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A T L A N T A , G E O R G IA
M a rc h 1 9 5 3

Bulletin No. 1116-18

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey
ATLANTA,




M arch

G E O R G IA

1953

Bulletin No. 1116-18
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Wa'shington 25, D. C .

-

Price 2 0 cents




Contents
Letter of Transmittal

£& ge

INTRODUCTION .........................................
THE ATLANTA METROPOLITAN AREA .............................
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C*, June 17, 1953*
The Secretary of Labors
I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on
occupational wages and related benefits in Atlanta, Ga., during
March 1953. Similar studies are being conducted in a number of
other large labor-market areas during the fiscal year 1953.
These studies have been designed to meet a variety of govern­
mental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide earnings
information for many occupations common to most manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries of selected
supplementary wage benefits* Whenever possible, separate data
have been presented for individual major industry divisions*
This report was prepared in the Bureau fs regional of­
fice in Atlanta, Ga*, by Bernard J* Fahres under the direction
of Louis B* Woytych, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst* The planning and central direction of the program was
carried on in the Bureau's Division of Wages and Industrial
Relations.

1
1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ...............................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations .................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .......
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ......
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations ................................

3
5
6
7

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis B-2333 Women*s and misses9 dresses ..................
B-35
Machinery industries ..........
B-7211 Power laundries *.............................

9
9
10

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction......... *.............
C-205
Bakeries .....................................
C-27
Printing ..........................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ............
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ...............

11
11
11
11
H

Supplementary wage practices D-l
Shift differential provisions ................
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours .......................
D-3
Paid holidays ..............................
D-4
Paid vacations ..........................
D-5
Insurance and pension plans ..................

12
12
13
13
16

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ............................

17

INDEX

19

Ewan Clague, Commissioner*
Hon. Martin F* Hirkin,
Secretary of Labor*







OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY - ATLANTA, GA

Introduction
The Atlanta area is 1 of 20 important industrial centers
in which the Bureau of labor Statistics is currently conducting oc­
cupational wage surveys. In such surveys, occupations common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries are stud­
ied on a community-wide basis, 1/ Cross-industry methods of sam­
pling are thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the follow­
ing types of occupations: (a) Office; (b) professional and tech­
nical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, ware­
housing, and shipping. In presenting earnings information for such
jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate data are provided wherever
possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Earnings information for characteristic occupations in
certain more narrowly defined industries is presented in series B
tables. Union scales (series C tables) are presented for selected
occupations in several industries or trades in which the great ma­
jority of the workers are employed under terms of collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are believed
to be indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data are collected and summarized on shift operations and
differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as
vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension plans.

The Atlanta Metropolitan Area
The Atlanta Metropolitan Area (Cobb, DeKalb, and Fulton
Counties) has an estimated population of 700,000, with three-fifths
of this total concentrated in the city limits of Atlanta,
Total nonagricultural
in the area exceeded 285,000 in
increase during the past year.
were employed in wholesale and
services and public utilities

employment (including government)
April 1953, reflecting a moderate
2/ Of these, approximately 79,000
retail trade; 33,000 in both the
groups of industries; 18,000 in

1/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.
Differences between the scope of this survey and the last previous
survey of Atlanta in March 1952 are indicated in the appendix
table. For earlier survey, see Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta,
Ga., March 1952, BLS Bulletin No. 1102.
2/ Estimates prepared by the Employment Security Agency of
the Georgia Department of Labor in cooperation with the U. S. De­
partment of labor*s Bureau of labor Statistics.




finance, insurance, and real estate establishments; and 13,000 in
contract construction. Manufacturing industries employed nearly
78,000 workers.
Among the industries and establishment-size groups sur­
veyed by the Bureau in March 1953, about two-fifths of the workers
in nonoffice jobs were employed in establishments having labormanagement contracts covering wages and working conditions. The
proportion of workers covered by such provisions was highest in the
public utility group of industries— about two-thirds of the plant
(nonoffice) workers in this industry group being employed under union-contract provisions. More than half the manufacturing plant
workers were employed in establishments with union contracts; in
other industry groups, however, the proportion was substantially
lower. Approximately a fifth of the clerical workers were in estab­
lishments with contracts covering office employees. Only in the
manufacturing and the public utilities groups were any significant
number of office workers covered by union contracts; nearly half of
the office workers in these divisions worked under the terms of la­
bor-management agreements.

Occupational Wage Structure
Wages and salaries of nearly all occupations studied in
the Atlanta area advanced between March 1953 and March 1952,
the date of the Bureau*s last survey in the area. Much of this in­
crease was the result of formal wage adjustments made during the
period. General wage change information from the larger establish­
ments (employing 200 or more workers) revealed that most plant and
office workers in manufacturing and in the public utilities group
had received one or more "across-the-board" increases since March
1952. Such adjustments were less prominent in the other industry
groups studied.
Formalized rate-structure plans applied to more than
nine-tenths of the time-rated plant workers in the area. Plans
specifying a range of rates for each occupation were somewhat more
common than single-rate plans. Among the industry groups surveyed,
single-rate plans predominated in manufacturing, whereas rate-range
plans were reported for a majority of the plant workers in the non­
manufacturing industries. Piece-rate or bonus incentive wage plans
covered slightly more than a fourth of the manufacturing plant
workers. Incentive plans were either nonexistent or relatively un­
important among nonmanufacturing industries, with the exception of
retail trade— where a fifth of the nonoffice workers were employed
in jobs paid on a commission basis.
Approximately 75 percent of the office workers were em­
ployed in establishments that reported plans providing a range of

salaries for each job, while virtually all of the remaining office
workers in the area were employed in establishments that determined
salaries on an individual basis*
Nearly all plant workers were employed in establish­
ments having established minimum entrance rates for inexperienced
workers* Plants employing a fourth of the workers had established
minimum entrance rates of 75 cents an hour* About a third of the
plant workers were in establishments whose minimum rates ranged
from over 75 cents to $1 an hour, and nearly a fourth were in firms
with minimum wages of $1 and over* No formal entrance rates below
75 cents were reported by wholesale trade establishments, and only
a small percentage of the manufacturing and public utilities plant
workers were employed in establishments having minimum entrance
rates below 75 cents* Retail trade and services generally had lower
entrance rates than other industry groups*
Two-thirds of the women employed in Atlanta offices in
March 1953 and about the same proportion of plant workers had work
schedules of AO hours a week* Most other schedules for women office
workers required less than AO hours a week, while most plant em­
ployees, not on a AO-hour basis, had weekly work arrangements for
more than AA hours* The public utilities group had the greatest
proportion of women office workers on shorter work schedules* This
group along with retail trade also reported the highest percentage
of plant workers scheduled to work in excess of AA hours a week*
Nearly 80 percent of the manufacturing plant workers in
the area were employed in plants with provisions for the payment of
late-shift work. The large majority of these plans provided for




premium pay above day rates* About a fifth of all manufacturing
plant employees actually worked on extra shifts at the time of the
survey, with three-fifths of the late shift workers receiving shiftdifferential premiums* These extra payments were most commonly ex­
pressed as cents-per-hour additions to day rates, and generally
ranged from 5 to 10 cents an hour*
Insurance plans providing life Insurance benefits or a
combination of life and other type coverage were common in nearly
all industry groups* Retirement or pension plans, less prevalent
than insurance plans, provided coverage for two-thirds of the em­
ployees in office jobs and two-fifths of the plant workers* Such
plans were financed at least in part by the employer*

Holidays with pay were granted to nearly all office and
more than three-fourths of the plant employees in Atlanta* Although
the number of paid holidays varied between 2 and 11 a year, most
plant workers and A of 5 in clerical positions received 5 or 6 days
annually. Holiday benefits were more liberal in the finance, insur­
ance, and real estate division— with nearly half the employees
receiving 8 or more days*
Nearly all office workers and more than nine-tenths of
the plant employees with a year or more of service received vaca­
tion benefits* Most office employees were granted a 2-week paid
vacation after a year of service, while the majority of plant
workers received a week’s vacation after a similar period of serv­
ice* More than half of the plant employees received 2 or more weeks
after 3 years of service.




A* Cross-Industry Occupations
T a b le A - ls

0C & 4fU t/dO H i>

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry division, March 1953)

Table A-l»
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings \J for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by Industry division, March 1953)

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b le *
*
T ra n sp o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i lr o a d s ) , c o n u n i c a t i o n , and o th e r p u b li c u t i l i t i e s *
* * F in a n ce, in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e *




Table A-li

~P f l i W V f l f l u /

(Average straight-time weekly houre and earnings 1 / fo r selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry division, March 1953)

f 't M e d d tOH G l G + td V eC H H U X U O cC S iM U O H d

Table A-2t

\
J

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings
for selected occupations studied cm an area
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry division, March 1953)

A erage
v
S e x , o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

S
Weekly
Weekly
Ifader 4 2 .50
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) $
4 2 .5 0 45.00

$
45.00

s

4 7 .5 0

$

$
55.00

$
$
5 7.5 0 60.00

$
6 2 .5 0

$

50.00

$
5 2.50

$
$
6 7 .5 0 70.00

$
75 .0 0

$

65.00

80.00

85.00

90.00

50.00 52.50

55.00

5 7 .5 0

60.00 6 2.50

65.00

6 7 .5 0

70 .00 75.00

80.00

85.00

90.00

95.00

$

4 7 .5 0

$

$

$
95.00

$

$

s

s

100.00 10 5 .OG110.00 1 1 5 .0 0 120.00

100.00 105.00 110.00 115 .0 0 120.00

and
o ver

&n
♦
D raftsm en, c h i e f ..................................... ....................
M a n u fa c tu r in g .........................................................

u

Draftsm en ........................................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ...........................................................
N o u m a n u fa ctu rin g ......... ................ ...........................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ...........................................

