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MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
April 1953

Bulletin

N o.

1116-19

UNITED STATES D E P A R T M E N T OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey
M IL W A U K E E , WISCONSIN




April

1953

Bulletin No. 1116—19

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin R Durkin, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U . S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents




Contents
Letter of Transmittal

Page
INTRODUCTION ...........................................
THE MILWAUKEE METROPOLITAN A R E A .........................

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LAB®,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C#, July 1, 1953#
The Secretary of Labor:
I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on
occupational wages and related benefits in Milwaukee, Wis.,
during April 1953* Similar studies are being conducted in a
number of other large labor-market areas during the fiscal year
1953* These studies have been designed to meet a variety of
governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide
earnings information for many occupations common to most manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries
of selected supplementary wage benefits. Whenever possible,
separate data have been presented for individual major industry
divisions#
This report was prepared in the Bureaufs regional of­
fice in Chicago, HI., by William Strevig, under the direction
of George E. Votava, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst. The planning and central direction of the program was
carried on in the Bureau's Division of Wages and Industrial
Relations.
Ewan Clague, Commissioner.
Hon. Martin P. Durkin,
Secretary of Labor.




1
1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE .............................

l

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations ....................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ......
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations.....
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations ............ .................

3
A
5
6

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis B-35
Machinery industries .......................
Machine-tool accessories ................
B-7211 Power laundries ............................

8
10
11

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction......................
C-205
Bakeries ...................................
C-27
Printing ...................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ...........
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ..............

12
12
12
12
13

Supplementary wage practices D-l
Shift differential provisions ...............
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours ......................
D-3
Paid holidays .....................
D-A
Paid vacations .............................
D-5
Insurance and pension plans ................

1A
14
15
15
18

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey..........................

19

INDEX

21




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY - MILWAUKEE, WIS.

Establishments
engaged
i n the
manufacture
of durable
g oods a c c o u n t e d for n e a r l y t h r e e - f o u r t h s of the total manufac t u r i n g
e m ployment.
Imp o r t a n t
in d u s t r i e s in
this g r o u p
include n o n e l e c ­
trical machinery,
s uch a s D i e s e l
a n d gas o l i n e
engines,
outboard
m otors, a n d tractors, w i t h 6 0 , 0 0 0 workers; t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q uipment
w i t h 2 7 , 0 0 0 wor k e r s ; e l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y (such a s
switchboard a p ­
p a r a t u s and i n d u s t r i a l e l e c t r i c a l controls) w i t h 22,000; fabricated
metal
products
(except
ordnance,
m a chinery, a n d
t r a nsportation
equipment)
w i t h 16,000;
a n d p r i m a r y metals,
such as n o nferrous
f o u n d r i e s a n d i r o n a n d s teel forgings,
w i t h 15,000. E m ployment
in
the n o n d u r a b l e gro u p of
i n d u s t r i e s w a s d o m i n a t e d b y establishments
m a n u f a c t u r i n g food a n d k i n d r e d produ c t s ,
i n c l u d i n g m a l t beverages,
w h i c h e m p l o y e d m o r e t h a n 2 3 , 0 0 0 worke r s .

Introduction
The M i l w a u k e e
a r e a is 1 of 2 0 imp o r t a n t
industrial cen­
t e r s i n w h i c h the
B u r e a u of L a b o r
S t atistics
is c u r r e n t l y
con­
ducting
occupational wage
surveys*
In such surveys,
occup a t i o n s
common to
a v a r i e t y of manufacturing a nd nonmanufacturing indus­
tries
are studied
on a
community-wide
basis* 1 /
Cross-industry
m e t h o d s of
s a m p l i n g a r e t h u s u t i l i z e d i n comp i l i n g
earnings data
for the
following types
of occu p a t i o n s :
(a) Office;
(b) p r o f e s ­
s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l ; (c) m a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r plant; a n d (d) c u s ­
t o d ial,
warehousing,
a n d shipping*
In p r e s e n t i n g e a r n i n g s i n f o r ­
mation for
s u c h j o b s (tables A - l
t h r o u g h A-A)
separate d a t a
are
p r o v i d e d w h e r e v e r p o s s i b l e f o r i n d i v i d u a l broad i n d u s t r y d i visions*

A m o n g the i n d u s t r i e s a n d e s t a b l i s h m e n t - s i z e groups w i t h i n
the scope o f the B u r e a u ' s study, m o r e than 85 p e r c e n t of the p l a n t
workers were
employed in
establishments
having
l a b o r -management
cont r a c t s cov e r i n g w a g e s a n d w o r k i n g conditions. S lightly mo r e than
2 0 p e r c e n t of the o ffice w o r k e r s
w e r e in f irms w i t h u n i o n contract
p r o v i s i o n s cov e r i n g office worke r s .

Earnings
information
f o r c h a ract e r i s t i c
o c c u p a t i o n s in
certain more
n a r r o w l y defined industries
is p r e s e n t e d i n s eries B
t ables.
Union scales
(series C tables) are p r e s e n t e d f o r selec t e d
o c c u p a t i o n s i n s e v e r a l i n d u s t r i e s or
trades i n w h i c h the g r e a t m a ­
j o r i t y o f th e w o r k e r s a r e e m p l o y e d u n d e r the te r m s of l a b o r - m a n a g e ­
m ent agreements,
a n d th e c o n t r a c t o r m i n i m u m r a t e s a r e b e l i e v e d to
be i n d i c a t i v e o f p r e v a i l i n g p a y practices*

Occupational Wage Structure

Data are
a l s o collected
a n d summarized on
s hift o p e r a ­
t i o n s a n d d i f f e r e n t i a l s , h o u r s of work,
and s u p p l e m e n t a r y b e n e f i t s
su c h a s v a c a t i o n a l l o w a n c e s ,
pai d holidays, a n d i n s u r a n c e a n d p e n ­
s i o n p l ans*
These a p p e a r
a s series D
t a b u l ations in
the report*

Gro s s h o u r l y e a r n i n g s (including p r e m i u m p a y f o r overtime
a n d l a t e - s h i f t wo r k ) f o r p r o d u c t i o n a n d r e l a t e d w o r k e r s
in M i l ­
waukee manufacturing
industries averaged
$1. 9 6 in
March 1953, 12
cents h i g h e r
than reported
a year
earlier. 2 /
Mu c h of
this in­
c rease m a y be a t t r i b u t e d t o
"across-th e - b o a r d "
wage a d justments
m a d e d u r i n g the period.

The Milwaukee Metropolitan Area
T o t a l p o p u l a t i o n of the Milw a u kee m e t r o p o l i t a n ar e a (Mil­
w a u k e e Co u n t y ) w a s e s t i m a t e d b y
the 1 9 5 0 census t o e xceed 871,000.
It is
t he s i x t e e n t h
l a rgest metropolitan a rea in
the N a t i o n a n d
c o n s t i t u t e s m o r e t h a n a f o u r t h o f the p o p u l a t i o n of W i s c onsin. More
t h a n 7 0 p e r c e n t o f the a r e a ' s p o p u l a t i o n reside w i t h i n the C i t y of
Milwaukee.

F o r m a l i z e d w a g e s t r u ctures
a p p l i e d t o the gre a t m a j o r i t y
of the p l a n t wor k e r s .
Plans providing a range
of rates f or in d i ­
v i d u a l o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e s o m e w h a t m o r e c o m m o n t h a n those w i t h single
rates, a l t h o u g h the l a t t e r type w e r e a l s o f r e q u e n t l y reported.
Ap­
p r o x i m a t e l y A O p e r c e n t of the m a n u f a c t u r i n g p l a n t w o r k e r s we r e pa i d
a c c o r d i n g t o some f o r m of i n c e n t i v e w a g e system. 2 /
Incentive w age
p a y m e n t plans,
p r i m a r i l y i n t he
f o r m of g r o u p
b o nuses or com m i s ­
sion-payments, w e r e a l s o r e p o r t e d a m o n g n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g est a b l i s h ­
ments.
T heir preva l e n c e ,
h owever, w a s s u b s t a n t i a l l y l e s s than in
the case of manufact u r i n g .

Hie M i l w a u k e e
a rea ranks
h i g h in
impor t a n c e
a m o n g the
N a t i o n 1s m a j o r i n d u s t r i a l centers*
N o n a g ricultural w a g e a n d sala r y
workers
(other than self-employed
a n d domestic)
in the a r e a n u m ­
bered m o r e
than 381,000
i n M a r c h 1953*
Ma n u f a c t u r i n g
indus t r i e s
a c c o u n t e d f o r o v e r h a l f o f this t o t a l — 2 09, 0 0 0 w o r k e r s *
The l a r g ­
est nonmanufacturing groups were
r e t a i l trade w i t h 4 9 , 0 0 0 wo r k e r s ,
p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s w i t h 28,0 0 0 ,
serv i c e s wi t h 27,000,
and wholesale
t r a d e w i t h 21 , 0 0 0 .

2/
E s t i m a t e s p r e p a r e d by the I n dustrial Commis s i o n of W i s c o n ­
sin i n c o o p e r a t i o n
w i t h the U. S. D e p a r t m e n t of Labor's
Bureau of
L a b o r Statistics.
i/
I n centive systems of w a g e p a y m e n t a r e g e n e r a l l y limited to
p r o d u c t i o n jobs i n m a n u f a c t u r i n g a n d to sales
pos i t i o n s in trade;
v e r y f e w of the w o r k e r s i n the jobs f o r w h i c h d a t a are p r e s e n t e d in
the series A
tables of this
report are
employed
u n d e r incentive
systems.

1/
See a p p e n d i x f o r d i s c u s s i o n of scope a n d m e t h o d of survey.
D i f f e r e n c e s b e t w e e n t h e scope of
this s u r v e y and the l a s t p r e v i o u s
s u r v e y a r e i n d i c a t e d i n the a p p e n d i x table.




(1)

S a laries o f t h r e e - f o u r t h s
of the o f f i c e w o r k e r s w e r e d e ­
termined
b y fo r m a l
w a g e s t r u ctures.
These
typically provided a
range of rat e s
for each
occupation.
A b o u t a fifth
of the office
work e r s w e r e i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s t h a t d e t e r m i n e d r a t e s of p a y on a n
informal basis.

p e n s i o n plan.
A m a j o r i t y of
office a n d p l a n t w o r k e r s w e r e c o v e r e d
b y li f e
insu r a n c e
plans a n d
b y some
f o r m of
retirement-pension
plan.
O t h e r plans,
in o rder of p r evalence, i n c l u d e d h o s p i t a l i z a ­
tion, surgical, sickness (weekly payments), m e d i c a l , a n d a c c i d e n t a l
d e a t h benefits.

Mo r e t h a n 9 0
p e r c e n t of
the p l a n t
workers
in m a n u f a c ­
turing w e r e
employed in establishments
w i t h fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s f o r
the paym e n t of e x t r a - s h i f t w o rk.
V i r t u a l l y a l l such p l a n s p r o v i d e d
for p r e m i u m pay,
u s u a l l y e x p r e s s e d as a c e n t s - p e r - h o u r a d d i t i o n to
d a y rates.
M o s t c o m m o n p r e m i u m s w e r e 5> 7, a n d 8 c e nts f o r s e c o n d shift w o r k a n d 1 0 a n d 1 2 c e n t s f o r t h i r d - s h i f t work. A b o u t a f o u r t h
of the m a n u f a c t u r i n g p l a n t w o r k e r s w e r e a c t u a l l y e m p lo y e d o n e x t r a ­
shift w o r k a t the time o f the study; the a b o v e - m e n t i o n e d s hift p r e ­
mi u m s a l s o a p p l i e d i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o p e r a t i n g e x t r a shifts.

