View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND
December 1952

Bulletin N o . 1116-10

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Occupational W Survey
age
PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND




December

1 9 5 2

Bulletin No. 1116-10
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary
B UREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague * Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents




Contents

J&s

I N T R O D U C T I O N ..................... ............... ...........

Letter of Transmittal

1

THE PROVIDENCE METROPOLITAN A R E A .............................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE

1

.............................

TABIESt

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
B ureau o f Labor S ta tis tic * ,
W ashington, D. C., March 25, 1953.
The Secretary of labor*
I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on
occupational wages and related benefits in Providence, R. I.,
during December 1952. Similar studies are being conducted in a
number of other large labor-market areas during the fiscal year
1953* These studies have been designed to meet a variety of
governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide
earnings information for m a n y occupations common to most manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries
of selected supplementary wage benefits. Whenever possible,
separate date have been presented for individual major industry
divisions.
This report was prepared in the Bureau's regional offloe in Boston, Mass., b y Harry H. Hall, Regional Wage and
Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and central direc­
tion of the program was carried on in the Bureau's Division of
Wages and Industrial Relations.
Ewan (Hague, Commissioner.
Hon. Martin P. Durkin,
Secretary of Labor.




Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .••••••
A—3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ......
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis B-35
Machinery industries (except machine
tools) ...............................
Machine-tool accessories .*••......
B-7211 Power laundries ••••.......
Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ••»••.••••.......... ••••
C-205
Bakeries ............
C-27
P r i n t i n g ..............
C-Al
Local transit operating.employees ............
G-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ...............

3
4
5
6

7
3
9

10
10
10
10
10

Supplem entary wage p ra c tic e s D-l
D-2
D-3
D-4
D-5

Shift differential provisions
Scheduled weekly hours ........
Paid holidays ..........
Paid vacations
Insurance and pension plans
......... •••*.••

11
11
12
12
15

APPENDIX*
Scope and method of survey

16

INDEX

18




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY - PROVIDENCE. R. I.
n o n e le c tric a l m achinery in d u s trie s were engaged in the production
of te x tile machinery and machine to o ls . Approximately 15,000 persons
were employed in th e prim ary and fa b ric a te d m etals in d u s trie s .
Providence p la n ts m anufactured a v a rie ty of products in
ad d itio n to those mentioned above. Among th ese were stone, clay ,
and g la ss products; instru m ents; processed foods; wearing app arel;
paper and a llie d item s; p rin tin g and p u blishin g products; indus­
t r i a l chem icals; in su la te d w ire and e le c tr ic a l w iring devices; in ­
candescent and flu o re sc e n t lamps; watch cases; o p tic a l goods; H ies,
ra s p s , n u ts, and b o lts ; and foundry p ro d u cts.
Nonmanufacturing in d u s trie s in th e a rea employed about
150,000 w orkers. More than 54,000 were employed in r e t a i l and whole­
sa le tra d e o u tle ts . F ederal, S ta te , and lo c a l government agencies
rep o rted employment of about 32,000 w orkers. The serv ice in d u strie s
employed approxim ately 23,000 persons in such fie ld s as automobile
and o th er re p a ir shops, h o te ls , lau n d ries and clean ing e s ta b lis h ­
m ents, m edical and o th er h e a lth se rv ic e s, rad io and te le v is io n
s ta tio n s , th e a te rs , and business serv ice estab lish m en ts. Employment
in o th er nonm anufacturing in d u stry groups of s u b s ta n tia l importance
in the area included c o n tra c t co n stru c tio n , 15,000; tra n sp o rta tio n
(except ra ilro a d s ), communication, and o th er pu blic u t i l i t i e s ,
15,000; and fin an ce, insu ran ce, and r e a l e s ta te , 11,000.
Among the industries and estab lish m en t-size groups studied,
about tw o -th ird s o f th e p la n t workers and s lig h tly less than a fifth
o f the o ffic e workers were employed in establishm ents having w ritte n
agreem ents w ith lab o r o rg an iz atio n s. The ex te n t o f u n io n izatio n
v aried w idely among the d if fe re n t in d u stry groups. Three out of
fiv e p la n t workers in m anufacturing were employed in union estab ­
lish m en ts. In nonm anufacturing the p ro p o rtio n o f nonoffice workers
covered by union agreem ents ranged from o n e -th ird in r e t a i l trad e
to n early complete coverage in th e tra n s p o rta tio n (except r a i l ­
ro a d s), communication, and o th er p u blic u t i l i t i e s group.

Introduction
The Providence area is one of sev eral im portant industrial
c e n te rs in which th e Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s conducted occupa­
tio n a l wage surveys durin g la te 1952 and ea rly 1953* In such su r­
veys, occupations common to a v a rie ty of m anufacturing and nonmanu­
fa c tu rin g in d u s trie s a re stu d ied on a community-wide b a s is , l /
C ro ss-in d u stry methods of sampling are thus u tiliz e d in com piling
earnings d a ta fo r th e follow ing types of occupations: (a) o ffic e ;
(b) p ro fe ssio n a l and te c h n ic a l; (c) maintenance and power p la n t;
and (d) c u s to d ia l, w arehousing, and shipping. In p resen tin g earn­
ings inform ation fo r such jobs (ta b le s A -l through A-4) sep arate
d a ta are provided w herever p o ssib le fo r ind iv id u al broad in d u stry
d iv is io n s .
E arnings inform ation fo r c h a ra c te ris tic occupations in
c e rta in more narrow ly defined lo c a l in d u strie s i s presented in
s e rie s B ta b le s . Union scales (s e rie s C ta b le s) are presented fo r
se le c te d occupations in sev eral in d u strie s or tra d e s in which the
g re a t m a jo rity o f th e workers are employed under term s of c o lle c ­
tiv e -b a rg a in in g agreem ents, and the co n tract or minimum ra te s are
b eliev ed to be in d ic a tiv e o f p rev ailin g pay p ra c tic e s .
D ata a re c o lle c te d and summarized on s h if t o p eratio n s and
d if f e r e n tia ls , hours o f work, and supplem entary b e n e fits such as
v acatio n allow ances, paid h o lid ay s, and insurance and pension plans.

The Providence Metropolitan Area
The Providence M etropolitan Area (the m ajor urban cen ters
o f Rhode Islan d and th e A ttleb o ro and North A ttleboro sectio n s of
M assachusetts) has approxim ately 750,000 in h a b ita n ts . A th ird o f
th e se liv e in Providence.
N o n ag ricu ltu ral wage and sa la ry employment (in clu d in g
government w orkers) in th e Providence M etropolitan Area to ta le d
more than 300,000 workers in December 1952. Of th e se , s lig h tly more
than h a lf were employed in m anufacturing estab lish m en ts. The major
m anufacturing in d u stry in th e area was te x tile s which employed
about 41,000 w orkers a t th e tim e of the study. O ther im portant
m anufacturing in d u s trie s included jew elry w ith over 30,000 w orkers,
and m achinery ( e le c tr ic a l and n o n e le c tric a l) which employed approx­
im ately 27,000 w orkers. A la rg e segment of the employees in the

Occupational Wage Structure
O ccupational averages recorded in December 1952 were gen­
e ra lly h ig h er than in a sim ila r study conducted a y ear e a r lie r . A
s u b s ta n tia l p a rt of th ese in c reases may be a ttrib u te d to general
wage and s a la ry adjustm ents made in th e in te rim . An a n aly sis of the
la rg e r firm s in the area (employing 200 or more w orkers), fo r which
d a ta on general wage adjustm ents were c o lle c te d , in d ic a te s th a t
wages of th re e -fo u rth s o f the p la n t (nonoffice) workers in these
firm s were a ffe c te d by one or more form al wage adjustm ents be­
tween December 1951 and December 1952. E arnings o f a few of the
workers - p a rtic u la rly in th e te x tile in d u stry - were affe c te d by
w age-rate red u ctio n s.
G eneral wage in c reases a ffe c tin g th e s a la rie s of o ffic e
workers were granted by firm s employing h a lf the workers in the

1 / See appendix fo r d iscu ssio n of scope and method o f survey.
D ifferen ces between th e scope of th is survey and th e l a s t previous
survey (December 1951) a re in d icated in the appendix ta b le .




a)

