View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

DALLAS, TEXAS
August 1952

Bulletin No. 1116-1

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU

OF

LABO R

S T A T IS T IC S

Ewan C la gu e - C o m m issio n e r

DALLAS

TEXAS

A u g u st 1952




B ulletin N o. 1116-1
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary
BUREAU

OF

LABO R

S T A T IS T IC S

Ew an C la g u e - C o m m is sio n e r

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 15 cents

Contents

L e t t e r

oF

Transmittal

Page
I N T R O D U C T I O N . . . . * ..........................................
THE DALLAS METROPOLITAN AREA ..............................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations .........
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ••«..
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ••••
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations ............................. .

(H i)

14

I N D E X .......................................................

Hon. Martin P. Durkin,
Secretary of Labor.

10
10
11
11
13

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ....................... .

Ewan Clague, Commissioner.

9
9
9
9
9

Supplementary wage practices D-l
Shift differential provisions ..........
D-2
Scheduled weekly h o u r s
............. .........
D-3
Paid holidays .................................
D-4
Paid vacations ...............
D-5
Insurance and pension plans ............

This report was prepared in the Bureau*s regional office in Atlanta, Ga., by Bernard J. Fahres under the direction of
Louis B. Woytych, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst.
The planning and central direction of the program was carried on
in the Bureau* s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations.

8
8

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction .......................
C-205
B a k e r i e s ........................
C-27
Printing ......................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ••••......
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ..............

I have the honor to transmit herewith a report onoccupational wages and related benefits in Dallas, Tex.,
during
August 1952. Similar studies are being conducted in a number of
other large
labor-market areas during the fiscal year 1953.
These studies have been designed to meet a variety of govern­
mental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide earnings
information for m a n y occupations eommon to most manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries of selected supplementary wage benefits.
Whenever possible,
separate
data have been presented for individual major industry divisions.

6

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis B-2333 Women*s and misses* d r e s s e s ...............
B-7211 Power l a u n d r i e s ..... .................

The Secretary of Labor:




1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ...............................
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C., January 22, 1953.

1

16

3
5
5

OCCUPATIO NAL W AGE SURVEY - DALLA S, TEX.

Introduction
The Dallas area is one of several important industrial
centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently con­
ducting occupational wage surveys* In such surveys, occupations
common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries
are studied on a community-wide basis* Gross-industry methods of
sampling are thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the fol­
lowing types of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional and
technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, ware­
housing, and shipping. In presenting earnings information for such
jobs (tables A-l through A-4), separate data are provided wherever
possible for individual broad industry divisions*
Earnings information for occupations that are character­
istic of particular important local industries is presented in
Series B tables* Union scales (Series C tables) are presented for
selected occupations in several industries or trades in which the
great majority of the workers are employed under terms of collec­
tive-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are
believed to be indicative of prevailing pay practices*
Data are collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such
as vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension
plans*

The Dallas Metropolitan Area
The Metropolitan Area of Dallas (Dallas County), one of
the fastest growing and most important distribution, communication,
and manufacturing centers of the Southwest, now has a population of
well over 600,000 inhabitants* Approximately two-thirds reside
within the corporate limits of Dallas*
Nearly 300,000 Dallas workers were employed in nonagricultural activities in August 1952* It is estimated that almost
half of these employees were employed by establishments within the
scope of the Bureau1s survey. 1/ More than 55,000 workers were in
the 214. manufacturing establishments included within the scope of
the study* Important manufacturing industries in the area include
apparel and related products, food processing, furniture, machinery,
petroleum refining, and transportation equipment. Public utilities
and retail trade establishments provided the bulk of the employment

1/

See appendix for discussion of scope of survey.




in that portion of the nonmanufacturing field covered by the study,
with each of these two major industry groups accounting for slight­
ly more than 22,000 workers. Nearly 12,000 workers were employed
in finance, insurance, and real estate firms, and about 8,000
were employed in both the wholesale trade and services groups of
industries*
Among the industries and size groups within the scope of
the survey, about half the plant workers were employed by firms
having written agreements with labor organizations. In manufactui>ing, more than two-thirds of the employees in plant jobs were em­
ployed in unionized shops, while in the transportation, communi­
cation, and other public utilities group of industries, four out
of five workers were in establishments having labor-management
agreements covering nonoffice workers. Only in the public utilities
group of industries was there an appreciable degree of unionization
among office employees* About 40 percent of the clerical workers
in this industry group were employed in establishments having union
agreements covering office workers* In all industries combined,
less than one in eight office workers was employed by a firm having
a union contract covering office employees*

Occupational Wage Structure
Wage levels in manufacturing and public utilities indus­
tries in the Dallas area were influenced extensively by general wage
increases and cost-of-living adjustments during the 14 months fol­
lowing the last previous comprehensive survey of the area, g/ About two-thirds of the plant workers in each of these groups of
industries were granted general wage increases - most of these work­
ers were in establishments whose increases ranged from 10 to 18
cents an hour* Two—thirds of the office workers in manufacturing
and four-fifths of those in public utilities received general wage
increases. In other nonmanufacturing industries wage adjustments
of an across-the-board nature were uncommon and generally confined
to the largest establishments*
Wage rates for time-rated plant workers in all the large
and a majority of small-manufacturing establishments and in trans­
portation, communication, and other public utilities firms studied
were determined on the basis of formal rate structures. More than
three-fourths of time-rated plant workers in these industries worked
under formalized wage plans providing a range of rates for each
job classification. In other nonmanufacturing industries, formal

Wage

(1)

g/ Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin No. 1043* Occupational
Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951.

2

rate structures providing either a range of rates, or a single job
rate, for time-worker jobs were less prevalent. About two-thirds
of the time workers in the plant departments of service and whole­
sale trade establishments worked under a formal range-of-rates ar­
rangement, In retail trade, however, the rates of more than halT
the workers were determined informally.

industries were higher in manufacturing establishments in 16 of 18
job categories for which comparisons were possible. Wages of office
as well as nonoffice workers in the public utilities groups were
generally above the average level for all nonmanufacturing indus­
tries, whereas in retail trade establishments wage levels were be­
low the nonmanufacturing average in a majority of jobs for which
comparisons could be made.

Minimum entrance rates for inexperienced plant workers
were established on a formal basis in nearly all Dallas firms. In
retail trade and services establishments, entrance rates were usu­
ally below 75 cents an hour, while in manufacturing and the public
utilities groups more than half of the plant workers were in es­
tablishments having minimum entrance rates of 90 cents or higher.
Nine out of 10 nonoffice workers employed in wholesale trade were
in firms having established entrance rates between 75 and 90 cents
an hour.

Practically all office workers and five-sixths of the
plant workers in the Dallas area were employed by firms providing
pay for holidays not worked. Two-thirds of the office and two-fifths
of the plant workers received six or more paid holidays.

Where occupational comparisons could be made, wages and
salaries were higher in manufacturing industries than in nonmanu­
facturing. In 14 of 15 office classifications permitting compari­
son, average salaries in manufacturing were higher than in nonmanu­
facturing. Average hourly earnings for plant jobs surveyed in all




Provisions for paid vacations were also more liberal for
office workers than for plant workers. After a year of service,
the majority of office workers were entitled to 2 weeks of paid va­
cation, whereas four-fifths of the plant workers received only 1
week. After 5 years of service, most office workers and two-thirds
of the plant workers were eligible for 2 weeks of paid vacation.
Variations in vacation benefits by industry group were less sig­
nificant for office employees than for plant v/orkers for whom the
pattern of benefits shifted noticeably with varying length of serv­
ice requirements.

3

A 5 Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

0 C C d 4 p x U iO **&

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied cn an area
basis in Dallas, Tex., by industry division, August 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME; WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Average
S e x , o c c u p a t i o n , and i n d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

%

U nder
Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) $
3 0 .0 0

$

3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0

i$
3 5 .0 0

1 *0.00 1 *2 .5 0

3 7 .5 0

ho
ho

l* c .5 _
l*o .5 i
l*o .5

*
5 3 .5 Q .
5 3 .5 0
5 3 .5 0

B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A ..................

28

U o .o

6 2 .5 0

c l a s s B .................................................................

31

3 9 .5

C l e r k s , o r d e r .......................................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...............................................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g .......................................................................

301*
1*9
2 55

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*6.0

6 l .5 o
6 9 .5 0
6 0 .0 0

C l e r k s , p a y r o l l ..................................................................................
N o n m a n u f a c tu r in g .......................................................................
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ■>.........................................................

59
1*6
38

1*0.0
1 *0.0
3 9 .5

7 2 .5 0
7 0 .0 0
6 8 .0 0

O f f i c e b o y s .............................................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...............................................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g .......................................................................
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ................................................... .....

183
62
121
28

1*0.0
1 *0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

3 6 .0 0
3 7 .0 0
3 5 .5 0
3 9 .0 0

S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ..............................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...............................................................................

U*
36

1 *0 .0
1*0.0

B i l l e r s , m a ch in e ( b i l l i n g m a c h i n e ) .............................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g .......................................................................
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s # .........................................................

la

C le rk s, f i l e ,

T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s .............................................
N o n m a n u f a c tu r in g .......................................................................

88

.

;

:
;
j

1 *0 .0
3 9 '.5

1 6 3 .5 0
; 6 3 .5 0

|
$

$
1

B

6 7 . 5 0 1 7 0 .0 0

j7 2 .5 0

7 5 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

6 7 .5 0 i 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0

! 7 5 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

8 5 a QO_[ 9 0 . 0 0

-

2
2
2

-

3
3

i

_

_

_

_

_

;

12

- .1 3 .

3

3

6 0 .0 0

5 7 .5 0

6 0 .0 0

6 2 .5 0 ^ 6 5 . CO

6 5 .0 0

6 2 .5 0

-

-

3
3

1*

1
l

i
;

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

,

-

i

68
18

3
3

j
1
1

;

2
2
2

-

_

8

-

9
9
9

_

_

13

11
11

(
|

8
8
8

-

-

3

~

_

I

27
-

-

-

-

- !

i*
-

18
8

i*
-

15 1
10
5 i
l

-

!6

1*

16

2

i

"

3

1

_
-

i*
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1 .
l i

2
2

j

-

_

i
i
!
I

_
-

-

i$

-

_

-

3
1
2
2

3

7

6
1
5
l

!
!

