View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

Occupational W Saivey
age

Bulletin No. 1109

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin * Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
fee
mscDucno*.............................................

l

THE COLUMBUS MTRO P O L I T A H ARIA .............................................................

1

OCCTJPATIQKAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E ...............................................

2

TABLES!
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on am area basis A-l
Office occupations .....................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ........................................
A-3
Maintenance and poser plant occupations .......................................
A-k
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ..............................

3
7
8
9

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an Industry basis B-*0
Railroads .......................................................................
B -63
Insurance carriers .............................................................

11
11

Union sage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building c o n s t r u c t i o n ..........................................................
C-205 Bakeries ........................................................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g ........................................................................
C-^l
Local transit operating employees .............................................
C-^2
Motortruck drivers and helpers ................................................
C-5*H Grocery stores .................................................................

12
12
12
12
13
13

Intrance rates D-l
Minimal entrance rates for plant workers ......................................

14

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions .................................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours .........................................................
E-3
Paid holidays ..................................................................
14
Paid vacations .................................................................
1-5
Paid sick leave ................................................................
1-6
lonproductlon bonuses ..........................................................
1-7
Insurance and pension plans ....................................................

14
15
15
16
17
19
19

AFPEHDIX1
Scope and nethod
UUEZ

of s u r v e y .............................................................

..........................................................................................

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents

August 6, 1952

20
22

Introduction 1/
The Columbus area is 1 of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surreys* Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis* Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilised in ooasiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional and technical;
(o) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping* In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for Individual broad industry divisions*
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey* 2j Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables* Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices*
Bata were collected and summarized 0 shift operations
n
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leavs allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

Tiie Columbus Metropolitan Area
Total population of the Colmbus Metropolitan Area
(Franklin County) was approximately 503,000 in April 1950, an 8
percent increase since 1940* Of this total, 376,000 resided in
Columbus, the third largest city in Ohio* Estimates for January
1952 were 518,000 for the Metropolitan Area and 389,000 for
Columbus proper.

1 / Prepared In the Bureau1s regional office in Chicago, 111*,
by Voodrow C. Linn and Marvin H* Gliok, under the direction of
George E. Votava, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst*
The planning and central direction of the program was carried
on in the Bureau1s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations*
2 / See appendix for diseussion of soopo and method of sur-




In December 1951, employment in Columbus area estate
lishments subject to the Ohio Unemployment Compensation Law j/
totaled approximately 160,000 persons, of whom about 66,000 were
employed in manufacturing plants. Columbus* highly diversified
industry sends its products to every section of the world. The
area*s dominant manufacturing industries in terms of number of
persons employed are in transportation equipment, fabricated
metal products, nonelectrical machinery, and food and kindred
products. Important products of Columbus metalworking indus­
tries include aircraft, roller bearings, construction and mining
machinery, automotive parts, iron and steel castings and forg­
ings, and heating equipment.

The importance of Columbus as a commercial and distri­
bution center for central Ohio is emphasized by the fact that
46,800 persons were employed in wholesale and retail trade
establishments in December 1951*
Transportation (excluding
railroads), communication, and other public utility companies
provided employment for 10,500 workers* An additional 11,500
employees were employed by finance, insurance, and real estate
institutions; and 14,000 were employed by the various services
industries*

Labor organizations represented 55 percent of the
workers employed in nonoffice jobs in the various industries
and establishment-size groups studied. Seven of 10 factory
workers in manufacturing establishments were employed in union
plants* In nonmanufacturing industries the proportion of non­
office workers covered by union agreements ranged from slightly
less than a tenth in the services group to seven-tenths in the
transportation (except railroads), communication, and public
utilities group# Union contracts covered a fifth of the workers
in wholesale And retail trade establishments.
Unionization was fhr less extensive among office work­
ers, with less than 5 percent working under provisions of col­
lective-bargaining Agreements. The highest proportion of office
workers coverid by union agreement provisions was reported in
tr&mspdrtAtioft (except railroads), communication, and other
utilities.

2/ Employing Who employ three or more workers at any one
time within a calendar year. The law exempts the self-employed;
those with fewer than three workers; agricultural labor;
do­
mestic service in private homes; government service; nonprofit
organization! such as religious and charitable agencies; inter­
state railrbed workers; students; teachers; and family workers.

