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ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
December 1952

Bulletin N o . 1116-12

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABO R STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Com m issioner




Occupational Wage Survey
ST.




L O U IS ,
D ecem b e r

M IS S O U R I
1952

B ulletin N o. 1116-12
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 20 cents




Contents
Page

Letter oF Transmittal

I have th e h o n o r t o tra n s m it h e re w ith a r e p o r t on
o c c u p a tio n a l wages and r e l a t e d b e n e f its i n S t, L o u is, M o,,
d u rin g D ecem ber 1952* S im ila r s tu d ie s a re b e in g co n d ucted i n a
num ber o f o th e r la r g e la b o r-m a rk e t a re a s d u rin g th e f i s c a l y e a r
1953* T hese s tu d ie s have b e e n d e sig n e d to m eet a v a r i e t y o f
g o v e rn m en tal and n o n g o v ern m en tal u se s and p ro v id e a re a -w id e
e a rn in g s in f o r m a tio n f o r many o c c u p a tio n s common t o m ost manu­
f a c tu r in g and n o n m an u factu rin g i n d u s t r i e s , as w ell a s sum m aries
o f s e le c te d su p p le m e n ta ry wage b e n e f i ts 0 W henever p o s s ib le ,
s e p a ra te d a ta have b een p re s e n te d f o r in d iv id u a l m ajo r in d u s tr y
d iv i s io n s .
T h is r e p o r t was p re p a re d i n th e B u re a u s re g io n a l o f­
f i c e i n C h icag o , I l l 0, by Woodrow Cc L inn u n d e r th e d i r e c t io n
o f G eorge E 0 V o ta v a 9 R e g io n a l Wage and I n d u s t r i a l R e la tio n s
A n a ly s t, The p la n n in g and c e n t r a l d ir e c tio n o f th e program was
c a r r ie d on i n th e B u re a u 1s D iv is io n o f Wages and I n d u s t r i a l
R e la tio n s ,
Ewan C lag u e, C om m issioner,

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE......................................................................

The S e c r e ta r y o f L abor:

1

THE ST, LOUIS METROPOLITAN AREA..............................................................
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF IABOR,
B ureau o f L abor S t a t i s t i c s ,
W ashington, D. C ., A p ril 8 , 1953.

INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................

2

TABLES:

A verage e a rn in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d on an
a r e a b a s is A -l
O ffic e o c c u p a tio n s • • , , , , o , , , o o o , , , , , , « o o » o o o
A-2
P r o f e s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s , • , • • •
A—
3
M aintenance and pow er p la n t o c c u p a tio n s
A-4
C u s to d ia l, w areh o u sin g , and sh ip p in g
o c c u p a tio n s ...........7

A verage e a rn in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d on an
in d u s tr y b a s is B-2333 Womenfs and m is s e s 1 d r e s s e s ..................................
9
B-2851 P a in ts and v a rn is h e s .............................................., , , , , 9
B -35
M achinery i n d u s t r ie s
o...*»**o****«*» 10
B -7211 Power la u n d r ie s .......................................................... , , , , , 11
U nion wage s c a le s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s C-15
B u ild in g c o n s tr u c tio n •
•••••,••,
C-205 B a k e rie s ...................................... ...............................................
C-27 P r in tin g
C-41 L ocal t r a n s i t o p e ra tin g em ployees , , , , , ................
C-42 M o to rtru c k d r iv e r s and h e lp e rs , • • • • , 1
S u p p lem en tary wage p r a c tic e s D— 1
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l p ro v is io n s , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
D-2

D-3
D— 4
D-5

Hon, M a rtin P , D u rk in ,
S e c r e ta r y o f Ia b o r 0




3
5
6

APPENDIX:

Scheduled w e e k l y hours ...................

14
14

P aid h o lid a y s
15
P a id v a c a tio n s ...............0, , o* . , o * , , • • • • • • • ............ 15
In s u ra n c e and p e n sio n p la n s ....................................
17

Scope and m ethod o f s u rv e y

IN D EX

3

12
12
12
13

18
2 0




- ST. LO U IS, M 0 .

O C C U P A T IO N A L W A G E

a c t i v i t y i n th e a re a i s w id e ly d i v e r s i f i e d w ith no s in g le in d u s try
group em ploying a s many a s 15 p e rc e n t o f th e w o rk ers. Food p ro c ­
e s s in g firm s , em ploying more th a n 3 6 ,0 0 0 w o rk e rs, re p re s e n te d th e
n u m e ric a lly m ost im p o rta n t m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s tr y g ro u p. The p r i ­
m ary m e ta ls in d u s tr y , th e n e x t l a r g e s t m a n u fa ctu rin g g ro u p, had a
t o t a l w ork fo rc e o f n e a r ly 3 1 ,0 0 0 engaged p r im a r ily in th e p roduc­
t io n o f s t e e l , ir o n and s t e e l c a s tin g s , r e in f o r c in g b a rs , p ip e s and
tu b in g , w ire , and n o n fe rro u s c a s tin g s . E sta b lish m e n ts engaged in
th e m a n u fa ctu re and assem b lin g o f m otor v e h ic le , a i r c r a f t , and o th e r
t r a n s p o r ta tio n equipm ent em ployed 2 7 ,5 0 0 . O ther m an u factu rin g in ­
d u s tr y g ro u ps o f m ajo r im p o rtan ce in c lu d e d e l e c t r i c a l m ach in ery ,
c h e m ic a ls , n o n e le c tr ic a l m a ch in ery , and a p p a r e l.

Introduction
The S t, L o u is a r e a i s one o f s e v e ra l im p o rta n t in d u s ­
t r i a l c e n te r s i n w hich th e B ureau o f L abor S t a t i s t i c s co n d u cted
o c c u p a tio n a l wage su rv e y s d u rin g l a t e 1952 and e a r ly 1953 • In such
su rv e y s o c c u p a tio n s common to a v a r i e t y o f m a n u fa ctu rin g and non­
m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s a r e s tu d ie d on a com m unity-w ide b a s is . 1 /
C r o s s -in d u s try m ethods o f sam p lin g a r e th u s u t i l i z e d i n co m p ilin g
e a rn in g s d a ta f o r th e fo llo w in g ty p e s o f o c c u p a tio n s : (a ) o f f i c e ;
(b ) p r o f e s s io n a l and t e c h n ic a l; (c ) m ain ten an ce and pow er p la n t ;
and (d ) c u s to d i a l , w a re h o u sin g , and sh ip p in g * In p re s e n tin g e a rn ­
in g s in fo rm a tio n f o r su ch jo b s ( ta b le s A -l th ro u g h A -4) s e p a ra te
d a ta a r e p ro v id e d w h erev er p o s s ib le f o r in d iv id u a l b ro ad in d u s tr y
d iv is io n s *

An e s tim a te d 4 3 1 ,0 0 0 wage and s a la r y w orkers w ere on th e
p a y r o lls o f S t. L o uis a r e a n o n m an u factu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts in Novem­
b e r . About 1 1 4,000 w o rk ers w ere em ployed i n r e t a i l tra d e a c t i v i ­
t i e s , and an a d d itio n a l 5 0 ,0 0 0 w ere em ployed i n w h o lesale tra d e
o u t l e t s . The v a rio u s segm ents o f t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , com m unication,
and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s fu rn is h e d em ploym ent to n e a rly 70 ,00 0
w o rk e rs . The s e rv ic e s in d u s t r ie s em ployed ap p ro x im a te ly 89,000 p e r­
so ns i n su ch d iv e r s e f i e l d s a s h o te l s , t h e a t e r s , h o s p ita ls , ra d io
and t e l e v is i o n s t a t i o n s , e d u c a tio n a l i n s t i t u t i o n s , la u n d rie s and dryc le a n in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts , and firm s p ro v id in g b u s in e s s and te c h n ic a l
s e r v ic e s . F e d e ra l, S t a t s , and l o c a l governm ent ag e n c ie s re p o rte d
em ploym ent o f 3 7 ,00 0 in th e a r e a , and a p p ro x im a te ly 30,500 p erso n s
w ere em ployed in f in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s t a te e s ta b lis h m e n ts .
B u ild in g c o n s tr u c tio n p ro v id e d jo b s f o r 3 7 ,0 0 0 w ork ers and th e ex­
t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r ie s em ployed a b o u t 3 ,5 0 0 .

E a rn in g s in f o r m a tio n f o r c h a r a c te r is t ic o c c u p a tio n s i n
c e r t a i n m ore n a rro w ly d e fin e d i n d u s t r ie s i s p re s e n te d i n s e r i e s B
t a b l e s . U nion s c a le s ( s e r i e s C ta b le s ) a r e p re s e n te d f o r s e le c te d
o c c u p a tio n s i n s e v e r a l i n d u s t r ie s o r tr a d e s in w hich th e g r e a t
m a jo r ity o f th e w o rk ers a r e em ployed u n d e r term s o f c o l le c ti v e ­
b a rg a in in g a g re e m e n ts, and th e c o n tr a c t o r minimum r a t e s a r e be­
lie v e d to be i n d i c a t i v e o f p r e v a ilin g pay p r a c t i c e s .
D ata a r e c o l le c te d and sum m arized on s h i f t o p e ra tio n s
and d i f f e r e n t i a l s , h o u rs o f w ork, and su p p lem en tary b e n e f its such
a s v a c a tio n a llo w a n c e s , p a id h o lid a y s , and in s u ra n c e and p e n s io n
p la n s •

The St. Louis M etropolitan A re a

Among the industries
and establishment-size
groups sur­
veyed, establishments
employing nine-tenths
of the plant
(nonof­
fice) work e r s h a d wr i t t e n agreements w i t h labor organizations which

T o ta l p o p u la tio n o f th e S t. L ouis m e tro p o lita n a r e a ,
( c o n s is tin g o f th e C ity o f S t . L o u is, S t. L ouis and S t. C h a rle s
C o u n tie s , M o., an d M adison an d S t . C l a i r C o u n tie s, 1 1 1 .) i s a p p ro x i­
m a te ly 1 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0 . About h a l f r e s id e w ith in th e c o rp o ra te l i m i t s o f
th e C ity o f S t . L o u is.

covered rates of p a y and w o r k i n g conditions.
Unionization was most
extensive in the ma n u f a c t u r i n g and transportation, communication, and
other public utilities groups of industries, applying to more
than
95 perc e n t
of the plant workers.
The propo r t i o n
of plant workers
covered by u n i o n agreements in other m a j o r nonmanufacturing industry
divisions ranged fro m two-thirds
in retail trade establishments to
m o r e t h a n three-fourths in the whole s a l e trade and services groups.
U n i onization among office workers
was considerably less extensive
than among plant workers; less than a sixth
of the office workers
w e r e employed u nder the terms of collective-bargaining agreements.
Only in the public utilities
group of industries,
in whi c h nearly
four-fifths
of the office workers
w e r e covered by contract provi­
sions, was there any appreciable degree of u n i o n ization among office
workers in the St. Louis area.