-

-

1
;
!
;

2
1
1
1

2 1
2
-

1

3 ■
r i

_

1

1 2 !
!

7
2
5

30

9

!

i
21*

1*

!
i

|

.

3
3 l

-

3

!

_
-

-

!
;

"

5

3
1

|

~ !

26
13
13

9
3

6
2

12
7

-

:

■

1

|
-

!
|

-

-

!

-

-

-

!

-

3

!
i

_

- ;

-

-

-

-

-

1

;

1

_

!

2

i

8
6

I

_

1* .
1*

1*
3

22
22
22

:
'
I

17
3
.11*
2
2

13

■

!
:

'

65
199
27
38

1*0.0
3 9 .0
1*0.5
1 *0.0
1*0.5

!
;
:

1 *3.50
1 *9.00
1*2.00
l* 3 .5 o
la .o o

67
61*

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A .....
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

101
81
36

l*o .5
C 6 .1 T 1
1 *0.0

5 6 .5 0
5 U .5 0
5 3 .o o

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ..................
Manufacturing ...............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................................................
Retail trade ........................................

U31
121*
307
52

1 *0.0
1 *0.0
1 *0.0
1 *1.0

533
70
1*63
227

1*0.5
1*0.5

1 *0.0
1 *0.0
1 *0.0
1 *0.0

| 1*8.00
| 1 *7.50

_

;

-

_

17
-

-

17
2
1

j

31*
!
i
;

i

-

;

1 *3 .5 0

_

1 *2.50

-

ia .5 o

-

l* 9 .5 o

_
-

92
7U

1*0.0
1 *0.0

1*3.00

Clerks, file, class A .................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................................................
Public utilities * .........................................................

216
202
30

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

1*3.00
1*2.00
1 *7.50

-

-

27
3
1

1*5
3
3

i

j

_

_

-

"

!

1 *9.50
1*7.00

31*
l*
13

_
-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

!

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

j
j
1

-

-

_

~

-

1
1

1
1

3
3

!
:

_

_

:

-

-

9 :
1* j

9
9

12
9

_

i

_

_

-

,

-

-

-

_
-

!

|

1
!

22
22
1

57

1
!

!

l

6l
9
52
6

57
12

;

12

7
7
-

1

3
9
3
-

22
22
-

-

-

13
13

3
2

11
10

;

2
2

12
11

1
1

16
11

1
!

I

7
7
5

1

1

|

10
56
! ------ g—
21*
32
1* j
8
!

1*2
17
25
9

7

;-------- 1 r
U i

1
|

7

1
9
19
19
11
11

1
|

7

j

5

6

i
j

3
2

!

i*o
ii
29
2

ii* •

i
I

10
10

!

100
38
62

!

!

1*2 :
11*
28 :

15
15

3
3
2

1

;

7
10

I
1 ____3 _ _
_
3

_

-

-

26
6
20

61
16

-

-

5o.oo

27

_

-

_

Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) .....................................
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .

|
!

h

1

!

8

:

-

j

_

1
|

3
3

12
9

3

■

_

_

_

!

_

_

_

-

-

-

;
;

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

2
2
2

12
3
-

2
_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_
_

_

_

2
-

1
1
-

'

"

i

!

'2
-

i
,

j
1

1
_

!
!
|

11*
11*
12

1
1

-

"

-

I

3

1

I

3 I

j

_

.6
-

9

20
-

6
3

9
3

20
15

-

9
9

_

8
3

_

-

1
'

-

"

1
1
j

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation "(excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

“

1*8
12
36
29

37
9
28
16

26
26
17

78
15
63
ia

:
s

13
8

2
2

15
10

17
11*

7
7

:
:

1*7
1*7
i*

1*3
1*3
6

1*2
1*2

31
31

16
16
6

i
1

r

1
6 !
j________

68
3
65
36

73
5
68
20

29
3
26
5

35
5
30
16

19
j

2
17

i
|

ll*
n r

-

1*

-

2
-

'

■

-

3

-

T~ ~

8
ir1

_

-

-

-

-

7
1

11*
i*
10

33
22

2
2

— JT
j

|

I

i
1
!

2

_
_

'

1*

h

-

-

-

-

~

2
2
-

-

i
ia
1
--------8“
i

i

_ i
- !

j

'




;

i
261*

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) .................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................................................

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) .....................................
Manufacturing ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing.......................................................................
Retail trade . ........................................................................

5
3

3
2
2

i 11
I
— 5
7
5
1
l

2
2

i
!

7

5
3
-

!
!

Women
B i l l e r s , m a ch in e ( b i l l i n g m a c h i n e ) .............................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...............................................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g .......................................................................
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * .........................................................
Retail trade .........................................................................

9
2

7
2
5

13
2

-

!
'

1
—

!

13

:

-

_

:

18
3

!
,

:
-

over

"

-

6 !
1
_ 1
1
! ------- “--- j
ri

;

:

1
1

18
18

$
8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0

- I
------------- !

-

_
-

6
6

$

_

6
6
6

1

j

8

-

7

_
-

_

25
11
11*

_

h

-

-

27

29

18
-

7
1
6
1*

-

_

!

-

29

_

-

"

22
22

_

_

!

!

22 !
22

_

7

!
j

t

l
l
l

1
,

7
7

3
3
3

_

20
10
10
2

!

-

____k _

;

-

:

la
19
22

_

_

50
3

-

;

3
-

j$

j

i

-

-

j$

$

5 7 .5 0

i
-

3U.Q0

51*. oo
5 5 .5 0

|
S

5 5 .o o

5 0 .0 0 i 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .o o

Men

$

$

$

1 *5 .0 0 ! 1 *7 .5 0 j 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0

1 *2.50 l * 5 .c o 1 1 *7 .5 0

3 7 . 5 0 ! 1 *0 .0 0
!

3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0

%
|

s

!$

S

$

$

3

3

6
3

3

18
—

|

r
16 i
1
1*
I

2
2

i

6
6

_ |

_

-

-

_
-

10

_

_

_

_

10

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1
1
1

6

_

_

3

-

-

3

"

-

~

_
-

-

_

-

-

“

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., August 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1
*
T able

A - l : (J\ f j iO * Q c o U f M t iOH A r Q o H t d H H lt d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Dallas, Tex., by industry division, August 1952)

N U M B E R OF W OR KE R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W EE KL Y EARNINGS OF

A verage
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
Under 30.00
$
30.00 32.50

—
$
$
s
32.50 35.00 37.50

S
$
$
$
$
$1
$
to. 00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 5o.oo 52.50 55.00 57.50

35.00

1*2.50

37.50 1*0.00

1*7.50 ' 50.00 52.50

1*5.00

1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
62.50 $65.00 67.50 $
70.00 72.50 75.00 !80.00 j85.00 90.00
and
over
62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.oo 80.00 85.00 90.00
60.00

57.50 60.00

55.oo

Women - Continued
Clerks, file, class B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Public utilities * . . . . . . . . . . ......
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

888
35
853
101
U7

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

35.50
1*5.00
35.oo
1*0.00
3l*.5o

13
13
1

325
1
*
16

16

Clerks, order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

187
39
11*8

1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0

l*5.oo
11 .
**5o
l*5.oo

_
-

_
-

11*
5
9

Clerks, payroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
.
Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

U02
135
267
60

1*0.0
39.5
l*o.5
l*o.5

5i.oo
5i.5o
5o.5o
1*8.00

_
"

5
5
-

1
_
1
1

7
5

Duplicating-machine operators . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . .

la
29

1*0.5
1*0.5

11.5o
**
l*3.5o

_

_

_

-

Key-punch operators .. . . . . . . . . ....... .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Public utilities * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

385
59
326
67

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

1*6.00
53.50
11.50
**
1*9.50

_ i
_
-

6
6
18
.
18
-

_
_
-

Office girls .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

11*7
139

1*0.0
1*0.0

36.00
35.50

1
1

29
29

Secretaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.022
Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . .. ...... .
21*6
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
776
Public utilities * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
198
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
129

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

61.50
68.50
59.00
62.50
59.50

_
.

Stenographers, general . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... .
Public utilities * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.506
T i n
1,018
3ia
na

1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

51.00
57.00
1*8.50
51.00
1*7.00

Switchboard operators .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . .......
Public utilities * .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Retail trade .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

263
37
226
1*
3
53

ia.o
39.0
la.5
1*0.0
1*1.0

iiii.OO
51*.5o
1*2.00
5o.oo
l*o.5o

Switchboard operator-receptionists .....................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................................

322
131
191
28

1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
ia.o

11.50
**
1*6.00
1*3.50
1*6.50

Tabulating-macbine operators ..................................
Nonmanufacturing............... ................................. ..

80
70

1*0.0
1*0.0

52.00
51.00

Transcribing-machine operators, general ......... ..
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................

331
265

1*0.0
1*0.0

1*6.50
1*6.00

Typists, class A ...........................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................
Public utilities * ...........................................
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

601

28
573
111*
83

1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
i*o.5

i*l*.5o
1*9.50
l*l*.5o
1*8.00
1*2.50

uo.o
1*0.0

1*2.50
51.00
39.00

Pllhl 1

f 11+^1 i
*

OQ -f
I.