Virtually all workers had
paid holidays
and vacations.
Six or m o r e p a i d
hol i d a y s w e r e rec e i v e d
b y m o s t office a n d p l a n t
worke r s .
Predominant vacation provisions for plant workers were 1
w e e k a f t e r 1 year,
2 w eeks a f t e r 5 y ears,
and 3 weeks
a f t e r 15
years.
F o r office workers, the p r e d o m i n a n t p r o v i s i o n s w e r e 2 w e e k s
a f t e r 2 y e a r s a n d 3 w eeks a f t e r 15 years;
a b o u t h a l f of the o f f i c e
w o r k e r s r e c e i v e d 2 w eeks a f t e r 1 year.

paid a t

Nearly all workers were
employed in establishments which
least a
p a r t of
t he c o s t
of some
f o r m of
i n s u r a n c e or




M o s t office and p l a n t w o r k e r s w e r e
h o u r s a w e e k a t the time of the study.

scheduled to w o r k U 0

A s Cross-Industry Occupations
CUlice

Table A-li

' I T *

(Average straight—time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Wis., by industry division, April 1953)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

Weekly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a rd )

W eek ly
earn in g s
(S ta n d a rd )

MSS
Clerks, order ...........................
Manufacturing............... .........
Nonmanufacturing.... ................ .

155
101
54

39.5
39.5
40.0

1
72.00
73.56
68.50

Clerks, payroll ..........................
Manufacturing .........................

119
106

40.0
40.0

63.50
63.00

“
-

-

.

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

_

-

“

6
6

131
--- 9l

39.5
40.6

42.50
43.00

4
4

14
10

10
6

175
137

40.0
40.6

70.50
72.06

-

-

_

-

*
*

Billers, machine (billing machine).......................................
Manufacturing..........................................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing................ ......

203
111
92

39.5
40.0
39.5

49.50
51.56
47.00

-

Billers, machine (bookkeeolxuc machine).....

53

40.5

53.00

-

BookkeeniiuMnachine operators, class A .....
Manufacturing.........................

176
U7"

40.0
46.0

58.00
~505T

_

_

-

- |

49.50
50.60
49.00

_
~

_
-

Office b oys.............................
Manufacturing t t f ........ .
Tabulating-machine operators.... ..........
Manufacturing........................... ..................... .......................................................

-i
-1
~1

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) .....................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ................... .

468
207
261

40.0
40.0
40.0

50.00
52.00
48.00

39.5
40.0
39.0

*44
431
413
uo
90

39.5
39.5

46.50
44.00

Clerks, file, class A ..................
Manufacturing... ................... .

115
72

39.5
40.0

1 52.00
54.50

Clerks, file, class B ....................
Manufacturing........ ................
Nonmanufacturing ...............................................................................................

890
"539
351

39.5
“ 40.D
39.5

Clerks, order .....................................................................................................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

w~
r
381

193

.

6
6
-

-

4
1
3

15
8
7

14
3
11

21
11
10

24
14
10

10
7

2
1

4
4

3
3

6
6

11
11

2
2

4
4

15
11

11
11

U
13

1
27 j
20

6

7

1
1

_

_

5

5
5

_

6 !

1
1

3
- j

3
"

4
2

4
3

30
5
25

12
6
4

_

_

-

-

7
7
-

24
13
11

- :
- j

_ I

4
3

-

'

3 i
3

-

23
11
12

3
3

13
7
6

j

4
--------- j -

1
!
7 !
2
5

48
16
38

60
25
35

18
12
6

13
13

48
11
37

-

54.50
54.00 "
56.00
60.00

“ !
-

200
171

40.0
46.6

47.50
46.$6

Key-punch operators ......................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing..... ................
Public utilities « ..................

470
364
106
40

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0

50.50
51.06
48.50
54.50

4 1

30
5
4 ! 26
i
83 ! 56
32 ! 35
21
51

4
2

14
6
8

6

!
!
!
!
!

5

18
n
a
31 !
10

i
135 ! 100 ; 152
80
49 i
86
40 j 72

82
21
61

&

5 !

-

1
6 !
6
-

9
9
“

-1

3

_ |

4

.

!

-

47
37

45 i
34 1
11

7 i
2 '
7 I
r 1 ---T ! --

1

91
8|

8 1
3 :

4

7

3
1

7

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~

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1

-

-

-

1

16 |
16
i
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3
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9
5

17
6

13
13 !

19 I
9 !

12
3 ! 12

37
154
“127" ~ 3 1 " !
6 ;
27

Z
T

r
—y
W
~
50

13

21
13
8

20
7
13

40
33
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2

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63 !
62
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11
4
7

27
17
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57
9
48

6
2
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17

12
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6

83
41
42
1

47
34
13
4

58
42
16
11

Z~
S
T

43

39
&
5
3

2
2

53
53

56

n
42
25

17
14

20
14

31
25

31
24

23
23

11
9

3
3
-

21
11
10
1

34
17
17
1

41
28
13

48
39
9
4

44
37
7 !
5

52
38
14
7

i ____
_

i
—

5
4

6
2

43
— 376
1

3

52
49
46 ! 46
6
3
1
4
i

-

54

!

_
-

13 ! 15
5 ! 12 1

_

_

-

-

_
.
_

_
-

_
_
-

-

-

-

_

_

8
5
3
5
3
2
1

33
30
3
-

17
9
8
“

8
6

18
17
1
1

9
4
5
5

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

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_
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i

12

1
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1
1

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2

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40
22
31
27 ' 30 1 17 !
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9
1
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47
9
31
103
9 “ z r - 37“
94
7
10
9
5 , 3
-

13
10

-

_
_
-

_

11
11

i

_

6
6

1
1

6
6
-

_
-

25
23

!

!
1
I

8
8
-

17
17

-

6
6

_

3
1

_

40
6 !
34 1

12 !
5 1

5
5

_

-

35
13
22

10

14
11

3

17

13
12

96
53
43

67
53
14

10
10

j
s
$
90.00 95.00
and
95.00 over

16 1
16 !
- |

2
2
-

-

u

16
13
38 1 35
28
9
7
29

14
14

_
-

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

5
5
-

19
^

—V
T

6 !

2

25
16
9

-

21 |
20

19
14

i

-

i

6

16!
14 !

17 !
17

3
'3

-

1

2
2

10
24
3 j

37
16

135 I 140
! - 8T~
56
I 59
21
27 ! 47
13
4 ! 13 r n s - 1
8
9
24
14

2
19
13
6

---

6

8
4

!

i
\
5

2

_

-

-

I
10 i
—
4 1
6

_

1

51.50

Duplicating-machine operators .............
Manufacturing...... ..................

|
9 i

l

_

W

21

T
~

7
4
3

50.50

166
58




7 !

11
3
3 '
—

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

654

—
-

36
11
25

!

j

42.00
29
74 137
44.50 — U “- ID- 39
16
38.50
64 ; 98

Clerks, payroll ..........................
Manufacturing................... .....
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................

E A R N IN G S O F -

2
2

i

Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) ...........
Nonmanufacturing........... ..........

W EEKLY

6
6
-

12
12

18
U

24
6

.

4
4
”

SsasB

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B .....
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing..... ................

S T R A IG IIT -T IM E

s
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
»
^
Under 32^0 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
a
under
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 150.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
I
i
1

-

_

-

_
-

-

_

_

_

-

_
-

_

3
3

_
_
_
-

_
-

_
—

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_

~

'
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., April 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-l:

i

e

( S r c u p a f f o H d r G a n /d + u t e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2/ for selected occupations studied
basis In Milwaukee, Vis., by Industry division, April 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Average
Sex, occupation, and Industry division

Number
o
f

$
$
$
s
$
Weekly Under 32.50 35.X 37.50 40.X 4 2 .5 0
Weekly
erig *
anns
hus
or
and
( t n a d ( t n a d 32.50 under
Sadr) Sadr)
35.X 37.50 40.X 42.50 45.X

m~
229

—

72

Secretaries................... .
Manufacturing ...................
Nonmanufacturing............. .

1.159
740
419

Stenographers, general.... ».......
Manufacturing ........ .
Nonmanufacturing................
Public utilities * ............

2.031
1,449
582
134

Stenographers, technical ............

77

Switchboard operators ...............
Manufacturing......... .........
Nonmanufacturing .......... .......

252
--- 75“
182

39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5
4 0 .0

39.5
40.0
4 0 .0

39.5
40.0

*
42.X
44*50
37.X

3
3

28
12
16

43
18
25

37
17
20

67.X
68.50
64.50

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

53.X
54.50
49.50
52.00

_
-

3 1
- !
3
-

9
1
8
-

44
13
31
1

_

_

_

6
6

4
4

i
;
'

_
-

11
-

i
j

-

39.5 ! 59.X
49.X
41.0
40.0 ! 5S.5o
45.50
41.5
40.0

Switchboard operator-receptionists...
Manufacturing..... .............
Nonmanufacturing.... ..... .......

442
270
172

4 0 .0

40.0

operators.........

75

39.5

3
_
3

50.50
52.X
48.50
60.X

Transoribing-machin* operators, general
Manufacturing.... ....... .
Nomanufacturing .......... .
Typists, class A .................
Manufacturing ...................
Nonmanufacturing........ ........
Typists, class B ...................
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......... .......
Public utilities * ............

$
$
s
■
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
—
'
45.X 4 7 .5 0 50.X 52.50 55.X |57.50 x . x 62.50 65.X 67.50 70.X 72.X 75.X X . X 85.X x . x
47.50 150.X

52.50 55.X

57.50 60.X

62.50 65.X

67.50 70.X

72.X 75.X

80.X

85.X

$
95.X
and
over
x . x 95.X

i

Women - Continued
Office girls ......................
Manufacturing ...................
Nonmanufacturing ................

on an area

403
235
168

7
0
0

39.5
39.5
39.0

50.X
52.00
47.50

40.0

53.X
55.X
48.50

_ ! _ 1 ---1
.
1
_
_
-

44.X
45.50

2

181

118

-

9
172

23
95
"

4 0 .0

459
241

40.0

1.819
1,086
733

40.0

82

39.5

39.0
40.0

41.X

2

43.50

11
1

11
n
-

14

7
7

14

22 i u
20
11
2

5
5

1
1

13
13

15
15

9
2
7

67
25
42

32
15
17

58
33
25

117
74
43

143

213
133
X
7

! 232
177
55
6

261
169
92
22

230
185
45
25

1

9

9

17
4
13

21

16
6
10

13
3
10

238
75 j 165
40 S 85
165
X
35
73
10
17 ! 15
i _
1
1 ---i
!
1
!

1

5

25
1
24

49
1
48

47
3
44

-

51
27
24

46
28
18

58
19
25 ! U
33
5

5

_

1
1

1
1 16
; 1
15

36
•
36

-

7
7

“

39
33
6

1
1 1
^
33
9
2 I 21
7 j 12

6

2

47
29
18

28
23
5
X
53

33

78
31
47

274 ! 246
154
98
138 | 157
56 1 136
89
i 6 i 31 1 18

410
326
84
19

131
103

23 1
23

53

20

27

28
4

8
13
130

-

-

-

.
.

