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Occupational W Suivey
age
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
May 1952

Bulletin No.

IIIO

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin • Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION .................... .

1

THE JACKSONVILLE METROPOLITAN AREA

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE .....

1

TABLES:

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations .....................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ......... .......
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ...............
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations .....

6
6

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis B-63
Insurance carriers .........................................

9

3

7

Union wage scales for selected occupations Building construction ...........
C-15
Bakeries ........................
C-205
P r i n t i n g .................. *.....
C-27
Local transit operating employees
C-41
Motortruck drivers and helpers ..
C-42

10
10
10
10
10

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers

11

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions
E-2
Scheduled weekly h o u r s .....
E-3
Paid holidays ...............
E-4
Paid vacations ..............
E-5
Paid sick leave .............
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses .......
E-7
Insurance and pension plans •

11
12
12
13

U
15
15

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ..........

16

I N D E X .....................................

18

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, l \ S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents

Introduction y
The Jacksonville area is 1 of 40 major labor markets
in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys •
Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis.
Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant;
(d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping.
In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Occupations characteristic of particular,
important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/
Earnings dAta for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices#
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials,
hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

Nonagricultural wage and salary workers in the Jack­
sonville Metropolitan Area totaled 106,150 during May 1952. 2/
Of this number, approximately 18,000 were engaged in manufac­
turing pursuits with manufacturers of transportation equipment
accounting for about 3,650 workers. Food and kindred products
plants employed another 2,750 persons and lumber and wood prod­
ucts companies had 1,650 on their payrolls, Chemical and print­
ing and publishing firms employed 1,350 and 1,200 workers, re­
spectively.
Among the major nonmanufacturing industry groups stud­
ied, retail trade establishments led in employment with almost
21,000 persons.
Approximately 14,600 workers were employed by
transportation (including railroads),
communication, and other
public utility establishments at the time of the survey.
Wholesale trade and service firms each employed about 11,000
persons, and finance, insurance, and real estate firms employed

6 ,000 .

Among the industries and establishment-size groups
studied by the Bureau, unionization was almost wholly confined
to the manufacturing and transportation,
communication, and
public utility groups. Approximately three-fourths of all public
utility plant and office employees were working under terms of
labor-management agreements,
and five-eighths of all manufac­
turing plant workers were in establishments having written agree­
ments with labor organizations.
There was considerably less
unionization in the wholesale trade and service groups and none
was reported in retail trade or finance establishments.

Occupational W age Structure
The Jacksonville Metropolitan A re a
The Jacksonville Metropolitan Area, entirely in Duval
County, had a total population of 302,711 persons in 1950. Of
these, approximately two-thirds resided within the city limits
of Jacksonville.
Jacksonville is the leading transportation, industrial,
and distribution center of the State. Pour major airlines, four
prominent railroad systems,
and a network of modern highways
connect the city with all parts of the Nation. Commercial har­
bor and shipbuilding activities are extensive, and both sea and
air naval facilities are an integral part of the areafs economy.

1/ Prepared in the Bureau* s regional office in Atlanta, Ga.,
by Louis B. Woytych under the direction of Harry H. Hall, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and
oentral direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau* s
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




Extensive general wage adjustments were made by Jack­
sonville establishments between January 1950,
the base period
for the Wage Stabilization Board’s 10-percent "catch-up” wage
increase formula, and the time of the survey. Few wage changes
were effected prior to the outbreak of hostilities in Korea,
but became more numerous thereafter.
About nine-tenths of the
manufacturing and public utility plant workers,
one-half of
wholesale trade nonoffice employees, and almost one-fifth of the
plant workers in services industries were granted wage increases
between July 1950 and May 1952.
Less than 2 percent of the
plant employees in other nonmanufacturing establishments received
general wage increases. Formal wage increases for office work­
ers also were extensive, with more than half of these employees
in all industries affected.
Increases were generally higher in
manufacturing firms,
commonly ranging from 8 to 18 cents an
hour, whereas a majority of increases among nonmanufacturing
establishments ranged from 5 to 12 cents.

2/ Labor Market Trends, July 1952, Florida State Employment
Service, Jacksonville, Florida.

Minimum entrance rates fbr inexperienced plant workers
were established by virtually all Jacksonville firms within the
scope of the survey* Although minimum entrance rates among all
industries ranged from 24 cents an hour to #1*41, few rates be­
low 75 cents were reported in manufacturing and wholesale trade
firms, and none in public utility companies; a large majority
of both retail trade and service employees,
however, were em­
ployed by companies with established hourly minima below 75
cents*

The scheduled workweek was 40 hours for approximately
three-fifths of the plant workers and more than half the women
office workers in all Jacksonville industries* The workweek for
public utility, wholesale trade, and retail trade groups was
generally longer than for other broad industry groups studied*
About a fourth of the public utility plant workers and more than
a fifth of the retail trade plant employees worked in excess of
48 hours, and more than two-fifths of the plant workers in serv­
ices industries .had a scheduled workweek of 48 hours*

Salaries of office workers were higher in nonmanufac­
turing industries than in manufacturing for a majority of com­
parable jobs studied*
In 8 of 15 office job classifications,
salaries of workers in nonmanufacturing establishments were
higher* This situation was reversed far plant occupations where,
in 12 of 15 comparable jobs, manufacturing plant workers re­
ceived higher rates than those in nonmanufacturing*

Virtually all Jacksonville office employees and al­
most two-thirds of the plant workers within scope of the survey
received one or more paid holidays a year* Among most industry
groups studied,
five holidays were most common whereas the
finance group granted more holidays than other industries, with
more than a fifth of the workers receiving 13 holidays a year*

More than a fourth, of the manufacturing plant workers
in the Jacksonville area were employed on extra shifts* Almost
half of the second-shift workers and more than a third of the
workers on third shifts were paid shift differentials, expressed
as cents-per-hour additions to day rates* Second-shift premiums
ranged from 5 to 10 cents an hour— with 8 cents the most frequent
amount paid*
Third-shift differentials also ranged from 5 to
10 cents an hour*




About a sixth of the plant workers in the manufac­
turing industries and in the transportation, communication, and
public utilities group were employed in establishments which
based their rates of first-level supervision on a fixed differ­
ential above rates earned by those supervised*
These differ­
entials took the form of a specified percentage, cents-per-hour,
of a daily salary addition to the earnings of the most highly
paid workers supervised*
Such supervisory pay practices were
negligible among establishments in other industry groups*

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

O f f ic e 0 cC 4 4 fu U iO 4 * l

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Jacksonville, Fla., b y industry division, M a y 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orken

x
x
X
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
S
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
X
$
W
eekly
W
eekly
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 Uo.oo U2.50 U5.00 U7.50 50.0 0 52.50 5 5 .0 0 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
_
_
_
•
(Standard) (Standard) nndm and
27.50 70,00 72,50 35.0 0 37.50 uo.oo U2.50 U5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 6 0 .0 0 62.50 65.0 0 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

$

M
an
-

-

2
2

.

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

B ille r s , —chine (b illin g — china) .............
Honaairufa c tu r in g ............................................

16
16

Bookkeepers, h an d ...............................................
Manufacturing ...................................................
HnMumiffnfaiH ng - - , - TT. . T__ ___M ft„ ,

1Q2L
33
7U
U3
15

la .o
U0.5
ia ,o
1(0*0
15 , o
i

g .g O
£1.00
£7.50
65.00
78.00

Hi

1(2.5

Bookkeeping-machine operators, c l —s B . . .

19

Uo.o

U7.00

.

_

Clarks, acco u n tin g ...............................................
Manufacturing..................................................
N
an—nufaeturlng
Finance a * .......................................... ..

206
22
ieu
12

1(0,0
Uo.o
UO.O
uo.o

55.5 0
5u.oo
55.5 0
5U.oo

«
•
-

_
•

Clerks, general .....................................................
Manufacturing ...................................... ............
N
on—n u factu rin g .............................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ..................................
Wholesale trade ........................................
R etail trade ..............................................

98
26
72
15
28
19

Uo.o
uo.o
uo.o
38.5
39.5
la .o

5 8 .5 0
55.oo
59.50
55.00
6U.50
57.50

Clerks, carder.........................................................
N
on—nuf—t u r i n g .............................................
Wholesale trade ........................................

lOj*
9U
91

Uo.o
Uo.5
U .5
0

51.50
5o.5 o
51.00

Clerks, payroll .....................................................
Manufacturing.................................. ..
N
on—nufa c tu rin g ...........................................
Wholesale trade ........................................

28
12
16
13

la .o
39.5
Ul.5
U2.0

52.00
52.50
52.00
U9.00

_
.

Office boors..............................................................
Manufacturing ...................................................
None—uf a c tu rin g ......... ...................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ..................................
Wholesale trade .........................................
Finance «* ..................................................

72
19
53
13
20
18

39.5
UO.O
39.0
39.0
39.5
39.0

37.00
37*50
37.00
Ui.oo
39.50
31.50

1
1

T voista. c la — B ...................................................
N
on—nufa c tu r in g ............. ...............................

