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B O ST O N ,M ASSACH U SETTS
M arch 1 9 53

Bulletin No. 1116-17

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
M artin P. D urkin - S e cretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




House Document No. 188

83d C n r s , 1 t S s i n
oges s eso

Occupational Wage Survey
BO STO N , M A SSA C H U SET T S




March

1953

BuUetin No. 112.6-17
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
M artin P. D urkin - S ecretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 20 cents




Contents
Page

Letter of Transmittal
INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................

1

THE BOSTON METROPOLITAN AREA.................................................................
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
B ureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s ,
W ashington, D. C ., Ju ne 12, 1953.
The S e c r e ta r y o f L ab o r:
I h av e th e h o n o r to tra n s m it h e re w ith a r e p o r t on
o c c u p a tio n a l w ages and r e l a t e d b e n e f its i n B oston, M ass*, d u rin g
M arch 1 9 5 3 . S im ila r s tu d ie s a r e b e in g co n d ucted i n a number o f
o th e r la r g e la b o r-m a rk e t a r e a s d u rin g th e f i s c a l y e a r 1953#
T hese s tu d ie s h av e b een d e s ig n e d to m eet a v a r i e t y o f g o v ern ­
m e n ta l and n o n g o v ern m en tal u s e s and p ro v id e a re a -w id e e a rn in g s
in f o r m a tio n f o r many o c c u p a tio n s common to m ost m a n u fa c tu rin g
and nonm & nufacturing i n d u s t r i e s , as w e ll a s sum m aries o f s e le c te d
su p p le m e n ta ry wage b e n e f i t s . W henever p o s s ib le , s e p a ra te d a ta
h av e b een p re s e n te d f o r in d iv id u a l m ajo r in d u s tr y d iv i s io n s .
T h is r e p o r t was p re p a re d i n th e B ureau f s r e g io n a l
o f f i c e i n B o sto n , M a ss., by H arry H. H a ll, R e g io n al Wage and In­
d u s t r i a l R e la tio n s A n a ly s t. The p la n n in g and c e n tr a l d ir e c t io n
o f th e program was c a r r ie d on i n th e B ureau*s D iv is io n o f Wages
and I n d u s t r i a l R e la tio n s .
Ewan C lag u e, C om m issioner.
Hon. M a rtin P . D u rk in ,
S e c r e ta r y o f L ab o r.




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ................................................................................

1

TABLES:
A verage e a rn in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d on an
a r e a b a s is A -l
O ffic e o c c u p a tio n s ...................................................................
A-2
P r o f e s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s .................
A-3
M ain ten an ce and pow er p la n t o c c u p a t io n s ..............
A-4
C u s to d ia l, w areh o u sin g , and sh ip p in g
o c c u p a tio n s .............................................................................

3
6
6
8

A verage e a rn in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d on an
in d u s tr y b a s is B-2333 Women’s and m is s e s ’ d r e s s e s ............................................
B-2851 P a in ts and v a rn is h e s .............................................................
B-35
M achinery in d u s t r ie s ..............................................................
M a c h in e -to o l a c c e s s o r ie s ...........................................
B-7211 Power l a u n d r i e s ............ ....................

10
10
11
13
H

Union wage
C-15
C-205
C-27
C-Al
C-42

s c a le s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s B u ild in g c o n s t r u c t i o n ............................................................
B a k e rie s ......................................................................................
P r in tin g ..............................................
L o cal t r a n s i t o p e ra tin g em ployees ..............................
M o to rtru c k d r iv e r s and h e lp e r s .....................................

15
15
15
15
16

S u p p lem en tary wage p r a c t i c e s D -l
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l p ro v is io n s ........................................
D-2
S ch ed u led w eekly h o u r s ........................................................
D-3
P a id h o lid a y s ...............................................................................
D-4
P a id v a c a tio n s .................................................
D-5
In s u ra n c e and p e n sio n p la n s .......................................

17
17
18
18

APPENDIX:
Scope and m ethod o f s u r v e y ........................................................................
INDEX

21
22
2U




OCCUPATIONAL W AGE

VEY - BOSTON, MASS.

Introduction

other transportation equipment employed 25,200 workers.
Other im­
portant manufacturing industries included leather and leather prod­
ucts, with a b out 30,000 employees— about one-half of w h o m are em­
ployed by the a r e a fs large footwear industry* Food processing firms
employed about 27,000 a nd apparel and other products made from fab­
rics had 24,500 workers* Approximately 22,000 workers were employed
in the printing a nd publishing industries.

The Boston are a
is 1 of 20 important industrial centers
in wh i c h the Bureau of labor Statistics conducted occupational wage
surveys during late 1952 and early 1953.
In such surveys,
occupa­
tions common to a va r i e t y of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing in­
dustries are studied on a community-wide basis* 1/ Cross-industry
methods
of sampling are thus utilized in compiling earnings data
for the following
types of
occupations:
(a) Office;
(b) profes­
sional and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) cus­
todial, warehousing, a nd shipping*
In presenting earnings informa­
tion for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4)
separate data are pro­
vided w herever possible for
individual broad industry divisions*

A n estimated 660,000 workers were on the payrolls of Bos­
nonmanufacturing establishments
in March 1953* About
2 2 4 ,0 0 0
were employed
in retail a nd wholesale trade activities*
Approximately 125,000 persons were employed in such diverse fields
as hotels, theaters, hospitals, radio a nd television stations, edu­
cational institutions,
laundries and dry-cleaning establishments,
and in other service industries*
Transportation (except railroads),
communication,
and other public utilities furnished employment for
almost 65,000 workers.
Finance, insurance,
and real estate indus­
tries employed 63,000 workers, one-third of w h o m were accounted for
by the a r e a fs insurance companies*
ton area

Earnings
information for characteristic
occupations in
certain more narrowly defined
industries is presented in series B
tables*
Union scales (series C tables) are presented for selected
occupations in several industries
or trades in which the great m a ­
jority of the workers are employed under terns of collective-bar­
gaining agreements, a n d the
contract or minimum rates are believed
to be indicative of prevailing pay practices*

Among the
industries a nd establishment-size groups in­
cluded w i thin the scope of the B u r e a u ^ study, nearly three-fourths
of the plant workers were employed in establishments liaving labormanagement contracts covering wages and working conditions.
Virtu­
ally all plant workers
in the public-utilities group of establish­
ments a nd more than three-fourths
in manufacturing were employed
under the provisions
of union contracts.
The proportion of plant
workers covered by union agreements
in each of the other major in­
dustry groups studied was slightly more than 50 percent*

Data are
collected and summarized on shift operations
an d differentials,
hours of work,
and supplementary benefits such
as vacation allowances,
paid holidays,
and insurance and pension
plans*

Relatively few office workers were
covered by unionagreement provisions. In manufacturing and wholesale trade, only a
fourth of the office employees were working under collective-bargaining provisions while
in the services group and finance, insur­
ance, and real estate, union contracts were practically nonexistent*
In the transportation,
communication,
and other public-utilities
group,
on the other hand,
3 out of every 4
office workers were
covered by labor-management agreements*

The Boston Metropolitan Area
The Boston Metropolitan area, consisting of Suffolk County
a n d parts of Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk,
and Plymouth Counties, has
a n estimated
total population of approximately 2,500,000* A b out
one-third of the residents of this area live within the city limits
of Boston.
Nonagricultural w age and salaried employment (including
government)
totaled approximately 970,000 in March 1953.
A b out
310,000 of these wer e
in manufacturing industries*
Establishments
engaged in the manufacture of machinery accounted for one-fourth of
the total factory employment.
Shipbuilding a n d repairing, the m a n ­
ufacture a nd assembling of m o tor vehicles, aircraft engines, and

Occupational Wage Structure
Gross hourly earnings
(including p ay for overtime and
night work) of Boston manufacturing plant workers averaged $1.67 in
March 1953, 7 cents higher than reported in April 1952, 2/ the date

1 / See a ppendix f o r discussion of scope and m e thod of survey*
Differences between the scope
of this survey and the last previous
survey (April 1952) are indicated in the appendix table*




2/ Estimates prepared b y the Massachusetts Department of
labor and Industries,
Division of Statistics,
in cooperation with
the U. S. Department of L a b o r 1s Bureau of Labor Statistics.

in

2

of the B u r e a u ’s last community-wage survey in the area. 2 /
Much of
the increase
can be attributed to "across-the-board" wage adjust­
ments made
during the period.
In addition,
m e rit and length—ofservice increases made
on a n individual basis added to the wagechange pattern.
Wages of approximately 70 percent of the plant
(nonof­
fice) workers within
the scope
of the
study were based on time
rates;
various
forms of incentive wage systems applied to the re­
mainder of the workers*
Formalized rate structures applied to 90
percent of the
time-rated workers*
Plans providing a
range of
rates for individual plant occupations were somewhat more prevalent
than single-rate plans*
Virtually all formal wage plans for office
workers were
of the rate-range type*
About a fifth of the office
workers were employed in establishments that determined salaries on
a n individual employee basis*
Salaries of office workers
in the manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing*
In 22
out of 25
office
classifications permitting comparison,
average
weekly salaries
in manufacturing establishments exceeded those in
nonmanufacturing. A similar pattern w as in evidence among the plant
jobs studied.
Averages
for selected maintenance and power plant
jobs were higher in manufacturing for 7 of 10 comparable
occu­
pations*
In custodial, warehousing,
and shipping categories m a n u ­
facturing rates exceeded those in noniaanufacturing in 13 of 17 com­
parable occupations and equalled them in 2 others*
Almost three-fourths
of the manufacturing plant workers
were employed in establishments with
shift-differential policies*
Nearly all
of these provided premium pay above day-shift rates.

2 /
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Bulletin No. 1106,
tional Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952.




Occupa­

Shift p ay was generally expressed as a u n i form percentage addition
to d a y rates, 10 percent being the m o s t common for second and third
shifts.
About 15 percent of the manufacturing plant workers were
actually employed on late shifts in March 1953*
Scheduled workweeks of 4 0 hours applied to two-thirds of
the plant workers;
longer schedules were in effect f o r a fifth of
the workers*
Most office workers were scheduled to w o r k less than
40 hours a week*
Paid-holiday provisions were a n established part of the
wage policy of firms employing v i r t ually a ll office workers and
nearly 95 percent of the plant workers.
On an all-industry basis,
more than half the office workers w e r e provided 11 days annually;
a majority of the plant workers,
on the other hand, were in estab­
lishments providing 6 to 9 days. Among the industry groups studied,
holiday provisions were most liberal in the finance, insurance, and
real estate group— more
than 85 percent of these workers were em­
ployed in firms granting 11 pai d holidays a year.

Virtually all office a n d plant workers in the area were
in establishments with formal provisions f o r paid vacations.
The
vast majority of the office workers
received a 2-week vacation
after a year of service while plant workers m o s t generally received
a w e e k ’s vacation after a similar period of service— 2 weeks were
commonly granted to plant workers a f t e r a service period
of two
years*
Vacation benefits of 3 weeks were prevalent for both office
and plant workers after 15 years of service.
Insurance or pension plans for which
at least a p art of
the cost is borne by the employer were a part of the wage policy of
m o s t of the establishments in the area. life insurance was the m o s t
common among this type of benefit applying to almost 90 percent of
the office workers and 80 percent of the plant workers.

3

A 5 Cross-Industry Occupations
OoCHp o / i Q H d .

Table A-Is

(Average straignt-time weekly hours and earnings \J for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, March 1953)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

N rn e’u b
of
w rk rs
o e

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

s
32.50 35.00 37.50

$
W
eekly Under 30.00
W
eekly
e rn g
a in s
hu
o rs
ta d rd
(S d ) (S n a ) *
tan ard
30.00 32.50

37.50 40.00

35.00

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
40.00 42.50 $45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00
42.50

45.00

47.50 50.00

52.50

55.00 57.50

60.00

62.50

65.00 67.50

70.00

75.00 80.00

72.50

85.00

i

s
85.00
90.00

90.00
and
over

Men
Clerks, order .................................................. ................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
Wholesale tr a d e ............................. ....................

346
148
198
177

3 9.0.
39.0
39.5
39.5

*
63.50
61.00
65.00
66.00

-

_
“

_
“

_
-

-

4
4
-

4
3
1
1

23
3
15
15

34
12
22
13

16
4
12
10

Clerks, navroll .................................................. *..........
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................

111
56
55

39.0
39.0
38.5

64.00
67.00
61.50

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2

_
-

_
“

-

1
1

15
2
13

6
1

-

Duplicating-machine operators ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................

66
65

38.0
38.0

41.00
41.00

_

6
6

14
14

9
9

7
7

10
10

-

O ffice boys .......................................................................
Manufacturing ............................... ..
Nonmanufacturing..................... .................................

39.0
39.5
38.5
38.5
39.5
37.0

38.50
41.00
37.00
37.00
45.50
3 6 .0 0

9
2
7

125
7
118
7

63
15
48
26
7
9 !

120
96
24
5
9
6

24
11
13

24

61
25
36
1
5
16

156

Wholesale tr a d e ..................................................
Finance ** ......................................................

650
225
425
/-a
80
172

Tabulating-raachine operators ....................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
Wholesale trade ..................................................
Finance ** .........................

281
65
216
95
72

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
3 8 .0

60.50
58.00
6 1 .5 0
6 9 .0 0
50.50

B ille r s , machine (b illin g machine) .......................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................... ...............................
Wholesale trade ..................... .................... ..
.............. ..

515
231
284
117
84

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
3 8 .0

45.00
47.50
43.00
47.00
37.00

B ille r s , machine (bookkeeping machine) ...............
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
R etail trade ........................................................

299
257
103

38.5
3 8 .0
38.0

45.00
44.50
39.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...............
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................

226
114
112

39.0
39.0
39.0

52.00
53.50
50.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...............
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
Wholesale trade ..................................................
R etail trade ........................................................
Finance ** .............................................................

1,532
1,163
248
264
603

38.5
3875“
38.5
39.5
38.0
38.0

45.50
5d.50
44.00
50.50
41.50
42.00

_
-

19
19
9
10

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) ...............................................................................
M anufacturing............. ..............................................
Nonmanufacturing........... ...........................................
Wholesale trade ..................................................
R etail trade ........................................................
Finance * * .................................................. ..

1,537
445
1,092
256
571
119

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.5
3 8 .0

47.50
50.50
46.50
53.00
43.50
43.50

4

26
26
26
-

34
34
32
2

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) ......................................................
M anufacturing................. ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................

193
70
123

37.5
3 8 .0
37.5

44.00
47.50
4 2 .0 0

_

2

1

-

-

-

2

1

-

_
7

ZT

135
3
23
94

_

_

!

-

-

-

:

„/

/»
-

22
22
22

13
13
1
2

-

12
12
11

;

-

9
9
9

_

_

-

-

_
-

1
|
j

_

3
----- 2

!

8
i
—
1 r~
i

7
6

44
25
19
1
9
5

5
5

!
-

7

20
19
12 — V
8
13
3
13

19
18
1
1

_

29
20
9
9

19
1
18
13

35
10
25
25

20
20
-

24
8
16
16

3
3
-

53
12
41
a

10
9
1

3
2
1

5
4
1

n
4
7

7
5
2

4

2
2

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
-

_
_

3
3
-

12

9
4
5
5

12
12

2
2
-

9
6
3

10
_
10

16
16
-

4

5

4

5
_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

10
10

_
-

_

10
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

16
16
14
-

16
16
7
-

4

5

4
4
-

5
5
-

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

_

_

-

"

4
4

2
2

1
1

7
3
4

10
10
-

1
1

5
5

_
_
-

10
5
5 !