55

85
66
19

97
70
27

72
61
11

X
61
19

114
75
39

169
132
37
17

146
123
23
8

94
84
10
5

88
83
5
-

20
15
5
1

15
15
-

13
15
-

9

13

8

18

4

5

_

7
6
1

17 ___2 _ !
8
12
l
5

8
8
-

4

?
6
3

3
3
-

15
2 l
13

23
22
1

5 i
2
1
71 ! 67 !
28 1
66
11
39 i

24
20

11

84 i
46

116

170
125
45
3

40
33

4
7
25

_

! __2_
_
5
2

14

5

j

18

9

4

21

12
_

1

13 1

12 ,

1 !

2
4
4
-

1 128
120
72
8
21

77
64
13
1

2

1
29 ! 19 :
18
16
n j 3

16 ' 14

|

93

I 42
i 30
1
1

I

7

51
33 ,
18

66
50

|

1
1

3
6
5
1

5
1
4

16 j 14 ! 28

1 |

1
1
-

-

_
-

2 ___ 4_
2
3
1
6 i

_
.

14 i 29

5

7

!
i

4

!

”
6
5

1
1
-

- :
“ 1
- |
- !
1

1

_
-

-

-

-

|

-

-

59
94
71
39
23 l 20

51 i
30
21

15
7
8

32
20
12

_
“

«
-

j

_

_

-

_
-

_

_
-

14
14
_
-

1
1
-

—
“

{
'

.
-

-

-

|

-!
1

-

.
-

!

1 i
11

-

1
1

_ |

-

-;

_
_
-

_

i
_
-

_
-

.
-

(
'

_
“
.
«
-

_
•

“

1

_____ i

_
-

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Table A-2:
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Vis., by industry division, April 1953)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

W eek ly
(S ta n d a rd )

Men
Prflftman...... ............
Manufacturing ............

82"

Draftsmen. Junior....... .
Manufacturing ............

~W T

W eek ly
earn in g s
(S ta n d a rd )

40.5
307
130
TZT

Under 42.J0 45.00
47.50 50.00 I 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 !62.50| 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.X
X
0
95 .odix.a 105.0 {110. X| 115.X 120.X
and
42.50 under
45.00 47.50 50.00 I52.50 ! 55.00 57.50 160.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.X IlX.Od 105.X 110.X 115.X 120.X over

55^T

40.0
46.0

72.50
72.50

40.0
59.00
" T O T ■3930"

E A R N IN G S O F —

$

88.50

"fc3—

S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y

137
134
12
11

18
“IF"

15
“I F "

15
“ IF "

13

14

“i r

"IT-

17
“E T

11
“ 9“

27
27

K -t-

_44_

33

43

7 ,
“"7"T

-fr

1<
5

74. 51
1
49
_J4_
^4

66 |
59

134

64
57

1Q5_
104

10_
10
2

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Manufacturing ............

260

“
"247"

40.0
40.0

63.50
63.50

34

42

12“

“ 4T "

29
29

31
T

24

~24T

30

~sr

17
15
I

y

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., April 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT <F LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

M tu n ie n a n c e a n d P a w e /i P la n t O cc u p x U lo M b

Table A-3::

%/

(Average hourly earnings
for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Wis., by industry division, April 1953)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

Occupation and industry d iv ision

Carpenters, maintenance .............................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing............................ .........................

N ber
um
of
W
orkers

460
—

161

A
verage
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
Under 1.40 1 .45 1.50
and
*
1.40 under
1.45 1 .5 0 1.55

#
2.08
5106
2.13
1.99

$
1.85

1.60

1.65

1 .7 0

1.75

1.80

1.85

1 .9 0

1.95

3
3
-

13
13
-

79
55
24
2

68
27
41
/l

31
19
12
12

32
22
10
5

41
11
30
30

26
23
3
2

31
30
1
2

2?
23
-

2.19
2.15

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

13
13

9
9

23
23

46
46

28
26

81
69

78
73

63
58

160
149

102
100

64
63

-

-

“

_
-

1
1
-

7
2
5

12
12
-

5
5

18
7
13*

26
24
2

9
7
2

52
38
14

22
19
3

33
18
15

115
115
-

4
3
1

31
23

24
22

31
26

101
101

83
83

40
40

68
64

44
23"

41
41

25
12

18
18

5
5

73
73

18
18

89
87

162
159

icn.
78

55
14

220
172

43
43

25
18

3
3

7
7

15
15

—

-

14
14

18
18

1
1

29
29

40
40

46
46

58
58

41
41

_

_

36
32
62
123
23 “ 3 ^ “ SO-1 121

674.
626

1.76
1.77

19
17

12
4

Helpers, trad es, maintenance ..................................
Manufacturing ............................................................

880
754

1.66
1.65

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ..........................
Manufacturing ........... ................................................

559
559

2.08
2.08

M achinists, maintenance .............................................
M anufacturing............... ............................................

1,197
1,177

2.22
2.22

30
48
“ 25“ — & r

1,006
973

-

445
444
432
422
209
126
83

2.19
2 .2 0 "

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

2.15
"2.12
2.20
2.15
"2.15

-

-

1.80
“ O b '"

P a in te rs, maintenance .................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................................

21
56
21 “ 5 5 "

_

-

2.10
2.10

O ilers ........................................ ........................................
Manufacturing ............................................................

-

_

2.08
2.08

M illw rights ......................................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................

a
a

_

481
2.05
-----135“ ' 2.09
2.04
351
2.06
291

Mechanics, maintenance ................. ................ ............
Manufacturing ............................................................

_
-

6
9
9 -----5“
..
-

_
-

_
1

-

_
-

_
-

-

28
6
----- 5 " “ 28"

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

_
-

1
1
1

2
1
1
1

4
3
1
-

5
1
4
4

17
5
12
6

19
19
8

32
11
21
6

107
23
84
68

59
2s
T
33
25

_

1
1

15
15

12
11

9
9

72
69

19
19

59
48

52
51

147
147

_

2
2

44
44
-

-

29
9
20

_

102
&L

24
20

44

120
107

8
8

40
9

19
19
-

8
8
-

3
1
2

2
2

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

.
-

_
-

_
-

“

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

34
34

63
63

18
18

27
27

10
10

2
2

6
6

-

-

-

52
48

99
96

87
87

65
65

81
81

121
121

122
122

3
3

280
280

-

_
-

-

74
2
72
72

21
20
1

43
4
39
38

55
55
55

_
-

5
5
5

36
34
2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

223
63
52~ 220

106
98

122
122

71
71

22
22

_
-

_

6
6

1
1

3
1

_

2
2

_
-

-

_

_

_

3
3

6
6

4
4

19
19

26
26

42
42

73
73

34
34

16
16

74
74

49
49

11
10

5
5

14
14

6
6

31
31

42
42

49
49

4444

31
21

10
10

39
39

15
15

29
29

3
3

2
2

101
101

1
1

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
1
- — r

_
16
3
5
9
19
13
- — r ----- 5- ----- 7- “ I T ----- T — r
2
9
4
9

2
2
-

2
2
-

4
3
1

3
3
-

_
-

_

_

-

-

1
1

26
14

36
34

56

-

8
7

_

_

i

-

-

i

16
15

23
22

103
102

100
100

18
44
E T “ 23“
16
7

12
12

3
3

12
12

15
13

-

2
2

3
3

5
5

4
4

5
13
4
3 — r — r

*

1
1

8
8

65
65

3
3

41
41

-

-

29
9

48
48

-

2.28
2.28

17
9

-

-

1
— r

4

63
63

-

27
29
14
26 “ Z T n r

L

12

_

_

___2 Z .

5
5

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




1
1

-

-

_

-

-

'

263074 0 - 53 -2

$
s
s
$
$
s
$
$
$
s
s
1
$
$
$
2.00 2 .05 2 .10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2 .35 2 .4 0 2.45 2.50 2 .6 0 2.70 2.80
and
2 .0 0 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2 .4 0 2 .45 2.50 2.60 2.70 2 .80 over

7
7
-

Firemen, statio n ary b o i l e r ......... .............................
M anufacturing............................ .............................

1/
*

S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$
s
1 .9 0 1.95

14
13
1

-

1,443
1,442

$
1.80

-

_
-

Tool-and-die makers .................................. ..
Manufacturing ............................................................

$
1.75

-

2.08
2.09
2.00

121
111

1.70

-

337
275
62

Sheet-m etal workers, m aintenance..........................
Manufacturing ......................................................... ..

%

-

Engineers, statio n ary .................................................
M anufacturing............................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................

321
— m ~~

$
1.65

-

1,057

P ip e f itte r s , maintenance ...........................................
Manufacturing ....................................................... ..

$
1.60

-

E le c tr ic ia n s , m ain ten an ce.........................................
M anufacturing........... ...............................................

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ....................
M anufacturing............................................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ...........................................

$
1.55

54
54

81
81

_

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
-

8
8

-

11
9

7
-

_

_

-

-

13
13

2
2

5
5

216
216

153
153

259
259

-

-

_

_
-

_ j
-

_

3

j

-

-

-

62
35
27

-

_
.
-

_
-

-

61
61

3
3

-

-

2
2

1
1

3
3

18
18

-

-

202
202

142
142

82
82

42
42

13
13

1
1

2
2

!

_

"
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., April 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT CP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

C u s t o d i a l , 7 0 a A e J u u 4 A iH X f,(* * id S U

Table A-4:

ift fd n f

O c c u fu M

a n d

l/

(Average hourly earnings
for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Wls., by industry division, April 1953)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

Number
o
f
Workers

Occupation and industry division

Manufacturing........ ..................

471
433

$
1.58
1.56

*

-

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) .......
Manufacturing.................... .
Nonmanufacturing ........................

2,220
1,67V
543

1.45
1.51
1.28

28
2
26

41
22
19

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) .....
Manufacturing........... ...............
Nonmanufacturing ........................

1,103
488
615

1.13
1.31
1.00

68
14
54

5
41

Laborers, material handling 3/ .............
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

4,126
3,197
929

1.64
1.63
1.66

15
3 I
12

-

623

1.71
1.68
1.75

Packers, class A (men) .....................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing........... ............

296
206
90

Packers, class B (men) .....................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing............ ...........

966
82

1.62
1.64
1.45

13
10
3

Packers, class B (women) .................. .
Manufacturing.......... ........... .
Nonmanufacturing ........................

1,002
886
116

1.19
1.21
1.03

!t/n5

Receiving clerks.......... ................
Manufacturing ............. .............
Nonmanufacturing.... ......... ..........

323
'•175.
148

1.74
17721.75

s
1.05

$
1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25 1.30

$
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

s
1.90

$
1.95

$
2.00

$
2.05

$
2.10

$
2.15

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20 1.25

1.30 1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65
1

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

2.10

2.15

and
over

1.74
1.74
1.73

* a r d s ....... ............................

Order fillers ..............................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ................. .

1,492
^

m

..

8
3“
5

89
14
75

27
- —
27

3

_
-

2
2

1
“

3
3

52
33"
37

398
33
365

$

$

1

48
4
~
4+ 4 r

30
89
--- r
5
82
25

•

60

120
67
42 — 5 T
69
25

27
33

50 * 33
55
4T
27 --- 9"
6
46
9

28
2r
7

30
48
—
4 — r |
26
41 1
|
!
2 !
2|
2
2|
“:
I

_

72

Shipping-end-receiving clerks..............
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing.......... .

—

Truck drivers, light (under 1* tons) ........
Manufacturing ...........................