N o n a g ric u ltu r a l wage and s a la r ie d w orkers i n th e S t. L ouis
a r e a num bered a p p ro x im a te ly 7 2 2 ,0 0 0 i n November 1952* F a c to ry em­
p lo y m en t a c c o u n te d f o r a b o u t 2 9 1 ,0 0 0 o f t h i s t o t a l . M an u factu rin g
1/
See a p p e n d i x f o r d i s c u s s i o n of scope and m e t h o d of survey.
D i f ferences b e t w e e n the scope of this survey and the las t previous
survey are indicated
i n th e a p p e n d i x table.
The c o nstruction and
ext r a c t i v e
industries
and government institutions
w e r e excluded
f r o m e a c h study.




i )

2

Occupational W age Structure
In December 1952, g ro s s h o u rly e a rn in g s (in c lu d in g pay
f o r o v ertim e and n ig h t w ork) o f St* L o uis a re a m a n u fa c tu rin g p la n t
w o rk ers av erag ed $ 1 .7 2 , 11 c e n ts h ig h e r th a n r e p o rte d i n December
1951, 2 / 1 m onth p r i o r to th e d a te o f th e B u reau ’s p re v io u s commu­
n it y wage su rv e y i n th e a r e a . 2 / M ost o f t h i s in c r e a s e can be
a t t r ib u t e d to na c r o s s - th e - b o a r d ” wage a d ju s tm e n ts made d u rin g th e
12-m onth p e r io d , many o f w hich r e p re s e n te d a d ju s tm e n ts b ased on
changes i n th e c o s t o f l i v i n g . In a d d itio n , in d iv id u a l m e rit a n d /
o r le n g th - o f - s e r v ic e r a i s e s added to th e t o t a l w age-change p a t t e r n .
Wages o f th r e e - f o u r th s o f th e p la n t (n o n o ffic e ) w o rk ers
i n th e S t. L o uis a re a w ere b ased on tim e r a t e s . Form al r a t e - s t r u c ­
tu r e p la n s a p p lie d to v i r t u a l l y a l l th e s e w o rk e rs. In m a n u fa ctu r­
in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts th e s e p la n s w ere d iv id e d a b o u t e q u a lly betw een
th o s e s p e c ify in g a s in g le r a t e f o r each jo b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n and
th o s e p ro v id in g a ra n g e o f r a t e s f o r in d iv id u a l o c c u p a tio n s , iimoqg
th e n o nroanu factu rin g in d u s tr y g ro u ps s i n g l e - r a t e p la n s w ere p re ­
dom inant i n th e p u b lic u t i l i t i e s and s e r v ic e s in d u s tr y g ro u p s.
P ie c e - r a te o r bonus wage in c e n tiv e paym ent p la n s a p p lie d to more
th a n a f o u r th o f th e w o rk ers i n m a n u fa c tu rin g \ such p la n s w ere
r e l a t i v e l y i n s i g n i f i c a n t among n o n ro an u factu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts ,
w ith th e e x c e p tio n o f r e t a i l tr a d e and s e r v ic e s i n w hich a b o u t 15
p e rc e n t o f th e n o n o ffic e w o rk ers w ere p a id on an in c e n tiv e b a s is .
S a la r ie s o f tw o - th ird s o f th e o f f i c e w o rk ers w ere b ased
on fo rm a liz e d p la n s t h a t p ro v id e d r a t e ra n g e s f o r in d iv id u a l occu­
p a tio n s . V i r tu a l l y a l l th e rem ain in g o f f i c e w o rk ers w ere em ployed
i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts t h a t d eterm in ed s a l a r i e s on an in d iv id u a l b a s is .

2 / E s tim a te s p re p a re d by th e M isso u ri D iv is io n o f Employment
S e c u rity in c o o p e ra tio n w ith th e U. S . D epartm ent o f L a b o r1s B ureau
o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s .
2 / Bureau o f L abor S t a t i s t i c s B u lle tin No. 1095, O c cu p atio n al
Wage S tr u c tu r e , S t. L o u is, M o., J a n u a ry 1952.




Wages and s a l a r i e s o f w o rk ers in m a n u fa c tu rin g
w ere g e n e ra lly h ig h e r th a n th o s e o f w o rk ers em ployed i n
o c c u p a tio n s in n o n m an u factu rin g . A verage s a l a r i e s w ere
m a n u fa c tu rin g f o r 18 o f 20 o f f i c e jo b s and 17 o f 22
w here com parisons co u ld be m ade.

i n d u s t r ie s
co m parable
h ig h e r i n
p la n t jo b s

P ro v is io n s r e l a t i n g to th e o p e r a tio n o f e x tr a s h i f t s were
re p o rte d i n m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts em ploying m ore than 85 p er­
c e n t o f th e w o rk e rs. N early a l l th e s e p la n t s had a p o lic y o f p ay­
in g prem ium r a t e s f o r work on l a t e s h i f t s . A lth o u g h th e am ounts o f
prem ium pay v a rie d g r e a t l y , a d i f f e r e n t i a l o f 5 c e n ts was m ost com­
m only re p o rte d f o r s e c o n d - s h if t w orkj 10 c e n ts an h o u r was th e m ost
f r e q u e n tly re p o rte d d i f f e r e n t i a l f o r t h i r d - s h i f t w ork. S l i g h t l y
m ore th a n a f i f t h o f a l l m a n u fa c tu rin g p la n t w o rk ers w ere em ployed
on l a t e s h i f t s in December 1952.
P a id v a c a tio n s w ere g ra n te d to a l l o f f i c e w o rk ers and
n e a r ly a l l p la n t w ork ers in c lu d e d i n th e s tu d y . V a c a tio n s u s u a lly
am ounted to 2 weeks a f t e r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e f o r o f f i c e w o rk e rs,
w h ereas p la n t w o rk ers t y p i c a l l y re c e iv e d 1 week a f t e r a s im ila r
p e rio d o f s e r v ic e . A 2-w eek p a id v a c a tio n f o r p la n t w orkers g en er­
a l l y a p p lie d a f t e r 5 y e a r s 1 s e r v i c e . The g e n e ra l a r e a p r a c t i c e was
to g iv e 3 weeks a f t e r 15 y e a r s , a lth o u g h s u b s t a n t i a l num bers o f
b o th p la n t and o f f ic e w o rk ers c o n tin u e d t o r e c e iv e o n ly 2 w eek s.
S ix
v a s t m a jo rity
d o m inant a re a
t io n s e x is te d

o r more p a id h o lid a y s w ere g ra n te d a n n u a lly to th e
o f b o th p la n t and o f f i c e w o rk e rs . A lth o u g h th e p re ­
p r a c tic e was to g iv e 6 h o lid a y s , s i g n i f i c a n t v a r i a ­
among th e m ajo r in d u s tr y d iv is io n s s tu d ie d .

In su ra n c e p la n s p ro v id in g l i f e , h e a l t h , and h o s p i t a l i z a ­
t i o n b e n e f its a f f e c te d la r g e p r o p o r tio n s o f b o th p la n t and o f f i c e
w o rk e rs. The number o f w o rk ers co v ered by th e v a rio u s ty p e s o f
b e n e f its v a rie d c o n s id e ra b ly . P e n sio n o r r e tir e m e n t p la n s were r e ­
p o rte d by em ployers o f 60 p e rc e n t o f th e o f f i c e w o rk ers and n e a r ly
50 p e r c e n t o f th e p la n t w o rk e rs.
A la r g e m a jo rity o f p la n t and o f f i c e w o rk ers w ere sch ed ­
u le d to w ork a 4 0 -h o u r week i n D ecem ber. M ost o f th e re m a in in g
p la n t (n o n o ffic e ) w o rk ers w ere on lo n g e r s c h e d u le s , w h ereas m ost o f
th e o th e r o f f ic e w o rk ers w ere sc h e d u le d to woric l e s s th a n 40 h o u rs .




3

A' Cross-Industry Occupations
Table a -i
«

Office OccttpaiiOHl

(Ayerage straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, December 1952)

NOTE*

Data for nonmanufacturing do not include information for department and limitedprice variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

u

Table A-l*

O ffice Occufiatio*H-6oHii*m ed

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, December 1952)

1/
*
**

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
J




5

Table A-2:

PtofadAiOHcU Gtui 'ec/vUccU CfoCi4f2<Uia*td
7

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, December 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Men

$
5
$
$
Weekly
Weekly Under &.50 &5 .oo 17.50 $
5o.oo la. 5 0
6 2 .5 0
6 5 .0 0 67.50 70.00 75.00 to.oo *8 5 .0 0 90.00 95.00 1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 lio.oo|1 1 5 .0 0 * 2 0 .0 0
1
erig
anns
and
(tnad (tnad $
Sadr) Sadr)
U2.50
x5
U5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50155.00 57.50 6 0 .0 0 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 !90.00 95.00 1 0 0 .0 0 i ) .oo 1 1 0 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 over
I
i
!
|
!
j
1
$
$
55.00 57.50 6 0 .0 0

$
82.50

Draftsmen
Manufacturing ............ ......•••••••
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••.....

710
&3
167

ko.o
Uo.o
39.5

8 1 .5 0
8 5 .0 0

-

Draftsman, junior •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ........ ............ .

3U7
2*3

Tracers *......... ............. ........

U6
uo

81
62

171

102 j

122

6

19

U9

75
27

28
17

11

2U

___ 13

8

12
1

U

30

1 i

n

j

1

u

3

u

6

27
23

1U
10

16

1

22

16 I ___ 2 _i ___ i.___
_
_
;

19

15 :

7
7

•

15
l*

22
21

18

??

y?

3U

l8

32

1

f
'l

1

2

5

?

13
13

2*

13
13

22
21

-

-

UO.O ' 63.00
5 8 .0 0
UO.O

6
6

8
8

16
16

27

27

56

uo.o

9

1*

3

178
161

Uo.o
uo.o

53.50

25 !
16
9

2
2

5
5
“

.
-

-

.
~

_
-

-

39
35
U !

5U
U6
8 !

a

51 1 __ 21
_
U7
15!
u 1
7

\

28 1
■

— j
—

1----|

1

-i
i
•

•»___ 2 k.___ Ikj— _ 2 6 ___ L L
21
8
5
27
»|
21
3
31
3i
ui
|

_!
"!

.1
“f

_•

_'

*

"
_

Women
j

Nurses, industrial (registered) ......... ••
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

62.50
62.50

3

23

15

1
1/

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




NOTE:

Data for nonmanufacturing do not include information for department and limitedprice variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in data far all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

2 1

i

33
1

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6

3 M aintenance and. Pome* Plant Cfacufiatianl

Table a - :

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, December 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Carpenters, maintenance ........... ...... .
Manufacturing ............ ..............

Number
o
f
Workers

715
657

$
Average Under
1.25 1.30
hul
ory
erig *
anns
1.25
1.30 1.35

$
2.06
2.05

-

-

-

$ ,
1.1x0

1.U5

$ ^
i.5o

i.55

1.60 1.65

$
1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

$
1.90

1.95

1.1x0

1.1x5

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80 1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

2.10

2.15

2.20

2.25

2.30

2.1(0

2.50

16

37
32
£

76
73
J

72
69

12
x
37
g
5

9
9

130
118
TO
JC
j

50
5o

23
20
9

l
x
l
x

3
-

10
x

-

9
8

51a

-

23
22

65

-

3
3

19

-

25
2x
l

35
26
9

23
23

69
67
2

96
95

11l
x
nix

7x
l
71
3

209
191
18

16
x
10
x
6

199
198

80
76
1
.
t
l

173
no

157
99
58

16
16

100
100

-

56
39
17

3
3

35
32

32
26
6

21a
6
18

19
18
X

13
1
T9
1C

19
19

60

1
«

35
3x
l

17
12

-

5
T
-

29
29
-

55

1x92
1x92

$

J

Electricians, maintenance ........ .........
Manufacturing ................... .

1.1x98
1,307

2.16
2.11a
2 .26

-

_

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

26
18
8

Engineers, stationary..... ............... .
Manufacturing ..........................

1x09
323
86

2.12
2.12a

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Firemen, stationary boiler ......... ..••••••
Manufacturing ...................... ....
Nonmanufacturing .....................