2

la rg e r estab lish m en t-size group. Such adjustm ents were more f r e ­
quently recorded among m anufacturing than in th e nonm anufacturing
in d u s trie s .
Wages of n early tw o -th ird s the p la n t workers in th e Prov­
idence area were based on a tim e -ra te system of wage payment. The
larg e m ajo rity of th ese workers were employed in establishm ents
having form alized r a te s tru c tu re s . Plans providing a sin g le r a te
fo r a l l workers w ith in a given occupational c la s s ific a tio n were
somewhat more common than those sp ecify in g a range o f ra te s fo r
in d iv id u al jo b s. Wage ra te s were in d iv id u a lly determ ined in e stab ­
lishm ents employing few er than 15 p ercen t of the to ta l p la n t
workers w ith in the scope o f the survey. Earnings o f about a th ird
of the p la n t workers in th e area were based on some form of incen­
tiv e wage payments. 2 / Such plans were confined m ostly to the manu­
fa c tu rin g in d u s trie s , w ith the exception of commission payment plans
rep o rted in r e t a i l tra d e .
S a la rie s o f tw o -th ird s the o ffic e workers in the area were
based on form alized wage stru c tu res, almost always o f th e rate-ra n g e
type.
Average weekly earnings o f o ffice workers in m anufacturing
in d u strie s were g en erally higher than those in nonm anufacturing. In
9 out of 13 o ffic e c la s s ific a tio n s p erm ittin g com parison, average
s a la rie s in m anufacturing establishm ents exceeded those in nonmanu­
fa c tu rin g . Wage ra te s fo r selected c u s to d ia l, w arehousing, and
shipping jobs averaged higher in m anufacturing in d u s trie s fo r 6 of
9 occupations where comparisons were p o ssib le . By way of c o n tra s t,
average wage ra te s fo r m aintenance and power p la n t jobs were higher
in nonm anufacturing in d u s trie s fo r the 4 job c a teg o ries p erm ittin g
com parisons.
Approximately a f i f t h o f the m anufacturing p la n t workers
in the Providence area were employed on e x tra s h if ts a t th e tim e of
the survey; 4 out of 5 o f th ese workers were paid a s h if t d iffe re n ­
t i a l , g en erally expressed as a cen ts-p er-h o u r ad d itio n to d a y -s h ift
2 / Very few of the workers in th e jobs fo r which d ata are re ­
ported in th e s e rie s A ta b le s were employed under in cen tiv e systems
of wage payment. To th e ex ten t th a t in cen tiv e system s are employed,
they g en erally are lim ited to production jobs in m anufacturing and
to sa le s p o sitio n s in tra d e .




r a te s . A m ajority of seco n d -sh ift employees receiv ed an h o urly
d if f e r e n tia l of 5 cen ts o r le s s , whereas alm ost a l l on th ird s h if ts
were paid a premium of 5 to 10 cen ts an hour.
A m ajo rity of the o ffic e and plan£ workers in th e P rovi­
dence area were scheduled to work 40 hours a week in December 1952*
A 40-hour workweek applied to n early th re e -fo u rth s th e o ffic e and
p la n t workers in m anufacturing in d u s trie s and to f o u r - f if th s o f
th e p u blic u t i l i t i e s p la n t w orkers.
Paid h o liday p ro v isio ns were an e sta b lish e d p a rt o f the
wage p o lic y in firm s employing v ir tu a lly a l l o ffic e workers and 90
p ercen t o f the plaint w orkers. On an a ll-in d u s try b a s is , p la n t
workers most freq u en tly received 6 days an n u ally , whereas 9 days
were most commonly rep o rted fo r o ffic e w orkers. T h ree-fo u rth s o f
the o ffic e workers and h a lf the p la n t workers in th e p u b lic u t i l i t y
group were granted 10 days a y ear.
P lan t workers u su a lly receiv ed premium pay when req u ired
to work on an e stab lish ed h o lid ay . N early h a lf th e workers were
employed in establishm ents paying 2£ tim es th e re g u la r r a te in such
in stan ces and another fo u rth were employed under p ro v isio n s o f
double tim e fo r work on a paid h o lid ay . A pproxim ately a fo u rth o f
th e o ffic e workers were employed in companies p roviding double tim e
fo r work on paid holidays and a sim ila r p ro p o rtio n were employed in
establishm ents providing pay o f 2£ tim es th e re g u la r r a te fo r work
on such days. Approximately h a lf th e o ffic e workers were employed
in establishm ents having no p ro v isio n s fo r e x tra payment fo r work
on h o lid ay s.
Insurance o r pension p lans fo r which th e employer paid
a l l o r p a rt o f the co st were alm ost u n iv e rsa l in estab lish m en ts
w ith in th e scope of th is survey. Almost a l l o ffic e and 9 of 10
p la n t workers were employed in estab lish m en ts which provided some
form o f l i f e or h e alth insu ran ce, o r re tire m e n t p ension, o r some
com bination of these b e n e fits .
V irtu a lly a l l o ffic e and p la n t workers in th e area were
employed in establishm ents w ith p ro v isio n s fo r paid v acatio n s. Va­
c a tio n b e n e fits fo r most workers provided re g u la r pay fo r a sp eci­
fie d period of tim e, graduated in accordance w ith th e w o rk e rs
len g th o f serv ice; however, a s u b s ta n tia l number o f workers were
employed in p la n ts which based v acatio n b e n e fits on a percentage o f
th e in d iv id u a l^ earnings fo r a s tip u la te d p erio d .

3
A ; Cross-Industry

Table A -lt

O c c u p a t i o n s

& 0 C < 4 p rt/f0 # d

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings 1 / fo r selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Providence, R. I . , by industry division, December 1952)

See footnote a t end of ta b le .
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .




Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4

Table A-li

l/

(Average straight-time weekly hour* and earning*
for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Providence, R. I., by industry division, December 1952)

NUMBER OF W
ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM WEEKLY EARNINGS OFE
N ber
um
of
w
orkers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

W
eekly
W
eekly ^ 7.50 *30.00 f c .5 0
hours
earnings
«d
(Standard) (Standard) under
30.00 32.50 35.00

W en - Continued
om
Stenoeranhers. g e n e r a l............................ ..
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ...........................................
Bafal 1
(1 (
rTIIfIIT. . T__ T
f

968
565
403
52
25

39.5
"1975
39.0
38.5
4 0 .0

|
45.00
45.50
44.50
51.00
35.50

Switchboard o n e ra to rs ..................................... ..
Manufacturing............................................... ............
Nonmanufacturing...............................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ...........................................
R etail t r a d e ......... ..............................................

137
46
91
25
25

4 0 .0
39.5
4 0 .0
38.0
39.5

45.00
f_45.50
44.50
50.50
38.00

Switchboard operator-receptionists ......................
Manufacturing............... ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing........... .............. ...........................
R etail t r a d e .......................................................

308
214
94
33

39.5
" 1 9 '. 5
4 0 .0
40.5

44.00
” 44700
43.00
38.50

Tabulating-machine o p e r a to r s ...................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................... ..............

59
— 36

38.0
3770

Transcribing-machine operators, general ...........
Manufacturing ...........................................................

111
75

T ypists, cla ss A ............................................................
Manufacturing...........................................................

132
126

39.5
4 0 .0

47.00
47.00

T vpists. class B ............................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................................
Ua+M friu^a
-fl

647
420
227
31

39.0
39.5
38.5
39.0

39.00
39.00
38.50
34.00

l/
*

_
—

“
_
_

19
19
- !
5

40.0 0

16
93
- ----- 33“
16
58
1
5
7
10
10
4
6

1
1
1

62
3
- — 451 —
17
3
8
3

.
-

-

-

6
6

68
46
22
10

-

6
------ 6“

20
-----2U~

120
125
75“ —
45
49
5

4 5.00 4 7 .5 0

50.00

141
107
109” ~ r r i
32
30 !
1
1
1

52.50 55.00

57.50

60.00

62.50 6 5.00

6 7 .5 0

70.00

99
60
39
4

75
53
22
12

47
46
1
1

40
18
22
14

16
10
6
6

11
8
3
1

# 1
1
_

3
_

20
18
12
------ 9“ ------ 6 “ “ “ E T “
11
12
1
1
4
4
-

8
2
6
2

11
3
8
2
-

10
10
7
-

6
3
3
1
-

10
3
7
7
-

2
2
-

2
2
_
-

-

30
57
33
24
I D - “ T r ­ — 33“ ----- TT
20
io
20
1
13
5
-

20
10
10
2

30
27
3
-

29
27
2
-

12
7
5
-

2
2
-

1
1
-

_
-

1
1
-

_
-

_

-

1
-

72.5 0 75.00

3
.
3

19
5
14
2
2

2
6
7
“ ------ 1 " ----- 2

5
5

8
9
- ------5 ~

6
-

42.50

112
165
6 1 .. — 86“
79
51
2
8
5
2

5
5
4

-

45.50
38.5
" 3875 - 1 44.50

37.50

3
3
3

-

47.50
~~47750“

$
$
$
$
$
s
s
$
47.50 50.00 *52.50 *55.00 *57.50 60.00 6 2 .5 0 65.0 0 * 6 7 .5 0 70.0 0 *72.50 *75.00 8 0.00 *85.00 9 0.00

:J5.00 *37.50 *40.00 *4 2 .5 0 45.00

6
12
7
3
----- 2“ ------ 8“ -------T
----_
8
2
----- 8“
2
-

4
4~

26
26

9
- U S - ------ 5“

7
7

4
3

31
31

2
2

31
19
12

11
8
3

39
20
19

12
12
-

35
29~
20

14

80

85
52
33
3

73
7

65
35
30

4
------4 "

3

2
1
1
1
1
1
1
-

80.00

15

.
.
-

-

.
_
_

_
_

-

-

_

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

6
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

e
»
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

5
5

4
4

6
4

-

-

4
4
-

1

-

_
_

-

_
_

-

_

_
_

_

_

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ far selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Providence, E. I., by industry division, December 1952)

NUMBER OF W
ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM WEEKLY EARNINGS OF
E

A erage
v
Sex, occupation, and industry division

W
eekly 4 5 . 0 0
W
eekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) unSer
47.50

M
en
Draftsmen ............ ............................................

lo.oo

I2 . 5 0

50.00 52.50

55.00

* 7 .5 9
4

62.50

72.50

*75.00

8 0 . 0 0 85 . 0 0

90 . 0 0 *95 . 0 0 100.00 1 0 5 . 0 0 1 1 0 .0 c 115.00

57.50

6 0 .00 62.50

65.00

67.50

75.00

8 0.00

85.00 90.00

95 . 0 0 100 . 0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 1 10.00 115.00 120.00

$

$

70.00 72.50

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$
2

7 6 .50

231

40. 0

183
Draftsmen, .junior .........................................................

*57.50 60.00

s
65.00 *67.50 70.00

$

55.00

$

T 5T 8

71
65

39.5

58.50

3 9 .5 ...