1.83
1.86
1.77

321

—

1.77

233
is i—

m

45
AA

1

38
26
22

17
49
64
I F ---53”h “ 35“—
7
11
9

“

_

12
19
8 --- F
11
4

2
2

4
4

68
66

111
125
99 “ T O T
12
24

160
132
28

27
27

7
1
6

41
41
-

10
7
3

AA

28
24
4

1.76
1.58

36
34

60
60

23
23

37
37

9
9

44

3
-[
—
3

46
fe‘
-

30

44

-

*
*

-

5
4
1

1
1
~

1
1

_
_

•

-

-

236
216
20

208
1^2“
16

284

29
29

140
140“

27
27

10
10

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

212
2l2
“

550
539
11

467
434
33

216
156
60

129
32
97

442
298
144

231
115
116

279
24
255

23
17
6

22
12
10

426
425
1

31
28
3

14
14
~

17
14
3

1
1

11
11
*

228

56

16
189
159 ----9"
30
7

129
122
7

104
40
64

100
96
4

94
87 —
7

95
7T
24

169
124
45

85
34
51

203
119
84

91
23
68

215
52
163

84
32
52

56
49
7

45
45

23
3
20

2

34
12
22

9
9
“

18
18

56
41
15

46
4^
"

26
20
6

16
10
6

53
18
35

20
17
3

15
15
-

~

_
“

1
1

66
59
7

75
63
12

73
65
8

55
47
8

52
52

60
60 —

15
ir

96
94
2

30
30
“

41
a
“

25
21
4

19
17
2

89
89

4

2
2

“

45
45
-

8
8
“

a
29
12

-

-

1

10
10
-

1

14
_
-

30
25~^
5

-

94
61 1
—
33

_
-

53
22
31

101

59
59
“

11
11
~

15
15

58
53
5

12
12

14
14

-

6
6

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
IF
4

10
8
2

22
18
4

31
22
9

28
8
20

54
46
8

21
17
4

17
7
10

38
15
23

9
9

9
9

3
1
2

19
19

4

_
- ,

_
”

2
1
1

3
3

14
14

26
21
5

17
17

“

7
2
5

20
10
10

12
4
8

5
2
3

26
19
7

2
1
1

18
14

“

10
9
1

35
35

~

11
9
2

9
3
6

40
38
2

33
21
12

37
36
1

33
26
7

62
51
11

53
38
15

6
6

10
10

_
-

11
8
3

8
8

1
1

31
31

20
20

14
14

4

2
1

6
2

3
1

126

1
1

58
6

*
"

I
31

22 j

25

2 j

50
4F1
4

49
35
14

45
42
3

28
25
3

138
130
8

23
23

6
100
63
6 T ~ ~ m r—

2
2

67
5TI
1

104
w

u

~

_
-

-

3
3

2

3
3

2

~

“

-

~

i

2

4
4

1
1

2
2

14 --- r
13
IF
12
1

_
-

_
-

_
~

_
-

_
-

-

-

_
-

13
6
7

20

_

7

-

-

”i

_

„

_

_

_

_

„

_

_

1.78

296
85

24
24

211
193“
18

23
3

— ""'1777
83

33
32

43

280
320
273“" H T
8
7

67
107
55“— 9 T
16
7

i

1

Shipping clerks ................... ........
Manufacturing........ ..................
Nonmanufacturing................ ..... ..

$

2

-

!
j

884

*

15

S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$
1.00

Average
3.90 0.95
hul
o r y Under [
and
erig 1
anns
0.90 Under
.95 1.00

7
_

_

j

5

2

_

6

5
5

7
4

6

-

“

4

A

_

______i
_____ 1
See footnotes at end of table.




Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., April 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

G tid to d u U , 7 V G /ieJ tfU 4 A tiK f,G * u A S U ip fU tU j, 6cC 44{L cU iO *pi ~G o + tti+ U i& d

Table A-4:

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Wis., by industry division, April 1953)

n u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e ce i v i ng s t r a i g h t - i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f —
t

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns

$

$

Aider 3.90
and
under
).90
.95 1 .0 0

S
1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1 .1 0

1 .0 5

1.15
1 .2 0

1 .1 5

5

$

$
1 .4 0

1 .5 0

$
1 .6 0

!1 .6 5

Is
il.7 5
, .

Is
ll.S O
j.

is
j l .S 5
.

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

s
2 .0 0

*
2 .0 5

1 .4 0

1 .4 5

1 .5 0

1 .5 5

1
1.60
!

$
1 .7 0
.

j
S

1 .3 5

I
j .5 5
1

$

1 .3 0

s
1 .4 5

$
!

1 .2 5

$
1 .2 0

s

1 .0 0

$
3.95

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

11.80

11.85

il.9 0

1 .9 5

I2 .OO

2 .0 5

2 .1 0

1 .3 0

1 .2 5

1 .3 5

$

I
i

I
s
I
s
12.10 2 .1 5
2 .1 5
,

over

i

%

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing.......................... ........................
Public utilities * ...................

950
£27—

523
35 1

1.82
1773...
1.88
1.98

- |

-

-

-

-

-

- j

-

8

-

-

-

16

-

8

16
16
-

40
40

1
1
-

7
2
5

1
1
-

32
32
-

3
3
-

1
13 !
13 !

Public utilities * ...................

j
111 1

81 ! ~ u T ]
r
3j
_

-1

i

i

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer type) ............................
Manufacturing..... ................ .

j

1
!
5*1

“ 1
1

27 1
21 !
6j
_ 1
1

14
14 J

14 1

30 j
18
12 j

52
28

72
48
24 ,

49

15!

8
8

11!
-

j

1

12
367
12
4
- ; 363
i 303
'i 1

75
35
40 1
33 i
]

74 !
46 ;
28 i

35:

- 1
- j

-1

~!

1
1
66 6
12 6

e/n
PAU

389

1 .9 9
1 .9 6
2 .0 0
z'.oo

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

6
6

"

7 !
3 j

/ j

-

1 |

-

-

- j
-1

-

11

477
12

0/

4DP
389

-

-

~!

i

1
1 .9 9

11
6

2.00

1
8 1

Truckers, power (fork-lift) .................
Manufacturing ................. ..........

833
735

.

1.74
1774"'

.

.

_

_ 1

65

1

6i

!

45
45

16
16

11 6
11 6

39 :
39 j

78 1

4
4

1 !
1 :

1 !
1

“

-

1

379
361

e
o

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
other than trailer type) .................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

j
_

_

i
.

8
7

48
48

7
7

66
64

53
53

92
92

90
89

10 4

!
142 j

101

142

1
20 i
9 I
|

133 1
12 6

5

5

13
1

46
46

|
j

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ......
Manufacturing...........................

204
189

1 .7 4
1 .7 4

1

1

—
'

Watchmen.................. ........ .
Manufacturing ............. ..............

71 1
407

1 .3 1

1.46

15

113
12

'

34

28

8

"

10

'

9

12
9

1
1

11

11

n

11

31
31

4

4

'

8
8

11

50

20

49

27

9

15

48

18

99
91

2 I

4

4

1

2 ____ 7 .
2 1
7

-!

57
50

44

44

71

38

27

71

46
33

16

7

10

7

11
5 |

39
30

j

8

1

i

6
5

8

- 1

12
12

1 !

21

1 ;
-

1
i

1

1/
~y

3/
5/
*

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," reported in the March 1952 study.
Workers were distributed as follows:
11 at SO. to tO.PO; 52 at $0..p0 to $0.85; 52 at $0.85 to $0.90.
75
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




j

|

,

B: Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-35:

Occupation and sex

o
f
Workers
2/

$
*
Under 1.40 1.45
and
$
1.40 under
1,45 1,50

McuUUH&Uf

9

2

/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
s
$
$
$
$
s
5
$
$
1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

s
1.75

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

2.10

2.15

2.20

2.25

2.30

§
2.30

$
2.40

s
2.50

s
2.60

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

S
s
$
$
2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
and
2.80 2.00 3.00 ovar
i
1

Machinery 3/

Men

Assemblers, class A:

Assemblers, class B:

Assemblers, class C:

Total ................
Time ..............
Incentive .........
Total ................
TIttia
.. , . ,
Incentive .........
Total ................

Incentive .........
Electricians, maintenance 4a/ ..............
Inspectors, class A 4a/ ....................
Inspectors, class B 4a/ ....................
Inspectors, class C 4a/ ....................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 4a/ ........
Laborers, material handling 4a/ ............

434
215
269
2,129
790
1,339
379
529
291
451
398
220
530
954

$
2.23
1.94
2.45
2.05
1.81
2.19
1.94
1.70
2.10
2.13
1.99
1.92
1.74
1.52
1.56

-

_
_
9

_
.
15

_
24

2

2

_

3

_
26
15
11
40
38
2

17

9
2

15
-

24
9
6

_
8
57
50

_
86
70

_
7
69
147

.
_
9
147
132

_
16
51
354

1
_
.
_
1
67
40
38 ' 33
7
29
22
63
16
61
6
2
. |
3
14
39
13
41
24
16
95

1
_
1
92
222
176
75
46
17
18
102
12
87
15 i 6
4
16
7
46
49
21
43
38
13
19
-

67
67
_
150
92
58
185
115
JJLP
70
12
48
57
21
2
56

31
24
7
203
195
8
31

56
50
6
214
132
82
79

25
22
3
68
24
44
10

30
16
14
61
10
»
95

10
2
8
322

29
11
18
53

15
12
3
27

30
11
19
49

8

53

47

14

11

12

8

6

30

8
29

53
92

47
86

14
57

11
82

12
54

8
39

6
6

30
42

322
28

53
4

27
26

49
47

29
12

92
15

86
22

57
10

82
5

54
2

39
6

6
4

42
25

31
11
52
52
6
2

79
22
82
22
14
2
7

10
35
87
89
5

95
9
74
8
2

28
27
16
4
M

4
56
7
22
-

26
7
2
-

47
65
1
2
-

12
2
1
11
-

15
17
52
2
2

22
13
6
-

10
8
_
1
-

5
_
-

2
_
_
2
-

4
.
2

25
3
_
.
_

10
10
_

12
12
-

6
_ |
_
12
-

6
1

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A ^/: Total .................... .
Time .....................
Incentive .................
Automatic-lathe operators, class A £b/ ....
Drill-press operators, radial,
class At Total .......................
Incentive ................
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class A 4b/ .........
Qagine-lathe operators,
class At Total .......................
Time .....................
Incentive ................
Grinding-machine operators,
class At Total .......................
Incentive......... ......
Milling-machine operators,
class At Total .......................
T i m e ................
Incentive ....... .
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class A 4b/ ..........................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
class At Total .......................
Time .............. .
Incentive ................

See footnotes at end of table,




12
12
-

20
1
19
-

60
36
24
2

207
152
55
-

178
134
44
1

211
140
71
2

214
145
69
13

222
122
100
2

2

2

8

2

8

26
17
9

57
Z5
.
12

25
19
6

4

2

4

15
3
12

_

2 •

-

2

3

14

5

11

11

1
1

_
_

_
_
_

1
1
_

8
6
2

16
12
4

13
11
2

35
27
8

36
31
5

-

-

_ I

5

-

.

13

_

_

_

4

14
13
1

9
1
8

-

3

2

8

1

2

4
2

3

2

8

1

2

2

48
33
15

37
25

_

12

_

-

»

1
41
36
5

2,671
1,048
1,623
42

2.12
2.00
2.20
2.15

2
2
-

1
1
-

3
3
-

8
8
-

16
16
-

232
88
144

1.96
1.84
2.03

-

-

2

i
7 !

_

_

4

2

7

4

162

2.13

_

306
183
123

2.09
2.C4
2.17

.

-

-

.

.
_
.