619
162
x
157

1.80
1.79
1.83

22
8
lx
l

Il
l
11
1
-

25
25
-

23
21

Helpers, trades, maintenance ••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••«•
Nonmanufacturing

1,898
1,61x2
256

1.79
O l
1.65

9
9

-

31
30

733
730

2.02
2.02

-

-

-

Machinists, maintenance •••••••••••••••«•••••
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••

1,552
1,1(68

2.15
2.15

_

_

_

-

-

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) •••••••••
Manufacturing ................... ..... .
Nonmanufacturing ••••••..........
Public utilities * ..................

61x7
113
53U
Ill
xxx

1.85
2.00
1.82
1.81

_
-

Mechanics, maintenance ................ .
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ............ ..... ••••••
Public utilities *

l,27ix
1,213
6l
38

1.93
1.96
1.89
2.03

_
-

Millwrights ........................... .
Vamifa/'+u
^^^T.Tf_tiit ■im i■i■i■■■ii■

l 7x
xl
l7x
xl

2.07
2.07

Oilers
................ ....... .
Manufacturing.... ............... ......

651x
632

1.77
1.77

Painters, maintenance ....................
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••.••.... .

1x56
1x17

2.10
2.09

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ..........
Manufacturing

Pipefitters, maintenance *•••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing .•••••••................. .

8
6
2

80
73
7

2
2

2
2

18
x
18
x
-

22
22

30
21a
5

27
2l
x
9

10
x
39

21x7
231a
ii
XJ

-

-

~

6
6
_

Uh

_

2.U
2.15

Tool-and-die makers ..........
Manufacturing ......................... .

1,025
1,025

3

18
7
n

36
21
it
■O

68
68

17
13
1
,
u

31
23
8

12
12 —
“

37
25
12

13
9
l
x

13
12
1

28
23
5

17
5
12

20
19
1

250
111
T^0
-07

92
865

339
30lx
35

86
38
18
x

22
21

12
x
10
x
2

m

66

.

W

12
x
12
x

17
17

23
23

3
3

10
8

18
x
18
x

12
x
12
x

37
36

70
70

60

-

_

_

_

8
8

19
x
19
x

66
61a

93
80

133
132

305

103

5i
8
13
x
18

11x5
9
136
122

23

87

W ~ W

59
X

2.70

over

10
23
23 — W

23
7
16

2.60

5

k

23
l
x
r --- T
15
-

-

-

17
x

-

-

-

102
102

.

_

-

-

.

-

-

60

173
173

111
111

83
83

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

llxi
11x0

66
62

H j7
85

53
53

56

30lx

150
150

29
29

222
222

-

23
23

9
lx
l
5

5
3
2
-

26
1
25
22

7
2
5
-

18
7
11
11

_
-

lx
l
13
1
1

lx
l
lx
i
-

3
3
-

-

_
-

_
-

.
.
-

129
129
-

2*
1
2^
“

-

_
-

_
-

_

_

1

~ W

—

.

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5
-

32
32
32

26
.
26
25

5;
1
3
51
17
x

21
lx
l
7
3

103
92

95
27
68
66

17
l
x
13
1

13lx
129
5
-

3
2
1
1

109
109
“

93
93
-

nli
n3
l
-

126
123
3
2

166
166
“

97
97
-

118
97
21
17

21j
12
12
12

7i
l
7a
1
“

16
15
1
1

25
21
l
x
l
x

3
■
»
j

1

59
tc
i

9
O
7

82
82

89
89

62
62

11x0
Tl O
i
li|U

27
27

_

_

29
25

10
x
10
x

16
16

9
9

8
8

lx
i
10

203
203

2
2

-

-

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

31
31

35
33

27

2x
l
21a

59
52

68
68

3
3

n
n

n

29

l
x
l
x

3

-

3»
1
31a

32
32

19
x
19
x

20
2

-

Il
xx
ll
xx

-

-

-

5

-

11
11

3
3

6

—r

18
18

18
x
ll
xx
ll T
xx

112
112

21x7
21x7

ll
x
a

39
39

69

10
10

300
300

22
22

7x
l
7a
1

_

3
3

_

19
19

29

13
1?
13 ~ i r

70
70

3
3

16
16

26
26 —

17
5
17 --- T

39
39

3
3

3
3

10
x
10
x

-

“

5
-

_
.
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

5
5
-

2
2
19
lx
l

7
7

1
1

_
-

7
7

_ ___L_
-

-

25
25

13
13

69

3

_

_

“

-

69

87
87
2
2

15
x

-

22
13

32
32

13
13

29

2.16
1,077
1,01x3 ' " 2.TB
265
262

12
l
x

J

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ••••••••••••
Manufacturing

2.31
2.31

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

-

-

7

-

_

27

26

_

7

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




$
$
$
$
$
$
2.00 *2.05 2.10 $
2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 *2.1x0 2.50 *2.«> $2.70
and

1.35

_

21
21

35

188
188

_

l
x
F
127
127

556
556

75
75

•

_

_
-

-

_

_

-

-

5
5

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

NOTE:

Data for nonmanufacturing do not include information for department and limitedprice variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

7
G u d t o d u U ,7 V c ft e U (H 4 A U U f,0 * 1 ( 1

Table A-4*

S U

iflfU

ft f

Q c C U fu U iO t U

l/

(Average hourly earnings
for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in St. Louis, Mo., by industry division, December 1952)

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

Occupation and industry division

Guards ...... ........ ............ .
Manufacturing

-

fL
l
76

1.20

-

U.831
3,06*

1,766

1.22
1.35
1.01

313
233

Janitors. Dorters, and cleaners (men) .......
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities * ....... ..........
Vholesale trade .....................

1.28
1.19

856
--- 259”

y
o
f
Xi
Oi

Laborers, material handling 3/
Manufacturing .... ......................
Nonmanufaeturing ................. ..••••••
Public utilities * .......... ••••••••..
ttiolesale trade ................. ••••••

NUMBER OF
$
$
$
$
0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 *1.10 $
Under 0.75 0.80 *0.85 $
1.15
1
0.75
.80 .85
.90
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20

$
1.56
1.59

936
—

Finance « * ...... ..... ........ .

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ••••••
Manufacturing ...... ...... ........

Aeae
vrg
hul
ory
erig
anns

.98
1.13
•oi
74
JLelO

1*48
i.5o"
1.39
1 .44
1.38

8.119
■

1,815

468

929

3
3

2
2
2

196

1<0

1

32
164
-

35
115

2i
l

35

-

___ 1

-

105_

m
.
10

105

299

-

12

• .

7238

77
77

20

£ h
i
3?

16

2h

12

15

U

.

-

*

.
.

6

-

6

12

?“
»
58
172
•

u
Uo

82

56

267

22
3U
2

21
21

4

.
-

8

___ 2.
9
9

121
24
99

6

U
64

6
6

13

20

4

6
5
5

35
16
19
$

55
49

15
i5

.

6
6

*

4

30? 1 135
48
81
54
254
11
52
36
10

251
k

16

4

g

8
8

•

1
3
1

16
39

2

37

*

WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
s
$
1.20 $1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.55 $1.60 *1.65 *1.70 1.75 $1.80 *1.90 2.00 *2.10 *2.20
and
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65

9
9

IT
i4

-

3

7
3
k
4

333
259
74

169
129

265
22u

11
10
8

3

60
22

16

33
31

74
30
44
44

190
82
108

197
154
43
3
40

2
2

.

57

41
10
19
26

26

227

A
Co
14
14

163
76
87
55
29

31
3
28
26

4

46

4

k
4

-

361
335
26

42

663

631

18

6
2

32
18
14

42
34

30
30

8

k

173
156
17
9

49
46
3

-

281
244
37
14
15

88

278
209
69
56
9

9

6
3
3

336 1103 1195 1325
1120
m
777
321 197
37 326
2 66 185
192
130 141
24

I85T ~599“

45

1

36

3

35
9
15

16
12

529

320

209
124
50

47
47

25

20

£
5

54
54

1.70
1?2
192

1.75

1.80

77 ___81
77
87

-

-

-

-

29
25
-

43
36
7
4
3

154
i5o
4
l
3

Ig4
i5i
3
-

48
*
•

-

3
3

-

-

2
2

-

-

717
500
209
57
82

236
79
157

117
91

•

.

97

68

3

68

26

25

2.00 2.10 2.20

over

9

9

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

37
37
-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

45

828
8?F

1.90

19 ___ ?£
19
29
“

62
62
-

116 266 26* 212
106 257 241 205
10
9
24
7
21
1
5
9

4

3

7

W —

15

1

-

14

6
6
*

'

Order fillers ••••••••••••••••••••••....... .
Manufacturing ....... ...... ••••.... .

2.197
951”

1,266

1 % 2~

7U0

Packers, class B (men) .•••••••••........ .
Manufacturing ............. ...... ..... ••
Nonmanufaeturing ••••.•••••••••••••••••••••

1.44
1.41

173

Wholesale trade ...... .......... .

2)

1.U3
.
_
“

23

9
9

.
”

.
“

25

29

1

10

20
20

10

36

25
25

32

35

4

52
37
15

26
.

28
12

130
96
32

1.62

2.488
■

"

523
364

1.36
1.37
1.34
1.35

“

15
15

43
23

7

11

20

76
24
52
47

107
35
72
71

235
65

170
68

12
24
.
.

•

2k

m
“

16
.
16
16

38
30

30

22

88

13
8
8

8
8

8
8

63
25
16

21

117

5l
63
40

142

H3

123

10*

19

8

16

4

110

187
74 ~ ~ 1 &
36
22
9
19

62

44

6
83
79

264
79
185
96

144
38

65

179
117

328

141
133

499

4

8

* 217
111
23

4

8

19

49

6

9

108

9

15

81

1

- --- 50
21
15
21
15

29
29

-

-

53

5

70
38
14

8
8

166

58

79

12

48

79
*

64
•

.

37

9

-

238

191
117
74
74

18
18

24

325
159

214

107
70
37
37

238

106

54

10

-

-

-

-

-

•
-

*

8
8

12
-

‘

Packers, class B (women) ............... •••••
Manufacturing ....... ................................ .

2.106

1,748

1.09
1.14
.86

Receiving clerks ........... .......................................
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

U28
------- 235"

l4
l2
tA.a I a mm3 a

. a.

98

145
-

^/12»5

31

70

1*
V

70

-

-

18

-

66

66

-

13
3

45

10

_

-

97
92

5;

1.60

1.62

-

-

1.58

1.55

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




45

NOTE:

-

420
394

26
5

5

389
374
15;

_

413
Ull

241
232

2

Q

7

3
3

3
3

23
23

1
1

21
36
29
25
17
7
25 ------ T — T --------7 —
-------- 7
i
8
8
2

2

5
-

5
5

2

39
23
16
16

34

30

59
38
21
21

42
25
17

-

-

-

-

22
8

46
26

10

26
25

20

52
37
15

26

14

16

1

6

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Data for nonmanufaeturing do not include information for department and limitedprice variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

14

15

10

T

h

t

1

7
7 -------- r

21

24

15

1

13
8

22
2

12

1

-

3

3

4

8

T a b le

a

-4 :

GudiodLcU, 74/ciAeJtfU4A4*Uf,GHd SUifLfUtuj, O ccH f^U io^-G ontlw ied
(Average hourly earnings V for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in St. Louis,"ho., by industry division, December 1952)

Number
of
Workers

Occupation and industry division

116
xx
303
■)3
j,

Shipping clerks •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ............ ........ .

88

Average
hourly
earnings

$
1.63
1.62
16|
.)
I.6 5

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
2.10 ^2.20
2.00 $
^•50 $
\.70 *L.75 \.80 *1.90 $
Under 0.75 0 . 8 0 0.85 0.90 0.95 i.oo i .0 5 i . 1 0 i.15 1.20 i.25 1.30 1 .3 5 \.b0
1.55 \.60
and
$
0.75
.80
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 i.bo l.b5 1.50 1«55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 .8 0 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 over
.85 .90

.

