6 at $2.4$ - 2.$0j 16 at $2.80 - 2.90; 16 at $3.10 - 3.20.
k/ Corresponds to "Stock handlers, and truckers, hand" reported in earlier study.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
3/

34
34

4

1.92
1.96

245
195
50

-

_

18
18

-

6

'

4
-

"

‘

‘

8
8

“

8
8

4
4

42
i2
i

6
6

-

.

2
2

6

C ! Union Wage Scales
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions* Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-15:

&uUdmp GonUtuation

Table C-27:

P4liU
**t4f

Table C-41:

Joc
lGU

Qp&uitUuf C+Hfxi&feoJi

j t'
—

July — 1952
1,
~—
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Bricklayers
$3,175
2.450
Carpenters
2.725
Electricians . . . •
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Padnterp .................
2.420
PI a pt.arfinfi - I . . . . , T . , T T T . T T T . . . . . . . . . ........ 3.000
2.770
PIumbers
P i H I r H n g l a h n r f i T 9 t t a i - i t t ______ . - __________________. . . .
1.850

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
4.0
40
40

Table C-205:
_______ July 1. 1952
Classification

B rea d and ca k e - Hand sh op s:
Foremen ............................................................. ..
Overmen, m i x e r s ...............................................
Bench hands .........................................................
Head c h e c k e rs ....................................................
P a c k e r s , hand w rappers ............................
H e lp e rs :
F i r s t y e a r ...................................................
A f t e r f i r s t y e a r .....................................
B read and ca k e - M achine sh o p s:
Agreement A:
Foremen ...........................................................
Overmen, m i x e r s .............................., ......
Bench h a n d s, cak e ...................................
W rapping-machi ne o p e r a to r s ••••••
H elp e rs ...........................................................
Agreem ent S :
Cake and p ie w o rk ers:
F o r e la d ie s ( i n ch arg e o f 4 o r
more g i r l s ) .....................................
Cake d e c o r a to r s . .............................
Women i c e r s * .......................................
C rackers. and co o k ie s :
B a k i ng d e p a rtm e n t:
M ix ers .............................................................
M ix e rs* h e lp e r s .......................................
B a k e rs ...................................................... ..
P a ck in g departm en t ( f e m a le ) :
Working s u p e r v is o r s ..............................
P a c k e r s , m achine o p e r a to r s .............
M is c e lla n e o u s h e lp e r s •............... • ..




Rate
p6r
M l

Hours
per

12.110

40
40
40
40
40

2.000
1.870
1.670
1.470

1.360
1.520

2.200
2.090
1.990
1.810

1.640

week.,

40
40

36
36
36
36
36

1.335
1.275
1.170

40
40
40

1.605
1.490
1.720

40
40
40

1.205

40
40
40

1.0 9 0
1 .030

Classification

Rate
per

Hours
per

Classification

&our_ ■Hgg)L-

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Operators:
Book and job shops:

$1,500
Bindery women ...................... ...
Bookbinders .............. ...................... 2.680
2.680
Compositors, hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ElectrotvDers .................. ........... .... 2.853
2.680
Machine operators . . .................. ....
Machinist operators .....
2.813
2.680
Machine tenders (machinists)
2.667
Mailers .....................
2.880
Photoengravers ....... .
Pressmen:
2.680
Cylinder ........ .......
2.680
Offset ..................
P l a t e n ...... ...........
2.613
Stereotypers ...............
2.853
3.280
Agreement A .............
Agreement B ........... ..
2.813

Table C-42:

October 1, 1952
C la s s ific a tio n

R ate
per
hour

B u ild in g :
C o n s tr u c tio n :
Dump tr u c k s :
6 y a rd s and under ......................................... $ 1 ,9 0 0
1 .9 5 0
6 - 8 y a rd s .......................................................
8 - 10 y a rd s ..................................................... 2 .0 0 0
2 .1 0 0
1 0 - 12 y a r d s ..................................................
2 .2 0 0
12 - 20 y a rd s ..................................................
2 .3 0 0
Over 2 0 y a rd s ..................................................
2 .0 5 0
Lumber c a r r i e r s .............................................

