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Occupational W Survey
age
LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY
May 1952

Bulletin No.

1112

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clagufc - Commissioner




Contents
ises.
INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................

1

THE LOUISVILLE M ETROPOLITAN A R E A ...............................................................

I

OCCUPATIONAL WAG E STRUCTURE .....................................................................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations .............................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ..........................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations .........................................
A-A
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping o c c u p a t i o n s .................................

3
7
8
10

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-35
Machinery industries ...............................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers .................................................................

12
13

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building c o n s t r u c t i o n ..............................................................
C-205
Bakeries .............................................................................
C-2082 >felt liquors ........................................................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g .............................................................................
C-Al
Local transit operating employees ................................................
C-A2
Motortruck drivers and helpers .........................
C-5A52 Milk dealers ........................................................................

Ik

l*t
1*
Ik

13
13
15

Entrance ra te s D-l
Minimum entrance ra te s fo r plan t workers
Wage p ra c tic e s E -l
S h ift d if f e r e n tia l provisions ....................
E-2
Scheduled weekly h o u r s .......................................................................................................................
E-3
Paid holidays ...........................................................................................................................................
E-A
Paid v a c a t i o n s ........................................................................................................................................
E-5
Paid sick l e a v e ........................................................................................................
E -6
Nonproduction bonuses ........................................................................................................................
E-7
Insurance and pension p l a n s ..............................................................................................................
APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey
INDEX ......................................................

* NOTE: Additional occupational earnings rep orts
a re a v ailab le upon request fo r auto re p a ir shops
(June 1 9 5 1 ); p aints and varnishes (May 1 9 5 1 );
and power laundries (June 1951)*
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, V. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 2r>, D. C. - Price 20 cents

^7
*7
18
19
21
21

Introduction

1/

The Louisville area is 1 of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys. Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries
were studied on
a community-wide basis. Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping. In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4), separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/
Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables.
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized cn shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The Louisville

M etropolitan A r e a

The 3-County Louisville Metropolitan Area, consisting
of Jefferson County, Ky., and Clark and Floyd Counties, Ind.,
had an estimated total population of 576,900 in 1950, repre­
senting an increase of 27 percent since 1940. Nearly 370,000
persons reside within the city limits of Louisville, the remain­
der being distributed among New Albany and Jeffersonville in
Indiana, and other cities, villages, and unincorporated areas.
Total population of the area was estimated at nearly 539,000 in
July 1951.

1/ Prepared in the Bureau's regional office in Chicago, 111.,
by Woodrow C. Linn, tinder the direction of George E. Votava,
Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst.
The planning
and central direction of the program was carried on in the
Bureau's Division of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2/ The construction and extractive industries and government
institutions were excluded from the study; see appendix for dis­
cussion of scope and method of survey.



Estimated nonagricultural employment in May 1952
totaled more than 216,000 workers, of whom 86,000 were employed
in manufacturing establishments. Manufacturing activity in the
Louisville area is diversified.
Of primary importance is the
food and kindred products industry with about 14,000 workers, of
whom 4,400 were in establishments producing distilled and recti­
fied liquors (employment in distilleries had decreased 15 per­
cent since March because of cut-back in bottling operations).
Other manufacturing industries of substantial importance include
nonelectrical machinery; primary and fabricated metal products;
chemical, petroleum, and coal products; lumber products and
furniture; and tobacco products.
Of the 130,100 wage and salary workers in nonmanufac­
turing industries, more than 43,000 were employed in wholesale
and retail trade activities, reflecting the city's importance
as a commercial and distribution center. Another 22,400 work­
ers were employed by transportation (including railroads),
communication, and public utility companies. The service in­
dustries provided employment for 26,500; and finance, insurance,
and real estate establishments employed 8,800 workers. Govern­
ment employment - Federal, State, and local - totaled slightly
under 16,000. The building construction industry provided jobs
for 12,700 workers in May.
Among the industry and establishment-size groups sur­
veyed by the Bureau, two-thirds of the workers in nonoffice jobs
were employed in establishments having written agreements with
labor organizations. Four out of five factory workers in manu­
facturing establishments were employed in union plants. In
nonmanufacturing industries, the proportion of nonoffice work­
ers covered by union agreements ranged from slightly less than
a fifth in retail trade and service establishments to more
than nine-tenths in transportation (excluding railroads), com­
munication, and public utilities.
Unionization was far less
extensive among office workers. Fewer than a tenth of all office
workers in the Louisville area were employed under provisions
of collective-bargaining agreements.
The highest degree of
office-worker unionization was reported in transportation (ex­
cluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Occupational W a g e Structure
Wages of more than 80 percent of Louisville area nonoffice workers included in the survey were formally adjusted
upward between January 1950, the base period far the Wage Stabi­
lization Board's "catch-up” wage formula, and May 1952, the
time of the Bureau's survey.
Nearly 95 percent of the plant
workers in manufacturing industries had received one or more
general wage increases. In nonmanufacturing establishments,
three-fifths of the nonoffice workers had received at least one

general wage increase during the period; nearly all the others
had received pay raises granted on an individual basis. Formal
revisions of office workers1 salaries were less prevalent, al­
though office workers in the larger manufacturing establishments
frequently were granted increases comparable with those given
plant workers.
Individual merit or length-of-service raises
were commonly used to adjust office workers* salary levels, in
place of general wage increases.
Formalized rate structures were reported in establish­
ments employing nearly 90 percent of all nonoffice workers, and
were common in all broad industry groups within the scope of the
survey. About half of all workers paid time rates were under
wage plans which specified a single or flat rate for each job
classification. Wage plans providing a range of rates for each
classification were in effect in establishments employing more
than a third of all time-rated workers.
The remaining time
workers were paid rates based on individual
determination.
Among the industry groups studied, single rates were typical
of manufacturing and services.
Piece-rate or bonus-incentive
payment plans covered plant jobs in which more than a fifth of
the workers in manufacturing establishments were classified.
They were either nonexistent or relatively insignificant among
the nonmanufacturing industries studied.
Virtually all formal wage plans reported for office
occupations provided a range of salaries for each job.
Few
office workers were paid salaries based on single-rate plans,
and more than a third were employed in establishments that
determined salaries on an individual basis.
Established minimum entrance rates for hiring inex­
perienced plant workers were part of the formalized wage struc­
ture in nearly all the firms studied.
Although entrance rates
ranged from less than 75 cents to more than $1.65 an hour, twothirds of the workers were employed in establishments with




minimum rates of between 75 cents and $1.25. In manufacturing
industries, about two out of three workers were employed in es­
tablishments having entrance rates of $1 or more.
A 75-c®nt
minimum was the lowest rate reported in manufacturing and whole­
sale trade. Minimum entrance rates of less than 75 cents were
found in other nonmanufacturing groups studied.
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing.
Thi3 relationship held in 27 of 28 office job classifications
and 16 of 20 plant job categories permitting comparison. In
half these instances the difference was between $2.50 and $5.50
a week for office jobs, and between 11 and 27 cents for plant
categories.

Nearly 20 percent of the plant workers in manufac­
turing establishments were employed on late shifts in May 1952.
Three-quarters of these were on second-shift operations. Vir­
tually all late-shift workers were paid differentials over day
(first-shift) rates in the form of cents-per-hour premiums for
about three-quarters of the workers and as percentage differ­
entials for the others. Shift premiums of A or 5 cents an hour
or 10 percent over the day rate were most commonly reported for
second-shift workers.
The scheduled workweek for two-thirds of all non­
office workers was A0 hours in May. Virtually all of the remain­
ing workers were scheduled to work longer hours.
Forty-hour
workweek schedules were in effect for three-fifths of the women
office workers, with a large majority of the others working
shorter schedules• In finance, insurance, and real estate of­
fices, two-thirds of the employees worked less than A0 hours.
A 37^-hour schedule was typical for office workers in trans­
portation (excluding railroads), communication, and public
utilities.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

O ffice O ccu p a tio n *

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Louisville, Ky., by industry division, May 1952)

See fo o tn o te s a t end of t a b l e ,
* * F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s ta te




Occupational Wage Survey, L o u is v ille , K y., May 1952
U .S. D
EPARTM T OF LABOR
EN
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

Table A-l:

Office Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Louisville, Ky., by industry division, May 1952)

Sec footnotes at and of table*

* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other publie utilities,

#* Finance!
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ Insurance, and real estate*
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

See footnotes a
 t end of table. railroads),
*
Transportation (excluding
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
# * Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Table A-l:

Office. Occupation*. - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Louisville, Ky., by industry division, May 1952)

communication, and other public utilities,

0cc44f2&iiO4U - QoniUmmd

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Louisville, Ky., by industry division, May 1952)

N U M BER OF WORKERS R EC EIV IN G STRA IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Avera g e

Number
of

S& z, oocupatlon^aad industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
«
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1 2.50 1 5.00
*
*
Weekly
Weekly
1 7.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo S7.S0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
*
hours
earnings $
and
(Standard) (Standard) 30.00
over
32.50 35.00 37.50 liO.OO 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
$

- Continued
$

1*8

Stenographer®, technical ..... • ••..... ....

Switchboard operators •
Manufacturing
Burable goods

192
......... ...«
••••••• ••.••<>

T 6~

28

28
136
1U

j^manssfactoring
Sal® trad® ..........esecsc ®®e • *
Retail trad®
o.

14*
Ul

S?&tchbesrd operator-receptionists ........

39.5

1*0.5

1 1.50
*
h33^00~
1*9.50
56.50
37.00
1*3.50

1 *o.o
1 0.0
*
Uo®o
l*o.5
1 0.0
*
U 0.0
36.5

168
8i

Finance
Services

39.5
39, c

25
nondurable goods ...«.«.....«««•«««••

1 0«,0
*

56
87
25

.......... .

20
12

39*5

1 0.0
*
11.0
*
38.0
1 0.0
*

36.50
36.50

1*3.00
L 6.00
M*.°o
1 7.00
*
1*0.50

12
1
1

13
•

11

39.5
0.0
XT' 1 *
39«5

1 3.00
*
1 6.00
*

-

11

2
7

1

2
3

1
*
6

13

9
---- -i

6
2
2

9
Q

h

1

i
t

_

12
1*8
2 ---&
2
11
10
33
12
7
5
2

1
.

- ---- 711
_
1
i

-

1*0
3
3

5
3

10
7
7

10

17
-

50.00

39.0
39.0
1 0.0
*
38.0
39.0
1 0.0
*

12
1
1

17

33
-

! 51.00

27

33
.
-

-

13
13

j 37.50
i 39.50
i 39.50

12
*

Tebuiating-Bachin® operators ........... .
Manufacturing ..........................
tarring

2

56.00

2
1
2
1

3
-

16

•

2

37

11

22
19

5
U*
3

1
1
1

2
2

_

10

12

1
*

15

3

ae
t

5
1
*

6
1
*

8
6

10

12
10

2
2

1
*
1
*

3
7
9

.

•
l
i

2
2
1
•
-

3

3

9
1

1
2
1
1

3
2
1

8
1
1
-

2

k

6

1

1

l
l

1

l
i

3

2
1

3

2

-

2
2

.
•

1

2

-

2

_

1

•

.
.

.
•

•
-

•

•
-

•

.

•

.

.

•

m

•

•

•

•

•

-

.

-

.

.

.
.

.

m

.

1

11
6
3
3
5

18

6
3
3
12
2
7

9

7

l

6
2

8
8
2
6

1

9

l
i

1

1

k

u
H

7
3

l
l

2

1

h

2
-

2

6
1
*
2

12

1
*

5
.

5
3

•

3

12

1

5

15
T

10

5

7

1

6
1
*

1
1

l
i

1
1
*

l
i

1

1
1

2
2

2
2
11
2
9

3

1
1

.

3
2

2

1
2

•

1
Tronscribin5
?-ias.chine operator®, general ...
Manufaetuxing
....... ........... .
Donah l s gtnods
a
Hosdurable goods
Idnajamsfac-^arlng .................. .
fcr&da
aans®
..