254
no
144
44

57

40.0
40.0

;

11
106.00

40.0

78.00
4070“ ■ "76.00
80.00
39 .5
39.0 : 80.50

-

1----- —
-

“

1

-

“

7

• i

64

S3
34

39.0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5

i

40.0
46.0

6 5.50
.. 6 7 .5 6

6 1.5 0

5

59.50

Tracers ............................................................................

-

r
5

Women
N u rses, i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g is t e r e d ) .......................... ..
M anu factu ring .................................................. ..

4

60I 00

3

3

2

4

2

i

-

2

2
1

t “ 1

!
Draft«mAn. lu n lq r ..........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ...........................................

2 i
!

7
-

-

i

12
1
1

3
3
3

6

3

------ 2

2

9
9

!

!
!
1

1. !
l

!

3
3
3

i
—

10

7

nr

6
1
1

!

14
13

1
1

i
i
i

6
2
2

2

5

5

1

1

2

4
4

4
3

2

-

49
42
7

22

2
11
9

2

6

9

4
3

8

13




7

8

5

26
10

55

22

2

3

16
3

53
5

7
15
13

1
1
1

1
1
1

6
1
1

16
14

—

5
r~

7

4

10

8

3

3
5
x

2
1

.

_

_

15

11

5
5

1
1

4

10
8
2
2

5
5

1
1

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

j
69

$0
31

3 8 .5

50.50

i
4

,

i
5

|

|

«.
_
3

1
1
1

----------1

8

_

5

I
_
i __ ”_
i

!

2

X

11
16

6
4

2

r/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), coaaamication, and other publio utilities.

2 60 81 3 0 - 5 3 - 2

1

— IT -

I

!

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

MtUtUeHCUUM Oh A P<HU&1 PlcbtU ChcUfuMoHl

T a b le

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for sen in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry division, March 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number

Average

W
orkers

O ccu pation and in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

earnings

$
1 .0 5

$
1 .1 0

$
1 .1 5

$
1 .2 0

$
1 .2 5

$

0.95

$
1.0 0

1.3 0

$
1 .3 5

s
1 .4 0

$
1 .4 5

$
1 .5 0

$
1 .5 5

1 .6 0

$
1 .6 5

s
1 .7 0

$
1.7 5

$
1 .6 0

$
1 .9 0

$
2.0 0

$
2 .1 0

$
2 .2 0

$
2 .3 0

$
2 .4 0

0.95

1.0 0

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1 .3 0

1.3 5

1 .4 0

1 .4 5

1.5 0

1 .5 5

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1.7 5

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

o ver

-

-

-

-

7
5
2
2

7
3
4
2

19
6
13
3

6
6

.

-

14
3
11
6

4

“

13
10
3
“

“

9
1
8
2

4
3
1
1

6

-

3
3

2

6
5

5
r
3
2

1

$
Under 0 .8 5

1

8
g

11

4
2

11
11

12
10

5
4

9

3

3

-

3
3

3
2

8
3
5
4

7
2
5
4

“

4
4

-

$
0.90

.90

-

%

and

0.85

125
117
76

1
1 .8 2
1 .8 7
1 .7 8
1 .8 6

286
... 23$

2.06
'5 .6 4

Engineers, stationary ..............................................
Manufacturing.........................................................
Nonmanufacturing........................................ ..
Retail t r a d e .................................. .................

125
47
78
31

1 .6 5
2 .0 4
1 .4 2
1 .5 6

“

~

~

Plrenen. stationary b o i l e r ....................................
Manufacturing.................................................. ..

91
72

1 .2 7
1 .3 8

9
-

5
~

“

Reiners, trades. Maintenance .................................
Manufacturing........................................................
Nomanufacturing..................................................

508

1 .3 5
1737
1 .3 2

-

4

7

4

-

227

14

4

3

3

Machinists. Maintenance ...........................................
Manufacturing ............................................ ..

338
307

1 .9 4
1 .9 8

-

-

“

C arp en ters. Maintenance ............................................
M anufacturing ............................................ .............
M o m a n u fa c tu r in g ......................... ..........................
R e t a i l t r a d e ............................. .............. ..

E l e c t r i c i a n s , M aintenance ........................................

m

281

“

-

~

2

-

-

1
1

-

4
4

5

5

5

9

6

13

2

4

4

5

9
"

6

2

~

13
~

4
4

4
4

5
4

6
6

24
24

4
4

5
5

-

-

3
3

3
3

25
12
13

25
21
4

23
19
4

48
15
33

17
6
11

13
8
5

40
1

2
2

22
19
3

66
58
10

151
32
119

21
21

8
-

-

-

-

-

11
11

6
2

9
5

1
1

7
7

1?
15

8
8

_
•

3

35
22
13
4
6

12
3
9
7
2

21
3
18
14
4

87
29
58
51
3

35
1
34
22
12

34

~ i t
8

31
25
6

22
13
9

3

1

1

14

1

2

1

2

“

“

3
1

3
3

3

Mechanics, automotive (Maintenance) ...............
Manufacturing...................................... .................
Ransanufaeturlng...................................................
Public u tilitie s * .........................................
Retail trade .....................................................

467
11 6
35 1
258
68

1 .6 0
1 .5 9
1 .6 0
1 .6 4
1 .4 3

-

-

-

-

•

“

10

2

Mechanics. Maintenance .............................................
Manufacturing.............................. ..........................
Momanufacturing...................................................
Public utilities » . . . 11T TTr Tr t TTt T T, . .
Wholesale trade ..............................................

483
344
139
59
50

1 .8 1
1 .7 9
1 .8 7

_
-

.
-

-

•
-

-

-

-

-

Millwrights ..................................................................
Manufacturing.........................................................

58
58

156
15 5

1 .2 2
1 .2 3

Painters. Maintenance ...............................................
Manufacturing.........................................................
Romanufact a r i n g .................................................

136

1 .8 5
1 .9 8
1 .7 4

2

a

•

_

63
73

Pip efitters. Maintenance.........................................
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . __ T»TtT»T«».»•»»»»

— 56-----

Sheet-metal workers. Maintenance.........................

38

1/
2/
•

96

2

3

10

-

-

-

3

10

2

1

1 .8 1

22
18
17

9

1

14
sr
6
4

23
IT
8
8

66
52T
12
8

15
12

—

16
— 15"

32
25

81
44
44 — 35“ —

r~

17
17

r —

15
r

-

3
n

-

1
1

2
1

4
1

7
5
2
2

_

1
1

"

2
2

_

1
1

8
6

3
3

20
20

-

_

9
8

6
6

16
15

3

40

66
3
63
59
4

32
“

36"

4

-

—

14
r

-

12
12

4
•

1

—

29
-y-

5
5

6
6

-

-

-

*

-

~

5
5

-

-

_

_

_

-

3
3

22

71
71

12

5
5

~

—

4

-

35
34

64

19
5
14
10
2

15
14
1
1

2
2

_

.
•

-

-

-

-

33

53
19
34

74
67"
7

3
2
1

10
2
8

64"

16

-

-

-

4

1

-

•

_
-

3
3

1

-

13
13

2
-

-

-

-

2

-

1

1

—

13

3-

-

10
6
4

3
3
-

12
3
9

4

-

.

11
9
2

19
17
2

-

6

-

1

-

4

9
8

_
-

-

-

*

6
6

-

.
-

2
2

.
-

2 .0 4

2.64—

2 .1 3

24
24

76
76

-

-

-

- — r
•
•

_

40
36
4

12
9
3

38
30
8

5

27
27

1

2
2
-

5
1

4
4
4

4
4
- — 5“
2
4

19
1
18

2
_
2

5

2

13
12
1

22
7
4

22
4
18
16
2

14
" 8
6
1

22
22

-

57
39
18

15
4
11

29

4

-

11
6
3

2

1
1

-

3

17

— r

-

12

3

3

1

7

1

1

-

2
2

1
1

54
54

-

-

-

5
5

4
4

2

-

-

-

-

-

8

7
----- r

8

4

2

2

-

13

.

35

~ 1 T

g

4

5
3

2

-

-

2

6

3

5

2
2

22
33
I8~ ~ 3 T
4
3

3

2
2

17
17

2

3

5

6
6

1

2
1

3

3

3

1

2

2

0/ •
sJ 7

2

4

3

.

33

4

8

2

9

1
1

4

-

4

2.09

E xclu des p r a a i m p ay f a r o v e r t in e end n ig h t work.
A l l workers were a t $ 2 .7 0 t o $2 .8 0 .
T r a n sp o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i lr o a d s ) , co ean in icatio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ,




12
10
2
2

—

7
1

—

2 .1 4
2 .1 4

O ile r s ............................................................................
Manufacturing .........................................................

-

-

46

— 4f~
13

_ ’
-

12

12

2

12

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table k-Ai

Gu&todud, WcfteJia44A44U},G*ul SUif»f»4Hf GcdifuUiOHi

(Average hourly M n d n g i 1/ for selected occupations ^ studied on an area
basis In Atlanta, Ga., by Industry division, March 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
o
f
Workers

O ccu pation and i n d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

Average
houriy
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Lbder 0.50 *0 .5 5 0.60 $0.65 0 .70 0 .75 0.80 $0.8 5 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0
.55

• 6o

.70

.7 5

•80

.85

.9 0

•95

1 .0 0 1 .0 5

86
86

1*6 8
1*6 8

Guards ..............................................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ................................................................