-

.

-

.

-

_

.

5
5

_

10
10

.

1
1

2
2

12
8
l
i

bb
38
6

100

7b
26
18

68
5&
2 T ~b6T
25
22
21
19

U6
17
29

28
12
16

6

26
23 —

\

8
IT
1
;

21
13
1STr - 1 r
3

3

6
1

1x56
2?0

Sonmanufacturing •••••••••....... .

3

2

10
2

3
2

2
2

•

_

~

“

_

20

u

”

20

Truck drivers, medium (1$ to and including
l tons)
x
•••••••••••••••

1 .6 3

1x56
207
2x
19

Truck drivers, light (under li tons) ••••••••
Manufacturing .............. •••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••

1 .6 2

2?

1.77
1.U9

23

1 .8 0 2

833
969
505

Ifa n u f^ n tiiH i» g n n t m i i m i m i r t m t i t i t

Nonmanufacturing.....................
Public utilities * o«...

"

"

~

“

“

“

1+6

19

33
13

12

3

8

I
f

32
3
29

n

it

_

1 .6 0

_

•

1.65

“

*

_

“

_

1

2

7

10

_

1 .6 6

1.7b

8

—
_

1.57

12
12

10

1. b
6
1 .6 8

166
85

1
1

2
2

7

10
2

"

2

■

20
10
10
2

b

5

7

6b
6

2
2

58
“

3b
3b

7
7

*

12

10

5
7

b

180

77
103
”

6

96
95
1
1

36
23
13
8

Il
f
13
28

93
6b
29
“

2b
12
12
8

ib
lb

72

29
— IT
18
1
9

51

150

27

5
5

2
2

39

12

5
3

111

15

2

163

3b?

79
8b
13

295
19b

267

60

— 35“
12
25 255
6
255

66

27
39
7

28

19

23

1

5
b

17
2
2

21
20
1
1

18
18

81

6
6

-

**

5

bt"
2b
18

31

39

b
v

Shipping-and-reoeiving clerks ••••.••••••••••

6
'6

.5
5

*

M7
167

26
b

85

8b
70

12 b

b
b

lb
13

3b
5

7
3

b
b

_____1 _

3

-

15?

b
l
i

‘
Truck drivers, heavy (over l tons.
x
trailer type) ...................... .
Manufacturing......... .... ..........
I f m M n n f ng r . TTt Tt r TTTt t Tt Tr t Tt t t r r T

1 .6 1 1

1x
17
l l 6U
,x
1 ,0 6 0

Truckers, power (fork-lift) •••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing.... ................ ...
Ifeniemntifme4sin4ruv _ . . .
P iiH I I a n M H M A , «

Sfetdimen •»»,.«•••••••»«...*•••••••«..•••••*.
Manufacturing....
Nonrasnufacturing .......... ......... .
Public utilities *
.

10
10

1

1.67
l«b9
1 .x
18

1

m~

1.61
1.62.

1,010
1x86
19
x

2
2

1.26
1.37

?2

16

•

1. b
0

32

5
11
5

l.b2

66
6b
2

lb
lx
i

22

16
.

20
20

28
3
25

55
bo
15
5

10

251

.

10

97
91

251

6

59
13
x
16

70

69
1

117
105
12
5

~S
J~
b6
20

“

1

752

195

7b0

11
10
1

13
13

1+3
b3

91
91

127
127

7

10

7

11
11

bo
bo

ib
lb

6
6

270
26

20
3
2

19
19

w
b8

82
82

26

W

ll
nr

752

23

2

1
•

32
2x
i

57
51
6
5

107

~s
tt

5o
5o

206
1
205

lb

5b

83
81

351
123
28

12b
59 120
25“ H 5 33
b
3

~~
T

218 176
lib T 5 T
22
10 b
98

9

13

*

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
3/ Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous study.
i j Workers were distributed as follows* 20 at $0.60 - $0.65? 69 at $0.65 - $0.70; and 56 at $0.70 - $0.75.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




-

16

1 .6 b

318

—

_

1 .7 6
1 .7 0

198
100

1,1x27
1,229

. _________ _____ ___ __ _
__ _____ _ _________

Truckers, poser (other than fork-lift) ••••••
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••..•cc.......

1.77
1.93

10

-

1
-

1
1

33
— T5~
15
15

28

~T
T

—

5
3

6b
6b

78
3
75
75

8
b
106
r ---1" 1 0 3
3
3
3
3
3

b

262

bO
222

133

12

5 T — 1 2 "—

118

118

•

-

“

16
22
19
22 — I T — i r
.

i
t
IT

80

-

-

9

B : Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
Workers'

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns

2/

$
$
Under 0.75 0.80
and
%
under
0.75
.80
.85

b -23331

$
0.85

lO

$
0.90

o s n e t i' A

$
0.95

$

. q *v £ M

$

$

1.00 1.05

1.00 i,P5

lU

e i,' S b t o e U

tl

1
/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65

1.10

.90

.95
263
15

223
7

227
17

173
5

362

292
17
275

1.10 1.15

248

216

210

168

192
4
188

_

-

-

.

1

2

11
21
21

q
24
5
19

g
7
7

5

4

-

21

21

7
14

7
14

10
2
8

1.20 1.25

1,30 1,25

1.40

1,45

129

101

10

1

4
97

103
15

1.60 1,65

$
$
$
$
$
$
1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10
and

2.00 2.10 over

1.70

1,75

1.80

1.90

67
31
36

47
4
43

38

37
31

69
40
29

137
76

26

87
35
52

68

12

50

56
5
51

1,50

1,55

81

52

%

All plant occupations:

Total ...............
M e n ..............
Women ............

1.16

25

560

1.59

2
23

65
495

_

-

3,885
4-51
3,434

1.11

157

1.86

385
23

164
4

127

135

2

160

125

125

128

_

_

1

1

_

g
14
14

4
7

1

5

1
6

9
9

13
5

1
10

1
21

1

3

14

10

21

49

88

5
76

84
13
71

3

7

2

1

27

3

12

31

27

21

15

7

5
5

6
1

3
3
-

1

1

7

11

12

-

-

2

9

52
46

1

1

5

2

9
3

-

-1

-

_

-

1

1
1

2

-

2

61

Selected Plant Occupations
Cutters and markers (men) 3a/ ...............
Inspectors, final (examiners)
^ mem anH 10f UAinonj ^n/
t
Pressers, hard (men and women) ...............
Men 3a/ ..................................
Women 3b/ ................................
Pressers, hand and machine
(1 man and 30 women) 3 b / ..................
Sewers, hand (finishers) (women): Total .....
Time ....
Incentive
Sewing-machine operators, section system
(women) 3b/ ...............................
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand
(tailor) system (2 men and 734. women) 3b/ ...
Thread trimmers (cleaners)
(women): Total ...........................
To
r
Work dlstrlhiit/vrs (women) 8a / ............

131
308
96

212

.93
1.41
2.04
1.13

-

15
26
-

26

33
15
15

18

16

20

18
18

3
29

3
53
33

-

20

.88
1.10

-

1,060

1.05

-

736

1.39

-

16

17

92
48
44
74

.88

-

27
g
19
29

28
23

10

5

3

13

8

31
271
89
182

1.04
1.03

.83
•92
.35

3
27
5

22
196

21
8
113

20

4
19
14
5

-

7

3

2

7
4
3

9

8
1

6
1
5

1
6

-

-

-

1

8

9

6

6

6

3

1
2

14

8

9

6

6

6

3

2

1

1

1

-

-

2

-

1

55

43

38

48

23

23

20

22

8

5

5

14

6

15

2

6

1
45

8

1
6

_

1

5

83

67

77

62

29

19

36

19

49

43

38

37

32

4L

36

38

33

31

23

29

26

25

13

25

21

15

13

10
6

1

3

1

3

1

2

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

4
.
7

1

3
4

1
2

1

2

79

7

1
2
1

1

1

6
-

1

1
1

3

1/ The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops employing 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of women's and misses' dresses (Group 2333) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classifi­
cation Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing housedresses, aprons, smocks, hoovers, and nurses' and maids' uniforms (Group 2334-) were excluded from the study. Data re­
late to an August 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-2851:

P d U tti

G 4 id

V c iA * ttiU & L

1/

1/ The study covered establishments employing 8 or more workers Drimarily engaged in the manufacture of paints, varnishes, lacquers, japans, enamels, and shellac (Groun 2851) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classi­
fication Manual (194-5 edition) prepared hy the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all workers in the occupations reported were paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureaux of Labor Statistics




10

Table B-35.

M c t 0 } 9iii>*
a U H U *d*tUl

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O ccu p ation

A ssem b lers, c l a s s A
A ssem b lers, c l a s s B

2
f

.................... .
................... .

Number
o
f
Workers

10
*6
5oo
357

t
o

Average
ho r y
ul
erig
anns

y
%
1.89
1.61*
U*6

Under

$
1.10

-

$
$
1.10 1.15 1 .2 0

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1 .7 0 1.75 1.80 $
1.85 1 . 9 0 1.95 2 . 0 0 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 *2.1*0 $2.50
and

1.15 1*20 1.25 1.3Q 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5

-

-

2

1

71

k

32

6
6*
1

2
88

157
12

0.
)
Tnena/*faeQ .

aoo ^ _ __ __ ____
_

1 * 1 1 1 t * 111 t t t x
+
hflTViH ng lj/ t T t t t t f T X T T f t l *
M a ch in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c tio n ,
c l a s s A 5 / .............................................................................. ..
D r ill-p r e s s o p e r a to rs , r a d ia l , c la s s A
,
E n g in e -la th e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A ..........................
G rinding-m achine o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A ............. »
M illin g -m ach in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A •••••••S crew -o ach in e o p e r a t o r s , a u to m a ti c ,
c l a s s A ...... ......... .......... .
T u r r e t - l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , hand (in c lu d in g
hand screw m a ch in e ), c l a s s A ....... *••
M a ch in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c tio n ,
®

iimiTTtTitrrttTtnti*
D r i l l - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s , r a d i a l , c l a s s B ....
D r i l l - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s , s i n g l e - o r m u lt ip le -

<
Q

67
2

335
936
58
177
98
177

1.66
111
.**
1.30
1.39
1.98
1.87
1.97
2.02
2.08

7*
1

1.95

113

1.75
1.73
1.89
1.70

57

7

Q
7

ia
-

-

-

-

5

11
**
66

-

-

-

JO

29
17
*
in
■-

2
t
p
jj

-

9
h
o
j

3k

8k

288

16

-

350
157
193

1.72

TfTtn,t M M t .t.TTTTT..
I n c e n t iv e ••••••....... .

D r ill-p r e s s o p e ra to rs , s in g le - o r m u ltip le s p i n d le , c l a s s C ............ .......
G rinding-m achine o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C •••••••
M a ch in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , to o lro o m .............
T o o l-a n d -d ie makers ( o t h e r th an t o o l - a n d - d i s

_ a1amm t )

M a ch in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c tio n ,
c l a s s c 5/ 1 T o t a l .....................

“

4aKK^n r sKnns^ .........
c
.......... .
W e ld e rs , hand, c l a s s A ...................

1
/
(
J

1
g

15
*
177
12
0
c
0
c

1t
f
XV

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

150
fii

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

-

1

-

1
-

9
9
6
1

-

-

1
*

2

1.92

_

.