1
_
1

1
_
1 I

365
60
305

2.31
2.00
2.37

-

-

-

_

_

335
108
227

2.05
1.93

2

-

2.11

2

_

108

2.28

_

_

14
_
14
_

9

5

j

_

158
78
80
2

112
5
107
3

310
49
261
1

240
25
215
2

51
3
48
6

36
36
1

2

5

14

9

8

2

_

2

5

14

9

8

2

7

7

10

26

3

4

22
14
8

40
32
8

9
1
8

18
10
8

15
4
11

12

35

7
1
6

53
6
47

18

13

18 i 17
_
1
18
16
_
-

105
36
69
-

259
88
171
4

175
33
142
3

6

5

6

4

25
•
a
22

5

22

23

41
22
19

16
7
9

20
5
15

7
4
3

19
16
3

5

22
10
12

35

31
15
16

12

33
14
19

21

18

5
8

15

16

44
7
37

12

7

12

15

19

1

1

2

11

2

6

19

1

8

37

7

72
56
16

63
41

43

66

5

23

21

65

31

5

6

1

4"

2

1

31
35

-

38
15
23

41

22
21

41

23

21

65

31

5

6

1

4

2

1

5

5
16

12

_

2

_

2

_

2

3

3

1

_

_

5
_
5

4
4

3

1

3 :

1

_
_

_
_
_

no

17

15

7

4

4 ;

7

no

17

15

7

4

;

7

4

1

2

2

2

2

4

1

2

2

2

2

4

4

2

2

_

2

2

”
564

2.07

212

2.17

-

1

_

2

1

4

4

7

17

-

1

-

2

1

4

4

7

11
6

1.92

352

22

5

Occupational V/age Survey, Milwaukee, Vds., April 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-35:

Occupation and sex

o
f
Workers

$
$
hul
o r y Under 1.40 1.45
erig %
anns
and
under
1.40
y
1.45 1.50

M G c J u tte /U f, 9nd(4A £> U e&

1/

(?a**£lH t€Jec£

$
1.50

$
1.55

1.60

$
1.65

1.70

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25

1.55

1.60 1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

10

57
44
13

148
117
31
5

191
141
50

234
173
61

167
93
74

1

1

94
50
44
4

15

32
19
13

36

17

5

20
16

11
6

46
34

a

%

%

2.00 2.05

2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25

s

$

$

$

$

$

2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80

2.30

2.40

2.50

89
_
89
-

155
3
152

77

2

76
4

1

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90

1

$
j
I
s
2.90 13.00
3.00

over

Machinery 3/ - Continued

Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B £/: T o t a l ...................... .
Time .....................
Incentive ................
Automatic-lathe operators, class B 4b/ ....
Drill-press operators, radial,
class B: Total .......................
IMflM
Incentive........ .
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B: Total ..............
T i m e ............
"
Incentive ........
Engine-lathe operator s,
class B: T o t a l ................. .....
TTf
^ni
1.
((( (.f.....?
Incentive ................
Grind ing-mech ine operators,
class B: Total .......................
Time t
T“_
..........
Incentive ................
Milling-machine operators,
class B: Total .......................
Time .....................
incentive ................
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class B 4 b / ...........................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
class B: Total .......................
TIttm* , ,,,,Tt- tt TT1-- Incentive ................

%

-

23
15
-

5
5
-

1.93
1,69
2.09

-

21

-

6

347
105
242

2.00

-

246

1.98
1.79
2.09

-

1

1

3

2

1

2
1

2.18

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

2
2

1,896
706
1,190
53
256

103
153

91
155

2.00
1.79
2.13
1.98

1.75

2.10

12

40
30

-

20
8
12
1

-

1

3

-

4

-

2
2

10
6

3

22
20
2

-

-

2

1

1

8

-

12

15

4

10

1
1

1

39
31

2

-

4

8

12

12

3

2

4
3

3

24
24

15
9

31
23

-

189
47

1.83

142

2.30

-

-

-

-

-

-

273
81
192

2.03
1.73

-

1

-

-

3

16

2
1

41

5

284

2.00

68

2.06

2

62
1

84
9

91
7

61
3

4

7

4

4

1

15

15

2

11

11

14

5

4

7

4

4

1

15

15

2

11

ll1

14

5

13

8

27

34

9

11

9

32

28

12

2

5

5
7

1
12

8

27

34

9

11

9

32

28

12

2

5

27

30

18

9

6

7

12

10

12

16

7

2

2

20

8
22

2
16

9

6

7

12

10

12

16

7

2

2

20

10

5

14

4

5

8

10

20

20

22

8

13
7

4
.

6

5

14

4

5

8

10

20

20

22

8

2

2

_

1

9

14

9

10

8

17

18

35

7

8

7

2

1

_

1
1

8

7

20

9
5
4

4
3

1

1
1

6

19

1

11

93

79
79

77

1

78

52

27

52

27
_

1

12
2
10

6
1

1

5

1

4

1

_

_

2

1

_

_

2

3

1

_

_

3

1

_

_

2

1

1

_

2

1

1

2

2

5

1

-

1

13

26

25

15

15
14

10

16

-

1

1

3

16
10

22
8

9

6

14

9

14

9

10

8

17

18

35

7

8

7

2

1

_

1

-

1

-

2

10

1

9

-

2

-

-

-

_

16

_

_

_

_

_

31
23

24
13

15
3

12

16

20

19

12

7

40

2

4

_

_

_

_

11

12

29
15
14

13

8

13

12

16

20

19

12

7

40

2

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

7

3

4

4

-

-

1

7

1
2

4

2
2

1.80

216

12

6

2.14

2.16

29

96

12

7
3
4

73

11
62
2

21
11
10

_
|
i

1
J

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C % /: Total ........................
TItba
. _TT..........T_
Incentive ................
Drill-press operators, radial,
cla88 C 4 b / ......... .................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C: Total ..............
TM me
incentive........
Engine-lathe operators, class C 4a/ ......
Milling-machine operators,
class C: T o t a l ................. .....
TM T A
n
Incentive ........... .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
class C: T o t a l ...... .................
Tin**
......
T f f r + Iv.
nlti.
......

23
3

14

24

35

26

21

16

15

21

21

29

7

4

1

_

20

14

24

35

26

21

16

15

21

21

29

7

4

1

_

3U
325

2.00

62

1.84

4

-

1

-

-

7

2

6

13

3

2

-

5

7

4

3

-

1

-

2

_

2

_

_

_

187
92
95
36

1.77
1.53

-

15
15

20

17
17

23

8

7

2

2

4

12

17

12

5

3

6

8

10

2

_

2

_

-

_

-

2

2

4

2

5

-

5

-

1

3
-

-

8
1

-

-

_
-

2

-

5
-

2

1

12
1

10

1

17
-

6

1.67

12
1

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

137
33
104

1.96
1.52
2.10

15
15

-

-

8

1
1

2
2

5

3

7

8

2

6

5

5

10

9

21

5

-

1

_

_

1

5

3

7

8

2

6

5

5

10

9

21

5

_

1

_

_

1

57
16
41

1.74
1.68
1.77

1
1

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

- 1
I

_




_

_

2.02

12
11
1

1.80
1.59

18
15
3

24

20
4

18

46
42
4

2

5

37

51
45

21

67
59

6

16

8

78
63
15

36
23
13

6

3

2
2

4
16

4

7

12

5
2

5

4

22
1

7

-

_

3

2

2

2

6

4

1

11

7

11

2

2

1

2

1

1

1

2

1
1

1
1

2
4

4

1

6
3

7

3
8

2

2

1

2

1

1

1

!
_____ i ____
_
See footnotes at end of table

_

21
20
1

636

1
j

1
_

_
_
1
I

_

Table B-35:

M oclU M JeSU f 9 H d u & tsU & l 1 / -G o**t& H toec£

J/ The study covered establishments employing mare than 20 workers in machinery (nonelectrical) industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) employing more than 7 workers were also included. Data relate to a February 1953 payroll period.
2 J Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2 / Includes establishments producing machine-tool accessories for which separate data are also presented.
lJ
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
jj/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shewn separately.




Table B-7211:

Powesi Jlcuuubueii J
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

4

4

0.70
and
under
.75

0.75

t
0.80

.80

•85

1

*
0.95

$

4

4

4

4

4

1.15

1.20

1.30

1.35

4
1.50

4

1.10

4
1.45

4

1.05

4
1.43

4

1.00

4
1.25

4

0.85

$
0.90

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

.90

.95

1.00

1.05 . 1.10

1.15

1.20

JL.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55 .1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

7

2
2

6

1

1

2
2

2

1 ---

4

1

m

4
23
25

39
189

.95

....
t. TtTt

112

1

3

1.19
1.41

.80
.99
.93
.84

_

_

1

«•

7

5

5

1

Women

V

44
m

mUa « «
i

a it wvmV
f
T-Iiim* t

Incentive

...

77
56

T T ............ t - r -

26

Identifiers * Total
T

30
Markers

jjj/

26

............ .

Average
weekly
earnings
y

9

7

8

11

8

_

H
14

7
3

7
3

16
2

16

14
4
7

3
2

1.00

Number
of
workers

4

TfiAam'f. vta

Wrappers, bundle 2^/

2

117
106

3

_

1.01
1.02

137
39
98
36

1

8
8
6
2

.88

6
34
30

•94
.81

4

1

.89

1
2
2
22
8

4

$
70.00

5

1

20
2

5

1
1

1

1
am

1
3

••

—

3

3
1

2

1
1

6

19

20

9

6

19

1

4
*
1
55.00 60.00 65.00

11

20

22
6

7
3

14

5

22

15
4

12

1

13

20

9
1

6

2

1

3
1
3

3

3
2

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEE K LY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation ( J

4
Dhder

50.00

and
50.00 under
55.00

4
75.00

1
?
80.00

$
35.00

4

|
|
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
1
1
4
95.00 100.00 105.00 n o .oo n s . o o 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 155.00

4

90.00

4

and

60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00

80.00 85.00. 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.C& 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 155.00 over

4
Rontemen, retail (driver-salesmen)*

Total ....

144

ff(yplnjeAk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

88

•••••••••«••••••••••••«••<•••

56

6 day workweek
—

102.50
93.00
117.50

1
1

1
1

2
2

5
5

7
3
4

5
5

6

15

3
3

12
3

8
8

9

8

8

9

10

8

3

1

6
2

5
3

1

13

8

7
3
4

8
8

9
4
5

3

7

7

2

1
2

1

2

•
»

6

5

2

1

3

1

3

1/ The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Glassification Manual (1949 edition) prepared ty the Bureau of the Budget.
Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period*
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime
night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Vis., April 1953
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
U.S. DEPARTMENT (F LABOR.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau of labor Statistics
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Data limited to men workers.
Jj Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
j/

{
J




12
C : Union

W a g e

Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade unions* Bates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated* Comprehensive listings
of union scales for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing for July 1.
1952 are available on request* Similar information for these industries will be published for July 1, 1953*/

Table C-15:

BhU I ^ Gnfutot
A h oiocit

BA/dd
oele,

Classification

Bricklayers
Carpenters ................. .
.......... ..... ...... .
Painters
Plasterers
Pltsnbera ............... .
Building "laborers ............................