2.759
2.897
2.759
2.897
2.759
2.897

36i
36i

2.513
2.693

37£
35

2.897
3.034

2.662

M t U o c ^^4L/
o & t U k bUJeU

and aJfelp&kl

Newspapers:

C o m p osito rs, hand:
Day w o r k ......................................
N ight work ..................................
Machine o p e r a to r s :
Day work .......................................
N ight w o r k .......... ..
Machine te n d e r s ( m a c h in is t s ) :
Day work ,• • • • • .......................
N ight work ..................................
M a ile r s :
Day work ...................... ................
N ight work ..................................
P h o to e n g ra v e rs:
Day w o r k ...................... ..
N ight work ..................................
Pressm en, web p r e s s e s :
Day work . . . . . . . . ....................
N ight w o r k .......... .......................
P re s s m e n -in -c h a rg e :
Day w o r k .......................................
N ight w o r k ...................... ..
S te r e o t y p e r s :
Day work ......................................
N ight work ........................ ..

40
40
40
40

First 3 months in platform service ....... $1,705
1.730
Second 3 months in platform service .....
Next 6 months in platform service .......
1.755
T h e r e a f t e r ....................................
1.785

2 .8 8 8

37£
35

2.882
3.123

37i
35

2.733
2.929

37i
35

G e n e r a l:
F re ig h t:
C ity p ick -u p
.......................................
Long d i s t a n c e :
1 0 0 m ile s o r l e s s , tu rn -aro u n d
run ................................................................... ..
H elp ers ........................................................................
G ro cery :
W h o le sa le:
Agreement A:
1 to n and under ..............................................
l £ - § to n s ................. ................................ ..
T ru ck and t r a i l e r and semi­
t r a i l e r . .......... ..................................... ..
H elp e rs
.......... ..
lo a d e r s .................................................................
E x tr a men ............................................................
Agreement B :
1 to n and u n d e r ................................. ..
Food s p e c i a l t y ( c o f f e e , e t c . ) ............

Hours
p er
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1 .6 6 0

48

1 .5 3 1
1 .6 2 8

Z.8
48

1 .7 1 8
1 .7 8 0

40
40

1 .8 5 5
1 .7 1 8
1 .7 4 3
1 .8 0 5

40
40
40
40

1 .5 0 9
2.163

48
Uo

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oreg., September 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10

D‘ Supplementary Wage Practices
S h ift ^biftesteulial P*oo*&iQ*tl 1/

Tab e D l
l -:

Percent o t t l p a t empl y e t f oa ln
omn
()
b
()
a
Actually working on ext a
r
By e t b i h e t
salsmn
s i t in hfs
oolicy in Almnfcuigidsre
l auatrn nutis
3 o oth r
d r e
2 sit
d hf
3 o ohr
d r te
2 sit
d hf
sit
hf
sitwr
hf ok
work

S ift d f e e t a
h
ifrnil

100.0

Workers in e t b i h e t h r n p o i
s a l s m n s a i g r v sions
for l t s i t ...... ......... . . .
ae hfs
..
With s i t differential............ .
hf
Uniform cents ( e h u ) ..........
pr or
3 l, and Jf c n s ............ ,
, i
* et
5 c n s •.................. .
et
6 c n s ................... .
et
7 l\ cents............. .
,
9 c n s • • . ......
et ••.
.
10 c
ents . .
. ................ .
O er 10 c n s . ..............
v
et .
.
Uniform p rcentage .. .......... .
e
10 percent... ....... ........
1$ percent ........ .........
F l day s pay f r r d c d hours....
ul '
o eue
Fl d
u l ay's pay for r d c d h u s
eue or,
plus a c n s a - o r d f e e t a • • ,
e t - n h u i f r n i l ••
F l d y s pay f r r d c d h u s
ul a*
o eue or,
plus a p r e t g differential.... .
ecnae
With no s i t differential....... ..
hf
Workers i e t b i h e t h
n s a l s m n s aving no p o i
r v sions
f r l t s i t *.......... ....... ,
o ae hfs

100
0.
6*
88
6.
U0
3.
10
•
22
.

XXX

XXX

8*
25
76.2
U.
95
5.0
1 .0
U
1.
71

A l workers ...... ................
l

18.1

72
.
71
.
U
.9

55
.
69
.
55
.
55
.
•

Ul
.
37
.
33
.
37
.
U3
.
U3
.
1.
08

1.
66
1.
27
11
.;
U1
.
36
.
.
1
•
12
.
2
.3
1 .0
10
.
•
•
U

10*8

1.
07

21
.

.
5

60
.
63
.

72
.
U8
.