_

1
*

2

1

122
25
55

1.59
1.61*
1,91

-

-

-

3
1

-

1

171
1(1
216

Q
t
7
S

116
107
9
10

2
1

0
7
g
5
63

1*
1
0
7
5

11

o
Xt

1
9
1

-

6*
1
61
3
1

7
1

3

9 11

l .j j 5

2.06

77
11
2*
6

i]
A*
i■

2
2

J
0

2.05

2 .1 0

101
1

21
-

1
-

5

g

O
y
20

Ot
f
cU

1
.
U

1
5
1.

9*
1
3
15
*
8
5

111*
12
1
*
5
15

153
20
35
9
25

59
3
7
10
13

16
*
8
•
»

53
n

j
J
L
J

13
-

2.15 2.20 2.10 2.1*0 2.50 o v e r

58
1

X

1
-

5

*2

16
16

30
30

98

3

6
-

29
1

30
1*
1

5

j
2
1

2
3

8
1

1
*
•

8
IO
xy

10
X

2

2

2

20
>

21
1

6
2
8

1*

13
3
2
6

*
*

k
1

21
6
6
1

9
13

1

39
35
1
*
90

-

125
12
11
8
2*
1

72

11*8

19
5
9

12
1*3

13
*

19
13
2
2
•

_

-

2*
1

27

1

8

2

-

-

-

12
2
1
.
*
*

1.95 2.00

2

55

1.71*

O4Wm A^mna4

G rinding-m achine o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s .......
T u r r e t - l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , hand (in c lu d in g

1
9
1
-O

g

1

1.67
1.83
1.80

V l f^
ff

k
\ X

1.93

836
7*
12

7

26
t.
i
17

9
inJ
X
\

2
21
16
*

1.60 1.85 1.90

32

1

16

32

7

3

9

1

175
169
6
13

21
9*
285
9
9

8

85
82
3

5

3

2

2*
1

6

1

8

5

3

2

2*
1

6

1

2

2

3

1

19
1
*

3
3

1

2

1
*

X y
\ >
J
1t
f
16
23

6

c
9

ol.
ya

AC
op

C

1

_

-

.

3

k

-

3

3

-

•

1

3

•

1

16
*
28

8

2

9

28

l

_

_
A

1

3

10

26

12
*

1

1
*

2

10

18

12

2

15

1*
1

7

2

9
8

3

10

26

12
*

1

1
*

2

30

18

12

2

15

1*
1

7

2

1
*

.

2

16

1*
1

-

-

_

1

•

1

2

9

3

7

2
1

3
1
*

2

m

I
T
9

7

I

16

1
8

26
1
3
19

11

70

10

22

17

6

2
6

-1,
t
A*
*
13
1

t

11

3
1
*

61*
1

_
_

79
ia

The study Included establishments employing more than 20 workers in the machinery (nonelectrical) industry (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were included in the study. Data relate to a November 1952 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers; all or a majority of workers in each occupation shown were paid on a time basis unless otherwise indicated,
Occupational Mage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., December 1952
j}/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT CP LABOR
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous study.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
£/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




11

Table B-7211:

1/

Budget.

%

PoitteA. Jla u n d fu e l i/

The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the
Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., December 1952
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Data limited to men workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).




1
2

C* Union Wage Scales
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated. Additional
information is available in reports issued separately for these individual industries or trades.)

Table C-15*

BUiU GHUMtO
uddf o/dciH

Table c - 2 0 5 *

Bricklayers ......... ........ ...........
Carpenters •••••......... •••••••••••••••••••
Electricians
Painters .....................................
Plasterers ......... .
Plumbers
Building laborers ••••••••••••••...... •••»••

♦3.450
2.900
2.900
2.750
3.175
2.900
1.970

a

Rate
per
hour

1

Classification

Table C-205*

Classification

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Bgk U d
&e

________ July 1. 1952
Classification

Bread and cake - Hand shops*
Lsadmen or first hands ........... ••••.•••
Second hands, benchmen ...... •••••••••••••
Bread and cake - Semimachine shops*
Leadmen, mixers, overmen.... •••••••••••••
Bench or machine hands •••••••••••••••••.••
Miscellaneous helpers, men ••••••••.......
Sunday help and miscellaneous
helpers, w o m e n ...... ......... ........
Bread - Machine shops*
Leadmen ...................................
Oven hands
Assistant spongers •••••••................
First bench hands, scalers..... ••••••••••
Bench and machine hands ................. .
Bread counters ....... .......... •••••••••
Helpers, pan g reasers....... ............
Ingredient scalers ......... ........ •••••
Wrapping- and slicingmachine operators........... ••••••••.••
Beltmen*
First 6 months ....................... .
Experienced..... ......... .... ......
Cake - Machine shops*
Leadmen ....T.....................Tr......^
Ovenmen, m i x e r s ..... ........... .........
Machine h a n d s ...................... ••••••
Cake counters ......................... .
Helpers .....................
Icing mixers, ingredient
scalers ................. ........... .
Car crews*
Inexperienced ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Experienced .................. •••••••••
Miscellaneous helpers:
Inexperienced (first 6 months) •••••••••
Experienced (after 6 months) ..........
Leadladies ....................... .
Women helpers*
Inexperienced (first 6 months) •••••••••
Experienced (after 6 months) ••••••....
Crackers and cookies*
Agreement A*
Leadmen
Oven operators ....... ••••••••••......




B g keA ied -G o sU cttu ed

T a b le c - 2 0 5 *

B ake/U ed -Q o jd cH44Jed

July 1, 1952

January 2, 1953

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.476
1.360

48
48

1.723
1.612
1.190

40
40
40

1.120

40

1.973
1.863
1.808
1.780
1.750
1.588
1.560
1.343

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.368

40

1.293
1.368

40
40

1.973
1.863
1.753
1.488
1.560

40
40
40
40
40

1.529

40

1.380
1.455

40
40

1.255
1.330
1.280

40
40
40

1.153
1.230

40
40

1.745
1.720

40
40

Crackers and cookies - Continued
Agreement A - Continued
Cracker-dough mixers, sweet-dough
mixers, graham-dough mixers, doughmachine set-up and operators,
sponge mixers, enrobing-aachine
set-up and operators.... •••••..... .
Marshmallow-machine set-up and oper­
ators, icing-machine set-up and
operators •••••••••••••••••.... ...•••
Dough-break roll feeders ...... ••••••••
Wrapping-machine set-up m e n ........ .
Agreement B*
Sponge mixing department*
Head m i x e r s ............ ...........
Sponge and dough mixers ........ ••••
Mixers' helpers •••••••••••••••••••••
Sweet mixing department*
Head m i x e r s ............. •••••••••••
Mixers
........ .......... .
Mixers' helpers ••••••••••......... .
Baking departments
Machinemen •••••••.... ••••••••••••••
Peelers ••.•••••••••••••••••........
Ovenmen ••••••••••••••......... •••••
Oven take-out men .......... .......
Sheeters and laminators, reliefmen, sweet .............. •••••••••
Stackers, m e n ..... •••••••••••••••••
General help, semiskilled ..........
Sponge and sweet-packing departments
Supplymen......... ••••••••.... ••••
General help, semiskilled, men .....
Working supervisors, women ••••••••••
Checkers, women •••••.... •••••••••••
General help, semiskilled, women ....
Icing department:
Mixers, machinemen ••••••........ .
Marshmallow and icing mixers ...... .
General help, semiskilled, men .....
Women employees*
Machine operators ••••••••••••••••
Machine feeders •••••••••••..... .
General help, semiskilled women,
trolley girls ............ ••••••••
Carton and caddy forming and
wrapping departments
Machinemen (set-up and adjusters) ...
Machine operators, men ••••••••.•••••
Receiving departments
Working supervisors..... •••••••••••
Receivers •••••••••••••••..... ••••••
Receivers' helpers, loaders and
unloaders ••••••..... •••••••••••••
Shipping departments
Working supervisors, men ••••••••••••
Checkers, m e n ..... •••••.......... .
Assemblers and loaders, men •••••••••
Agreement Ct
Baking and mixing departments*
Head mixers ............ ...........
B a k e r s ..... ••••....... ..••••••••••

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Class!fication
Crackers and cookies - Continued
Agreement C - Continued
Baking and mixing
departments - Continued
Sponge mixers ....... ............
Rollexmen ...........................
Assemblymen .....................
Mixers' helpers, stackers,
general help ••••••••••••••••••••••
Packing departments
Floormen .........................
Women employees*
Working supervisors ............
Packers, sponge ••••••••••••••••••
Tally clerks ...... ••••••••.... .
Machine operators •••••••.......
Other helpers ..........•••••••••

Hours
Rate
per
per
hour . week
.
.

40

1.695
1.545
1.430

40
40
40

1.495
1.375
1.275

40
40
40

1.495
1.375
1.275

40
40
40
40

1.305
1.285
1.200

40
40
40

1.245
1.200
1.100
1.060
.895

40
40
40

40
40
40

1.410

40

1.300

40

1.300
1.185
1.165
1.195
1.185

40
40
40
40
40

Rate
per

Hours
per
JJSSku

40
40
40

1.480
1.440
1.375
1.335

♦1.580
1.465
1.435

JOSSSL.

♦1.720

Table C-27* P n i n t i n t f

1.375
1.345
1.200

40

40
40
40

40

1.085
.975

40

.895

40

1.410
1.345

40
40

1.355
1.305

40
40

1.220

40

1 .3 5 5
1.305
1.220

40
40
40

1.690
1.635

40
40

40

_______ July 1, 1952
Classification
Book and job shops*
Bindery women ............ .
Bookbinders and cutters .............. ..
Combination men ........... .
Rulers and finishers ••••••••••••••••..
Compositors, hand •••..•••••......
Eleotrotypers ......................
Machine operators •••••••••••••••••••....
Machine tenders (machinists) •••••••••••••
Mailers ..............................
Photoengravers ••••••••.....
Press assistants and feeders*
Assistant on single cylinder larger
than 27 x 41 in,; 2-oolor larger
than 27 x 41 in.; 2 Miehle horizon­
tal 22 x 28 in. ..................
Assistant on 74 in. cylinder and 2color perfecting 68 in. or over;
2 assistants on McKee or Claybourn
4-color when in operation on makeready; 1 assistant on 5-color when
in operation on make-ready .........
1 assistant on 2-color Claybourn
over 52 i n . .... ....... .
Rotary web assistants ••••••••••••••••.
1 assistant on automatic-feed press
less than 27 x 47 in. and in com­
bination with job presses (up to
2 years experience) ...............
2 or more years experience •••••••.,
1 assistant on presses over 22 x 28 in.
and under 27 x 41 in., hand-feed
Job press feeders (2 or more years
experience) •••••••••........ .