11
11

Uo.o
uo.o

39.00
39.00

1M —m « « h 4 n .
11
#
#
N
o— imf a c to r in g ............... ..............
Wholesale t r a d e ........................................

5U
^ 0
28

Uo.o
U0.0
Uo.o

U3.50
UU.00
U5.50

B ille r s , — chine (bookkeeping —chine) . . .
N
on—nufacturing .............................................

33
33

Uo.o
Uo.o

Ui.oo
UI.OO

_

2
2
2

1

0
ft

8
8

X

_

•
«

_

_

11
7.
1
u
1
.
II

9
2
7
7

3

15

3
4%
z

- it
1
xo

71.50

R etail t r a d e .................................. ..
Bookkeeping-— till— operators. c l—s A . . .

1(1,0
W
u i.o - 38.50

6
6
U
U

-

5

2

5
£

%
ft
H'
ft
0

.
.
_
-

.
_
-

2
-

.
_
_

.
.
_

-

-

-

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6
6
6

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

2
2
_
.
_
-

_
.
_

5

2
1

3

1

3
3

1
.

c

2
_
2
1

m

_

21
7
1U
l

7
1
6
_
u
2

8
1
7
2

—f-

-

-

_
-

-

-

X

X

2

9

23
7
16
A

12
l
1
Li
(4
-L

6

7
2
5
2

22
6
16
1
7
8

0
7

0
ft

_

t

1

-

-

-

-

13
13
13

6
6
6

16
13
12

7
7
7

15
i5
15

_
_

8
2
6
6

k

1
1

1

u

1

26
ftO
*

12
u
0
0
■
"

8
1
7
1

8
6
2
2

aZ

u
u

6
1
5

U

“

3
1
2
1

8

-

-

16
U
12
7
2
1

6

2

7

5

2

O
z

6
u
2
2

9

£
O

9
"

11
•

13
•

1
1

2

9

2

13

11
u
7
2
2
1

1

7

11
2
0
7
n
ft

2
2
-

1

6

2

6

8
7
7

8
7
7

u

9
2
7

-

8
6
6
1
1

_
- .

U

1
1

-

1
3
1
3

_
1
1

n

13

1

2
„
1

-

13
1
12
13
12
12
1
1

7
•

1
_
1

_
-

2

-

“
“
1

_
_

2
-

"

1

-

1

-

-

-----

1
1

2

1
1

u
u

11
3
8
2
6

5

12
5
7
2
5

-

-

u
u

-

-

-

2
2

2
2

-

21
18
10

8
7

12
12
0

_
_

11
11
10

5

3
3

2
2

2
2

1
1

3
3

3

5
-

6

1

_

13

1

2
20
2
18
“

10
2
8

u
2
2

1

2
2

_

_

1

lk
3
11
5

.
.

.

—

“

_

W
o—n

5
5“

See f o o tn o te a t end o f t a h l e .
*
**

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

8
~ ~ 0“

2
2

2
2

“

Occupational Wag e Survey]

"

Jacksonville, Fla., M a y 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B u r e a u of Labor Statistics

Ojfoco Occupationl - Continued

Table A-ls

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Jacksonville, Fla., by Industry division, Nay 1952)

A
tbbao
b
8ex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

W
eekly
W
eekly
earnings i d 0
(Standard) (Standard) nodif
27*W

9
2 7 .5 0
30.00

NUMBER OF W
ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM WEEKLY EARNINGS O
E
F—
t
*
s
t
9
t
9
*
9
9
9
9
$
%
$
t
$
30.00 3 2 .5 0 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1*2 .5 0 *5.oo b7.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.00 ?r.5 o 60.0 0 6 2.50 6 5 .0 0 67.5 0 70 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.0 0
and
J 2 .J 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 1*0,00 * 2 .5 0 tfto o b7t?o 50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 57.50 60,99 62«50 6 5 .0 0 6lft5QL7 0.00 25.00 * 9 .9 0 *5 .0 0 j>o»QQ ever

Woann - Continued
127
13
u ii
29
31
20

UO.O
39.5
UO.O
UO.O
Ui.o
1*0.0

53-00
5U.50
53.00
58.50
U7.00
62.50

Bookkaoplnt-naohlns operators, class A . . .
Noonanufaoturing..................... ......................

id
17

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

inffnanhine operators, olass B . . .
Manufacturing ..................................................

218
12

1*0.5
39.5

11

90 K
J7.P
lih C

1*2.00
1*9.00
U1.50

.

.

-

-

.

10

b

10

k

8

-

50.00
50.00
50.50

Bookkeepers, hand............................................ ..
Manufacturing ............................................
Wholesale trade ........................................
R etail t r a d e ..............................................

.
-

-

.
-

-

-

-

-

6
1.

28
28
9

12
12
12

7**
39.0
£0 .0
39.0
39.0

50.50
1*8.00
50.50
53.50

Calculating-aachine operators
fothar than Comptometer tvpe) ....................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................

33
21

1*1.0
ia .5

38.00
36.00

Clerks, accounting ..............................................
Manufacturing..................................................
rig .............
M h f t T m trade
DaAe41 A
iaailm

B30
39
791
168
136
15U

UO.O
39.5
39.5
1*2.0
39.5

P Ji

j«5.50
U5.50
U5.50
1*8.00
39.00
1*0.50

Rlarlra. f j l * . cl O A ..................... ..............
ff#
Nomanufacturlng ....................... .................. ..

33
33
19

1*0.0
1*0.0
La a
i| eV
U /

1*5.50
l*5.5o
liA»Jv
* * dn
*>

fflarlra. M ia. nlaaa B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vonnazmfacturing ............................................
A
eaajlm

230
221
9*7
*7
ll|6

39.0
39.0
in d
tti-O
90 n
J7.U

3U.00
3U.00
to A
A
33.00

279
50
229
29
17

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
lift n
i*u.u
hi 5

1*8.00
UU.00
1*9.00
67.50
1*3.00
37.00

Clerics, o r d e r ................................................ ..
Manufacturing...................................................
Monmanufacturing ............................................

75
1$

1*0.50

60

1*2.5
UO.O
1*3.5

39.00

Clarksr pavroll .....................................................
HarmfgffanH ng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H
wn,,*|
TOfir^vr ^wg
......... ..

1GU
20
8U
09
44
1 9
A4

39.5
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
lift d
itu.p

U7.00
1*8.50
U7.00
1*6.50
laA«U
< UAU
| A

Clerks, c e n e r a l.....................................................
Manufacturing •••••................... .................. ..
Komanufacturing . . . . .
Wholesale trade ........................................

See footn o t e at end of table.
#* Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

m

ee

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m
m

2

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7
7

7
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1*
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bo

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2

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89
1*1
1*9
87 ” w "H r
1
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li
u
y
1*
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(ft
35
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6
2
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11
3b
3 r r
8
20

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35

11
l

9

u

2
2

2
6
1

-

-

b

21

6

12

32

6
2

12
3

32
22

10

6

___1 _

-

6

89
1
88
23
29
6
6

2
2

7
7
7

16

7

12
2
10

lflf
1*
1*0

18
b
lb

7

10

y

7
5
2

17
17

b

5

5

X

9

-

k

5
“

5

9

9
y

9
4
4

29
9
20
18

10
2
16
16

10
3

12
8
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15

n

26
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2b
b

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3

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___ 1 _

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93 ___ k _
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35

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15
2
13
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3
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2
13

3b

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5

___ 2 _ ___L _

2
1

1

18
17
2
3

12
12

u

9
y

5

73 _1Q5_ - 2 2 - S L - - S 3 6
2
10
l
1*
U8
95
95
52
71
10
22
22
lb
32
1
11
18
5
8
15
13
29

9
9
f

1
*

1 '

07

23
2
21
9

u
-

22 _ J 5 _ ... V L
2
3
12
22
33

g

17

5

-

lb
1
13
2

15

7

2
6
2 — 5“
£
0
4

36

38
y°
33
2
23

1*2
51* - J L .
1 10
56
1*2 i 56 ! 1* *
1
3
15
17 !
id
7
*?
17
1
2
9<
6
1

185
19
166
11b

ib
li*
10

net
CH
M

Manufacturing .......................
Moounufaeturiig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5
5

_ 4 _ ___ 2 J ___8 _ ___k _
8
2
5
2
3

“

Calculating-machine operators

20 _ i _
2
18
9

15
1,
u

lb
1*
10

<

8

1

33

10
10

6
1
5
b

16
1
15
5

6 ___6
b
2
6
b

2
2

_
-

5
5
5

.

1
1

-

_

_

-

7

!

7

-

.

•

•
-

i
___L J

7
3
b

5
5

l

-

_

_

1

_

2
•
2

_
_

.

"

-

.

Table A-l,

Office Occupation^ - Cont i nued

(Average straight-time weekly ho u r s and e a r nings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Jacksonville, Fla., b y In d u s t r y division, M a y 1952)

1/
*
**

H o urs r e f l e c t the workw e e k f o r which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these w e e k l y hours.
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, and other p u blic utilities.
Finance, insurance, a nd real estate.