Typists, class B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.11*9
Manufacturing ...... ,,,... . . . . . . . . . . . .
338
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................
81
1
Public utilities • ..........................................
83
Retail trade ................... . . • • • • • • • • . ............
81
*

1
*0.0
1
*0.0
1
*0.0

!
!
j
i
:

_
_
.
_
3
3
-

-

_

325

2
6
6
8
8
5

2

*

7
2
5
-

_

l
l

_
-

17
9
8

6
-

7

20
U

6

7

19
*
19
30
2

30
6
2*
1
5

67
30
37
15

U2
7
35
5

63
32
31
8

21
1
20
1

l
l

9
7

1
1

12
! 5
i

-

9
8

2
-

39

36
1
35
7

la
3
38
13

66
7
59
8

U7
13
3U
25

j 33
16
17
j 3

1
*

2

2
-

! -

16
*
-

39
-

3*
1
3* .
1

19
19

7
7

9
9

_
_

_
_
-

52

15
*

_

52
_
-

15
*
5
6

11

1* *
11
16
128
13
*
25

200
26
171*
53
36

28
1
27
6
1
*

21
1
*
17
2
1
*

30
3
27
6
17

1*
2

56

l*o
12

_
_ i
_ ;
- ;

- ,
- ;
55 1
10 1
15 |
*
_ 1
8 I

-

1
_
l

"
83
6
77
12
7

63

9

63 !
_
6

-

12
16
10

12

15
U
11
l

9
1
*
5

7

21

6

-

33
11
22
2

33
8
25

25
2
23
5

12

17
2
15
6

57
9
18
*

9

21

2
2

_
-

21
1
*
1
*

16

9

1
_ ;
_
_
-

2
2

3

16

u
u

U

1*0
10
*

- i
1
-

_
_
-

7
3
U
-

17
11
6

9
2
3
11
*
17
2*
1

120
7
113
26

55
12
U3
1
i

15U
U2
112
37
5

I
1
j 21
! 21
i 5
U
30
11
19

U
u
-

i
— -—

1
—
:

8
I 11
2
5 ^
3
1 9
1
i _
I-- 1 -

!
|

6U
12
52
13
7

i10U
15
! 89
' 39
13

loU
32
72
21
j
8

135

108

60

3U
: 7U
! 32

91
31

■ 80
! 32
U8

135
75

16

18
2

18

91
9
;33

75
39
21
17
5
12
5
l

! 60
30
10

3

_
-

_
-

_
-

7
7
1

2
2
-

11
1
io ;
1
2

5

_
-

_

3'
1
3
i
3

-

_
-

_
*
i
- !
_
- i

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

11
3

8
1

32
21
11
1

_
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
J
-

-

_
-

_
-

r
-

_
-

31 i
T i
25 i
13 :
5 |

50
22l
28 !
20
2 !

U2
17
25
6
6

59
22
37
19
8

8$
62 —
23
15
-

68 i
551
13
9
U

27
17 —
10
8
-

9
r
1*
2

6
6
-

U
U
■-

8
7
1
1

!

65
29
36|
8!
lU1

1
1

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

5

11
7
U

5
5

21
17
U
3

7

2
2

_
-

-

2
2

7
3

-

-

-

-

20

“

u

i :
i
- :

13
5
8
U
-

5
2
-

_
-

U
—
IT I
- i
-

5 .
.
5 ;
-

1 7
17
9
8
8
j “

U
2
2
2
-

_
-

“

U
3 --1
1

2
3

2
-1
2:
2.1
-

_
-

79
11
68
12
11

60

U

_
-

|
_
- !
- !
i
'

_
_
-I
_1
-—
1
-1
1

_

U i
U I
- ;
!
_ i
!---

! 90
I 8
: 82
i 28
: 6

109

I

30
18 '

12
U
1
1
1
1
_
-

j
'

;
! - - --

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_
_
_

_
.
_

-

-

6

91*

6

9
h

_

39.50

“

28

3

5

1U
3

1
*
1
*

12
12

1
1

U
U

13
9

10
9

7
7

10
9

2
2

3
1

5
5

1
1

2

"

-

-

-

-

-

13
13

53
12
*

82
60

32
3°

39
17

_

3
3

1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

10
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6U

60

35
1
3U
9
-

11
u
7
U
-

12
6
6
U
2

3
2
1
1

3
1
2
2

_

_

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

_

_

107
1
107

U7
36

!

11
1

6
8

6

_

6

!

1
*
1
*

2*
1
2*
1

_

1
*2.00

26

30
2

2
2

-

-

5

37

3
3

16

55

16

1*6

8

50

90

_

-

-

90

112
13
99
10
22

1

50

7*
1
15
19

78
11
17

6U
20
U

60

122
16

120
11*

57
17

58

106

106

U0

33

93
70
23

23

13

5

-

11

12

U
7

_

!
!

8
2
-

|

2

8

11*

3

161*

139 | 83
.
8
5
5
75
179 ! 131*
_ !
20 1 13
3
23 ! 20

78

75

j

25
"

26
2

2

(

-

-

|
i
|

_

_

i

i
______ i

-

-

|
31

r 27
i

!

^

U

!
!
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
_

_
-

*
*

1

*

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




-

-

_
-

_
.
-

5

-

•

1/

21

_
_
-

8
5
3
3
-

1*
6

177
12

78
1*
1
61*
3*
1
6

_
_
-

9
6
3
3
-

156
3
153
18
2

81
2
79

3
2
1
1
-

6
_
6
2
-

*
*

177

_

-

_

~

5

Table A-21

P tojed d ia nnl a*u$ ^ e cA n ica t (b ccH p atia nd

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Dallas, Tex., by industry division, August 1952)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number

o
f

workers

Weekly
earnings
hus
or
(Standard) (Standard)
Weekly

$
$
$
37.50 Uo.oo U2.50

under

kO.OO

U2.50 U5.oo

s
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
U5.oo U7.50 5o.oo 5 2 .5 0 55.oo 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 72.5 0 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 9 0 .0 0
95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00
U7.50

5 0 .0 0

5 2 .5 0

5 5 .0 0 S7.5Q

6 0 .0 0

6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0

67 .5 0

7 0 .0 0

17
13

72.5 0

33
26

l£.QQ 80.0 0

8 5 .0 0

90.0 0 9 5 .0 0

100.00 L05.00 110.00 115.00

|

Men
187
131

Uo.o ! 70 .0 0
Uo.o
7 1 .0 0

_
_

_

118

Msnufsicburing *••••••••♦*•••••••••••••••••*

Uo.o

3

-

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) . . . . . . . . . . .
M
fltmfflP+.iiT*! ricr_

1/

| U9.00
!

_
_

3

21

12

16

-

-

-

_ i
1

i

10 !

U !
_

5
22

13

5 ;
3

16
10

11
9

7

9

12
5

20
20

_

2
1

_ ___2
___
_
1

_

_

.

.

.

1
1

_

_

_

_

6
6

2
2

2

25
22

7
7

8

_

10
9

2

i
6o
----- G
B

Uo.o ! 66.00
Uo.O ' 67.50
!

6
U
5
5“ ------- T ------ 2

2
2

l

-

12
-----I P

U

1
1

7
r

u —

U
3

7
7

u
L

________

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

Table a -3:

Maintenance andPowesi Plant ChcnfuUieni

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Dallas', Tex., by industry division, August 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
Workers

Occupation and industry division

202
79
123
6l
38

Carpenters, maintenance ....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Retail trade ........................

Average
earnings

1.8U
1.86
1.82
1.68
2.05 .

$
$
$
$
$
o.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05
and
under
.90
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10

166
86--80

l.6l

_
-

Firemen, stationary boiler .................
Manufacturing ...............................................................................

106

1.5U
i.UU

_

Helpers, trades, maintenance .............................................
Manufacturing ...............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................................
Pwtlx*"*
T+ OC ^
1

280
129
151

1.36
1.U3
1.30

3

Machinists, maintenance ...................
Manufacturing ..........................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ........
Manufacturing ..... ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ...................
Retail trade ...... .................

Engineers, stationary .....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

—

67

1.70

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

k
k

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

2

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

k
k

_

13

_

-

2k

-

2
11

-

-

-

12

5
5
_

2

2
3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

h
k
~

12
10
2

l
1

33

22

-

6
6

33

17
5

_

10
10

_

_

_

_

-

28
28

_

"

2
-

6
2

-

3

_

19

35

-

-

-

____ 5_

____

3
2

1.79
1.87

-

-

-

99U

1.69
1.66

_

_

_

-

-

-

5
h

-

-

-

-

_

11

_

-

ll

-

-

U2
k2

-

9

27
U
23

16

66
52
1U
1U

kk

2

-

9
2
7

5

36

2
13

5

32
6
26
20

2

12
12

-

18

k

-

_

1

-

-

10
10

2

5

k

6

Ik

1

18

-

11
10
1

23
16
7

23
21
2

7

5

1

_

_

-

-

1

5
5
-

-

-

9

21
-

1
1

3
3

-

3
3

1
1

3
3

h
k

_

_

_

_

_

_ _

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

11
11

_

-

k
k

_

17
16
1
1

16

23
23
-

_

16

k

-

3
2
1

11
11

2
2
-

20
19
1

1
1
-

-

5
5
-

2
2

9
8

18

2

20
20

25
22
3

7

17

7
r

30
12

12
12
-

2

-

•
3

j

5
3
2

1
*
1
3

19

23
20 —
3

3

-

17
17

6
10
r ~ T
1
5

7

11
11 —

2

39
9 —
30
O
7

1

12
5
r --- 5“
1
6

19

7
7
-

13
11
2

15

2

-

-

15U
~IoS

1.68
1.53

5

_
-

1.52

1.67

1.25 1.30

-

3

8k

1.20

-

1.31

910
828
56

1.15

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.30 1.35 l.Uo 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.U0 2.50
and
1.35 l.iiO 1.G5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 i.?5 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 .
2.30 2. Go 2.50 over

_

2l 8
t
~ m —
62

$
1.20 1.25

2
-

1.91
1.93
1.8U

Electricians, maintenance..................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

$

1.10

$
1.15

$

15

k

7

1
_

-

-

6

_ _
-

-

-

-

-

"

-

k
~

1U
12

8
-

28
12

8
8

1

-

-

6
6

12
1

13
13

2
2

11
11

26
22

1
1

5
5

8
8

7
7

"

5

2

13

7

U

10

28

53

k

13
8
5

-

7
U

k

6
k

k
2k
2k

38
5
33

-

333
1
332
328
U

21
18
3
3

12
11
1
1

10

2
2

21
1
20
18
2

_

-

223
11
212
203
6

_

-

103
5
98
87
11

10

5

19
19
19

2
2

3
3

65
3
62

17

-

5
5

_
-

_
-

-

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

-

5

u

2

-

53
35
5

60
2

k

2k

13
5

9

_

_

1

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., August 1952
u.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

240555 0 - 5 3 - 2




6

Tkbie a-3: McUntenaHce. and Poute* P lant Cku^ufiatloni-CaHtinued
(Average hourly earnings V for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Dallas, Tex., by industry division, August 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Average
hourly
earnings

Mechanics, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * .............................................................