115

2ypi«ts„ class A
Mfomafaetering •
3
Sarable goods .................... .
Ifezsdnr&blfi goods
U n m w wnfn r t aiIng
e H
trt.
1 1 T T,__
Fiiwsnn© -a* w...TftrB(l9rttrtvlrott.
ttrt>.
S&rvioos

188

!£ypists, class B
Manufacturing.... .*...................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
rfag
Public utilities * Ttntt9.*ofkttrT1. l
t„„„
yfciolB sale trad® e»»»,.»*«..•«.»......
Fa tail trad© A . . . rf r t 1( , 1 l t t t t 1 r v n i r T r r t t T t
Finance **

1/
2/
#

36
19
17
79
37
hi

151
1*5

86
57

25
lit

"

1,059
358

202
156
701
70

130
161
318

38.0

1*2.50
1*9.50
11.50
*
12.00
*
1 0.50
*

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
38.5
1 1.0
*

1*9.50
53.50
1*9.00
Ui*.oo
51*.5o

39.5
1*9^5
10.0
*

39.5
39.5
39.0
1 0.0
*
1*0.5
38.5

!
-

2

15 | ---- 15
3

-j

3

„

6
1
5

2
2

m

-

U"

15

h

8
7

5
10

k
h

. j

-

-

m

1
1

7
3

29

32

12

2
1

9

2*
1
15

h
h

17
■M
l*
l

3

9
8

i
i

25
19

H*

1*
1

12

H*

8

2

3

•

17

9
2
1

6
8

15

38.00
1 1.00
*
1 0.50
*

15

37.00

■15

72
7

1A

187

17

12
*

5
2

11
6

65

137

23
19
li*5

9
2

5

6

29
27
72

25
28
7*
1

31
23

188

170
8T

1*1
2i
20

1*0
29
2 * --- 6
1
1C
3
A9
Q
3
7

90
C7
c
;
C
9

16
c
9
Q
/

26

13

85
13

1*6
7
1

15

18

17
•W

12

16
33

2
20

77
ff

59

70

2

18

1

* ]
|

„

17

28
21

7
7

13
10

3

2
5

2

1
1
1

.
.

-

.
•

.

23

1
21
1

11
2

„

.

-1

-

•

.

8
0
7

18
7

t

2

96
50
19
31

71 “
38
33
117

«
•

9

6

c
?

7

17
9
c

O
7
9

1
1
6

8

3

9
3
9

1
7

f

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,
Workers were distributed as follows; 8 at $90 to $95; 7 at $100 to $105; 1 at $105 to $110; and 9 at $115 to $120.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




8
3

6

2
L
*
*
c

1

_

3

2
2

3

1

39.50
1*2766
1*1.50
1 2.00
*

37.50

-

12

15

12
8

1
.

10
8
2

3
1
8

51.00

52.00

25

3
3

2
1

.

PnoledAianal and ^ectu ucai O ccupation^

Table A-2:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Louisville,, Ky., by industry division, May 1952)

N U M BER OF W ORKERS R EC EIV IN G STR A IG H T-TIM E W E E K L Y EA RN IN G S OF—

Av e r a g e

Number
Sex,

occupation,

and industry division

of

workers

$

Weekly

-

-

~

-

■

■

$

$

$

-

-

*

%

-

c

c

c

1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.on 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50

$

$

$

3

1*2.50 i*5 .o o l*7 .5 o 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r

$

$

1 * 0 .0 0

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Weekly

$

%

$

95.00 100.oc 105.00 110.00 115.00
_
_
and
72.50 75-00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 11.
5.00 over

Men
1
$

Draftsmen,

chief

M a n n f a fib itH n g

................................
ttt

_ ti

r , r . T . . . T , , _______

D r a f t s m e n ......... ...............................
Manufacturing

................................

D u r a b l e g o o d s .......................
N o n d u r a b l e g o o d s ....................

D r a f t s m e n , j u n i o r ...............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ......... .....................

36
29

l*o.o
ho, 5

91.50
92.00

197
188
166
22

1*0.5
Uo.5
1*0.5
1*0.0

8 3 .0 0
8 3 .5 0
81*. 00
7 8 .0 0

he

39.5
39.5

59.50
59.50

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2
2

5
T~

6
6

2

1

2

ii

2

-

2
'

u

8
0

2
2

13
13
8
5

25
25
21
1
*

31
31
30
1

1
.

1
*
1
*
1*
-

3
3
2
1

1
1
1
-

5
5
5
-

6
6

6

2
2

5

1

3

3

3

2

3

l

3

3

3

2

6

18
17
12
5

22
22
22
-

10
10
10
-

11
1
*
2
2

9

0
c

11*

13
11
2

1
1

3

3
0

2
O
c

3
3
3

•
3

.

J

12
12
10
2

3
3

19
19
19

6
6
6
-

**

"

“

-

_ !

-

“

'

i
Women

N u r s e s , i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g i s t e r e d ) .............
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...... ........................ .
D u r a b l e g o o d s ............................
Nondurable

goods

........................

51
h9
21
28

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

6 1 .0 0

61.00
57.50
63.50

-

-

-

1
1
1

-

1 9
!
— 8
i 6
2

1
*
1
*
— F " — in

2
2

1*

2
2

1
1

6
r i r i

13
12

1*

1

2

11

—

6
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1
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-

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2
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1

6

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2

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-

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1
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_

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1

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Hours reflect the vrorkweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational wage Survey, Louisville, Ky., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

M aintenance and Powek P la n t O ccupation^

Table A-3:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Louisville, Ky., by industry division, May 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and ind ustry d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

Average

$ _ $
1 .0 5 u i o U 1 5

Under 0*. 90 0 .9 5 t o o

earnings $

,? 5

I
|
Y i m K I. wuwta * ______«.____ ____ ___________________
V
VnnAimhla
. . . . . . . . . _____ ___. . . ____ ______
M m . w faniiirliw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
a
w

Fireman, s ta tio n a r y b o i l e r .......... . ♦ ..................... ....................
Manufacturing ................................................ ..
Durable goods •••••••••••«••.•••••«•••••*••••••
Nondurable goods
ttttTtttlttttttttttttlTtttttlttttttttt

H elpers, tr a d e s , maintenance ••••••«••••••••••••*••.»
Manufacturing
Durable g o o d s ........... (••••••••••••••••••• m m * * * *
Nondurable goods
l i M
l l l l . r ...... « » « ...» » ...................
Wholesale trad e
R e ta il trad e m t t t t t M t t t . M n t t n t t M t t f t t t t ,

1.0 0

Maintenance men. g en eral u t i l i t y
Manufacturing
Durable goods ••••••••••••«••••••••••••••••••••
I uM h m M a MMi4a ______ ______ _____ . . . . . . ___. . . .
Urines m f a

. .. . . . .. .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19*4,41 4 m <U - __________ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sevnrlnee . . . . . . . . . . . . . ______ ____ ___. . . . . ________

See foo tn o te a t end of ta b le .




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F n fin eara. gtflf^rtnaiy .................................................................. ..

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Occupational Wage Survey, L o u is v ille , K y., May 1952
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

Table A-3:

M aintenance and, Pout**. P la n t O ccupation4 - Cont inued

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Louisville, Ky., by industry division, May 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number

Occupation and Industry division

of
workers

Mechanics, automotive (Maintenance) •••••••••••••••«•
Manufacturing
...

302
76
2$

nondurable goods ••••**••••••••#••••»••*••»*«•«
Wonsamfactaring

hi
226

lift

Avers*. Under
0*.90 tf.9S £•00 i o s £ . 1 0 £ . 1 5 £ 2 0 L t $ £ 3 0 f .3 5 £ u o i h S £ 5 0 £ 5 5 £ .6 0
1 .7 0 1 .7 5 L e o U s 1 .9 0 ^ .0 0 *2.10 *2.20 *2*30 *2,1*0
hourly
•
earnings $
and
0.90
.9 5 1*00 1 * 0 5 M O 1 .1 5 I t 20 1*25 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .1 0 1.L5 1 .5 0 L 5 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 5 l a 70
l e 8 0 1«(K 1.9(7 2*00 2 .1 0 2 ,2 0 2*30 ?.K l
$
1 .7 1
1 .8 2

m
99
86

- m —
2U
120

Pioe fi t t e r s , maintenance t » • • • « •« •• •• * •• •• •• •• •• •• •*

1
|

flUP.VI M M w
W ifl
_. . . . . __
Nondurable goods • • • • • « • • .• • • • « • • • • .« • •

tbrnfAMKiHM ________ _____

______ _ ______ . . . . .

NutlfA0^nr1 Y£ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
%
T
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...
Nondurable goods

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Excludes premium pay f o r overtim e and night work.
T ran sp ortatio n (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .




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Masufactoring •.«•••«•••««••«••••••««.•.*.••«•«««•
Durable goods •••••••••••••••••••«••••••••••«••
MftiiifciwKI. wno/h _______ ___ ____ - ___ - ____________

-

2 .0 1
2 .0 1

1*60
1*61
1 .6 2
1 .5 9

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190

1

1*96

96
— 96—

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1 .9 7

31

a
i5
ic

Ui
111
111
J4

1*68
1*7

7hl

............... ..
..................................................................
Manufacturing
Durable goods •••••••••••«•«•••••••••••••••••••

27
12

1

TulS
3 ,8 $

710
230
lt80

M illvrichts ............................................................................................
m ninfsctn H n f ^ . . . . . . . . . .

l

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•

.

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3
3

4,
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9

15
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15

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96
19

-

Table A-U:

Quiiodial, rJan&luu*i-i*uff a*ut SUippiuf Occupation
U

(Average hourly earn ings 1f f o r s e le c te d occupations 2/ studied on an area
b a s is in L o u is v ille , K y., by in d u stry d iv is io n , May 1952)

N U M B ER OF W ORKERS REC EIV IN G STR A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y EA R N IN G S OF—

O c c u p a tio n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

of
workers

hourly
earning.

9
Under 0 .60 0 . 6 5

$
*
* „ s
0 . 7 0 0 . 7 5 0.80 0 . 8 5

s
9
w s
9
$
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1 ,6 0 1 , 7 0 1 ,8 0 1 ,9 0 2 ,0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 o v e r

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.......................... . . ........................ ..........................

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G u ard s .............. ............................................................................... .. ..........................

li9 3
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C ran e o p e r a t o r s ,
M arm ifectu rin g

N o o R a n u f a c t u r in g ........................... ........................................................... ..

lb 5
317
31
2?

M a n u f a c t u r in g .................................... ..................... •••••••••••••••
D u r a b le g o o d s .................................. .................................. ••••.•••
N oinduraljle g o o d s
N o n m r m f a c tu r i n g ....................................................•••••............... ..
PnKl^r- v + i l i t t e a *

1 .6 7 5
910
363
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965
90

R e t a i l tra d ®
............ ••••••••••
F in a n ce * * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

135
b57
17b

fiftrvi fi« s t r * t t T i t M i t r i i i r - t T t T t i n T T t i m m r t »
O r d e r f i l l e r s ............................... .................. ..
.
M a n u f a c t u r in g
ffeywaVtl« grAAdn i i m i n i i n m i t t m t i n i n n I I M
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s • • • • • • • • • • « ...• ............ « « • ...• • • • •
I c n n a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................... ........................................ .............
W h o le s a l e t r a d e » . . . . ..................... ..

R
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P a c k e r s (m en ) . . . . . . . . .................••.................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...................... ....................... .. .......................................
Durable g o o d * # # » » « « » « ,
NOnAll^bl A gflMifl i t i t n i r i r i u r M r r r t l t M i m M l
H o n n a im fftrtn ^ i ng i n u t t t m i i i t t t t t u t i t i i i i i t i i t M
W h o le s a l e t r a d e ...............•••••••..................................................
R e t a ,3 1 fn 'a d * . f ( t r i „ t. T T | l l t t ( t f f t f . t T T t . , t f t t l I l t l
P a c k e r s ( w o m e n ) ................... ............. . ................................. ............................
N e s n m n u f a c tu rin g
W h o le s a l e t r a d e
______t. - „ TTTT. ^ - T r -.T- - l1, TT* ^ TVTT
R e t a i l t r a d e T___

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1 .2 9

1 J »6
1 .2 8
1 .2 7
1 .3 7
.9 9
.9 8
.9 9
.9 8
1 .U 9
1 .5 7
1 .6 2
1 .5 2
l .b 0
1 .3 b

-

m
•

-

m
-

.