_
4

_

_
1 i

5

_

-

-

5
-

13
1
12
5
5

29 1
n
18
10
5

7
5
2
1

36
1
35
15
2

26
7
19
16
3

20
n
9
5
-

12
9
3
3
-

17
17
11
6

-

j
1

_

_
j
I

4

_

2
2
2 i

8
6
2
2

8
1
7
7

3
3
3

19
1
18
18

15
| 3
| 12
12

23
7
16
6

27
11 !
16
16

53
*
48
7
22

143
70
73
a
11

42
15
27
13
2

88
51
37
21
9

33
13
20
14

9
8
1
-

9
9
-

15
15
-

21
10
n
5

-

4
4
-

-

35
20
15
15

1
1
_

21

19
19
17

101
90
17

20
11
5

27
19
16

17
14
-

2
6

27

4
4
2

3
3
-

2
2
-

-

18
18
“

12
2
-

-

-

-

-

5

7
7
-

..
-

1
1
-

10
3
7

38
n
27

49
13
36

44
28
16

H
7
7

32
24
8

14
14
-

7
4
3

9
6
3

3
3
“

5
5

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

30 ! 174
1
3
171
29
5
65
4
101
25

103
4
99
14
22
58

231
29
202
45
147

227
38
189
33
34
no

259
53
206
80
48
74

128
39
89
27
26
26

112
53
59
26
9
23

58
31
27
9
2
12

-79
58
21
H
9

57
45
12
7
4

27
15
12
8
4

_
-

1
1
1
-

_
“

12
12
12
-

6
6
6
-

7
7
7
-

2
2
2
-

_
-

-

51
16
35
24
9

81
6
75
5
38
21

298
47
251
39
128
25

169
39
130
43
65
19

212
65
147
34
92
15

126
28
98
15
62
13

178
80
98
10
74
6

66
16
50
17
12
9

131
104
27
11
7
-

34
18
16
12
1
-

24
1
23
14
2
“

25
3
22
2
4
-

40
10
30
30
“

8
3
5
3
-

12
2
10
10
-

6
6
-

6
1
5
5
-

4
4
4
-

2
2
2
-

-

34

24
5
19

29

16
2
14

50
41
9

n
8
3

8
6
2

9

-

1

—

—

2

—

-

—

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

4
4

29

;

!

W en
om

t-

1

-

4
_
4
-

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




W~
2i

_

34

-

!

-

1

2
1
1

:
,

_

-

2

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, M ass., March 1953
U.S. D P R M N Q LaB R
EAT ET F
G
Bureau of Labor S tatistics

4

Table A-lt

~

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings i/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, March 1953)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N m er
u b
of
wr es
ok r

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
W
eekly Under 30.00 *32.50 35.00
W
eekly
ea in s
rn g
hu
o rs
ta d rd
(S d
tan ard) (S n a )
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50

$

$
37.50

40.00

s
$
42.50 45.00

47.50

%
50.00

4 0 .0 0

42.50

45.00 47.50

50.00

52.50

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*52.50 55.00 57.50 6 0 .0 0 62.50 6 5 .0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50
55.00 57.50

60.00

62.50

6 5 .0 0 67.50

70.00

s
75.00

72.50 75.00

80.00

_
_
_
-

10
_
10
_
-

3
3

80.00 *85.00 90.00
and
8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 over

W en - Continued
om

Clerks, f i le , class A .................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
Finance ** .................
.........................
Services ................................................................

373
67
306
178
66

3 8 .0
'3975 "
37.5
37.5
37.5

*
47.50
46.50
4 6 .0 0
43.50

-

2
2
1
"

“

36
3
33
22
2

24
4
20
12
4

76
46
49
3 ------ 5” r - g —
38
38
73
27
31
31
6
39
3

...
3 8 .0
39.O
39.5
33.5
38.0
37.5

38.00
4375037.00
41.50
40.50
35.00
36.50
36.50

54
54

118
-----

_
2
52
“

10
17
89
1

46.50
48.50
44.50
50.00
37. 5O

7
7
7

7
7
7

30
30
22

60

U

235
130

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
38.0

48
7
41
24

1,585
1,005
580
130
118
153
90
89

39.0
39.5
38.5
3 8 .0
39.0
38.0
37.5
39.0

51.50
51.00
52.00
54.00
6 0 .5 0
4 6 .0 0
49.50
50.00

-

28
28
“

9
7
2
2
“

48
IS
32
7
25
-

zT

190
Duplicating-machine operators .................................
Manufacturing ................................... ........................ — 106
84
Nossnanufacturing ......................................................
52
Finance * * ...........................................................

39.0
” 59^5
38.0
3 8 .0

44.50
48.50
4 0 .0 0
38.50

-

_
“

10
10
6

30
31
13
— v - — i r ------- 8~
25
5
19
2
19
13

1,077
327
750
88
139
464

38.5
39.6
3 8 .0
39.0
39.5
37.5

45.50
” 47.50
45.00
46.50
51.50
43.00

_
-

7
6
1
-

24
24
17

70
— U“
57
52

38.0
39.0
38.0
37.5
•a O
a

37.50
~42T0036.50
37.00
32.50

17
17
1
16

3 8 .0
39.0
37.5
33.5
38.5
3 8 .0
38.0
36.5

5 8 .0 0
63.50
5 6 .00
6 8 .5 0
59.00
53.50
56 .0 0
51.00

Clerks, f i le , class B ................................................. 2 ,0 4 8
Manufacturing ............................................................ “ 1
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................... 1,653
PiiKHn u tilitie s # ...........................................
46
158
Wholesale trade ............................................. .
106
R etail trade ........................................................
Finance ** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,231
Services ................................................................
112
Clerks, order ..................................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturirg .....................................................
Wholesale tr a d e ................................................
(
- - - |T- 1- - - - T11..........
Clerks, payroll ..............................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................................
Public u tilitie s * ...........................................
Wholesale trade .................................................
R etail trade ........................................................
Finance ** ............................................................
S e rv ices...............................................................

W~

Kev-nunch operators .....................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................................
Public u tilitie s * ...........................................
Wholesale trade .................................................
Finance * * ............................. .............................

716
294

O ffice g irls ......................................................... ..
541
Manufacturing ............................................................ — 107”
Nonmanufacturing ................................................. ....
434
253
Finance ** ............................................................
Secretaries ......................................................................
Nonmanufacturing......................................... ............
Public u tilitie s * ...........................................
Wholesale trade ..................................................
R etail trade ...............*......................................
Finance ** ............................................... ............
Services ...............................................................

4,199
1,217
2,982
222
580
307
1,091
782

33.5

_
_

117

445
— 29“
416
2
1
45
355
13

538

—w

448
9
44
21
295
79

46
9
21

301
— 19"
282
13
17
7
234
11

_

16
16
2
14

193
10
40
n
130
2

11
2
9
7
2

22
17
5 -------5 "
12
16
6
9
4
-

5
2
3
1
1

6
1
5
_
-

3
2
1
_
1

9
2
7
7
-

14
13
1
1

3
3
_

1
_
1

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

„

_

-

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
_
-

_
_

-

7
4
3
1
2
_
-

56
47 !
9 j
9

22
22
- !
_

23
4
19
19

4
4
-

16
3
13
13

.

228 ! 125
90
102
55
179
35
49
23
8
15
15
2
7
9 i
2 i 12
1 !
9
4
12
7
4

97
57
40
16
17
1
6

27
8
19
11
5
1
2

28
11
17
9
5
3

-

_
-

_
-

7
7
-

15

61

2

26

2

-

8
16
2

73
61
12
2
7
3
21
21
-

_
_

_
_
_
-

_
_

-

_
_
_
-

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

“

_
.
-

-

-

-

8
8
8

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

27
20
7
6
•
1
-

9
8
1
_
•
_
_
1

14
3
11
5
6
_

14
5
9
1
6
_
2

7
1
6
_
6
_

5
1
4
_
4
_
_

10
_
10
_

-

-

1
1
“

1
1
-

_
-

_

_

_

-

-

_
-

_
_

-

-

-

_

_
_
_
_
_

-

j

61
21
40
40

94
35
59
59

126

198
95
102
11
24
28
28
11

122
78
44
6
13
17
4
4

197
152
45
8
1 2
i 13
1 19
| 3

8
7

18
10
8
4

12
10
2
-

25
21
4
-

148
186
123
8 — 451
50
136
115
103
11
27
1
16
29
78
81
96

145
55
89
7
21
57

87
32
55
3
16
32

102
36
66
27
7
21

95
52
43
5
5
29

34
20
14
1
5
-

8
8
3
4
1

18
4
14
2
12
-

16
4
12
1
11
-

_
-

5
5
5
-

1
1
-

2
2
2
-

6
6
.
6
-

_

47

19
4
8
2
5

33
6
27
4
6
17

83
25
58
21
25
129
----- & ~
43
1
14
6
22

~~W
62
14
17
15
9
7
20

1

20
17
3 !
i
1

2
2

-




-

_
-

-

10

-

_

_

-

-

-

55
7
48
29
2

30
7
23
22

7
3
4
3

1
1
-

8
8
-

24
23
1
-

1
1
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

267
9
258
19
17
a
181

126
8
118
9
18
19
54
18

293
40
253
10
24
49
92
78

361
38
323
8
32
25
142
116

474
82
392
151
48
74
119

273
n
202
6
29
14
96
57

367
134
233
10
56
30
109
28

287
83
204
12
51
6
73
62

381
120
261
18
39
24
168
12

264
143
121
21
19
28
35
18

316
153
163
18
40
12
67
26

131
76
55
10
11
5
26

158
68
90
8
14
10
50
8

94
38
56
34
1
2
12
7

129
35
94
27
17
4
24
22

103
5&
47
3
29
4
7
4

29
34
15
5
9
1

96
43
53
23
21
3
6

3
_______ l

See footnote at and of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_

67
17
50
31
15

*¥

-

~ ^rr

50
104
58“ ” 28—
76
22
7
27
3
40
17 i
2
2

15
— 5”
10
1
2

109
74
35
26
9

171
111
42
74
------9” ------ r - — 19~ ----- 23T
152
86
65
37
116
19
19
44
/
2
13
13
1
1
1
-

264

39
10
29
23
2

5

Table JU1*

Q ty iC *

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, March 1953)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Unmnfl _

N m er
u b
of
w rk rs
o e

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

W
eekly Under *30.00 32.50
W
eekly
e rn g
a in s
hu
o rs
(S d
tan ard) (S n a ) t 0 .0 0
ta d rd 3
32.50 35.00

Continued
38.5
39.0
3 8 .0
38.0
39.0
38.0
37.5
33.5

$
49.50
51.50
4 8 .0 0
52.00
54.50
43.50
44.50
44.50

-

349
105
244
172

38.0
3 9 .0 "
37.5
37.5

50.00
53.56
4 8 .0 0
46.50

_
“

Switchboard operators ..................................................
M anufacturing............. .......................... ....................
Nonmanufacturing......................................................
Public u t ilit ie s * ............................................
Wholesale tr a d e ..................................................
R etail trade ................... ........................ ............
Finance ** .......................................................... ..
Services ..................... ...........................................

774
177
597
62
59
105
188
183

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
38.5
38.0
41.0

48.50
5 6 .06
46.50
50.00
1 53.00
47.00
47.50
4 2 .0 0

_
-

Switchboard operator-receptionists .......................
M anufacturing............................................................
Nonmanufacturing.................................................. ..
Wholesale trade ..................................................
D
41 A m<a
m 9
Finance * * ................................................ ............
Services .................................................................

815
373
442
175
1
50
73

39.0
39.5
38.5
39.0
38.0
37.5
37.5

4 6 .0 0
; 4 * .#
45.00
48.50
42.00
1 42.00
j 44.00

_
“

_

_

-

-

“

Tabulating-machine op erators...................................
M anufacturing.............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
Public u tilitie s * ....................... ....................
Finance ** ............................................................

401

38.5
39.5
38.0
38.5
37.5

1 52.50
| 56.06
; 51.00
! 54.00
49.50

_
-

_
-

1
1
-

Transcribing-machine operators, general .............
M anufacturing..............................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................................
Wholesale trade ..................................................
Finance ** ............................................................

1,015
239
776
113
551

9

Stenographers. general ................................................
M anufacturing............................. ..............................
Nonmanufacturing......................................................
Public u tilitie s * ............................................
Wholesale trade ................................................ ..
R etail trade ........................................................
Finance »* .............................................................
Services ................................................................

3,599
1,5*4
2,035
199
569
212
825
230

Stenographers, technical ............................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nonmanufacturing................. .......................... ..
Finance ** .............................................................

pci
W

304
34
211

1,279
Typists, class A ................... .........................................
Manufacturing ............................................................ — 401“
878
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
57
Wholesale trade ..................................................
547
Finance ** ............................................................
151
Services ..................... .....................................
Typists, class B ............................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing............. .........................................
Wholesale tr a d e .................................... ..
R etail trade ........................................................
Finance ** ......................... ...................................

3,766
1 ,0X2
2,754
384
213
1,412
477

.
_
“

i
!

_
-

38.5
3 9 .5 ....
3 8 .0
38.5
3 8 .0

46.00
4 7 3 0 ..
46.00
51.00
44.00

_
-

_
-

38.5

3 8 .0
39.0
38.0
38.0

47.00
50.50'
45.00
6 2 .0 0
42.50
49.00

..
-

_
-

3 8 .0
39.0
3 8 .0
39.0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
36.5

41.50
45.50
40.00
44.00
38.00
39.00
37.00

6
6
2
4

72
1
71
31
32
8

- 79:5
—

45.00

37.50

40.00

47.50

50 .0 0

52.50 55.00

151
11
140
6
11
32
89
2

185
8
177
10
3
14
122
28

418
97
321
22
a
24
149
85

406
161
245
10
61
40
123
11

569
230
339
16
107
57
106
53

364
190
174
22
58
10
75
9

353
182
171
36
35
26
53
21

23
23
19

37

-

5
5
3

30
16

108
14
94
92

24
H
12
8

39
39 |
1 !
9
10 !
17
2

31
1
30
4
_

101
3
93
8
1
12
9
63

105
lo
95
17
1
3
30
44

63
5
60
14
9
16
21

102
19
83
5
25
42
11

89
28
61
5
3
23
26
4

71
7
64
18
0/
17

30
30
10
20

183
75
108
33
20
20
25

87
29
58
24
2
3
29

170
57
71
5
46
2
13

71
47
24
24

19
-

16

35
35
10
22

26
2
24
16

112
44
1
2
42 j 111
8
95
29

171
76
95
9
82

155
12
143
5
128

237

146

192
3
154
26

98
2
55
29

677
185
492
132
29
255
54

375
163
212
83
30
78
4

10
4
12
_
-

1
1
1
-

37.50 *40.00 42.50

26
26

-

21
; 21
1
3
| 18
-

!

i

;
i

$
$
$
$
$
5
$
47.50 50.00 *52.50 55.00 *57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 *67.50 *70.00 72.50

35.00

1
!

1
!
!