Occupational W age Structure
Extensive formal wage adjustments were made in Colum­
bus area establishments between January 1950, the base period
for the Wage Stabilization Board*s “catch—up1 wage formula, and
*
the time of the Bureau's survey. By April 1952 , 95 percent of
all plant workers in manufacturing establishments studied had
received one or more general wage increases. In nonmanufactur­
ing establishments two-fifths of the plant workers had received
at least one general wage increase during the period. Many of
the remaining workers had received pay raises granted on an in­
dividual basis. Formal revisions of office workers' salaries
were less prevalent, although office workers in the larger manu­
facturing establishments frequently were granted increases com­
parable to those given plant workers. Individual merit or
length-of-service raises were commonly used to adjust salary
levels in place of general wage increases.
Wage rates for nearly 90 percent of all Columbus area
plant workers were determined on the basis of formal rate struc­
tures. Three-fifths of all time-rated workers were employed
under plans which provided a range of rates for each job. Wage
plans specifying a single or flat rate for each job classifica­
tion were in effect in establishments employing more than a
fourth of all time-rated workers; the rest were paid time rates
based on individual determination. Piece-rate or bonus incen­
tive payment plans covered plant jobs in which 30 percent of
the workers in manufacturing establishments were classified.
They were either nonexistent or relatively insignificant among
the nonmanufacturing industries with the exception of services
establishments in which about 10 percent of the plant workers
were paid incentive rates.
Virtually all formal wage plans reported for office
occupations provided a range of salaries for each job. Few
office workers were paid salaries based on single-rate plans*
and a fourth were found working in establishments that deter­
mined salaries on an individual basis.




Established minimum entrance rates for hiring inex­
perienced plant workers were part of the formalized wage struc­
ture in nearly all the firms studied. Although entrance rates
ranged from less than 75 cents to more than #1.45 an hour, $1
or more was the minimum rate in establishments giving employment
to slightly more than half of all plant workers. In manufac­
turing industries 3 out of 4 workers were employed in estab­
lishments having entrance rates of $1 or more. A 75-cent mini­
mum was the lowest rate reported in nianufacturing; and trans­
portation, communication, and other public utilities. Minimum
entrance rates of less than 75 cents were found in other non­
manufacturing groups studied.

Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in noaaanuf acturing. In
24 of the 29 office classifications permitting comparison, aver­
age weekly salaries in manufacturing establishments exceeded
those in nonmanufacturing. Average hourly earnings for plant
workers studied in all industries were higher in manufacturing
for 17 of the 20 job categories for which comparisons were pos­
sible.

More than 20 percent of the plant workers in Columbus
area manufacturing establishments were employed on late shifts
in April 1952.
Over four-fifths of these workers were on
second-shift operations. Nearly all second- and third-shift
workers were paid shift differentials, usually expressed in
terms of a uniform oents-per-hour addition to day rates. Most
common second-shift differentials were 5 or 8 cents an hour.
The scheduled workweek for 55 percent of all plant
workers was 40 hours in April. Virtually all of the remaining
workers were scheduled to work longer hours with a third of
these workers scheduled to work 43 hours. Forty-hour weekly
schedules existed for more than 70 percent of the women office
workers, with nearly all of the others working shorter sched­
ules. In finance, insurance, and real estate offices 6 in every
10 employees worked less than 40 hours a week.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Columbus, Ohio, by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$

*

$

$

$

$

$

$

1

Weekly 2 7 .5 0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3*7. 50 t o . 0 0 1*2.50 I6 .0 0 1*7.50 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 to .o o 8
Weekly
$5.o o 9 0 .0 0
earnings
hours
and
and
(Standard) (Standard) under

3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 liO.OO L 2.5 0 li5.00 L 7.50 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0

over

Men
Bookkeepers, hand •*.•••••••••••*•••••••••

121

$

13
j
Wholesale trade «••»»••••••.•••••••
Clerks, accounting ..............................................
Manufacturing ..................................................