58 :5 0 " — T ~ ------ T~
i ---------

78.00”

“

-

40.0

56.50

1

4

4 0 .0

57 ;o o " ----- 1“ — r ~

2

*
24

6

7

18

6

7

6

16

4

lb

9
9

1

15

26

1

8

6
6

6
6

13
13

! 12
|
i
1

20

10

20

9

7
4

“

1

14
10

19
18

21
19

56
48

40
36

16
16

7
3

8
8

2
2

1
1

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

4

1

4

1

2
2

""

—

1
1

_
-

-

W en
om
Nurses, ind ustrial (registered) ....................

1/

88

— 85—

3

3

7

7
'

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




-

_
_
_

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

9 5.00

3

-

3

.
.

3

_
_

_

3

15

3
3

-

1
1

1

85.00 9 0 .0 0

“

Occupational Vage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

5

Table A-3:

M a in te n a n c e G S td fio tU & l P la n t C h C 4 4 ftx U la n l

(Average h o u r l y earnings 1 / f o r m e n I n s e lected occupations studied o n a n are a
ba s i s i n P r o v i d e n c e , R. I., b y i n dustry division, Dece m b e r 1952)

NUMBER OF W
ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM HOURLY EARNINGS O
E
F—

%

$
Ifader 0. 9 0
and
8

$
0.95

$
1.0 0

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.3 0

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.5 0

1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

$
1.9 0

$
2.00

0.9 0

of
W
orkers

O c c u p a t i o n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

n r

1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1. 2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.5 0

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.7 0

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

2.00

2.10

*
1.69
.1.69

-

“

*

-

4
4

-

14
12

43
‘4 1

22
16

62
61

51
42

21
21

48
48

42
42

36
36

17
16

9

“

7

-

1.76
1.72

14

26

-

-

19
17

56
47
9

43
18
25

42

34
4
30

-

9

41
32
9

51

-

74
71
3

69

-

4
4

10

-

48
48

7

14

18

5

9

14

hourly
earnings

C a r p e n t e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e .........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................

3 91
356

E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e .......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............................

473
372
101

E n g i n e e r s , stati o n a r y ............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...... .......... -................

251
214

Fire m e n , s t a t i o n a r y b o i l e r ......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............................

692

Rein e r s , t r a des, m a i n t e n a n c e ...................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............................. .
PllM f l l U H M . l *
t
i f 1r 1
r rt r

552
452
1 00
76

1.42
“ 1.42—

M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e .........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................ .................

549
546

1.77
“ T77E—

M e c h a n i c s , automotive, m a i n t e n a n c e ............
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ....... ......................
P n K H c 11- M H - M « a «

2 71

1.63

“ 554

1.66
1.65

Mecha n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ..... .....................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ................... ..........

812
“ T O
92

M i l l w r i g h t s .......... .......... ................ .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................................

“ 107 ----

555
164

\

165

107

478

3
~

-

~

•

“

1.47
1.46
1.51

16
16
-

10
lb

10
10

a
20
21

•

14

”

“ I

1.75

-

-

-

P a i n ters, m a i n t e n a n c e ........... ................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ......................... ...«••••

133
113

1

40
22
18

16
16

-

12
7“

—& r
47

47

48

5

-

-

3
-

2
-

7

3

1

2

~
_

_

_

-

-

-

-

“

" 10“

U

3

—

r

—

5
2

“

—

P i n e f i tters, m a i n t e n a n c e ................ .......
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................

146
“ 137

S h e e t - m e t a l workers, m a i n t e n a n c e ..............
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............. ................. .

“

T o o l - e n d - d i e m a k e r s ..............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................

347
“ 1ZS

*

18
18

-

40
28
12

-

-

-

-

■
*

3

_

2

_

_

-

-

-

2.30

2.40

“ 25 "

4
-

$
2.40

-

-

—T
~

U

_

_

1.59

1.76
1.76

30
"iff"

_
-

—

5
5“

2

20
20

26

43

22
21

1
1

2“

30
30

8
--- 8“

11
10

15
t
—

12

-

-

-

2
2

55
40
15

58

6

27
31

6

9

19

96

17

60
36
36

54
35
19
19

26
26

?0
30

3
3

.

-

.

3

.

.

2
2

27
27

43
43

82
E “

24
24

60

71
71

55
55

32
32

95
95

19
17

12

11

2
2

17
9
Q
7

43

23

65

22

11
11

1
1

2

63

6
3

1

33

1
1

10
10

“

60

28
28

124

121

34
34

65
63

63
60

”

3

“

2

3

11
11

7
7

2
2

35

3

5

35

3

5

79
79

10
10

36
32

7
7

25
25

3

5

2

5

4
4

6
6

9
8

14
13

3
3

“

8
—

5“
1
1

1.81

oo

1

1

1.92

10

1.92 ~

10 “

94
40

4
4

105
38

4

_

10
3

_

3

_

ii

1 43

56
56

.

15

11

5

9

16

“ 1.81

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r over t i m e a nd n i g h t work.
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding rail r o a d s ) , communication, and other public utilities.

-

16

2

2
2

49
49

14
11
3

12
51
184
“ 5T^ " T 2 “ 1 5 T

1

3

55
45
10

U
42

2

-

64
60
4

34
34

9

6

•

25
25

8

11

-

98
98

1

41
9
Q
7

1
1

6

“

6

T
g

4

9

1
1

-

7

33

6o

over

11

-

27
27
-

-

I

2

8
4

17
13
4

1 05

25
“ 25“

•

4

4

3

_

2.20

10
10

-

10?

63
“ 53“
-

-

-

7
7“

_

—r

13

•

3

-

—

_

$
2.30

-

5

-

.

3
-

“ 1.58 .




-

-

21
6
15

_

*

_
-

—

“ 10"

“

1.69
" T . 69""

1.44
~ n z r "

249329 O - 53 - 2 -

-

•

-

5“

15

TT

1.69

■“ r . 6a r ~

459

1/
*

-

10

•

Oil e r s .............................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................................

33
H ----

-

1.94

“ 1.95

-

$
2.2 0

and

1.93

1.44
1.52

2.10

51
51

_

i

40

11

67
64
3

29

_

x

26
9
17

21
21

2
2

_

-

-

-

3
3

11
11

26
26

2
2

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

19

18
18

4

1

g

3

-

-

-

-

43
43

24
24

-

3

-

-

-

-

6
6

2

7
7

5
5

5
5

-

-

-

2
2

-

26

39

" 58 “

38
38

118

“ 25 ~

22
22

21
21

19
19

15
15

13

20

16

17

13

5
5

3
3

20

10

20“ 1 0 “

-

3

6

3

118

5

5

Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6




Table A-4:

GdoiU fctU4A*p<dS i t U fOafxiH,
utdc, yreo44u,m U f f n ctaUod

(Average h o u r l y earnings l / f o r selected o ccupations 2 / studied o n a n area
basis in Providence, R. I., b y industry division, December 1952)

7

B: Characteristic Industry Occupations
Ta b l e B-35:

M cu J u H e/U f S*u lu & t> U eA *

1/

NUMBER O W
F ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS O
F—
Atoitea
Occupation 2/

of
Workers

hourly
earnings

2/

$
*
0.95 1.00
and
under
1.00 1.05

$
1.05

$

$
1.15

1.10

1.15

1.20

-

-

-

12

13
-

-

-

-

-

-

28
5

1

1
12

5

23

%

$

1.10

1.20 1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

1.25

1.30

1.35

1 .A0 1.A5

-

12

2

6

13
-

16
-

-

1

3
32

-

A
16

20

6

30

$

1 .A0

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.A5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.A0 2.50
and
1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2. A0 2.50 over

Machinery (except Machine Tools) A/
$
Assemblers, class A 5a/ ....................
Assemblers, class B 5a/ ....... .............
Assemblers, class C 5b/ ....................
Electricians, maintenance 5a/ ...............
Inspectors, class A 5a/ ....................
Inspectors, class B 5a/ ....................
Inspectors, class C 5a/ .......................................................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 5a/ ........................
Laborers, material handling 5a/, 7/ ........................