9
9
6
6
6
-

4
7
15

j
7
7
7

'

25

6

65 j 163
------ 5“ ------ 15“
57 ! 148
1
1
56
86
|
1
782 i 681
| 259
47
94
1 24
735 | 587
■ 235
! 11
47 i
7
22
29
44 !
: 146
393 i 401
93
49 | 250 i

42.50 45.00

— z r ~~W ~

67.50

70.00

79
24
55
16
30
_
6
3

28
5
22
3
18
_
1

38
8
30
10
20

72
27
45
5
40

_
-

20
16
4
3

6
6
-

9
3
-

_
“

44
24
20
2
5
9
4
-

33
n
22
10
7
3
2
-

7
4
3
—
2
1
-

7
1
6
1
5
•
-

7
3
4
2
2
-

26
26
-

_
_
-

30
23
7
7

25
7
18
16

23
15
8
5

2
2
“

11
4
7
7

5

5
5

_
-

_
2

_

“

1
-

_

-

-

-

-

20
3
17
3
9

37
25
12
5
5

39
27
12
1
4

26
11
15
2
11

8
8
-

8
2
6
4
2

17
17
4
13

85
22
63
3
50

45
7
38
10
18

36
10
26
4
7

25
14
11
3
-

4

25
16
9
5
-

5

4
4
“

15
15
5
10

81

39
2
12
24

109
53
56
27
16

29
1
12
14

&

142
120
22
2
10
6

25
4
21
11
2
4

26
6
20
7
9

25
3
22
5
1
11

6
3
3
3
-

109
74
35
9
1
15
3

131
55
76
7
1
26
9

89
55
34
12

132
104
28
4

21
5
16
6
1

40
40
7
6

19
19
10
-

12
12
11
1

57.50

60.00

251
154
- ^ S r 1 183
68
58
8
9
n
17
1
28
38
2
9

331
279
52
8
30
.
9
5

112
54
58
18
23
1
15
1

6
2
4
1

28
11
17
6

64
27
37
4
1
2
25
5

30
12
18
8
•
10
-

28
20
8
8

-

74
47
27
8
8
7
4

46
1
45
44

40
1
39
3
33

45
10
35
2
22

173
48
125
38
78

107
31
76
10
45
53

178
"3 0 “ “
148
2
126
11
347
199
148
46
24
38
7

_

40
1 11"
29
18

y

43
26“ "
17
6

-

!
|

1

1/
*
**

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

2 6 0 6 5 0 0 - 53 - 2




62.50 65.00

72.50 75.00

$
$
80.00 85.0 0 90.00
and
80.00 8 5 .0 0 90.0 0 over

75.00

_
_

10
_
10
10
_
_

-

_
_
_
-

-

-

_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_

-

-

-

1
_
1
1
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

5
5

_
-

_
“

_
-

-

-

-

_

1

-

-

-

!

10
1
9
7

_
-

9
9
-

5
5
-

2
2
2
-

_
-

_
-

6
6
6
-

J L .
0
7
7
-

1
1
1
-

i

5

_

25
5
20
_
20
_

-

-

_
_
“

!

23
3
20
_
20
_
_
_
_
_
-

3
3
_
3
_

4
4
4
_

_
-

“

_
_
-

2
_
2
-

_
_
-

2
2
2
-

_
-

-

_
-

3
3
3
-

........4

-

2
2
2
-

2
2
2
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

4
4
-

6

P to fed d d O H cU C U td, ^ e c /u U C tU O c d ifia iiO H d

Table A-2:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings j / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, March 1953)

Average
Number
o
f
wr
o kers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

1
Weekly
Weekly 35.00
h
ours
erig
a n n s and
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
40.00

$
10.00 $
45.0O *50.00 15.00 10.00 $
65.00 ■?o.oo 75.00
45.00

50.00

55.00 60.00

65.00

70.00 75.00

80.00

$
$
$
i
$
s
s
s
t
s
80.00 *85.00 90.00 * 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.0c125.00 130.00 135.00 140.0C 145.00
and
85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.0c 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.0C over

Men

Tracers..... ............................
Manufacturing ..........................

$
114.50
113.56

~

-

-

~

“

-

40.0
1,903
l ^ r T 1 40.6
40.0
586

Draftsmen ................................
Manufacturing ......................... .
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Draftsmen, junior..... ...................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

40.0
40.0

83.00
85.66
79.00

“

-

_

5
4
1

23
18
5

83
44
39

202
133“
69

61.50
62.56]
56.00

-

5
3

69
145
125
53 . 93 1 91
16
32
54

182
169
13

79
75

Draftsmen, chief ..........................
Manufacturing...... ...................

40.0

83
66

—

804
S7T
129

40.0
46:6

40 io
39.5

2

47.50
"TT.WT

4

62.00
62.50
61.50

_
-

-

“

~

2
2

6
6

-

2
2

16
15

8
7

17
17

9
8

-

-

3
3

215
159"
106

277
199
78

413
312
101

226
87
139

167
130
37

54
52
2

19
15
4

66
65
1

3?
30
3

72
72
"

29
28
1

19
19
-

-

28
21
7

206
20T
-

26
23
3

12
10
2

6
6
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

21
18

ib

14
14

4
3

1
”

3
3

2
2

1
~

_

_

_

_

-

"

-

_

12
3
9

33

39
18
21

41
27
14

74
65
9

59
43
16

23
14
9

15
3
12

2
2

6
6

-

„
_

3
3

2
1

11
11

_
_

_

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

~

~

-

Women

Nurses, industrial (registered) ............
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

1/

278
185
93

39.0
3970' "
39.0

7
6
1

_

_

_

”

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

Table A-3 s M G A tU e H G H C e G 4 id P < U U & 1 P l a n t C h c M fU iiiO H ^
(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, March 1953)

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hul
o r y under
erig $
anns
1.15

$
$
1.15 1.20
and
under
1.20 1.25

$

$

$

1.30

1.35 1.40 1.45

1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55

Caroenters. maintenance ...................
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Retai 1 trade T___....._ ..............
_

726
484
242

$
1.90
i.85
1.98

150

2.11

I
_

_

3
2

Electricians, maintenance ........... ......
Manufactirring T............................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Retail trade ...........................

1,070
824.

2.01

_

_

10

1

_

1

_

«
_

10

50

2.62
1.96
1.77

_

1
1

_
_

Engineers, stationary ......................
Manufacturing ......... ................
Nonrranufacturi ng ....................... .
Retsi1 trade .tTTTT.....................
Servir».es
_____ ....
_

474
260
214
72
61

1.92
2.00
1.83
1.81
1.63

10

_

_

3

_

246

_______ __________ |
See footnote at end of table.




-

I
_

7
3
3

3

_

10

3

:
_

10

”
_
_
1
______ l

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40
and
1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 f.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 over
$

$

$
1.25

7
3
4
2

21
8
13

_

15

1
1

_
_

12
8

20
10
10
10

9

4

4

9

4

4

6
6

3

3

3
|

_
_

12

8
4

13
5
9
7

9

4

4

56
48

8

8

52
69

27

3

19

9
8

10

7
57
42
15

8

4

22
11
11
1

20
6
14
13

42
3
39
25

44
28

14

6

16

14

_

59

40
33
7
3

6
_
_

51

7

1
1

_

88
7l
17

12
10
2

2

-

~

3

_
_

8

31

18

6
16

8

8
8

43
29
14

9

72
61 —

11
2
39
31

8
7

40
17
23
6

59
42
17

9

121
ll9

5
3

90
8l

121
103
18

1

9
2

60
46
14

14
2

27
16

12
9

11
1

2

21

20
1

298

83

6T
22
2

3

11
6

2
2

32
275 --- 8"
23
24

6
4

4

6

44

2

4
j
4

O
£
O

UA
A3

18
4.
14

21
21

64
O
R
36

5
3
2
2

30
3
27

41
37
4
2

39
- --- T
33
OO
/O
C

12
f.
0
6

42
34
a
0

4
20
14
6

4,

30
25

5

2

6
5
1

3

14
14
”
~

10
9

1
~

1 _____
:
_
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

7

Table A-3:

McUttteHGHCe C A P U & Plant OcCM
m
<U1
fIcUfanI- Continued
(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied o , an area
;
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, March 1953)

Number
o
f
Workers

Occupation and industry division

$
$
$
s
Average
hul
o r y Under 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30
and
erig %
anns
1.15 under
1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35

83

$
1.66
1.70
1.62
1.87
1.31

1,494
1,099
395
199
59
91

1.56
1757
1.53
1, 5
*7
1.60
1,46

Machinists, maintenance ....................
Manufacturing........ ............ .....
Nonmanufacturing ........................
P
, •A * ^ 144jAM $
$ 44 >
»
■

867
803
64

1.95
1.95
1.93
1.97

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ........
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufecturing .......................
Public utilities * ...................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade ........................

785
642
329
110
191

1.82
1.89
1.80
1.77
2.07
1.71

Mechanics, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
P i i 4 n+111 +l
iVl
ocs ^
Retail trade ........................

1,437
1,145
292
125
62
82

1.86
1.84
1.93
1.98
2.22
l!78

Millwrights ...............................
Manufacturing ..........................

421
416

Firemen, stationary boiler ............... .
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .................. .....

705
377
328

Helpers, trades, maintenance ...............
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ...................... .
Wholesale trade ......................

Oilers ....................................
Manufacturing ..........................
Painters. maintenance ......................
.Manufacturing ........... ...............
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ...................
Retail trade ........................
Finance * * ..........................
Services ............................

jo

292

1.88
— 0 7 “

w r~

1.53
1.50

480

—

1.66

1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

1.40

1.45

1.50

48
17
r~ —
42
10

24

58

48
TT~ “ 47"
1

8

10
62
41
21

-

-

10

-

1

36
22
14
1
6
5

-

-

-

-

“ W~
18

12

1
10

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
- — r~
13

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

12
12

12
1

_

_

-

-

14

10

25

~ n r

_

_

6

25
-

20
20
_
8
12

_

25
25
20
1

12
11
1

6
6
2
-

1
l

30
6
- --- F ~
30
4
26
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Plumbers, maintenance ......................

65

1.79

_

_

6

1

_

1

_

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ...........
Manufacturing ..........................

137
125

1.93
1.95

26
22
4

4

20
20
5
1
14

24
23
1

14
2
12
5
7
-

130
75“
34

2.12
2712

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

20
8
12

_
_

1

1

5

1

1

-

-

-

_

5

1

1

_

89
83
6
6

63
59
4

112
102
10

87
74
13
Q
7

59
54
5
C
7

26
13“
13
10

97
96
1
1

43
41“
2
2

4
4

26

5

24 —
2

1

2

3

-

69
32“
57
46
9
2

5
5
-

_
_.

_
.

_

_
_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_

6
r
-

56
_ --- 5T
-

7
4
3

11
36
11 “ 35- —
-

_
_

17
2
15

—r

2

5

29

•

2

_

15

5

29

_

18
-

20
20
2

43
15
28
n1
XX

14
12
2

21
17
4
A

8
8

6

15
2

-

-

-

37
32
5
c
0

r

3

11

29

_

18
_
18

267
258
9
Q
7

33

_

26

19
14
10

-

22

4

-

-

-

155
155

13
13

4
4

5
5

8

_

_

_

-

18
18

_

3

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

1
_
1
_
1
-

_
_
_
_
_

1

-

-

-

-

5
5
-

14

_

14

-

_
_
-

14
14
-

_

2

12
54
54 “ I

9
9

5
5

20
20

16
16

24
6

17
17

3
3

16
1
15
6
5

56
45
11
7
1
2

25
14
11
5
3
2

4

_
_

114
81
33
OQ

34

30
53
7 “ 13“
46
12
3
1
6
45
2
“

34
34
_

110
121
77
69
55“ “ 75“ “ 55“
96
17
34
3
25
0/
2
21
4
f
2
11
1
1
4

7

25
25

57
11
46
44

5

61
34"
27
15
12

126
— r
122
120
60
90
4
60
28

11

-

44
33
11
/

45
7
38
38

132

35
35
-

52
52 —

8
r

43
18

_
-

70
12
44 --- 5“
6
26
4
6
17
5

48
48

u

19

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

26
7
19
6
11
2

42
39
3
3
_
-

9
3
6
1
3
_

4
4
_
_

2
2

7
5
2

-

_
_

_

2

4

7

26

- —

18
38
9
2T --- T~ — i x r ---g- — irl “ 34“
6
2
4
-

1

1

4

7

-

1

4

3

3

3

1

6
2

*-

97
54
43
41

90
252
156
37“ “ W ~ 545“ “
6
71
3
4
33
2
2
2
1
36

100
47
39
34
- ---7“ ~ T T h T
~
40
20
96
39
8
26
59
6
1
5
'
37
39
3
3

2
7
2 --- 7 -

16
5
--- r
2
2
14
5
1
8
2

43
21
22
16

66
56
10

18
56
4
35
3 ~ W “ T8“ ~ ~W ~

-

4

6

29
19
10

29
25
4

2
2

1.95
1795
1.97

25
8
17

38
23
15

41
40
1

-

567
497
70




-

-

Pipefitters, maintenance ...................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

1/
*
**

4

1

“

48
45
3

2
42
42
7
132
78
4
65
- ---T ~ ---T “ 42- “ ZI“ “ 53“ T 2 T ““ 53“
2
1
11
13
6

1.55
1.71
1.71
1.56
1.29

1,112
17112“

53
49
4

117
197
89
43
123
143
~ ^ 2 T “ I5T1 “ 35“ ~ W
44 “
42
50
37
9
45
44
4
26
32
21
32
25
8
2
10
7
9
5
1
1
12

268
45
57
88
73

Tool-and-<3ie makers ........................
Manufacturing ...........................

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40
and
1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2,35 2.40 over

21
16
22
15
24
3
- ---5“ ---5” - 2" ~“ E “ — T 1
10
1
24
9
9
15

13

—

1.80

—

%

45
45“
-

56
65
55“ “ 5 T
20
-

5

22

6
5

15
15

9
4

17
17

13
15
IT-~ W

33
—i r

39

102
102

“ 19“

90
36
74 ~ ~ w \
16
2

117
115 —
4

18
r “ 13“
2
-

5

_
-

_
_

1

1

2

4

_

_

39
39

14
14

21
21

-

-

4
4

-

53
53

139
139

73
73

199
199

28
28

343
343

26

_

-

47
47

3

26

4
4

-

1

“

_
_
_

2
2

8

Table

G u d i o d U U , ' k J o / i e J t OU d iH

t f, 0 * u t S U

ift p U

\J

t t f 0 c C 4 4 fU u tiO H d

2J

(Average hourly earnings
for selected occupations
studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., hy industry division, March 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Workers

Crane operators, electric bridge
(under 20 tons) ..........................
Manufacturing...........................

206
206

Guards ....................................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing..................... .
Finance ** ...........................

960
633
327
244

%

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) .......
A,529
Manufacturing.............. ............
2,161
Nonmanufacturing........ ...............
2,368
373
Public utilities * .-T*-T___ TT-..... .. T
Wholesale trade ......................
165
Retail trade .........................
616
Finance ** ...........................
919
Services ................ .......... .
295
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners (women) ......... ...............
Manufacturing................... .......
Nonmanufacturing ........................

Average Under &.80
hul
ory
erig *
anns
0.80
.85

1,747
327

1,420
158

_

1.48
1.35
1.34

&.90

.90

.95

"

_

1.42

32
3
29
5

457
297

1.52
1.56
1.46
1.51
1.37

_
-

Packers, class B (men) .....................
Manufacturing...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade .......... ............
Retail trade .........................