1*1.0
1*3-0

78
39

1*0.0

5 9 .5 0

-

-

-

-

t o .o
to *o
t o .5

-

-

-

-

to .o

...6 k .fi)
6 6 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
5 8 .0 0

*

"

t o .o
1*0.0
t o .o
to .o

6 7 .0 0
6 9 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
6 k 00

t o .o

5 8 .5 0
6 2 .5 0
5 7 .5 0
5 8 .0 0

132

62
70
25

1fAnii^aMMit»4vwy... ....................... .. . * . . * * * . * » .
Nonmanufacturing ••••••*••••••••••••••
UTia I a s a I a
*.*,a » ^ * * * . _ _ . . . k

Clerks, order
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••*••••••
Wholesale trade

177
109
68
35
188
35

053
133

to .o
to .o
to .o

6 6 .0 0

11

to .o
to .o

6 3 .5 0
6 k 00

lit

to .o
to .o
to .o

25
12
13

to .o
to .o
to .o

6 3 .0 0
6 1 .5 0
6 k 00

to .o
to .5
to .o

B i l l e r s , m achine (b o o k k eep in g m a ch in e ) . .
M a n u fa ctu rin g ............................................................
N o nm anufacturing

70
32
38

*

^ r a i f a t t t l t t t t t t m t t t n i M i i i
f|/v^mar^ifa(>^iii>^g t m t i . 11 n i t t i l l t u t

Tabulating-machine operators .................. ..
Manufacturing

111
27

m

•
•
•

_

•

1

*

-

-

-

•

9
1
8
5

_
.

3
-

"

m
m
.

-

.

•

.

3
3

.

11

-

8
8

5

6

11

5

O
y
3

17

5

£

3

3

8
6
2
2

«

3
2

12
2

10
3

19

.

1

10
9

6

7

16

7

2

30

11
ii
IQ
*7

6

21

10

9
•

6
1
*
-

29

8

5

l
•

3

5

12

21
8

1
*

-

“

“

_

_

-

“

-

2
2

5

-

3

1

13

21

21

18

10

8

18

3

1

13
8

21
19

3
ia
18

it
11*

1
9
8

-2 J_

3
3

1

it

5

i2
12

.

«»

1
*

1
1

-

- !

11

It

9
2

3

1

2
2

1*

-

10

5

3

7
3
1
*
n
TJ
7

9

2
6
2 ------- x
1
-

11

3
1
2

_
-

-

-

n
3

16
12
1
*
-

13
5

6
6

5

30
30

13
12

18

3
8

J
3
3

2

2

in
iw
0
7

6
-

1

9 -

9
9

“
9
9

3
3

l
1

6

i
h

i2
u*

5
2
3
3

6
6

1
1

9
9

2

-

2

2

6

_

8

2

2

1
*

.

1

-

8

1*

-

1

2
2
-

“
It

2

6

8
1
*

1
12

7
2
<
2

x

8

1

19

5
if
5

-

2
2

2
2
2

•

1

p

1

*

0
d

«
*

3

1 .0 0
*6

W h o le sa le t r a d e • *«• • »• »***• »»*• • *•

181*
72
112
53

Office bovs ..................................... ............................

to

3l*

-

.
1

39*00
3 9 .0 0
3 8 .5 0

Clerks, p ay roll •
Manufacturing

-

8
8

5

n

X

6
1,
**

3

-

-

-

2

•

-

-

-

-

3
3

1
1

2
2

•

2
2

2

-

1

-

2
2

1

•

-

6

•

-

2

-

•

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

2

1

•

-

-

-

-

“

6

1

1

-

-

6

11

21a

10
«
a

10

11
8
•
a
x

5

35
17

19
7
12

5

g
5

31
2
29
7

9

3

8
8

x
x

1
x

6
6

2
-

1*
1*

1

1

19
8
11

2

2

-

Women
B i l l e r s , m achine ( b i l l i n g m a ch in e ) ••••••

180
37
11*3

12
65
22
31*

See footnote a t end of table*
* * Finance, insurance, and r e a l estate,




3 9 .5
3 9 .5

to .o
39 *5

to .5
to .o
t o .5

to .o
l a .o
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1*5.50

3
3
3

U 5.50
1*6.50
1*5.00
l i .0 0
1*5.50

-

6 3 .0 0
6 0 .0 0
6k00
6 3 .0 0
6 5 .5 0
6i*.00
6 1 .5 0

•
«
-

6

------- j~ ■
'
X

y ------ y

2
-

-

•

2

#
—

•
•
•
—

•
_
_
•

•
•
_

5
2
3

16

8

1?
12
7

12
12

M*
9

16

2
H*

3

2

7

2
-

3
3

5

3

£
t
p

1

•
•

2

—

9

12
•

2

9

12
2

2

9

•

"