1.
75

3.
12

•
U
15
.
XXX

•
2
.
1
XXX

lh.0

1 .0
•

.
1
33
.
.
3
.
7
.
1
.h

.
1
.
1
l.U

1/ S i t d f e e t a data a e presented i t r s o ( ) e t b i h e t p licy a d ( ) w r e s actually e p oyed
hf ifrnil
r
n em f a salsmn o
n b okr
ml
c l t s i t a t e t me of t e s r e * An est b i h e t w c n i e e a h v n a policy i i met any o t e
m ae hfs t h i
h uvy
a l s m n as o s d r d s a i g
f t
f h
f l owing c n i i n : ( ) ope a e l t s i t a t e t m o t e s r e , ( ) h d u i n c n r c p o
ol
odtos 1
r t d a e h f s t h i e f h u v y 2 a n o - o t a t r visions c v
o ering
l te s i t , o ( ) had o e ated l t s i t w
a hfs r 3
pr
a e h f s ithin 6 m n h prior t t e s r e *
ots
o h uvy

T b e D-2:
al

Scheduled IVeehkf JfoutU
P r e t o plant w rkers employed in ecn f
o

P r e t o o f c w r e s 1/ empl y d i ecn f fie okr
oe n
Weekly hours
A l w r e s ........ ............ ...... .
l okr
3 h u s a d under......................
7i o r n
O e 3 i a d u d r UO h u s ...... ......... ..
vr 7 n ne
or
hO hours... ......... ........... • • • •
••••
O e 10 a d und r 18 h u s ....... ....... .
vr * n
e * or
18 h u s a d o e .............. ......
* or n vr

Al
l
idsre 2
nutis ^
1
00.0
22
.
h.7

9.
12
17
.
.
2

Manufa t r n
cuig
100
0.

Pbi
ulc
utili i s *
te
100
0.

03
.
.
8
9.
81

55
.
.
7
9 .8
3

.
8

*
*

-

Rti tae
eal rd

Al
l
idsre 3
nutis /

100
0.

100
0.

100.0

26
.

U7
.

«

•

-

9.
65
35
.
•

9.
02
.
3
69
.

8.
56
•
97
.

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *
100.0

Retail t a i
rd
100.0

m

m

•
9.
29
71
.

*
9.
69
19
.
12
.

1/ D ta r l t t women w r e s
a eae o
okr*
2 Ic u e d t f rw o e a e tae fnn e i srne a dr ett; a d s r i e i a d t o t to e i d s r dv s o s son sp r t l *
(
n l d s a a o h l s l r d ; i a c , n u a c , n eal s a e n e v c s n d i i n o h s n u t y i i i n h w e a a e y
2/ I c u e d t f r w o e a e t a e r a e t t , and s r i e , i a d t o t t o e i d s r d v s o s s o n s p r t l *
nlds aa o hlsl rd, el sae
evcs n diin o hs nuty iiin hw eaaey
*
T a s o t t o ( x l d n r i r a s , c m u i a i n and o h r p
rnprain ecuig alod) omncto,
t e ublic u i i i s
tlte*
Occupational Wage S r e , Portland, O e . September 1 5
uvy
rg,
92
U S DEPARTMENT OF L B R
..
AO
Bureau o L b r S atistics
f ao t




T a b le D-3

Number of paid holi a s
dy

Paid etfoiidcufA.

P r e t o o f c wor e s e p o e i ecn f fie kr mlyd n
Pbi
ulc
AH
Manu a t r n
fcuig
Ret i t a e
al rd
uiiis *
tlte
i d s r e 1/
nutis

P r e t of plant workers e p o e i
ecn
mlyd n
Pbi
ulc
A
ll
M
anufacturing
uiiis *
tlte
i d s r e 2/
nutis

Rti tae
eal rd

AH w rkers ............ ................
o

100
0.

100
0.

100
0.

100
0.

1 0
00

100
0.

100
0.

100
0.

Workers in e tablishments providing p h l d y . .
s
aid o i a s . .
2 to 4 days..........................
6 days ............ ........ .........
6-days ..... ....... ................
J
7 d y ....... ..... ................
as
3d
ays ........... ...... ............
9 days.............................
1 days ..................... ......................
1
Workers i e t b i
n s a l shments providing n p i
o ad
h l d y .......... ...................
oias

9.
96
.
2
5.
57
.
5
2.
25
80
.
12
.
1.
15

100
0.
.
6
7.
40
2 .8
3
16
.