253
210

1 .6 7
1 .7 3

_

J a n i t o r s , p o r t a r a , and c le a n e r s (nan) . . . . . . .
M a n u fa c tu r in g ............................................. ..
H o m a n u fa c tu r l n g .........................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * .........................................
W holesale t r a d e ............................ ..................

2,299

.99
1 .1 7
.86
1*05

60

9%T
1 ,3 5 7
265
202
328

1*08

-

_

?9

_

b7

_

5U

•

-

-

60

39

-

-

b7
-

5b
-

3

•
g

_

.0^

J a n it o r s * D a r t e r s , and c le a n e r s (w o m en ) ..........
M a n u fa c tu r in g ...............................................................
Honeanu f a c tu r in g .........................................................
n *t*4 i fa w u

636
190

m

in

_

_

$k
-

196

5b

198

-

TI 7

-

179
73
106
10
12
b9

16 2
.7 2
.9 0
•6b
.6 1

32

51

21

32
10

51
b9

21
n

-

25o
n
239
11

6

6

5
5
k

_

157
38
99
6
28
29
<7
79

_

201
bb
157
3
11
10 b

3(

_

_

192
126
6b
15
10
12
10
*/

13 5

60
75
29
13
18

n

$
1 .8 0

$
1 .9 0
and

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1 .3 0

1 .3 5

l.b O

l.b 5

1 .5 0

1 .5 5

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

o ver

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

lb
lb

28

-

n
ii

-

-

13
13

11
y n

_

7

lb
11

2

_

-

-

1
1

lib
lib

b3

18 1
16 9
12

lb

91

97

20
16
b
b

8

22
5

8
6

17
16

b5

US

-

5b
9
b5
1.
•f
20

39
18
21

6
l
5

2

21

k

2

6

?

2

b

0

0
y

2

k
T
3

• 99
]

257

1 .0 5
1«06

n l|

1 .0 b

3 1?
15 b
1 65
72

1 .0 5
1 .1 7
oi,
• /■ I
1 fnft

2bb

1 .3 1
1 .3 6
1 .3 0
1 .3 2
1 .3 0

Packer a . d e s s B (wonsn) * . . . . . . . ............. .
M anu factu ring .........................................................
llnr^ ■ nnfa rrfrirH«m» . . . .
m, a] ^
( ( 1 1 ___ _ T___
f.«*e^n
. . . .

t.T t.I1
.T

93

—

12
19 2
5o

79

303
103
200
96
97

_

-

-

-

-

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

.

.

1 .1 7

76
75
1

i5
t
29
16
K
V

3
*

3
T

3

1
-

.
-

_
-

_

.
_

18
28

38
11

88
b9
39

52

11

26
2b
2

26

22

1

1

1

27
11
*7
10

16
5
n
T
3
0

8b
is

57

b

16

<7

L
M

b

7
.

b

1
1

•

•»
»

bB

0
y

k
8
-

-

L
M
10
2
8
8

6

7
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

6

7

**

“

“

“

“

“

8

6

7

See footnotes at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), oo— uni nation, and other publio utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*

97

oc
T
3

.

•

8

91

<r

50
8
)(9
1,0

. 89

1 .3 5
l.u 6
1 .2 9
l.b 0

50

b6
6
10
28

12
11
1
1

-

13?
bo
91
77
b
10

516
27

287

b89
b75
12
2

270

32
bb

2?b
77
2 17
10 5
5b
b7

55

90

36
lb
22

8

55

n

T
3

82

7T
f3

9

*7
7
9

8
li
k

1

b
k

2

17
261

8

0

T
3

11

T9
jy

67
b3
2b

10
2
8
7
f
i

lb
12
2

2
9

10
3
7
0

15

1

15

15

5

5
ib
9
5

T
3
2

2

1

17

_
-

63
61
2
-

21
20
1
-

2

1

-

-

20

1|2

127
12 7

.

28

9b
~ 9 ir

_
.

30
29
1
1

19
19

.
-

.

6

-

3
3

3

lb
9
5
3
2

-

-

-

b

26
1
25
25

9
8“
1

8
b

2b
2b

b
b

-

“

1

1*7

_

_

b
b

-

5

1

25

1
1

25

.

25

-

-

-

12
5

19

17
1

7
7
1

16

10
9
1

3

19
id
V

8
5
3

17
17

50

17
1
16

9
2
7
2
5

3
1
2

b

2

h

12

21
10
11
10
1

6

53
~ b
b9
ii
n

15
U

21

-

12

11
5

21

31

6

21

18
13

b3

b3
1
b2
k
k
15
<r

9
2

16

20
“ i n

15

_

3

5

9
7

22
6
16
12
b

21
1
20
12
8

10

188

6
6

2b

-

5
5

2

5

50

15
8
7
f

0

12
1
n

5
b
1

-

12
10
2

7
b

.

bl
111

~ ^ r

76
fo

1 .0 5
1 .0 6

_

17
3

1.7
L5
H?

_

k7
T
3

_

68
1

3r

563
306

_

50

9

P a c k e r s , c l a s s B (nan) ..................................................
M a nu factu ring ................................................................
H o m a n u fa c tu r l n g ...................................................
UKaI e n d m tr sd n ..............................
..........
Rfftr*n
,
)t

-

15

6b
2
62

32
36

701

-

26
17
1
16

7
2

51
31
20

89
6
3b
b9

7

ig

39
39

55
5

80
105

6

39
31
8
2
6

10 5
61
bb
1
U2
1

35

k

_.

-

_
-

78
3
75
b2
31
2

?

b
b

_
•

18

6
-

3

12

lb
b2
b6

1

-

8
T
*7

10 b
28
76
-

1

.
-

16

3
3

18
lb
b

-

7b7

1 .2 8

-

23
9
lb

221
15 3
68
-

1 .3 3
1 .2 7
1 .2 8

2b

_

-

u

fo .

179
111
138
13 b

7

15
3
12

20

520

P a c k e r s , d e s s A ..........................................................
N lf f ll f t ^ ^ r l ^
T l « - t Tt TTt r l TT« » Ti - I Tl t i r t t l
H o m a n u fa ctu rln g ...................................................
W h olesale tr a d e ...................................................

-

_

1

3

237
3b5
1
19 9
lb 5

-

-

_
_

T

0

ib

582

-

2b
-

IT

hi
15
32
5
11

!8 5

0

.8 7

-

7

96
30
66
33
17

82b
b22
b02
8
18 5
206

1 .1 7
1 .2 6
l.lb
1 .1 5
1 .1 3

•

9

99
lb
85
b2
30

-

787
212
575
383
1 92

2lf

259
12 9
13 0
96
8
16

3

1

O rder f l l l e r e ..................................................................... ..
M anu factu ring ................................................................
M o m a n u fa c tu r in g .........................................................
*f*1*
M I I I T I I t I T - l TI- 1
T|
P f^ * U
l i t l T - t l
- -II
1
•

7

2

2

-




1.7 0

It

-

tr-i

1 .5 5

2

1 .0 7
1 .0 b
1 .2 2
•96

,, , T

1.5 0

l
1 .6 0

$

1.U 5

5?
57

2 ,7 33
2 ,3 8 1
1,00.0
705
61i9

T.

$

l. b O

9
1
8
8

1.0 6

R e t a i l t r a d e .....................................................

$

1 .3 5

88
73
15

5.J01.

c l e r k s ............................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ..........................................................
Moosanufas t a r i n g ......... .....................

$

1.3 0

<

26
13
13

ltd
18
30

L ab orers* m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g h / ..........................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ............. ...........................................
H o m a n u fa ctu rln g * .................................................
P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s * .........................................
W h olesa le t r a d e ...............................................
R e t e l l t r a d e .....................................................

Shinnlafif

s

1 .2 5

$

8

Crane o p e r a to r s , e l e c t r i c b r id g e
(under 20 to n e ) ........................................................
M anu factu ring ..........................................................

c l e r k s ................................ .........................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ............... .........................................
H o m a n u fa c tu r ln g .................................... ..............
U h W Iau la tr a r i* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _______
Rat*1^ t .n d a . r t r T T . T . T t T f - . T T - . T . 1
..T - t

s
1 .2 0

$

ia 5

1
1

S .5 o

$
1 .1 0

$

1 .0 5

~

r

7
7
f

Ib3
13 b
9
9
-

165
3
3

-

1
1

7
•
7

-

52
bi

7

-

11

_

-

u

11
11

.

_
-

3

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

3
3

-

-

5

2
2
-

3

b

3
3
2

1

23
7
16
b

1
1
-

—

r
-

12

10
15
“ ~ T ~ “ “T ~
10
2
2
10

13
17
3 S/ll
10
0
b

”

Occupational Mags Survey, Atlanta, Qa., March 1953
U.S. IBPARBBHT CF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

Table A-4* G u l t o d u U , tyj€toUo4444Wp,€Hul S U & p f U H Q

Q c C M f t f M a H i l ' G o r f iHlitGc
t

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupation# 2J studied an an area
basis in Atlanta, Qa., by industry division, March 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
Workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns

o.5o

Mcnnanufseturlng.......................
utilities * t t __r-t_ T___ T-- t
_
Wholesale trad#
TTr,,,,t ,
l
Ifotett trad. T___t.T_ t..T....... TrTt
_

h68
lyfl
290
111
T| )
|
6b

$
1.38
1«b3
1.3b
l.b2
1.3b
1.21

Track drivers, lisht (under l4 tons).......
Manufacturing ..........................
Bonaanufacturlng............... ...... .
Wholesale trade.................... .
T
tota-tl trad*
__T.T.T..TT1..T t.

lil6
106
310
107
129

1.09
1.17
1.06
1.15
•88

2.069
396
1,691
961
170
531

1.1b
1.05
1.17
1.31
1.0$
.95

Sh1|«p4ii|^nHdMMlTlttf clerks ........... .