-

•
•

10

•

2

5

6
“

U

— ____ ■_

17

n

2

16

11
3

2

•

•

1
_
8

8

5

•
«.

2

1*8
17
31
•
21*
“

3
1
2
2

•

33

I

33

h

.
•

It

.

„

•
•

23
8
2

•

7

2
5

.
-

•
•
•

•
•

5

•

2
2
•
.

2

Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 1952
O.S. D RTM T, O LA O
EPA
EN F B R
Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s

O ffice 0ccs*patio*U - C ontinued

Table A-l:

(Average s t r a i g h t - t i m e w eekly h o u rs and e a r n in g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d
on a n a r e a b a s i s i n Colum bus, O h io, by in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n , A p r i l 1 5 5 2 )

Weekly Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

2 7 .5 0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 l 5 .o o

and

Uo.oo U 2.50 U .o o ltf .5 0 5 0 .0 0 I 2 .5 0
$5

1 .
8

Sex, occupation, and industry dlvial on

1 .
$

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O FNumber
of
workers

$
5*7.50 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 sV .50

70.0C 7 2 .5 c 7 5 .o c 80.0C *85.oc 9 0 .0 0

and

32»?o 3 5 .o o 3 7 .5 0 * 0 .0 0 L 2 .5 0 L s .o o * 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6S .P P , 5 7 .5 0 70-aQQ 7 2 .5 0 75.o< 80.0C 8 5 . a r 2QaPC o v er

W
omen - Continued
3 9 .5
u o .o
to <
39 0
ho#o

I s .o o
5 9 .0 0
5U oo
60^00
U8 0 0

U o.o
u o .o
]|0 o
Uo*o
AO t
h n ft

UU.5Q
U 9 .0 0
t .t cfn
5 0 .0 0
kvSB

uo.o

1<*

Beokkeerdns-machine operators, cla ss A . . .
Manufacturing ............................................... ..

U 0.0
ho 0
Uv.v
* 0 .0

U 7.50
5 0 .5 0
U 6.00
u no
* 6 .5 0

10L
23
81
kO
28

UO.O
u o .o
La .v
eu a
39»5

W .g o
UU.50
U 8.00
5 2 .0 0
UU.oo

U 0.5
“ Uo.o
U 0.5
Uo.o
Uo.o
U l.5
3 9 .0
U 3.0

U 7.00
5 0 .0 0
U 6.00
U 7.50
U 8.00
U 5.oo
U 7 .0 0
1(1 t no

63
25
18

Bookkeeping-machine operators, cla ss B . . .
Manufacturing .................................................. ..

2U8
37
67
98

Calculating machine operators
fCemBfcamater time) ..................................... . . . .
Manufacturing ••••.•••*•••••.................... * .
Wonm>nnfantTir<«g
IffkAlammlm
H a ta il tr a d e

P aled sting*— chi na operators
(other than Comptamoter type) . . . . . . . . . .
Mopmanufacturing

tlW a 1!
m A m aJa
M e k a m m m JU t

....

Clerks r accounting ................................................................................
ng ##. . . . . • • • • • • • • • • • . . • • . . .
Moossnufacturlng
P n k ll.

«

________

trade
B e ta il trade
F in a n c e **

Manufacturing . . . . ............................................ ..
■ * ----- --- jaja

Clerks, f i l s , c la ss B ............................................ ..
Manufacturing . . . .......................................................
D VII 4 MilllAiaa Jg
m
.
Ukmlmaelm A
taajtm
‘ F i n a n c e * * ................... . .............. ..