1,864
1,169
695
425
270

1.26

9
9

9
9

109
35
74

9

9

Packers, class B (women) ...................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .........................
Retail t r ade................ T_ TT___
_

1.311
1,142
169
124

1.06
1.06

1?
13
-

1.08

Receiving clerks ......................... .
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade .........................

843
357
486
193
202

1.42
1.55
1.33
1.41
1.27

160
101
59

1.35
1.13
1.18
1.04

1.06

-

-

-

-

-




_
_
-

-

-

208
158
50

24
182
340

21

64

6
1
X

497

22

6

2
394
83
311

45

101
7
8
11

67

2

24
16

21

50
46
4
/
4

18
3

1

474

308

120

1*
106

2?6

30
19

86

51
5
46
35

59
9
50

26

20

10

30

13
13
13
-

14
9
5

61

15

49

11

12
12

4
4

166
22

53
3
50
43
7

148
14
134
134

_
-

_
-

1

6

-

-

10
1

8
1

15

1
1

6
1
5

5
$
-

9
_

7
-

1
1

5

9

7

143
109
34
g

212

3

4?

305

a

287
18

87
70
17

7

20
20

36
_
36
_
28

7

24
7

7

17
_
14

6

12?
103

26

14?
118
27
23

252
218
34
15

74
56
18
18

6

10

_

6
4
4

74
32

-

313
231
32
42
40

29

205
57
148
114
34

a

20
8
12

308

25
25
25
-

74

71
56
15

140

42
42
24
18

64
148
131
17

5

1
4

168

42
42
15
27

195
&

2

67
49
17

8

8

U

166

6

8

18
13
4

2?3

21

46
40

6

12
17
17
-

16

1
4

72
158
141
57 “T25“ " E T
“
146
15
13

2

10

13

3

7
_
7

46

5

50
33
13 — r —
20
46
10
40
6
9

42
4

2
44
IT

31

138
8
21
20
1
1
54
9
45

2

20

29

23

226
36
14
5
_
17
-

6

237
91
146
31
115

1

170

48

26

219
158
61
37
24

21

144
136

22

6

8

210

14

69

_

1

126
21

20
2

107
13
7

See footnotes a t end of tab le .
* Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, insurance, and re a l estate.

5
_
-

262

204
163
a
15

6

_
_
_
"

275
193
82
41

106

11

_
-

258

-

11
_

5

_
-

261
135

8
5

-

_
-

292
191

12

12

64
4

_
_
_

228
103
125
37

55
14

12

2

87
24
19
5
-

10
10

732
178
554

41

2

68

40
19
21
21

_

Packers.class A (men) ......................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing .................. .....
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade....... .......... .......

_
-

111

55
10
45
17

27
27
27

1.41
1.54
1.33
1.30
1.41

54
46

143
106
37
7

39
23
15

2,441
913
1,528
1,125
401

20

-

84

2?
8
15
10

]
_

5d
42
-

-

291
209
82
58
14
_

17
5
12
12

47
46

Irder fillers ..............................
Manufacturing ................ ...........
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade ....... ..............
Retail trade.........................

1.42

-

_
_
-

61
4
57
54

41

1.47
1.35

1.42

_
_
-

-

_
_
-

28
12
16
16

100

62

20
20
-

35
15
20
12

89
18
71
9
50

£

15
15
-

3
13
12

475

1,004

36
36
-

16

323
31
292
/
175

4,838
37lS
1,689
573
774

175
150
25
21

15
15

19

FInence ** tIT-ril,....t.r..TI...IT.T.I
T

113
102
11
11

-

25

Laborers, material handling 3 / ....... ......
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade .......................
Retail trade .........................

95
73
22
22

6
6

106
0*2

60
44
16
13

-

115
9

1

1
1

6
6

_

-

71
25
46
/O

37

_
-

-

_

-

320
22

36
36

66
66

_

-

47

89
89

3
3

_

49
33
17

1.06
1.17
1.03
.85
1.07

_

-

10

2

2
2

1.60

21

25

43
43

1.55

16
66
1

1.14
.91

4
4

1.50

120

34
32

40
40

1.45

562
107
455

34

4
4

1.40

267
147

52

16
16

1.35

174
17
157

2

over

1.30

17
5
12
12

1.10

2.20

1.25

11
6
5
4

88
2?

2.10

1.20

_
_
-

_

2.00

1.15

_
-

61

1.90

1.10

_
-

_
39
63

1.85

1.05

_
_
-

_

1.80

1.00

_

54

1.75

1.60
1.40 *1.45 1.50 *1.55 $

-

102

1.70

1.35

-

148
20 ~ S 6“

1.65

1.30

_

81

$
$
$ _
2.00 2.10 2.20
1.85 *1.90 $
and

1.25

-

102
-

1.80

1.20

-

54

$
1.70 i .75

i .05 i .10 1.15

-

1.22
1.31
1.14
1.32
1.25

1.65

?>.95 i.oo

-

1.79
1.79

1 *5 5

$.85

88
52

22
12

84

26

79
59

_
_

_
_

_
.

_
_

_
_

68

240
191
49
15
-

30
5
25
25
-

43
43
39
-

28
28
28
-

_
_

47

10
10

3
3
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_

_
_
_

3
3

_

_
_

_

2
2

_
_

_
_

270

577
263
314

319
167
152
_
149

94
32
62
_
61

675

52
35
17

84

48

12

2
2

20
20

-

-

-

120

59
45“
13
13
-

370
235
135
35

11

31
25

124

30
17
13

16
73

142
95
47
40

273
1^9
104

88

-

6

16

14

15
15
-

47
40
7
7

80
34
46
44

7
4
3
3

-

4

26
2

21

_
_

36
36

40
40

51
40

8

105
47
58
44
14

_

_
~

-

341
43
298
298
-

175
147
28

-

_
_
-

6

114
90
24
15
9

20
16

2

-

58
43
15

106
14

135

86

21

100

103

-

39
3
36
9
27

25
18
7
7

8
_

51
50

8
8

1
1

14
14
-

17
3
14

155
155
_

14

-

6

-

56

16

56

16

_

64
43

37
27

35
24

21
10
11

10

11

5

7

1

4

6

87
25
46

6
6

102
96

588

.
.
_

5

2

10

212

-

_
_
~

2
2

2

52

_
_
-

_

_
-

7
7

2
42
42
-

8
g

_

-

2
6
2 --- 5“
_

_

11

7
7
_

-

36
36

_
_
-

_
_

31
29

15
15

2
2

_

18
18
-

9
9
_

3
3
-

_
_

_
_

17
17
_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

12
1

-

-

-

-

13
13

3
3

_

-

13
13

-

21
21
70

21
49
14
30

11
9

1

5
3

1
1

27
25
59
19
18 — r --- 5“ — r
22
21
1
35
_
_
20
5

2

16

4
3

30
3o

1
_

1

_

4

2

16

«

14

4

2
2

2
2

2
2

9

Table A-4*

-

6uUodialM&iaJum&44iar€m& SUfafUna 0ccafi€
i/4O*U Go+tfto
uted
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, March 1953)

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns

%

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
%
s
$
$
$
$
$
0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00

0.85

0.90

0.95

1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

18
18
18

12
12
-

44

1
1
-

14
14
8

7
7
-

8
8
2
2

23
13
10
6
4

74
43
31
14
12

88
49
39
18
16

54
38
16
13
3

68
31
37
15
18

56
34
22
22

68
4
64
51
4

60
30
30
23
7

87
30
57
35
22

55
30
25
14
11

68
38
30
30

168
23
145
145
-

17
10
7
2
5

1
14
14
-

-

_
-

3
_
3
-

40
40
13

28
6
22
“

15
15
9

26
13
13
9

77
28
49
9

23
23
12

26
4
22
9

33
5
28
“

21
16
5
“

45
20
25
23

62
21
41
27

32
32
28

62
20
42
39

141
123
18
16

_
-

21
20
1
-

12
12
-

-

-

1
_
1
-

14
14
9

-

28
28
18

17
6
11
-

26
3
23
“

34
14
20
11

4
4
“

81
28
53
39

51
15
36
”

42
14
28
28

10
1
9
9

25
14
11
2

25
6
~

14
7
7
2

5

-

5
2

8
7
1
“

2
2
-

12
12
12

_
-

9

9

9

4

25
7
18
4

39
16
23
23

68
38
30
30

54
10
44
44

171
9
162
65
97

39
10
29
25

151
108
43
30
12

198
119
79
60
12

53
36
17
2
11

14
2
12
2
-

8
_
8
8

5
5
-

2

1
2
1

70
66
4

167
24
143
16
67

20
18
2

78
20
58

2

58

Under 0.80
%

0.80

1.90

2.00

?4
47
7
7

15
15
_

2.10

$
2.20
and
2.20 over

2.10

%

Shipping clerks ...........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.... ...................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade ........................

1.1U
U 5
669
377
240

1.47
1.50
1.45
1.60
1.27

18
18
18

Shipping-and-receiving clerks ..............
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Retail trade ........................

687
291
396
198

1.45
1.55
1.37
1.45

_
-

Truck drivers, light (under l£- tons) ........
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.................... .
Services ............................

398
139
259
120

1.40
1.48
1.35
1.35

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including
4 tons) .................................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade ........................

1.089
540
549
216
293

1.62
1.74
1.49
1.57
1.43

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer type) ...........................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Whnl h s r Ie trade .T__ __ __ T.... ....
_ _
1 t r f f --it___1I1.TTTTII1IIITTITI
.Blt

759
186
573
379
134

1.92
1.75
1.97
2.11
1.70

Truck drivers, heavv (over A tons, other
than trailer type) .......................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonaanufacturing .......................
Whnleaale trade rtTr-.T.Tt__TrtrrT-lt-T

809
163
646
284

1.72
1.78
1.71
1.84

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ................
Manufacturing....... ......... .........
Nonmanufacturing .......................

615
364
251

1.61
1.59
1.64

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ......
Manufacturing ..........................

226
226

1.73
1.73

Watchmen ............ ......................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade .........................
Finance ** .......................
Servigas t - - - t ........ T - t T - T T . . . . . . . r . . . T

1,145
725
420
69
144
105
63

1.27
1.29
1.22
1.53
1.15
1.16
1.02

1/
7j

2/
**

-

_
-

_
-

~

-

_
-

44
'38

9
9
9
-

9
9
-

9
9

9
9
~

4
4

2
2

-

_

-

-

-

25
25
6
1

43
33
10
_
9

4
4
_
4

18

1

-

_

17
17
10

7

2
2

-

72
22
14 “ 268
46
_
16
5
3
15
15

2
2

-

-

-

70
30
40
_
3
37

67
28
39
27
10
2

-

-

4
4

3
3

102
97
63" — § r
39
13
10
27
5
5
2

7
2
5

-

6

8

_
-

3
3
-

_
_

2
2
“

-

12
12
.
-

95

4

_

-

4

73
73
_

_
_
-

114
38
76

16
10
6

59
48
11

6
6
“

197
142
55

47
23
24

63
12
51

_
-

-

8
8

45
45

7
7

39
39

8
8

20
20

22
22

8
8

115
109
6
_
2

47
35
12
1
11

26
_
26
20
-

11

5

3

11
_
2

5
5

3
3

90
5
5
-

3

2
38
_ r-342
4
_
'
2
_
4

12
—

-

_
_

-

78
78
_

-

?2
42
10
10

18
8
10
10

245
6
339
339

_
_

3
3
-

26
26
_

132

_
_
-

132
132

-

-

16
16

“

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

58
58

_

8

r

6
6
_

25

-

25
25
-

18
18
-

91
71
20
1
2
14

10

5

_
_

16

4
4

6

2
2
~

16

6
6
-

82
54
28
2
-

8
_
8
-

5
2
3

27
20
7

34
13
21
_
5

_
3
-

228
16
212
78

71
71

152
125
27
5
11

7
3
4
4

134
9
125

71

24

4
4

31
31
“

10
2
8
8
“

40
28
12

24

12

-

12
_
12
10
2

45
6
39

12

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous study.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2
2
2

-

_
_
-

8
8

10

B: Characteristic Industry Occupations
O t fft

Table 8-2333:

Occupation and sex

Total .............
M e n ............
W o m e n..........

1 /

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.30
and
.90
.80
.85
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 over

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns

2,292
363
1,929

*
1.52
2.31
1.37

139
25
114

128
8
120

79
3
76

69
9
60

65
1
64

105
17
88

67
2
65

104
3
101

92
92

177
5
172

183
7
176

144
6
138

100
8
92

146
7
139

99
3
96

78
7
195
100
95
46
49
9

2.19
1.31
2.22
2.99
1.42
1.32
1.51
1.86

-

-

2
2
2
-

3
3
3
-

1
1
1
-

1
1
1
-

11
11
5
6
-

1
15
1
14
10
4
1

2
2
2
-

1
16
1
15
11
4
1

4
7
7
4
3
2

2
10
10
8
2
1

3
1
7
3
4
4
-

2

-

7
2
5
4
1
1

82
235
31
204

2.81
1.21
.90
1*.25

11

7

2
14

13

18

11

1
28

1
44

3
18

1
13

16

7

2
13
4.
9

331

1.40

13

738
142

1.68
.85

30

1.03

2/
All plant occupations!

2 > * e id £ i

172
19
153

131
41
90

2

8

3
3
3
-

12
4
8
4
4
1

1

38
28
10

14
10
4

52
52

27
27
-

75
29
46

39
23
16

31
17
14

27

10

19

2

_

3

_

_

13
7
6

10
10
-

_

1
1
_

10
7
3

6
6
-

35
35
_

6
-

-

-

_
-

3
-

-

5
-

1

2

2

14

18

3
3
-

13
10
3

10
10
_

3
3

10
10
_

_
_

_
2

_
-

.
-

_

16

15

Selected Plant Occupations
Cutters and markers (men) 3a/ .............
Inspectors, final (women) 3b/ .............
Pressers, hand (men and women) 3b/ ........
Men 2 ^ / ...............................
Women: Total .........................
Time .......................
Incentive ...................
Pressers, machine (6 men and 3 women) 3b/ ...
Pressers, hand and machine
(67 men and 15 women) 3b/ ...............
Sewers, hand (women): To t a l .......... .
TMit a
i
Incentive .......
Sewing-machine operators,
section system (women) 3b/ ..............
Sewing-machine operators, single hand
(tailor) system (21 men and
717 women) ^ b / .........................
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (women) 3a/ .....
Work distributors (l man and
29 women) 3a/ ..........................

_

12

4

15
10
5

14

13

18

8

28

44

18

13

16

1

-

1

17

5

10

14

10

17

15

25

35

20

23

21

20

33

22

15

6

5

-

4

1

-

-

_

-

2
35

43

1
29

3
13

10
2

14
15

6
1

23

33

50

71

72

47

83

56

118

68

43

12

14

6

3

_

_

_

3

5

9

1

1

3

3

“

1

1

”

~

6

3

7
5

3

_

1/ The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops employing 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of women's and misses' dresses (Group 2333) as defined in the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing housedresses, aprons, smocks, hoovers, and nurses' and maids* uniforms (Group 2334-) were excluded from the study.
Data relate to an August 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2 / Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

P o U tti

Table B-5851 *

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns

2/

C H ld

V o A + U llt& L

NUMBER OF
$
$
%
$
%
$
$
$
$
0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25
and
under
.90
.85
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30

l/

WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ , S
$
$
%
$
$
1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
1.40

1.45

_

1.35

1.50

1.55

32

65

4

2

48

6
8
1
1

1.60

1.65

1.70

-

-

2
_

3
_

-

-

3

-

1

2
2

6

5

6
n
t

2

2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50

2

1
8
11

1.80

1.90

Men

1
Labelers and packers ......................
Maintenance men, general utility ..........
Mixers ...... ........ ....................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand .............
Technicians .........................................
Tinters ..................................... ........