%
o.5o 0.55

$

$

0.60

0.65

0.70

•60

•65

.70

_*25_

_

-

-

$
0.75

9

$

0.80

0.85

•80

.85

.90

.

_

.

$
$
$
!
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
s
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.bO I.b5 i.5o 1.55 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90
end
•95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.l|0 i.b5 1.50 1.55 1.60 I .70 1.80 1.90 over
$

.55

_

-

6
•

-

2

.
-

_
-

.
-

•
-

9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

6

.

0.90

0.95

2b
10
lb

25
13
12

3

b7

_

3

b7

8
8

Under

7
I
P

7
P

*1
?
77
P*

17
*1

29
3
26
6
8

bo
13
27
19
8

11
9

ib
3
11
7
I
t

51
lb
37
32

35
3b
1
-

7?
bB
25
20
4

35

28

b3

•
-

_

35
7
26

26
1
21

b3
b3

9

_
_

23b
lb9
85
2

272
1r

56

80

lb2
30
112
b3
69

256
2
16
238

58
lib
J
i
10

_

_

12
12

12
12

2

35
2b

5

U7
lb
30 " 5
9
17

1

7
£

30

7 j
f
2

72

30
n

70
69
X

10

9

18
8
10
10

18
18
7

0
7

2

2
2

8
8
7
2
,

96
1
97
97

b
b
-

2

2
2
-

1
1
-

285
2
283
226

66
39
27
13

55

5

b8
— Sr
8
7
P
£
P
9
1
8
7

17
17
b
P

59
59
a

32
28
lb

9
2

1A
XU
J
L
«
#

8
2

_
-

-

8

3
2
2
2
2

36
PP
1
2

25

9

23
20

0
7

L
*
1
-

10
10
-

3
3
-

Truck drivers, asdiua (lj to and
Manufacturing..................... .
Vonaanufacturing ....................
Public utilities « ............. .....
Uhnlm ^I* 4m H. tTT1..TT i T rTTT tlI.
f
Retail trade ........................

Truck drivers, heavy (over b tons,
trailer true)............... ...........
366
MuefaftnHni Tt,,r.T..TTT.((l1,Tt.rT.)11.) --- U T ~
a^arrl ng ,TtttTTTf.
Ttt,,.T<1.T.lt t
I
2JL
Truckers, uowur (fork-lift)...............
Manufacturing ..... ...................
Hoaaanufactaring .......................
PiMle
« tTTt t TttTTT Vl^biula

—

km
252
175

_

1.35
1.20
l.bb
1.29
1.31
1.26

.

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

.

-

35
33
2

3
3

1 .3 3

2b
27
26 T T
1
9
o
£
7
2
f

*2

lj6

Trnckere. noser (other then fork-lift).....

81

1.52

1

Watchnen.................................
Manufacturing ••••........ ............ .
Monsanufaeturlsg.......................
Public utilities * ....... t_ T..... T,
_
Retail trade........................

382

.98

18b
b3
71

.96
1.28
.95

76
. i r
_
26

52
32
20

_
•

2b

6

-

19

13
n a ~
2
19
-

-

.
.

.

-

-

_

-

-

1
_

6
5
1
2

77
57
17 ” T ”
bO
69
1
3b
65
6
3
30
30

h

17
13
13 H T ”
9
2
8




1

18
5
13
-

3

13

-

„

_

.

b
— V

8
1
7
1
*.
1

5

1
b

ib

10
b

1

26
57
1 ~W ~
12
25
7
1
1
9

IfBb
bBb
b72
2
11

126
50
2b “ f r
102

ib

17

15

17

11
2

17
*1

25

7

16
2
15

9
18
7
f
10

2
5
i
t

7
b
3
2
1

73
10
63
62
2

8
2
6
2
3

1
1

3
3

3

5

1

29
30
3 ~ k
26
26
18
I
t
15
2
b

8
8
2

hi
b~
37
21
2
15

22
21
1
1

-

-

b
2

6
2
)
t

lb

3b

b

5&

1

1

20

3b

4

58

2

2

20

15
lb
1

-

-

2
2
-

26
25
1

9
8
1

2
8

11

6

5

20
6
12
12

b
k

9
9

8
---8"
•
•

20
13
7
7

2

1

2

8

5

27

b7
12
35
vi

1

ib

5

8

A/ Excludes pre a u t psy far overtine and night work.
aia
A/ Eats Halted to aan workers except where otherwise indicated.
3/ A H workers were at |2.10 to $2.20.
Title change only, fTon "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported In previous study.
5/ Workers were distributed as follows! 6 at #1.90 to #2; 4 at #2 to #2.10; 2 at #2.10 to #2.20; 4 at #2.20 to #2.30} 1 at #2.30 to 92.40.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), ooanunication, and other public utilities.

U

h?
23
2b
1
8
13

b
b

-

5

5

-

-

-

3

56
56

.
-

33
3
3

.

2
2

-

-

-

B5 Characteristic Industry Occupations
Tibi, b-2333: ' k J o r n t n U a + t d M - U A & l ' 3 b * e U e i i /
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
Workers

Occupation and sex

2/

All plant occupations *

T o t a l ...... ...........
M e n ................
W o m e n ..............

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

1.10

1.20

1.30

1.40

1.45

1.50

$
1.55

9

1.05

$
1.35

9

1.00

$
1.25

9

0.95

$
1.15

9

0.90

1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

.90

.95

1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

22
1
21

9

28
2
26

19
1
18

26
26

16
1
15

22
1
21

15
-

12
1
11

11
1
10

7
-

-

2
-

2
-

2

3

2

3
2
1

3
1
2

1
1

4

5
2
3

3
-

7

8
1
7

4

15

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

.

1

_

_

2

-

_

2

1

13
4

21
12

11

14
11

3

1
-

1
-

2
-

1
-

3

2

1

1

2

2
2

-

1
2

2
-

3

2
7

-

8

6
6

3

9

11
5
6

9

3

9

0.80
under
.80

s
0.85

.85

59
3
56

hiry
oii6
earnings

343
23
320

1
1.01
1.27
.99

69
2
67

11
38

1.56
.80

-

-

-

-

17

18

2

1.02
1.00
1.03
.79

32
2
30
12

14
6
8
11

13
2
11
1

19
14
5

1.90

$
1.95

$
2.00

$
2.10

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.10

2.20

2
1
1

1
-

1
1

-

1
-

1
1

1

-

-

1

-

1

1

«

1

_

_

-

_

1
-

_
_

_
-

1

1

180
62
118

9

Selected Plant Occupations
Cutters and markers (men) y
..................
Pressers, hand (vomen) 2 / ...... . ..............
Sewing-machine operators, section
system (women) ................................
Time ..........................................
Incentive ....................................
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (women) 2 / ........

24

-

1

1

_

1
_

1 / The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops employing S or more workers engaged in the manufacture of women's and misses' dresses (Group 2333) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
(194-5 edition) prepared b y the B ureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing housedresses, aprons, smocks, hoovers, and nurses' and maids' uniforms (Group 2334) were excluded from the study. Data relate to an August 1952
payroll period.
2 / Excludes p remium p a y for overtime and night work.
2 / Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages b y method of wage payment; all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.

Table B-35*

M a cJ U n eA # !h ids4A lA £e& 1 /
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
Workers

Occupation and grade 2 /

Avenge
hourly
earnings

y

AapsmmVtl A^m p
j

a Ia a i

P
nlaafl P
,

.1 .

. . . ....

36
72
95

Laborers, material handling ...................

111

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A
....................................
Engine-lathe operators, class A ...........

47
18

Jl

9

9
0.85

0.90

0.95

9
1.00

9
1.05

9
1.10

9
1.15

9
1.20

9
1.25

9
1.30

.90

.95

1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

_
2

8

9

_

_

13

36

3

1

3

9

7

14

29

6

6
7

13

14
15

1.59
1.65

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

99

1.36

“

23
15

1.31
1.48

~

~

57

1.21

1

“

22

y

Machine-tool operators, production,
olass B
....................................
Drill-press operators, singletthiI^ 1p
i
Aj
Asa n
(
Milling-machine operators, class B ........

y

Maehins-tool operators, production,
class C
....................................
Drill-press operators, single-

y

1( i1m 4 m A «
yAAt

mmi|j»4^ Aktm

1.15

Usl linra f tisniij el ass B

.......