168
91

^ $
L.69
l. t 7
1.5U
1.62

Oilers ...................................................................................................................
Manufacturing .................................................................................. ...

97
97

1.39
1.39

Painters, maintenance ...................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing.....................

132
85

1.63
1.73
1.57

Plumbers, maintenance ...... .............

35

$
0.85

$
0.90

$
0.95

$
1.00

$
1 .0 5

$
1.10

$
1.15

$
1.20

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

$
$
$
1.U0 1.U5 1.5 0

$
1.55

.90

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
Workers

.95

1.00

1.0 5

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.U0

1.U5

1.50

1.55

10

5
5

6

and
under

1.8U

Tool-and-die makers .....................
Manufacturing .......................

ii70
302

hi

__

1U7

6

_ e_
_

8

10

38

6

13
13

38

-

-

-

16

-

ill
Hi

1
+

30

h

30

_
-

_
-

“

1.60

$
$
$
1.65 1.70 1.75

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

10

-

8
8

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

•-

-

20
20

2
2

2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

6

12

9

,-

_
-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

1

12

h
5

h
h
-

_

10

-

22
20
2

36
20
16
10

28
19
9
2

it

1
1
Hi
3
11

hi

hh

37
10
10

39
5
3

6
6

7
7

-

1

-

ii
ii
“

1

10

-

_

_

$

-

1.98
1.98

-

it
h

_

It
It

_
-

5

_

_

5
-

"

32
1
31

h

>

_

8
8

2
2

_
10
10

1.80

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.10 2.50

1.80

1.90

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30

V?

31
30
1
1

5i

63
ill
22
22

13
13

16

11
11

2
2

1
1

_

-

-

7
*
2

20
19
1

2
2
“

1
1

2

6

3

1

15
-

_

2
2

5

30

30

hO

lit
lit

-

33
33

2.U0

2.50

and
over

10
6
”

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
It
3

1
1
-

-

-

-

6

~

“

12

1

_

_

-

2
2

- ■

-

111
111

19
19

6

9
9

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

b h l . A-4s

G sfA h uh a J.j ^ Ja A m LtudA J^.Ta A a i S k ip p in g QcCM pO&OM i.

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Dallas,“Tex., by industry division,“August 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PifKl* r+
5
i*MeiQ * f_. ._,_.T. _.( ( .
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

$

206

1.01

923
1,1*83
505
501

60

o.55

0.60

0.65

.60

.65

.70

1 .1 7

.92
1.09
.81

0.50

$
i.5o
1.56

2 .1i
06

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5
$
s
$
$
s
$
$
$
0.70 0.75' 0.80 $0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .U0 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10
and
.80
.90
.75
.95 1.00 1.05 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.ltO i.5o 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 over
.85

$

.55

Under
$
0.50

Guards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

265

27
20
__ 6Q. __ 1 L __ 2L. __ 25_ I 6Z. __ m .
__
16

26

25

67

70

hio
lit?

lid,

263
3

119
6
8it

22

-

13

26

11

55

63

97

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ....
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Public utilities * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retai 1 trade ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

870

.62

363

53

12

H 16

28

Hi

123
7U7
122
98

.92
.57
.99
.62

3/363

53

12

lii6

28

lit

20
10
10
8

32

12

17

28

2

6U
53
11
10
1

Laborers, material handling h f . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Public utilities * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2,690
1,32U
1,366
801
213

1.13
1.17
1.09
1.16
.97

5

7
_
7

8
_
8

i
t
h

6?
53
10

.

-

-

-

i
t

1

h

h

203
53
150
81
35

_

_
_

.

5

_

-

5

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




-

lt)
i"
32
111
il
t
31

89
21
68
8
3t
i

107
16

313
1U7

91
38
20

166

18
15
3
2
1

i
t
3
1
1

56
5
5i
1*6

ko
12
28
28

12
12

1
+

-

11a
13
101

181

550
U83
67

lUt
95

Bh

33
7

199
75
12it
20
10 -

5

i5
*
53

h

177
U9
lt
i

119
16

13

105

18
12

52
53
32
17

U9

98
23
75
38
25

16
-

3

161 111
35
57
10ii 76
61
92
2
2
_
_

i
t
1
*

22
22
22

19
13
6
6

103
10
93
52
29

181
59
122
82
16

-

12
12

9
6

i
t
1

10

88
28

39
2t
i
15
6
2

13
8
5

163
159
i
t

l

_

2
1
1
1
69
17
52
22

165
138
27
27

60

52
2
_
_
-

23U
ho

19i
t
17i
t
12

-

263
13U
129
125

5

i3
i
27

60

60

39
39

125
125

5
5

31
22
9

18
18

2
2

-

-

_

_
_
_

_
-

h

2
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i
t
a

8
8
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_

_

_
_

U8
30
18
16

it
5
22
23
21

8
8
-

65
65
-

10
10

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., August 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

7

Table a-U: Gu&ioduU, VVcrteJvauUtUf,and SUififiUuj, GhcMfuMoHd.-Continued
(Average hourly earnings V for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Dallas, Tex., by industry division, August 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Order fillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M an ufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Number
o
f
Workers

811
298
513
1U2

Packers, class A /npn') . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11*9
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - E T
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63

Average
hourly
earnings

$
s
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
S
$
$
%
$
$
$
Under 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.3 0 1.35 l.ko 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80
$
.60
.80
.90
o.5o
.65
.70
.75
.55
.85
.95 1.00 1.05 1.1 0 1 .1 5 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 i.ao 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90
$

_
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

».
«
-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

369
103

1.38
1.59
1.30
1.30

.82 _
.89

_

-

_
-

-

___ L
1
a
1
a

-

-

-

-

12
a
k

___ i
5

_

-

-

_
-

_ •
-

_
-

_
___ i
3

789
193
596
363
77

1.21
1.25
1.20
1 .27f
1.2k

-

_

-

-

-

305

1.39
1.31

-

W

Uoi
253
1U8
111*

1.27
1.21
1.37
1.33

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) .....
Manufacturing ........................

92

1.35
1.38

Watchmen.... ..........................
Manufacturing........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * .................
Retail trade ......................

228

V
"?/

131
U8
62

_
-

_
-

35
30
5

8
a
a

18

_
-

_

5

_

8
8

28

8

-

-

-

9
5

10
a

17
5

lk
5

30
23
7

19
5
lk

lk
8
6

1
2

100
100
93

21

27
13

21

ia

_

-

-

_

-

-

5
5
5

13
5
8
2

10
10
-

26
12
ia

_

-

39

62

-

-

39

62

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

_
-

_!
-

3

-

-

10
10
10

5
5
5

3
3

_
-

:

55

2
’
2

5

26
29

5
3

11

2

_
9k
91
3
3
10
10

i

_

5

7

_
_

21

-

12

2
2
-

:

at $.U5 - *50.

lk ___ k
k
Ik
-

_
-

1
'1

-

_
-

_ _

5
5
-

.

_
-

_
-

-

_

_

_

_
-

-

6
-

8

-

-

26
-

-

-

-

-

21

-

28
20
20

120 _ _ _ 31
21
72
16
18
*
16
22

17
5

-

-

12

-

-

UO at $.30 - .35} 102 at ^.35 • »k0; 210 at $.1*0 - .U5» H
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand", as reported in previous study.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




5
k
1

71

6 ___ k __ 12.__ l k __ 1 1
k
5

1
1

E x c l u d e s prem ium p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and n i g h t w ork .
D a ta l i m i t e d t o men w o r k e r s e x c e p t w h ere o th e r w is e i n d i c a t e d .

3/ Workers were distributed as follows:
*

97

1.01
1.11
.9U
1.01
.90

_
-

_
-

90

1.22
1.23
1.22
1.16

51

15
9

_ ___ 1

-

Truckers, power (fork-lift) .. . . . . . . . .. ....
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P l )\ 11+* l t TOi
lK
.1 i . f
- i
,- i i a
i

20
9
11
a

8
-

Truck drivers, medium (if- to and
including k tons) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing •«••••••••••»••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4a ninl 1+■ X
?
nO
Retail trade
Truck drivers, heavy (over k tons,
trailer type) ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Manufacturing ......... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

-

-

278

8
8
-

10
6

l.kk
1.50
1.38

357
79

a
a
-

3
3

212
99
113

168

8
5
3

1
1

-

1.05
.97
.96

-

Truck drivers, light (under 1^ tons) . . . . . . . •
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade

5

1

5
5

-

266

1

18
12

-

Shioping-and-receiving clerks . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing..... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

26
i2
12

-

Shipping clerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M an uf acturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

68
ia
5U
a

19
19
10

_

215
78

26
10
16
8

a7
U7
20

1.31*
1.55

Receiving c l e r k s......... .. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31

16
10
6
2

17
9
6

_
-

106

21
19
2
2

lk
k
10

-

Packers, class B (women) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nanmanufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32
23
9
9