100
0.

100
0.

8.
40
84
.
4.
95
2.
51
10
.

9.
16
*
3.
28

8.
92
92
.
7.
81

2/
*

-

3.
04
30
.
5.
86
80
.
-

•U

96.7
25
.
.
8
-

8.
44
66
.
5.
17
2.
31
22
.
.
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

H.6

1.
60

-

-

-

8U
o

19
.
-

1.
08

In c lu d e s d a ta f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s i n a d d itio n t o th o s e in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n s shown s e p a r a t e l y .
In c lu d e s d a ta f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , and s e r v ic e s i n a d d itio n t o th o s e in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n s shown s e p a r a t e l y .
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , con nrun ication , and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .

T a b le D-A:

P

a id

' l/a C c U

ia H

d

(t y a S im

ic U

P ^ U

U

t iiiO

* t i)

P r e t of p a x w r e s e p o e i
ecn
in. o k r m l y d n

P r e t o o f c w r e s emp o e i ecn f fie okr
lyd n
Vacation policy

A ll

-

4.
52
89
.
4.7

w rkers ............ .................
o

Al
l
idsre 1
nutis /

Manu a t r n
fcuig

100
0.

100
0.

100
0.
100
0.
4.
11
5.
60
29
.
-

100
0.
100
0.
3.
64
5.
55
81
.
-

Rti tae
eal rd

All
i d s r e 2/
nutis

Manuf c u i g
atrn

1 0.0
0

100
0.

100
0.

1 0.0
0

100
0.

100
0.

100
0.
100
0.
6.
37
3.
23
40
.
-

100
0.
100
0.
8.
32
1.
68
-

9.
91
9.
70
7.
97
18
.
1.
37
1
.8
15
.

9.
96
95.8
7.
75
31
.
1.
21
31
.
27
.
11
.
.
4

100
0.
100
0.
72.4
2.
76
-

9.
64
9.
64
9.
26
38
.
36
.

9.
96
95.8
5.
61
1.
92
1.
41
6
.4
27
.
11
.

100
0.
100
0.
3.
59

Pbi
ulc
uiiis *
tlte

Pbi
ulc
uiiis *
tlte

Rti tae
eal rd

After 1 rear of s r i e
evc
Workers in e t b
s a lishments providing paid v c t o s . * .
aain ..
Leng h o - i e payment ....................
t-ftm
1 week .............................
Over 1 a d under 2 wee s ............ ....
n
k
2w
eeks ................. ...........
3 w e s a d over. ...................
ek n
.
P r e t g payment J/ .......... ..........
ecnae
j
Flat-sum payment........................
Workers i establ s m n s providing no p i v c t o s .
n
ihet
ad aain .

-

-

-

-

.6

.
9

-

After 2 vears of s r i e
evc
Workers in establ s m n s providing p v c t o s .
ihet
aid a a i n .
Len t - f t m payment...... .............
gho-ie
1 week ....... ................ .... ..
Over 1 a under 2 weeks .................
nd
2 weeks... ........................
Over 2 and under 3 wee s ..... ........ ...
k
3 weeks a d over......... ............
n
. ...... .......... .
.
Per e t g payment
cnae
Flat-sum p yment ............. ....... ...
a
W orkers in est b i h e t providing no p
alsmns
aid v c t o s .
aain .

1 0 0 .0

100
0.
1.
46
5 .5

7.
45
.
8
4 .6

-

100
0.
100
0.
1.
19
7.4
6.
64
1.
43
-

S e e f o o tn o t e s a t end o f t a b l e .
a T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




100
0.
100
0.
2.
29
31
.
7.
00
_
40
.
-

100
0.
100
0.
1.
14
8.
86
-

9.
91
9.
70
4.
86
1.
15
3.
32
37
.
15
.
.6

.
9

.4

3 .3

6
0.3
_
-

9.
64
9*
64
2.
66
6.
98
36
.

O c cu p a tio n a l Wage S u rv ey , P o rtla n d , O re g ., Septem ber 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF IAB0R
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

1
2

T b e Di. Paid Vacatio*U WoAmol PAoutiUmC) -Goniinumd
a l -Percent of office workers employed in Vacation policy

All workers ...........................................