Rate
Hours
per
per
week
hour
*
40
3.065
2.790
40
2.780
40
2.400
40
2.900
40
2.800
40
40
2.125

iC
SU

Table C-205:
July 1, 1952
Classification

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Foremen ......................... .......
Flr8t
Benchmen:
First hands.......... ....... .
Second hands .........................
Third hands......... ................
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Mixers, ovenmen, doughnut-machine
operators, dividermen ...............
Depositor operators, ingredient
scalers, oven feeders and dumpers
(bread) ...........................
Clerks, shipping and receiving........
Oven feeders and dumpers (cake), bench
hands, wrapping-machine operators,
moldermen.......... .............. .
Bench and machine helpers ....... .
Miscellaneous helpers:
M e n ........ .....................
Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Agreement B:
Working foremen......................
Mixer8, shipping clerks..............
Dividermen..........................
Ovenmen, molders ............ ....... .
Wrapping-machine operators...........
Miscellaneous helpers, shipping-roam
workers ............................
Agreement C:
Mixers, ovenmen........ ........ .
Dividermen, moldermen, bench hands,
doughnut-machine operators, stockroam workers ....... .
Miscellaneous helpers:
Man ....rr...........................
Women ........... ................




Rate
per
hour
*
1.570
1.480
1 .4 0 0

1.300
1.150

1.625

Hours
per
week

48
48
48
48
48

40

1.525
1.525

40
40

1.315
1.025

40
40

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement D:
Mixer8, ovenmen, cake
decorators ........................
Wrapping-machine operators ...........
Dividermen, bench hands, doughnutmachine operators, molders, flour
dumpers, ingredient scalers,
depositor operators................
Shipping-room workers ................
Miscellaneous helpers:
M e n ..............................
Woman ...............................
Bread only - Machine shops:
Foremen, ovenmen........................
Mixers, wrapping-machine
operators
..........
Oven feeders and dumpers, moldermen,
dividermen...........................
Stockroom workers .........................
Miscellaneous helpers
(men) ..............................T....
Cake only - Machine shops:
Foreman ...................................
Mixers, ovenmen........................
Depositor operators .......... ..........
Miscellaneous helpers:
Men ............................. .
Women
Hebrew baking - Bread and cake:
Cake bakers, bread workers ..............
Dough mixers, benchmen ............. .

_______________July 1, 1952
Hours
per
week

Pk
w

f n l 196 fifrrea - Continued
rf

1.885
1.635
1.575
1.525
1.405

40
40
40
40
40

1.335

40

1.535

40

1.475

40

1*275
1.065

40
40

Pressmen, cylinder presses:
1 single-roll rotary (bread wrapper); 3
patent inside blanket; 2 Miehle vertical
(22 x 28 inches or less); 1 Addressograph
or similar type; 1 multicolor Harris;
1 sheet-fed rotary ......... ...........
1 double-roll rotary; any rotary that
prints 3 or more c o lors............. ..
1 Cox Duplex or Goss flat-bed .............
Job cylinder presses:
1 Kelly, Miehle vertical or horizontal
Miller High-Speed or Simplex or
similar job cylinder (22 x 23 inches
or less) ...........................
Pressmen, platen*
1, 2, or 3 presses....... ...............
4 presses ....... ........................
Stereotypers ...............................

40
40

1.470
1.370

40
40

1.250
1 .0 4 0

40
40

1.635

40

1.535

40

1.475
1.475

40
40

1.275

40

flttaBMSEg

I.6 3 5
1.535
1.475

40
40
40

1.275
1.065

40
40

1 .6 4 0

45
45

Compositors, band - day w o r k ..... ......... .
Compositors, hand - night work ............ .
Machine operators - day w o r k .................
Machine operators - night work •••••••...... .
Machine tenders (machinists) - day w o r k .....
Machine tenders (machinists) - night work ....
Mailers - day work ............................
Mailers - night work ..........................
Photoengravers - day w o r k ....................
Photoengravers - night work ..................
Pressmen, web presses - day w o r k .............
Color m e n ....... •••••....... .............
Pressmen, web presses - night w o r k ...........
Color m e n .................................
Pressmen-in-charge - day w o r k ................
Pre^smen-in-charge - night work ..............
Stereotypers - day work ............. ....... .
Stereotypers - night work ....................

1.560

Table C-27:
July 1, 1952
Classification

Classification

___________
Hours
Bate
per
per
-frqaL. XPfiJk.

$
1.530
1.530

40
40

1.435
1.315

Glassification

Bate
per
hour

~Q*iUJc
@*£*te£

Table C-27:

Table C-205*
______________ July 1, 1952_________________

April 1, 1953

$

2.610

40

2.680
2.710

40

2.510

40

2.490
2.530
2.640

40
40
37*

40

2.720
2.853
2.720
2.853
2.720
2.853
2.373
2.480

2.946
3.080
2.533
2.633
2.750
2.857
2.733
2.964
2.640

2.773

Hours
per

Bate
per
J1S2UL

MSL&L.

*
1.230
2.460

40
40

Book and lob shops
Bindery women •.............
Bookbinders...............
Compositors, h a n d .........
Electrotypers .............
Machine operators........ .
Machine tenders (machinists)
Mailers ........ ..........
Photoengravers .............
Press assistants and feederst
Cylinder and rotary ....
Job cylinder and platen

2.613
2.700
2.613
2.613
2.613
2.924

3*$
37f
37|
3?f

2.335
1.575

40
40

n

tw o.

0 -411

J io c a l V -b o n U t

Qeaif Cpaed
pAiH. mlye.
Classification

Rate
per

Hours
per

3
36*

1-man cars and busses:
First yaar ............................a...
After 1 year

♦
1.710
1.750

40
40

Occupational Mage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., April 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

3

Table C -42:

A fo t& b t'U ic A

Table C- 4 2 :

S b t la e b d

A 4 o ta fct> U 4 cA

S b td & e tid

Table C -42:

C la s s if ic a tio n

Helpers .............................................................................
Armored c a r
.............. ................................. ..
Bakery:
Wholesale - Transport ......................................... ..
R e ta il - S tore d e liv e r y :
T ransp ort ..................................................................
Pick-up d r iv e rs .....................................................
F lo u r h au lers ..• •• • ............................................
S p ecial d e l i v e r y .............. ........................ ..
Cracker
le a s t:
F i r s t 3 months .......................................................
Second 3 m o n th s...................
A fter 6 months .......................................................
B eer:
Depot d r i v e r s 1 h e l p e r s ...........................................
Brewery:
P la n t-to -p la n t ......................................................... ..
E x tr a d r iv e rs .............. .................................................
B u ild in g :
C o n stru ctio n :
Paving, e x ca v a tin g ,
grading ..................................... ........................
3 -a x le s e m i t r a i l e r .............................................
Concrete-m ixer tru ck .........................................
M a te ria l:
3 -a x le s e m itr a ile r ........................................... ..
Helpers




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

t
1 .9 5 0
1 .8 3 0
1 .6 4 0

40
40
40

1 .7 9 0

43

1 .7 8 0
1 .7 8 0
1 .8 1 0
1 .6 6 0
1 .6 0 5

48
40
40
40
43

1 .3 4 4
1 .4 1 7
1 .6 7 5

48
43
43

1 .5 0 0

40

1 .9 0 0
1 .8 6 3

40
40

1 .9 2 0
2 .0 2 0
1 .9 7 0

40
40
40

1 .9 1 0
1 .7 4 0

40
40

_________ * * L h
C la s s if ic a tio n

Building: - Continued
Material: - Continued
Conventional type
Plumbing s u p p l y .... .
Sand and gravel:
Conventional type .
3-axle semitrailer
Carbonic g a s ............. .
Coal, coke, and o i l ...... .
H e l p e r s ...... ......... .

Cartage - Package:
M etropolitan a re a
Helpers .............

S tM lu & M

J u ly 1 . 1952

1952
Hate
per
^22SL

%

Hours
per

1 .8 5 0
1 .6 9 5

40
40

1 .8 0 0
1 .8 5 0
1 .5 8 0
1 .6 8 0
1 .5 6 0

40
40
40
40
40

Department s to r e :
Furniture ............. ,
Helpers ............ .
Package ............... .
Parcel d e l i v e r y ....... .
Drug:
Agreement A ........... .
Agreement B .... ........
Fruit and vegetable:
Agreement A - Retail ....
Agreement B ........ • «.,
Agreement C - Wholesale ,
H e l p e r s ....... .....
Furniture - R e t a i l ....... .
Helpers ............... .
General:

M o t& U b U c A

a n d Jfelp& U -G antintied

a n d a t fe lp & b l- G a t w fa u c e c l

1 .6 5 0
1 .5 5 0
1 .6 3 0
1 .6 3 0

40
40
A
O
40

1 .6 0 0
1 .3 5 0

40
40

1 .3 8 0
1 .3 0 0
1 .7 3 0
1 .5 4 0
1 .6 6 5
1 .5 5 5

40
40
43
40
44
44

1 .8 5 0
1 .7 3 0

44
44

C la s s if ic a tio n

Grocery - Chain s t o r e :
C i t y ..............................
Helpers ................
Hardware - Wholesale •
Ice cream ( s t a t i o n - t o s t a t i o n ) .......................
S p ecial d e liv e ry . .
Laundry:
I n d u stria l v ip e r . . .
Dry cle a n in g :
I n t r a c i t y ............
R e l a y .....................
Branch s to re . . . .
R u g .........................
Helpers ..........
Machinery, h e a v y ..........
M a g a sin e.............................
Milk:
T r a c t o r ....................... ,
P la n t-to -p la n t . . . .
Oil and g a s:
F i r s t 3 months . . . .
A fte r 3 months . . . .
P a p e r ............ ......................
Railway e x p re ss:
Under
t o n s ..........,
to n s and
over ,
S o ft drink

Rate
Hours
per
per
Ja g g ___K§SK
$
1 .7 1 0
1 .6 6 0
1 .6 6 5

48
43
40

1 .575
1 .4 7 1

43
43

1 .5 1 0

40

.950
1 .1 0 0
1 .1 5 0
1 .3 6 0
1 .2 5 0
2 .2 5 0
1 .6 0 0

44
44
44
44
44
40
40

1 .5 7 5
1 .5 7 5

48
48

1 .8 2 9
1 .8 6 1
1 .6 0 0

40
40
40

1 .7 2 9

40

1 .7 5 8
1 .5 1 0

40
40

D'* Supplementary W age Practices
Table D - l :

S h i f t ^ ift e s ie * U ic U

p M H jU d d a n l

1/

P ercen t o f t o t a l p la n t employment -

S h ift d i f f e r e n tia l

M
<
A ctu ally working or e x tr a s h i f t s in A ll manufacturing
Machinery
indii s t r i e s
indust r i e s 2 /
3d or other
3d o r o th e r
2d s h i f t
2d s h if t
sh ift
sh ift

Bv establishm erit p o licy in ■
A ll manufacturing
Machinery
Indus t r i e s 2 /
indti s t r i e s
2d s h i f t
3d o r other
2d s h i f t
3d o r other
s h i f t work
work
work
s h i f t work

A ll workers ......................................... ............................ ..
Workers in establishm ents having provisions
f o r l a t e s h if ts ..................................................................
With s h if t d if f e r e n tia l ..............................................
Uniform cen ts (per hour) ....................... .............
Under 5 cen ts .......................................................
5 cen ts .............................. ......................................
6 c e n t s ................ ...................................................
7 o r ? £ cen ts ......................................................
8 c e n t s .............. ............... ................. ....................
9 cen ts ....................................................................
10 c e n t s .................................................... .............
11 c e n t s .............. ...................................................
12 or 12-J- cen ts ..................................................
13 or 1 3 i cen ts ..................................................
15 c e n t s ............................................... .................
Over 15 c e n t s ................ ......................................
Uniform percentage .................................... .............
5 p e r c e n t .............. .................................................
6 p ercen t ................................................................
percen t ..............................................................
9 p ercen t ................................................................
10 percent ....................... ........................ .............
Other i j .........................................................................
With no s h if t d if f e r e n tia l .......................................
Workers in establishm ents having no provision s
f o r la te s h if ts ......................... ........................................