1.45

1.50

n

3

7
1
2
4

-

5

26
6

3

_

1
1
2

-

-

1

2.00
1.60
1.50

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

n
t

4

J

1
4

I
4

16
A

2

1
2

8
8

5

1.85

1.90

8
4

2

-

-

2.00

2.10

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2.20

1

A

3

“

*

-

-

1

1

2

*

3

4

34

1

1
_

3

10

24

5

10

4
1

1

29

1

12

4

3

-

4

10

-

-

-

-

-

2

7

4

8

2

8

2

-

-

-

-

~

2

-

-

-

-

1
Xo

46

O

21

1

13

1

1

4

-

-

2

1

1

"

~

“

2

1

7

“

1
2

4
2

2

10

~

10

—

~

_

~

1

”

~

“

“

2

3

“

4

1

2

1

-

-

“

-

-

~

-

-

2

2
1

over

5

_

1.68

11
38
58

$
$
$
9
$
$
1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20

2

4

.2
12

7

1.60
2

1.55

“

125

Tool-and-die makers (other than tooland-dle jobbing shops) .......................
Ua I
a aa A

1.40
2

12

48

9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5

and

1 .5 9
l!29
1.04
1.34
.98
.94

a 1a a a

9
0.75 0.80
and
under
.80
.85

1

1

c

10

2

A

2

■
a

1
15

2

5

19

2

2

3

1 / The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in nonelectrical machinery Industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19A5 edition^
w +v,a
= , ..
machine-tool accessory establishments employing more than 7 workers were also included. Data relate to a December 1952 payroll period.
' Prepare<J ** the Bureau of the
Data limited to men marker.. All <OTker. in the occupation, reported - o r . paid on a tie s ta a ia .
Ooonpatlonal W Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1953
age
Exclude a premium pay for overtime and night work.
>
O mrtw »t ™ ttI™
T
.
y Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Bureau of labor S ta tistics

,t ;
Budget;




P oW & l J la U tlA /U eib 1 /

Table B-7211:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

*
0.35

$

0 .3 0
and
under
.35

%

4

0.45

.45

.50

.55

-

.40

-

%

*
0.50

0 .4 0

0.55

*
0.60

*
0.65

*
0.70

♦
0.75

.60

.65

.70

.75

.80

“ 1 -----0.80

1
0.85

.85

.90

*
1.00

♦
1,05

«
1.10

1.0*,

1.10

1.15

_

_
_
_

5

_

_

_

7

.95

*
0.95

1.00

-----0.90

7

M an

23
46
6
59

1
0.83
.76
.82
.88

Clerks, retail receiving 2 / ...........................
Finishers, flatwork, machine 2 / ......................
Identifiers 2 / .........................................
Markers:
Total ........... ............. ...............
Tims ......................................
Incentive .................................
Pressers, machine, shirts:
Total ....................
Time ..................
Incentive .............
Wrappers, bundle 2 / ....................................

146
352
60
169
137
32
294
65
229
85

.68
.40
.62
.55
.51
.71
.57
.50
.60
.44

Occupation l j

of
workers

Clerks* retail receiving 2 / ............. .............
Extractor operators 2 / ................................
Firemen, stationary boiler 2 / .........................
Washers, machine 2/ ................. ..................

-

-

-

_

2
6
2
6

.
20
-

3
1
-

3

1
-

7

7

22
-

3
-

23
-

32
.

17
_

4

4
7
4
3
75
3
72

6
10
5
5
19
3
16
4

9
4

3
12
6
6
16
_

2
3
3
_
.
_

5
5
2
3
_
_
_

3
2
-

4
8
-

5
2
_

7
4
8

_

14

Women

Average
weekly
earnings

5/

Routamen, retail (driver-salesmen) &/i Total
5&'-day workweek .......................
6-day workweek ........................

199
175
12

4
69.00
70.50
78.50

.

2
200
5
34
34
27
20
7
32

6
121
2
6
6
18

2
1
1
9

12
27
3
31
31
-

14
3
12
a
35
6
95
39
56
15

33
33
6

4
1
5
12
11
1
16
16

4
8
_
8

16
1

4

_

_
_

_

2
_

2

2
4

2

_

4

_

3

_
_
_
_

2

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Coder “1 ------- 1 ------- "1------ 4

$
40.00

9
5

40.00 42.50

45.00 47.50

42.50

47.50

17
4
5

45.00

-

4
4

1 ------- 1 ------- T ------- 4 ------- 1 -------- 4 ------1 ------ 1 ------ 1 ------ 1 ------ i — 1------ 1 ------ 1 ------- "4------- 4
95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
and
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 TO.W 75. W 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 over

1 ------- 4

50.00

6
6

50.00

7
7

4
4

15
15

10
10

16
16

16
16

13
13

17
17

17
17

6
6

8
8

10
5
5

2
2

5
5

5
5

3
3

3
3

6
4
2

l / The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1953
''
U.S. DEPARTMENT (F LABCR
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.
Data
to men workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
jht-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Includes 12 routamen on a 5-day workweek.

0




C! Union Wage Scales
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated. Additional
information is available in reports issued separately for these individual industries or trades.)

Table C-15*

B m

Table C-205* /id A e /U e d

l d iH l f G o tj& iU io td O H

- Q o H t iH lU e d

Table C-27:

_______________ July 1. 1952_______
Glassification

Rate
per
hour

Bricklayers ...................................... $2,900
Carpenters .............
2.350
Electricians ............................__ ...... 2.750
Painters ......................................... 2.350
Plasterers ....................................... 2.625
Plumbers ....... ....... .....................
2.900
Building laborers ............. .............. . 1.200

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Table C-205*
July 1. 1952_______
Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Working foremen ..................................................... $1,470
Mixers, overmen .............................................
1.420
Roll-machine o p e ra to rs.......................................
1.320
Dividers, depositors, wrapping-machine
operators, and checkers
1.320
Molder operators, stockmen
1.270
Icing-machine o p e ra to rs.....................................
1.H0
Oven feeders and dumpers ...............
1.080
Pan-washing-machine operators, r o ll panners
(female), make-up women, tw isters,
panners, rackers, catchers, carton
makers, flour dvmpers, pan greasers,
hand ioers (cake), and wrappers
Agreement B*
Breads
Foremen............................. .................••••••••,
1.620
Dough mixers, overmen .................................... 1.420
Dividermen .....................................................
1.340
Moldermen, roll-machine operators,
and henchmen................................................ . 1.310
Oven loaders and dumpers.............................. 1.110
Dough mixer helpers, pan greasers,
se t-o ff men, and bread rackers
( a ll a fte r 6 months)
Cakes
Foremen
............................. ..................... . . . ,
1.470
Overmen ................................................................ 1.400
Mixers
......................... ................................. .,
1.320
Ingredient scalers, scaling-machine
operators, and flo o rla d ie s ...............
1.190
Supervisors........................................................ 1.060
Cake-wrapping-machine operators, le e rs,
oheokers, mappers, packers .................... 1.020
Greasing-machine operators . . . . . . . .
1.010
Helpers, m ale........................... ......................... 1.010
Shippings
Shipping clerks ............................................. ..
1.420
Wrapping-machine o p erato rs......................... . 1.290
Bread checkers
1.260
Cake ch eck ers................................................... . 1.190
Wrapping-machine helpers (a fte r
6 months) ............................. ..
1.050
Bun tray ers, hand wrappers,
truck loaders, and helpers ......................




Hours
per
Jii—
ffk

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40

Classification

Crackers and cookiess
Agreement As
Sponge and sweet mixings
Head m i x e r s ......
Mixers
.....•••••••.
M i x e r s 1 h e l p e r s ......... ...... .
Sponge bakings
Head bakers ............... .
Machine captains
B a k e r s ............ .......... .
Rollexmen .................. .
Sweet bakings
O v e n m e n ....... ....... .............
Dough feeders, machine set-up men
Scalers, weighers, dough
Icings
Head m i x e r s ........... ••••••••••<
M i x e r s ........ * .............. .
.
M i x e r s 1 h e l p e r s ....... ............
Floormen ......... ...... ........ .
Machine operators' helpers ......
Packings
Supplymen ........................
Pasteoen, assemblymen ....... .
Wrapping-machine o p e r a t o r s .......
Sponge packers, handlers (hand) .,
Stitchers, formers
Sweet packers, closers, weighers ,
Agreement Bs
F o r e m e n ......
Mixers ................... .
Overmen, loaders ................... .
Wrapping-machine operators, scalers ,
Dumpers, enrobers, squeeze bagmen ...

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
■YfMfe
..

$1,730
1.615
1.445

40
40
40

1.730
1.665
1.585
1.535

40
40
40
40

1.445
1.385
1.225

40
40
40

1.645
1.560
1.500
1.330
1.385

40
40
40
40
40

1.500
1.445
1.385
1.240
1.215
1.205

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.325
1.125
.975
.925
.875

40
40
40
40
40

Newspapers*
Compositors, hand — day work ................ $2,666
Compositors, hand — night work ................ 2.746
Machine operators — day woric .................. 2.666
Machine operators — night work ................ 2.746
Mailers — day work •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2.200
Mailers — night work •••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2.253
Photoengravers — day work ••••••••••••••••••••• 2.826
Photoengravers — night work ••••••••••••••••••• 2.986
Pressmen, web presses — day work .............. 2.628
Pressmen, web presses — night work •••••••••••• 2.736
Preasmen-in-charge — day work ................. 2.895
Presanen-iiv-charge — night work ............... 3.003
Stereotypers — day work ....................... 2.666
Sterentypers — night work ..................... 2.774

Q fv & u U u t p

Classification

Book and job shops*
Bindery women ............... .
$1,320
B o o k b i n d e r s ....... ........ .................... . 2.555
Compositors, hand ................... ...... .
2 .6 2 0
E l e c t r o t y p e r s .................... ...............
2.800
Machine operators ................. ............. ,
2 .6 2 0
M a i l e r s ..........................................
2 .4 1 0
Photoengravers .................. .
2.773
Press assistants and feeders ..................
1.731
2 -color presses ................ .....
1.777
Pressmen, cylinder ....................... .
2.567
2 -oolor presses .............. ............
2.674
Rotary and offset presses, 21 x 28 inches
through 22 x 42 inches ..................... 2.738
Offset presses under 21 x 28 inches ........ 2.567
P e r f e c t o r ..........................T___ T.TTrr
2.599
Rotary, sheet feed, first ......... .........
2.442
Rotary, sheet feed, second ................. . 2.364
Pressmen, platen ........................... .....
2.567
Stereotypers ............ ................. .
2.800