109
23
76
46

11

1.44
1.67
1.46

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

3

*

-

-

2

1.90

28

1.24

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

8
1

-

-

-

*

_

26
_

1.63

35

-

1.66

3

1.46

21

1

Vui^TI r V ttiaV a T*A
)

-

3

_

2

c
J

_

2

0

>

11

_

-

-

_

_

_

1

3

1

_

2
-

2

Women
labelers and packers

.............................

2

-

-

3

3

2

-

2

3

8

-

-

-

12

7/
study covered establishments employing 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of paints, varnishes, lacquers, japans, enamels, and shellac (Group 2851) as defined in the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night workj all or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




11

M

Table B-35

Number
o
f
Workers

Occupation 7 j

c u Ju H & u f

1/

O u d u A JU d e l

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
Average Under $1.00 *1.05 *1.10
*1.20 *1.25 *1.30 *1.35 1.40 *1.45 *1.50 *1.60 *1.70 *1.80 *1.90 2.00 * 2.10 * 2.20 2.30 *2.40 2.50 * 2.60 *2.70 * 2.80 * 2.90 *3.00
*1.15
hul
ory
and
erig 1
anns
and
1.00 under
y
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over

Machinery ( J

%

1
1

Assemblers, class A : Total ............... .

655

1.88

Incentive .........
Total ............ .
Time ..............
Incentive ..........
Total ................

277

2.06

_

890
600

1.65
1.55
1.84
1.51

_
_

Assemblers, class B:

Assemblers, class Ct

Incentive ..........
Electricians, maintenance 5a/ ..............
Inspectors, class A 5 a / ................. .
Inspectors, class B 5a/ ............. .......
Inspectors, class C 5a/ ....................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 5a/ .........
Laborers, material handling 5a/ ............

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 6/t Total .......................
Time .....................
Incentive ................
Automatic-lathe operators, class A 5a/ ....
Drill-press operators, radial,

290
464

r.

Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A 5b/ ..................
Engine-lathe operators,
rtlaea A 9 Trt+el
..

1.58

-

U l

1.92
1.64
1.38
1.25
1.41

198
65
295
234

1.92
1.77
2.07

1,945
987
958
30

Incentive ........... .
Screw-machine operators, automatic,

See footnotes at end of table.




-

-

_
-

13
13
24

12
1

16
8

-

-

1
1

27
27

20
20

48
40

39
33

30
14
16
-

8

6

9

48

72
46

-

-

13

_

-

23
4

42
4

3
30

-

-

_

-

6

H

5
15

2

2

26
11

15
41

-

1
1

-

36
-

26

183
154
29
152
65
87

-

2

6

4

3
4

20

12

118
98

20
283
218
65

21

185
136
49
94
58
36
23

120
77
43
43
4
39
30

50
15
35
43
4
39
19

18
16
27
48
3

30
14

11

2

23

5

114

1.98

340
198

-

1.99

-

146

12

6

3

4

12
1

6

2

15
-

-

3
-

4
-

-

1
-

_
_

-

13

2

2
1

4

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

26

121
101
20

222

483

323

211

113

26

173
49

301
182

189
134
9

98
113

20

11

93
-

100
-

31
4
27
-

33

14
/

1

18

20

2

6

4,

4,

5

3

1

1

33

10

1

18

20

2

6

4.

4

5

3

1

1

6

-

19

3
24
52

2

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

5
7

6

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

155
55

69
17
52

46
46

29
29

49
49

24
24

17
17

11

10

1

1

1

1

1

1

-

1

32
16
16

6

a

-

8

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

2

2

9

6

9

7

6

36
30

117

26
9

21

19

g

10

17

79
51
28

17

21

19

g

10

20
20

100

-

11

10
1

1

8

1

3

2

1

4,

4,

2

3

2

1

-

-

1.75
1.93

-

1
1

Occupational Wage Survey

16
16

4,

4

2

3

2

1

2

5

2

5

3

8

2

9

11

6

3

8

2

9

11

6

-

-

22
22

65
47
18

37
32
5

14

7

13

-

14

7

13

_

34
28

58

24
13

11
2

4

17

4

12

9

11

14

4

2

4

2

21
37

11

9

4

17

4

12

9

11

14

4

2

4

2

3
3

-

1.68

-

17

1.96
1^88
2.19

-

-

25

-

6

-

-

9
_

1
--

-

7
-

2
1

1

2.17

230

15

4
4

6

233
87

1.88

4

5
9

12

1.75
2.06
1.92
1.67
2427

335
105

5

5
7

g
g

-

104

5

6

26

9

1.88

250

6

5

24

52
61

21
21
-

5

9
13

59

12

43
16

3

-

32
4
28
3

21
12

3

26
12

1

-

70

10
60

14
7
4
4
38
7

2.01

22

Incentive ................

2
2

_
4

1
1

1.91
it
An

57
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
class A: Total .......................

6
6

_
44
44
13

2.06

165
41

11

77
0
<

Incentive................
Milling-machine operators,
class At Total ......................

_

_

1.90

•\/p

Grinding-machine operators,
class A: Total .......................

-

_

6

8
g

255
76

124

Ttn
-ia

_
_
4

-

_
_
_

_
_
_
9

14
H

17
13

24
23

3

/

2

g

4

2
.

1

1

3

2

2

4

1

1

50

24

16

4

8

7

2

1

2

1

-

-

24

16

4

8

7

2

1

2

1

30
29

13

27

11
2

22
5

95
31
64

84
37
47

4.

46

Boston, Mass., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12

Table B-35*

M a c lu n & u f U n d t iit A im l 1 /

-& a ^ U in tn ed

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

N ber
um
of
W
orkers

Occupation 2/

Machinery U

. . .. . t

T- Tt ,

-T - -

-Tr .

II I It -tTtTTTftfTtTT

D rill-press operators, sin gle-or m ultiplespindle, class Bi Total ..................
T tnp
M
Incentive ..........
Engine-lathe operators,
class Bi Total ............................

t

(|
Grinding-machine operators,
(| j i i i
T-fm
a

riiii i i i i i *- r i
iiii

,

i ti ■i i i ' i i
.,t

Milling-machine operators,
class Bi T o t a l .......... ........................................
,,

- T T T _ T..... T
_

Incentive .....................................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
a I a s s tie
Ta+oI
. ................ .....
T'f mo
,
.Tr
_
_
iiiit
iiiii
i | ■ - ||
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 6/t T o t a l ......................... ..........................
ii i i

ri

i

ii

Incentive ....................
D rill-p ress operators, ra d ia l,
class C 5b/ .................................
D rill-press operators, sin gle-or m ultiplea

/ la as H t
e

T a +a I ......... ...... . . . .
TMmfl _rll .rTTt.T_
_
...

Engine-lathe operators, class C 5 a / ....... .
Grinding-machine operators, class C 5a/ ••••
Milling-machine operators,
Pf
T-fpiO

( ( ||||f--fi*-|||
TTI
_ t-TT-t___ T
_
i i i i r i i i i i i i i i i lit

Screw-machine operators, automatic,
f «jh/
i

»
1.10

$
1.15

1.20

1.25

i .30

$
1.35

%

1.40

«
1.45

i .50

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.90

$
2.00

$
$
2 .1 0 2 .2 0

2.30

$
2.40

$
s
$
$
$ ,
9
2 .5 0 2 .60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
and

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1,60

1.70

1.80

1.90

2.00

2 .10

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2.40

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2.70

2 .80

•
-

6
6

8
8

12
12

441
369
72

22
1
21

2
_

8

13

3

2

-

-

74
24
50
5

45
25
20

-

167
101
66
5

30
4
26

-

348
247
101
5

3

-

170
160
10

13

-

145
142
3

15

-

30
29
1
1

73
73

-

12

37
20
17

5

3

7

3

2

2

5

3

7

3

2

2

44
"36
8

33
2/

15
10
5

8

6

6

5 1

-

1

2

1

8

6

6

5

-

I

2

I
-

-

%

2 .9 0

3.00

over

_

2

-

2

_
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- Continued

Machine-tool operators, production,
class 6 6/» Total ............................................. ••.
T im e...............................................
Incentive .....................
Automatic-lathe operators, class B 5a/ .....
D rill-press operators, ra d ial,
Tlmft

$
$
A
verage
hourly Under 1.00 1.05
earnings $
and
2/
1 ,00 under
1.05 1.10

...........................

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class C 5a/ .................

See footnotes a t end o f table,




$

1,6141,201
413
16

1.60
1.54
1.80
1.72

75
28
4.7

1.63

164

I .61
1.49
1.87

-

53
209
162
47

1.60
1.54
1.81

-

176
127
49

1.61
I .54
1.80

200
94
106

1.67
I .49
1.83

270
186
84

1.60
1.52
1 .77

763
570
193

1.39
1.32
1.59

16
16

45

1.47

-

m

141
82
KQ

43
46
51
10
41

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

4

l

1.71

1.43
1*33
1.57
1.42
1.42
1.56
1.36
1.61

16

1.35

8
8
8

-

_

15

_

_

-

-

6

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
2
2

12
11
1

3
3

17
16
1

20
20

42
41
1

93
75
18

17
4
13

1

6

1

1

1

2

2

1

6

1

1

1

2

19
19

15
15

56
49
7

38
27
11

27
13
14

4.

3

3

3

2

1

1

4

3

3

3

2

1

x

23
22
1

30
28
2

46
22
24

29
7
22

15
1
14

12
4
8

7

3

5

7

7

3

-

7

3

_

14
14

44
44

51
42
9

76
47
29

31
16
15

156
141
15

99
53
46

51
48
3

54
26
28

52
32
20

32
28

-

1

-

4

13
12
1
12

12

5

7

12

5
5

7

12
12
4
4
4

-

18
18

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

_

_

33
33
10

31
27
4

36
32
4

69
69

-

-

-

5

8

-

4,

8

5
4,
1

74
66
8

_
-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

2

5

7

8

6
6

-

-

16

22
18

38
30
8
14
6

18
6
12
6
2

4

5
6
5
5

L
*
►

-

1

11

32

£

3

2
16

1

5

-

1

_

.

1

_

1

_

_

.

3

5

15

4,

6

4

x

1

15

4

6

4

1

1

16
5
11

15

7

2

1

-

1

-

_

_

_

_

15

7

2

1

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

3

3

2

1

4,

5

1

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

7

8

4

3

2

2

-

2

2

2

4

4

1

7

10
10

7

15

1

6

5

9

6

-

4,

£

14

/
a

6

-

2

23
23

-

1.53

97

4,

8

1

-

13

Table B-35*

M

a c k u t e /u f. 9 n d i> u tfU

el

1 / -G o tU

&

tm

ed

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2/

N ber
um
of
W
orkers

S
A
verage
hourly Under 1.00 1.05
earnings 1
and
1.00 under
2 /
1.05 1.10

$
1.10

$
1.15

$
1.20

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

s
1.50

1.60

$
1.70

$
1.80

$
1.90

$
2.00

$
2.10

$
2.20

$
2.30

$
$
2 . A 2 .50
0

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.90

2.00

2 .10

2.20

2 .30

2 .40

2.50

2.60

-

“

“

“

“

8
4

8

-

5
28

27
21

15
a

18
44

43
32

4

2

1

5

6

4

1

5

9

15

14

20

15

4

-

-

22
158
13

36
23
5

52
31
22

20
25

12
9
4

9
2

24
3
2

8

-

$
S
$
$
2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
and
2 .7 0 2.80 2.90 3.00 over

$
2.60

Machinery 4/ - Continued

Machine-tool operators, toolroom 5a/ .................
Machinists, production 5a/ ....................................
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
Jobbing shops) 5a/ ..................................................
Tool-end-die makers (other than tool-an ddie Jobbing shops) 5 a / ................. ........................
Welders, hand, class A 5a/ ......................................
Welders, hand, cla ss B 5 a / ......................................

117
207

%

1.79
1.83

1

2.04

184
290
147

1.94
1.84
1.71

1
11

19

17
24
65

4

1

1

1

3

-

-

“

-

-

_

_
_

_

_
_

_

'

82

-

'

'

Machine-tool Accessories

Ja n ito r s , p o rters, and cleaners 5a/ . . . . . . . . . .

11

1.15

1

-

-

3

3

3

-

-

1

Machine-tool operators, production,
cla ss A 5a/. £ / ........................................................
Grinding-machine operators, class A 5a/ . . .

29
17

1.73
1.79

_

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

45

1.48

~

*“

-

“

8

-

2

2

4

6

1.59

69

1.14

Machine-tool operators, production,
cla ss B 5a/. f j .................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), cla ss B 5a/ ...............
Machine-tool operators, production,
cla ss C 5 a / ................................................ ................
M achinists, production 5 a / ............. ........................
Tool-and-die makers (tool-end-die
Jobbing shops) 5 a / ................... ..............................

82

-

11

5

1.76

82

12

2.04

1/
Budget;
2/
J/

6

4

6

4

7

2

3

12

9

5

3

12

2

“

1

2

8

27

20

12

4

5

9

15

14

3

9
9

9
8

3

2
11

20

15

4

The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in n onelectrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard In d ustrial C la ssifica tio n Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau o f the
machine-tool accessory establishments employing more than S workers were also included. Data re la te to a January 1953 payroll period.
Data re la te to men workers.
Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.
U
Includes data fo r machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) for which separate data are also presented.
2/ In su ffic ien t data to permit presentation o f separate averages by method o f wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) A ll or predominantly incentive workers.
fj

Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




u

Table B-7211:

Powesi Jladuudbue^ 1/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

4
4
0.60
0.55
and
under
.60
.65

1
0.65

4
0.70

.70

.75

.80

_

-

-

_

6

9

_

-

42
42
-

81
75
6

_
_

_

_
_

_

_

_

79
55
24
7
1
1

_

_

_

-

-

-

1

1
0.75

0.80

0.85

1
0.95

1
1.00

7
1.05

1
1.10

1
1.15

1.20

1
1.25

4
1.30

1
1.40

1
4
1.60
1 .50

.95

1

0.90

1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

1 .2 1

1.30

1.40

1.50

1.60

1

1

3
30

6
1

-

6
13

18

10
28
3

13
23
18
6
12
2

/
4
9
11

1
3

11

1 .7 0

1

1.80

4
1.90

1.90

2 .00

over

_

1

4
2 .00

4

_

and
.90

-.85...

1.70

1.80

M
en

Extractor operators 2/ . . . . ...........................................

28
113

Id en tifiers 2 / .......................... . . . ............................ ..
Washers, machine 2/ .........................................................
Wrappers, bundle 2 / ............................. ..............................