1 0 0 ,0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

xxx

XXX

9 2 .1
9 0 .5
7 4 .7
.8
2 5 .0
4 .0
2 1 .2
1 3 .0
2 .5
5 .2
1 .9
.4
.7
1 5 .8
9 .9
2 .6
3 .3
1 .6

8 4 .6
8 4 .0
6 0 .8
1 .4
.6
6 .2
.9
3 .4
2 1 .9
4 .1
1 4 .0
2 .1
5 .5
.7
1 5 .9
6 .5
2 .6
6 .8
7 .3
.6

9 6 .3
9 6 .3
7 0 .2
5 .1
8 .2
3 6 .0
1 1 .5
3 .7
.6
5 .0
.1
2 6 .1
1 5 .4
1 0 .7
-

9 0 .4
9 0 .4
3 9 .2
1 .0
1 .2
1 .1
1 6 .5
5 .7
8 .5
5 .2
2 6 .0
-

1 9 .6
1 9 .4
1 5 .6
.2
5 .5
1 .3
4 .1
2 .9
.1
.6
.5
.3
.1
3 .8
2 .3
.5
-

5 .7
5 .6
3 .7
( 2 /)
.1

2 6 .0
2 5 .2
-

1 .0
.2

1 .3
.1
1 .9
.1
.1
.1
1 .2
.3
.3
.6
.7
.1

7 .9

1 5 .4

3 .7

9 .6

xxx

XXX

-

XXX

-

5 .8
5 .8
.9
•
.5
.3
.1

2 2 .5
2 2 .5
1 6 .2
.6
2 .8
9 .3
2 .2
.3

$

-

XXX

(2 /)
1 .0
6 .3
2 .7

2 .3
-

-

-

3 .6
-

2 .3
2 .6
-

XXX

XXX

-

-

-

-

-

-

1/ S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l data are presented in terms o f (a ) esta b lish m en t p o lic y and (b) workers a c tu a lly employed on l a t e s h i f t s a t th e tim e o f th e s u rv e y .
estab lish m en t was con sid ered as having a p o lic y i f i t met any o f th e follo w in g co n d itio n s* ( l ) Operated l a t e s h i f t s a t th e tim e o f th e su rvey , (2 ) had u n io n c o n tra c t p ro v isio n s co v erin g l a t e s h i f t s , or (3) had operated l a t e s h i f t s w ith in 6 months p r io r to th e survey.
2/ In clu d es data f o r machinery in d u s tr ie s a ls o shown s e p a r a te ly .
2 / Less than 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.
£/ F u l l day’ s pay f o r reduced hours p lu s 7 c e n ts per hour.

Table D-2s

S

c h e d u

le d

'U

/e e h U

f.

o

K

q h

P ercen t o f o f f i c e workers 3/ employed in Weekly hours

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2/

Manufacturing

P u blic
u tilitie s *

A ll workers ...........................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Under 3 ?£ h o u r s .............. ...................................................................
37£ hours ............................................. .................................................
Over 37jjr and under 40 hours ......................................................
40 hours .................................................................................................
Over 40 and under 44 hours .........................................................
44 hours .................................................................................................
45 hours ..................................................................................................
Over 45 h o u r s ........................................... ..........................................

0 .8
1 1 .7
1 .5
8 1 .1
2 .1
2 .6
.2

1 .1

l/

2/
2 /

*

_

4 .7
1 .0
8 9 .3
1 .5
3 .1
.4

-

9 8 .7
.2
-

-

M

An

.

P ercen t o f p la n t workers employed in A ll
in d u s trie s

Manufacturing

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

0 .5

0 .7
.4
7 7 .8
2 .1
6 .4
1 2 .6

7 6 .8
1 1 .6
2 .9
8 .7

.9

.2
7 3 .3
2 .6
4 .1
6 .8
1 1 .6

Data r e l a t e to women w orkers.
In clu des data f o r w holesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s in ad d ition t o th ose in dustry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly ,
In clu des data f o r w holesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s in a d d ition t o th o s e in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
T ran sp o rtatio n (excludin g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., April 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




5

Paid Jiolideufl

Table D -3:

P e rcen t o f o f f i c e workers employed in Number o f paid h olidays

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 1/

1 0 0 .0

A ll w o r k e r s ..........................................................................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing paid
h o lid a y s 2/ ......................................................................................
Less than 6 days ........................................................................
6 days ..............................................................................................
7 days ...............................................................................................
8 days ..............................................................................................
9 o r more d a y s .................................. ..........................................
Other 2 J ..........................................................................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing no paid
h o lid ay s .............................................................................................

9 9 .9
7 8 .1
1 3 .0
.7 .8
1 .0
-

P e rcen t o f p la n t workers employed in A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2/

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .1
1 5 .4
1 .5
-

- -

P u blic
u t ilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 1 .0
1 .3
8 6 .4
1 .1
1 .4
(A/)
.8

1 0 0 .0
8 4 .6
1 5 .4
-

Manufacturing

9 3 .6
1 .7
8 9 .3
.8
1 .8
-

8 9 .7
8 1 .1
8 .2
.4
-

9 .0

Manufacturing

P u blic
u tilitie s *

6 .4

1 0 .3

1 0 0 .0

.1

1 / Includes data fo r wholesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; fin a n ce , insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in add ition to those ind ustry d iv isio n s shown
s e p a ra te ly .
2 / Includes data fo r wholesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tra d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e rv ice s in add ition to those industry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
2 / Paid holidays of le s s than a f u l l day have been om itted.
i j Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
5/
Three to s ix days, according to length of s e r v ic e .
*
Transportation (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er public u t i l i t i e s .

Table D -4:

P a id

V cU x U iO fU ty o d U tu U P A O O ld lO H ii)

Percen t of o f f ic e workers employed in Vacation p o licy

A ll
in d u strie s 2 /

A ll w o rk e rs ......................... ............................................................. ..

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .3
4 4 .7
.3
5 4 .3
.7
.7
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
5 0 .0
.5
4 8 .4
1 .1
1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 6 .8
3 3 .2
-

Percen t o f p lan t workers employed in A ll
in d u strie s 2 /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100>Q

9 8 .8
8 3 .1
.4
6 7 .6
6 .3
8 .8
1 5 .2
1 2 .0
3 .2
.5

9 9 .1
7 9 .6
.5
6 8 .3
8 .1
2 .7
1 9 .5
1 5 .4
4 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
_
7 3 .8
_
1 7 .9
.
_
8 .3

1 .2

.9

A fter 1 year of se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid
v acatio n s .............. ...........................................................................
Length-of-tim e payment ...........................................................
Less than 1 week ..................................................................
1 week ............................................................................ ..
Over 1 but l e s s than 2 w e e k s.......................................
2 weeks ......................................................................................
Percentage payment 2 / .................. ..........................................
2 percen t ............................................... .................
Over 2 but le s s than 3 percent ...................................
Flat-sum payment ........................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid
v acatio n s ..........................................................................................

See footnotes a t end of ta b le .
*
Transportation (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er public u t i l i t i e s .

NOTE:

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, W ls., A p ril 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

Estim ates are provided se p a ra te ly , according to employer p r a c tic e in computing
v acatio n payments (le n g th -o f-tim e , p ercen tage, or fla t-s u m ); percentage and
flat-su m payments were converted to equ ivalen t time periods in e a r l i e r s tu d ie s.

1(

Table D-4:

P a u l V c u x U U u ti {ty o to m c U p A x w id & o ^ )-C o n tin u e d
Percen t o f o f f i c e workers employed in -

Vacation p o licy

A ll
in d u strie s 1 /

Percent o f plan t workers employed in A ll
in d u stries 2 /

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .3
9 .8
2.A
8 7 .1
.7
.7
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
1 1 .5
3 .7
8 3 .7
1 .1
1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
A .l
9 5 .9
-

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .8
8 3 .1
A6.0
1 5 .2
2 1 .9
1 5 .2
9 .7
5 .5
.5

9 9 .1
7 9 .6
52 .A
1 9 .5
7 .7
1 9 .5
1 2 .5
7 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
13.A
7 8 .3
8 .3

1 .2

Manufacturing

.9

A fter 2 y ears of se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid
Length-of-tim e payment ......................... .................................
1 w e e k ........................................... ............................................
Over 1 but le s s than 2 weeks .......................................
2 weeks ......................................................................................
Percentage payment
..............................................................
2 p e r c e n t ....................... ..........................................................
Over 2 but le s s than 3 percen t ..................................
Flat-sum payment .........................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid
v acatio n s ...........................................................................................
A fter 3 y ears of se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid
v acatio n s ...........................................................................................
Length-of-tim e payment ...........................................................
1 w e e k .........................................................................................
Over 1 but le s s than 2 weeks .......................................
2 weeks ......................................................................................
Percentage payment
..............................................................
2 p e r c e n t ....................... ..........................................................
Over 2 but le s s than A percent ..................................
Flat-sum payment ................................ ........................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid
v acatio n s .................................................. ........................................

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .3
6 ,3
2.A
9 0 .6
.7
.7
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
8 .6
3 .7
8 6 .6
1 .1
1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.1
9 9 .9
-

9 8 .8
8 3 .1
3 2 .7
16.A
3A.0
1 5 .2
9 .5
5 .7
.5
1 .2

9 9 .1
7 9 .6
3 8 .9
2 0 .9
1 9 .8
1 9 .5
1 2 .2
7 .3
.9

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
1 .8
8 9 .9
8 .3

-

A fter 5 y ears o f se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid
v acatio n s ...................••••••••••••,........................ . ...............
Length-of-tim e payment ...........................................................
1 w e e k ....................................... .................................................
Over 1 but le s s than 2 w e e k s.............. ........................
2 weeks ........................................................... ..........................
Over 2 but le s s than 3 weeks .......................................
3 weeks ..................................................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ....................... .....................................
A p ercen t ......................... .......................................................
Over A but le s s than 6 percen t ..................................
Flat-sum payment .........................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid
v a c a t i o n s ............ ................................... ..........................................

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .3

(Q )
.3
9 7 .5
.3
1 .2
.7
.7
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
.5
9 7 .2
1 .2
lo l
1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

9 8 .8
8 3 .1
1 .0
1 .5
7 2 .5
6 .3
1 .8
1 5 .2
1 2 .1
3 .1
.5

9 9 .1
7 9 .6
.5
1 .9
6 8 .7
8 .1
•A
1 9 .5
1 5 .5
A.O
-

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
8 8 .8
2 .9
8 .3

1 .2

.9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 5 .9
3A.1
-

9 8 .8
8 3 .1
1 .0
6 0 .3
8 .0
1 3 .8
1 5 .2
1 1 .7
3 .5
.5

9 9 .1
7 9 .6
.5
6 1 .1
1 0 .3
7 .7
1 9 .5
1 5 .0
A .5
-

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
A6.2
A5.5
8 .3

—

1 .2

.9

■
*

-

A fter 10 y ears o f se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid
v acatio n s ...........................................................................................
Length-of-tim e paym ent....................... ................................. .
1 week ........................... ............................................................
2 weeks ....................... ...............................................................
Over 2 but le s s than 3 w e e k s........................... ..
3 weeks ......................................................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ••••................................ ............... ..
A percen t ..................................................................................
Over A but le s s than 6 p e r c e n t ..................................
Flat-sum payment .........................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid
v acatio n s ................................ ..........................................................