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 5a/, 6/ ................ ..................................................... ...
Drill-press operators, radial,
class A 5a/ .........................................................................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiple spindle, class A 5 a / .......................... ..
Engine-lathe operators, class A 5a/ ................
Milling-machine operators, class A 5b/ . . . .
Turret-lathe operators (including
hand screw machine), class A 5 a / ...................

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 5a/. 6/ ................................................................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class B 5 a / ........... .............................................................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B 5a/ ..................
Engine-lathe operators,
class B: Total .......................
TMmo
Grinding-machine operators, class B 5a/ ...
Milling-machine operators,
class B: Total .......................
Tima
Incentive ........ ....... .
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class B 5 a / ...........................
Turret-lathe operators (including
hand screw machine), class B 5a/ .......

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 5a/. 6/ ..........................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C 5 a / ......... ........ .
Grinding-machine operators, class C 5a/ . . .
Machine-tool operators, toolroom 5a/ .....................
Machinists, production 5a/ .......................... ...................
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing
shops) 5a / ..................................................................................
Tool-end-die makers (other than
tool-end-die jobbing shops) 5a / .............................
Waldens, hand, nla.es A Sa/
Welders, hand, class B 5a/ ..................

See foo t n o t e s at e n d o f table,




31
265
170
37

22
91
A3
115
10A

1.66
-

1.53
l.AA
1.75
1.70
1.51
1.33
1.16

6

1.21

“

-

20
21

51
18

53

29

11

11

IA
36

9
17

10

57
A1

1.52
1.69
1.8A

A9

1.57

_

**

”

35

1.A9

-

-

-

88

1.55

-

-

-

59
a
18
15A .

1.53
1.A9

-

-

-

-

-

15
3

3

7
13

8

9

16

51

1

6

_

_

1

_

6

_

_

_

_

_

_

5
7

8

11

5

1

-

-

5

2

3
-

3

3

5
3

6

-

-

-

6

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A

-

-

-

--

-

-

1
1

8

10

A

3

A
3
3
-

9

6

38

103

60

35

10

10

11

11

21

6

7

9

3

1

2

A

3

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

13
3

1

1.69

821

6
8

1
31
3

1.63

16

-

1.73

18

A
7
17

-

1

A09

-

2

8

-

10
1

1

5
3
7 '

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

8

2

1

1

-

23

6

10

1

-

-

3

7

A

1

1
10

-

1

1
2

-

2

2
1

-

1

7
3

5

2

1

~

1

1

-

A

-

1
1
1

—

2

7

-

15

8

3

1

2

A

1

2

_

~

“

"

A

8

1A

57

32

113

107

8A

78

118

29

18

56

15

2A

20

11

25

3

2

“

_

3

-

-

2

1

-

12

7

5

5

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

A

-

5

3

6

10

13

9

5

6

A

3

12

1

1

1

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- ■

7

-

-

-

5
A

1

9
8

3

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

1

2
1

5
4.

1

16
6
10

"

-

"

2

3

1

19

11
10
1
26

23

7

32

9

5

6

2

3

3

3

A

, 1

2

-

-

3

1
1

-

3

1A

13

3

A

31

7

7

13

-

-

-

-

2
1

1

3

1

9

5

6

5
4.

9

2
1

10
7

26

3

5

7

7

5

3

13

1

10

-

-

-

_

_

-

7

1
1.62

-

-

-

137
76
61

1.67

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

8
7
1

8

11
2

3

1

13

1.39

-

”

-

“

"

3

“

3

6

—

”

-

1.6A

39A

1.36

2

1

97

1

1.58
1.79

1.38

-

-

-

'
-

-

“

21

5

7

9

7

2

33

3

1

5

2

10

9

19

7A

71

100

2A

1

2

52

2

12

3

1

2

1

-

1

-

1

-

1

“

A

—

1
1

1

9

1A

1

A

7

7

16

A

16

11

31

15

12
11

21

3

1

5
1

-

-

-

2

2

A

A

_

8

19

11

23

23

19

26

19

10

12

_

-

_

_

_

2

_

2

60
3

1
3

2

5
1

35
1

3

1
3

3

3

13
5

4.

1

2
1A

21

_

2
3

-

-

-

_

_

_

19A

1.90

-

-

-

-

\1A6

1.86
1.69
1.59

-

-

-

_

_

_

.

9

3
3

-

-

-

A

-

_

-

_

-—

1

_

-

-

3

_

_

-

-

A

A

_

3

-

2A
15

_

1.58
1.59

-

1

1

A

75
1A8

IP

~

1
A

1.37'

22

2

2

“

37
AO

”

~

1
9

5

c
J

5

7

7

3

~

“

-

3

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8

Table B-35*

M acUiHVuf ftU ia fa im i 1/ - Q n tim m i

1 / The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers engaged in no n electrical machinery ind ustries, except the machine-tool industries (Group 3 5 , except 3 5 4 1 ), as defined in the Standard Industrial Classi­
fica tio n Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) employing more than 7 workers were also included.
2 / Data limited to men workers.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
j j Includes data for machine-tool accessories (Group 3543) for which separate data are also presented.
2 / insufficien t data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
6 / Includes data for operators of other machine to ols in addition to those shown separately.
2 / T itle change only, from "Stock handlers and truck ers, hand," as reported in previous study.




9

P otuesi j£o444u!/U eA y

Table B-7211:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

$

$
0.70
and
under
___t25

$
0.80

0.75

*
0.85

4
0.90

4
0.95

4
1.00

4
1.05

*
1.10

4
1.15

4
1.20

4
1.25

4
1.30

4
1.35

4
1.40

4
1.45

4
1.50

4
1.60

4
1.70

#
1.8C

.95

1.00

1.05

1.10

..1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

. 1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.90

6
1
3
4

1

6

3
3

-

-

-

-

_
_

3

_
7

_
_

_

-

1

3
1

-

7

"

"

“

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

.80 ___ *8£_ ___t2Q_

Men

Extractor operators ^ a / .....................
Firemen, stationary boiler 3a/ ..............
Identifiers 3a/ .............................
Washers, machine
........................

24
12
17
24

*
1.01
1.27
.94
1.22

1

-

4

2

-

3
3

-

-

-

2

6

-

-

2

1
-

2
2

“

“

Women

.80
.76
.76

Clerks, retail receiving ^a/ .................
Finishers, flatwork, machine: Total .........
T i m e .......
Incentive ...
Markers: Total .............................
Time ...........................
Incentive ..... .................
Pressers, machine, shirts 3b/ ...............
Wrappers, bundle 3q/ ........................

36
170
120
50
48
23
25
122
44

.96
.82
1.09
1.04
.82

Occupation i j

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
earnings

.77

6
42
42
1

11
66
28
38
8
7
1
12
14

-

1
-

3

12
50
38
12
3
3

1
_
_
4
3
1
19
5

3
12
12
15
10
5
10
5

_

6
13

3
_
2
-

2
15

_

_

...

-

_
_
1

3

_
_
_
2

_
_
_
5

_
_
1

_
_
_
1

_
_
_
1

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

1

3
6

2

5

1
15

_

-

1
3

1

-

-

6

-

-

26

_
_

_

_

_

1

_
_

_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_
1

_

3

..

-

_

_
_
_
_

1

4

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

y

Routemen, retail (driver-salesmen):

Total ....

5^-day workweek ..........................

135
97
38

4
68.00
74.50
50.50

1

1----

%

50.00

1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- 4
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00

42.50

Under
4

1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50

45.00

52.50

55.00

57.50

60.00

62,59

65.00

3
3

3
3

6
6

3
3

6
3
3

5
5

4
3
1

1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- $
4
1—
1—
80.00 85.00 90.00
95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00
and

40.00

3
-

3

47.50

10
-

10

50.00

1
1

19
14
5

y
The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) i
Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2 J Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
y
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
ij
Data limited to men workers.
y
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).




*

72.50 75.00

67.50 .70.00

5
2
3

4
1
3

72.50

4
4

75.00

XL

11

80.00

13
13

85.00

12
12

90.00

95.00

8
8

4
4

100.00 105.00 110.00

6
6

1
1

3
3

over

1
1

defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT (F LABCR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1
0

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon tbrough collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated. Additional
information is available in reports issued separately for these individual industries or trades.)

Table C-15:

B i iU d U u p

C o H d i^ H o t iO i

Table C-205*

B a A e /d e d .

Table c -a i * J Z o o c U

G o + U i+ u t e c t .

O

July 1, 1952

January 2, 1953
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Bricklayers ................. .................
Carpenters .............. ................ .
Electricians..... ...... ..... ............. .
Painters....................................
Plasterers .............. .
Plumbers .............. ................ .....
Building laborers ............................