All
industries i /

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Percent of plant workers employed in Retail trade

All
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Retail trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0
.1
93.7
1.6

100.0
100.0
85.7
14.3
-

100.0
100.0
96.0
4.0
-

100.0
100.0
1.0
99.0
.
-

99.1
97.0
.7
92.6
3.7
1.5
.6
.9

99.6
95.8
89.4
6.4
2.7
1.1
.4

100.0
100.0
1.9
98.1
-

96.4
96.4
96.4
—
3.6

100.0
100.0
.1
86.2
.8
12.9
-

100.0
100.0
85.0
15.0
-

100.0
100.0
73.5
26.5
-

100.0
100.0
99.0
-

99.1
97.0
.7
90.4
_
5.9
1.5
•6
.9

99.6
95.8
-■
88.4
7.4
2.7
1.1
.4

100.0
100.0
1.9
87.4
_
10.7
-

96.4
96.4
96.4
—
3.6

100.0
100.0
.1
49.3
50.6
- ■
-

100.0
100.0
61.0
39.0
-

100.0
100.0
25.2
74.8
.-

100.0
100.0
1.0
61.9
37.1
-

99.1
97.0
.7
60.8
35.5
1.5
.6
.9

99.6
95.8
59.9
35.9
2.7
1.1
.4

100.0
100.0
1.9
36.1
62.0
-

**>.4
96.4
75.7
20.7
3.6

100.0
100.0
.1
47.1
49.4
3.4
-

100.0
100.0
61.0
39.0
-

100.0
100.0
-

100.0
100.0
1.0
61.9
37.1
-

99.1
97.0
.7
57.9
38.4
1.5
.6
.9

99.6
95.8
55.8
40.0
2.7
1.1
.4

100.0
100.0
1.9
36.1
62.0
_
-

96.4
96.4
-75.7
20.7
3.6

100.0
100.0
.1
47.1
39.7
13.1
-

100.0
100.0
-

100.0
100.0
25.2
70.8
4.0
-

99.1
97.0
.7
57.9
34.1
4.3
1.5
.6
.9

99.6
95.8
-

100.0
100.0
1.9
36.1
62.0
-

96.4*
96.4
■■
75.7
26.7
• - ’
'- ■
3.6

After 5 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid vacations »....
Length-of-time p a y m e n t ..... ........................
1 w e e k .......... ................................
2 w e e k s ........ .............................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ....... .................
3 weeks and over .".............. .................
Percentage payment 2 / ............ ..................
Flat-sum payment .V................. .............. .
Workers in establishments providing no paid vacations ••
After

4 .6

-

-

1
^

years of service

Workers in establishments providing paid vacations .••••
Length-of-time p a y m e n t ................. ....... ••••
1 w e e k ..........................................
2 weeks .........................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........................
3 weeks and o v e r ............... ........ .
Percentage payment
............... .............
Flat-sum p a y m e n t ................................ .
Workers in establishments providing no paid vacations ••

J
j

1 .0

After 15 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid vacations ....
Length-of-time p a y m e n t .............................
1 w e e k ........... ..............................
2 weeks ............................... ..........
.
.
3 weeks and o v e r ................... ............
Percentage payment 2 / ........................ .....
Flat-sum p a y m e n t.... ..............................
Workers in establishments providing no paid vacations ..

-

After 20 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid vacations ....
Length-of-time p a y m e n t ...... ......................
1 w e e k ......... ..... ......................
2 w e e k s ....... ..................................
3 weeks .................. .......................
Over 3 weeks ................... .................
Percentage payment 2 / ..............................
Flat-sum payment ....................................
Workers in establishments providing no paid vacations ..

2 5 .2

70.8
4.0
-

-

After 25 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid vacations ....
Length-of-time p a y m e n t ............... .............
1 week ................... .......................
2 weeks . ................. .......................
3 weeks .................. ......................
Over 3 weeks ....................................
Percentage payment 2 / ....... ......................
Flat-sum payment ............ ......................
Workers in establishments providing no paid vacations ..