35
183
47

$
1.19
1.07
1.28
1.15
1.28
.83

18
921
717
204
83
182
103
79
485
157
328
106

.88
.83
.83
.83
.81
.84
.80
.90
.99
.92
1.02
.79

Numoer
of
workers

Average
weekly
earnings
5/

_
_

—
_
_

_

_

*
6

22

3

_
6
6

_
6
21

4
3

6
474
456
18
35
61
51
10
59
53
6
32

73
7
66
19
40
29
11
34
3
31
15

9
80
8
72
12
44
16
28
45
4
41
14

12
8
4
1
22
6
16
55
5
50
15

_

_

6
3
_
_

—
9
3
40

I
20

3

14

I
_
_

1

_

2

_

7

2
1

3
1

_

_
12

6

T
O
12

_

6

2
12

_

W en
om

Clerks, r e ta il receiving 2 / ........................... - ............
T im e...................
Incentive .........
Id en tifiers 2/ ....................................................................
Markerst Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tima
In c e n tiv e ...................................................
Pressers, machine, s h irts i Total .............................
Time .........................
Incentive ...............
Wrappers, bundle 2/ - - .............- .....................................

Occupation

Routemen, r e t a i l (driver-salesmen)* Total ...........
5-day workweek....................... .....................................
5£*4ay workweek............................................... ............
6-day workweek ..............................................................

545
255
202
88

4
72.00
72.50
66.50
82.50

12
12

_
6

_

_
6

25
20
5
16

3

2
11
9
3

5
5
45
18
27

12
12

_
80
42
38

3

3
6

3
42

_
26

3
15

*
23

_
18

6
2

42

26

15

23

18

OL

24J

3
_
_
—

12
12
_

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OFf
Under 4
40.00 42.50
4
40.00
42.5.9 .lS t.00

6
6

6
6

9
9

-

-

-

4
45.00

$
47.50

47.50

50.00

18
6
12

6
-

6

4
50.00

4
52.50
JS

39
27
6
6

j

PL

18
18

f
57.50

4
60.00

4'
62.50

4
65.00

$
67.50

f

70.00

$
72.50

4
73.00

4
80.00

4
85.00

4
90.00

ZLAS 60.00
L

62.50

65.00

67.50

70.00

72.50

75.00

80.00

85.00

90.00

95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00

39
7
30
2

21
11
9
1

27
13
14

13
13

17

20

35

6

6

8
1

14

30
20
8
2

68
56
7
5

4
55.00

46
12
24
10

36
6
24
6

-

U

17
4

4
I -------r
1”
95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00
and

29
17
2
10

19
8
6
5

9
5
2
2

10
1
1
8

over

24
4
8
12

1 / The study covered establishments employing more than 2 0 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification M a n u a l (194-9 edition) prepared b y the Bu r e a y of the Budget*
D a t a relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2 / Excludes pr e m i u m pa y for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., March 1953
2 / Insufficient d a t a to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF L A BOR
Data limited to m e n workers.
B u r e a u of Labor Statistics
j>/ Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).

fjj




15

C : U nion

W a g e

S c a le s

(Minimum v a g e rates and m a x i m u m straight-time h o u r s pe r w e e k a g r e e d u p o n thr o u g h collective b a r g a i n i n g
b e t w e e n employers and t r a d e unions* R a t e s a n d h o u r s are tho s e In ef f e c t on dates Indicated. A d d i t i o n a l
information Is available in reports issued separ a t e l y for t h ese
individual industries
o r trades.)

Table C-15:

H

w

ld u t q ,

6oMii*tto£iOH

Table C-27:

Classification

Bricklayers .... .
Carpenters *..*..,
Electricians .....
Painters ....... .
Plasterers .....
Plumbers .......
Building laborers

riate
per
hour
$
3.000
2.625

Hours
per
week

2 .9 0 0

ko
ko
ko

2.1*00
3.050
2.850
1.930

io
*
10
*
10
*

10
*

Table C-205:

Classification

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Agreement A:
Dough mixers ................ .........
Ovenmen, bench hands .................
Agreement B:
Ovenmen (bread and pies) .............
Mixers ......................... .
Ovenmen (cakes) .......................
Head b e n c h m e n .........................
B e n c h m e n .... ........ ......... .
Agreement C:
Ovenmen, dough mixers ................
B e n c h m e n ................ .......... .
Agreement D:
Dough mixers, o v e n m e n ................
B e n c h m e n ..............................
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
(General Agreement):
Bread:
Mixers ..........................
Head o v e n m e n ....................
Ovenmen, bench hands ...........
Bench helpers, general helpers .
Cake:
Mixers ..........................
Ovenmen .........................
General helpers ................
Agreement B:
Ovenmen, mixers .......................
Bakery helpers ........................
Agreement C:
Mixers .................................
O v e n m e n ............. *..... ...........
General bakery helpers ...............
Pie and pastry shops:
Mixers, ovenmen, benchmen ...............




P sU

n U

Table C-27:

n tf

''
flate” ' Hours
per
per
hour
week

$
1.701*
1.59*

1*8
1*8

1.1*15
1.395
1.385
1.365
1.315

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.520
1.1*65

1*0
1*0

1.1*05
1.1*05

11
**
11
**

1*0
1*0

1.685
1.655
1.575
1.1*1*5

1*0
1*0

1.655
1.595
1.385

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.1*75
1.225

1*0
1*0

1.720

1*0

1 .6 2 0
1 .5 0 0

1*0

1.555

1*0
1*0

10
*
1*0

Classification

Book and job shops:
Bindery w o m e n .........................
Bookbinders, rulers ...................
Compositors, hand .....................
Electrotypers .........................
Machine operators (linotype and
monotype) ...........................
Machine tenders (linotype and
monotype) ...........................
Photoengravers ........................
Press assistants and feeders:
Single presses:
Cross feeding presses,
under 6 5 inches; pile
feeding presses; cylinder
presses (hand feeding);
job automatic cylinder
presses .......................
1 2 -color press, 1 perfecting
press, cylinder presses with
2 -pile feeding
machines ............ ...... ......
1 cross feeding machine, over
6 5 inches .........................
Job presses ........................
Pressmen, cylinder:
1 perfecting press; 1 2 -color
press; 2 high-speed cylinder
presses, 2 5 x 3 8 inches
or l a r g e r ........................
1 cylinder press, over 6 5
inches; cylinder presses
under 6 5 inches; with 2pile feeding machines .............
Cylinder presses, under 6 5 inches ....
Job cylinder presses: Kelly,
Miehle (vertical or hori­
zontal), Miller, Simplex
or other types ....................
Pressmen, platen:
2 automatic presses ...... ..........
Hand-fed presses ....................
Stereotypers ..........................
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day work ...........................
Night work .........................
Machine operators:
Day work ........ ...................
Night work .........................
Mailers:
Day w o r k ...........................
Night work .........................

PUtUt-oU+ie
s+ttyG+ivet
July 1, 1952

July 1. 1953

April 1, 1953

T S E T - Hours
per
per
week
hour
*
1.250
2.330
2.353

371/2

2.560

37 1/2
37 1/2
ItO

2.353

37 1/2

2.353
2.693

37 1/2
37 1/2

2.073

37 l/2

2.173

37 1/2
37 1/2

Newspapers - Continued
Photoengraver s :
Day w o r k ..............................
Tint layers .......................
Night w o r k ..................... ......
Pressmen, web presses:
Day work:
Agreement A .... ...................
Agreement B .......................
Night work ............................
Pressmen-in-charge:
Day work:
Agreement A ............. ..........
Agreement B .......................
Night work ............................
Stereotypers:
Day work ..............................
Night work ............................

Rate
per
hour

$
2.996

3.260
3.180

ttours
per
week

371/2
3 71/2
371/2

2 .63! 1*2
*
2.766 1*0
3.073

36

2.813
2.953
3.282

1*2
1*0
36

2.881*
3.188

35
,
31 2/3

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

37 1/2

2.113
1.1*13

Classification

JloOcU
Ope/taUtt/a Cmfxlomel

Table C-ll:

October 1, 1952
Classification
2.500

37 1/2

2.1*10
2.330

37 1/2
37 1/2

2.330

37 1/2

2.210
2.120
2.920

37 1/2
37 1/2
*0

2 .821* 37 1/2
2.950

37 1/2

2.821*
2.950

37 1/2
37 l/2

2.270
2.1*32

37 1/2
35

1-man cars and busses:
First 3 months ...........................
1 - 6 months .............................
*
7 - 9 months ....................... .....
10 - 12 m o n t h s ....... ........ ..........
After 1 year .............................
2-man cars:
First 3 months ...........................
1 - 6 m o n t h s ...... ......................
*
7 - 9 months .............................
10 - 12 months ...........................
After 1 y e a r ............... .............
Rapid transit lines:
Guards:
First 3 months .......................
1 - 6 m o n t h s .........................
*
7 - 9 months .........................
1 0 - 1 2 months ................... .
After 1 year ..........................
Motormen - Road .........................
Motormen - Y a r d ................... .

*

1.560
1.675
1.710
1.755
1.850

1.1*1*0

1.560
1.595
1.61*0
1.733

1.1*1*0

1.560
1.595
1.61*0

1.73 5
1.795

1.850

lA
in 1 A
Ul
M lA
i*x l A

M
in
in
in
in

lA
1A
iA
xA
iA

in
in
in
M
in

iA
iA
iA
iA
iA

in 1A
in iA

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

Table C 4 2 :

M oto^UtcA Syuaetel

Table C42:

B u ild in g :
C o n stru ctio n :
E u c lid t r a c t o r ....................................................
C oncrete m ixer ....................................................
Low-bed t r a i l e r ..................................................
Dump tr u c k :
Over !§■ to n s ................................. ................
H elpers ..............................................................
M a te r ia l:
C oncrete ..................................................................
H elpers ..............................................................
Lumber .......................................................................
H elpers .........................................................
W recking:
l £ to n s o r l e s s ..................................................
Over \ \ to n s ............................................. ..
Carbonated bev erages ....................................................
H elpers ............................................................................
C oal ..........................................................................................
H elpers ............................................................................




Table C-k2:

a n d a U e lp e A d ~ G o * t£ * * u *e d

and oi/elpeMC la s s ific a tio n

M ottvU dH cJl ^ td ttetd

B a te
per
hour

Hours
p er
week

$
2 .0 0 0
1 .7 0 0
1 .8 0 0

40
40
40

1 .7 4 5
1 .5 4 5

40
40

1 .5 0 0
1 .4 5 0
1 .4 6 0
1 .4 1 0

40
40
40
40

1 .0 8 0
1 .2 5 0
1 .4 6 0
1.2 6 0
1 .5 5 0
1 .4 5 0

4o
40
44
44
4o
4o

C la s s ific a tio n

F u r n itu r e :
R e ta il:
Agreement A:
Large tr u c k ....................................................
L ig h t tr u c k ....................................................
H elp ers .............................................................
Agreement B ...........................................................
H elp ers ........................................ ....................
Agreement C ...........................................................
T r a n s fe r tr u c k .............................................
H elp ers ..............................................................
Agreement D ................... .......................................
H elp ers ..............................................................
Garbage d is p o s a l .............................................................
H elp ers ............................................................................
G en eral f r e i g h t :
Up t o 3 to n s ................................................................
3 - 5 to n s .....................................................................
5 to n s and r ig g e r s .................................................
H elp ers .......................... ................................................

AdotottdUcA ^dUiedd

and a¥e!fie*d-(2o4ftintted
Rate
per
hour

Hours
p er
week

*
1 .4 3 1
1 .3 3 1
1 .2 7 5
1 .4 7 5
1 .3 4 3
1 .4 1 2
1 .3 2 5
1 .2 9 2
1 .3 6 8
1 .2 6 2
1 .6 0 0
1 .6 0 0

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
4o
40
44
44

1 .5 8 0
1 .6 0 5
1 .6 8 0
1 .5 5 5

40
40
40
40

C la s s ific a tio n

G en eral h a u lin g :
Up t o 3 to n s .................................................................
3 - 5 to n s ......................................................................
5 to n s and o v er ..........................................................
H elp ers .............................................................................
G rocery:
C hain s to r e ...................................................................
H elp ers ......................................................................
W h olesale - 3^ to n s and under ........................
H elp ers ......................................................................
L au n d ries - W h olesale ..................................................
L in en supply ............................... ........................................
Movers - P la n o and h ou seh old :
T r a i l e r .............................................................................
R e g u la r .............................................................................
H elp ers .............................................................................
Newspaper:
D a y ......................................................................................
N igh t ............................................................ ............. ..
Rend ering ...............................................................................
Scrap ir o n and m eta l .....................................................

" g a g " Hours
per
per
hour
week

$
1 .5 8 0
1 .6 0 5
1 .6 8 0
1 .5 5 5

40
4°
4°
40

1 .7 5 9
1 .6 1 5
1 .4 3 8
1 .3 0 8
1 .2 0 0
1 .4 2 5

48
48
40
4°
4o
4o

1 .6 5 0
1 .6 0 0
1 .5 0 0

48
48
48

2 .3 1 5
2 .4 8 0
1 .5 5 5
1 .2 7 5

42
39
40
40

17
D** S u p p l e m e n t a r y

T able D - l :

S

h

if t

^

b iffe ^

W a g e

e n U

P r a c t i c e s

a i P

1/

e o u iid o u d .

P e rc e n t o f t o t a l p la n t employment ------------------------ J5 J--------------------A c tu a lly working or e x t r a s h i f t s in A ll m an ufacturin g
M achinery
in d u s tr ie s 2 /
in d u s tr ie s
3d o r o th e r
3d o r o th e r
aq s n i i 0
s h ift
s h ift

(a )
By esta b lish m e ri t p o lic y in
A ll m anufacturing
M achinery
in d u s tr ie s 2/
indiu s t r i e s
3d o r o th e r
2d s h i f t
2d s h i f t
3d o r o th e r
s h i f t work
work
work
s h i f t work

S h ift d iffe re n tia l

A l l w orkers ....................................................... ..............................
W orkers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts having p r e v is io n s
f o r l a t e s h i f t s ............... ........................................................
W ith s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ..................................................
Uniform c e n ts (p e r h ou r) ........................................
Under 5 c e n ts ...........................................................
5 c e n ts .........................................................................
6 c e n t s ...................... .. ...............................................
7 o r 7^ c e n ts ...........................................................
8 o r 8 j c e n ts ...........................................................
9 c e n ts .........................................................................
10 c e n ts .......................................................................
Over 10 c e n ts ...........................................................
Uniform p e rce n ta g e ......................................................
5 p e rc e n t ............ .......................................................
7 o r 7& p e rc e n t ......................................................
10 p e rc e n t ..................................................................
12-^ p e rc e n t ........................................................... ....
15 p e r c e n t ..................................................................
O ther 2 / ..............................................................................
With no s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ..........................................
W orkers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts having no p ro v is io n s
f o r l a t e s h i f t s ......................................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

7 3 .8
7 2 .2
2 7 .9
1 .7
1 0 .7
1 .0
3.A
1 .6
1 .3
5.A
2 .8
A 2.0
A .5
A .2
3 2 .7
.6
2 .3
1 .6

6 6 .6
6 6 .6
26.A
.9
9 .2
A .l
2 .3
7 .1
2 .8
3 7 .1
5 .9
2 3 .3
7 .9
3 .1
-

7 5 .7
7 5 .7
1 7 .6
.3
1 7 .3
5 7 .6
51.A
6 .2
.5
-

2 6 .2

3 3 .A

2A .3

1 0 0 .0

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

5 6 .1
5 6 .1
1 7 .6
.3
3.A
1 3 .9
3 8 .0
3 1 .8
6 .2
.5
-

1 1 .6
1 1 .0
A.A
.3
1 .6
.1
.3
.3
(£/)
.7
1 .1
6.A
.5
.A
5 .3
.2
.2
.6

3 .0
3 .0
l.A
.A
.A

9 .2
9 .2
2 .1
-

2 .0
2 .0
.3
-

A 3.9

XXX

1 0 0 .0

.A
.2
1 .6
.1
1 .0
.5
(£/>
-

(V )
2 .1
6 .9
A .8
2 .1
.2
-

(a /)
.3
1 .7
.5
1 .2
(A/)
-

XXX

XXX

XXX

U t/)

l / S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l d a ta a re p resen te d in term s o f (a ) e s ta b lis h m e n t p o lic y and (b) w orkers a c t u a l l y employed on l a t e s h i f t s a t th e tim e o f th e su rv ey .
An e s ta b lis h m e n t was co n sid e re d a s having a p o lic y i f i t met any o f th e fo llo w in g c o n d itio n s :
( l ) Operated l a t e s h i f t s a t th e tim e o f th e su rv e y , (2 ) had u n io n c o n t r a c t p r o v is io n s c o v e rin g l a t e s h i f t s , o r (3) had o p erated l a t e s h i f t s w ith in 6 months p r io r t o th e su rv e y .
2/ In c lu d e s d a ta f o r m achinery in d u s tr ie s a ls o , shown s e p a r a te ly .
2 /
In c lu d e s such p r o v is io n s a s f u l l d a y 's pay fo r reduced h o u rs; and p e rce n ta g e d i f f e r e n t i a l p lu s c e n ts p er hour d i f f e r e n t i a l .
i j
L e s s th an 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t.