$3,038
2.A50
2.550
2.150
3.050
2.700
1.800

AO
AO
A0
A0
AO
A0
A0

Table C-205*

& € iA e /U e ±

July 1, 1952
Classification

Bread and cake - Hand shops*
Mixers, ovenmen ...........................
General helpers ...........................
Bread and cake - Machine shops*
Agreement A*
Mixers, head ovenmen...................
Divider operators, rdl-oven m e n ........
Molder operators .......................
Ingredient scalers, mixers* helpers .....
Benchmen, head wrappers ................
Roll-oven helpers.......... ...........
Flour dumpers, ovenmen's helpers ........
Wrappers, packers ......................
Agreement B*
Mixers - second c l a s s .......... .......
Dividers ..............................
Molders................ ............. .
Ingredient scalers, mixers' helpers .....
Flour dumpers, molders* helpers .........
Wrappers ............. ........... ......
Pan greasers ...........................
Packers ................................
Agreement C*
Mixer scalers ..........................
Mixers ...............................
Ovenmen.......................... .....
Divider operators, first benchmen .......
Molders ................................
Wrapping-machine operators, checkers,
pan greasers .........................
Oven helpers, general helpers,
benchmen .............................
Agreement D *
Mixers (cake) ......................... .
Ovenmen .................... ............
Scalers, icing mixers, fryers, icingmachine operators ....................
Pan greasers, pan washers, pan
paperers ...................... .....
Agreement E*
Head mixers and scalers ................
Traveling-oven men .....................
Dividers .... ....................... T.T
Molders ................... ............
First benchmen .........................




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

I1.A60
1.260

A0
A0

1.580
1.A80
1.A30
1.380
1.360
1.350
1.330
1.280

A0
AO
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0

1.580
1.A80
1.A30
1.380
1.330
1.2A0
1.290
1.280

A0
A0
A0
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.5A5
1.A95
1.445
1.370
1.320

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.2A0

AO

1.220

AO

1.580
1.505

AO
AO

1.385

AO

Bread and cake - Machine shops - Continued
Agreement E - Continued
Mixers' helpers ........... ............
’
Ovenmen, roll-oven men, benchmen........
Benchmen's helpers, checkers, molders'
helpers ..............................
Wrapping-machine operators, packers .....
Pan greasers ...........................
Pie and pastry shops*
Cooks, dough mi x e r s.......................
Bakers ...............__ ........_ .........
_
Filling mixers, dough breakers, helpers ....
Hebrew baking*
Working foremen ...........................
Second hands ..............................

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

$1,380
1.350

A0
A0

1.330
1.280
1.230
1.370
1.320
1.270

A0
A0
A0

2.002
1.891

A5
A5

P n in t i t U f

Book and job shops*
Compositors, hand:
Agreement A ............................
Agreement B ............................
Electrotypers ................. ....... .
Machine operators ....................... .
Machine tenders (machinists) ..............
Photoengravers ............................
Press assistants and feeders:
Agreement A*
Cylinder presses............. ......
Platen presses ......................
Agreement B*
All type presses .....................
Pressmen:
Agreement A *
Cylinder, all presses; platen,
automatic .........................
Agreement B*
Cylinder ............................
Hand-fed job presses ................
Agreement C*
Cylinder and platen .................
Newspapers *
Compositors, hand - day work ..............
Compositors, hand - night work ............
Machine operators - day work ..............
Machine operators - night work ............
Machine tenders (machinists) - day work ....
Machine tenders (machinists) - night work ...
Photoengravers - day work .................
Photoengravers - night work ...............
Pressmen, web presses - day work ..........
Pressmen, web presses - night work .........
Pressmen-in-charge - day w o r k .......
FTessmen-in-charge - night w o r k ...........
Stereotypers - day work ...................
Stereotypers - night work ..................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,700
1.730
1.750

A0
A0
A0

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1.A30

A0

1.600

A8

1.050
1.5A5

5A
A8

1.270
.963

AO
5A

1.838
1.763
1.723
1.670
1.570

A0
A0
A0
A0
AO

1.600
1.750

A0
A0

1.650
1.700
1.650
1.A80
1.520
1.370
1.520
1.A20

A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A8
A8

1.520
1.A20
1.620
1.520
1.A00
1.180
1.650

A8
A8
A8
A8
A7
A7
A0

1.670
1.570
1.670
1.A70
1.670
1.768

A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0

A0
A0
A0

July 1, 1952
Classification

1.680
1.500
1.A80
1.A30
1.A00

Hours
per
week

Classification

1-man cars and busses*
First 3 months ............................
A - 12 months .............................
After 1 year ..............................

Table C-A2* M

o fo U b U c A

July 1, 1952
Classification

Table c-27*

1.170

f C + M fU o y e e d .

October 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

Classification

p e /i a i i H

* J* & t* U t

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$2.A00
2 .A00
2.560
2 .A O
G
2.A00
2.690

3 7*
37*
37*
37*

1.825
1.825

3 7*
37*

1.876

36*

SI

2.A00

37*

2.256
2.076

SI

2.200

37*

2 . 6$0
2.813
2.680
2.813
2.680
2.813
2.9A1
3.061
2.605

37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
3 7*
37*
37*
37*
3 7*
37*
37*
37*

2.692

2.739
2.825
2.605
2.692

Armored c a r .................. .
'Bakery*
Agreement A*
5 tons and over .... ...
Sparemen and helpers*
After 30 d a y s ........ .
Agreement B ................
Agreement Cs
Special delivery - Utility
Sparemen ................
Beer*
Brewery*
Agreement A .............
Agreement £ .............
Helpers.............
Distributor .................
Helpers .................
Construction*
Building:
Dump truck - Regular ......
Dump truck - Heavy .......
Highway*
Low-bed equipment ........
Heavy equipment ..........
Ready-mix ...............
Dump truck ...............
Department store - Furniture ....
Helpers....................
General - Freight ..............
Helpers ....................
Grocery*
Chain s t o r e ..... ...........
Helpers .................
Wholesale ........ .
Helpers.................
Laundry - After 5 weeks ........
Helpers ....................
Newspaper ........ .............
Oil*
Agreement A ................
Helpers ........ ....... .
Agreement B ................
Helpers ..................
Agreement C ................
Railway e x p r e s s ................

Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




u

D( Supplementary Wage Practices
Table D -l:

S h ift Jbifte/ie+UicU P^txuddUaui 1/
P ercen t o f t o t a l p la n t employment
<
A ctu a lly working oz
A ll m anufacturing
ixulu8trie8 2/
3d or
2d s h i f t
o th e r s h i f t

By estab lish m en t p o lic y in
Machinery in d u s trie s
A ll mam:Lfacturing
(ex cep t machine to o ls )
indusl .r le s 2 /
2d s h i f t
3d or o th er
2d s h i f t
3d o r o th er
s h i f t work
work
s h i f t work
work

S h ift d iffe re n tia l

1 0 0 ,0

xxx

XXX

XXX

1A.3

6 .1

8.A

.5

6 .1
5 .3
1 .1
2 .7

8.A
A.3
A.2

.5
.5
-

-

-

1 9 .5
1 .3
-

1 1 .6
1 0 .0
.3
5 .7
.9
1 .1
.8
.9
.3
1.A
.7
.7
.2
2 .7

1 .3
.2
.8
.3
.1
.A
-

.1
2 .A
2.A
1 .7
-

.5
.
-

A7.5

xxx

XXI

XXX

XXX

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

m

8 3 .7

65 .A

79 .A

5 2 .5

6 8 .3
5 3 .6
1 .7
2 2 .5
9 .0
5 .6
8 .1
A.A
2 .3
1 3 .7
5 .1
■8 .6
1 .0
15 .A

A ll w o r k e r s ...........................................................................

6 2 .7
A5.A
9 .2
2 3 .6
1 1 .3
1 .3
1 7 .1
2 .1
.8
1 0 .6
3 .6
.2
2 .7

79 .A
A 9.6
2 .2
A l.l
6 .3
2 3 .5
2 3 .5
6 .3
-

5 2 .5
3 1 .7
.7
-

3A.6

2 0 .6

Workers in estab lish m en ts having
p ro v is io n s f o r l a t e s h i f t s ......................................
With s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ...........................................
Uniform c e n ts (per hour) ..................................
Under A c e n ts ...................................................
A ce n ts .................................................................
5 c e n t s ............................................................ . .
6 c e n t s ................................................................
7 c e n ts .................................................................
Over 7 and under 10 ce n ts .................. ..
10 c e n ts
......................................
Over 10 c e n t s ....................................................
Uniform percentage . . . ; , ......................... ..
5 p e rce n t ............................................................
Over 5 and under 10 percen t ....................
10 p e r c e n t ..........................................................
Over 10 p e r c e n t .............................................
Other 2 / .....................................................................
With no s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ............................. ..
Workers in estab lish m en ts having
no p ro v isio n s f o r l a t e s h i f t s ................................

1 6 .3

e x tr a s h i f t s in Machinery in d u s trie s
(ex cep t machine to o ls )
3d or
2d s h i f t
o th er s h i f t

-

30.01 .0
2 0 .8

-

1 / S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l data a re presented in term s o f (a ) estab lishm en t p o lic y and (b ) -workers a c tu a lly employed on l a t e s h i f t s a t th e tim e o f th e
su rvey . An estab lish m en t was considered as having a p o lic y i f i t met any o f th e follo w in g c o n d itio n s ! ( l ) operated l a t e s h i f t s a t th e time o f th e
survey , (2 ) had u n io n -co n tract p rov ision s covering l a t e s h i f t s , or (3 ) had operated l a t e s h i f t s w ithin 6 months p r io r to th e survey.
2/ In clu d es d ata fo r machinery in d u s trie s a ls o shown s e p a r a te ly ,
2 /
In clu d es such p rov ision s a s f u l l d a y 's pay f o r reduced hours; and paid lunch period in ad d itio n to c e n ts -p e r -hour d i f f e r e n t i a l .