«
•
-

-

.

9
9

•

b

-

202

k
b

T T

3
3

x

19

9

-

-

15
15

2

-

-

-

-

-

13
13
13

5
~ T
k

bO

28

b

0

9

1
38
38

36
36

28
28

30
19

18
2

73
58
56
yw

2

2

38
3b
ol
9**

11

16

Vi

h
a

9

lb

15

2
2

-

•
5

1

_

2
2
2
2

5

2
2

-

•
*
-

20
20

2

•

15

m

38
38
3b
3k

J
O
35

X

•

x
11
8
8

3b

n

11

12
12

3b
----- o f
239
9ft
rj
>A
ol.
9Gft
cw
94

125
125
17

81

5
-

-

5

-

-

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9h0

1

I d
98
17

108

x

bo

2

ib

2

23
18

x

2

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7

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2

7
1
4.

12

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1

10
10

u
b

8
7

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li

$$
19

86
11

0

7

x
x

18

-

.

x
A

17
36
36

b
7
75
15
60

2

25

15

23

39
18

18

8
8

10

5
5

2

16

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

b7

bb

l .b 5

«
»

2?
16

-

h

„

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b le .
*
T ran sp o rtatio n (exclud in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
Fin ance, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e .




10

2
2

2

.8 6
1 .1 2
1 . 1b
1 .1 1

365
9b

2

1

x

67 _ 5 5 _

19

lb9
93
151
136
15

2

1

1 .2 6
1 .1 9
1 .3 0

32

310
b2

-

1 .0 8

8
2

638
17b
3b
IbO
U6b
62

1

1 .6 8

b5

232
M a n u f a c t u r in g . . . . . . . . . . . ............ .......................................
D u r a b l e g o o d s ............................................ ..............................................
N o n d u r a b le good.!
, t |t itirTT- , T t , | t t t T ,
N
ffltiw r
ta m
g gr t1l1ritll, t M O t t l t 1 f t , t t t t , t t t t t t t t t t
>
R e t a il t r a d e i u u i t t i i i i n » t n m t f * M t t i - Tt Tt t

_

b8

109
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s * and c l e a n e r s (w om en) ••••••••••••••
M a n u f a c tu r in g .................................................................
D u ra b le goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M nnm am ifsc.t.iirlng i t t H t f t m t i i i t t t i t t t r m i i M M i
1 trade t i , n i i i m i i i i n i * i i i t n i n t - m i i
P i nannp -s-tf-

b
b

18

3

7

1

7

58

20

85

68

b
t.
u

28

bO

16

38

16

57

28
10

lb

10

22
18
28
28

15
2

12

7

r
7

2

13

13

6
7
1

11

21
17

2b
5

33

1
X

3

26
99
66

2

b

7
7

7
7

bl

26

1

27

20

b
23

Hi
AU
lb

.

m

.

1

11
11
11

•
.

1
X

6

. !

_

O
A
£V
X
O

•
.

m

2
23

x

6
1
1

10

1

2

-

10

8

1

x

x

20
20

2X

5
5

-

17

-

7
f
i

u

8

x

1

c

9

5

5
Jx
L
a

9
c

3

2
10

* 7

g

bo
23
13
in
iv

17
10

17
9

bo

12

lb

16

3

11

5

2

0
9

l
in
XU

1,
u

8

1L
ol.
«»
c
9

0
7

t

X

17
17
15

3
m
.

•

0
9

“

O
6

•

r

O ccupational Wage Survey, L o u i s v i l l e , K y., May 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

'able A-b :

Guitadicd, 'Wa'ieUoMA.itu}, and S k ip pin g OcoupatiMU - Qo*U*m*ed
(Average hourly earnings 1/ lor selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Louisville, Ky., by industry division, May 1952)

1/
y
*

Excludes premium pay f o r overtime and. night work.
Study lim ited t o men workers excep t where otherwise in d icated .
T ransp ortation (exclu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
* * Finance, in
su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .



B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
9*tAu&&U*&

Table B-35:

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Number
of
workers

Occupation 2 /

Avenge
hourly
earnings

y

l
$
f
t
t
<
<
S
% t
t
t
t
•
f
s
s
f
$
1 ,
Under 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0
$
and
1 .0 5
1 ,1 0 1*15 1 ,2 0 1 ,2 5 1 ,? 0 1 ,3 5 1 ,4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 ,6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 9 1 .7 5 1 .8 9 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2,j.O 2 ,2 0 2 ,3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 over

%
Assemblers, c la s s A £ / a ....................................................................
Assemblers, c la s s B y b ....................................................................
Assemblers, c la s s C £ / a ....................................................................
E l e c tr ic ia n s , maintenance y & .......................................................
In sp e cto rs, clad s A y b .......................................................................
In sp e cto rs, c la s s C y & .......................................................................
J a n ito r s , p o r te r s , and clean ers y & ...........................................
M achine-tool o p e ra to rs, production,
c la s s A y b , y .....................................................................................
A utom atic-lathe o p e ra to rs, c la s s A L jb ...........................
D r ill-p r e s s o p e ra to rs, s in g le - or m u ltip le sp indle, c la s s A y b ..................................................................
Engin e-lath e o p e ra to rs, c la s s A y b ................
Grinding-machine o p e ra to rs, c la s s A L j b .........................
T u rre t-la th e o p e ra to rs, hand (including hand
screw 'm achine), c la s s A l j b ................................................
M achine-tool o p e ra to rs, production,
c la s s B l j b , y ..................................................................................
A utom atio-lathe o p e ra to rs, c la s s B £ / a .............................
D r ill-p r e s s o p e ra to rs, s in g le - or m u ltip lesp in d le, c la s s B l j b ..................................................................
Machine-tool o p e ra to rs, production,
c la s s C y% T o t a l ..............................................................................
Tlnift

t . l t f t t t T T I t r t t T - T __ r T - - 1 ___ _

In cen tiv e .............................................................
A utom atic-lathe o p e ra to rs, c la s s C £ / a .............................
D r ill-p r e s s o p e ra to rs, s in g le - or m u ltip lesp in d le, c la s s C: T o tal .........................................................
T im a

1

Incen tive ........................................
Milling-machine o p e ra to rs, c la s s C l j b ............................
T u rre t-la th e o p e ra to rs, hand (including hand
screw machine) , c la s s C £ / a ...............................................
M achinists, production £ / a ........................................................... ..
Stock handlers and tr u c k e rs , hand J b. ................................ ..
Tool-and-die makers (o th er than
to o l-an d -d ie jobbing shops) £ / a ...............................................
Welders, hand, c la s s A: T otal ......................................................
T1 ma

W elders, hand, c la s s B

Ja

Incen tive

T

......................................
................................................................

102
595
339
78
62
39
99

1 .9 0
1 .8 8
1 .4 4
2 .1 8
1 .8 9
1 .4 0
1 .2 8

401
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

10

2

-

27

22

32

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

9

2

13

2
8

2 .1 0
1 .7 9

-

-

-

-

106
53
107

2 .2 6
2 .0 6
2 .1 9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

67

2 .1 4
1 .5 7

-

-

122

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
11

12
4

1
27

1

2
4

6
4

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25
15

1 .9 2

255
15

1
1
59

1
12
17

4
4
3

-

-

-

-

82

2 .3 0

-

-

-

-

-

1 .7 0
1 .3 6
2 .0 6
1 .4 6

-

-

1
1

3
3

23
22
1

117
40
77
90

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1 .7 2
1*33
1 .9 3
2 .1 3

-

-

-

-

16
16

-

_

-

-

-

-

22
89
267

1 .4 3
1 .8 9
1 .4 7

-

-

1

2

6

11

2

1

88
156
100
56
49

11
1

-

29

11

-

-

12
4

5
2
1
5

-

2
2
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

4

6

1

1
-

4

4
22

-

-

46
4

13
1

1

-

1

-

1
-

-

-

-

10

1

8

36
2

15
1

42

28

48

36

41

34

2

22
2
7

28
13

4

8
5

6
16
18

18
4

4

2
2
8

4

4

2
4
24

12

6

1

4

3

5

30

1

2

3

-

-

-

1
1

6

1

6

8

11

19

28

36

49

24

8

11

12
1

14

16
-

11
2

24
1

17

-

-

4

1

-

-

6
2

2
-

3
3

2
-

1
6

1

1
9
1

3

3

2

17
9

6
1

4

10
1

-

5

-

4

-

5
1

7
3

11

18

5
-

9

220
2
1
4

4
5
3

-

-

12
156
2

-

14
5
4
1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

2

1

-

-

2

-

-

2

2

2

13

16

20

10

8

69
64
5
1

9
6
3
1

22
20
2
16

18
17
1
4

38
33
5
3

13
3
10

4

9

2

2

1

5

9

4

10

4

14

37

35

7

2

4

9

2

2

1

5

9

4

10

4

14

37

35

7

2

-

35
25
10
16

5

2
2

2
2

8
g

9
3
6

8

3

6

2

2

-

5

6

2

3

3

6

9

9

1

8

3

6

2

5

6

1

3

3
7

1

6
7

9
26

9
20

1

-

2
1

3

3

2
-

13

21

3

7

1

3

41

-

-

-

-

-

3
64
62
2

1
30
27

-

17

-

-

20

23
1

40

3

1
2

-

3

-

3

12

8

1

20

1

3

12

8

-

-

1 #7 0
-l

5

2
2

2

-

2

10
&
4
4

-

-

-

1

1

2

2

-

3

1

8

1

-

3

1

1

-

147

88

-

7

%

2
1

X

t
y

2 .2 3
1 .5 4

151

9

376
194
182
41

2 .1 1
1 .9 5

2
4

9

13

21

1
1

X

8
7
1
6

3

I
2

3

x

_

4

2
_

1 / The study covered establishm ents v ith more than 2 0 workers engaged in the manufacture o f n o n e le c trio a l machinery (Group 35) as defined in th e Standard I n d u stria l C l a s s if ic a tio n Manual (1945 e d itio n )
prepared by the Bureau o f the Budget; m achine-tool accesso ry establishm ents (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were also included.
2 / Data lim ited to men workers.
O ccupational Wage Survey, L o u is v ille , Ky., May 1952
2 / Excludes premium pay f o r overtime and night work.
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT OP IABOR
l j In s u ff ic ie n t d ata to perm it p resen tatio n o f sep arate averages by method o f wage payment.
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s
(a ) A ll o r predominantly time workers.
(b) A ll or predominantly in cen tive workers.
y
Includes d ata f o r o p erators of o ther machine to o ls in ad d itio n to those shown s e p a ra te ly .




13

Table £-63:

AVERAGE

W eekly
earnings
(S ta n d a rd )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

3 0 .0 0 § 2 .5 0 J 5 .0 0 1 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 1 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0
to .o o I 2 .5 0 I5.OO 1 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 * 9 5 .0 0
and
under
3 2 . £0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 75*00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0
,

W eekly
hours
(S ta n d a rd )

2/

! a

Occupation and sex

N u m b er
of
w orkers

9n&44/VG4U>e G & V l l e S U ' 1/

MSS
S e ctio n heads
Underw riters .......................

C le rk s, accounting . . .
C le rk s, f i l e , c la s s B
Key-punch o p e rato rs . .
Premium a cc e p to rs . . . .
S e ctio n heads ................
Stenographers ................
T y p ists , c l a s s B .........

31
26

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

*
7 7 .0 0
83.00

49
42
38
15
11
24
225

3 7 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .5

4 2 .0 0
3 4 .0 0
4L .50
4 7 .5 0
6 7 .0 0
4 5 .5 0
3 8 .0 0

3

3
4

6
8
-

2
8
1

-

-

10
9
8
1

-

-

10

48

41

2
62

17
-

1
|

6

7

6

10

3
4

8
4

-

-

4
19

5
18

4

5

.