T a b le D -2 :

S c h e d u le d 'W e e k ly d to u M

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS i / EMPLOYED I N -

Weekly hou rs

All
in d u strie s

M a n u fa ctu rin g

A l l w orkers .................................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Under 35 h o u r s ................ ...........................................
35 h ou rs ....................* ..................................................

0 .7
5 .3
1 1 .3
2 7 .0
1 6 .0
3 6 .1
.2
.6
.2
2 .6

0 .2
3 .7
2 .2
1A.2
6 .1
6 2 .6

3 7 £ h ou rs ......................................................................
Over 37& and under A0 h ou rs ...........................
A0 h o u r s .............................................................................................................
Over A0 and under AA h o u r s ............. ...
AA h ou rs ........................................................................
Over AA and under A8 h ou rs .............................................
A8 h o u r s ................... ...........................................................
Over A8 h o u r s ............ ... .............. ... ............................
1/
2/
*
**

P u b lic
u tilities*

1 0 0 .0

R e ta il tra d e

F in a n c e * *

S e rv ice s

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

_

5 .0
.A
5 5 .5
1 .3
3 7 .8

_

-

2 .2
1 9 .8
1 8 .2
3 1 .A
2 8 .A
-

8 .3
2 1 .5
8 .1
6 0 .9

-

-

-

1 .0
.8
9 .2

-

1 .2

-

-

-

D ata r e l a t e t o women w o rk ers.
,, , ,
.
. _
In c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e a l e s t a t e i n a d d itio n to th o se in d u s try d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

W h olesale
tr a d e

1 .7
A .9
1 7 .9
3 6 .9
2A .9
1 3 .7
-

A ll
in d u stries 2 /

1 0 0 .0

_

2 7 .1
1A .5
1 7 .2
9 .5
2 6 .5
2 .2
3 .0

”

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

[

0 .7
.A
2 .1
3 .6
2 .2
6 8 .3
3 .3
2 .8
6 .8
7 .9
1 .9

.

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

W h olesale
tra d e

R e ta il tra d e

S en d ees

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

.

_

1 .0
5 .1
7A .8
3 .2
1 .8
A .7
6 .7
2 .7

-

-

_

-

9A .9
-

1 .6
3 .5

2 .0
3 .A
7 7 .9
A .9
5 .3
3 .A
3 .1

9 .0
2 .2
7 .8
1 .9
1 1 .2
A 2.8
A.O
A.O
1 7 .7
8 .A

-

.5

3 7 .8
7 .2
7 .A
5 .1
3 3 .0

-

O ccu p a tio n a l Wage Su rv ey , B o sto n , M a s s ., March 1953
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

18

P aid , ettolid a tfd .

T a b le D -3 :

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N Number o f p a id h o lid a y s

All
industries

1/
*
**

9 9 .2
2 .6
.5
3 .3
6 .1
$ .3
6 .3
1 8 .5
5 5 .7
.9

Manufacturing

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finanoe**

Services

1 0 0 .0

All w orkers ................................................................
Workers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid h o lid a y s .................................................. ..
L ess th an 5 days .............................................
5 days .....................................................................
6 days .....................................................................
7 o r 7^ days .......................................................
8 o r 8§- d a y s ................... ...................................
9 or 9 i days .......................................................
10 o r 10 £ days ......................... ........... ..
11 o r 1 1 £ days ..................................................
12 or more d a y s ...............................................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid h o lid a y s ................................................

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Public
utilities*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
7 .5
18.410 .A
6 .6
2A .7
31.A
1 .0

1 0 0 .0
2 .8
5 .8
3 .A
5 0 .5
3 7 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
A .5
3 .6
1 2 .8
3 1 .9
A 7 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
6 .5
5 .8
8 7 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
.2
.5
5 .2
.9
5 .3
2 .3
1 3 .0
6A .6
8 .0

9 3 .8
8 .6
3 .0
2 1 .2
2 0 .3
1 2 .1
5 .8
1 5 .7
6 .7
.A

1 0 0 .0
2 .6
1 .1
3 0 .8
3 0 .A
1A .5
7 .2
8 .9
3 .9
.6

.8

9 0 .7
3 0 .9
6 .1
.5
1 8 .A
1 .9
1 9 .7
11.A
1 .8
9 .3

All
.
industries 1 / Manufacturing

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Servioes

1 0 0 .0

6 .2

Public
utilities *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
_

8 0 .8
3 2 .8
7 .7
2 .A
9 .5

5 7 .9
3 .3
1 3 .1
1 5 .8
7 .7
6 .A

2 5 .0

3.S
3.7

9 6 .A
5 .3
A. 3
8 .5
6 .7
3.A
5 0 .A
1 7 .8
-

3 .1
6 .2
_
8 .0
2 1 .3
2 5 .3
3 6 .1

3 .6

3.A
1 9 .2

A.O
A 2 .1

In c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e a l e s t a t e in a d d itio n t o th o s e in d u s tr - d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and osher p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .

T a b le D-A:

P<U (l

PA04MA4X iA )
M

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V a ca tio n p o lic y

A ll w orkers ................................................................

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

industries l /

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .9
5 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
7 .3

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 .7

8 9 .0
A .8
.2
-

8 8 .8
l .A

9 7 .0

9 2 .7

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 7 .6
7 7 .9
A .5

9 0 .8
9 .0

7 9 .2
8 .0
3 .1

9 8 .9
8 5 .5
A 8.9
1 .5
3A .7
.A

9 8 .7
7 8 .3
6 2 .6
2 .A
1 2 .6
.7

1 0 .8
8 .8
1 .5
.5
2 .6

1 6 .2
1 3 .1
2 .3
.8
A .2

1 .1

1 .3

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 3 .3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 9 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 9 .8

9 5 .8
8 6 .8
6 6 .9

8 6 .7

7 1 .0

8 0 .2

1 9 .9

Retail trade

Servioes

A fte r 1 v e a r o f s e r v ic e
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
p aid v a c a tio n s .....................................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...............................
1 w e e k ..............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ............ ..
2 weeks ........................................................ ..
3 weeks ............................................................
A weeks and o v e r ................................................
P ercen tag e payment 2 / ..................................
2 p e rc e n t .......................................................
3 p e rc e n t .....................................................................
A p e r c e n t .....................................................................
Other ............................................. ..............................
Workers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid v a c a tio n s .........................................................

-

-

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

—




-

-

-

-

-

-

—

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (e x clu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .
NOTE:

-

-

-

.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

E s tim a te s a re provided s e p a r a te ly , a cco rd in g to employer p r a c tic e in computing
v a c a tio n payments ( l e n g th - o f - tim e , p e rc e n ta g e , or o t h e r ) ; p ercen ta g e and o t h e r ty p e payments were co n v erted to e q u iv a le n t tim e p eriod s in e a r l i e r s tu d ie s .

-

-

-

O c cu p a tio n a l Wage Surv ey , B o s to n , M a s s ., March 1953
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

-

-

-

9 .0
9 .0

-

A .2

1
9

T able D -4*

P a id V a ca tio n ^ ty o su tta l P *xw llla *iA )-G o*d l* i**# d
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V a ca tio n p o l ic y

A l l w orkers ............................................................ ...

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finanoe**

Servioes

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .9
2 .3
.4
9 2 .0
.2
4 .8
O

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 .6
1 .3
9 1 .7
1 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .6
.4
9 7 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
9 8 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.2
9 3 .6
1 .7
4 .5
—
-

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8
9 0 .7
9 .1
.2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .9
8 3 .7
1 .3
8 .0
3 .1
-

9 9 .8
8 6 .4
2 7 .5
1 4 .3
4 3 .4
.3
.9
1 0 .8
8 .8
1 .5
.5
2 .6

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
7 9 .6
3 7 .6
2 2 .7
1 8 .6
.7
1 6 ,2
1 3 .1
2 .3
.8
4 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 .3
9 1 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
7 .4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 .4
9 1 .4
1 .7
2 .5
-

9 5 .8
8 6 .8
3 7 .4
4 9 .4
9 .0
9 .0
-

All -i /
industries 4 / Manufacturing

A f te r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
W orkers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s ........................................... ..
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...............................
1 w e e k ................................................ ..
Over 1 and under 2 weeks . . . . . . . . .
2 weeks ............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks . . . . . . . . .
3 weeks ............................................................
4 weeks end o ver .......................................
P e rc e n ta g e payment 2 / ..................................
2 p e rc e n t ........................................................
3 p e rc e n t .......................................................
4 p e rc e n t ........................................................
O ther .........................................................................
W orkers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p a id v a c a tio n s ..............................................

.1
-

-

-

-

.2

-

-

-

-

9 2 .6
-

4 .2

-

A f te r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
W orkers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s .................................................. ..
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ................................
1 week ...............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ...................
2 w e e k s .................................................. ..
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ....................
3 w e e k s .......... .................................................
4 weeks and o ver .......................................
P e rc e n ta g e payment 2 / ...........................
2 p e r c e n t ........................................................
3 p e r c e n t ..................................................... ..
4 p e r c e n t .......................................................
O ther ........................................................................
W orkers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p a id v a c a tio n s .............................................

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .9
1 .6
.1
9 2 .8
.2
5 .0
.2
.1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 .2
.4
9 4 .0
1 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 6 .9
3 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
9 8 .7
“

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.2
9 3 .6
1 .7
4 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8
9 0 .7
9 .1
.2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .4
8 4 .2
1 .3
8 .0
3 .1
•

9 9 .8
8 6 .4
2 0 .3
1 0 .8
5 3 .7
.3
1 .3
1 0 .8
7 .8
2 .5
.5
2 .6
.2

1 0 0 .0
7 9 .6
2 7 .2
1 6 .9
3 4 .8
.7
1 6 .2
1 1 .5
3 .9
.8
4 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 .5
8 8 .2
5 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 .3
3 .1
9 2 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 .4
9 1 .4
1 .7
2 .5
-

9 5 .8
8 6 ,8
3 0 .1
5 6 .7
_
9 .0
9 .0
4 .2

A f te r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
W orkers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
p a id v a c a tio n s ......................................... ..
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ................................
1 week ...............................................................
2 weeks ............................. ..............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ....................
3 ‘Weeks ............................................................
4 weeks and o v er .......................................
P e rc en ta g e payment 2 / ..................................
2 p e rc e n t .......................................................
3 p e rc e n t ........................................................
4 p e rc e n t ........................................................
O ther .....................................
W orkers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p aid v a c a t i o n s ....................................... ..

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .9
.3
7 1 .6
4 .0
2 3 .8
.2
.1

1C 0.0
1 0 0 .0
.6
9 6 .4
3 .0
-

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 4 .4
5 .6
-

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
9 8 .7
-

-

See fo o tn o t e s a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.2
5 0 .7

-

4 9 .1
-

-

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8
4 9 .2
1 0 .3
4 0 .3
-

-

.2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 1 .8

-

4 5 .1
3 .1
-

-

9 9 .8
8 6 .4
1 .5
7 2 .8
.7
1 1 .4
1 0 .8
.6
.6
9 .6
2 .6
.2

1 0 0 .0
7 9 .6
.7
7 5 .2
1 .1
2 .6
1 6 .2
.9
.9
1 4 .4
4 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .0
9 1 .7

-

5 .3
-

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .4
9 6 .6
-

-

-

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .7
5 2 .5

9 5 .8
8 6 .8
2 .4
6 9 .4

4 4 .8

1 5 .0

„

_

_

9 .0
9 .0
-

4 .2

20

T a b le D-A.J

Paid VacationA tyofyMal PamuA c iA) -Go*Uitmmd
Ah

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V a ca tio n p o lic y

A ll w orkers ................................................................

All
industries

Manufacturing

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 ,0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .9
.3
6 2 .6
A.O
2 9 .6
3 .A
.1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.6
9 3 .1
6 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 3 .6
6 .A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
9 2 .3
6.A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 0 .9
10.A
3 8 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8
3 1 .5
1 0 .3
5 8 .0
.2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
AA.O
5 1 .6
A. A
-

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 C 0 .0
7 9 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .0
9 0 .2
6 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .A
9 0 .A
6 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1
5A .1
_
1 2 .2
3 2 .6
-

ah
_/
| industries 1/ Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

A fte r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
Workers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s ............................................. ..
L e n g th -o f-tim e p a y m e n t.......... ..
1 w e e k .................................................. * . . . •
2 weeks . ................. .......................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ....................
3 weeks ...........................................................
A weeks and over .................................
P ercen tag e payment 2 / .................................
2 o e r c e n t ......................................................
3 p e rc e n t ......................................................
A p e rc e n t .......................................................
O t h e r .......................................................................
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid v a c a tio n s ...........................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9 9 .8
86.A
1 .2
7 0 .7
.7
7 .6
6 .2
1 0 .8
.6
.6
9 .6
2 .6
.2

n

72 .*8
1 .1
5 .0
1 6 .2
.9
.9
1A.A
A .2
-

-

-

-

9 5 .8
8 6 .8
2.A
69 .A
1 5 .0
9 .0
9 .0
A.2

A fte r 15 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s .....................................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...............................
1 w e e k .............................................................
2 w e e k s .......... ....................... ....................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ....................
3 weeks ...........................................................
A weeks and over ......................................
P ercen tag e payment 2 / ........................ « . . .
2 p e r c e n t ......................................................
3 p e r c e n t ............................... .......................
A p e r c e n t .......................................................
6 p e rc e n t and o v er .................................
O t h e r ............ ............................................ ..............
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p rov id in g
no paid v a c a tio n s .............................................