T b e d- : Sch eduled 'k/vekly, dtou/U
al 2
Percent of office workers l/ employed in Weekly hours

All workers....................
Under 37& hours ...................
37& hours ............................
Over 37& and under A0 hours .........
A0 h o u r s ....... ;........ ..........
Over A0 and under A5 hou r s ........ .
A5 h o u r s ..........................
Over A5 and under A8 hours...... .
A8 hour8 ........... .............
Over A8 h o u r s .....................
1/
2/
3/
*

All
Manufacturing
industries 2/

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Public
Retail trade
utilities *

All
Manufacturing
industries 2 /

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

10.6
13.3
13.1
59.1
2.2
.7
.1
.9
•

3.6
9.1
10.6
73.9
.7
.6
1.5
*

2.8
77.0
19.8
.A
-

11.9
1.9
30.1
Al.l
11.8
2.2
.7
.3

1.0
.9
.8
68.2
6.5
8.8
1.9
7.0
A.9

Public
Retail trade
utilities *

1.2
.6

-

100.0

-

-

73.3
5.2
7.7
l.A
6 .A
A.2

81.5
9.0
9.5

100.0

A.7
8.5
26.1
17.9
17.8
6.2
8 .9
9 .9

Data r e l a t e to women workers,
In clu d es data fo r w holesale tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s in a d d itio n to th ose in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly ,
In clu des data fo r w holesale tr a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s in a d d ition to th ose in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly ,
T ran sp o rtatio n (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, R, I., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




1
2

T able D-3

P a id d fo lid a y l
P ercen t o f p la n t workers employed in -

P e rcen t o f o f f ic e workers employed in Number o f paid holidays

A ll w o rk e r s .................................................... ....
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid h olid ay s 3/ .........................................
5 days or l e s s ..................................
6 d a y s ............ ................................................
7 days .............................................................
8 days .............................................................
9 days .............................................................
10 days ..........................................................
11 d a y s ..........................................................
12 d a y s ............................................. .............
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid h olidays .........................................

AH
Manufacturing
in d u s tr ie s 1/

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l trade

A ll
Manufacturing
in d u s trie s 2/

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
.6
3 .8
3 .7
1 7 .2
7U.7
-

9 6 . li
-

96. U
-

9 2 .7
6 .5
3 3 .7
1 0 .6
1 3 .8
2 2 .9
5 .2
•
-

93. li
5 .6
1*0.5
1 2 .1
16.U
1 5 .8
3 .0
-

9 6 .6
.8
1 1 .1
U.o
2 9 .5
5 1 .2
-

8 6 .li
9 .8
7 6 .6
-

3 .6

9 9 .7
.1
*
3 .3
3 .1
1 9 .9
1*0.5
19 .6
1 .6
1 1 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 00.0
.2
6 .1
5 .1
3 3 .0
50. U
5 .2
-

100.0

7 .3

6 .6

3.1*

1 3 .6

-

.3
'

1/ Includes data fo r w holesale tra d e ; fin a n c e , in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s in ad d ition to those in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s ep a ra tely *
*2/ Inclu des data fo r wholesale tra d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s in ad d itio n to those in dustry d iv is io n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
V
Paid holidays of less than a full day have been omitted.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

T able D -4 :

P

a id

V c U z U to H A

ty o to m

o l P 4 0 4 A U ia * U )

P ercen t o f o ff ic e workers employed in V acation p o lic y

A ll workers ........................................................

A ll
Manufacturing
in d u s trie s 1 /

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l trade

P ercen t o f p la n t workers employed in A ll
Manufacturing
in d u s trie s 2/

P u b lic
u t ilitie s *

R e t a i l trad e

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .2
Hi. 8
69.1*
2.1*
.6
1 2 .8
1 2 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
7 6 . li
1 7 .9
5 8 .5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 .1
9 3 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 8 .8
7 2 .5
8 .7
-

9 6 .7
5 8 .2
ill*. 8
1 2 .2
1 .2
3 8 .5
3 6 .2
2 .3

9 6 .0
5 0 .0
1 * .3
3 .0
.7
1*6.0
U3.2
2 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 7 .0
7 3 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 9 .5
5 3 .6
6 .9
-

3 .3

U.o

A fter 1 year o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v acatio n s .............................................
L ength-of-tim e payment .........................
1 week ......................................................
2 w e e k s .............. .....................................
3 w e e k s ....................................................
O th e r .................................................... ..
Percentage payment 3 / ..................... ..
2 p ercen t .•••••7............................. ..
Over 2 but l e s s than 3 p e rce n t •
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v acatio n s ......................................

2 3 .6
2 3 .6
-

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .
* Tran sportation (excludin g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .

Occupational Wage Survey, P rov id en ce, R. I . , December 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

E stim ates are provided s e p a ra te ly , according th em p lo y er p r a c tic e in
computing v a ca tio n payments (le n g th -o f-tim e or p e rce n ta g e ); percentage
payments were converted to eq u iv alen t time period s in e a r l i e r stu d ie s.

13

t «u

«

d-4 :

Paid Vacatia*U (Qosimal PAooiiia*u)-Co*Ui*u*ed
P ercen t o f o f f i c e workers employed in -

V acation p o lic y

A ll w o r k e r s ........................................................

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s trie s 1/

P u blic
u tilitie s *

P ercen t o f p la n t workers employed in -

R e t a i l trade

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s 2/

p u b lic
u t ilitie s *

R e t a i l trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .2
1 1 .6
7 2 .3
2 .7
.6
1 2 .8
8 .7
3 .8
.3

1 0 0 .0
7 6 .il
I5.s>
6 0 .5
2 3 .6
1 6 .1
6 .9
.6

100 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .8
8U.3
U.2
8 .7
-

9 6 .7
5 8 .2
U2.0
1U.6
.u
1 .2
3 8 .5
3 3 .2
3.U
1 .9

9 6 .0
5 0 .0
U6.3
3 .0
.7
U6.0
3 9 .5
U.2
2 .3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 5 .1
8U.9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .3
7 2 .7
U.1
6 .9
-

*■

3 .3

U.o

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .8
8U.3
U.2
8 .7
- •
-

9 6 .7
5 8 .2
2 9 .0
1 6 .3
•U
1 2 .5
3 8 .5
1 7 .3
2 .2
1U.9
3 .3
.8

9 6 .0
5 0 .0
3 1 .5
U.2
1U.3
U6.0
2 0 .5
2 .6
1 7 .9
U.o
1 .0

-

3 .3

U.o

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .8
69. U
27.8
-

9 6 .7
5 8 .2
1U.1
U1.6
2 .5
3 8 .5
.6
3 7 .0
.9

9 6 .0
5 0 .0
1U.5
3 5 .2
.3
U6.0
•U
UU.5
l.l

3 .3

U.o

A fte r 2 y ears o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
p aid v acatio n s ....................................
L e n gth -o f-tim e paym ent.......................
1 w e e k .................................................
2 weeks ................................................. ..
3 w e e k s ...................................................
Other ..................................................... ..
P ercentage payment 3/ ••••.............. ••
2 p e r c e n t ............7 ................................
Over 2 b u t le s s than 3 p ercen t •
3 p e r c e n t ...............................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v a ca tio n s ......................................

m

"

—

A fte r 3 y ears o f s erv ice
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a c a t i o n s .......................................... ..
L en gth -o f-tim e payment .................... ..
1 w e e k ......................................................
2 w e e k s ....................................................
3 weeks ............................................ . . .
Other ............................. ..........................
Percentage payment 3 / ..............
2 p e r c e n t ............7 ...............................
Over 2 b u t le s s than 3 p ercen t •
3 p e rc e n t ...............................................
Over 3 but l e s s than U p ercen t •
U p e rce n t .............................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no p aid v a c a t i o n s ................ .....................

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .2
1 1 .3
7 2 .6
2 .7
.6
1 2 .8
7 .7
3 .8
.3
1 .0
-

*

1 0 0 .0
76. U
1 5 .9
6 0 .5
2 3 .6
Hi. 2
6 .9
.6
1 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
100 .0
-

“

1 0 0 .0
lp o .o
1 5 .1
8U.9
-

1 00.0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .3
7 2 .7
U .l
6 .9
~
-

~

A fte r 5 years o f se rv ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s .............................................
L en gth-o f-tim e payment ..................
1 w e e k .....................................................
2 w e e k s ........................ ..........................
3 weeks ••••...........................................
Percentage payment 3/ ...........................
2 p e rce n t ............7 ...........................
U p e rce n t ......................................
Over U bu t le s s than 6 p ercen t •
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no p aid v a c a t i o n s ........................... •••••




1 0 0 .0
8 7 .2
7 .6
7 5 .0
U.6
1 2 .8
.1
1 2 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
76. U
9 .2
6 6 .7
.5
2 3 .6
.1
2 3 .5
-

100 .0
100 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .3
5 9 .5
2U.2
-

14

Table D-4 :

PA0 4 Udio^)-Go ^ < 4e(f
*U

Paid* fyaccUiatiA.