23
15
8

5a
9
U5
5

1.15
1.22
1.06

_

2kk
157
98

59
2

57
39
18
17

129
35
9k
10

-

_

Packers, class B (men) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

69

15
5U
3

28 __ k t ___ L
2
2
7

-

68
1
67
38
37
12
25

1.15 .
1.23
1.11
1.15

s
s
2.00 2.10
and
2.00 2.1C over

1.90

12

6
5
l

3

9

9
9

9

9
9

20
9
11

3
3
O
J

22
22

10
10

k
k

2k
19
5

16
11
5

21
21
Jo

61
11
50
16

16
k
12
6

11
11
8

9
9

5
5

21
15
6
k

11

22 .13k
w
ia 13k
2
12

19
k
15
11
1

68
3k
3k
21
1

8
1
7

29

22

k7
11
36
28
8

129
k7
82
75

6

27
9

3

_
_
-

_
_

37
3k
3
3

-

6
-

1
1

11
7

a
3
1

12
2
10
3

9

9

3—

5

nr

26
18
2

7

13
10

K

8

10
k
6

1
3
_

10

-

7
k
2
2

19
10
9
2

7

7

c
12

10
2
c

k
31
1 - - - IT
27
3
16
10
3

1
1

7

IT
7
5

3

n

7
k

k
*
*

12
12

_
-

_
-

31

2
2

2
2
-

7
2
5

11
11
"

_
■

23
10
13

11
11
-

8

_
-

19
19
-

11
11
-

3
3
-

1
1
-

2
2
_

_

_
-

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

33
7

23

15

58

10
5

27

u

17

8
1

3
3
-

9

16
11
5
5

25
10

k

15

1

6
2

7
7

2
2

_
"

12
U9
23 --- 9
26
3
3

29
29
-

_
-

13
13
-

11
2

9

211
2
209

31
25
6

k2
11
31

25
13
12

7

8

5

22

2

18
k

11
1C

12
-

12

18
9

11
k
7
3

5
5
_

37
26
9
9

85

-

-

16
12

2
lk
lk

k

23
22
1

3
11

2

1

-

85
Op
_
_
_

6
2
k

lk6
7

3

_
_
-

_
_
-

"

:

11
11

27
12

lk
9

a
a

7
7
-

_
-

_
.

_
-

-

7
k

_
-

_
-

:

:

:

:

:

3
3

_

_
-

B* Characteristic Industry Occupations
T able B -2 3 3 3

O ccupation and sex

Number
Workers

Total ........
M e n .......
Women . . . . . .

under
.80

,85 , .90 ■■^95

1,206

$
1.06
1.33
1.03

56
18
*
8
17
*
2*
i
23
126
28
98
75
21
5*
1

1.58
1.61
1.38
.97
.81*
1.10
1.00
.82
1.05
.91*
.86
.97

_
_
12
11
1
39
15
2*
1
20
6
U*

_
_
6
1
*
2
12
5
7
12
5
7

392
26
366

1.03
.87
1.01*

101
16
85

2*
1
2k

212
9
203
17

1.17
1.08
1.18
.93

10

1

10
1
*

I
-

1,331
125

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$ „ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ ■ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ „ $ „ $
$
Average $
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.0 5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 $1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
hourly
and
earnings
ana
2/

All plant occupations!

' h /amest'A a n d M O & e l ' 3 > 4 e d d e d

261

103 ' 83
10
11
92
73

16
2U5

1.00

1.0 5

1.10

1.20

11*3
1
*
139

87
_
87

70
2
68

53
_
53

1
1
_
1
*
_
1
*
11
1
*
7
11
1
10

2
2
3
1
2
10

1
1
_
2
_
2
l
*

_
_
2
2
_
3

62

1*0
_
10
*

97
5
92

77
1
76

.
_
3
2
1
8
2
6
1
*
2
2

_
_
5
3
2
9
2
7
1
*
1
*
-

-

17

18
1
17

28

_
28

16
*
3
13
*

11*

11
*
2
12
2

25
2
23
2

1.1*0

1.2|_ 1.30

1 .1*5

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.60

1.65

1.90

2.00

2.10

2.20

over

2
60

11
**
7
37

20
5
15

29
8
21

3*
1
2
32

2*
1
8
16

20
1
*
16

29
12
17

13
1
*
9

8
3
5

11
5
6

2
1
1

3
2
1

5
2
3

3
1
2

3
3
-

7
7
~

_
_
_

2
_
2
3

1
*
3
1
1

5
5
_

5
5
_
,

_
_
2

1
*
1
*
_
_

_
_
-

13
12
1
1

2
2
_

2
2
_

7
5
2

1
1
_

_
_

2
2
_

_
_

2
2
_

3
3
_

_
5

3
3

1

_
_

_
1

1

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_

10

_
1

_

l

2
1

1

3

_

_

_

_
_

_

Selected Plant Occupations
Cutters and markers (men and women) 3/ ••
M e n ............................
W o m e n........ •. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspectors, final (examiners) (all women)
Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incentive..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pressers, hand (all women) . . . . . . . . . . .
T i m e. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incentive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .
Sewers, hand (all women) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T i m e..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incentive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sewing-machine operators, section
system (all women) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incentive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sewing-machine operators, single­
hand (tailor) system (all women) ....
T i m e. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Incentive .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Work distributors (all women) 3/ ......

17
6
'
6
2

3
1
2
1
*
1
*
8
1
7

1U
i
*

1
*
2
1
1

3
2
.
.
2

5
2
_
2

3
2
1
1

3
1
_
1

_
_
.
.
-

£
_
_
-

I
2
_
2

£
_
_
-

10
_
_
-

_
1
_
1

I

£

_

_

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

■_
-

_
-

23
1
22

13

17

16

6

9

10

6

2

1

6

i
*

2*
1

21
5
16

13

17

16

6

9

10

6

2

I

6

i
*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

32
2
30
1

18
1
17
-

13

9
1
8
-

7

13
_
13

8
1
7

8

13
_
13

5
_
5

2

8

2

1
1

1
1

1
1

_

_

_

-

1
1

-

■
“

“

10
1
*
1
*
2*
1

13
-

_
7
2

_

8

-

-

-

2

8

2

_
-

_
_

_
-

_
_

1/ The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops with 8 or more employees engaged in the manufactureo f women’s and misses* dresses (Group 2333) as defined in the Standard Industrial classification Manual
(19U5"”
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing house dresses, aprons, smocks, hoovers, and nurses* and maids' uniforms (Groups 2331*) were excluded from the study.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
3 / Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate
averages by method of wage payment] all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.

PoW & l JlcU U utkieA *

Table B-7211:

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Average
hourly
earnings
2/

0.50

1
o.55

.55

.60

$

$

1 --- 1 --- 1 --- $
1 --- $
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90
0.95 1.00

0.60

*
0.65

0.70

.65

.70

.75

.80

.85

2

2
2

1*
1
7

3
8
1

-

.90

.95

1.00

1.05

8
2

10
3
13

2
2
1
*

"1
1
1
"5
1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35

1.10

1 .1 5

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

-

-

*
•

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_

~

■

-

“

-

-

■

1
3

~

1
1.15

5
2
3

-

«
1—
1.05 1.10

”

1.1*0

1
1 .1*0

$

$

1.1*5

1.50

1.55

1.50

1.55

1.60

-

-

-

1
—1

1
1
0.35 0.1*0 o.l*5
and
under
.1*0
.50
.1*5

w\

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Men
Clerks, retail receiving 3/
Extractor operators 3/ ..T..
Washers, machine 3/ 7.....

18
*
27
32

$
0.85
.81
1.03

-

-

'
Clerks, retail receiving 3/ .............
Finishers, flatwork, machine 3/ . . . . . . .
Indentifiers 3/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....
Markers 3/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pressers, machine, shirts: Total .....
T i m e...
Incentive
Wrappers, bundle 3/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31
21*3
35
69
181*
128
56
18
*

.82
.1*8
.62
.71*
.63
.60
.70
.56

-

2
3

-

8
-

’

1*5
1
*
-

-

-

-

2

2

90
2
2
6
2
1
*
2

-

"

( "

50
6
1
*
28
2*
1
1
*
11

1
36
1
6
U*
10
*
1
*

2
10
8
l
*
2*
1
2*
1

19

6

5
3
7
5
28
20
8
3

-

‘

5

1

7

3

3

1
*
2*
1
6

-

2
1
_

8
2

6
3

2

-

-

-

-

2

'

3

'

2

2

1
*

1
-

7
11
**
18
26
“

5
2

“

-

-

-

■

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation

Routemen, retail (driver-salesmen):
5^-day workweek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-day workweek ........... .

Number
of
workers

76
39
37

Average

weekly
earnings

V

1—
l*o.oo
and
under
1*2.50

“1------1 .5 0
*2

1 5 oo
*.

1 -------

$
1*7.50

*

SO, oo

“ J------52.50

1 ------55.oo

1 ------57.50

6 0 .0 0

----

1------

1*5.oo

1*7.50

50 . oo

5 2 , SO

55.QO

57.50

60 .0 0

62.50

6 5 .0 0

62.50

*

65.00

67.50

1 ------67.50

70.00

72.50

1—
75.00

70.00

72.50

75.00

8 0 .0 0

1—

1—

eo.oo

85.00

1 ------- "¥-------85.00

9 0 .0 0

90.00

95.00

$
57.00
55.00
59.00

l/ Hie study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in power laundries (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19U9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., August 1952
3/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
I*/ Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Bureau of Labor Statistics




9
O Union W a ge Scales
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated^)

Table C-15:

B uilding Gon&buidUoH,

Table 0-205: £ a k & U e d .