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .9
.3
2 5 .A
A.O
6 6 .8
3.A
.1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.6
A 0.2
5 9 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 .9
9 3 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
53 .A
A 5.3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
33.A
2 7 .9
3 8 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8
8 .7
1 0 .3
8 0 .8
.2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 3 .0
7 2 .6
A. A
-

9 9 .8
86 .A
1 .2
3 9 .9
.7
3 8 .A
6 .2
1 0 .8
.6
.6
2 .9
6 .7
2 .6
.2

1 0 0 .0
7 9 .6
.7
3 6 .9
1 .1
A 0 .9
_
1 6 .2
.9
.9
3 .7
1 0 .7
A .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .0
7.A
8 9 .6
_
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3.A
5 6 .8
_
3 9 .8
_
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1
5 1 .0

9 5 .8
8 6 .8
2 .A
6 8 .9
_

1 5 .3
3 2 .6

1 5 .5
9 .0

_
_
_
_

9 .0
_
_

-

A .2

A fte r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p rov id in g
paid v a c a tio n s ................... ................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment .......................... ..
1 week ................... ............................. ..
2 w e e k s ...........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...................
3 weeks ............................... ............................
A ‘weeks and over .............................
P ercen tag e payment 2/ ..................................
2 p e r c e n t .......... ............................................
3 p e rc e n t ................................... ..................
A p e rc e n t ........................ ..............................
6 p e rc e n t and over ..................................
Other ...................................... ................................
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p rov id in g
no p aid v a c a tio n s .............................................

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .9
.3
2 1 .1
6 9 .7
8 .8
.1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.6
3Q .6
6 8 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 .9
9 3 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
A 8.0
5 0 .7
-

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b l e ,
*
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (e x clu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ,
* * F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2A .0
3 6 .8
3 9 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8
8 .7
7 7 .3
1 3 .8
.2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 3 .0
7 2 .6

A.A
-

9 9 .8
86.A
1 .2
3 2 .8
.7
A5.2
6 .5
1 0 .8
.6
.6
2 .9
6 .7
2 .6
.2

1 0 0 .0
7 9 .6
.7
3 1 .5
1 .1
A 6.3
1 6 .2
.9
.9
3 .7
1 0 .7
A .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .0
7 .A
8 9 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .A
5 0 .2
A6.A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1
3 3 .2

9 5 .8
8 6 .8
2.A
6 8 .9
_

3 1 .5
3A .2

1 5 .5
9 .0

_
_
-

9 .0
_

_

A .2

21

T able

d- 4 :

P

a id

V

a o a iio s t A

{Q

o fy P u U

P

a jQ 4jl U a o

*

uL

)

-C

o n

t in

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN V a ca tio n p o l ic y

A ll w o r k e r s ............ ....................................................

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .9
.3
1 7 .3
6 0 .5
2 1 .8
.1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.6
3 0 .6
6 7 .4
1 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
100. c
6 .9
9 3 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
3 8 .7
4 3 .8
1 6 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 8 .6
2 8 .6
5 2 .8
-

e d

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

1 0 0 .0

u

All
.
industries 1/

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8
2 .2
5 8 .6
3 9 .0
.2

1
I
|
|

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 3 .0
7 1 .3
5 .7
-

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .8
86.41 .2
3 1 .3
.7
4-5.1
8 .1
1 0 .8
.6
.6
2 .9
6 .7
2 .6

1 0 0 .0
7 9 .6
.7
3 1 .5
1 .1
4 5 .6
.7
1 6 .2
.9
#o

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .0
7 .4
8 9 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .4
3 7 .2
4 4 .7
1 4 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1
2 8 .0
3 3 .6
3 7 .3
_
_

9 5 .8
8 6 .8
2 .4
6 8 .9
-

A f te r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
Workers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
p a id v a c a tio n s ................. .......................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ................................
1 w e e k ...............•••••••••................ ..
2 w e e k s ............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ....................
3 weeks ............................................................
4 weeks and o ver .................................... ..
P e rc en ta g e payment 2 / .................
2 p e rc e n t ........................................................
3 p e rc e n t ........................................................
4- p e rc e n t ....................................
6 p e rc e n t and o v e r ..................................
O ther ........................ ...............................................
W orkers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p aid v a c a t i o n s ..............................................
1/
2/
*
**

.

—

.2

—

9 * t iiiA

O

*1 G

e a n

d

P « H

li0 4 t P l&

A ll w orkers ....................................................................
W orkers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts h aving
in su ra n ce o r p e n sio n p la n s 2/ ....................
In su ra n ce p la n s 2 / .................................... ..
L i f e ...................... ................................... ..
A c c id e n ta l d eath and
dism em berm en t................. ..........................
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t .............................
H o s p ita liz a tio n ............................................
S u r g ic a l ............................................................
M ed ical ...............................................................
R e tire m e n t-p e n s io n p la n ................................
W orkers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts h av ing
no in su ra n ce o r p e n sio n p l a n s ...............

*
**

-

-

4 .2

* td .

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type o f p la n

1/

~

-

9 .0
9 .0
_

In c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e a l e s t a t e in a d d itio n to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
P e rc e n t o f an n ual e a r n in g s .
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .

T a b le D -5s

2/

3 .7

1 0 .7
4 .2

1 5 .5

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

A
U
industries 1/ Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

10C .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .1
9 2 .1
8 7 .1

9 4 .5
9 3 .4
8 4 .6

9 1 .3
9 1 .3
9 1 .3

9 0 .5
8 7 .8
8 2 .2

9 4 .4
9 3 .3
8 2 .0

9 7 .3
9 3 .4
9 3 .3

9 6 .3
8 3 .5
6 9 .4

9 1 .1
8 8 .5
7 9 .3

9 1 .6
8 9 .3
7 8 .8

9 1 .3
9 1 .3
9 1 .3

9 0 .3
8 7 .4
8 1 .1

9 2 .6
8 7 .3
7 8 .2

8 6 .8
8 6 .8
7 5 .7

3 2 .2
4 5 .6
7 4 .4
6 8 .5
2 5 .1
6 6 .6

3 3 .5
6 4 .3
8 1 .2
7 5 .0
3 8 .8
5 1 .9

6 8 .5
6 2 .1
4 1 .9
3 7 .6
1 .0
8 9 .0

2 6 .0
4 6 .7
7 1 .4
5 3 .4
2 0 .3
5 7 .8

1 3 .0
5 4 .0
4 9 .8
4 4 .4
4 2 .8

3 4 .4
2 8 .7
8 4 .5
8 3 .0
2 6 .2
8 5 .2

8 .0
2 9 .6
4 6 .8
3 0 .4
1 5 .9
4 2 .8

3 0 .5
6 6 .7
6 6 .0
6 0 .2
2 2 .9
4 2 .9

3 3 .0
7 0 .1
7 8 .0
7 3 .5
3 2 .5
4 1 .5

6 0 .5
6 7 .9
3 9 .7
3 6 .5
2 .7
8 2 .9

2 6 .3
4 8 .3
6 2 .7
5 0 .2
1 8 .7
5 4 .8

1 0 .3
6 2 .7
4 1 .7
3 7 .8
4 1 .7

3 4 .2
6 1 .1
6 1 .1
3 1 .3
2 6 .9
.5

4 .9

5 .5

8 .7

9 .5

5 .6

2 .7

3 .7

8 .9

8 .4

8 .7

9 .7

7 .4

1 3 .2

Includes deta for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately,
Uhduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Finanot**

-

O ccu p a tio n a l Wage Surv ey , B o sto n , M a ss., March 1953
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

22

A ppendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau’s occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources* In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community* Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments*

such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied*
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment’s full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau’s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) Office
clerical^ (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-4). The industry groupings surveyed are: Manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each, of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term "office workers” referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. ”Plant workers”
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in ncnoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries, these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries•
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey. Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

23

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift*

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours*
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller*

Information on wage practices other than «$hift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables* It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments; that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Boston, Mass., 1/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Mhrch 1953

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
• establi shments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis

101

1 ,2 4 4
475
769

2 51
81
170

427,700
230,000
197,700

2 2 1,13 0
114 ,4 4 0
10 6,690

4 7 ,12 0
15,50 0
31,620

101
51
101
51
51

All divisions ............................ ........
Manufacturing ............................... .
Nonmanufacturing................ ..............
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ........ ........................
Wholesale trade ............................
Retail trade ................... ............
Finance, insurance, and real estate .........
Services 2 / .................................

67
212
149
153
188

24
39
37
32
38

34,400
28,000
65,200
43,200
26,900

26,000
8,020
39,470
23,340
9,860

4,540
2,410
4,280
18,560
1,830

8
8
21
21

43
19
162
107

22
12
45
27

2,431
1,305
22,953
5,632

1 ,5 7 5
1,0 0 3
13,666
1,997

160
1,862
128

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 4/
Women’s and misses1 dresses ........ ..............
Paints and varnishes ............. ................
Machinery industries .............................
Power laundries ..................................

5/

1/ Boston Metropolitan Area (Stiffoik County, 1U communities in Essex County, 28 in Middlesex County, 17 in Norfolk County, and 2 in
Plymouth County).
*
2/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in the April 1952 survey was 21 workers in wholesale
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services; and 1G1 in the other major industry divisions.
2/ Hotels, personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
ij Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.




2k

Index
A ssem bler (m ach in ery ), 11
A u to m a tic -la th e o p e ra to r (m ach in ery ), 1 1 ,

J a n it o r , 8
J a n ito r (m ach in ery ), 1 1 , 13

12

K ey-punch o p e ra to r, U

Bench hand ("b ak eries), 15
B i l le r , m achine, 3
Bookbinder ( p r in tin g ) , 15
B ookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to r, 3
B ric k la y e r (b u ild in g c o n s tr u c tio n ) , 15

L a b e le r and p ack er (p a in ts and
v a rn is h e s ), 10
L ab o rer (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 15
L a b o re r, m a te ria l h a n d lin g , 8
L a b o re r, m a te ria l h a n d lin g (m ach in ery), 11

C a lcu latin g -m ach in e o p e ra to r, 3
C a rp en ter (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 15
C a rp e n te r, m ain ten an ce, 6
C lean er, 8
C le rk , f i l e , k
C le rk , o rd e r, 3 , 4
C le rk , p a y r o ll, 3> k
C le rk , r e t a i l re c e iv in g (power
la u n d r ie s ) , Ik
C om positor, hand ( p r in tin g ) , 15
Crane o p e ra to r, e l e c t r i c b rid g e , 8
C u tte r and m arker (women *s and m is s e s 1
d r e s s e s ) , 10

M achine o p e ra to r ( p r in tin g ) , 15
M achine te n d e r ( p r in tin g ) , 15
M ach in e-to o l o p e ra to r, p ro d u c tio n
(m ach in ery ), 1 1 , 1 2 , 13
M ach in e-to o l o p e ra to r, toolroom
(m ach in ery ), 13
M a c h in ist, m ain ten an ce, 7
M a c h in is t, p ro d u c tio n (m ach in ery ), 13
M a ile r ( p r in tin g ) , 15
M arker (power la u n d r ie s ) , 1^
M echanic, autom o tiv e (m ain ten an ce), 7
M echanic, m ain ten an ce, 7
M illin g -m ach in e o p e ra to r (m ach in ery), 1 1 , 12
M illw rig h t, 7
M ixer (b a k e r ie s ) , 15
M ixer ( p a in ts and v a rn is h e s ), 10
M o to rtru ck d r iv e r , 16

D raftsm an, 6
D r ill- p r e s s o p e ra to r (m ach in ery ), 1 1 , 12
D u p licatin g -m ach in e o p e ra to r, 3 , U
E le c tr ic ia n (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 15
E le c tr ic ia n , m ain ten an ce, 6
E le c tr ic ia n , m aintenance (m ach in ery ), 11
E le c tro ty p e r ( p r in tin g ) , 15
E n g in e -la th e o p e ra to r (m achinery) , 1 1 , 12
E n g in eer, s ta tio n a r y , 6
E x tra c to r o p e ra to r (pow er la u n d r ie s ) , 1^
F in is h e r , fla tw o rk (power la u n d r ie s ) , 114Firem an, s ta tio n a r y b o il e r , 7
Firem an, s ta tio n a r y b o ile r (pow er la u n d r ie s ) ,

N u rse, i n d u s t r ia l ( r e g is te r e d ) , 6
O ffic e b o y , 3
O ffic e g i r l , k
O ile r , 7
O p erato r ( lo c a l t r a n s i t ) , 15
O rder f i l l e r , 8
Ovenman (b a k e r ie s ) , 15
Ik

P a ck er, 8
G rinding-m achine o p e ra to r (m ach in ery ), 1 1 , 1 2 , 13 P a in te r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 15
P a in te r , m ain ten an ce, 7
H elper (b a k e rie s ), 15
P h o to en g rav er ( p r in tin g ) , 15
H elp er, m o to rtru ck d r iv e r , 16
P i p e f i t t e r , m ain ten an ce, 7
H elp er, t r a d e s , m ain ten an ce, 7
P la s te r e r (b u ild in g c o n s tr u c tio n ) , 15
Plum ber (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 15
I d e n t if i e r (power la u n d r ie s ) , IllPlum ber, m ain ten an ce, 7
In s p e c to r (m ach in ery ), 11
P o r te r , 8
In s p e c to r, f i n a l ( exam iner)(vcm enfs and
P re ss a s s is t a n t ( p r in tin g ) , 15
m is s e s * d r e s s e s ) , 10
P re s s fe e d e r ( p r in tin g ) , 15




P r e s s e r (vomen, s and m isses* d r e s s e s ) , 10
P r e s s e r , m achine, s h i r t s (power
l a u n d r ie s ) , lU
Pressm an ( p r i n ti n g ) , 15
R e ceiv in g c le r k , 8
Routeman (d riv e r-s a le s m a n ) (pow er
l a u n d r ie s ) , Ik
Screw -m achine o p e ra to r, au to m atic
(m ach in ery ), 1 1 , 12
S e c re ta ry , ^
Sew er, hand ( f i n i s h e r ) (women*s and m isses*
d r e s s e s ) , 10
Sew ing-m achine o p e ra to r (women*s and
m isses* d r e s s e s ) , 10
S h e e t-m e ta l w o rk er, m ain ten an ce, 7
S h ip p in g c le r k , 9
S h ip p in g -a n d -re c e iv in g c le r k , 9
S te n o g ra p h e r, 5
S te re o ty p e r ( p r i n ti n g ) , 15
S w itchboard o p e ra to r, 5
S w itch b oard o p e r a to r - r e c e p tio n is t, 5
T ab u latin g -m ach in e o p e ra to r, 3 , 5
T e ch n ic ian ( p a in ts and v a r n is h e s ) , 10
T hread trim m er (cleaner)(w om en*s and
m isses* d r e s s e s ) , 10
T in te r ( p a in ts and v a r n is h e s ) , 10
T o o l-a n d -d ie m aker, 7
T o o l-a n d -d ie maker (m ach in ery ), 13
T ra c e r, 6
T ra n scrib in g -m a ch in e o p e ra to r, 5
T ruck d r iv e r , 9
T ru c k e r, pow er, 9
T u r r e t- la th e o p e ra to r, hand
(m ach in ery ), 1 1 , 1 2 , 13
T y p is t, 5
V arn ish maker (p a in ts and v a r n is h e s ) , 10
W asher, m achine (pow er la u n d r ie s ) , Ik
Watchman, 9
W elder, hand (m ach in ery ), 13
Work d i s t r i b u t o r (women*s and m isses*
d r e s s e s ) , 10
W rapper, bundle (power la u n d r ie s ) , Ik
U. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R INTING O F F I C E :0 — 1953




This report was prepared in the Bureau's New England Regional Office.
Communications may be addressed to:
WendelJ. D. Macdonald, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
18 Oliver Street
Boston 10, Massachusetts
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial
relations, employment, prices, labor turnover, productivity, work injuries,
construction and housing.

The New England Region includes the following States:
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts

New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont





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