Percent of office workers employed in V acation p o lic y

A ll workers ...........................................................

A ll
Manufacturing
in d u s trie s 1/

P u blic
u tilitie s *

I

R e t a i l trade

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Iin d u stries
m

2/

Manufacturing

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l tra d e

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .2
7 .6
6 8 .9
9 .2
1 .5
1 2 .3
.1
9 .3

1 0 0 .0
7 6 .4
9 .2
6 4 .8
2 .4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

2 3 .6
.1
1 7 .2

-

9 6 .7
5 8 .2
1 2 .0
4 1 .4
3 .4
1 .4
3 8 .5
.6
3 5 .6

9 6 .0
5 0 .0
1 2 .3
3 6 .0
1 .7

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .8
6 9 .4
6 .6
2 1 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .3
5 4 .8
1 3 .5
1 5 .4
-

3 .4

6 .3

-

-

AfterJLO y a g a q f .geprioe
Workers In estab lishm en ts providing
paid v a c a t i o n s ...................... ........................
Len gth-of-tim e payment .......................
1 w e e k ........................................................
2 weeks ......................................................
3 weeks ......................................................
4 weeks and o v e r ..................................
Percentage payment 2 / ..............................
2 p ercen t ..................................................
4 p e r c e n t ..................... ............................
Over A bu t l e s s than
6 p e rce n t .............................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v acatio n s .........................................

-

-

~

-

9 5 .2
4 .8

-

-

-

-

8 6 .6
1 3 .4
-

4 6 .0
.4
4 2 .8

-

-

2 .3

2 .8

-

-

3 .3

4 .0

-

—

9 6 .0
5 0 .0
1 2 .3
3 1 .2
6 .5

A fte r 15 v ears o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a c a t i o n s .............................. ....................... ..
Length-of -tim e pay m en t.............. ...............
1 w e e k ....................................................................
2 w e e k s ................................................. .. ...........
3 w e e k s .................................................................
A weeks and o v e r .............. ..........................
Percentage payment 2 / ....................................
2 p ercen t ..................................................
A p ercen t ..................................................
Over A but l e s s than
6 p e r c e n t .................................................... ..
6 p ercen t and o v e r ...................................
Workers In estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s .................................................

1 0 0 .0
8 7 ,2
6 .0
3 7 .4
4 2 .3
1 .5
1 2 .8

1 0 0 .0
7 6 .4
9 .2
4 8 .5
1 8 .7
2 3 .6

-

.1

.1

-

-

9 .3

1 7 .2

-

-

9 6 .7
5 8 .2
1 2 .0
3 2 .5
1 2 .3
1 .4
3 8 .5
.6
3 0 .3

3 .4

6 .3

-

-

-

-

2 .3
5 .3

“

**

•

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

9 .8
9 0 .2

1 0 0 .0
100*0
2 .8
6 7 .7
8 .3
2 1 .2
-

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

3 .4
9 6 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .3
5 0 .7
1 7 .6
1 5 .4

4 6 .0

-

.4

-

-

3 6 .4

-

-

2 .8
6 .4

-

-

3.3

4 .0

-

—

9 6 .7
5 8 .2
1 2 .0
3 1 .6
1 3 .0
1 .6
3 8 .5
.6
2 9 .6

96<0
5 0 .0
1 2 .3
3 1 .2
6 .5

-

Aftey, a q . J M r s ,<g.,„flgplcg
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v a c a t i o n s .........................................................
Len gth-of-tim e p ay m en t .................................
1 w e e k ....................................................................
2 w e e k s ........................................ .......................
3 weeks ......................................................
A weeks and o v e r ..................................
Percentage payment 2 / .......................
2 p e r o e n t ..................................................
A percen t ..................................................
Over A h a t l e s s than
,
6 p ero en t .............................................
6 peroen t and over ..............................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v acatio n s .........................................




1 0 0 .0
8 7 .2
6 .0
3 4 .7
3 7 .6
8 .9
1 2 .8

1 0 0 .0
7 6 .4
9 .2
4 7 .4
1 9 .8
2 3 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

9 .8
9 0 .2
-

.1

.1

9 .3

1 7 .2

-

3 .4
-

6 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .8
5 7 .4
1 8 .0
2 1 .8
-

-

See footnotes a t end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), c u n iilc a tio n , and other public u t ilit ie s

-

-

4 6 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .4

9 6 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
16.3
4 1 .8
2 4 .7
1 7 .2
-

3 5 .6

-

-

2 .3
6 .0

2 .8
7 .2

-

-

3 .3

4 .0

.4

15

Table D -4: P a i d

V cU xU lO + tA

P A Q 4 J4 d 4 Q H tfi-G o H iti4 U ted

P ercen t of p la n t workers employed in -

Percen t of o ff ic e workers employed in Vacation p o licy

A ll w o rk e rs ........................................................

A ll
Manufacturing
in d u stries 1 /

Public
u tilitie s *

R e ta il trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
8 7 .2
6 .0
3 3 .0
3 7 .2
1 1 .0
1 2 .8
.1
9 .3
3.1*
-

1 0 0 .0
76. U
9 .2
UU.6
2 2 .6
2 3 .6
.1
1 7 .2
6 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 .8
9 0 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .8
5 3 .7
2 1 .7
2 1 .8
•
-

A ll
Manufacturing
in d u strie s 2 /

1 0 0 .0

Public
u tilitie s *

R e ta il trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .0
5 0 .0
1 2 .3
2 9 .1
8 .6
1*6.0
.1*
3 5 .6
2 .8
7 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3.1*
9 6 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .3
3 2 .1
3U.U
1 7 .2
*
-

A fter 25 years o f serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v a ca tio n s ......................................
Length-of-tim e paym ent................
1 w e e k ..........................................
2 weeks ................................................. ..
3 w e e k s................ .................
1* weeks and over ............................. ..
Percentage payment 3 / ........... ...............
2 p e r c e n t ............7 . . . . . ................
1* p ercen t ...............................................
Over 1* b u t le ss t h a n 6 percent •
6 p ercen t and o v e r ...........................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s .......................... ..




1/
"2/
3/
*

9 6 .7
5 8 .2
1 2 .0
2 9 .0
15. U
1 .8
3 8 .5
•6
2 9 .6
2 .3
6 .0

U.O

3 .3

Includes data fo r wholesale tra d e ; fin an ce, insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in addition to those industry div isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
Includes data for wholesale tra d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e rv ice s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
P ercen t of annual earnings.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and o ther public u t i l i t i e s .

Table D -5:

j&ltotSMe* O H /t Pe*tU O *t P lcutd.

Percen t o f o ffice w r k e r s employed in T^pe o f plan

A ll workers ...................................................... ..
Workers in establishm ents having
insurance o r pension plans 3 / ............

A ll
in d u strie s V Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Percent of p lan t workers employed in -

R e ta il trade

A ll
in d u stries 2 / Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Public
u tilitie s *

R e ta il trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .0

9 7 .2

9 5 .3

9 2 .6

9 0 .1

9 1 .8

9 1 .0

8 3 .3

Insurance plans 3 / ..................................
L i f e ................ 7 .......................................
A ccid en tal death and
dismemberment ..................................
Sickness and accid ent .....................
H o sp italizatio n ..................................
S u rg ical .................................................
Medical ....................................................
R etirem ent-pension p l a n ................

93.1*
7 9 .5

9 0 .5
7 6 .8

9 5 .3
9 5 .3

9 2 .6
8 6 .7

8 8 .6
7U. 1

9 0 .0
71*. 6

9 1 .0
9 1 .0

8 3 .3
69.1*

2 5 .0
1 8 .8
7 7 .3
6 2 .2
17.1*
61*. 1

2 6 .1
11*. U
7 7 .1
5 8 .3
1 7 .2
5 2 .5

6 2 .8
7 3 .7
3 1 .3
1 2 .9
1 0 .3
9 0 .2

3 8 .5
2 0 .6
73.2
69.1*
1 3 .3
1 5 .2

3 8 .6
2 1 .6
7 5 .1
6 0 .8
2 1 .2
3 1 .6

3 9 .7
19.1*
8 0 .1
6 5 .7
21*. 0
3 0 .5

5 0 .2
6 8 .5
3 8 .7
1 2 .5
7 .6
81.1*

2 8 .9
1 8 .7
5 8 .8
50.1*
5 .2
1 8 .5

Workers in establishm ents having
no insurance or pension p l a n s ............