♦1.295
2.330
2.400

37- r
37- •
37; r

2.350
2.600
2.520
2.600
2.600
2.473
2.667

37*
37 r
37; r
37 3737*

2.105

37*

2.160

37 *

37-

2.220

2.340

a

1.750
1.805

37*
37*

1.805

37*

1.385

37*

Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mo., December .1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

13

Table C-27x

plliU G+t+Hc
SUttf a*ile£

Table C-41*

J lo Q c U

O p & u U u tp

Rate
per

Hours
per

JS2SL

JSfiL

Book and jo b shops - Continued
Pressmen, cy lin d ert
1 4 - or 5 -c o lo r .................. •••••••••••••••• ♦2.760
1 single-roll rotary, 1 2-roll rotary ... 2.700
Second men on 5-color; second men on
2-roll rotary; 1 2-color less than
68 in.; 1 rotogravure, sheet-fed,
single-color; 1 19 x 28 in. to
24 x 35 in. press without assistants;
all makes of automatics printing from
cylinder up to 68 in.; 1 automatic
17 x 22 in. to 68 in. and 2 platen •••• 2.575
1 2-color 68 in. and over, 1 double2.620
cylinder perfecting •••••••........ .
1 2-color Cl&yboum
.....•••••••••••• 2.660
Hand-fed equipment*
1 cylinder, 24 x 36 in. or l e s s ..... 2.275
2 presses, 24 x 36 in. or less;
1 press, 24 x 36 in. or less and
1 or 2 p laten .........................••••••••• 2.365
1 press. 25 x 38 in. or larger and
less than 68 in. ............. .
2.365
1 press, 25 x 38 in. or larger and
less than 68 in. and 1 or 2
2.490
platen ..... ................... .
Vertical equipment*
All automatics printing from cylinder
less than 17 x 22 in., 2 presses; 1
automatic cylinder less than 17 x 22
in. and 2 hand-fed platens........ 2.420
Offset presses*
Multilith* 14 x 19 in.............. 2.070
Pressmen, platens
1 or 2, hand-fed ••••••••...... •••••••• 2.140
3 or 4, hand-fed •••••••••••••••••••••••• 2.310
2 automatics or 2 automatics and
1 hand-fed; 1 coupon, 42 in. •••••••••• 2.310
1 coupon, 28 in. ........ .
2.225
1 New E r a ...........................
2.420
Stereotyperss
••••••••••*•• 2.863
Agreement A ......
Agreement B ••••••••..... •••••••••••••• 2.923
•••••••«• 2.863
Agreement C ............
Agreement D ••••••••••*••••••••••••••«••• 2.776
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day w o r k.... ••••••••••
Compositors, hand - night work •••..••••••••
Machine operators - day work •••••••••••••••
Machine operators - night work •••••••.....
Machine tenders (machinists) - day work ••••
Machine tenders (machinists) - night work ...
Mailers - day work •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Mailers - night work •••••.... •••••••••••••
Fhotoengravers - day work ........... ••••••
Photoengravers - night work ••••••••••••••••
Pressmen, web presses - day work •••••••••*•
Rotogravure............... •••••••••••.
Pressmen, web presses - night w o r k ...... .
Rotogravure ........ ••••••••...... •••••
Pressmen-in-eharge - day work ••••••••••••••
Rotogravure ....... ........ ..........
Pressmerv-in-charge - night work ••••••••••••
Rotogravure ..........................
Stereotypers - day work ••••••............
Stereotypers - night w o r k ........•••••••••




a n d

2.882
3.041
2.882
3.041
2.882
3.041
2.500

2.700
2.986

3.146
2.627
2.880
2.834
3.100

2.813
3.067
3.034
3.305
2.746
2.962

n

Classification

Table C-42*
n

37*

37*

37*

37*
37*

n

Hours
per
week

_

_
_

60
60

Mtbrik
oafuc
and eJfelp&bL

______________ July 1. 1952
Classification

37*

Rate
per
hour

1-man cars and busses*
First 4 months ............................. ♦1.550
1.600
5 — 8 months •
Q — 12 months
...........
1.650
1.700
After 12 months
St, Louis County*
Busses*
First 6 months .......................... 1.350
After 6 months •••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1.450

37*

M t U U A SUe d
o & b c . &A t

c J fe lp je A A

-Q

o *d U u 4 ed

July 1. 1952

October 1. 1952

_______ July 1. 1952
Classification

Table C-42*

X *G H d 4 i
7

C t H fU o y e e d .

Rate
per
hour

Bakery*
Cr&oker ...... .......... ..........
♦1.470
Relay drivers (apeoial delivery) ...... .
1.325
Roll, doughnut and pastry.............
1.518
Yeast*
Agreement A ...... ............ ..... . 1.588
Agreement B ,..•••••...... »•••••..... . 1.785
Agreement C ..................... ••••• 1.429
Food products*
Start............................ 1.335
After 3 months ••••••••••••••••••••••• 1.439
After 6 months •••••••••••••.•••..... 1.510
Beer*
Brewery and distributor............ •••••• 2.085
Helpers ............ .
2.085
Building*
Construction*
Dump trucks
Under 4 ou. yards .................. 1.660
4 and less than 7 cu. yards •••••••••• 1.810
7 ou. yards and over ........... ••••• 2.310
Pick-up driving .....
1.560
Machinery hauling •••••••••••••••••••••«• 1.810
Euclid wagon*
7 - 13 cu. yards ............... .
2.360
13 - 16 ou. yards ....................................... .. 2.460
Materials
Agitator or mixer*
3 ou. y&rdser l ess............. .
1.650
Over 3 and up to and including
5 ou. yards .................................................. 1.800
Over 5 ou. yards •••••••••••.................... 1.970
Tournamixsrs ••••••••••••••••••••••••» 2.400
Dry-batch truck*
1.550
3* ou. yards or less •••••••••............
1.810
Over 3* ou. yards ••••••..............
Flat-bed or open trucks
8 tons or less ••••••••••••••••••••••• 1.550
8 - 1 5 tons ••••••••••••••••••••••••.. 1.810
Over 15 tons ...................... •••••••••••••• 2.200
1.500
Lumber ................ ..
Plumbing*
* - 3* tons ...................... •••••••................. 1.500
Over 3* tons ..................................................... 1.600
All tractors.......................................... ••••• 1.600

Hours
per
week

48
40
54
42*
33*
48
48
48
48
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classification
Cheese
Cleaning and dyeing:
Relay drivers .......... ....... ••••••••••
Rug or furniture ....•••••...............
Coal ..........................................
Helpers
Commission house........... •••••..........
Helpers ....................................
Department store ..................... •••••«
Relay, tractors and freight ....... .......
Helpers (junior) .......... ••••.......
Combination drivers - Furniture and bulk ...
Helpers
Fish*
Special delivery •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Fixture
...........................
Helpers ...,................
Flowers*
Wholesale ..................................
Freight - General*
Agreement As
Local*
* ton - 5 tons •••••••••••••••••••••••
5 tons and o v e r........... ........
Helpers •••••••.....•••••••••••••••••
Tractor*
* ton - 5 tons ••••••••••••........ .
5 tons and over •••••....••••••••••••
Helpers.............. .... .......
Agreement Bs
Tractor*
* ton - 5 tons •••••••.... ••••••••••
5 tons and over ••••••...... ••••••••
Helpers ..........................
Transfer*
* ton - 5 tons ••••......... ..... .
5 tons and over ..... ..... .........
Helpers........... •••••••...... .
Furniture
Helpers
Grocery - Chain store.......... ....... •••••
Helpers
Ioe ...........................................
Helpers ................................
Laundry*
Overall (utility drivers) ••••••••••••••••••
Towel supply ••••••••••••••••••••••••.... .
Mattress*
Wholesale ..................................
Meat*
Packing house......... •••••............
Poultry ....................................
Milks
Relay drivers •••••••••••••••••....••••••••
Route riders, wholesale, relief..........
Tractor or tank drivers •••••..... ••••••••
Moving
Helpers
Newspapers
Day ....................... .
Helpers ....... ........... .
Night.................... .............
Helpers ............ .
Oil and gasoline ...... •••••••••...... •••••••
Railway express •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Helpers

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.670

40

1.133
1.223
1.320
1.210
1.370
1.270
1.625
1.650
1.125
1.725
1.670

45
45
48
48
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.600
1.250
1.200

40
40
40

1.500

40

1.500
1.600
1.380

48
48
48

1.520
1.600
1.380

48
48
48

1.590
1.590
1.390

48
48
48

1.490
1.590
1.390
1.750
1.670
1.845
1.675
1.408
1.283

48
48
48
40
40
45
45
48
48

1.400
1.400

40
40

1.750

40

1.910
1.170

40
40

1.664
1.868
1.700
1.525
1.475

48
48
48
40
40

1.900
1.680
2.000
1.750
2.075
1.770
1.570

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1A

D : Supplementary Wage Practices
Table D -lt

S h if t d iffe r e n tia l

A ll w o rk e rs ...............................................................................................
Workers in establishm ents having provisions
fo r la te s h i f t s ...................................................................................
With s h i f t d if f e r e n tia l ...............................................................
Uniform cen ts (per hour) .......................................................
Under 5 cen ts ........................................................................
5 o e n t s .....................................................................................
6 cen ts .....................................................................................
7 cen ts .....................................................................................
7£ or 8 cen ts ........................................................................
9 cen ts ....................................................................................
10 cen ts ...................................................................................
Over 10 cen ts ........................................................................
Uniform oercentage ..................................... ..............................
5 percent .................................................................................
or 8 percent ...............................................................
10 o e r c e n t ......... ..
Other y ...................................................... ..................................
With no s h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l ...................... ..................................
Workers in establishm ents having no provisions
fo r l a te s h i f t s ........................................................................

&

U

ift ^

b ifo t t U

ic U

P^UU

t& tO H d .

1/

Percent of to ta l plant employment
(ia)
(157-----------------------------------------------------By estab lish ® Bnt p o licy in A ctually working oi e x tra s h i f t s in A ll manixfacturing
MachdLnery
A ll manufacturing
Machdnery
bries y
in d u stries 2/
tr ie s
t r ie s
2d s h i f t
3d or other
2d s h if t
3d or other
3d or other
3d or other
2d s h if t
2d s h i f t
work
s h i f t work
work
s h i f t work
s h ift
s h ift
100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

XXX

8 6 .5
8 2 .5
5 8.1
3 .3
2 6 .1
9 .1
5 .2
.6
1 .5
1 1 .2
1 .1
17 .6
7 .2
6 .2
A.2
6 .8
A.O

7 8 .2
7 5 .6
A9.0
.2
2 .2
2 .2
6 .6
5 .5
7 .8
16.3
8 .2
1 1 .2
.A
6 .3
A.5
15.A
2 .6

9 8 .1
89.A
2 7 .8
2 .6
1 1 .8

80.3
7A.8
1 3.0
_
3 .0
_
.
2 .6

AO.7
12.5
8 .7

38.1
A.8
3 .6
2 9 .7
2 3 .7
$.5

1 6.2
1 5 .6
1 2 .0
.9
5 .8
1 .8
.A
.1
.2
2.A
.A
2 .7
1 .1
1 .3
.3
.9
.6

1 3 .5

2 1 .8

1 .9

19.7

XXX

-

-

-

1 0 .3
3 .1
A9.1
8.A

7. A
-

-

XXX

XXX
1 2 .8
1 0 .7
A.3
.8
1 .6

6 .3
5 .8
A.9
(2/)
.1
.3
.5
.8
1 .3
1 .0
.9
.1

XXX
2 .6
2 .6
_
_
_

_
l.A
.5
5 .7
.5

.1

_
_
_

.8
,5

5 .2
.7
2 .1

XXX

XXX

(J/)

1 .3
.2
1 .1
1 .3
XXX

l/ S h ift d if f e r e n tia l data are presented in terms o f (a) establishm ent p o lic y and (b) workers a ctu a lly employed on la te s h if ts a t the time o f the survey. An establishm ent was considered
as having a p o licy i f i t met any o f the follow ing conditions f ( l ) Operated l a t e s h if ts a t the time o f the survey, (2) had union-contract provisions covering l a te s h i f t s , or (3) had operated
l a te s h if ts within 6 months p rio r to the survey.
2/ Includes data fo r machinery in d u stries a lso shown sep a ra tely .
2/ Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
y
Includes such provisions as 8 hours* pay fo r 7 hours worked; cen ts or percentage d i f f e r e n t i a l , plus f u l l pay fo r le s s hours worked.

Table D-2*

S o U

tJL tU

d

Percent o f o ff ic e workers y
Weekly hours

A ll
in d u stries 2/

Manufacturing

A ll workers ................................................................................................

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 00.0

Under 37& hours .......................................................................................
hours ...................... ........................... .................................................
Over 37^ and under A h o u r s .................................................... ..
O
A hours ......................................................................................................
O
Over A and under A8 hours .................... ...........................................
O
A8 hours ............................................................................ ............ ............
Over A8 hours .....................................................................................