37y
37»
37y

37?

y jL
v tL
3l\

VJl
37!
37
37
37*
3?i

&

37v
37?
37?
37?
37?
37?
37?
37?
37?
37?
37?
37?
37?

ft f i /o y e e d

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Busses and trackless trolleys*
First 6 months ................................ $1,360
7 - 1 2 months ...... ........ .
1.420
After 1 year ..................................
Feeder busses*
First 6 months ................................ 1.310
7 — 12 months .......__ .........._____ T___
1.370
After 1 year ......... .................. ..
1.410

1.4 0
6

M o t a 'U t iM c A
a n d

Hours
per
week

Hours
per
week

Table C-41s J i o o o l

Table C-42s

Rate
per
hour

Rate
per
hour

Classification

d fe lfu e A A

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Baggage . . . . ....... .................. ....................... ......... .
$1,225
Helpers ......................................... ..
1.175
Bakery ........................................... ........ ..
1 .3 6 0
Beer - Keg d r i v e r s ........... .......................................... „
1.423
General - Freight, city d e l i v e r y ........ .. ........
1.290
Helpers ....... ................... .. ............ M
1.170
Film drivers - City pickup*
First 3 months .................................................
1.360
Over 3 months ......................................... .......................
1 .5 8 0
Grocery*
Chain store ...................................... ....... ,f..f M .
1 .4 0 0
Wholesale .................................... ..
1.430
Meat - Packinghouse*
Agreement A ....................................................... .................. , . .
1.515
Agreement B ...................... .................................................... ..
1.490
P a p e r ........................... ...........................................................................
1.380
Railway express*
Pickup and delivery .................................. ..
1.635
Money pickup
1.775

Hours
per
week
40
40
48
40
48
48
40

40
48
in
40
40
40
40

AO

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT C F LABCR
I
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Ds Supplementary Wage Practices
Table D-l t

S h ift 3 b * tf* fe u / ia / P tO U U iO H d.

l/

Percent of toted plant employment -------------------------tb)-------------------------------------------G 3 -----By establishment nollejy in Actually working on extra shifts in A H marLufacturing
All marmfacturing
Machinery
Machinery
indue tries 2/
industries 3/
indue tries
industries 3/
2d shift
2d shift
3d or other
3d or other
2d shift
2d shift
work
shift work
work
shift

A

QV 4m
4
4a1
onixt aiiierenxiajL

2J

100.0

100.0

100.0

XXX

XXX

79.8
57.2
42.0
5.8
7.0
5.5
16.7

All workers ......................................
Workers in establishments having provisions
for late s h i f t s .... ............................
With shift differential .............. .........
Uniform cents (per hour) ....................
Under 5 cents
5 cents ....................... .........
Over 5 nr> under 8 cents ____ ............
d
8 cents ................ ...............
9 cents ............ ........ ......
10 cents
Over 10 cents
Uniform percentage ..........................
5 percent
6 percent ................. .
7 percent .............................. .
7J- percent ........................ ......
10 percent TTT__ ....______...............
With no shift differential ....................
Workers in establishments having no provisions
for late shifts ................. ...............

65.2
53.0
40.4

44.3
44.3
44.3

4.5
2.2
2.2

12.4
1.0
12.7
3.8
4.7
5.3
12.6
2.6

37.8

14.7
9.0
8.9
1.3
1.5
1.4
3.9

1.9
5.1
15.2
12.6
1.5

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

2.5
7.5
1.1
22.6

12.2

20.2

34.8

.1

_
_
_
_

_
_
2.3

XXX

55.7

_
_

_
_

5.7

1.6
i.6
_
_

<5/>
.4
.6
.3
.1

_
_

_

y

.8

.2
.6
.1

6.5

XXX

XXX

_
_
XXX

1/ Shift differential data are presented in terms of (a) establishment policy and (b) workers actually employed on late shifts at the time of
the survey. An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met any of the following conditions* (l) Operated late shifts at the time of
the survey, (2) had union-contract provisions covering late shifts, or (3) had operated late shifts within 6 months prior to the survey.
2/ Includes data for machinery industries also shown separately.
2/ No provisions for third-shift operation.
y Insufficient number of workers to warrant detailed presentation of data.
y Less than 0.05 percent.
Table D-2t

S c h e d u le d

' te kly JtouAA.
k e

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS1 l/EMPLOYED IN—
Weekly hours

All workers ........................
35 hours............ ...............
Over 35 and under 37i hours ..........
37& hours ..........................
Over 37& and under 40 hours ..........
Over 40 and under 44 hours ...........
44 hours ...........................
Over 44 and under 48 hours ...........
48 hours ..................... ......
Over 48 land under 50 hours..... .....
50 hours...... ....................
Over 50 hours .......................

2/
2/
3/
*
**

industries^/ Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.3
1.1
14.3
7.1
68.9
2.7
2.5

_
9.3
2.0
82.5
1.4
3.8
1.0
“

9.8
63.8
22.7
3.4
.3
”

.9
.8
.2
.1
.1

_

5.8
77.4
12.2
4.6
-

Retail trade
100.0
_

3.4
4.4
82.9
1.7
1.1
4.5

.4
1.2
-

.4

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Finance**
100.0
_

4.4
6.6
22.7
66.1
.1
.1
-

Services

industries 2 / Manufacturing
100.0
_

0.4
2.6
68.6
1.9
1.5
6 .4
13.7
1.2
1.7
2.0

100.0
_
4.7
83.1
1.1
.4

6.2
3.8
.7

“

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

65.9
21.6
4.3
8.2

Data relate to women workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1953
Includes data for services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Includes data for real estate and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_
77.1
3.7
8.1
6.5
4.6
-

Retail trade

BcnloM

100.0
_
_
_

46.6
4.0
2.2
4.7
31.5
4.7
2.7
3.6

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table D-3:

P < U fl j f o lU tc U fi

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number of paid holidays
industries l /

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance •
•

All
.
inductrice 2 / Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays 2/ ..................
Less than 5 days ..................
5 days ...........................
6 days ...........................
7 days ........... ...............
8 d a y s ........................ .
9 days ...........................
10 days ..........................
11 days ..........................
Workers in establishments providing

99.6
1.9
41.8
38.2
4.0
9.8
1.8
1.1
1.0

100.0
1.2
21.1
73.6
1.0
3.1
-

100.0
.6
40.4
54.1
4.9
-

100.0
•6
39.6
51.3
8.5
-

99.6
5.4
91.3
2.8
.1
-

100.0
1.6
38.6
4.7
6.9
32.6
7.3
4.4
3.9

.4

Retail trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

73.5
6.2
13.6
46.7
4.2
2.8
-

88.6
4.4
27.4
49.3
7.5
-

96.8
8.6
39.0
42.7
6.5
-

84.4
14.9
66.8
1.7
1.0
_
-

26.5

11.4

3.2

15.6

100.0

.4

—

Wholesale
trade

77.8
8.9
28.6
34.8
3.8
1.7
(V)

100.0

All

Public
utilities*

22.2

workers .........................

Services

Srie
evcs

"
1/
2/
2/
4/
*
**

Includes data for services in addition te those industry divisions shown separately.
Includes data for real estate and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Paid holidays of less than a full day have been omitted.
Less than 0.05 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table D-4* P a i d

V c U x U iO tp l V J& U M

jgU

P *J0 4 J4 4 A &

h

£\

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy

All workers .........................

100.0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Public
utiUtiee*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

100,0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.5
98.5
20.3
78.2

100.0
100.0
56.9
43.1

100.0
100.0
17.3
75.4
1.9
5.4
-

100.0
98.0
54.6
2.4
41.0
2.0

100.0
100.0
3.2

93.7
80.6
51.9

96.8
-

All
industries ,\/. Msnufscturing

Services

All
.
industries 2 / Msnufscturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0
54.6

96.7
96.7
46.1

28.6
.1
(£/)
12.6
12.6
.5

92.7
71.6
50.9
20.7
21.1
21.1
-

45.4
-

47.9
2.0
.7
-

93.2
90.9
51.2
_
39.7

6.3

7.3

“

3.3

Services

After 1 year of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ....................
Length-of-time payment ............
1 w e e k ............... .........
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s......
2 weeks .................... ..
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s.... 1 . . .
4 weeks and over ...............
Percentage payment 2/ .............
2 percent............. ..... .
Flat-sum payment ................. .
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ..................

99.5
99.2
24.9
.3 ‘
72.9
.3
.8
.3
.5

-

-

-

-

1.5

—

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




NOTE*

Estimates are provided separately, according to employer practice in computing
vacation payments (length-of-time, percentage or flat-sum); percentage and
flat-sum payments were converted to equivalent time periods in earlier studies.

-

-

-

_

2.3
6.8

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga,, March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Table D -4*

P a id V a c a tio n ^ ty o & m a l P to a U io tU )-C o n tin u e d

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V acatio n p o l i c y
induetriesl/

A ll w o r k e r s .................................................................