3 .0

2 .8

U.7

7.1*

9 .9

8 .2

9 .0

1 6 .7

1/

cf
3/
*

Includes data fo r wholesale tra d e ; fin a n ce , insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in addition to those ind ustry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
Includes data for wholesale tra d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in addition to those ind ustry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
Unduplicated t o t a l .
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey

The Bureau1e occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with avallable resources* In order to use resources efficiently and
publisb results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community*
Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments*

sueh jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions*

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation* Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied*
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data*

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work* Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and ineentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included*
Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations* reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour; for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed* Bata are shown for only full-time workers, i*e«, those
hired to work the establishment fs full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification*

to

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau9s
field representatives to establishments included in the study*
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations!
(a) office
clerical; (b) professional and technical} (c) maintenance and power
plant} and (d; custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-4). The industry groupings surveyed ares manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads;, communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services* Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions* As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied* Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion*
Among the industries in which eharaeteristie jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table)* Although size limits frequently varied from these estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources*
Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations*

The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel* "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffioe functions* Administra­
tive, executive, professional, and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded* Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, these work categories are included as plant workers in nonmanufacturing industries*
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the stirvey*
Establishments were
eonsidered as having a shift-differential polioy if they met any of
the following conditions t operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work*
Rroportions in the tabulation of establishment polioy are presented

17

in t m i o f to ta l p la n t employment, w hereas p ro p o rtio n s in th e se e ond ta b u la tio n ro p ro sa n t on ly tboso w orkers a c tu a lly employed on
th o sp e c ifie d la ta s h if t.
In fo m a tio n on wage p ra c tie o s o th e r th an s h if t d iff e r ­
e n tia ls re fe rs to a l l o ffic e and p la n t w orkers as sp e c ifie d in th e
in d iv id u a l ta b le s . I t i s p resen ted in te rn s o f th e p ro p o rtio n o f
a l l w orkers employed in o ffic e s (o r p la n t d ep artn en ts) th a t observe
th e p ra c tic e in q u e stio n , except in th e se c tio n re la tin g to wonen

o ffic e w orkers o f th e ta b le su n aarisin g scheduled weekly hours.
Because o f e lig ib ility requirem en ts, th e p ro p o rtio n a c tu a lly re ­
ceiv in g th e s p e c ific b e n e fits nay be a n a lle r.
The summary o f v aca tio n p lan s i s U n ite d to form al a r­
rangem ents. I t excludes in fe rn a l p lan s whereby tin e o ff w ith pay
i s gran ted a t th e d is c re tio n o f th e em ployer o r o th e r su p erv iso r.
T abu lation s o f in su ran ce and pension p lan s have been confined to
th o se fo r w hich a t le a s t a p a rt o f th e c o st i s borne by the em ployer.

E stab lish m en ts and W orkers in Major In d u stry D ivision s and in S elected In d u s trie s in P rovidence, R. I . , 1/
and Number Studied by th e Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s , December 1952
Number► o f
Employment
e sta b lish m eats
M inim a number
o f w orkers in
E stim ated
E stim ated
In estab lish n sn ts
Item
to ta l
estab lish m en ts
to ta l
stu died
w ith in
stu d ied
S tudied
w ith in
scope o f
scope o f
T o tal
O ffice
a/
stu d y _
stu d r
In d u stry d iv isio n s in w hich ooounations
were surveyed on an are a b a sis
132
161,600
65,050
8,320
AU d iv isio n s ................................................... ..
51
701
129,800
15,820
M anufacturing .........................
1,350
51
509
73
31,800
3,970
19,230
192
N om anufaeturing • • • • • • • • « • • » • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
59
51
T ra n sp o rta tio n (exclu ding ra ilro a d s ),
com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic
u t i l i t i e s .................................................................
22
9,000
8,120
12
1,250
51
W holesale tra d e
2,700
860
270
51
29
9
U ,9 0 0
R e ta il tra d e ...................................................• • • • •
620
91
21
6,910
51
F in ance, in su ra n c e , and r e a l e s ta te « •••••
5,100
8
2,310
1,760
51
23
S erv ices j / ........................... ..
6
2,800
21
70
51
1,030
In d u s trie s in w hich ooounations were
surveyed on an in d u stry b a sis tJ
M achinery in d u s trie s (ex cep t m achine to o ls) . . . .
9,700
5 / 21
66
28
920
7,110
Power la u n d rie s .................. ................... • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
31
21
1,205
781
23
18
2 / The P ro vidence, R . I .,a r e a fo r th is survey c o n sists o f m ost o f B ris to l, K ant, and Providence C ounties w ith N orth K ingston in
W ashington C ounty, Rhode Isla n d , and a contiguous se c tio n o f M assachusetts in clu d in g A ttleb o ro and N orth A ttle b o ro .
2 / T b ta l e stab lish m en t em ploym ent. The minimum e lse o f estab lish m en t stu d ied in a l l d iv isio n s in th o Beoember 1951 survey was
21 w orkers.
2 / H o tels) p e rso n a l se rv ic e s) b u sin ess se rv ic e s) autom obile re p a ir shops) ra d io b ro ad castin g and te le v is io n ) m otion p ic tu re s)
n o n p ro fit m em bership o rg a n iz a tio n s) and engineering and a rc h ite c tu ra l s e rv io e s.
lJ Instabslish m enre dmefin ed in fo o m achine-tool a ctaebssosrie s w ith 8 o r more w orkers were in clu d ed .
d u trie s a
tn o tes to wage
le .
E
ts anufacturing
c




18

Index

Assembler (machinery), 7
Bench hand (bakeries), 10
Biller, machine, 3
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3
Bricklayer (building
construction), 10
Calculating-machine operator, 3
Carpenter (building
construction), 10
Carpenter, maintenance, 5
Cleaner, 6
Clerk, file, 3
Clerk, order, 3
Clerk, payroll, 3
Clerk, retail receiving
(power laundries), 9
Compositor, hand (printing), 10
Crane operator, electric
bridge, 6
Draftsman, A
Drill-press operator (machinery), 7
Duplicating-machine operator, 3
Electrician (building
construction), 10
Electrician, medntenanoe, 5
Electrician, maintenance
(machinery), 7
Electrotyper (printing), 10
Engine-lathe operator (machinery), 7, 8
Engineer, stationary, 5
Extractor operator (power laundries), 9
finisher, flatwork (power laundries), 9
Fireman, stationary boiler, 5
Fireman, stationary boiler
(power laundries), 9
Grinding-machine operator
(machinery), 7, 8
Guard, 6




Painter (building construction), 10
Painter, maintenance, 5
Photoengraver (printing), 10
Pipe fitter, maintenance, 5
Plasterer (building construction), 10
Plumber (building construction), 10
Porter, 6
Press assistant (printing), 10
Press feeder (printing), 10
Pressor, machine, shirts
(power laundries), 9
Pressman (printing), 10

Helper (bakeries), 10
Helper, motortruck driver, 10
Helper, trades, maintenance, 5
Identifier (power laundries), 9
Inspector (machinery), 7
Janitor, 6
Janitor (machinery), 7, 8
Key-punch operator, 3
Laborer (building construction), 10
Laborer, material handling, 6
Laborer, material handling (machinery), 7

Receiving clerk, 6
ROuteman (driver-salesman)
(power laundries), 9

Machine operator (printing), 10
Machine tender (printing), 10
Machine-tool operator, production
(machinery), 7, 8
Machine-tool operator, toolroom
(machinery), 7
Machinist, maintenance, 5
Machinist, production (machinery), 7, 8
Marker (power laundries), 9
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 5
Mechanic, maintenance, 5
Milling-machine operator (machinery), 7, 8
Millwright, 5
Mixer (bakeries). 10
Molder (bakeries), 10
Motortruck driver, 10

Screw-machine operator, automatic
(machinery), 7
Secretary, 3
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance, 5
Shipping clerk, 6
Shipping-and-recelving clerk, 6
Stenographer, A
Stereotyper (printing), 10
Switchboard operator, A
Switchboard operator-receptionist, A
Tabulating-machine operator, 3, A
Tool-and-dle maker, 5
Tool-and-dle maker (machinery), 7, 8
Transcrlbing-machine operator, A
Truck driver, 6
Trucker, power, 6
Turret-lathe operator, hand
(machinery), 7, 8
typist, A

Nurse, industrial (registered), A
Office boy, 3
Offioe girl, 3
Oiler, 5
Operator (local transit), 10
Order filler, 6
Ovenman (bakeries), 10

Masher, machine (power laundries), 9
Watchman, 6
Welder, hand (machinery), 7
Wrapper (bakeries), 10
Wrapper, bundle (power
laundries), 9

Packer, 6
Packer (bakeries), 10
☆

U. S . G OVERN M ENT PRIN TIN G O FFIC E : 0 — 1953




This report was prepared in the Bureau's New England Regional O ffice.
Communications may be addressed to:
Wendell D. Macdonald, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor S ta tistic s
18 Oliver Street
Boston 10, Massachusetts
The services of the Bureau of Labor S ta tistic s' regional o ffices
are available for consultation on sta tis tic s relatin g to wages and industrial
rela tio n s, employment, prices, labor turnover, productivity, work in ju ries,
construction,and housing.
The New England Region Includes the follow ing S ta tes:
Connecticut
New Hampshire
Maine
Rhode Island
Vermont
Massachusetts


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102