Table a- 2 :

P^o^eUianot and ^ecJuucal Occupation*

(Average straight-time w eekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Jacksonville, Fla., b y industry division, May 1952)

M cU n to H O H C O G H ut P oW O k P l a n t O c C U p a tiO H *

Table A-3:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ f or m e n in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Jacksonville, Fla., b y industry division, M a y 1952)

O ccu p atio n and in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
worken

NUMBER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
t
s
t
•
t
•
s
l
l
•
$
«
1 .
t
s
>
$
s
•
»
t
s
t
Atw u i I
hourly 0 .7 5 0 .6 0 0 . 8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 . 2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 l .k o I .k 5 1.50 1 .5 5 1.6 0 1 . 7 0 1.8 0 1 . 9 0 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 . 1*0
earnings
and
undex
-2x i o
2 .3 0 2*H 2.50
.9 5 1 . 9 0 1 .0 5 JrrlO 1 .1 $ 1 * 2 0 . 1*21 1*21 1*21 1*11 1*11 1*51 1*51 1*51 1*31 lafifiL 1*21 2*51
.9 0
.6 5
,6 0

1
C a r p e n t e r s , m ain ten an ce .........................................................................
N oanaxxufacturing ...................................................................................
TV 4 m ,«+4 14+4 as 4t
..VI

52

20
32

16
79

1 .5 8
1 .5 1
1 .6 3
1 .8 0

2
-

-

-

_

-

-

"

■

“

1.0 2
1 .2 1
•8U

16

16
6
8
8

3
3
3

15
jj

k

7

11
7
«

k

193
96
97
37

1 .2 3

52

4 m mA4 li A 4 a e M

158

1 .2 6
1 .2 0
1.0 8

76
82
1k

1 .3 5
1 .3 8
1 .3 2
l.l t l

22

1 .3 9
•95

27 1

1 .5 9
1 .5 9

16
M ech an ics, m ain ten an ce ............................................................................
N onm anufacturing ...................................................................................
W h o lesale t r a d e ...................................... .......................................

16
12

6

~

~

3
3

2

"

-

3

1

123

6k

1 .7 3
1 .8 2
1 . 6k

50

6
6

3

_

l

2
2

1
1
1
9

3
3

“

2
2

"

2
2

”

_

6
6

21
21

15

25

8
1

8

6

19
li

7

7

5

-

~

10
2

6

*

8
8

•

”

3

_

7

7

2
2

7

13

5

3

2

2

_

_

10

3

3

10

3
7

2

5
10
8

3

18
18

8

2

3

-

-

8

2

3

-

8
It
It

-

6

17

3

-

-

11
2

25

8

9

3

6

9

k
“

k

2
8

2

3

2

1

k

_

k

1

.

a
m
-

9

5

-

8
31
23

8

“

~

k

2
2
2

x

-

“

3
-

3

-

over
_

-

-

3
2
2

li

16

3
-

“

3
3

-

2A 5
-

**

.

.

-

-

7
7

"

b

k

5

k

7

13

.

-

3

2

8

21

9
k
5
5

2
2

18

16
2
1

-

5

.

5

5

-

5

9
8

-

6

.

.

5

9

-

18

1

10

9
9

-

1

7
3

”

3

1

.

20
2

60

-

3
2
2

2
2

1

3

-

~

”

1
1

1
2

108

3

16

-

-

5
5

5

12

6

•

”

~

3

6

1

b

23

2

7

2

1

1.6 8

-

7
2

8

1
-

5

_

18

5
5
k
k

3

11
2

m

and

h

2
2
k

2
2

•
”

2
2

1 .7 6

13
T1
J*
M ech an ics, au to m o tiv e (m a in te n a n ce ) ...........................................

1

k
I4
.

1 .9 k
1 .7 5
A# fP

21
M aintenance men, g e n e r a l u t i l i t y ................................................ ..
M an u factu rin g .............................................................. ...........................
M om anufac tu r i n g ..................................................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * .......................................................................

-

3

x
-

•81
H e lp e r s , t r a d e s , m ain ten an ce ••••................ ..................................
iff _ ..a _ _ t _

1

8
5
-

x

1 .5 3
l.i i 9

o*

-

-

1 .9 6
9 .0 0
t# v 7

28
17

3
h

1

2

6?
°i

E n g in e e r s , s t a t i o n a r y ....................................................................

2

1

s „
2. 5o

3

2

2

2

k
k

5

18

1
1

-

b

2
1
1

2

1
1

10
10

3

5

1
k
k

-

3
31
X7
lk
13

6

11

8

6
6

11
11

8

2

_

_

.

_

3

5

3

3
3

18

.

16
2

-

k

.

5

5
-

‘
See f o o t n o t e s at e n d of table.

 r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding
*
T


Occupational Wage Survey,
railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Jacksonville, Fla., M a y 1 9 5 2
U.S.

DEPARTMENT OF LA B O R
Bure a u of L a b o r Statistics

M aintenance and Powak P lan t Occu pation* • Continued

Table A-3:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Jacksonville, Fla., by industry division, May 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

w in irH ghta ...................................... .. .............................................

Number
of
worker*

Average
hourly
•usings

13
13

1.11
1.11

61

~ JT ~
Sheet-m etal w orkers, maintenance
Nomanufa ct urlng .....................................................................
BM
k14a «$414$4aa M
.
...............

$
$
s
s
$
$
$
s
$
$
«
%
$
s
*
t
$
t
s
»
*
0.7$ 0.80 0.85 0 .9 0 0.95 1.00 1.05 1 .10 1.15 1 .20 1.25 1.30 U3$ L.U0 i.li$ 1 .50 1.55 1.60 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .10 2 .2 0 2.30 2.1i0 2.50
and
and
1 .0 0 1.05 1.10 U l£ _ 1 .20
U 20 1 ,8 0 1 ,9 0 2*90 2 ,10 2,20 2*30 2.1|0 2.50 over
k±2QL k d 5 _ U iS L L A L U&L
-a SS. .90

1.66
1.66

~ w ~

Occupation and industry d iv isio n

7U
70
60

1.86
1.88

k

9
9
12
12

$

3
3

1
1

2
2

1
1

2
2

h

k

m

1
1

5
5

*

”

•

8

1

1

8

10
10

1

“

•

“

6

1

20

6
6
6

6

__ 1_
1
6
6
6

i .n

1.89

7

k
k

20
20

.I d . __6_ I Q
16
6
10
3

3

3
3

3
3

11
10

15
15
1$

3
3
3

-

*

-

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for overtime and night work.
A l l wo r k e r s at $ 2 .60 to $2.70.

*

“'

6

2

1.91

y
y

h

T r a n s p o r ta ti o n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .

Table A i :
-i

Gu&toduU, WaneUoulinf, and Skipping Occupation*

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied o n an area
basis in Jacksonville, Fla., b y industry division, M a y 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

N ber
um
of

$
$
s
*
»
s
«
*
s
s
$
s
s
s
$
*
% »
$
s
$
$
s
t
s
Avenge
t
hourly Under 0.L0 0.1x5 0 .5 0 0 .5 5 0 .6 0 0.65 0 .7 0 0.75 0 .8 0 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .00 1 .05 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0
1.25 1 .3 0 l.ifO 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .80 1 .9 0 2.00
earning*
$
and
O
.I4O
♦U5 .50 .55 .6 0 .6$ .7 0 •75 .8 0 .85 .90 •95 1 .00 1.95 1 .1 0 1 4 5 1 .2 0 1*25 1*30
1 ,5 0 1 ,6 0 1 ,7 0 1 ,8 0 1 ,9 0 2 ,0 0 over
$
1.U9
2
6
2
2 2

Crane operators, e le c tr ic bridge (under 20 t o n s ) .........

Hi

ftnarrie ..................................................... ...........................................
Nomanufacturing ....................... .............................................

38
12

1.18
.91

Ja n ito rs, s o r te r s , and cleaners (men) ................................
Manufacturing............................. ............................ ................
Nomanufa c tu x in g .............................. .......................................
PnhUe n filitie ® * ................................
Wholesale t r a d e .................................................................
R etail trade ........................................................................
Finance * * ................... ........................................................
Services ............... ............................................................ ..

792
102
690
93
87
362

.78
•9U
.75
I.0 5
.8$

k7
101

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (woman) ..................... .

Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R etail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Services ................................................. ..............

306
23
50
2U
172

Pack-era fmenl ...................................... ........................................ .
Nomanufa c tu r in g .....................................................................