January 2 , 19531

B rick la y e rs .........
Carpenters ............
E le c tr ic ia n s . . . .
P ain ters ................
P l a s t e r e r s .............
Plumbers ................
Building la b o re rs

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

S3.500
2.488
2.750
2.350
3.4 3 8
2.763
1.325

C la s s ific a tio n

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Table C-205* /io J& e /U e d ,




Hours
per
week

•1.580
1.560

1.470
1.230

£
o

Bread and cake - Machine s h o p s ::
Agreement A:
Mixers ............................................................... ..
Ovenmen ..................................................... ..
Machine o p erato rs, panners, tw is te rs ,
in g red ien t s c a le r s , stock c le r k s ,
shipping c le r k s , ch eck ers, and
slice-wrap-m achine operators ..................
F o r e l a d i e s ................................. ............................
Pan g re a se rs , cake dumpers, ra c k e rs,
packers, helpers and cake-w rapmachine operators (fem ale) . . ..................
le e r s and wrappers:
F i r s t 6 m o n th s............................................ ..
Second 6 m o n th s........................................
A fte r 1 year ...................................................
Agreement B:
Bread:
Mixers ................................................................
Ovenmen ..............................................................
Dividermen, moldermen, panners,
tw is te r s , pan dumpers, slice-w rap machine o p erators, bench hands
and checkers ..............................................
Pan g re a se rs , ra c k e rs, slice-w rap machine fee d e rs, ta k e -o ff men
(o th e r than o p e ra to rs), and
h elp e rs:
F i r s t 3 months ........................................
Second 3 months ......................................
A fte r 6 months ........................................
Cake:
Mixers ................................................................
Ovenmen ..............................................................
Machine o p erato rs, bench hands, and
In g red ient s c a le rs .................................
F lo o rla d ie s:
F i r s t 6 months ............................. ..
A fte r 6 m on th s........................... ............
Wrapping-machine operators .................. ..
H elpers:
F i r s t 3 months ;........................................
Second 3 months ......................................
A fter 6 months ........................................
le e r s and wrappers:
F i r s t 6 months ........................................
Second 6 months ......................................
A fte r 1 year .............................................

Rate
per
hour

£ £
o o

Ju ly 1 , 1952
C la s s ific a tio n

PsU M titU f Go**t£*tit€ec0

Table C-27:

Ju ly 1 , 1952

___________________ Ju ly 1 , 1952

40

1.150

40

.900
.960
1.080

40
40
40

1.640
1.590

45
45

1.480

C la s s ific a tio n
Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement C:
Mixers .................................................................
Overmen...............................................................
Machine o perators, panners, tw is te rs ,
ingred ient s c a le r s , ch eckers, and
slice-wrap-m achine operators . . . . . . .
Pan g re a se rs, cake dumpers, ra ck e rs,
packers, h elp ers, and cake-wrapmachine operators (fem ale) ..................
le e r s and wrappers:
F i r s t 6 months .........................................
Second 6 months .................... ...................
A fte r 1 year ..............................................
Crackers and cookies:
Mix and bake department:
Machine m en .......................... ...........................
M ixers, head (sponge and sweet) ...........
P eelers ...............................................................
M ixers, sweet ..................................................
Overmen, sponge and sweet ........................
Mixers a s s is ta n t , sp o n g e........................ ..
Overmen h e l p e r s ..............................................
Pan g reasers ....................................................
M ixers' h elp e rs, and pan feeders .........
Ic in g department:
Machine set-up men .......................................
Mixers .................................................................
Enrober operators ..........................................
M ixers' h elpers ..............................................
Packers and s e a le rs ........... ..
Cake feeders ....................................................
Packing department:
Machine operators ..........................................
Pan dumpers ......................................................
Packers, sponge and sweet ........................
General help (fem ale) .................................
Shipping department:
Checkers (head), receivin g cle rk s . . . .
Checkers .............................................................
Order f i l l e r s ..................................................

Hate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

45
45
500

45

..180

45

.930
.990

45
45
45

.110

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.640
1.590

45
45

1.480

45

1.270
1.360
1.150
/
1.090
1.140
1.190

45
45
45
45
45
45

.920
.970
1.080

45
45
45

$2,843
2.986
2.843
2.986
2.843

35
35
35
35
35

2.986

35

2.257
2.400
2.330
2.430
2.610
2.740
2.729
2.871
2.943
3.086
2.636
2.776

35
35
37£
37i
37i
36r|35
35
35
35
35
35

C la s s ific a tio n

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

1-man cars and busses:
F i r s t year ......................................................................
A fter 1 y e a r ........... .....................................................

$1,450
1.500

54
54

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work ...............................
Compositors, hand - night w o rk ...................... ..
Machine operators - day work ...............................
Machine operators - night work ..........................
Machine tenders (m achinists) - day work . . . .
Machine tenders (m achinists) night work .................................................................
M ailers:
Agreement A - day work .....................................
Agreement A - night work .................................
Agreement B - day work .....................................
Agreement B - night work .................................
Photoengravers - day w o rk ........... ....................... ..
Photoengravers - night work .................................
Pressmen, web presses - day work ......................
Pressmen, web presses - night work ..................
Pressmen-in-charge - day work .............................
Pressmen-in-charge - night work ........................
Stereotypers - day w o rk .........................................
Stereotypers - night w o rk ........... .........................

Table C-41:

40
40
40
40

1.135
1.025
.890
.860

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

J? O Q cU

< 'b a * p U
T

t

October 1 , 1952

Table C-42:

M

o t& U > U ic A

an d tjfelpefrl

S b 'U u e /M

Ju ly 1 , 1952

Table C-27:
45
45
45

Hours
per
week

40

1.235
1,
1.1 5 0
1.030
.890
.860

45

1.090
1.140
1.190

Rate
per
hour

C la s s ific a tio n

C la s s ific a tio n

PbUttUuj.

July 1 . V )$ 2
C la s s ific a tio n
Book and jo b shops:
Bindery women .............................................................
Bookbinders .................................................................
Compositors, h a n d ........... ................... .....................
E le ctro ty p e rs .............................................................
Machine operators ....................................................
Photoengravers ...........................................................
Press a s s is ta n ts and fee d e rs, cylin der
and o f f s e t .........................................................
Press work and feeding own platen
presses ...............................................................
Pressmen, cy lin d er, ro ta ry and o ff s e t .........
Small automatic cy lin d er, 12 x 18
inches or le s s ................................................
Stereotypers ...............................................................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,100
2 .1 0 0
2.6 0 0
2 .6 6 7
2 .600
2.613

40
40
40
37£
40
37£

1.781

40

1 .840
2 .2 4 0

40
40

2.053
2.7 6 4

40
37£

B a k e r y ........... .............. ..........................................................
Fond , r ...... . - TT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................... .
General - F re ig h t:
Agreement A .................................................................
H e lp e rs ............................................................... ....
Agreement B ........... .............. ......................................
Agreement C .................................................................
Helpers ...................................................................
Agreement D ........................ .........................................
Helpers ....................................................................
Grocery - Chain s to re :
F ir s t 6 months .............................................................
7 - 1 2 months ...............................................................
Second year .......................................................
A fter 2 years ...............................................................
Grocery - Wholesale .........................................................
Helpers . „........................................................................
Liquid carbonic .................................................................
Manufacturing .....................................................................
Railway express .................................................................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$ 1 ,2 7 0
1 .3 4 0

48
40

1 .2 5 0
1 .1 1 0
1 .5 0 0
1 .4 9 0
1 .3 7 0
1 .4 6 0
1 .4 1 0

48
48
48
48
48
50
50

1 .2 4 0
1 .2 9 5
1 .4 6 0
1 .5 1 5
1 .5 2 5
1 .3 6 5
1 .4 2 0
1 .5 0 0
1 .7 3 2

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Occupational Wage Survey, D a lla s, T ex ., August 1952
U .S. DEPA EN OF LABOR
RTM T
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

10

D s Supplementary Wage Practices
'-l:

Table D-

S h ift u b ifteteu lia l PexuMliOHd. 1 /
P ercen t o f t o t a l p la n t employment •
tb)
A ctu a lly working on e x t r a
s h i f t s in -

(a )
By estab lishm ent
p o lic y in -

S h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l

A ll m anufacturing in d u strie s
2d s h i f t
work

3d o r o th er
s h i f t work

1 0 0 .0

5 4 .8
4 5 .9
2 7 .7

2 1 .2
1 .7
1 8 .2
8 .9

3 2 .2

4 5 .2

-

2 .2
2 .6
-

3d o r o th e r
s h ift

XXX

1 0 0 .0

6 7 .8
5 6 .3
5 4 .4
2 .6
5 .5
1 .5
2 .8
3 4 .3
6 .0
1 .7
1 .9
1 .9
1 1 .5

Workers in estab lishm ents having p ro v isio n s
f o r l a t e s h i f t s ......................................................................................
With s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ..................................................................
Uniform cen ts (per hour) ............ : ..........................................
4 c e n t s ................... .................... ................................................
5 ce n ts .........................................................................................
6 c e n t s ........................................................................................
7 ce n ts .........................................................................................
7-£ ce n ts ......................................................................................
10 ce n ts .......................................................................................
Over 10 cen ts ...........................................................................
Uniform percen tage ................................................................. ....
5 p e rce n t ....................................................................................
Other ....................................................................................................
With no s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ...........................................................
Workers in estab lishm ents having no p ro vision s
f o r l a t e s h i f t s ......................................................................................

2d s h i f t

XXX

1 2 .9
1 0 .7
1 0 .5
.7
.9
.8
6 .5
1 .3
.3
.2
.2

3 .5
1 .7
1 .3
-

2 .2

.7
.2
.4
.4
1 .8

XXX

XXX

-

1/ Shift differential data are presented in terms of (a) establishment policy and (b) workers actually employed
on late shifts at the time of the survey. An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met any of the
following conditions: (1) operated late shifts at the time of the survey, (2) had union-contract provisions covering
late shifts, or (3) had operated late shifts within 6 months prior to the survey.

Table d-2 : S ch ed u led Tlfeehhf. dtouM .
P e rc e n t o f o f f i c e w orkers l / employed i n Weekly hours

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2/

M anufacturing

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

A ll workers ...............................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

35 hours ........................................................................................... ..
37£ hours ....................................................................................................
Over 37£ and under 4 0 hours ...........................................................
40 hours .......................................................................................................
Over 40 and under 4 4 hours .............................................................
4 4 hours .......................................................................................................
Over 4 4 and under 48 hours .............................................................
48 hours ......................................................................................................
Over 48 and under 50 hours .............................................................
50 hours .......................................................................................................
Over 50 and under 54 hours .............................................................
54 hours .......................................................................................................
Over 54 hours ...........................................................................................