1/
2/

2/
*

-

6 1 .0

38.0
1.0
-

-

100.0
100.0
1.0
61.9
37.1
_

-

In c lu d e s d a ta f o r w h o le sa le t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s i n a d d itio n t o th o s e in d u s tr y d i v is io n s shown s e p a r a t e l y .
In c lu d e s d a ta f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , and s e r v ic e s i n a d d itio n t o th o s e in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n s shown s e p a r a t e ly .
P e rc e n t o f an n ual e a r n in g s .
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




55.8
40.0
2.7
1.1
•4

13

tU t d P + H & 4 M . P J o t l i l

Table D -5 t

P e r c e n t o f o f f i c e w orkers employed i n Type o f p la n

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

M anufacturing

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

I
R e t a i l tr a d e

P e rce n t o f p la n t uorlcere employed in' A ll
i n d u s tr ie s 2 /

M anufacturing

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l tra d e

A l l w orkers ...................................................................................................

lb o .o

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers i n e sta b lis h m e n ts h aving in s u ra n ce o r
pen sio n p la n s 2 / ...................................................................................

8 1 .5

7 7 .9

9 9 .3

4 2 .6

8 1 .9

8 2 .0

9 8 .1

7 3 .4

In su ra n ce p la n s j / ................................, ................................. ..
L if e .....................................................................................................
A c c id e n ta l d e a th and dism em berm ent.............................
S ic k n e ss and a c c id e n t ..........................................
H o s p ita liz a tio n .............. ............................................................
S u r g i c a l ........... ............................... ...............................................
M edical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ; ..........................................................
P en sio n o f r e tir e m e n t p la n .......................................

6 5 .3
5 8 .8
5 .7
2 2 .3
4 3 .9
4 1 .0
3 4 .6
6 2 .6

.4 8 .8
4 8 .2
1 .2
2 0 .1
3 7 .0
3 6 .7
2 5 .9
5 8 .4

5 8 .1
t 5 .1
9 .0
V8;3
L8.2
L8.2
L4.2
3 0 .5

3 4 .9
2 5 .7
1 1 .7
1 0 .3
2 7 .7
2 7 .7
2 7 .7
1 4 .6

7 1 .3
6 4 .0
1 0 .5
3 3 .0
5 3 .3
5 2 .0
4 6 .6
4 1 .8

7 8 .8
7 7 .8
5 .4
4 0 .3
6 2 .3
6 0 .0
5 1 .3
4 1 .3

6 1 .6
5 4 .4
3 9 .8
2 2 .4
3 4 .8
3 4 .3
3 1 .9
7 4 .6

5 6 .5
2 6 .1
2 .8
1 3 .5
4 1 .0
4 1 .0
4 1 .0
2 2 .0

W orkers i n e sta b lis h m e n ts having no in s u ra n ce o r
p en sio n p la n s ................................................................................... ....

1 8 .5

2 2 .1

.7

5 7 .4

1 8 .1

l » .u

1 .9

2 6 .6

1/
2/
2/
*

In clu d es d a ta f o r w h o lesale t r a d e ; f in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s i n a d d itio n t o th o se in d u s try d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a t e l y .
In clu d es d a ta f o r w h o lesale t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , and s e r v ic e s in a d d itio n t o th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a t e l y .
U nduplicated t o t a l .
T ra n s p o rta tio n (e x clu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com munication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
O ccu p atio n al Wage S u rv ey , P o r tla n d , O re g ., September 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




u
Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau's occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with avail*
able resources* In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community.
Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.
Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation.
Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data*
With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau's
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and power
plant, and
(d; custodial, warehousing, and shipping
(tables A-l
through A-4). The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads;,
communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they furnished
insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant in­
clusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cover­
ed were determined separately for each industry
(see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




these jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

meeting the size require*

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources.
Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but cost*
of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included.
Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers,
i.e., those
hired to work the establishment's full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.
The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel.
"Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, these work categories are included as plant workers in non­
manufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

15

in terns of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift0

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements,
the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller.

Information on wage practices other than shift diffejv
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in.question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements,
It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions in Portland, Oreg., 1/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, September 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
e stabli shments
studied

z/

Nuna!>er of
establi.shments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study
_

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occuoations
were surveyed on an area basis
All d i v i s i o n s ..................... .......... .
Manufacturing .......................... ....... .
Nonmanufacturing ...............................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .................................
Wholesale trade .............................
Retail trade ................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .......
Services 2 / .................................