158 _
12U

W h o lesale t r a d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sk

-

-

-

8 12
8 12

22
22

121
121

16
16

29
.
29

12

.80
.76

_
109

_
13

2

10

12

3

.1*9

179 12
179 12

11
11

8

7

k

.6k

•77

•hi y 17
.6k

k

k

k

2

k

2
2

_ 4 _ ___k_

51
51
„
U2
9

2
2

80
80

Ill*
12
102

_
61*
12

k

66
12

U6
12

Sk

3k

6

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

81

2
k
Si

32
6
3
it
12

_12_
16
10
2
k
k
10

1
-

1
1

2 29
2

10

Ik
Ik

(T
23
23

10
10

23
18
18

15
1$
6

k3

28
17

ll*

2

2

3

6
6

1
19
1
it
9

1

-

-

10
9
23
7
£

2 _38

1.08
1.02
1.10
1.09
.93
.90

-

7
7

j/162

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




.
29

2
2

•31

CM

228
158

283

-

_
8 10

O
s
•

Order f i l l e r s ....................................................... ..........................
Manufacturing ............................................................................
Nomanufacturing ................... .................................................
Wholesale trade ..................................................................

-

-

36
13

3
3
19
12
7
x

53
6
xx

28
12
16
lit

15

2

hi

2
2
2

3
3

_

11
11
.
.

3

21
1

1
1
.

15

2

15

2

15
15

Q
7

6

_

_

_
_

2
_

_

_

_

.

_

_
_

_

2X
-

___3_ _ J 2 _
32
-

-

x

k

_
1
1

8

2
6
26
9

30
1*
26
23

10
U
6
6

21

55
12

16
12

2

21
16

k3

h

2
-

27
1

7
7
it

30
30
12

16
13
*

7
6
6

3
3

35
3
32
26

-

_
_

_

23
6
17
3

k
k
2

2

9

IX

it

it

2
2

9
9

11
11

k
k

k
h

_

_
-

-

_

Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville, Fla., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-4:

G&oiU
utdc,

Ct &iLUQOcUMtOA G*i4m
Hd Uff* CfkiH oUH4d
“

2j

(Average hourly earnings V for selected occupations
studied on an area
basis in Jacksonville, Fla., by industry division, May 1952)

.NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

N ber
um
of

225
6U
Manufacturing ............................................................................
Wholesale trade .................................................................
Shipping clerks .............................................................................
Manufacturing......................................................................... ..
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................................

Normanu fa ctu rin g .....................................................................

handler* and truck ers. h an d ............... ........................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................................................
fiet a i l t r a d e ............................................................. ..
Truck drivers, lig h t (under lk tons) ................. ................
Manufacturing ...........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................................
fietail trade .......................................................................
Services ».*•»»•»••••»•»»•»»»»•'»»•»••••»»••»••»•
Truck drivers, medium fl^ to and including lx tons) . . .
Nonmanufacturing................. .......................... ........................
R etail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, t r a ile r type) .........
Manufacturing...........................................................................

Manufacturing ............................................................................

TVimlrftrfl. nower ( oth^T* than fnrk»11 ftl
Watchman ........................................................................... ..
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................................
R etail trade .......................................................................
Services .................................................... ...........................

y
y
~y
y

*

•
>
t
Ararat*
hourly Under 5.1x0 5.1x5 5 .5 0 5.55 5 .6 0 5 .6 5 5 .7 0 5 .7 5 5 .8 0 5 .8 5 0.90 0 .9 5 1.00 1.05 1.10 1 .15 1.20 1 .25 i .3 0 1.40 1 .5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1 .9 0 *2.00
M iD $
m gi
and
0.1x0
•45 •50 •55 .60 .6 $ .70 •75 .80 .8 $ .90 •95 1.00 1.0$ 1.10 IrlS L £ 0 i i 2Sl 1*32. Uifi. 1*5 2 .1*62 1 *2 ^ 1*22. J..90 ?.oo OV§£_
$
0.87
.80

109
12
97
28
66

1.15
1.29
1.13
1 .0$
1.17

109
14
95
72
23

1 .3 1
1.44
1 .29
1.3b
1.16

138
126
62
51

1.U9
1.U8

952
273
679
U8l
177

.8 6
•89
.85
.87
•80

193
13
180
12U
27
28

.3 5 1 .13
•94
1.00
.7 8
.8 3

6
«
•
-

6

1

_

_

_

-

-

-

•

-

•

•

2
2

-

• . _

2

58
34

3

_

2

3

2

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

11

14

-

8

7

-

14

-

11

8

-

14

-

11

4

353
84
269
189
68

1

8

2

4

8

2

4

4
2
2

1

22 _12_ _16_
3
5
12
13
17
10
10
17
3
2

13?
12
120
94
26

3
3
_

6
6

-

8
8

-

6

•
»

6
6
4
2

24
24
6
16

17
14
12
2

56

8

?1

9

4

93
16
77
66
11

56
45
11

8

21
18

9
8

4
4

2
2

3
3

-

107 22 _56_ _5L_
8
28
88
37
28
14
19 14
26
6
12 13
8
1
1
7

.

.

-

.

7

8

42

18

28

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

8

18
8

-

-

-

-

-

4
3

8

28
17
5
6

16
14

-

42
29
8
5

21

4

21

4

21

4

89
63
26
1C

.9 9
1.00
.99
.7 /
1.02

9
6
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

•82

95
20
75
71
4

10

2

_

12
12
•

6

3

2

lx

2

-

3

2

lx

2

-

3

2

2
2

2

-

2

4

2

4

4

30
14
16
12

2
-

1

_ S _ _ 2 _ __2_ ^ o _
10
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

-

31
11
20
6
2

11 _23_
3

9
9

-■

_

_

35
29

19 _ 1_ ___2_
_
1
4
2
15
2
lix
1

_

-

“

—

—

• _lu _ ___3_
1
3
3
_

19
15
5
10

12
12
12

20
16
4
4

_

_

..
-

—
-

-

5 / 7'

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

36

9

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

36
36

9
8

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

:

_
-

_

_

“

__ 2_ _53_ __ Z_
•
5
7
48
2
48

”

_2S_
25

6
•
»
6
6

•

6
«
•
6
6

_

*

•
-

6
6

14 _ 1 2 . _ ia _ —L . _ S _ _ 1 _
8
10
8
1
1
4 10
4
4
2
8
5
1
1
3

15
15

-

-

6
2
4
4

«
>
.

10 ___5.

12

6

6

21

.

10
10

5
5

12
12

6
6

6
6

21
21

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

2
7
4
3
2

10
7

2 _22L
1
27
1
22
$

_

1

12
9

14
9
$
3

•

-

23

10
2
8

.
"

1

8

2

6 11
6 3

8
8
_

3

_Jk _ —12. _ J 6 _ _21_ _12_ __ fi_ _12_
7
8
12
6
18
61 29
12
15
45 34
8
12
30 20
41 12
20
1
4
3
4
15

1.00
1.00
.9 0
1.00
.82
.86
.87
.57

4

12
12

7

80
12
68
58
10

68
84
35
20
10

_

-

_

-

4

8

-

l.llx
1.07
1.16
I.2 3
•79

152

-

•

2

2

.

220
52
168
127
12

52

_

.

36

4

_
5 ___8_ _ J x _ 2 1 - _ z _ _16_ _ Z _ __ 2—- L - — 2_ _11_ _ B_ — L . ___3_
1
2
1
3
5
11
2
8
20
16
2
1
$
8
2
2
2.
4
7
10
5
13
2
6
11
1
5
8
2
2
2
2
2
7
4
7

-

.9 6
1 .0 1
.95

61

*
»

30 12
2

12

kill
83
358
254
76

•99

-

26
10

.

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Workers were distributed as follows: 14 at $.25 to $.30} 3 at $.35 to $.40.
Workers were distributed as follows: 116 at $.25 to $.30} 45 at $.30 to $.35} 1 at $.35 to $.40.
All workers at $2.10 to $2.20.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




46
18

_

_

•
10
8
2
2

2

1 _1S_
15

•

•

*

•

m
e

•

1

1
-

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Tabic B-63:

9 H&44toG4tC<& G & W lieS U * 1 /

NUMBER OP WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage 2/
N u m b er

Occupation and i

of

$
W e e k ly
h ou rs
( S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
( S ta n d a r d )

38.0

37.5

32.00

55
56

39.5
39.0
.39.0
38.0

1*1.50
38.00
32.50
31*.50
U3.5o
6 o. 5 o
1*2 .0 0
3U.50

$

$

$

$

a nd
under
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1 0 . 0 0
*

$

$

Section beads .

20

Assemblers ..................................
Clerkst
Accounting ............................
Correspondence, cla ss B •
F i l s , class B ......................
Key-punch operators ...............
Premium acceptors ....................
Section heads ............................
Tabulating-machine operators
Typists, class B ......................

116
39
15
23
13
95

37.5
39.0
38.0
39.0

$

$

$

$

s

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$
and

1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55tOQ 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 IfiiOQ 75.00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 90.00 95.00

$
71.50

15

$

$

2 5 .0 0 27.50 3 0 .0 0 32.50 35.00 37.50 1 0 . 0 0 1*2.50 l 5 .oo 1*7.50 5 0 .0 0 52.50 5 5 .0 0 57.50 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 95.00
*
*

1

1

-

3

2

1
*

9

9

1

2

-

10

9

3

51*

12
2
-

32
9

26

1
-

1
2
21

1*6

1

2
2

6

_

5

3

-

2
.6

2
-

1
1
2

_
-

1

2

1*

3

3

1

1

-

2

_

_

_

_

_

1

.
.