0 .8
1 .7
7 .1
7 6 .3
4 .3
6 .8
2 .8
.2
-

0 .7
3 .2
7 .0
8 0 .5
1 .3
2 .5
3 .8
1 .0
_
_
_

3 .8
.4
8 1 .7
1 .7
1 0 .4
2 .0

1/
2/

„
-

-

,

P e rc e n t o f p la n t w orkers employed in -

1 0 0 .0

-

2 .9
7 6 .8
1 1 .8
5 .4
3 .1
_

_
_
•
_

_

-

-

.

M anufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

0 .4

R e t a i l tra d e

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2 J

0 .9

{(J)
.5
4 7 .2
1 3 .1
2 .6
1 5 .7
9 .6
.3
3 .1
.5
3 .8
3 .2

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for wholesale trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Includes data for wholesale trade; real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
less than 0.03 percent.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., August 1952
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

-

5 4 .5
1 8 .2
2 1 .3
-

.9
-

.7
3 .5

P u b lic
u t ilitie s *
1 0 0 .0

-

5 8 .9
_
4 .0
2 1 .0
_
9 .8
3 .1
3 .2

....

R e t a i l tr a d e

1 0 0 .0

2 .7
2 4 .4
1 3 .0
6 .9
1 1 .7
1 6 .4
1 .2
4 .7
1 2 .3
6 .7

2
/
L
j
*




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

11

Table D -3 :

P aid jfolidcU fd.
P e rc en t o f p la n t workers employed in -

P e rc en t o f o f f i c e workers employed in Number o f paid h o lid a y s

A ll
in d u s tr ie s J J

M anufacturing

A ll w orkers ...................................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g paid h o lid a y s ..........
1 d a y ..........................................................................................................
2 days ........................................................................................................
3 days ........................................................................................................
A days ........................................................................................................
4 £ days .....................................................................................................
5 days ........................................................................................................
days .....................................................................................................
6 days .......................................................................................................
7 days ........................................................................................................
7% days .....................................................................................................
8 days .......................................................................................................
17 days .....................................................................................................
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g no p aid h o lid ay s . .

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

1/

2/
2/
*

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

M anufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 4 .3
1 .3
1 .3
1 .7
1 7 .7
.4
22„7

8 6 .3

7 6 .4

8 8 .2
6 .4
2 .9
4 1 .7

R e t a i l tra d e

-

-

-

.4
.3
8 .5
.1
2 1 .9
2 .8
4 2 .6
8 .9
1 .3
5 .8
7 .4

1 .5
1 .0
5 .2

-

-

1 .4

-

1 4 .9

2 0 .5

6 5 .8
1 .1
1 0 .3

3 5 .0
4 3 .1
-

.6
3 2 .1
2 0 .7
2 .6
4 4 .0
_

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

.2

(2 /)

P u b lic
u t ilitie s »

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2/

-

2 .5
2 .2
1 3 .4
1 6 .7
4 9 .9
1 .1
.5

-

3 1 .4
7 .1
.7
_
1 5 .7

R e t a i l tra d e

-

2 .2
-

-

1 6 .0
2 0 .5
3 7 .7
-

2 5 .6
1 1 .6
-

1 1 .8

-

-

-

1 3 .7

2 3 .6

In clu d e s d ata f o r w h o lesale tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s in a d d itio n to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
In clu d es d a ta f o r w h olesale tr a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v ic e s in a d d itio n to those industry divisions shown separately,,
L ess th an 0 .0 5 p e rce n t*
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (ex c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .

Table D -4 :

P

a id

V c U x U lO + V i (tf-O /H fu U

P ^ O iU

d iO

S tl)

P e rc en t o f p la n t workers employed in

P e rc en t o f o f f i c e workers employed in V a ca tio n p o lic y

A ll w orkers .....................................................................................................

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 1/

M anufacturing

100. C

-

R e t a i l tra d e

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2/

M anufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .C

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
y 5 8 .3
.6
y u i.1
-

100. C
lC^.C
8 2 .4

9 5 .4
9 3 .5
7 6 .3
1 .4
1 5 .8
1 .9
4 .6

9 5 .3
9 2 .2
8 5 .9
6 .3
3 .1
4 .7

9 1 .6
9 1 .6
6 2 .2
2 .5
2 6 .9
8 .4

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .3
7 2 .7
4 .6
2 1 .0
1 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
100. C
2 0 .3
.3
7 8 .8
.6

100. c
1 0 0 .0
2 0 .7
8.C
7 1 .3

9 6 .5
9 4 .6
4 9 .7
7 .6
3 6 .9
.4
1 .9
3 .5

9 5 .3
9 2 .2
6 2 .9
4 .0
2 5 .3

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
4 5 .4

100. c

P u b lic
u t ilitie s #
1 0 0 .0

P u b lic
u t ilitie s *

R e ta il trad e

A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g p aid v a c a tio n s ..........
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ....................................................................
1 w e e k .......................... .......................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .........................................................
2 weeks ............ ........................... ........................................................
P ercen tag e payment £ / .......................................................................
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g no paid v a c a tio n s . .

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
l i 4 1 .7
.1
y 5 8 .1
.1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 4 .1

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 2 .6
2 .1
8 5 .3

-

5 5 .9
-

-

3 7 .6
-

A fte r 2 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g p aid v a c a tio n s ..........
L e n g th -o f-tim e p a y m e n t.......................... ..........................................
1 week ...................................................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .........................................................
2 weeks .................................................................................................
Over 2 weeks .....................................................................................
P ercen tag e payment L j .......................................................................
Workers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g no paid v a ca tio n s . .

9 9 .9

1 3 .5
2 .6
8 3 .7
.1

-

-

-

.1

S ee fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b l e .
* T ra n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , cominunication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s , ,




-

-

-

3 .1
4 .7

-

4 9 .9
2 .5

9 8 .3

3 0 .2
1 4 .6
5 3 .5
-

-

1 .7

2 .2

~

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., August 1952
u.S. DEPARTMENT JE LAbJR
Bureau of Laoor Statistics

1
2

Table d - 4 ,

P aid VaccMosU tyoAvud P *aviiia*d) G * l u e
oU*td
-

P e r c e n t of p l a n t work e r s em p l o y e d in -

Percent of office w o r k e r s employed in Vac a t i o n po l i c y

All workers .................... ......................... ....

All
industries 1/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Retail tra d e

All
industries 2/

Manuf a c t u r i n g

Public
u t i l ities *

Re t a i l trade

100.0

1 00.0

1 00.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 00.0

100 . 0

99.9
99.9
7.6
1.1*
90.2
.1
.6
-

100.0
100.0
8.6
2.1

100.0
100.0
9.2
-

100.0
100.0
8.1
-

96.5
9U.6
36.6

95.3
92.2
1*7.0
8.0
37.2
.
-

97.8
9 7.8

1 00.0
98.3

26.9
-

25.5
68.1
-

After 3 years of service
Workers i n establishments pr o v i d i n g p a i d vacations .
Length-of-time
t ..... .......... ............. .
1 w e e k ........................ ............ ....... .
Over 1 a nd under 2 weeks * ....................... .
2 weeks ..................... ..........................
Over 2 and u n d e r 3 weeks ............................
3 weeks ............................................ .
......... .........................
Percentage payment
Workers in establishments providing no p a i d vacations ..

pay men

k /

.1

89.3
-

90.2
.6
-

86.5
5.1*
-

6.5
50.1
.1
*
1.0
1.9
3.5

3.1
it. 7

96.8

9 5.3
92.2
30.2
i*.o
58.0
-

68.1*
2.5
2.2

1*.7
1.7

After 5 years of service
Workers in e stablishments p r o v i d i n g p a i d v a c a t i o n s .....
Length-of-time p a y m e n t ..................................
1 week .................................................
Over 1 aid under 2 w eeks ............................
2 w e e k s ..................... ..........................
Over 2 aid under 3 weeks ......................... .
3 weeks ................ ................. ........... ..
Percentage payment
........................ ..........
Workers in establishments p roviding no paid vacations ..

k /

99.9
99.9
3.3
.5
95.3
.1
.7
.1

100.0
100.0

99.9
99.9
2.6

100.0
100.0
2.3
92.0
-

2.3
2.1
95.6
-

100.0
100.0
8.2
.

100.0
100.0

91.2
.6
-

86.5

7.5
-

-

-

6.0
-

-

-

-

9U.9
25.1
2.0
65.9
•U
1.5
1.9
3.2

3.1
1*. 7

100.0
100.0

100 . 0
98.3

11*. 1
*
.