Manufacturing

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Senrioee

All 0 /
industries 2 /

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6
9 9 .3
7 .2
.3
8 8 .9

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
10 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.6

10 0 .0

100.0
100.0

9 3 .7
8 0 .6
3 3 .1
5 .0
4 1 .0
1 .5

9 2 .7
7 1 .6
3 7 .9
7 .5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

9 6 .7
9 6 .7
1 9 .7
5 .6
6 8 .7

9 3 .2
9 0 .9
1 9 .9

.3

9 8 .9
9 8 .9
1 3 .9
8 5 .0
-

.4

1 .1

9 9 .6
9 9 .3
6 .3
.3

.3

9 8 .9
9 8 .9
1 1 .7
8 7 .2
-

.4

1 .1

9 9 .6
9 9 .3
2 .5
9 0 .4

9 8 .9
9 8 .9
4 .7
9 3 .6
-

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
Workers in esta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
p aid v a c a t i o n s .......... ..........................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 week ...............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ....................
2 weeks .............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ....................
4 weeks and ov er .......................................
P ercen tag e payment j j / ..................................
2 p e r c e n t ........................................................
Over 2 p e ro e n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F la t-su m payment ..............................................
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p aid v a c a tio n s ...............................................

2 .1
.8

8 9 .8
-

-

9 2 .1
1 .9
5 .4
-

9 8 .0
4 .7
2 .4
8 1 .4
9 .5
-

3 .2
9 6 .8
-

UJ)

1 2 .6
1 2 .2

2 6 .2
-

2 1 .1

.4
.5
6 .3

2 .0

2 0 .4
.7
-

9 2 .7
7 1 .6
2 8 .7
4 .9
3 8 .0
-

2 .6

.7
-

6 1 .0
7 .4
2 .3

3 .3

6 .8

100.0
1 0 0 .0

9 6 .7
9 6 .7

1 9 .7
-

1 5 .8

9 3 .2
9 0 .9
1 5 .2

7 .3

9 3 .7
8 0 .6
2 5 .4
3 .7
4 9 .9

2 8 .5
7 1 .5
-

2 .0

A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s ......................................................
L en g th -o f-tim e payment ...............................
1 week ...............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ....................
2 w e e k s .............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks . . . . . . . . .
4 weeks and o v er .......................................
P ercen tag e payment 2 / ..................................
2 p e r c e n t ........................................................
3 p e r c e n t ........................................................
F la t-su m payment ..............................................
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid v a c a tio n s . . . . - ...................... .............

8 8 .8
3 .1

.8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 .1

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.6

9 1 .9
-

9 2 .1
1 .9
5 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0

100.0
100.0

4 .7
2 .4
8 1 .4
9 .5
-

3 .2
9 2 .7
4 .1
-

1 .6

l /)

(i
1276

1 2.2

2 1 .1

8 0 .3
_
-

2 .6

7 .3

100.0
100.0

9 3 .7
8 0 .6

9 2 .7
7 1 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

9 5 .9
4 .1
-

1 1 .6
1 .6
6 3.8
.1

1 0 .0

5 .6
9 1 .7
2 .7

2 .0

6 5 .7
7 .4

.7
-

2 .3

3 .3

.4
.5

2 0 .4
.7
-

6 .3

2 .0

9 .5
6 8 .7

6 .8

9 6 .7
9 6 .7
1 3 .2

9 3 .2
9 0 .9
1 5 .2

A f te r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s .....................................................
L en g th -o f-tim e payment ................................
- 1 week ...............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ....................
2 weeks .................................... .......................
Oyer 2 and under 3 weeks ....................
3 weeks .............................................................
4 weeks and ov er .......................................
P ercen tag e payment 2 / ..................................
2 p e r c e n t ........................................................
4 p e r c e n t ........................................................
F la t-su m p a y m e n t............................. ................
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p aid v a c a tio n s ................. ..................

1 .8
3 .8

.6

.3

-

.4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.6

9 5 .9
-

8 4 .4
1 .9

2 .1

7.7

-

5 .4
-

1.1

.8
-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1 0 0.0
9 8 .0
3 .9
7 9 .5
-

1 4 .6
-

2 .0

-

-

3 .5
Q )

1 .7
5 9 .1
-

.8
-

1 2 .6

2 1 .1

5 .7
6 .9

1 2 .6

.5
6 .3

8 .5
7 .3

-

-

1 .8

2 .6

7 4 .9

6 1 .7

2 .0
4 .1

1 1 .4

.7
-

2 .3

3.3

6 .8

Senrioee

Table D-A:

P a id V a c a tio + U ty o tm o d P A a a U to ttd ,) -

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy

All workers ..........................

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Who e a e
lsl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

Finance**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.6
99.3
2.0
86.2
3.2
7.0
.9
.3

98.9
98.9
3.2
93.1
2.6
-

100.0
100.0
2.0
9A.3
3.7
-

100.0
100.0
.6
8A.A
1.9
7.7
5.A
-

100.0
98.0
3.6
66.3
13.5
1A.6
2.0

100.0
100.0
87.8
A.l
8.1
-

.A

1.1

99.6
99.3
2.0
53.8
.3
A1.2
1.0
1.0
.3

98.9
98.9
3.1

.A

1.1

99.6
99.3
2.0
A6.8
.3
AA.8
1.0
A.A
.3

98.9
98.9
3.1
81 .A
1A.A
-

.A

1.1

Al
l
/
fcuig
I d s r e 1/ Manu a t r n
nuti*

100.0

Pbi
ulc
ui i i s
tl t e *

Who e a e
lsl
tae
rd

Rti ta e
eal r d

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

93.7
80.6
11.0
.9
60.A
2.9
5.2
.2
12.6
5.7
6.9
.5

92.7
71.6
10.0
1.7
58.0
1.9
21.1
8.5
12.6
-

100.0
100.0
5.6
8A.A
10.0
-

96.7
96.7
13.2
76.7
2.0
A.l
.7
-

93.2
90.9
11.8
53.6
1A.1
11 .A
2.3

6.3

7.3

3.3

6.8

93.7
80.6
11.0
.9
A3.2
•1
24,7
.7
12.6
5.7
A.8
2.1
.5

92.7
71.6
10.0
1.7
AA.9
_
15.0
21.1
8.5
8.8
3.8
-

96.7
96.7
13.2
AA.7
2.0
36.1
.7
-

93.2
90.9
11.8
38.9
_
AO.2
2.3

6.3

7.3

3.3

6.8

93.7
80.6
11.0
.9
36.1
.1
28.5
A.O
12.6
5.7
A.8
2.1
.5

92.7
71.6
10.0
1.7
A0.7
19.2
21.1
8.5
8.8
3.8
-

96.7
96.7
13.2
AA.7
2.0
35.3
1.5
_

93.2
90.9
11.8
_
30.1
32.6
16.A
2.3

6.3

7.3

3.3

6.8

Al
l
,
i d s r e 2/ Manufacturing
nutis

Srie
evcs

After 10 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations .....................
Length-of-time payment .............
1 week .........................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ..... ’
...
2 weeks ......... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........
3 weeks........................
A weeks and over ................
Percentage payment 2 / ..............
2 percent ......................
A percent .......... ............
Flat-sum payment ................ .
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations .............

"

"

After 15 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations .....................
Length-of-time payment .............
1 w e e k .........................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ........
2 w e eks........................
Over 2 a i under 3 weeks ....... .
rd
3 weeks ........................
Over 3 and under A w e e k s ........
A weeks and over ................
Percentage payment 2/ ..............
2 percent .................... .
A percent ......................
6 percent and over ..... ....... .
Flat-sum payment ..................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations..... ............

-

81.8
_
1A.0
-

100.0
100.0
2.0
41.0
57.0
-

100.0
100.0
.6
31.9
1.9
60.2
5.A
-

100.0
98.0
3.6
32.7
—
61.7
2.0

100.0
100.0
5A.8
—
Al.l
A.l
-

I
1
8

100.0
100.0
5.6
AA.A
50.0
-

B

After 20 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations........ .............
Length-of-tlme payment .............
1 week .........................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ....... .
2 weeks ...........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 Greeks ............... .........
Over 3 and under A weeks ........
A weeks and over ................
Percentage payment 2 / .......... .
2 percent ......................
A percent ......................
6 percent and over ..............
Flat-sum payment..................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ....... .......... .

100.0
100.0
2.0
12.3
85.7
-

-

-

-

-

100.0
100.0
.6
31.9
1.9
58.2
7.A
”

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0
98.0
3.6
25.9
53.0
15.5
2.0

100.0
100.0
A9.8
A2.2
A.l
3.9
~

100.0
100.0
5.6
20.9
73.5
_
~

Sere*.




Table D-4*

Paid Vocation* {^o^mal PtOMdionAdZonjinned

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED INVacation policy

All workers .........................

AU
. a ufacturing
i d s r e 1/ M n
nutis

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Pbi
ulc
u iiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti t a e
eal rd

Fi a o *
nne*

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.6
99.3
2.0
42.9
.3
36.4
17.7
.3

98.9
98.9
3.1
81.4
14.4
-

100.0
100.0
2.0
12.3
85.7
-

100.0
100.0
.6
31.9
1.9
42.7
22.9
-

100.0
98.0
3*6
25.9
11.8
56.7
2.0

100.0
100.0
34.4
40.9
24.7
-

.4

1.1

Srie
evcs

Al
l
.
i d s r e 2/ Manufacturing
nutis
100.0

Pbi
ulc
uiii s
tlt e *

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti t a e
eal r d

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

92.7
71.6
10.0
1.7
40.7

100.0
100.0
5.6
_
20.9
73.5
-

96.7
96.7
13.2
_
44.7
2.0
29.1
7.7

93.2
90.9
11.8
_
30.1

After 25 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations..... ...............
Length-of-time payment .............
1 week .........................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..... .
2 weeks....... ............. .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........
3 weeks ........................
4 weeks and over ...............
Percentage payment 2/ ..............
2 percent................ .....
4 percent ......................
6 percent and o v e r ........ .....
Flat-sum payment.... .............
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ..................