2

5

i -

1

over

13

9

_
11*
1
1*
2
.
_

17
19

1

7

_

1

3

5

2

_

1

7

.

3

.

2

.

.
.
-

2

15

1

X / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workera in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual (191*9 edition) prepared by the
Bureau of the Budget.
£ / Hours r e f le c t the workweek f o r which employees receive their regular straight-tim e sa la rie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville, F l a ., M 1952
ay
U.S. D R M T O LA O
EPA T EN F B R
Bureau of Labor S ta tistic s

201517 0 —52----- 2




C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-tim e hours per week agreed upon through co llectiv e bargaining between
employers and trade-unions.
Rates and hours are those in e ffe c t on dates indicated. Comprehensive listin g s
of union scales for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing fo r July 1 .
1951 are available on request. Similar information fo r these industries w ill be published fo r July 1 , 1952*}

Table c-15* B u i l d i n g

July 1 , 1951
Rate
per
hour

C lassification

A ric k la y a rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C a rp a n te ra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12.700
2.150
2.620
P a i n t e r s ....................................................................................
1.91*0
Plasterers
2.1*75
Plumbers ................... ..................................................... 2.750
.900
Building laborers .............................................. ....
E lectrician s

Table c -2 0 5 :

Hours
per
week
h0
hO
hO
ho

1*0
U0
1*0

BaJzesU&i

July 1, 1951
Classification

Rate
per

hour
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Overmen, mixers..................... 11.330
Benchmen, wrapping-machine operators .. 1.280
Moldera ............... .
1.230
Second class benchmen......... .....
1.180
Panners, molders' helpers ...........
1.000
Bakers' helpers:

F ir s t
After

3
3

months ..........................................

months.................. .
Doughnut packers, cake cutters,
packagers, wrappers, catchers ......
Agreement B:
Bread:
Mixers...........................
Overmen..........................
Wrapping-machine operators ........
M o l d e m e n ........................
Wrapping-machine helpers ..........
Helpers ..........................
Cake:
Mixers ...........................
Overmen..........................
Wrapping-machine operators........
Wrappers, icers, and helpers ......
Shipping:
Packers, helpers .................
Agreement C:
Bread:
Mixers ...........................
Head overmen.....................
Mixers' helpers, bread panners ....
Wrapping-machine helpers .........
Bakery helpers:
First 6 weeks .................
After 6 weeks .... .............




Table C-27: P /U u td H ^ - C o n t in u e d

Table c - 205: B a k & U e d - C o n t in u e d

C o n A t b u c t io n

July 1 , 1952

Hours
per
week

lO
i
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

.900
1.000

1*0
1*0

1.000

1*0

1.310
1.260
1.190
1.120
1.090
.950

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

1.310
1.260
.950

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

.950

1*0

1.200
1.150
.950
.900

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

.750

1*0
1*0

1 .0 5 0

.820

C lassification

July 1 , 1951
Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement C: - Continued
Cake:
Cake mixers, head overmen........... .
$ 1 ,0 0 0
Wrapping-machine operators ...........
.900
.860
Overmen........................................ ................
Wrappers, i c e r s , and helpers:
F ir s t 6 weeks ......................................
.750
.820
After 6 weeks ............ .
Shipping*
.8 6 0
Shipping h e lp e rs ......................................
Agreement D:
Bread:
Mixers ........................................................... 1.310
Oven operators .......................................... 1 .2 1 0
Divider operators .................................... 1 .1 6 0
Wrapping-machine o p e ra to rs ................. 1 .1 0 0
Mixers' helpers, icing mixers ........... 1.000
.8 6 0
Bread helpers ............................................
Cake*
Mixers ........................................................... 1 .2 0 0
Oven operators .......................................... 1.160
U tility men............... ................................. 1 .1 0 0
Depositor o p e ra to rs................................ 1 .0 5 0
Wrapping-machine operators .................
.950
.860
Icers and wrappers, helpers ...............
Shipping:
Shipping clerk s, checkers ................... 1.000
Helpers:
.770
F i r s t 1 w eeks......................................
*
.810
Second 1 w eeks....................................
*
.860
After 8 weeks ......................................

Hours
per
week

1*0
1*0
1*0

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

Rate
per
hour

C lassification

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand; machine operators)
machine tenders (m achinists); photo­
engravers; pressmen, web presses;
stereotypers:
Day work ........... .................................................. $2.1*90
Night w ork.......................................................... 2.590
Mailers:
Day w ork............................................................. 1.900
Night work ......................................................... 1.900
Pressmen-in-charge x
Day work .............................................................. 2.615
Night work .......................................................... 2.715

Hours
per
week

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

1*0
1*0

1*0
1*0

1*0

Table 0-1*1:; j£ o C o l

Qfienatinip CntfUoifeel
October 1 , 1951

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

C lassification

Rate
per
hour

Busses:
F ir s t 6 months ....................................................... $1,180
7 - 1 2 m onths.......................................................... 1.230
After 1 y e a r ........................................................... 1.280

Hours
per
week
1*8
1*8
1*8

1*0

1*0

Table C-l*2: M

/o t o * b u ic k

3 b lia * 4 d

mud JtelffU
July 1 , 1951
Table C-27: p /U u tU U f

Classification

July 1, 1951
C lassification

Rate
per
hour

Book and job:
Bindery women......................................................... $0,900
Bookbinders ............................................................. 2.000
Compositors, han d....................... ........................ 1.875
Machine o p e ra to rs............................................ .... 1.875
Machine tenders (machinists) .......................... 1.875
Photoengravers ....................................................... 2.300
Press assistan ts and feeders .......................... 1.1*50
Pressmen, cy lin d e r.............................................. 1.650
Pressmen, platen ................................................ .. 1.650
Stereotypers ........................................................... 2.590

Hours
per
week

hO
hO

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

hO

1*0

Rate
per
hour

Beer - Transport .......................... $1,130
Helpers .......................... .....
.655
Building - Construction:
Dump - Over l£ t o n s ...... ..............
1.250
Dump - Regular truck, l£ tons
and under .......... .......... .......
1.000
Concrete - Mixer truck:
3 cu. yds. and under ................. 1.100
Over 3 cu. yds................... ....
1.350
General - Freigvb*
Local pick-up and delivery.............
1.000
Helpers ......................
.850
Railway express:
Local pick-up and delivery.............. 1.780
Air express ............................
1.81*0

Hours
per
week

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville, Fla., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

D:
Table D -l:

Entrance Rates

M m U M U U K Z jitb O H & e. H aU s4 . J o *

P la * U

W ok& S S U 1 /

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates in -

Minimum rate (in cents)

All
industries
y

All establishments ...........

100,0

25 or under ..................

4.o
1.4
.5
.4
2.1
1.2
1.1
1.6
4.0
.6
2.3
o
4.5
.5
3.0
1.0
24.9
7.4
• 3.0
4.7
l.l
7.4
1.2
5.6
1.0
1.7
6.1
1.2

30 ...........................
Over 30 and under 35 ..........
35 ...........................
Over 35 and under 4 0 .........
4 0 ...........................
Over 40 and under 45 .........
45 ...........................
Over U5 and under 50 ..........
5 0 ...........................
Over 55 and under 60 .........
60 ...........................
Over 60 and under 65 .........
65 ....................... .
7 0 ............ >.............
Over 70 and under 75 ..........
75 ...........................
Over 75 and under 80 .....................

80 ...........................................................

Over 80 and under 8 5 ......
85 ...........................
Over 85 and under 90 .........
9 0 .........................
Over 90 and under 95 .........
95 ........ ...................
Over 95 and under 100 ........
1 0 0 ..........................
Over 100 and under 105 .......
Over 105 and under 1 1 0 ........
Over 110 and under 115 ........
115 ..........................
Over 115 and under 120 ........
120 and o v e r .............. .
Establishments with no
established minimum .........
Information not available .....

1/
2/
3/
*

.3

Manufacturing establishments
with 501 or
21-100
101-500
more
workers
workers
workers
100.0

.100.0

_

-

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

■

-

100.0

Supplementary Wage Practices

100.0

25.2

-

-

-

2biftf4*4tticU

14.3
4.9

1.4
5.8
4.3
2.4
5.3
6.8

4.3

Shift differential

20.2
6.0

5a
5.3

2d
shift

3.6

1 1 .6

Pa&v UUmU

Percent of plant
workers employed
on each shift in
all manufacturing
industries

4~5

6.7

3d or
other
shift

5.8
i .h

“

*
*

-

3.6
48.4
-

30.5
7.2

5.0

_
44.1

10.2
7.5
14.2

34.6

_

27.8
2.9

52.5
3.8
9.2
3.2
2.7

11.5
_

_
11.3
2.9

1 1 .0
O 7
y# (
17.2

_

-

7.6
2.0
16.4
4.3

2.5
4.0

18.9
-

11.7

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ......