2 .6
A.2
5 .2
8 5 .A
2 .3
.3
*

2 .0
.8
3 .1
9 3 .3
.3

3 .8
1 .0
.9
8 9 .6
A.7
-

-

-

Public
u t ilitie s *

Percent o f p lan t workers employed in -

employed in Wholesale
trade
1 0 0 .0
3 .0
A.8
8 9 .8
2 .A
-

Finance * *

A ll
in d u stries 2/

Manufacturing

100.0

1 00.0

1 0 0 .0

2 .6
1 2 .7
1 9 .0
65.2
.5
-

1 .6
1 .5
1 .1
8 0 .9
7 .3
6 .5
1 .1

l.A
1 .6
1 .5
8 9 .1
3 .3
1 .6
1 .5

Pu blic
u tilitie s *
1 0 0 .0
_

8 2 .9
1 7 .1

Wholesale
trad e
1 0 0 .0
.7
9 1 .7
7 .6
‘

Data r e la te to women workers.
Includes data fo r r e t a i l trade (except department and lim ited -p rice v a rie ty s to re s ) and serv ices in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra te ly .
Includes data fo r r e t a i l trade (except department and lim ited -p rice v a rie ty s to r e s ) , r e a l e s ta t e , and serv ices in addition to those industry d iv is io n s shown s ep a ra tely .
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e .
Occupational Wage Survey, S t . Louis, Mo., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




15

Table D-3t

P a id J to lid a fi

P e r c e n t o f offJLee w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in Number of paid holidays

All
indus t r i e s 1 /

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

P e r c e n t o f p l a n t w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d iz

Finance

**

All
industries 2 /

Manufacturing

Publ i c
utilities

*

Wholesale
trade

100.0
W o r k e r s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g p a i d h o l i d a y s 2 / • •••
L e s s t h a n 6 d a y s ............................................
6 d a y s ....................................... ................
7 d a y s .......... .............................................
8 d a y s ........................................................
M o r e t h a n 8 d a y s ................................... ........
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g n o pa i d h o l i d a y s ....

*«

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

10 0 . 0

100.0

10 0 . 0

99.7

10 0 . 0
.1

100.0
20.0

97.5
-

100.0
2.1

97.5
4 .2

100.0
2.2

97.6

97.7
-

55.5
42.0
-

18. 5
4.7
66.0
8 .7

65.9
17.1

71.5
15.3
11. 0
-

.4
57.2
18.2
22.3
1.6

74.4
13.7
11.8
-

U.5
35 . 5

.3

2.5

10. 3
2.5

15.3
23.4
32.2
26.7
2.4

53.9
43.8
2 .3

Includes data fo r r e t a i l trade (except department and lim ited -p rice v a rie ty sto re s) and serv ices in addition to those industry divisions shown sep arately .
Includes data f o r r e t a i l trade (except department and lim ited -p rice v a rie ty s t o r e s ), r e a l e s t a t e , and serv ices in addition to those industry divisions shown sep arately .
Paid holidays of le s s than a f u ll day have been omitted.
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .
Table D-4t

P a id

V cU x U d O tU {ty o A d ttfU fld U U U d d C d ld )

Percent o f o f f i c e workers employed in V acation p o lic y

A ll
in d u stries 1/

A ll workers ................................................................................................

Manufacturing

Public
u t ilitie s *

Percent o f p lan t workers employed in -

Wholesale
trade

Finance * *

A ll
in d u stries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
u t ilitie s *

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
2 8 .1
7 1 .4
.5
-

100 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 1 .1
7 8 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 4 .0
1 6 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 1 .2
6 8 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .0
9 7 .0
-

9 9 .6
9 2 .1
7 7 .5
1 3 .9
.7
6 .6
6 .6
.4

9 9 .6
8 9 .6
7 9 .4
9 .3
.9
8 .8
8 .8
1 .2
.4

9 8 .0
9 8 .0
6 6 .2
3 1 .8
2 .0

100.0
1 00.0
5 6.7
4 3 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 1 .2
2 .1
8 3 .8
2 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 1 .6
3 .5
8 0 .1
4 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 .5
9 5 .5
—

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 8 .3
1 .8
7 9 .9
**

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.4
9 9 .6
-

9 9 .7
9 2 .2
56.3
11.4
2 3 .2
1 .3
6 .6
5 .6
1 .0
.9
.3

9 9 .6
8 9 .6
6 0 .5
1 4 .7
1 2 .8
1 .6
8 .8
7 .4
1 .4
1 .2
.4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 8 .7
8 1 .3
“

100.0
100.0
3 0.9
4 .9
64.2
-

A fte r 1 year o f serv ice
Workers in establishm en ts providing paid v a c a t io n s ...........
Length-of-tim e paym ent............................... ..................................
1 week ..............................................................................................
2 w e e k s ......... .........................................................................
Other ................................................................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ....................................................................
2 p e r c e n t .......................................................................................
Other L j ............................. ..................................................................
Workers in estab lishm en ts providing no paid vacations . . .

.
9

A fte r 2 v eers o f serv ice
Workers in establishm en ts providing paid v a c a t io n s ...........
Length-of-tim e paym ent............................... ..................................
1 week ..............................................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......................................................
2 weeks ............................................................................................
3 weeks ............................................................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ....................................................................
2 p e r c e n t ................ .......................................................................
Over 2 p ercen t ............................................................................
Other t j ................................................................................................
Workers in establishm en ts providing no paid vacations . . .

See footnotes a t end of ta b le .
*
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .




Occupational Wage Survey, S t. Louis, Mo., December 195£
U.S. D RTM T OF LA R
EPA
EN
BO
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

N TE < Estimates are provided sep arately , according to employer p ra ctice in computing vacation
O
payments (length-of-tim e, percentage, or o th e r ); percentage and other type payments
were converted to equivalent time periods in e a r l i e r stu d ies.

16

Table D-A*

P<iid V aC ittfUU tyolm cU PtM dU O H di)C ontinued
C
Percent o f o f f ic e workers employed in -

Vacation p o licy

A ll workers .................................................................... ............................

A ll
in d u stries 1/

Manufacturing

Public
u t ilitie s *

Wholesale
trade

Percent o f p lan t workers employed in Finance * *

A ll
in d u stries 2/

Manufacturing

1 00.0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 .A
1 .0
8 9 .6
A.O
-

1 0 0 .0
100 .0
8 .7
8 6 .5
A.8
-

1 00.0
1 00.0
1 .2
9 8 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1
1 .8
9 7 .1
-

100.0
1 0 0 .0
.A
9 3 .7
5 .9
-

9 9 .7
92.2
3 7.3
1 0 .0
A3.6
1 .3
6 .6
A .5
2 .1
.9
.3

10 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.5
9 3 .0
5 .2
1 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
100 .0
1 .0
9A.2
A.8
-

1 0 0 .0
100.0
1 00.0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0
2 .0
-

100.0
1 00.0
8 2 .0
1 1 .0
7 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.8
86.A
1 2 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 6 .6
3 .A
' -

1 0 0 .0
100.0
7 5 .7
1 7 .3
7 .0
-

1 0 0 .0

100 .0
100 .0
1 6 .8
83.2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 7 .0
A3.0
-

100.0
100.0
32.2
6 1 .9
5 .9
-

P u blic
u t ilitie s *

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0 ____

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6
8 9 .6
AA.l
1 0 .7
3 3 .2
1 .6
8 .8
6 .0
2 .8
1 .2
.A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 5 .0
_
8 5 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .9
6 .5
8 9 .6
_
-

9 9 .7
92.2
2 .7
8 7 .7
1 .3
.5
6 .6
6 .6
.9
.3

9 9 .6
8 9 .6
3.A
8 3 .9
1 .6
.7
8 .8
8 .8
1 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_
1 0 0 .0
_
_
_
_
-

9 9 .7
9 2.2
2 .7
83. A
6 .1
6 .6
6 .6
.9
^o

9 9 .6
8 9 .6
3 .A
7 9 .5
6 .7
8 .8
8 .8
1 .2
.A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_
9 8 .6
l.A

9 9 .7
9 2.2
2 .7
AO.O
A9.5
6 .6
1 .5
5 .1
.9

9 9 .6
8 9 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
io o .o

.3

.A

A fter 3 years o f serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid vacations ............
Length-of-tim e payment ..................................................................
1 w e ek .............................................. ...............................................
Over 1 and tinder 2 weeks .......................................................
2 weeks ............................................................................................
3 weeks ............................................................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ....................................................................
2 percent ........................................................................................
Over 2 percent .............................................................................
Other i j ................................................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid v acations . . .
A fter 5 years o f serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid v acations ...........
Length-of>time payment ..................................................................
1 week ..............................................................................................
2 weeks ........................................................... ................................
3 weeks ............................................................................................
Other ................................................................................... .............
Percentage payment 2 / .............................................. * ...................
A percent ........................................................................................
Other £/ ................................................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid v acations . . .

.A

_
_
_
--

A fter 10 years o f serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid v acatio ns ............
Length-of-tim e paym ent........................................................... ..
1 w e e k ........................................................... ..................................
2 weeks ............................................................................................
3 weeks ............................................................................................
Other ................................................................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ....................................................................
A percent .......................................................................................
Other i j ................................................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid v acations . . .

.A

86.3
1 2 .0
1 .3
-

_
_
_

-

A fter 15 years o f serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid vacations ............
Length-of-tim e payment ..................................................................
1 week ..............................................................................................
2 weeks ............................................................................................
3 weeks ............................................................................................
A weeks and over ........................................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ....................................................................
A p e r c e n t ................................. ......................................................
6 percent and over ....................................................................
Other i j ................................................ .................................... ..
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid v acatio ns . . .

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.A
A l .l
57.A
1 .1
-

io o . o

.8
AO.9
58.3
-

Sec footnotes at end of table.
*
**

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




3. A
33.A

5 2 .8
8 .8
2 .0
6 .8
1 .2

-

21. A
7 8 .6
-

_

6 8 .8
3 1.2
_
_
_
-

17

P a i d V c U x U i O t t i { t f & U M x U P4XWiA*04iA)-Qo4lJiHd4e<A

Table D-4*

P e r c e n t o f o f f i c e w o rk e r s em ployed i n V a c a tio n p o lic y

A ll w o r k e r s ........... .......................................................................................................

A ll
in d u s tr ie s l/

Manuf a c t u r i n g

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.4
3 9 .9
5 7 .8
1 .9
-

_

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.8

P e r c e n t o f p l a n t w o rk e r s em ployed i n -

P u b lic
u tilitie s

*

W h o le s a le
tra d e

1 0 0 .0

_

_____1 0 0 . 0 ___

F in a n c e

**

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2/

1 0 0 . 0 ___ ______1 0 0 . 0 _______

P u b lic
u tilitie s

M a n u fa c tu r in g

*

W h o le sa le
tra d e

1 0 0 . 0 ______ ______ 1 0 0 . 0 _____

1 0 0 .0

A fte r 2 0 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
W o rk ers i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g p a id v a c a t i o n s ..............
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e paym en t ...............................................................................
2 w ee k s
3 w ee k s
A w ee k s
P e rce n ta g e

..............................................................................................................
........... ............................................................................................... ..
and o v e r ......................................................................................
paym ent 2 / .................................................................................

6 p e r c e n t and o v e r .................................................................................
O th e r 4 / ...................................................................................................................
W o rk e rs i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g no p a id v a c a t i o n s . . .