25.5
-

83.1
2.5
-

65.1*
-

-

7.1*
1.7
-

After 10 years of service
Workers in establishments prov i d i n g p a i d v a c a t i o n s .....
Length-of-time payment ..................................
1 w e e k ........ ........... .......... ..................
2 w e e k s ..... ................................ ..........
Over 2 a nd und e r 3 weeks ...... ...... ......... .
3 w e e k s ....... ........................................
Percentage p a y m e n t
...... .............................
Workers in establishments p r o v iding no p aid vacations ••

h /

89.li
5.3
2.6
.1

5.7
-

100.0
100.0
5.2
90.1
U. 7
-

100.0
100.0
5.9
88.1
6.0
-

96.8
9l*.9
13.0
78.2
2.2
1.5
1.9
3.2

95.3
92.2
8.1*
83.8
-

100.0
100.0
11.0
76.2
12.8
-

1*.Y

-

100.0
98.3
22.8
68.2
7.3
1.7
-

After 15 years of service
Workers in establishments prov i d i n g p a i d vacations .....
Laigth-of-time p a y m e n t ............. .....................
1 w e e k .................................................
2 weeks ................................... ............
3 weeks .............. ........... ......................
Percentage p a yment
....... ........................
Workers in establishments p r o v i d i n g no p a i d vacations ..

h /

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
2 .6

100.0
100.0
2 .3

100.0
100.0
5 .2

5 9 .9

1* 8 . 1*

1*6 . 6

37.
.1

1* 9 . 3

1* 8 . 2

h

100.0
100.0
5 .9

-

-

l*l*.i
5 o .o
-

-

-

-

96.8
9 i* . 9
13.0
6 3 .8
18.1

1.9
3 .2

95.3
92.2
8.1*
70.1
13 . 7
3.1
1*.7

100 . 0
100.0
11.0

95.3
92.2

100.0
100.0
11.0
1*9.0
1*0.0

1* 9 . 0
1* 0 . 0

-

100.0
98.3
22.8
56.5
19.0
1.7
-

After 20 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid vacations .....
Length-of-time p a y m e n t ..................................
1 w e e k .................... ............. ........... .
2 weeks ..... ......................... .... ........... .
3 weeks ................................................
......... .........................
Percentage payment
Workers in establishments p roviding no p a i d vacations ..

h /

9 9 .9

99.9
2.6
59. 1
*
37.9
-

100.0
100.0

luO.O
100.0
5.9

2.3

5 .2

1* 8 . 1*

1* 6 . 6

3 9 .7

U9.3

1* 8 . 2

51*.1*

-

.1

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), cojnmunication, and other public utilities,




100.0
100.0

-

”

-

96.8
91*. 9
13.0
6 2 .6
19.3
1.9
3 .2

8 . 1
*

70.1
13.7
3.1
1* . 7

_

-

1 0 0.0
9 8.3
22.8
50.5
25.0
1.7

13

Table D—4 •
-

P aid VacationA W otm al PaomA ohA)- Ca**li**ued
c
Percent of o ff ic e workers employed in _

A ll
in d u stries 1/

Vacation policy

A ll w o rk e rs........................................ .....................................................

Manuf acturing

Public
u tilitie s *

Percent of plan t workers employed in R e ta il trade

A ll
in d u stries

2/

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

R e ta il trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9
99.9
2 .6
57.0
31.3
9 .0
.1

100.0
100.0
2.3
1*7.8
39.6
10.3
~

100.0
100.0
5 .2

100.0
100.0
5 .9
39.7
15.1
39.3
“

96 .8
9U.9
13.0

95.3
92.2

100.0
98.3

6 2 .6

70.1
13 .2

100.0
100.0
11 .0
1*9.0

A fter 25 years o f serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing paid vacations .........
Length-of-tim e paym ent............................... ............................. ..
1 w e ek .................. ................... .....................................................
2 w e ek s....................................................................................
3 w e e k s................................................................................... ..
1* weeks and o v e r ........................... ...........................................
Percentage payment h / ..................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing no paid vacations . .

1 *6 .6
1 *8 .2

—

8.1*

1 6 .7
2.6
1 .9
3.2

.5

3.1
1*.7

2 2 .8

50.5
13.1*
11.6
1.7
-

1 *0 .0

-

1/
Includes data for w h o l esale trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
5/
Includes data for w h olesale trade; real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions
separately.
3/
Vac a t i o n p rovi s i o n s r e p o r t e d for “ all industries1 and ’public util i t i e s ” in the June 1951 Dallas Occupational Wage Survey Bulletin (Number 10B3 " P» 21) were in error.
’
’
Revised estimates
are as follows:
al l industries, l - w e e k ’s v a cation - 1 1 .3 percent, 2-weeks' vacat i o n - 52.6 percent; p u blic utilities, l-week's vacation - 5 9.U percent, 2-weeks' vacation - 1*0.6 percent.
**
I*/ P e r c e n t of annual earnings.
3/
Less t han 0.0$ percent.
*
T r a n sportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

shown

Table D 1
-5

PsiAuAosux an d pestddon PJattA
Percent of plant w o r k e r s employed in

Percent of office workers employed in -

Type of plan

All
industries 1/

Al l w o r k e r s ................................. ............. .
Work e r s in e s t a blishments having insurance or
p e nsion p l a n s 3 / ....... ................................
Insurance plans 3 / ................... ........... .
L ife ....................... .......... ...............
Accidental d e a t h aid d i s m e m b e r m e n t ........ .
Sickness and accid e n t ..............................
H ospitalization ....................................
S u r g i c a l ................... ........................ .
Medical ..............................................
Pension or retirement p l a n ......... ........... .
W o r k e r s in establ i s h m e n t s h a ving n o insurance or
p en si on p l a n s ............. ......... ................... .

\J
y

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Retail trade

All
industries 2/

100.0

100 . 0

100.0

100.0

96.6
96.6

98.2
98.2
98.2
35.8
6 .2

97.1*
96.2
79.1
12.3
-

89.8
89.2
81.8

2 6 .2
2.2
-

75.1*
-

73.2

63.2

1.8

2.6

10.2

13.3
2.0
57.8

51*. i
87.9
33.8
1.1
53.6

6.3

3.1*

Retail trade

.

1 00.0

1 0 0 .0

91.1
91.1
80.8
11*. 0
1 1 .6
**
77.2

11*.3
27.0
62.5
12.9
2.1
35.9

88.3
16.1

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

93.7
93.5
87.7
12.5
15.8
61*.?

Manufacturing

92.9
92.9
92.9
22.7
10.1

88.8
66.1
71*. 7
1U.9
55.7

31.5
1.8

25.1
1 .2
*
3l*.9

65.1*

*
*
31.2

8.9

7.1

11.2

Includes data for wholesale trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Includes data for wholesale trade; real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.

3/

Unduplicated total.

*

T r a n sportation (excluding railroads),




Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas,
cormunication, and other public utilities.

Jex., August 1952
’
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LAruR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

u
Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau’s occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with avail­
able resources.
In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community.
Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.

these jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation.
Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in enployment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included.
Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
The number of,workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment’s full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau’s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of inter establishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and power
plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through k - U ) .
The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which chara.cteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cover­
ed were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources.
Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term ”office workers” referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. ’Plant workers”
’
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, these work categories are included as plant workers in non­
manufacturing industrieso
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

15

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift, •

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller.

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Dallas, Tex., 1/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of labor Statistics, August 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establi shment s
studied
2/

Numb<3r of
establi shment s
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions .................................
Manufacturing ............... ...............
Nonmanufacturing.... ....... ................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ..............................
Wholesale t r a d e .... ........... .........
Retail trade ..... .......................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .....
Services 2 / ....... ............ .........

51
51
51

564
2U
350

138
45
93

127,700
55,800
.71,900

70,760
31,360
39,400

15,450
4,490
10,960

51
51
51
51
51

50
72
104
61
63

22
16
25
15
15

22,300
7,900
22,500
11,600
7,600

17,560
2,350
13,140
3,910
2,440

4,230
700
2,550
3,030
450

8
21

20
28

13
15

1,609
1,948

1,227
1,260

72
53

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis
Womenf and misses* dresses ....................
s
Power laundries ....................... ...... .

1/ Dallas Metropolitan Area (Dallas County).
2/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in all divisions in the June 1951 survey was 21 workers.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




16

Index

Bench hand (bakeries), 9
Biller, machine, 3
Bookbinder (printing), 9
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3
Bricklayer (building
construction), 9
Calculating-machine operator, 3
Carpenter (building construction), 9
Carpenter, maintenance, 5
Cleaner, 6
Clerk, file, 3, 4
Clerk, retail receiving (power
laundries), 8
Clerk, order, 3, 4
Clerk, payroll, 3. 4
Compositor, hand (printing), 9
Cutter and marker (women*s and
misses* dresses), 8
Draftsman, 5
Duplicating-machine operator, 4

leer (bakeries), 9
Identifier (power laundries). 8
Inspector, final (examiner) (women*s and
misses* dresses), 8

Plumber, maintenance, 6
Porter, 6

Press assistant (printing), 9
Press feeder (printing), 9
Presser (women*s and misses*
dresses), 8
Presser, shirt (power laundries), 8
Pressman (printing), 9

Janitor, 6
Key-punch operator, 4
Laborer (building construction), 9
Laborer, material handling, 6

Receiving clerk, 7
Routeman (driver-salesman)
(milk dealers), 8

Machine operator (printing), 9
Machine tender (printing), 9
Machinist, maintenance, 5
Marker (power laundries), 8
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 5
Mechanic, maintenance, 6
Mixer (bakeries). 9
Molder (bakeries), 9
Motortruck driver, 9

Secretary, 4
Sewer, hand (women’s and
misses* dresses), 8
Sewing-machine operator (women’s
and misses* dresses), 8
Shipping clerk, 7
Shipping-and-receiving clerk, 7
Stenographer, 3, 4
Stereotyper (printing), 9
Switchboard operator, 4
Switchboard operatorsreceptionist, 4

Nurse, industrial (registered), 5
Electrician (building construction), 9
Electrician, maintenance, 5
Engineer, stationary, 5
Extractor operator (power
laundries), 8
Finisher, flatwork (power
laundries), 8
Fireman, stationary boiler, 5
Guard, 6
Helper (bakeries), 9
Helper, motortruck driver, 9
Helper, trades, maintenance, 5




Office boy, 3
Office girl, 4
Oiler, 6
Operator (local transit), 9
Order filler, 7
Ovenman (bakeries), 9

Tabulating-machine operator 3, 4
Tool-and-die maker, 6
Transcribing-machine operator, 4
Truck driver, 7
Trucker, power, 7
Typist, 4

Packer, 7
Painter (building construction), 9
Painter, maintenance, 6
Photoengraver (printing), 9
Plasterer (building
construction), 9
Plumber (building construction), 9

Washer, machine (power laundries), 8
Watchman, 7
Work distributor (women*s and
misses’ dresses), 8
Wrapper, bundle (power
laundries), 8
☆

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952




This report was prepared in the Bureau’s
Communications may be addressed to:

Southern Regional Office,,

Brunswick A, Bagdon, Regional Director
50 Seventh Street, N. V „
f
Room 66A
Atlanta 5, Georgia
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial
relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries,
construction and housing.

The Southern Region includes the following States
Alabama
Arkansas
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Louisiana
Maryland
Mississippi

North Carolina
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102