21.5

7.3

Receiving shift differential ___

10.5

2.7

Uniform cents foer hour) .
5 cents ........
8 cents ........
10 cents ........

10.5

2.7
2.i

Receiving no differential .....

1 .4
6.8
2.3

.3

11.0

4.6

.2

_

-

4l5

-

~

“

1.7

.6

43.3

"

.7

_

19.0

1.9

lf . 3
12 6

Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville, Fla., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1*0

1.3
-

-

.2

-

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Services

T ab le E - i i

-

.2
1.8
2.0

(2/)

trade

5.2

-

-

Retail

Es

_

-

100.0

Public
utilities*

-

Table E -2 :

ScJt&dnl&d Tifj+eJUif attouM

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS

Weekly hours

All
industries

All establishm ents............................................
Under 35 hours .....................................................
35 h o u rs .......................................................... .. • •
Over 35 and under 37$ h o u rs...........................
Over 37$ end under U0 h o u rs ...................................
1*0 hours .................................................................
Over 1*0 and under 11 h o u rs ..................... ......
**
11 h o u rs.................................................................
**
Over U and under 1*8 hours ............................
U
1*8 h o u rs....................... '........................................
Over 1*8 and under 50 hours ............................
50 hours .................................................................
Over 50 hours .......................................................

100.0

Public
utilities*

100.0

100.0

100.0

2.6
7 .6
1.7
1.9
78.1
3 .3
U.8
“

_
61.6
.5
35.7
•
>
•
2.2
"

Manufacturing

_
3.1*
.6
21.0
6 .9
52.6
lul*
3 .6
1*.2
3 .1
•2.

y

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

100.0

_
-

Finanoe**

Sendees

All
.
industriesy

100.0

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Sendees

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

0 .2

m
-

.
6 .0

• 100.0

100.0

•
8 .9
17.6
1 2.5
61.0
<
•
“

•
1 .8

0 .6

-

-

(y )

•
•
-

-

-

15.5
6 .5
57.5
.7
7 .0
12.0
.8
, ”

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

EMPLOYED IN—

•

10. l*
-

33.7
2U.8
8 .0
7 .6
15.5
“

8.2
17.1
1*8.5
•
9 .1
10.0
1.2
U.l

op

58.8
6 .5
U*6
6 .2
13.0
1 .1
2.8
6.1*

•

91.0
1 .6
l*.o

3.1*
-

«•

56.7
6 .9
1 3 .1
•
23.3

•2

-

m
m

-

•
-

2 8 .6
17.1*
5 .0
5 .6
21.2
3 .8
9 .5
8 .9

11*. 5
8 .3
7 .0
17.2
1*0.6
•
6.1*

76.1*
2.2
9 .0
8 .5
3 .5

-

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .0 5 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railro ad s), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l estate.

Table E-3*

P fr id J h liA c U fl

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number of paid holidays

All
industries

All establishm ents............................................
Establishments providing paid holidays

..

Manufacturing

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.7

77.2

93.7

99.1

100.0

100.0

97.9

6U.6

_

_

_

.

_

_

.

1 d a y .................................................................
2 days ...............................................................
3 days ...............................................................
1 d a y s ......................................................................................
*
1 $ d a y s ..........................................................................
*
5 d a y s ....................................................... ..
6 d a y s ...............................................................
7 days ...............................................................
8$ days ...................................................................................
9 d a y s ......................................................................................
13 d a y s ...................................................................................

2.6
.2
1*0.3
31.8
9.8
2.7
1.2
7.5

Establishments providing no paid
holidays ...................................................................................

3.3

y
*
**

.5
.1

1.1
1.7
2.1
3* 2
1.
38.1
-

Retail trade

Finanoe**

Sendees

All
,
industries 1 / Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Sendees

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

11.
**6

6, 0
7.

80.9

85.9

1*1.5

.

.

2.6
7.2

8.3

-

-

_

-

-

1.3

-

5.6

8.0

-

-

-

-

2.7

3.3

3.3

-

-

-

-

.8
3.1
.8
3.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.3
7U 6
2.3

25.8
50.1
17.1

91.8
3.6
-

7* 7
1.
1* 3
1.
-

33.7
20.7
2.1

10.2
3.*
21
-

17.3
27.2
15.1*

33.8
35.8
21
.*

70.3
2.5
-

21.7
5.1
-

-

-

-

-

.3

-

-

-

1.6

-

-

39.3
13.5
16.3
8.2

.6
11
.*
-

-

6.9

2.3
5.0

3.3

6.1*

-

2.5

31
.*

-

-

“

■

-

22.7

-

■

“

“

■

~

*

22.8

6.3

.9

-

-

2.1

3 .1*
5

55.1*

33.0

19.1

1* 1
1.

58.5

-

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railro a d s ), communication, and other public u ti l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e sta te .




PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Public
utilities*

.2

Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville, Fla., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-U*

P a id V & o a tu m l ( t y o im a l P A o v U ia n d )

PERCENT OF O FFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Vacation policy

All
industries

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments with paid vacations ...........

9 9 .5

9 8 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .3

1 w eek.............................. ................................
2 weeks .............................................................
3 weeks .............................................................

37 .lt
6 1 .0
1 .1

2 8 .6
6 2 .5
7 .6

6 3 .8
3 3 .7
2 .5

2 6 .0
7 1 .3

7 9 .0
• 1 .0
2

1 8 .1
8 1 .9

3 5 .0
6 0 .3

Establishments with no paid vacations . . .

.5

1 .3

Establishments with paid v a ca tio n s...........

9 9 .5

9 8 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 week ................................ ............................ ..
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks...............
2 weeks .............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks.........................
3 weeks .............................................................

8 .9
.1
8 7 .9
1 .5
1 .1

1 U. 7
1 .3
7 5 .1

5 .6

1 2 .0

1 8 .9

9 1 .9

8 7 .3

8 1 .1

7 .6

2 .5

Establishments with no paid vacations . . .

.5

1 .3

-

Establishments with paid vacations ...•••

9 9 .5

9 8 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 week ........... ...................................................
2 w eeks.......................... ...................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks.........................
3 weeks .............................................................

U .l
8 7 .9
lt.9
2 .6

7 .U
8 3 .7
7 .6

2 .2
9 5 .3

3 .7
9 2 .3

9 .0
9 1 .0

Establishments with no paid vacations . . .

.5

9 9 .5

9 8 .7

1 0 0 .0

7.U

Over 3 weeks ...................................................

2 1 .3
3 6 .0
2 .7
3 8 .0
1 .5

2 .2
2 0 .0

Establishments with no paid vacations . . .

.5

A ll estab lishm ents............................................

Retail trade

Finance**

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Servicee

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 2 .U

85 .U

1 0 0 .0

8 6 .0

8 8 .0

29.U

6 3 .1
1 9 .3

7 8 .1
7 .3

5 8 .8
2 7 .2

6 1 .6
26 . U

23.3
6 .1

-

6 0 .9
3 8 .9
.2

-

-

1 U.6

-

lU .o

1 2 .0

70.6

29. U

Ail
industries

Services

1

. Manufacturing

1/

1 0 0 .0

1 year of service

-

-

-

-

(2 /)

U.7

1 7 .6

9 5 .3

82 .U

85 . U

10 0 .0

8 6 .0

8 8 .0

2 2 .3

ltU.9

39 .U

3 2 .2

18.0

.7
3 6 .8

7 0 .1
2 .0
1 3 .3

3U. 1

U6 .7

.7

5 5 .8

ll.U

2 years of service

-

-

-

-

-

•
-

-

1 0 0 .0

.

-

-

1 0 0 .0

•
-

2 6 .3

-

-

(/
2 )

•
-

-

6 5 .7

-

U6 .6
-

-

“

.2

-

-

1 U.0

1 2 .0

70.6

U.7

1 7 .6

1 U. 6

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .7

8U.3

85 . U

1 0 0 .0

8 6 .0

8 8 .0

1*9.1

2 7 .6
5 7 .8

1 1 .6
8 8 .2

1 9 .3
5 8 .3

1 8 .8
6 9 .2

28.6

87 .U
8 .2

2 1 .9
6 1 .1

-

1 8 .1
5 2 .3
2 6 .3

-

U.U

-

1 .3

-

3 .3

1 5 .7

-

.7

5 years of service

•

-

2 .5

3 .3

1 .3

-

.7

'-

-

1U.6

-

.2

-

8 .U

-

20. S

-

1 U.0

1 2 .0

50.9

15 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations . . . . . .
1 week ................. .............................................
2 webks................................ ............................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks.........................
3 w eeks................................. .........................

f

**

7 8 .3

-

-

9 9 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .7

8 U.3

85 . U

1 0 0 .0

8 6 .0

8 8 .0

U9.1

3 .7

9 .0
8 1 .7

5 2 .0

1 8 .1
5 2 .3

2 1 .9
U0 .9

2 7 .6
2 9 .3

1 1 .6
U6 .9

19.3

3 9 .2

1 8 .8
5 9 .3

20.5

2 7 .5

9 .9

1U.0

1 2 .0

U8 .0
-

1 3 .0

7 7 .8

U7 .6

-

9 .3

8 .2
3 9 .8

-

-

-

-

1 .3

.7

Includes data for induetr ie s in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .0 $ of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding ra ilro ad s), communication, and other public u ti l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance and r e e l estate.