“

93.7
80.6
11.0
.9
36.1
.1
24.8
7.7
12.6
5.7
4.8
2.1
.5
6.3

“

19.2
21.1
8.5
8.8
3.8
7.3

-

-

-

15.2
33.8
_
_
2.3

*
*

3.3

6.8

-

-

l/ Includes data for services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2/ Includes data for real estate and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2/ Percent of annual earnings.
y
Less than 0.0$ percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table d -5*

JniuAanco jand PonUon Plan*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type of plan

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

idsre y
nutis
All workers .........................
Workers in establishments having
insurance or pension plans 2 / .......
Insurance plans 2/ .................
Lif............................
Accidental death and
dismemberment....... .
Sickness and accident ...........
Hospitalization ................
Surgical .......................
Medical ........................
Retirement-pension p l a n ............
Workers in establishments having
no insurance or pension plans .......

y

M
anufacturing

Pbi
ulc
u iiis
tlte*

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.8
95.1
94.5

95.6
95.6
94.2

99.3
99.3
99.3

91.2
88.4
87.3

97.9
88.9
88.9

100.0
100.0
100.0

91.0
90.0
88.3

28.6
45.1
72.8
64.4
21.9
67.1

57.6
70.8
88.5
81.9
54.5
28.7

46.9
65.2
32.0
29.5
2.1
84.2

3.3
43.3
65.5
61.6
11.8
69.4

.2
23.3
76.9
63.0
86.7

15.9
21,9
83.7
70.0
18.8
86.5

3.2

4.4

.7

8.8

2.1

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti ta e
eal r d

Fn
i ance**

Includes data for services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Includes data for real estate and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately,
Unduplicated total.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

2/
2/

Srie
evcs

Al
l
I d s r e 2/ Manufacturing
nutis

Pbi
ulc
u iiis
t lte*

Whole a e
sl
tae
rd

Rti t a e
eal rd

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

94.4
94.4
91.7

98.7
98.7
98.7

86.8
83.1
80.1

84.4
80.4
80.4

20.2
52.1
71.1
61.1
14.3
41.5

27.5
63.0
83.2
74.4
24.9
35.4

30.4
58.6
54.9
49.3
3.1
64.6

14.3
40.6
62.8
59.6
5.6
45.1

35.1
59.8
44.6

9.0

5.6

1.3

13.2

15.6

Sendees

1.0

56.3

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17

Appendix— Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau's occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources. In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community. Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.

such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest $0 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, l.e., those
hired to work the establishment's full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau's
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) Office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-4). The industry groupings surveyed are: Manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined- separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries, these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey. Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

18
in terms of total p l a n t employment, whe r e a s proportions i n the sec­
ond tabulation represent
only those workers
actually employed
on

office workers
of the table
summarizing
scheduled weekly
hours.
Because
of e l i g i b i l i t y r e q u i r e m e n t s ,
the proportion
actually re­

the specified late

c e i v i n g t he s p e c i f i c b e n e f i t s m a y b e

shift.

Information
on wage practices
other than
shift differ­
entials refers
to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables.
It is p r e s e n t e d
in terms of the proportion
of
a l l w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d i n o f f i c e s (or p l a n t d e p a r t m e n t s ) t h a t o b s e r v e
the practice in question,
except in the section relating
to w o m e n

smaller.

The s u m m a r y o f v a c a t i o n p l a n s

is l i mited

Item

ar­

Tabulations of insurance
and pension plans
have been
confined to
t h o s e f o r w h i c h a t l e a s t a p a r t o f t h e c o s t is b o r n e b y t h e employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Atlanta,
a n d N u m b e r S t u d i e d b y t h e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s , M a r c h 1953

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
V

to formal

rangements.
It e x c l u d e s
informal plans w h e reby time off
with pay
is granted at the discretion
of the employer
or other supervisor.

Numlser of
establj shments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Ga.,

1/

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions .................................
Manufacturing ..............................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .............................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade ............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services 2 / ................ ........ .

51
51
51

660
233
427

187
56
131

144,300
68,300
76,000

88,070
42,610
45,460

19,020
6,010
13,010

51
51
51
51
51

52
119
120
67
69

19
33
31
25
23

19,600
12,900
25,400
10,200
7,900

15,750
5,220
14,710
5,720
4,060

3,310
2,000
2,870
4,170
660

8
21
21

6
29
43

6
15
16

374
2,285
3,021

374
1,695
1,574

11
174
60

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis U
Women’s and misses' dresses ....................
Machinery industries ..........................
Power laundries ...............................

5/

i/ Atlanta Metropolitan Area (Cobb, DeKalb, and Fulton Counties).
2/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in all divisions in the March 1952 survey was 21
workers.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organisations; and engineering and architectural services.
ij Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.




1 9

Index
Assembler

9

(machinery), 9

Identifier (power laundries), 1 0
Inspector (machinery),

3

Bench hand (bakeries), 11
Biller, machine,
Book b i n d e r (printing), 11
Bookkeeping-machine operator,
Bricklayer (building construction),

Janitor, 7
Janitor (machinery),

3

11

K e y - p u n c h operator,

3

Calcinating-machine operator,
Carpenter (building construction),
Carpenter, maintenance, 6

7

3

7

9

E l e c t r i c i a n ( b u i l d i n g cons t r u c t i o n ) , 11
Electrician, maintenance, 6
Electrotyper (printing), 11
Engine - l a t h e operator (machinery), 9
Engineer, stationary, 6
E x t r a c t o r operator (power laundries), 10
Finisher,

flatvork

(power laundries),

Fireman, stationary boiler, 6
F i r e m a n , s t a t i o n a r y b o i l e r (power
laundries), 10
Guard,

7

Helper (bakeries), 11
Helper, mo t o r t r u c k driver, 11
Helper, trades, maintenance, 6




7

9

k

7

11

Cleaner,
Clerk, file,
C l e r k , order, 3, ^
C l e r k , p a y r o l l , 3, ^
Clerk, retail r e c e i v i n g (power
laundries), 10
Compositor, h a n d (printing), 11
Crane operator, electric bridge,
C u t t e r a n d m a r k e r ( w o m e n fs a n d m i s s e s 1
dresses), 9
Draftsman, 5
Drill- p r e s s operator (machinery),
Duplicating-machine operator, k

Pipefitter, maintenance, 6
P l a s t e r e r ( b u i l d i n g c o n s t r u c t i o n ) , 11
P l u m b e r ( b u i l d i n g c o n s t r u c t i o n ) , 11
Porter,
Press assistant (printing), 11
Press feeder (printing), 11
Pres6er (women's and misses*
dresses), 9
Presser, machine, shirts (power
laundries), 10
Pres s m a n (p r i n t i n g ) , 11

10

Laborer (building construction), 11
Laborer, material handling,
Laborer, material handling
(machinery), 9
M a c h i n e operator ( p r i n t i n g ) , 11
Machine-tool operator, production
(machinery), 9
Machinist, maintenance, 6
Machinist, p r o d u c t i o n (machinery),
M arker (power l a u n d r i e s ) , 10
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 6

9

Mechanic, m a i n t e n a n c e , 6
Milling-machine operator
(machinery), 9
Millwright, 6
M i x e r (bakeries), 11
M o l d e r (bakeries), 11
M o tortruck driver, 11

R e c e i v i n g cle r k , 7
Route m a n (driver-salesman)
laundries),

(pow e r

10

Secretary, k
Sewing-machine
dresses), 9

operator

( w o m e n ' s a n d mi s s e s '

7

Sheet-metal worker, maintenance, 6
S h i p p i n g cle r k ,
Shipping-an d - r e c e i v i n g clerk,
Stenographer, k
Stereotyper (printing), 11

7

Switchboard operator, k
Switchboard operator-receptionist,

h

3, ^

Nurse,

industrial

(registered),

Tabulating-machine operator,
T h r e a d t r i m m e r ( c leaner) ( w o m e n ' s a n d m i s s e s '
dresses), 9
Tool-and-die maker (machinery), 9

5

boy, 3

Office
O f f i c e girl, k
Oiler, 6
Operator (local t r a n s i t ) , 11
Order filler,
O v e n m a n ( b a k e r i e s ) , 11

Tracer, 5
Transcribing-machine
Tr u c k driver, 8
Trucker, power, 8
Typist, 5

7

Packer, 7
P a c k e r ( b a k e r i e s ) , 11
Painter (building construction),
Painter, maintenance, 6
Photoengraver (printing), 11

Washer, machine
11

operator,

5

(power laundries), 10

Watchman, 8
Welder, h a n d (machinery), 9
W r a p p e r ( b a k eries), 11
Wrapper, b u ndle (power laundries), 10
U. S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: O — 1953
.







This report was prepared in the Bureau’s
Communications may be addressed to:

Southern Regional Office*

Brunswick A. Bagdon, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
50 Seventh Street, N„ E*
Room 664 .
Atlanta 5, Georgia
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial
relations, employment, prices, labor turnover, productivity, work injuries,
construction and housing.

The Southern Region includes the following States:
Alabama
Arkansas
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Louisiana
Maryland
Mississippi

North Carolina
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102