See footnotes at e n d of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads),




1 0 0 .0
9 9 .3
( 4 /)
7 9 .0
3.5
1 6 .8
.7
.7
-

communication,

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
8 0 .2
5.0
1 3 .7
1 .1
1 .1
-

-

and other public utilities.




Table D-A*

P & u l 7J o C & U q *V I W J& U H c U P a X H U H O H A ) -C o + ttifitH & c i

Percent of o ff ic e workers employed in Vacation p o licy

All
in d u strie s l /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1C0.0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .3
< )
y
2 1 .7
.3
7 7 .3
.7
.7
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
1 4 ,8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
A .3
9 5 .7
-

Percen t o f p lan t workers employed in A ll
in d u strie s 2 /
1 0 0 .0

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .1
7 9 .6
.5
1 4 .4
5 .2
5 6 .1
3 .4
1 9 .5
6 .9
.7
1 1 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
1 .4
9 0 .3
8 .3

A fter 15 y ears of serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid
v a ca tio n s .............. ....................................................... ..................
Length-of-tiir.e paym ent........................... .............................
1 week .....................................................................................
2 weeks ................ ...................................................................
Over 2 but le s s than 3 weeks .....................................
3 w e e k s ......... .................................................................. ..
Over 3 but le s s than A weeks .....................................
Percentage payment 2 / ...........................................................
4 p ercen t ..............................................................................
Over A but le s s than 6 percen t ................................
6 p ercen t and over .................................................... ..
Flat-sum payment .............................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid
v a ca tio n s ........................... ......................................................... ..

83 ’ 6
.
1 .1
1 .1
-

9 8 .8
8 3 .1
1 .0
1 8 .2
A.O
5 7 .3
2 .6
1 5 .2
5 .A
.5
9 .3
.5
1 .2

.9

-

A fter 20 y ears o f serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid
v a c a t i o n s .......................................................................................
Len gth-of-tim e payment ........................................................
1 w e e k .................. ..................................................................
2 w e e k s ......... ........................................................................
Over 2 but le s s than 3 w e e k s.....................................
3 weeks ............................................. ......................................
Over 3 but le s s than 4 weeks .....................................
4 weeks and over ............................................. .................
Percentage payment 2 / ..........................................................
4 p ercen t ........................... .....................................
Over A but le s s than 6 percent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6 p ercen t and over ...........................................................
F lat-sum payment .....................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid
v a ca tio n s ................................................................... ••••...........

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .3

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
1 3 .2
8 4 .5
1 .2
1 .1
1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
A .3
9 5 .7
-

9 9 .1
7 9 .6
.5
1 0 .6
4 .7
6 0 .A
3 .4
1 9 .5
6 .9
.7
1 1 .9
-

1 .2

(it/)

19 .A
7 8 .7
1 .2
.7
.7
-

9 8 .8
8 3 .1
1 .0
1 5 .0
3 .7
6 0 .8
2 .6
1 5 .2
5.A
.5
9 .3
.5

.9

9 8 ,8
8 3 .1
1 .0
1 3 .9
3 .7
5 4 .5
3 .0
7 .0
1 5 .2
5 .4
.5
9 .3
.5

9 9 .1
7 9 .6
.5
9 .3
A .7
5 8 .6
3 .9
2 .6
1 9 .5
6 .9
.7
1 1 .9
-

1 .2

.9

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
1 .4
9 0 .3
8 .3
-

A fter 25 y ears o f serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid
v acatio n s ...................................................... .................................
....................................
Length-of-tim e payment
1 week ................................................................. ..
2 weeks ...................................................................................
Over 2 but le s s than 3 weeks .....................................
3 weeks ........................... .......................................................
Over 3 but le s s than A w e e k s.....................................
A weeks and over ...............................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ...........................................................
A p ercen t ...............................................................................
Over A but le s s than 6 percent ................................
6 p ercen t and over ...........................................................
Flat-sum payment ......................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid
v a c a t i o n s .............. .........................................................................

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .3

a /)

1 9 .2
7 3 .0
.3
6 .8
.7
.7
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .9
1 3 .2
8 2 .2
.5
3 .0
1 .1
1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
A.3
8 1 .1
1 4 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
1 .4
8 2 .4

-

7 .9
8 .3

\ J Includes d ata f o r wholesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; fin a n ce , insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ic e s in ad d itio n to those ind ustry d iv isio n s shovn
s e p a ra te ly ,
2 / Includes d ata fo r wholesale tra d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e rv ic e s in ad d itio n to those in d u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
2 / Percen t o f annual earnings.
i j Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
*
T ransp ortation (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .

1

Table D -5i

Pld*t&

$ 4 ti4 t* O n C * fU id

Percen t o f o f f ic e workers employed in A ll
in d u strie s 1 /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

Percen t o f plan t workers employed in A ll
in d u strie s 2 /

Manufacturing

Pu blic
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

A ll workers ...........................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

0
0
b

Type of plan

1 0 0 .0

Workers in establishm ents having insurance
o r pension plans 2 / .............................. . . . ...............................

9 6 .4

9 7 .7

9 7 .9

9 4 .6

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .0

Insurance plans 2 / .....................................................................
L ife y .......................................................................................
A ccidental death and dismemberment...................
Sickness and a c c i d e n t ................ ......................................
H o s p ita liz a tio n .............................. ........................
S u rg ical .....................................................................................
Medical .......................................................................................
Retirem ent-pension plan .........................................................

9 4 .6
9 0 .9
4 3 .3
6 5 .2
8 1 .7
7 8 .1
4 9 .5
8 1 .4

9 7 .1
9 5 .3
5 7 .9
7 7 .7
9 2 .9
8 9 .8
5 7 .4
8 6 .0

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
7 6 .3
7 5 .1
4 8 .0
4 8 .0
3 2 .8
9 5 .3

9 2 .2
8 6 .4
4 5 .2
6 9 .7
8 0 .6
7 6 .3
5 3 .4
6 3 .4

9 5 .2
9 0 .8
4 8 .1
7 8 .6
8 9 .9
8 5 .4
5 8 .9
6 4 .1

9 9 .0
9 9 .0
6 1 .3
5 4 .4
3 9 .8
3 9 .8
3 0 .9
7 6 .3

Workers in establishm ents having no insurance
o r pension p l a n s ................................ ..........................................

3 .6

2 .3

2 .1

5 .4

4 .2

Includes d ata f o r wholesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; fin a n ce , in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e rv ice s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown
s e p a ra te ly ,
2 / Includes d ata f o r wholesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e rv ice s in ad d itio n to those industry d iv isio n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
2 / Unduplicated t o t a l .
I j E stim ates f o r " a l l in d u strie s" and "p ublic u t i l i t i e s " a re not comparable with those published in the previous re p o rt due to the in c lu sio n in t h i s
y e a r 's study o f d eath -b en efit p lan s.
*
Transp ortation (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o ther public u t i l i t i e s .




Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, W ls., A p ril 1953
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT (F LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

19

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau1
8 occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources* In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community* Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.

such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied*
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the aocuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment’s full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau1
s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on & uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) Office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-A). The industry groupings surveyed are: Manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), comrnunication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees arc excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries, these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey. Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

20

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller*

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Milwaukee, Wis., 1/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, April 1953

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
eetabli shments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
51
51
51

649
363
286

189
91
98

243,000
182,500
60,500

167,250
124,860
42,390

29,050
18,750
10,300

51
51
51
51
51

All divisions ................................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ........... ...............
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .......................... .
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade ................... ....... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services 2 / ............. ......... ......

31
61
no

16
18
29
17
18

16,400
7,000
24,600
6,900
5,600

14,700
3,050
16,710
4,990

3,390
820
1,670
3,810

21
8

151
51
21

43
16

57,761
1,190

14

1,422

48,348
512
1,183

9,426
38
83

41
43

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an lnduetry basis ( J
Machinery industries ..........................
Machine-tool accessories ...................
Power laundries ...............................

5/

21

1/ Milwaukee Metropolitan Area (Milwaukee County).
2/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in all divisions in the March 1952 survey was 21
workers.
2 / Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.




21

Index
Assembler (machinery), 8
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery), 8, 9

Identifier (power laundries), 11
Inspector (machinery), 8

Bench hand (bakeries), 12
Biller, machine, 3
Bookbinder (printing), 12
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3
Bricklayer (building construction), 12

Janitor, 6
Janitor (machinery), 8, 10

Calculating-machine operator, 3
Carpenter (building construction), 12
Carpenter, maintenance, 5
Cleaner, 6
Clerk, file, 3
Clerk, order, 3
Clerk, payroll, 3
Clerk, retail receiving (power
laundries), 11
Compositor, hand (printing), 12
Draftsman, 4
Drill-^press operator (machinery), 8, 9, 10
Duplicating-machine operator, 3
Electrician (building construction), 12
Electrician, maintenance, 5
Electrician, maintenance (machinery), 8
Engine-lathe operator
(machinery), 8, 9, 10
Engineer, stationary, 5
Extractor operator (power laundries), 11

Key-punch operator, 3

Laborer (building construction), 12
Laborer, material handling, 6
Laborer, material handling (machinery), 8
Mailer (printing), 12
Machine operator (printing), 12
Machine tender (printing), 12
Machine-tool operator, production
(machinery), 8, 9, 10
Machine-tool operator, toolroom, 5
Machine-tool operator, toolroom
(machinery), 10
Machinist, maintenance, 5
Marker (power laundries), 11
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 5
Mechanic, maintenance, 5
Milling-machine operator
(machinery), 8, 9, 10
Millwright, 5
Mixer (bakeries). 12
Molder (bakeries), 12
Motortruck driver, 13
Nurse, industrial (registered), A

Finisher, flatwork (power laundries), 11
Fireman, stationary boiler, 5
Grinding-machine operator
(machinery), 8, 9, 10
Guard, 6
Helper (bakeries), 12
Helper, motortruck driver, 13
Helper, trades, maintenance, 5




Office boy, 3
Office girl, 4
Oiler, 5
Operator (local transit), 12
Order filler, 6
Overman (bakeries), 12
Packer, 6
Painter (building construction), 12

Painter, maintenance, 5
Photoengraver (printing), 12
Pipefitter, maintenance, 5
Plasterer (building construction), 12
Plumber (building construction), 12
Porter, 6
Press assistant (printing), 12
Press feeder (printing), 12
Presser, machine, shirts (power
laundries), 11
Pressman (printing), 12
Receiving clerk, 6
Routeman (driver-salesman) (power
laundries), 11
Screw-machine operator, automatic
(machinery), 8, 9
Secretary, 4
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance, 5
Shipping clerk, 6
Shipping-and-receiving clerk, 6
Stenographer, 4
Stereotyper (printing), 12
Switchboard operator, 4
Switchboard operator--receptionist, 4
Tabulating-machine operator, 3, 4
Tool-and-die maker, 5
Tool-and-die maker (machinery), 10
Tracer, 4
Transcribing-machine operator, 4
Truck driver, 6, 7
Trucker, power, 7
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery), 8, 9
Typist, 4
Washer, machine (power laundries), 11
Watchman, 7
Welder, hand (machinery), 10
Wrapper (bakeries), 12
Wrapper, bundle (power laundries), 11
U. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F IC E : 0 — 1953







office.

This report was prepared in the Bureau's North Central Regional
Communications m a y be addressed to:
Adolph O. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
105 West A d a m s Street
10th Floor
Chicago 3, Illinois

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turnover, productivity, w o r k
injuries, construction and housing.

The North Central Region includes the following States:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Michigan
Minnesota

Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102