-

•

-

-

-

-

2 1 .5

2 8 .5

2 6 .3

-

-

3 .1

1 5 .7

lit . 6

-

ltl. 5

-

-

-

28.6

50.9

Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville, Fla., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-5*

P a id S ic J i Jlj^aae (tyotm al fl*oui440H&)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

P r o v is io n s f o r p a id s i c k le a v e
All
industries

A ll e s t a b lis h m e n ts ...................................................

Public
utilities*

Manufacturing

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

All
industries

Services

y

. Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

I
1 0 0 .0
—

1 0 0 .0

1 2 .8
7 .9
.1*
3 .9
.6

u .e
u .e
-

13.U
13.U
-

2 2 .9
2 2 .9
-

1 7 .9
11*.0
3 .9

5 .7
1 .3
U.U
-

1 0 .3
1 0 .3
-

8 .7
6 .0
.6
.2
1 .9

1 .6
1 .6
-

8 7 .2

9 5 .2

8 6 .6

7 7 .1

8 2 .1

91*. 3

8 9 .7

91# 3

98.1*

2 5 .7
l * .l
1 .7
1 .2
9 .5
.5
U .9
3 .2
.6

6 .1
3 .0
•
-

13. U
-

3 .1
-

13.U
-

U 0.7
2 .7
.9
3 .8
2 0 .2
1 3 .1
-

2 9 .0
3 .7
1 0 .6
1 0 .3
.5
3 .9

2 6 .6
8 .2
3 .7
13.1*
1 .3
-

1 0 .3
1 0 .3
-

1 2 .8
.1*
1 .8
.3
6 .0
1 .3
.5
.3
2 .2

3 .6
1 .1
.9
1 .6
-

7U .3

9 3 .9

8 6 .6

5 9 .3

7 1 .0

73.1*

8 9 .7

8 7 .2

96.1*

31*. 3
1 .3
1 .7
1 .2
1 0 .6
.5
1 .7
8 .0
.6
8 .7
-

6 .1
1 .7
-

7 1 .7
-

1 .3
-

1 3 .U
-

2 9 .0
3 .7
1 0 .6
-

3 .1
-

U 2 .7
2 .7
.9
3 .8
-

3 .9
•

2 6 .6
3 .7
2 1 .6
1 .3
-

1 0 .3
1 0 .3
-

1 5 .6
.1*
1 .9
.3
.1*
1 .3
5 .8
.8
2 .2
2 .5

6 5 .7

73.1*

8 9 .7

3 5 .1
1 .3
1 .7
1 .2
7 .9
.5
3.1*
-

1 0 .3
-

3 .9

. 2 6 .6
3 .7
13.1*
1 .3
8 .2
-

65.6

73.1*

8 9 .7

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Servioee

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

U .8
3 .2
1 .6
-

2 5 .5
1 8 .9
6 .6

6 m onths o f s e r v i c e
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ...........................................
5 d ay s .........................................................................
6 d ay s .........................................................................
10 days .......................................................................
1 1 days .......................................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo r m a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ......................................

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .2

8 8 .1

6 6 .6

3 .6
1 .1
.9
1 .6
-

21*. 3
2.1*
2 1 .9

1 1 .9
1 .9
2 .9
-

33.1*
(2 / )

5 .5
1 .6
-

2 .6
1 8 .9
6 .6
-

8U.1;

9 6 .1

7 5 .7

8 8 .1

6 6 .6

1 6 .6
•1*
1 .9
.3
.1*
1 .3
.3
.3
.3
6 .0
1 .0

21*. 3
2.1*
2 1 .9

1 1 .9
1 .9
2 .9
2 .2
1 .6
3 .3
-

3 6 .8

U.U

3 .6
1 .1
.9
1 .6
-

83.1*

96.1*

7 5 .7

8 8 .1

1 0 0 .0

33.1*

1 0 0 .0

-

71*. 5 •

1 1 .9
1 .9
2 .9
3 .3
2 .2
.1 .6

-

1 y ear o f s e r v ic e
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ...........................................
5 d a y s ..........................................................................
6 d ay s .........................................................................
7 d ay s .........................................................................
10 d ay s .......................................................................
12 days .......................................................................
1 5 d ay s .......................................................................
20 d a y s ......................................................................
22 d a y s ......................................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ...........................................

-

«
-

•
-

1 8 .9
2 .6
6 .6

1 0 0 .0

2 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ............................................
5 d ay s .........................................................................
6 d a y s .........................................................................
7 d ay s .........................................................................
10 d ay s .......................................................................
12 days .......................................................................
1 5 d ay s .......................................................................
20 d ay s .......................................................................
22 d ay s .......................................................................
25 d ay s .......................................................................
Over 25 d ay s ..........................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith no fo r m a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ..........................................

.5
1 0 .3
-

5 8 .3
-

3 3 .3
2 .0
-

9 3 .9

2 8 .3

5 7 .3

7 1 .0

6 .1
1 .7
-

7 1 .7
-

1*2.7
2 .7
.9
3 .8

31*. 1*
3 .7
1 0 .6
-

-

.5
•
1 0 .3

1 0 0 .0

15 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ...........................................
5 days .........................................................................
6 days .........................................................................
7 d ay s .........................................................................
10 d ay s ......................................................................
12 d ay s .......................................................................
20 d a y s ......................................................................
22 days .......................................................................
25 d ay s .......................................................................
30 d a y s ...................................... ................................
35 d ay s .......................................................................
50 days .......................................................................
Over 50 d ay s ..........................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo r m a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ...........................................

1 .3
-

1 3 .U
-

9 .3

3 .1
-

5 8 .3

1 3 .1
2 0 .1
2 .1

61*. 9

9 3 .9

2 8 .3

5 7 .3

2 .7
6 .3
.8

-

1
V
y

*
**

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5.1*

1 0 .3
-

I

1

d

/

£3
2 .6
1 8 .9
3.U

6 .6

6 3 .2

|

-

1 0 0 .0

i

Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville, Fla., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

>

Table E-6:

ft(m pA4uU uoiU ut &04Uti*4>

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of bonus

All
industries

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

100.0

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses y ..........................

59.0

55.U

20.6

Christmas or year-end..............
Profit-sharing .....................
Other .............................

U7.5
6.1
6.5

5U.3
3.3

17.2
3.U
-

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ............................

U1.0

LL.6

79.U

All establishments ....................

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finanos**

Services

All
industries

y

. Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

y

*
**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

39.8

88.6

79.5

U7.7

57.9

L8.6

26.9

52.8

82.0

65.1

32.9
3.6
3.3

67.5
13.0
15.0

62.3
9.0
8.2

37.U
10.3

53.0
2.2
5.0

U7.1
1.5

20.6
6.3
-

U3.6
.9
8.L

73.9
U.7
11.1

65.1

60.2

11. L

20.5

52.3

1*2.1

51. U

73.1

U7.2

18.0

3L.9

1

9 jiA 4 4 /lG 4 V (> e

O lid P -C 4 U 4 0 H

_______________
Jl

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

86.3

86.8

90.2

89.1*

99.1*

90.6

75.6

8L.6

61.0

6L.9

78.1

73.2

76.8
1*6.7
67.2
2U.8

82.7
73.9
19.1*
78.7 v

79.1*
171
*.*
59.7
37.0

77.1*
U1.8
63.5
36.5

79.2
1*8.1
90.1*
,68.2

73.0
19.2
7l*.9
27.5

57.7
LI. 2
5L.1
26.0

58.7
L5.3
69.7
18.0

55.1
L3.3
27.6
52.1

53.7
15.9
33.9
19.L

68.2
50.3
50.9
37.7

3L.8
37.0
73.2
-

13.7

13.2

9.8

10.6

.6

9.1*

2L.L

15. L

39.0

35.1

21.9

26.8

All
industries

Manufacturing

All establishments ....................

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans y ....................

92.3

Life insurance .....................
Health insurance .............. ....
Hospitalization ....................
Retirement pension.................

78.9
U8.9
66.2
51.1*

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans .......................

7.7

1/

-

P lo t t A

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of plan

2/

-

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately*
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7:

*
**

Servioss

100.0

V

Retail trade

Public
utilities*

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




.

Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville, Fla., May 1952
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

Appendix - Scope
Vith the exoeptlon of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed* In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations s (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain sise were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied,
sise of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although sise limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




Method of Survey
of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtins and night work* Vonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour; for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i*e«, those hired to work the establishment’s full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables* It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table sumnariaing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN JACKSONVILLE, FLA,, 1/
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MAY 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ............... •
Manufacturing ................. ......
Nonmanufacturing ................ .....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .................. .
Wholesale trade ............ .
Retail trade... ......... ...... ..
Finance, insurance, and real estate ...
Services £/' ••.............. .....