•

3
2

2
6

_
.

_

1

-

2
6

2

17

18
8

-

6
1

4
27

-

-

4

-

2

4

-

•

i / T*1® study covered estab lishm ents with more than 20 workers in the insurance in d u stry (Group 6 3 ) as defined in the Standard In d u stria l C la s s if ic a tio n Manual (1949 e d itio n ) prepared by the Bureau o f the
Budget.
2 / Hours r e f l e c t th e workweek f o r which employees re ce iv e th e ir regu lar stra ig h t-tim e s a l a r i e s and the earnings correspond t o th ese weekly hours.
Occupational Vage Survey, L o u is v ille , Ky., May 1952
U.S. D
EPARTM
ENT OF LABO
R
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




II.

C:

Union W a g e Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agx’
eed upon througn collective bargaining between
employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.
Comprehensive listings
of union scales for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing for July 1,
1951 are available on request. Similar information for these industries will be published for July 1, 1952.)

Table C-205

Table 0-15: j ( i u i l d u U f G o 4 tiP l4 4 Jc tiC 4 t

S rick la y sra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carpenters
^ l n c t p i ................................
P ain ters
P la s te r e r s
Plumbers
Building lab o rers .................................................... ..

feate
per
hour

HOUT8
p er
week

$2,915
2.U00
2.700
2.310
2.750
2.625
1.600

1*0
liO
ho
UO

UO
UO
UO

Table C-205: B o h & U e * ,
Ju ly x , 1952
C la s s if ic a tio n

fcate
p er
hour

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
F i r s t m i x e r s .......... ............................................... $ 1 ,5 5 0
1.520
Overmen, dumpers, feeders
Wrapping-machine o p e ra to rs, f i r s t
hands, m olders, u tility m en ..................... 1.500
Head packers and c h e c k e r s ............................ 1.U70
Cake benchmen ....................................................... 1 .U 5 0
M ixers1 h e lp e rs , pan r a c k e rs , packers
and ch eckers, f i r s t c la s s .......................
1.420
Bread panners, pan s e t t e r s , a f t e r
U m o n th s.............................................................. 1 .3 1 0
Bakery h e lp e rs, pan g re a s e rs , a f t e r
U m o n th s.............................................................. 1.2U0
Bread ra ck e rs, a f t e r U m o n th s................... 1.210
Foremen (women).............. ................................... 1 .1 8 0
Women production workers, a f t e r
U months • • • • ............................................. .. 1 .1 5 0
Women i c e r s , wrappers and
1 .1 3 0
f in is h e r s ...........................................................
Agreement B:
Overmen, cake ....................................................... 1.630
1 .5 3 0
Mixers
Overmen, feed era and dumpers,
machine o p erators ......................................... 1 .U 8 0
M ixers' h e lp ers, m olders,
relieftaen ...........................................................
1 .U 3 0
Bread r a c k e r s ........................... ........................... 1 .3 8 0
Pan s p o tte r s , machine p an -g reasers,
general h e lp e rs, p ack ers, wrappers'
h e l p e r s ................................ ............................... 1 .3 5 0
1.200
F lo u r blenders ................................................
Agreement C:
Mixars f ............ ........ T. . ........................................ 1.520
Molders, d e p o s ito rs, oven feed ers and
dumpers, ch eckers, benchmen ................... 1.U70
Stockkeepers, tw is te rs ................................... 1 .3 U 5
General h e l p e r s ................ ..
1 .2 1 5
Women help ers (cake shop) ............................ 1 .0 9 5




Table C-2082:

Hours
per
week

UO
Uo
UO
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

Uo
Uo
Uo

C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement D:
Head m i x e r s ..................... ................................. .. $1.5U0
M ixers, overmen, feeders .............................. 1 .5 2 0
Machinemen, head checkers ........................... 1.U60
1.U30
Dumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General h elp ers .................. • • • • ................. 1 .3 6 0
Wrapping- and slicin g-m ach ine h e lp e rs,
pan ra ck e rs, g re a s e rs , m ixers'
h elp ers ................................................................ 1 .3 5 0
Bread ra ck e rs, bench and machine
h elp ers ............................................................. 1 .3 1 0
Agreement E:
Dough m i x e r s ......................................................... 1 .5 5 5
Batchmen, oven o p e r a t o r s ..................... ..
1.5U5
U tilitym en, dough m ixers' h elp ers .......... 1.U85
Head packers and checkers ...........................
1.U55
Oven feed ers and dumpers, bread
wrapping-machine o p e r a t o r s ............ ..
1.U05
Panners, reliefm en a f t e r 60 days,
pan g re a s e rs , pan r a c k e rs , m o ld e rs ... 1 .3 8 5
Pack ers' help ers ................................................ 1 .3 0 5
Wrapping-machine h elp ers (bread) ............ 1 .2 8 5
Bakery h e lp e rs , m ixers' h e l p e r s ............
1 .2 7 5
Women b r e a d - r a c k e r s ......................................... 1.2U5
Pan c l e a n e r s ............................................. ..
1 .1 5 5
Agreement F :
Oven o p erators ....................... ............................. 1 .6 8 5
.............. .............
Mixers
1 .6 3 5
Molder o p e ra to rs, benchmen, bread
feed ers and dumpers, cake oven
feed ers ............................................................... 1 .5 3 5
Wrapping-machine o p e ra to rs, cake
d e p o s ito rs, pan g re a s e rs , c h e c k e r s ... 1.U85
S e le c to r s , bread r a c k e rs , machinemen,
pan r a c k e rs , bread p a c k e r s ................ ..
1.U35
Cake dumpers, m ix e rs' h e lp e rs , general
production m a rk e rs ........................... ....
1 .3 5 5
Foremen (women) ......................................... ..
1 .3 1 5
Wrapping-machine feed ers and h e lp e rs,
cake wrappers and i c e r s , cooky g i r l s ,
bread p a n n e r s .............................................. ..
1 .2 1 5
General bakery h e lp e rs, cake
1 .1 6 5

Hours
per
week

U
O
U
O
U
O
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

Table C-2082: M & lt

C la s s ific a tio n

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

-

6oHtiM44*d

M echanical departm ent: - Continued
Maintenance man h elp ers •••••••«•»•»••»•
O ile rs
Brewing departm ent:
R egular employees • • * • • • • • • • • • ..........
Apprentice brewers — f i r s t y e a r •••*••••
Apprentice brewers — second y e a r ••••••«
B o ttlin g departm ent:
R o ttla r s
............................ ..
Checkers
Government cellarm sn . . . . . . • • » * » . » . * » * . .
Yardmen
D elivery departm ent:
Routs salesman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route salesman h e lp e rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shipping chauffeu rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shipping deliverymen . . . . . T. . . . . . . . . . . . .
T r a i l e r d riv e rs
T r a i l e r d riv e r h elp ers . . . . . r . . . . . . . . . . .
1/

Uo
Uo
UO
UO

Hours
p er
week

$ 7 1 .2 0
75*00

Uo
Uo

7U.U0
6 2 .6 0
6 7 .6 0

Uo
Uo
Uo

7 1 .6 0
7 1 .6 0
7U.U0
7 1 .6 0

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

73.UO
7 1 .6 0
7 1 .6 0
7 1 .6 0
7U.U0
7 1 .6 0

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1/

Plus commissions.

Table C-27: P /U 4 tti* U ^
ju iy 1 , 1951
C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
p er
hour

Book and job shops:
Bindery women:
Agreement A ................................. $1,130
Agreement B .................................
1.125
Bookbinders:
Agreement A .................................
1.925
Agreement B ................................ . 1.900
Compositors, hand:
Agreement A ........................ ............ . 2.200
Agreement B .................................
2.238
Agreement C .................................
2.135
E le c tro ty p e rs ..............................................................
2.3U7
Machine o p e ra to rs :
Agreement A ............................................................
2.200
M achinists o p e ra to rs ............................ .
2.325
Agreement B • • • • ..... ..................... . 2.238
Agreement C ...... . ...................... .
2.135
Machine te n d e rs :
Agreement A ................. ................ 2.200
Agreement B ...................... ........... 2.363
Agreement C ...................................... 2.285
Mailers

Mechanical departm ent:
Engineers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8l.U 0
Firemen ........................................................... .. f . . . . .
7 6 .2 0
Grain d ryers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7 3 .2 0
Maintenance men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7 3 .2 0

Rate
per
week

C la s s if ic a tio n

Uo
Uo

Ju ly 1 , 1952
Uo
Uo

M frU
Ju ly 1 , 1952

Ju ly 1 , 1952

Ju ly 1 , 19$2
C la s s if ic a tio n

Bok&UeA, - G oH tU uted

................. ....................t t T .

Cheshire o p e ra to rs • • • • ...................
Photoengravers :
Agreement A ...........................................................
Rotogravure ....................................... ............
Agreement B ............................................................

1.360
1.560

2 .2 2 5
2.U00

2 .6 6 7

Hours
p er
week

UO
37 1/2
UO
37 1/2
UO
UO
37 1/2
37 1/2
UO
UO
UO
37 1/2
UO
UO
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2

O ccupational Wage Survey, L o u is v ille , K y ., May 1951
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

Table C-27:

Table C-27: p A d S t tit U f* G o + U iH U & f

PA44tU *Uf - G o n tiH U A lt

Table C-4.2:

M <Uo^t^U4ch 3b'U t/& td

a n d cttelp & iA , G tm lU uie d
-

C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
per
hour

Book and job shops: - Continued
P ress a s s is ta n ts and f e e d e rs :
Agreement A:
1 cy lin d er p r e s s , sin g le c o lo r ••••• $1.U85
1 o r 2 job autom atic c y l i n d e r s .......... 1 .5 3 5
1 p laten p r e s s , hand-fed ••••••••••• 1 .3 5 5
Agreement B:
1 cy lin d er p r e s s , sin gle c o lo r ;
1 r o ta r y r o l l - o r sh e e t-fe d . . . . . .
1 .5 9 5
1 cy lin d er p r e s s , 2 -c o lo r •••••••••• 1.655
1 p laten p r e s s , h a n d -f e d ...................
1.U65
2 p la te n s , au tom atic-fed ••••............... 1 .5 0 5
Agreement C:
1 .5 5 0
Cylinder p r e s s ...................
R otary p r e s s , Goss and Comic ••••«.• 1 .8 7 0
Pressmen:
Agreement A:
Cylinder p r e s s e s :
1 .8 8 5
1 , not over 65 in .......................... ..
2.0 1 0
2 , not o ver 65 i n . .......... ..
P la te n p r e s s e s :
1 p r e s s ................... ............... ••«•••••• 1 .660
1 .698
2 p r e s s e s .............. ...................... ..
3 p re ss e s ••••••••.............. •••••••• 1 .7 3 5
Agreement B:
C ylinder p r e s s e s :
1 , no t o ver 65 in . ............................... 2.0 2 5
2.150
2 , not o ver 65 in .
1 , 2 -c o lo r f la t-b e d ;
1 p e r f e c tin g ........................................ 2.1*88
Second pressmen ••••••••................... 2 .288
O ffse t p r e s s e s :
1 , 17 z 22 i n . o r u n d e r ...................
2 .0 7 5
1 , over 17 z 22 i n . to U i n . . . .
O
2 .1 7 0
1 , hO i n . o r over ••••........................ 2 .2 9 0
1 , 2 -c o lo r ................................................. 2 .3 6 5
1 , r o l l - f e d ............................................... 2*Ul5
P la ten p r e s s e s :
Operating 1 p ress and
feed in g ...................................................
1 .8 0 0
2 p r e s s e s ................................................... 1.838
3 p re sse s ••••......................•••••••••
1 .8 7 5
Agreement C:
Cylinder p r e s s e s :
Job , M ille r o r e q u a l .......... ................ 1 .7 1 0
1 s in g le -c o lo r , f la t-b e d ................. 1.930
2 s in g le -c o lo r , f l a t bed •••••••• 2 .000
1 2 -c o lo r f la t-b e d .......................... ..
1 .9 5 0
P la ten p r e s s e s ..........•••••••••........... ..
1 .7 1 0
R otary p r e s s e s :
In -ch a rg e -o f doss and Comic .......... 2.1*10
Second pressmen, Goss and
C o m ic........................................ ...............
2 .1 1 0
Newspapers1
Compositors, hand - day w o rk .............. ..
2.623
Compositors, hand - n ig h t w o rk ........................ 2 .757
Machine o p erato rs - day work •••••............ .. 2.623
Machine o p erators - n ig h t work ........................ 2.757
Machine tend ers (m ach in ists) dayw ork ..................... ...................... ...............
2 .6 2 3
Machine tend ers (m ach in ists) n ig h t work ................................................................. 2 .757
2 .170
M ailers - day work ............................ ..
2.270
M ailers - n ig h t work .............................. ...............
2 .8 3 6
Photoengravers - day w o rk ...................................
Photoengravers - n ig h t work •••••••••.••••
Pressmen, web p re ss e s - day w o rk ................... 2.597
Pressmen, web p re ss e s - n ig h t w o rk ............ .. 2.703
Presam en-in-charge - day w o rk ..........................
2.863
Pressm en-in-charge - n ig h t w o rk ...................... 2.970