51
51
51

572
253
319

146
64
82

121,400
59,200
62,200

63,850
28,490
35,360

10,740
2,530
8,160

51
51
51
51
51

64
87
86
37
45

21
17
19
10
15

22,900
10,600
18,500
5,600
4,600

16,890
3,220
10,270
3,150
1,830

2,730
1,060
1,500
2,680
190

2 / Portland Metropolitan Area (Clackamus, Multnomah, and Washington Counties, Oreg,; and Clark County, Wash,),
2/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in all divisions in the June 1951 survey was 21 workers.
2 / Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




16

Index




A
9
6
9
6
6
7
9
9
6
7

A
9
7
9
9
6
6
9
6
6

☆

v0

0 ' v0 \ 0 * > J n0 - > J n0 0 ' . ^ - V a> vj» v0

9
7
5

vO

A
A

O

3,
3,

M i l l w r i g h t .................................................. •
Mixer (bakeries) .... ............................... ...... .
Motortruck d r i v e r .... .................... .................. .
Nurse, industrial (registered) ............................ .
Office boy ....................................................
Office g i r l ....... ...........................................
Oiler .........................................................
Operator (local transit) ................................ .
Order f i l l e r ....... ....... ..................................
Overman (bakeries) ...........................................
Packer ........................................................
Packer (bakeries) ............................... ........ ....
Painter (building construction) ..............................
Painter, maintenance .................................. .......
Photoengraver (printing) ....................... .............
Pipe fitter, maintenance ............................. .......
Plasterer (building construction) ................... .......
Plumber (building construction) .............................
P o r t e r ........................................................
Pressman (printing) .............. ...................... .
Receiving clerk ... ......................................... .
S e c r e t a r y ........ ..................................... ......
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance .................. ...........
Shipping clerk ................................................
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ........ ••••••••............. ..
S t e n o grapher...... .............. ...........................
Stereotyper (printing) ...................... .................
Switchboard o p e r a t o r .... .................... ................
Switchboard operator-receptionist •••••......................
Tabula ting-machine o p e r a t o r .............. ...................
Tool-and-die m a k e r ................. .........................
Transcribing-machine o p e r a t o r ........... ....................
Truck d r i v e r ...... •••••••••............ .............. .
Trucker, p o w e r ............................ .................. .
T y p i s t ................................. .................. .
W a t c h m a n ..................... ...... .........................
Wrapper (bakeries) ••••......................................

3

U. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F IC E : 1953 0 — 239683

Vi

9
9
3
9
3
9
3
9
6
7
3

'O

Baker (bakeries) •..... .............. ........... .......... .
Bench hand (bakeries) •••••...................... ......... • •
Biller, machine .................. ....................... • •••
Bookbinder (printing) .... ....................... .......... .
Bookkeeping-machine operator •• • • •...... ....................
Bricklayer (building construction) ....... •......... .
Calculating-machine o p e r a t o r ................................
Carpenter (building construction) •••••••••............ .. •. •
Carpenter, maintenance •••••••.... .............. .......... .
Cleaner ...................
Clerk, file ..................................................
Clerk, o r d e r ............................................. ..
Clerk, p a y r o l l ...............................................
Compositor, hand (printing) ................................
Crane operator, electric bridge .............................
D r a f t s m a n ....................................................
Duplicating-machine operator .................................
Electrician (building construction) ...•••..............
Electrician, maintenance .................
Electrotyper (printing) ..............
Engineer, s t a t i o n a r y .... ....................................
Fireman, stationary boiler ..............
G u a r d ..............
Helper (bakeries).............................................
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r .................
Helper, trades, maintenance ..................
Janitor ..........................
Key-punch o p e r a t o r ...........................................
Laborer (building construction) •..........................
Laborer, material handling .................... ......... .....
Machine operator (printing) .......
Machine tender (printing) ......... ..................... . •••
Machine-tool operator, toolroom ..................
Machinist, maintenance ......................
Mailer (printing) .............
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ..........................
Mechanic, maintenance •••••.....

O

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This report w a s prepared in the Bureau's Western Regional
Communications m a y be add r e s s e d to:

Office.

M a x D. K o s s o r i s , R e g i o n a l D i r e c t o r
Bureau of Labor Statistics
R o o m 1074870 Market Street
S a n F r a n c i s c o 2, C a l i f o r n i a
The services of the B u r e a u of Labor Statistics'

regional offices

are available
for consultation
on statistics
relating to w a g es
and
in d u s t r i a l r e l a tions, employment, prices, l a b o r turn-over, p r o d uctivity,
w o r k injuries, construction and housing.

The W e s t e r n R e g i o n i n c l u d e s t h e f o l l o w i n g Stat e s :
Arizona
California

New Mex ic o
Oregon

Colorado
Idaho
Nevada

Washington
Wyoming

Utah


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102