21
21
21

534
112
422

146
37
109

46,400
13,000
33,400

24,080
8,550
15,530

3,820
500
3,320

21
21
21
21
21

38
136
141
46
61

15
29
29
15
21

5,500
8,200
11,800
3,500
4,400

3,640
2,080
5,680
1,820
2,310

850
430
530
1,300
210

21

25

9

1,897

1,117

761

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis U
Insurance carriers ................... . ••••

1/ Jacksonville Metropolitan Area (Duval County).
2/ Total establishment employment,
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures;
nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
ij Industries are defined in footnotes to vage tables*




18

Index
Page
Assembler (insurance carriers) ........................
Bench hand (bakeries) •••••••••••••.•••... ...... .
Biller, machine .............................
Bindery woman (printing) .....................
Bookbinder (printing) ................
Bookkeeper, hand •••••••............ ..... •••••......
Bookkeeping-machine operator •••••••...................
Bricklayer (building construction) ••••............. .
Bus operator (local transit) .................... .....
Calculating-machine operator......
Carpenter (building construction) •••...................
Carpenter, maintenance ••••............... ....... •••••
Cleaner ............
Clerk, accounting *.......... ••••••••••••...... ••••••••
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ••••••••........
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers)... .•••••••••••
Clerk, file ....................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ................ ......
Clerk, general... ............. ....................
Clerk, order .......................................
Clerk, payroll ......... .............................
Compositor, hand (printing) ................
Crane operator, electric bridge .................. ••••••
Draftsman.........................................
Electrician (building construction) ...................
Electrician, maintenance... .....
•••••••
Engineer, stationary......
Fireman, stationary boiler............
Guard... ......
Helper (bakeries) .....
Helper, motortruck driver ...................
Helper, trades, maintenance ........
Janitor.........................................
Key-punch operator •••••........
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) .•••••...........
Laborer (building construction) .....................
Machine operator (printing) ........
Machine tender (printing) ............. •••••••••......
Machinist, maintenance •••••...... ••••••••••••••..... .
Mailer (printing) ............
Maintenance man, general utility ••••••••..... •••••.....
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance).••••••••••• ....... ••••••
Mechanic, maintenance.............
Millwright ....................................




9
10
3
10
10
3, A
3* U
10
10
U
10
6
?
3, U
9
9
A
9
3, U
3, U
3, U
10
7
6
10
6
6
6
7
10
10
6
7
5
9
10
10
10
6
10
6
6
6
7

Page
Mixer (b ak eries)
....................... ••••.................. .........................................
Holder (b ak eries) .............................................. ...........................••••...........
Motortruck d riv e r •••••••••••*••••••••••............ ..
o
Nurse, in d u s tria l (r e g is te re d ) •••••••...........................
O ffice b o y ...........................
O ffice g i r l ................................................................................
O i l e r ..................................................................................................................
Operator ( l o c a l t r a n s i t ) ••••••..................
•••••
Order f i l l e r •••••....................................
Overman (b ak eries) .........................................
P a c k e r ..........................................
Packer (b ak eries) .............. •••••••••.......................................................
P a in te r (building c o n stru ctio n ) ••••••••................................... •••••
P a in te r, maintenance .........................................
Photoengraver (p rin tin g ) ..............................................................••••••••
P la s te r e r (building co n stru ctio n ) ••••••••••.......................... •••••
Plumber (building co n stru ctio n ) ...............................................................
P o rte r ........................................................................................................................
Premium a cce p to r (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ...........................................
Press a s s is ta n t (p rin tin g ) ...........................................................................
Press feeder (p rin tin g ) ..................................................................................
Pressman (p rin tin g ) ....................
R eceiving c l e r k ............•••••........... ................................................................
S e c r e t a r y ....................................
S e ctio n head (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ...........................................................
Sheet-m etal worker, m ain ten an ce.........................................
Shipping c le rk ......................................................................................................
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ..................
Stenographer ....................................................
•
S tereo ty p er (p rin tin g ) ..........•••••................................ .............................
Stock h a n d le r ...........................
Switchboard o p e r a t o r ........... ••••••••••.................................................. ..
Switchboard o p e ra to r-re c e p tio n is t .........................................................
Tabula ting-machine op erator ••••••.............................................•••••••
Tabulating-machine op erator
(insurance c a r r i e r s ) ....................................
•••••••••
Trans crib in g-machine o p e r a t o r .....................................................
Truck d r i v e r ........................
Trucker, hand .................................
Trucker, power ................ ••••••••••••••••••••.......................................
T y p i s t ......................................................................................
T ypist .(insurance c a r r i e r s ) ........................................................................
Watchman ......................... •••••••.................. •••••...........................................
Wrapper (b ak eries) ......................... ......................................................... « «
☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFIC"

C — 1952

10
10
8 , 10
6
3
5
7
10
7
.1 0
7, 8
10
10
7
10
10
10
7
9

10
10
10
8
5
9

7
8
8
5
10
8
5
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8 , 10
8
8
3, 5
9
8
10







THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
I n a d d i t i o n to this bulletin,
s i m i la r o c cu p a t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s
a re n o w av a i l a b l e f rom the S u p e r i n ­
t e n d e n t o f Doc um e n t s , U.S. G o v e r n m e n t Printing Office, W a s h i n g t o n 25, D. C. f o r the fo l l o w i n g communities:
BLS
B u ll e t i n

BI S
Bulletin

-Jfo*___
Baltimore, M a r y l a n d
Br id gepo rt, C o n n e c t i c u t
Bu ffalo, N e w Y o r k
Cincinna ti, Oh i o
Cleveland, O h i o
Dallas, T e x a s
Dayton, O h i o
Denver, C o l o r a d o
De troit, M i c h i g a n
H a r tf ord, C o n n e c t i c u t
Houston, T e x a s
I n d i a napol is, I n d ia n a
Kansa s City, M i s s o u r i
Los Angele s, C a l i f o r n i a
Me mphis, T e n n e s s e e
Milwauk ee, W i s c o n s i n
M i n n e a p o l i s — St. Paul, M i n n e s o t a
This report

Price

1045
1044

c ents
1 5
cents
2 5
c e nts
2 0
c e nts
2 5
c e nts
2 0
cents
2 0
cents
2 0
c e nts
2 5 cents
2 0
cents
2 0
cents
2 0
cents
2 0
cents
2 5
cents
15 cents
2 0
cents
2 5 cents

1035
1 0 9 6

1056
1043
1041
1066
1036
1059
108 4
1075
1064
1094
1 0 6 7

1099
1 0 6 8

2 0

was prepared i n the B u r e a u ' s

City

—

N e w a r k - J e r s e y City, N e w J e r s e y
N e w Orleans, L o ui s i a na
Norfolk-P o r ts m o u th , V i r g i n i a
O k la h o m a City, O k l a h o m a
P h il adelphia, P e n n s y l va n i a
Pittsburgh, P e nn s y l va n i a
Portland, O r e g o n
Providence, R h o d e I s l a n d
R i chmond, V i r g i n i a
Rochester, N e w Yo r k
S a l t Lake City, U t a h
St. Louis, M i s s o u r i
S a n F r an c i s co - O a kl a n d ,
California
Scranton, P e n n s y l va n i a
Seattle, W a s h i n g t o n
W orcester, M a ss a c h u s e t t s

S o u t h e r n R e g i o n a l Office.

2&«
£ L ___
1081
107 4
1088
1070
1 0 6 0

1082
1 0 4 2

1071
1 0 5 8

1087
1069
1095
1076
1078
105 7
10 7 7

P s L ss
cents
15 cents
15 cents
15 cents
2 5
cents
2 0
cents
2 0
cents
2 0
cents
15 cents
2 0
cents
1 5
cents
2 5 cents
2 5

2 5
1 5
2 0
2 0

cents
cents
cents
cents

C o m m u n i c a t i o n s m a y be addressed

to:
B r u n s w ic k A. Bagdon, R e g i o n a l D i r e c t o r
B u r e a u o f L a b o r Sta ti s t i cs
Room 6 6 4 , 50 S e v e n t h Street, N. E.
A t l a nt a 5, G e o r g i a
T h e se rv i ce s
o f the B u r e a u o f L a b o r St a t i st i c s '
r e g i o n a l o f f i ce s
a re a va i l a b l e fo r c o n s u l t a t i o n o n
statistics r e l a t i n g to wages a nd industrial r e lations,
employment, prices, l a b o r turn- ov er, productivity, con­
s t r uct ion a n d ho us i n g , a nd w o r k injuries.




T h e Sou t h er n R e g i o n i n cludes the f o l l o w i n g States:
Alabama
A rk an s a s
D is tr i c t o f Columbia
Florida
Georgia

L o ui s i a n a
Maryland
Mississippi
N o r t h Caro l i na
Oklahoma

So u t h C a r o l i n a
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102