Ju ly 1 , 1951

Ju ly 1 , 1951

Ju ly 1 , 1951
Hours
p er
week

Rate
p er
hour

C la s s if ic a tio n
Newspapers: - Continued

Stereotypers - day work .................. *2 .5 9 7
Stereotypers — night work ................
2.703

UO
UO
UO

Table C-/.1:

37 1/2
37 1/2

jH &C&i*

Ofx&udUuf C m fU o4f**l
Uo
Uo
uo
Uo

C la s s if ic a tio n

UO
UO
U
O

per
hour

1-man c a rs and b u sses:
F i r s t 3 months .............. .......................................... .. 1 1 .3 5 0
U - 6 m o n th s.............. ................................................. 1.U30
1.U80
7 - 12 months .................................................. ..
A fte r 1 y ear ................................................................ 1 .5 8 0

Table

uo
uo

M

o t o s it lu c k

Hours
per
week
U8
U8
U8
U8

Ju ly 1 , 1951

uo
Classification

uo
Uo
U
O
U
O

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
37
37
37
37
37

1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
3 /2
1 /2

37 1 /2
37 1 /2
37
37
37
37

1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2

37 1 /2
37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37

1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2

per
week

I1.17U
1 .3 1 0

Ice :
Route .........................
Supply
Meat - Packing house
Country d riv e rs . .
M i l k ..................................
Tank tru ck ..•••«,

ho

Rate
per
hour

Bakery - Biscuit:
Agreement A .............................. ti.Uio
1.U00
Agreement B ..............................
1.U80
Agreement C ......................•.......
Beer ....................................... . 1.705
Helpers
..... . ,f ...... ....., ..... ...
1.660
Building:
Construction:
1.620
Up to 3 t o n s .......... ...............
1.720
3 tons and over .......................
Euclid, winch and low b o y ............
1.880
Material:
Hauling:
Up to 3 cu. yd ......... ••••........
1.510
1.610
Over 3 cu. yd.............. ........
Dump:
1.610
Dump truck, over 6 cu. yd.
1.560
Semitrailer ........................
1.U60
All other truck drivers ...........
1.330
H e l p e r s ....... ....................
Lumber:
Agreement A .................... .
1.380
1.380
Agreement B ........................
Helpers .......... .............. . 1.280
Sand and gravel .......... .............
1.510
1 .U00
Crushed s t o n e ..... .......... .
Euclids ........... .................
1.U50
1.500
Large t r u c k s .......................
Coal:
1.170
Agreement A ......................... .
1.180
Agreement B ..............................
Dry goods .M r t , ........................ ...
.
1.U20
Furniture .......... ...... .....t.........t...
1.370
H e l p e r s ..................... ............ .
1.300
General - Freights
Local cartage ............................
1.530
Pick-up and d e l i v e r y ...... .............. 1.580
H e l p e r s .................... ......T.ttt
1.510
Storage and t r a n s f e r ......... •••••...... 1.250
Transport
1.610

Hours
per
week

Uo
U8
U8
Uo
Uo

Uo
Uo
Uo

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

kk
uu

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
50

h
0

1.580
1.630

lO
i
10
*

1 .0 7 5

1.250

U
O
U0

1.628
1.728

D a y ..................................................................
Night ..............................................................
S p l i t - s h i f t ....................... . . . . ' ...............
Produce - F r u i t (d riv e rs and h elp ers)
Railway e x p r e s s ..............................................

10

1 .6 7 3

1.060
1.690

10
liO

UO
hO

Table C-54-52: M i l k j b e a l e * l
Ju ly x , xy?i
C la s s if ic a tio n

S b 'U a & M

<S4tfl J t e l p & M

U
O

Hours

p er
hour

C la s s if ic a tio n

Newspaper:

October l , . 1 9 5 l

37 1 /2
37 1 /2

TOT

Hours
per
week

Working foreman: garage;
m aintenance; r e fr ig e ra tio n ••••
Working foremen, a l l o th er
departments ••••....................... ..
Mechanics, auto and tru ck ;
m echanics, m aintenance;
p a in te rs , si& i; p a in te rs ,
sp ray ; r e f r ig e r a tio n ca b in e tmakers .....................................................
B lacksm iths; ca rp e n te rs; firem en;
maintenance h e lp e rs: mechanic
h e lp e rs ; o i l e r s ; p a s te u r is e rs ;
power-machine o p e ra to rs, p la n t
shop; tank tru ck d riv e rs ............
Hardening room men; load out men;
shipper-and-checker8; s o f t
cheese makers; s p e c ia l d e liv e ry
tru ck d riv e rs •••••••••••••••••
B o ttle f i l l e r s ; b o t t l e washersan d -feed ers; b u tte r c u t te r s ;
can f e e d e rs , can f i l l e r s ; can
washers (m achine); cheese maker
h e lp e rs; dumpsi-s-and-graders;
f r e e s e r o p e ra to rs; head
ch eckers; hcmogenisers; la b e l machine o p e ra to rs; milk
sta c k e rs ; mlz p ro ce ss o rs; pan
o p e ra to rs; p a s te u r is e r h e lp e rs;
pure-pak o p e ra to rs; re tu rn
checker sam plers; se p a ra to rs;
s e r v ic e men, garag e; s t e r i ­
l i z e r s ; syrup and f la v o r
co o k ers; t e s t e r s : t i r e
changers; watchmen; w eiehers
N ovelty baggers-and-packers
(ineluding ch e e se ); n o v elty
.................
w orkers, o th er •
Cleanup men - p ro cessin g equip­
ment, s a n ita tio n ; e le v a to r
o p e ra to rs; laundry-machine
o p e ra to rs; laun dry-p ress
o p e ra to rs; mold f i l l e r s ; p lan t
lab o r not elsewhere c l a s s i f i e d ;
p u sh ers-an d -p u llers; s la b cu t­
ting-m achine o p e ra to rs; s to c k roam c le r k s ; tru ck washers . . . .

bate per
bats per
hour hour F i r s * 30 days A fte r 30 days

$ 1 .3 5

I1 .U 5

1 .3 0

1.U0

1 .2 5

1 .3 5

1 .2 0

1 .3 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 5

1 .1 3

1 .2 3

1 .0 3

1 .1 3

1 .0 1

1 .1 1

D:
Table D-lt

Entrance Rates

Mdjumum { aUsu+
Z
moc Rated, job Plant W m A sM. 1/

Minimum rate (in cents)

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates in Manufacturing
Durable
Nondurable
All
goods
goods
Public Wholesale Retail
industries
Establishingj ts with n
utilities* trade trade Services
2/
21-250 251 or 21-250 251 or
workers more workers more
workers
workers

E:

Supplementary W age Practices
Sbitfetential Pa o m M o m A

Table E-li

Percent of plant workers employed
on each shift in All manuf LCturingr indiistries 1/
Machinery
All
Durable Nondurable industries
goods
goods
industries
r
2d 3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d o 2d 3d or
other
other
other
shift other shift shift shift shift shift shift
shift

Shift differential
All establishments .......
Under 50 ...............
50 .....................
Over 50 and under 55 ......
55 ....................
Over 55 and under 60 .......
6 0 ....................
Over 60 and under 65 ......
6 5 ....................
Over 65 and under 70 ......
75 ....................
Over 75 and under 80 ......
s o .:..................
Over 80 and under 85 ......
8 5 ....................
Over 85 and under 90 ......
90 ....................
Over 90 and under 95 ......
95 ....................
Over 95 and under 100 .....
100 ...................
Over 100 and under 105 ....
105...................
Over 105 and under 110 ....
n o ......... ..........
Over n o and under n 5 ....
Over n 5 and under 120 ....
120...................
Over 120 and under 125 ....
125...................
Over 125 and under 130 ....
Over 130 and under 135 ....
Over 135 and under 140 ....
Over 140 and under 145 ....
145 ...................
Over 145 and under 150 ....
Over 155 and under 160 ....
1 60...................
Over 160 and under 165 ....
165 and over............
Establishments with no
established minimum . .
* ...
Information not available . .
.

100.0
1.9
1.3
1.4
.5
.5
.8
1.5
.8
1.8
11.4
.7
2.7
5.1
1.9
4.7
2.7
4.1
1.7
3.1
4.1
5.3
1.5
3.6
2.8
2.0
4.2
.
3
3.9
2.9
4.8
.
1
1.4
10.2
.
2
.4
.5
.
3
.5
1.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

24.0
5.8
3.9
3.5
9.6
9.7
6.7
5.4
10.4
1.3
2.7
2.7
2.6
1.6
1.4
2.6
-

1.1
—
3.8
.9
7.6
3.9
9.4
16.7
1.1
10.1
10.5
1.5
-

26.9
1.4
17.7
5.5
3.4
16.3
10.1
2.4
10.3
2.2
3.8
-

2.9
1.9
24.5
22.6
10.8
.8
1.7
.7
3.4
1.2
11.9
-

20.9
17.6
15.4
12.0
2.3
6.3
1.8
11.2
2.2
1.6
6.2
1.0
-

2.8
4.5
7.8
1.8
3.1
3.1
8.8
7.6
8.4
9.1
4.3
9.2
11.1
_
2.6
3.1
1.6
4.7
2.7
3.7

26.8
11.3
3.5
7.0
14.0
12.7
4.9
-

-

-

-

-

-

28.3
_
5.1

1.5
-

-

-

8.8
7.0
12.8
5.7
9.5
7.4
9.3
2.8
15.5
5.7
13.6
1.9
-

3.2
-

-

2.4
5.7
3.5
6.0
-

_
-

.4
2.5
1.0
-

1.1

2.9

-

-

14.5

.
1

•

-

-

1.4

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Percent of workers
on extra shifts,
all establishments ...

Htl

4t?

45,1

4.1 13.0

5.4 20,9

6.8

Receiving shift
differential ......

L3.3

4.7 14.9

4.1 11.5

5.3 20.9

6.8

9.2
.4
5.0
3.8
-

1.9 10.7

5.1
.1

4.5

.2

.7
3.8
-

-

-

-

.4
-

.1
-

1 6 .4
-

6 .4
6 .4

Uniform cents
(per hour) .....
3 cents ......
4 cents......
5 cents ......
6 cents ......
7 cents ......
7.5 cents .....
10 cents ......
15 cents ......

9.9
.
2
3.9
3.9
.3

.6
.5
.5

Uniform percent­
age ..........
5 percent .....
10 percent ....

3.0

Other ..........

.3

.8

Receiving no
differential ......