3 9 .6
5 9 .6
~

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .8
8 3 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 2 .6
4 4 .6
2 .8
~

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 2 .2
5 9 .6
8 .2
~

9 9 .7
9 2 .2
2 .7
3 6 .3
5 3 .1
.1
6 .6
1 .5
5 .1
.9
.3

9 9 .6
8 9 .6
3 .4
2 9 .6
5 6 .6
8 .8
2 .0
6 .8
1 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.8
3 9 .6
5 7 .6
2 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .8
8 3 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 2 .6
3 5 .6
1 1 .8
-

1 0 C .0
10 c . 0
3 2 .2
5 7 .9
9 .9
-

9 9 .7
9 2 .2
2 .7
3 6 .3
4 9 .8
3 .4
6 .6

9 9 .6
8 9 .6
3 .4
2 9 .6
5 3 .8
2 .8
8 .8
2 .0
6 .8
1 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 1 .4
7 8 .6
-

.4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 9 .4
4 9 .1
1 .5
_

A fte r 25 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
W o rk ers i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g p a id v a c a t i o n s .............
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e paym ent ..............................................................................
1 w eek ......................................................................................................... ..
2 w eek s ..............................................................................................................
3 w eek s ..............................................................................................................
4 w eeks and o v e r .......................................................................................
P e r c e n t a g e paym en t 2 / ........................................................................... • •
A p e r c e n t .........................................................................................................
6 p e r c e n t and o v e r .................................................................................
O th e r
....................................................................................................................
W o rk e rs i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g no p a id v a c a t i o n s . . .

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

.A
3 9 .9
5 5 .2

A.5
-

"

1/
2/
2/
L f

*
**

'

1 .5
5 .1
.9
.3

1C C .0
1 0 0 .0
2 1 .4
7 8 .6
-

.4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 9 .4
4 6 .5
4 .1
-

“

—

Includes data fo r r e t a i l trade (except department and lim ited -p rice v a rie ty s to re s ) and serv ices in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra tely .
Includes data fo r r e t a i l trad e (except department and lim ited -p rice v a rie ty s to r e s ) , r e a l e s ta t e , and s erv ic es in add ition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra tely .
Percent o f annual earn in g s.
Includes p rov ision s fo r len g th -of-tim e payments plus a percentage o f annual earnings.
T ran sportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Fin ance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s ta t e .

Table D -5:

J + liU A t+ H C e Q + ld P &

n lia H

P J& H d *

Percent o f o ff ic e workers employed in Type o f plan

A ll workers ................................................................................................
Workers in establishm en ts having insurance
or pension plans 2 / ..........................................................................
Insurance plans 2 / ..........................................................................
L ife ...................................................................................................
A ccidental death and dismemberment .................................
Sickn ess and accid en t .............................................................
H o s p ita liz a tio n ............................................................. ............
S u rg ica l ..........................................................................................
M e d ic a l......... ..................................................................................
Retirem ent-pension plan ...............................................................
Workers in establishm en ts having no insurance
or pension plans .................................................................................

l/
2/
2/

A ll
in d u stries 1/

Manufacturing

Public
u t ilitie s *

Wholesale
trade

Percent o f plant workers employed in Finance * *

A ll
in d u stries 2/

Public
u t ilitie s *

Manufacturing

Who]esale
trade

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

1 00.0

1C0.0

9 4 .1
92.2
90.5
44.2
52.9
60.4
58.7
51.2
59.4

9 4 .0
9 4 .0
9 2 .8
50.5
7 0 .8
7 5 .2
7 1 .7
5 8 .4
56.3

9 8 .0
9 5 .7
9 4 .7
57.4
6 3 .9
2 5 .2
2 5 .2
29.2
8 4 .9

8 8 .9
8 7 .5
7 9 .6
6 1 .2
4 8 .8
6 6 .2
5 7 .4
58.2
4 1 .3

9 9 .6
9 3 .9
9 3 .9
1 8 .1
4 .3
4/49.3
53.5
4 7 .9
7 0 .9

9 2 .2
9 1 .9
8 7 .8
5 5.0
7 3 .0
7 1 .8
6 8 .4
5 7.8
4 8 .0

9 5 .2
9 5 .2
9 0 .8
5 9.1
7 9 .3
8 0 .6
7 5 .4
6 3 .4
4 8 .5

1 0 0 .0
9 6 .6
9 4 .8
6 1 .0
7 1 .4
4 8 .8
4 8 .8
4 8 .2
7 6 .3

8 9 .7
8 9 .0
7 7 .9
50.3
4 1 .8
54.2
54.2
4 8 .4
35.1

5 .9

6 .0

2 .0

1 1 .1

.4

7 .8

4 .8

'

-

10.3

Includes data fo r r e t a i l trade (except department and lim ited -p rice v a rie ty sto re s) and serv ices in add ition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra tely .
Includes data fo r r e t a i l trade (except department and lim ited -p rice v a rie ty s to r e s ) , r e a l e s ta t e , and s erv ic es in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra tely .
Uhduplicated t o t a l .
I jJ Estim ates in the e a r l i e r study in co rre ctly included 1 establishm ent as having a h o s p ita liz a tio n p lan . Corrected data are as follow s* A ll in d u s trie s , 52.2 percen t; fin a n ce , insurance,
and r e a l e s t a t e , 51.5 p e rce n t.
*
T ran sportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Occupational Wage Survey, S t . Louis, Mo., December 1952
* * Finance, in suran ce, and r e a l e s ta t e .
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




18

A p p e n d ix - Scope and Method of Survey

The Bureau’s occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources. In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community.
Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.
Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation.
Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied*
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.
With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau1s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-4). The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources.
Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included.
Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment1s full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.
The tern "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, these work categories are included as plant workers in non­
manufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shif t-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-3hift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

19

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller.

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in St. Louis, Mo., 1/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establi shments
studied
2 /

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
-

All divisions ................................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ............................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade 2/ .........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services ij ....................... .....

1 0 1

-

1 0 1

51
1 0 1

51
51

897
417
4-80

218
96

343,500
239,900

12 2

1 0 3 ,6 0 0

51
151
78
93
107

2 1

27,000

35
15
27
24

2 0 ,4 0 0

14,900
15,300

4,870

4,718
1,235
17,200
3,451

3,948
978
11,031
1,694

2 6 ,0 0 0

1 8 2 ,6 2 0

131,690
50,930

29,570
15,360
1 4 ,2 1 0

21,710
7,880
8,440

4,490
2,550

8 ,0 3 0

5,430

1 ,0 5 0

6 9 0

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 5/
Women*s and misses* dresses ...................
Paints and varnishes ..........................
Machinery industries ..........................
Power laundries ..............................
1/

8

6

/

63

35

8

2 0

1 2

21
2 1

108
35

28
15

3 6 6

185
1,336
72

St. Louis Metropolitan Area (City of St. Louis, St. Louis and St. Charles Counties, Mo.; and Madison and St. Clair Counties,

IllJT
2/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in the last previous survey was 21 workers in whole­
sale trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services; and 101 in the other major industry divisions.
2/ Excludes department and limited-price variety stores.
4/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
5/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
6 /
Machine-tool accessory establishments employing 8 or more workers were also included.




2 0

Index

Assembler (machinery), 10

Key-punch operator, b

Bench hand (bakeries), 12
Biller, machine,
Bookbinder (printing), 12
Bookkeeping-machine operator,
Bricklayer (building construction), 12

Labeler and packer (paints and
varnishes), 9
Laborer (building construction), 12
Laborer, material handling, 7
Laborer, material handling (machinery), 10

3

3
3

Calculating-machine operator,
Carpenter (building construction), 12
Carpenter, maintenance, 6
Cleaner,
Clerk, file,
Clerk, order,
Clerk, payroll,
Clerk, retail receiving (power
laundries), 11
Compositor, hand (printing), 12, 13
Cutter and marker (womens and misses*
dresses), 9

7

3

3

3

Draftsman, 5
Drill-press operator (machinery), 10
Duplicating-machine operator, b
Electrician (building construction), 12
Electrician, maintenance, 6
Electrician, maintenance (machinery), 10
Electrotyper (printing), 12
Engine-lathe operator (machinery), 10
Engineer, stationary, 6
Extractor operator (power laundries), 11
Finisher, flatwork (power laundries), 11
Fireman, stationary boiler, 6
Fireman, stationary boiler (power
laundries), 11

Machine operator (printing), 12, 13
Machine tender (printing), 12, 13
Machine-tool operator, production
(machinery), 10Machine-tool operator, toolroom, 6
Machine-tool operator, toolroom
(machinery), 10
Machinist, maintenance, 6
Mailer (printing), 12, 13
Maintenance man, general utility (paints
and varnishes), 9
Marker (power laundries), 11
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 6
Mechanic, maintenance, 6
Milling-machine operator (machinery), 10
Millwright, 6
Mixer (bakeries), 12
Mixer (paints and varnishes), 9
Motortruck driver, 13

Nurse, industrial (registered), 5
Office boy, 3
Office girl, 4
Oiler, 6
Operator (local transit), 13
Order filler, 7
Ovenman (bakeries), 12

Grinding-machine operator (machinery), 10
Guard,

7

Helper (bakeries), 12
Helper, motortruck driverf 13
Helper, trades, maintenance, 6
Identifier (power laundries), 11
Inspector (machinery), 10
Inspector, final (examiner)(women*s and
misses* dresses), 9

7

Janitor,
Janitor (machinery), 10




Packer, 7
Packer (bakeries), 12
Painter (building construction), 12
Painter, maintenance, 6
Photoengraver (printing), 12, 13
Pipefitter, maintenance, 6
Plasterer (building
construction), 12
Plumber (building construction), 12
Porter, 7
Press assistant (printing), 12
Press feeder (printing), 12

Presser (women's and misses* dresses), 9
Presser, machine, shirts (power
laundries), 11
Pressman (printing), 13
Receiving clerk, 7
Routeman (driver-salesman)(power
laundries), 11
Screw-machine operator, automatic
(machinery), 10
Secretary, h
Sewer, hand (finisher)(women's and misses’
dresses), 9
Sewing-machine operator (women’s and misses
dresses), 9
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance, 6
Shipping clerk, 8
Shipping-and-receiving clerk, 8
Stenographer, b
Stereotyper (printing), 13
Stock handler and trucker, hand (paints and
varnishes), 9
Switchboard operator, b
Switchboard operator-receptionist, b
Tabulating-machine operator, 3, b
Technician (paints and varnishes), 9
Thread trimmer (cleaner)(women’s and misses
dresses), 9
Tinter (paints and varnishes), 9
Tool-and-die maker, 6
Tool-and-die maker (machinery), 10
Tracer, 5
Transcribing-machine operator, U
Truck driver, 8
Trucker, power, 8
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery), 10
Typist, Ij
Varnish maker (paints and varnishes), 9

Washer, machine (power laundries), 11
Watchman, 8
Welder, hand (machinery), 10
Work distributor (women’s and misses’
dresses), 9
Wrapper (bakeries), 12
Wrapper, bundle (power
laundries), 11
☆ U. S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1953 O — 250852
.




This report
office.

w a s prepared In the

Bureau's

North Central

Regional

Communications m a y be addressed to:
A d o l p h 0. B e r g e r , R e g i o n a l D i r e c t o r
Bureau of Labor Statistics
105 Vest Adams Street
10th Floor
C h i c a g o 3,

Illinois

The services
of the B u re a u of Labor
Statistics'
regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relati n g to w a ges and industrial
relations, employment,
prices, labor turnover,
productivity, w o r k injuries,
c o n s t r u c t i o n and housing.

The North Central R e g i o n includes the following States:
Illinois
Indiana

Missouri

Iowa

Nebraska
North Dakota

Kansas
Kentucky
Michigan
Minnesota

Montana

Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102