3.5
(2/ )
-

.1
1.0
.1
2.3
-

-

-

.1

2.7
(2/) 3.9
1.4
.7
.2
1.3
1.0
.3
1.0
-

.5
_
4.3

3.1

1.2

5.7

.1

1 .2

-

-

5.7

2.2

.1
.2

(2/)

-

-

.5

.1

(2/)

.2

1.5

-

.4
-

.1

2.2

.3

.1 1 6 .4
-

-

1/ Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, Louisville, Ky., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-2:

PERCEN T

M

Weekly hours

A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

A ll establishm ents ....................................... ..
Under 35 hours ................................................
^5 hours .............................................................
Over 35 and under 37^ hours ... .................
37^ hours ..........................................................
Over y \ \ and under 1*0 hours ....................
U hours ............................................................
O
Over 1*0 and under 1 * hours ......................
*1
1 * hours ............................................................
*1
Over 1*1 and under 1*8 hours ......................
*
1*8 hours ............................................................
Over 1*8 and under 52 h o u r s ......................
52 hours and over .........................................

O F O F F IC E

W O RKERS

M

anufacturing

D u r a b le
goods

A ll

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
s a le
tr a d e

R e ta il
tra d e

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

0 .2
1**6
6 .6
13.5
6.2
60.9
2.9
2 .6
2.1*
.1
-

0.1
2.1
1 .6
8.3
2.2
83.2
.6
1.9

.
1 .9

_
5 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
_
0.1*
58.8
.6
31*.6
3.3
2.3
-

0.9

2.5
1*.9
90.1*
-

0.2
2.2
2.8
13.2
76.6
1.2
3 .6

~

“

■

1/

Includes data for i n dustries i n a d d i t i o n to those
L e s s t h a n .05 o f 1 p e r c e n t .
Transportation

**

Finance,

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

_

1.5
7.6
1 .8
67.3
12.7
8.2
-

-

■

“

100.0

100.0
1.3

ll*.7
26.6
11.2
ll*.0
33.3
.2
-

_

100.0

(3 /)
T
1 .2

51*. 8

8.7
.1
13.0
.5
-

■

2 .6
.3
68.2
l*.l
2.9
5 .0
8.7

■

lu5
13.1*

3.9
81.5
8.7
1*.6
-

3.7

3 .3

W O RKERS

EM PLO YED

IN

goods

.

1.9
3.9
80.3
1 .6

89.2
2.0

_

R e ta il
tra d e

100.0

100.0

Servioes

!

_

.
_

W h o le ­
s a le
tra d e

100.0

goods

100.0 i 100.0

100.0

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

N on­
d u r a b le

D u r a b le

A ll

100.0

.

_

- >
56.3
15.0

3 .9
8.3
70.5
1.1

-

-

-

-

2.5
2.7
l*.l*
2.7

3.7
3.1
2.0

1 .2
2.3
7.0
5.7

3.7
10.1*
11*. 6

.

.

_

.

_

_

63.2
7.8
15.1*
5 .3
8.3

-

1*2.6
2.1
9.2
2.8

"

-

1 .8
31*. 7
8.8
10.3
17.5
23 .6
3 .3

3 9 .3

l*.o

Data relate to wom e n workers.

*

.3

F in a n c e **

OF PLA N T

anufacturing

V

100.0

2/
3/

PERCENT

l/ EMPLOYED IN-

(excluding railroads),

insurance,

and real

shown separately.

communication,

and other public utilities.

estate.

P & id c J h d id a t fd .

T able E-3:

P E R C E N T OF O F F IC E W O R K ER S E M P L O Y E D

Number o f paid holidays

M

All

P E R C E N T - O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I& —

M

A
H
indus­
trie s

IN —

anufacturing

D u rab le
goods

Non­
durable
goods

P u b lic
utili­
tie s*

W hole­
sale
trad e

R etail
trad e

F in a n c e * *

S ervices

All
indus­
tries

anufacturing

All

D urable
goods

Pu b lic
utili­
tie s *

N on ­
durable
goods

y

W hole­
sale
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

Services

I
A ll estab lishm ents .................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

| 1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

| 1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishm ents providing paid holidays . .
1 d a y ........................................................................
1^ days .............. ....................................................
2 days .....................................................................
3 days .....................................................................
days ...................................................................
1* days ................................................................... ..

9 6 .7
.2
2.1*
.1
2.1*
.2
6 7 .1
5 .3
1 0 .0

9 6 .6
-

99.1*

9 9 .6
8 7 .5
1 2 .1
-

99.6

1 0 0 .0
_
_
_
.5
_
.1
95.1*
_
.3
3 .7

90.1*
_
_
-

9 0 .7
_
_
_

8 0 .1
.3
.6
.1*

8 5 .9
.1
_
.5

7 5 .2
.1

9 7 .7
_

7 1 .5

9 1 .6

7 5 .1
2 .0
3 .7

2 6 .6

1 .1

_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_

6 .3
_

3 .1
.6
.2
1 .8
.3
2 .6

9 7 .9
i*.6
2 .2
7 1 .9
ll*.9
1*.3
~

3 .3

2 .1

£ ....................................
5 days .....................................................................

days ...................................................................
6 days . . ................................................................
6£ d a y s ..................................................................
7 days .....................................................................
..............................................................................
8 days .....................................................................
8^ days ......... .. ........................................... ........
10 days ...................................................................
11 days ...................................................................
12 days ...................................................................
13 days ......................... .........................................
Establishm ents providing no paid
holidays .......................J .........................................

li

1/

2/

•1*

.7
«
1 .5
9 3 .0
1.1*
-

8 .9
3 .1
1*8.7
2 9.7
9 .0
-

3.1*

.6

.1*

communication,

a nd o ther public utilities,

-

_

-

-

I n c l u d e s data f o r i n d u s t r i e s i n a d d i t i o n t o those sho w n separately.
L e s s t h a n . 0$ o f 1 p e r c e n t .

*
T FRASER
Digitized for r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s ) ,
**
Finance, insura
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e .
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

_
1 .0
_
9 1 .2
7.1*
_
-

-

6 .6
«.
1 3 .9
2 7 .7
7 .7
2 .1
1*.3
2 .9
.9
9.1*
1 .6
1 3 .3

.1*

-

9 .6

_

3 .5
1*.6
2 .2
2.1*
3 .5
7lt.5
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

9 .3

.1*

1 .3
..
1*.2
6 5 .6
_
6 .1
_
1 .2
_
_
(2 /)

(I/>
1 9 .9

_
1 .6
_
5 .8
6 9 .3
8~1*
.2

_
_

_
_
_
_

1 .2
_

_
'2 .0
_

_

_

_

_

_

3 .0

-

_
_

_
_

_

1*.3

7 .5

6 8 .6
_
1 .0
_
_

7 0 .1

6 8 .8
_

8 1 .9
_

6 1 .7

1 8 .6

1 6 .6

2 .7
_
_

3.1*
_

.6

_
_

_
_

.1*

_
_
_

_

_

-

-

-

21*.8

2 .3

2 8 .5

7 .1

_

_

8.1*

..

_

-

..

-

l i * .l

_
_
_
_

_

-

21*. 9

73.1*

_

_

Occupational Wage Survey, Louisville, Ky., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B u reau of L a bor Statistics

P a id V & ocU iattl (fyokm cU P/UMMAio*tf)

Table E-A:

P E R C E N T OF PLA N T W O R K ER S E M P L O Y E D IN—

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E W O RK ERS EM PLO YED I N -

Vacation p o licy

A
ll
indus­
tries

M
anufacturing
Durable
goods

A
ll

N
on­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W
holesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Manufacturing

A
ll
indus­
tries
1/

Services

A
ll

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

W
hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

!

i
|
!
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0 !

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishm ents with paid v acatio n s ............

9 9 .6

9 9 .2

9 8 .9

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

99.1*

9 5 .9

9 7 .5

9 6 .2

9 9 .0

9 6 .5

9 1 .6

9 3 .7

81*.1*

Under 1 week .......................................................
1 w e e k ....................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............................
2 weeks ..................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................
3 weeks ..................................................................

.1
3 2 .7
.1*
66.1*

.3
1 3 .0
8 5 .6
-

_

..
.1
1 .8
9 8 .1
-

-

-

_
31i.O
6 5 .5
-

_

-

.1
2 3 .0
_
7 6 .1
-

_
29 .2
7 0 .2
-

.2
7 3 .9
2.1*
1 8 .7
.6
.1

.3
7 6 .2
3 .6
16.1*
1 .0
-

.5
9 1 .0
2 .0
2 .7
-

6 0 .3
5 .2
3 1 .5
2 .0
-

89.lt
7 .1
-

6 5 .3
2 6 .3
-

57.1*
3 6 .3
-

_
7 7 .6
5.1*
l.l*

Establishm ents with no paid v acatio n s . . .

.1*

.8

.6

l*.l

2 .5

3 .8

1 .0

3 .5

8.1*

6 .3

1 5 .6

A ll establishm ents ................................................

1 y e a r o f se rv ice

1 .1

8 0 .2
_
1 9 .8
-

.5

5 9 .6
1*0.1*
-

5 8 .7
1*1.3
-

-

-

_

_

_

_

2 y ears o f se rv ice
Establishm ents with paid v acations . . . . . .
1 w e e k ......................... ' . ........................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...........................
2 weeks ..................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................
3 weeks ..................................................................

9 9 .7

9 9 .3

9 9 .2

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

99.1*

9 6 .0

9 7 .5

9 6 .2

9 9 .0

9 6 .5

9 1 .6

9 3 .7

8 6 .5

1 5 .6
.1*
82. 1
*

1 1 .9
.1
8 7 .3

1 1 .9

1 1 .9
.3
8 7 .3 '

11*.0

3 8 .0

28.1*
2 .6
6 9 .0

.1

2 8 .3
.9
7 0.2

5 7 .2
5 .7
3 2 .3
.6
.2

6 2 .0
6 .9
2 7 .6
1 .0
-

8 5 .1
7.1*
3 .7

5 5 .5

-

3 6 .5
6 .3
51*. 22 .0
-

1*1.0
-

3 8 .7
6 .3
1*6.6
-

3 7 .2
3 .5
5 3 .0
-

7 1 .3
6 .0
6 .2
3 .0

l*.o

2 .5

3 .8

1 .0

3 .5

8.1*

6 .3

3 .5

-

8 7 .3

-

8 6 .0

-

6 2 .0

-

9 3 .3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .3

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 .6

-

.3

.7

.8

.5

Establishm ents with paid vacations ............

9 9 .7

9 9 .3

9 9 .2

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

99.1*

9 6 .3

9 8 .0

9 7 .0

9 9 .0

9 6 .5

9 1 .6

9 3 .7

8 6 .5

1 week ....................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...........................
2 weeks ..................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................
3 weeks ..................................................................

5 .3
.1*
9 2 .0
.6
1.1*

2 .3
.1
9 6 .9

•li.O
.3
9U. 9

.1*
9 9 .1

1 .6
98.1*

1 3 .9
. 8 6 .1

1 6 .0
2 .6
8 0 .1
1 .3

_
9 0 .5
2 .9
6 .6

lit. 7
.9
8 3 .8

1 1 .2
2 .5
7 9 .5
2 .0
1 .1

8.1*
2 .1
81*.1
3 .1
.3

1 1 .7
3 .9
8 0 .8

lt.lt
9 2 .1

.6

1*.7
8 7 .9
6.1*
-

2 2 .9
6 .3
62.1*
-

1 2 .6
3 .5
7 3 .0
It. 6

1*3.1*
6 .0
31*.1
_
3 .0

.6

3 .7

2 .0

3 .0

1 .0

3 .5

8.1*

6 .3

1 3 .5

99.1*

9 6 .3

9 8 .0

9 7 .0

9 9 .0

9 6 .5

9 1 .6

9 3 .7

8 6 .5

lt.l*

2 2 .9

-

-

21*. 8

13.1*

1 2 .6
6 3 .2
1 7 .9

1*3.3
3 6 .8
3.1*
3 .0

3 .5

8.1*

6 .3

1 3 .5

Establishm ents with no paid vacatio n s . . .

-

■

-

.6

-

-

5 y ears o f se rv ice

Establishm ents with no paid v acatio n s . . .

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.7

.3

-

-

.8

.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.

15 y ears o f se rv ice
Establishm ents w ith paid v acatio n s ............

9 9 .7

9 9 .3

9 9 .2

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 w e e k .............................. ......................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............................
2 weeks ..................................................................

2 .3
.1
6 9 .1

lt.o
.3
7U.9

.1*

1 .6

3 weeks ....................... ........................ .................

5 .3
.1
68.9
.6
21*. 8

2 7 .8

2 0 .0

3 6 .3

Establishm ents with no paid v acatio n s . . .

.3

.7

.8

.5

1/

Includes

-

data for industries i n addition to those

 * T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s ) ,
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e .
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

-

6 2 .8
-

-

-

1*8.1*
-

5 o .o

1 0 0 . o'

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 3 .9
7 7 .2

_
_
76.5
2.9
2 0 .6

ll*.7
_
5 8 .1
_
2 6 .6

1 0 .9
.9
6 1 .7
1 .6
2 1 .2

7 .9
1 .3
6 3 .1
2 .1
2 3 .6

1 0 .9
2 .6
5 9 .3

8 .9

1 6 .0
6 8 .8
_
1 5 .2

21*. 2

1*.7
6 6 .8
lt.lt
2 3 .1

~

■

■

.6

3 .7

2 .0

3 .0

1 .0

-

shown separately.

communication,

-

Occupational W a g e Survey, L ouisville,

and other public utilities.

U.S.
Bu r e a u of Labor Statistics

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Ky.,

-

6 7 .3

May 1952

-

5 5 .3

P a id StcJz Jl& aae (fyokm a l P t aaiddOH A)

Table E-5

P E R C E N T OF PLAN T W O RK ERS E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T OF O FFIC E W ORKERS EM PLO Y ED IN —

P r o v i s i o n s f o r p a id s i c k le a v e

MA U C U IN
N FA T R U

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

A
ll

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

y

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Servioea

1 0 0 .0

I

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

50. U

9 .U

1 1 .0

1 0 .3

2 8 .5

2 0 .2

2 7 .7

3 .7

2 .0

0 .6

3 .6

1 .0

1*.9

1 3 .6

1 .3
.6
1 5 .2
1 1 .6
1 .0
1 .1
“

.2
.2
.2
1 .3
-

.6
3 .0
-

1 .0
•
"

3 .9
1 .0

_

2 .8
1 .2
5.U

2 .2
2 5 .5
■

_

2U .3
2 2 .2
1 .8
2 .1
~

8 .9
U .7
-

•
-

7 6 .0

6 9 .2

U 9.6

9 0 .6

8 9 .0

8 9 .7

7 1 .5

7 9 .8

7 2 .3

9 6 .3

9 8 .0

9 9 . it

9 6 .lt

9 9 .0

9 5 .1

8 6 .U

2 8 .6

3 0 .8

50. U

9.U

5 9 .3

1 0 .3

2 8 .5

2 0 .2

2 7 .7

U .7

2 .0

.6

3 .6

1 3 .U

1*.9

1 3 .6

2 .2
-

•2
.2
.2
.5
1 .1
.5
.9
-

_

_

.3
.3
.8

.6
-

.6
1 .8
•
1 .2
-

12.1*
1 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ...............................................

2U .0

3 0 .8

3 d a y s .............................................................................
U d a y s ........................................................................ ..
5 days .............................................................................
6 d ay s .............................................................................
7 d a y s .............................................................................
1 0 days ................................................................... ..
12 d a y s ...........................................................................
lit d a y s ...........................................................................
2 1 d ay s ...........................................................................
U8 d ay s ...........................................................................

1 .1
.9
3 .5
.5
1 0 .8
6 .2
.U
.5
.1

-

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ...............................................

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts ......................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 y ear o f se rv ice

_

-

_
.2
1 0 .8
-

-

8 .1
1 .6
.6

_

_

-

1 .8
18. U
-

18. u
li.it
5 .7
-

1 .7
.1
-

-

_

..

.3
.3
1.1*
-

.6
-

-

(2/)

-

*

1 0 0 .0

2 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ...............................................

3 d ay s .............................................................................
U d a y s ..............................................................................
5 d a y s .............................................................................
6 d a y s ....................................... .....................................
7 d a y s ..............................................................................
1 0 d a y s .......................... ................................................
1 2 days ..........................................................................
1U d a y s ...........................................................................
1 5 d ay s ...........................................................................
2 0 d ay s ...........................................................................
2 1 d a y s ...........................................................................
U8 d ay s ............................... ...........................................

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no f o rm a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r paid s i c k leave ..........................................

See footnotes at
*

1 .1
.8
3 .1
5 .1
7 .1
6 .6
•U
2 .2
2 .1

_

_

_

_

-

1 2 .8
2 2 .1
1 .8
U .5
9 .2

-

-

.5
.6
9 .6
1 1 .6
1 .0
2 .3
U .8

.1

71. U

**

6 9 .2

U 9.6

■** F n a n c e , i n
Digitized for iFRASER s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l


estate.

communication,

-

lit. 7
lt.lt
•
3 .7

-

U 8.3
1 0 .8

-

-

-

“

.6

1 .9
1 .2
6 .3

9 0 .6

-

1*0.7

and other public utilities

m

-

1 .6
-

.2
-

end of table.

Transportation (excluding railroads),

8 .1

8 9 .7

-

1 .8
1 5 .7

-

2 5 .5
-

5 .7
-

2 .7
-

-

.7
•U
-

**

”

•

.6
-

(2 /)

7 1 .5

7 9 .8

7 2 .3

9 5 .3

-

-

99.1*

-

-

-

96.1*

8 6 .6

-

3 .5
-

-

5.U
U .7
-

•
•
-

1 .0

-

■

9 8 .0

3 .9
-

•

•

9 5 .1

86. U

1 0 0 .0

Occupational W age Survey, Louisville, Ky., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

P a id S ia k JL&upe (tyoAm al P a o u M om* ) - G o *U i*u**d

Table E-5

P E R C E N T OF PLA N T W O R K ER S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E W ORKERS EM P L O Y E D IN —

P r o v is io n s f o r p a id s i c k le a v e

Manufacturing

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

A
ll

Durable
goods •

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

y

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Sendees

1 0 0 .0

!
A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts .....................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

3 0 .0

3 0 .8

5 0 .it

9 .U

5 9 .3

1 0 .3

U 2.0

2 0 .2

2 7 .7

6 .1

2 .0

0 .6

3 .6

13. U

U .9

2 2 .8

.
1 2 .8
2 2 .1
1 .8
2 .1
-

.
-

_
1 .8
-

2 .2
2 5 .5
-

_

_

_

_

_

•2
•U
.5
1 .0
.5
.5

.3
.3
.8
-

.6
-

.6
1 .8
-

1 2 .U
1 .0

_
-

5 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ..............................................
3 days ............................................................................
U days ............................................................................
5 days ............................................................................
6 d a y s ............................................................................
7 d a y s ............................................................................
1 0 days ..........................................................................
12 d a y s ..........................................................................
Hi days .........................................................................
1 5 dv
..........................................................................
18 days ..........................................................................
20 days ..........................................................................
2 1 days ..........................................................................
25 days ....................................................................... ..
30 d a y s ..........................................................................
1*2 days ..........................................................................
U8 days ..........................................................................
50 d a y s ..................................................................

1 .7
3 .1
5 .1
6 .5
6 .3
.U
.6
.3
•2
.5
1 .1
1 .0
1 .6
.1
l .U

E s ta b lish m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ..............................................

7 0 .0

6 9 .2

U 9 .6

9 0 .6

3 0 .1

3 0 .8

5 0 .lt

9 .U

.1

•
.9
.6

.1
-

.9
.6
7 .8
1 1 .6
1 .0
1 .3
.5
1 .1
2 .3
3 .7

-

U .5
7 .1
-

1 .9
1 .2
2 .6
2 .8
.9
-

.
•2
U 8.3
1 0 .8
•
-

.
8 .1
1 .6
-

-

_

H i. 6
U.U
.7
-

3 .1
-

1 5 .7
-

.u
.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .0
-

U .7
9 .2

-

-

3 .5
2 .9
2 .5
-

2 .7

-

-

-

-

(2/)

-

-

-

179

.6

-

1 .2

7 2 .3

9 3 .9

9 8 .0

99. U

96. U

8 6 .6

9 5 .1

7 7 .2

2 7 .7

•6

3 .6

1 5 .1

U .9

2 2 .8

-

.
-

„
-

-

1 3 .5

U 0.7

8 9 .7

5 8 .0

7 9 .8

6 0 .5

1 0 .3

U 2 .0

2 0 .2

-

-

3 .9
-

-

5 .7
-

.6
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

•
-

-

1 0 0 .0

15 y ea rs o f s e rv ic e
Establishm ents with form al provision s
f o r paid s ic k leave ..........................................
3 d a y s .....................................................................
U d a y s ....................................................................
5 days .....................................................................
6 d a y s ................................................ . . ...............
7 d a y s .............. ......................................................
1 0 d a y s ..................................................................
12 days ..................................................................
1U d a y s ..................... .............................................
18 days ..................................................................
2 0 d a y s ...................................... .............................
21
25
35
U2

days

....................................................................................................

days ....................................................................................................
days ....................................................................................................
d a y s .......................................... .........................................................
Ii8 d a y s ...................................................................................................
50 days ...................................................................................................
6 0 days and over ......................................................................

Establishm ents with no formal p ro vision s
fo r paid s ic k leave

1 .7
3 .1
5 .2
6 .5
6 .3
•U

.3

-

7 .9
1 1 .5
1 .0
-

•

.
-

-

-

.2

-

-

U 9 .5

2 .6

-

-

2 .0

.

.

8 .1

-

•

1 .8

-

-

2 5 .5

.2
•U
.5
1 .2
.5
.5

-

-

-

-

1U. 6
U.U

.7
-

-

-

-

-

-

1 5 .7

.8

-

-

-

-

3 .1

-

-

.U

-

.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .6

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .7

.5

.5
.5
.6

1 .1

2 .1

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

5 .7

-

-

.7

3 .7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 .1

-

-

-

-

-

.6

l .i i

-

-

-

-

-

1 .6

3 .6

U .5

2 .8

6 9 .9

6 9 .2

U 9 .6

9 0 .6

. 1

-

.6

-

•2

1 .6

.3
.3

1 0 .8

-

3 9 .5

1/ Includes data fo r Industries In addition to those shown sep arately.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.

 * Transportation (excluding railroads),
**
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

6 .2

2 .2

_

1 .9
1 .2

-

1 2 .8
2 2 .1
1 .8

_

communication, and other public utilities.

-

1 3 .5

8 9 .7

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 8 .0

-

7 9 .8

-

7 2 .3

-

(2/)

1 .U
.u

9 3 .8

-

3 .9

•

-

-

2 .5

«*

-

-

-

•
-

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .8

-

llfl
1 .0

3 .5

2 .9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

U .7

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9 .2

-

-

1 .2

-

-

-

-

9 8 .0

9 9 .U

-

-

.6

-

.6

•

96.U

-

8U .9

1

. 0

9 5 .1

7 7 .2

-

1 0 0 .0

^1an^iocU€<U>iaH R o tu ti& i

Table E-6

P E R C E N T OF PLAN T W O RK ERS E M P L O Y E D IN

P E R C EN T OF O FF IC E W ORKERS EM PLO Y ED IN —

T^pe o f bonus

M
All
indus­
tries

M

anufacturing

Non­
durable

Durable
goods

All

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

goods

anufacturing

Durable

All

goods

V

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100*0

goods

1
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

Establishm ents with nonproduction
bonuses %/ ...............................................................

5 0 .0

5 3 .1

1*2.9

6 1 .3

Christm as or y e a r - e n d ...................................
P r o fit-s h a r in g ...................................................
O t h e r ........................................................................

1*2.7
6.U
1 .9

3 9 .9
1 1 .1
3 .1

35.9
5 .7
1 .3

1*1*. 2
1 7 .2
5 .0

Establishm ents with no nonproduction
b o n u s e s ............................ .........................................

5 0 .0

1*6.9

5 7 .1

35.7

A ll establishm ents .................................................

3/

V
*
**

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100*0

1 0 0 .0

9.1*

1*2.9

9.1*
-

1*2.9
-■
1 .6

7 3 .1

5 6 .6

1*3.8

3 9 .7

3 2 .7

3 2 .1

3 3 .3

2 6 .5

3 9 .3

7 9 .5

3 6 .5

5 9 .6
1 3 .5
-

5 6 .6
1 .8

1*1.0
2 .8
-

3 2 .8
U.9
3 .5

2 7 .0
5 .0
2 .8

3 0 .0
2 .1
-

2 3 .7
8 .3
5 .8

1 3 .2
1 3 .3

3 9 .3
1 .8

7 0 .3
9 .2
-

21*. 9
3 .6
8 .0

9 0 .6

5 7 .1

2 6 .9

1*3.1*

5 6 .2

6 0 .3

6 7 .3

6 7 .9

6 6 .7

7 3 .5

6 0 .7

2 0 .5

6 3 .5

-

Includes data f o r In d u strie s in add ition to those shown separately*
Unduplicated t o t a l .
T ran sp ortatio n (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s *
F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s ta te *

Table K-7s

O sU ddSU U V & e a n d P -C H A U M

P lo t U

P E R C E N T OF PLANT W O R K ER S E M P L O Y E D IN—

P E R C EN T OF O F F IC E W ORKERS E M PLO Y ED IN —

Type o f plan

M
All
indus­
tries

All

M

anufacturing

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

y

All

anufacturing

Durable

goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

goods

!

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts .......................................... ....

1 0 0.0

1 0 0 .0

100*0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 1 0 0 .0

1 1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishm ents with insurance o r
pension plans 2 / .................................................

8 8 .7

9 5 .5

9 3 .1

9 8 .1

9 1 .5

7 3 .0

7 8 .8

9 7 .2

51.1*

8U.1

8 9 .6

8 3 .0

9 6 .9

9 7 .1

6 8 .8

82 .2
69.U
61*. 1
*
51*. 1
*
-

8 7 .8
8 3 .5
8 6 .5

8 5 .2
8 1 .6
8 7 .9
71*.9
-

9 1 .3
63.1*
1U.6
8 1 .8
•

67.1*
6 5 .5
5 1 .8
5U. 6
-

6 6 .7
5 2 .5
52.1*
1*0.1
-

9 3 .5
6 7 .7
6 2 .3
7 1 .0
-

1*1.5
1 2 .1
3 5 .2
1 3 .3
-

71*. 0

8 0 .8
8 1 .3
1 .1

8 0 .3
7 3 .3
71*. 1
1 8 .6
-

8 1 .5
9 0 .2

-

90 .2
8 5 .1
8 5 .1
25.7
-

2 .3

9 5 .1
5 0 .3
3 8 .1
6U.3
-

5 9 .5
1*9.3
1*1.7
1*3.9
•

1**5

6 .9

1 .9

8*5

2 7 .0

2 1 .2

2 .8

1 * 8 .6

10. h

1 7 .0

3 .1

2 .9

3 1 .2

L ife i n s u r a n c e ...................................................
Health insurance ..............................................
H o sp ita lisatio n .................................................
R etirem ent pension ..........................................
Other .......................................................................
Establishm ents with no insurance or
pension plans ........................................................

V

y
*
*»

1 1 .3

1 * 9 .2

Includes data fo r in d u strie s in add ition to those shown separately*
Unduplicated t o ta l*
T ransp ortation (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s ,
Finance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s ta te *




6 8 .9
6 5 .8

1*1.7
.7
1 5 .9

7 8 .2
1 * 2 .2

8 2 .8
6 8 .1 *

71*. 1
*

1*1*. 8

5 6 .9

21*. 0
23.1*

1 * 8 .8
1 * 9 .0

2 7 .6

3 7 .8
•

1 2 .9

2 5 .6

5 5 .2

O ccupational Wage Survey, L o u is v ille , Ky., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

22

Appendix — Scope
With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin vr.s collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed* In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4.)* The covered industry groupings are s manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




id Method of Survey
a

of
certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work* Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, Including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i*e*, those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables* It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offioes
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

23

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN LOUISVILLE, KY. 1/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OP LABOR STATISTICS, MAY 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

NumberP of
e8tablls|aments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establ ishments
stud i e d ..............
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occuoations
were surveyed on an area basis
21
21
21
21
21

975
350
169
181
625

241
105
53
52
136

126,100
77,500
40,500
37,000
48,600

80,680
55,380
30,560
24,820
25,300

11,390
5,950
3,250
2,700
5,440

21
21
21
21
21

All divisions ...............................
Manufacturing ............................
Durable goods 2 / .... ...............
Nondurable goods ( J .................
Nonmanufacturing........................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ........................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate. •
Services 2 / .........................

75
133
241
75
101

23
23
38
26
26

10,200
8,000
17,700
5,600
7,100

7,530
3,620
7,640
2,980
3,530

1,320
1,120
760
1,920
320

21
21

27
30

11
10

14,739
2,243

12,960
989

1,772
600

Industries in which occuoations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Machinery i n d u s t r i e s ........................
Insurance carriers ..........................

2/

1/ Louisville Metropolitan Area (Jefferson County, Ky., and Clark and Floyd Counties, Ind.).
2/ Total establishment employment*
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
u Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
5/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organisations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.




Inc

2U

Assembler (machinery) ....... ............................ •
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery) •••••••.••...........
Bench hand (bakeries)..... ............. ♦
.............
Biller, m a c h i n e ......... ........... .................... ••
Bookbinder (printing)...........•....••.•••«•.............
Bookkeeper, h a n d ...... .......... ......... .......... •.....
Bookkeeping-machine operator
Bottler (malt liquors) ...............................
Brewer (malt liquors) ...............................
Bricklayer (building construction)..... *.................
Calculating-machine o p e r a t o r .......
Carpenter (building construction) .........................
Caxpenter, m a i n t e n a n c e................
Cleaner .........................
Clerk, a c counting..... ....... ............... .............
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ....................
Clerk, f i l e ................................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ..........................
Clerk, general ........................................... ..
Clerk, order ...............................................
Clerk, payroll ...•••...... ................................
Compositor, hand (printing)
...................... .
Crane operator, electric bridge
Draftsman ...................................................
Drill-press operator (machinery) ..........................
Duplicating-machine operator ..............................
Electrician (building construction) .......................
Electrician, m a i n t e n a n c e ..................................
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) .............
Electrotyper (printing).........
Engine-lathe operator (machinery)................
Engineer (malt l i q u o r s ) .... .............................
Engineer, stationary ...............................
Fireman, stationary boiler .................................
Grinding-machine operator (machinery)...........
Guard ........................
Helper (bakeries) ..........................................
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r .................................
Helper, trades, m a i n t e n a n c e ...............................
Inspector (machinery) ......................................
J a n i t o r ....................................................
Janitor (machinery) ........................................
Key-punch o p e r a t o r .........................................
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ...................
Laborer (building construction) ...........................
Machine operator (printing) .............................. .
Machine tender (printing) .................................
Machine-tcol operator, production (machinery).............
Machinist, maintenance .............
Machinist, production (machinery) .........................
Mailer (printing) ................................... ......
Maintenance man, general utility •••••••......
Maintenance man (malt liquors) ............................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ........................
Mechanic, m a i n t e n a n c e ......................................
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ......................

Mi l l w r i g
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ h t.............................................

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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Mixer (bakeries).... ............... ................
Molder (bakeries) ..................................
Motortruck driver.......................
Nurse, industrial (registered) ........................
Office boy ....................................
Office girl.................. ..... .......... ......
Oiler...........................
Operator (local transit) ..........................
Order filler.............................
Overman (bakeries) ..................................
Packer
.........••••••........................
Packer (bakeries) .......
Painter (building construction) .........
Painter, maintenance... ••••••••..... ................
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) •••••... *..................
Photoengraver (printing) ...... .......................
Pipe fitter, maintenance.............................
Plasterer (building construction) ......
Plumber (building construction) ................•••••••••
Plumber, maintenance .........
Porter ..... ............ ........ ...... .............
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ........ .........
Press assistant (printing) ..........................
Press feeder (printing) ..............................
Pressman (printing) ........................
Receiving clerk..........••••.... ................ .
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) .......
Sanitary man (milk dealers) ... ........... ...........
Secretary.....................
Section head (insurance carriers) .....................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ••••..................
Shipping clerk ••••••.............
Shipping-and-receiving clerk......
Stenographer ........................ ....... ........
Stenographer (insurance carriers) .....
Stereotyper (printing) ...................
Stock handler ............................
Stock handler (machinery) .......
Switchboard operator............
Switchboard operator-receptionist
.... »•••••••••

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Tabulating-m achine o p e r a t o r ................................. ............. ............. ........

3, 6

Tool-and-die maker ........ •••••......................
Tool-and-die maker (machinery)............
Transcribing-machine operator ..........
Truck driver ............... ................. ..... ..
Trucker, hand •••••••••.... ......................... .
Trucker, hand (machinery) ....... ......... ........... .
Trucker, power.................................
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery)..... ......... .
Typist •••• ...................................... . •
Typist (insurance carriers) ...........................
Underwriter (insurance carriers)
... .
Washer, bottle (milk dealers)..... ••••.... ...........
Washer, can (milk dealers) ............................
Watchman ..........
Welder, hand (machinery).... .................. .
Wrapper (bakeries) ...................

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THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
I n a d d i t i o n to this bulletin,

similar occupational wage

surveys

are n ow available from the Superin­

t e n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s , U . S . G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W a s h i n g t o n 2 5 , D. C.

fo r the f o l lowing communitiesi
BIB

BLS
Bulletin

___

City

Bulletin
Price

1045

N e w a r k - J e r s e y City, N e w J e r s e y
N e w Orleans, Louisiana

20 cents

1044
1085
1096
1056

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut

Pijsa

C & y

15 oents

Norfolk-Portsmouth, Virginia
O k l a h o m a City, O k l a h o m a
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado

1043

25
20
25
20

1041
1066

20 cents
2 0 oents

Portland, O regon
Providence, Rhode Island

Detroit,

1086

Buffalo,

New York

Cincinnati, Ohio
Cleveland, Ohio

Hartford,
Houston,

Pennsylvania

1082
1042
1071
1058

25
15
15
15
25
20

oents
oents
oents
cents
oents
oents

2 0 oents
2 0 oents
15 oents
2 0 oents

Texas

Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, M i s s o u r i
Los Angeles, California
Memphis, Tennessee
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota

25 oents
2 0 oents

Richmond, Virginia
Rochester, New York

2 0 cents

Sal t Lake City, U t a h

1069

15 cents

1075
1064

Connecticut

report

Pittsburgh,

1074
1088
1070
1060

1059
1084

Michigan

This

oents
cents
cents
cents

1081

20 cents
2 0 oents .

St* Louis, M i s s o u r i
San Francisoo-Oakland,

1095

25 oents

1094
1067

25 oents

1076

25 cents

1078

15 oents
2 0 cents
2 0 cents

1099
1068

was prepared i n the

California
Scranton,

15 oents
20 cents
25 oents
Bureau's

1087

Pennsylvania

1057
1077

Seattle, Washington
Worcester, Massachusetts
N o r t h Central Re g i o n a l Office*

Communications m a y be ad­

d r e s s e d to:
A d o l p h 0*

Berger, Regional Director

Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jac k s o n Boulevard
C h i c a g o 6,
The

services

Illinois

of the Bureau o f Labor Statistics'

statistics rel a t i n g to wages and industrial relations,
struction and housing,




regional offices

employment,

prices,

are available for consultation on
labor turn-over,

and work injuries.

T h e N o rth Central R e g i o n i ncludes the f o l l o w i n g States:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky

Nebraska
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Montana

North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin

productivity,

con­


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102