298
119
179

791
a7—
57U
130
76
183
132
tft

uo.o

tn,
7*1
hO
l|v

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
39 .9
9T 5

to ?
3 7 #K

U 7 .0 0
5 0 .0 0
U 3.0 0
111 <0
UA.9W

680
170

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

3 9 .0 0
U 3.00

12 7
73

d o

to
v;
12
398

O
off

to <
| A
,A
uu«u
I.A A
U #W
w
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

to <
9 7 .9

t7 K(\
9le-9v

.

•

-

t7 do
9 f*? u

to ftft

*•

2 _____1

2

3 _____ 3_

2

3

3

2

3

3

2

15.
3
12

12

28

1.1,

28

jJ
11

1.

3
2U

22
3
19
3
7
7

2
2

12
•
12
5
5

16
3
13
2
2

U3
19
2U
X3
8

1

7

1

1

•

uu

12

•

7
5

1

"

l
•

l
1

•

2

5

m

26
_

2$

5

26

25

10
12
2
2

10
8
2

m
u

-

X

u

9
•

-

9

8

-

.
-

93
9

Cl
9*

ft).

9

5

2
U3

1
65
10

£

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




.

*

See footnote at end of table*
*
**

•

2

Li no
4 A.UU
39*00
3 7 .0 0

.

-

156
19
137
5

5

5o
5
U5

151
37

x

nu

13
12
58
1U
17

11 ____ 1
2
3
11
7
t
9
113
U2
71
f*

A

135
27
108
16

5

10

t
9

2
118

60

1
88

5

20
1
19
13

1 7 ___ 2 2 . —
12
3
5
2U

1

l
12
16
15

x
xx

xx

39
7
32
12
](
9

5
x
it

1 ? ___Uk_
8
8
9
36
8
29
£
x

2
2

IS 7
8
8

____ 3_ ____ 2_
15 1
2
9
5
3
6
3

2

11
1
10
10

13
7
6
3
3

IS .
5
7

x

12 _____ L ______ k _______2 L
2
1
12
1

5

3

65
21
UU
11

1U6
U5
101
50

35
5
30
12
3
7
8

u

u

9
17
3

16
18
X3

18 — 2 1 .
6
11
X2
xu
10
12

x
108
36
72
20
11
20
21

U3
18
25
11
12
2

58
13
U5
9
2
9
25

UQ35
5

5

12
12

.

•
•

•
•

m

.
•

.

m

a
m

m

•
*

m

x
x

9

•

•

2
m

2
2

it>

9
O
y

1U

29
18
11
2
9

xu

2U
3
21
2
10
8
1

6 ___ 32_ ____ L . _____ L ____ k _____3_
1
6
1
6
1
39
x
2
2

U2____ 2 2 . ____ 2^
6
7
13
2
36
16
2
10
9
k
2
2
u
2U

.

1

2
x

Ii

6 0 ___ 33. ....2U- ___ 32- ... - 2 2 ____ 2_ ___ 1 5 . ____ 2_
8
12
12
11
17
23
13
20
10
2
2
1
21
37
13
8
8
9
2
2
1
12
12
29
13

13

7

11
7
It

6
6

m
m

9
6
3

U1
1
3

6 ______ k
2
1
u

x
X
2

2

u

*
•

m

m
m
m
m

m
m
_

m

Table A-l*

O ^ lce OcdifuUiOHA - GoiUiHM*d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Columbus, Ohio, by industry division, April 1952)

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Table A-lx

O ^ice 0cC44fuUiO4tl - GotUinUod

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Columbus, Ohio, by industry division, April 1952)

S e x , o c c u p a tio n , and in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

Number
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A erage
v

Weekly Weekly
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
X
$
$
$
$
$
s
s
*
t
$
$
27.50130.00 3 2.50 35.00 37.50 1x0.00 1x2.50 1x5.00 1x7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 7 2 .5 0 75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0 .0 0
and
under
iiO.OO L 2 .5 0 L5.no li7 .5 0 tjo.oo
3Q.QQ ,^2-5 q i5.oo
6n.no 6?.<n 6^.00 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 9 0 .0 0 over
5tJ.no

Women - C o ntinued

f
1x9.00

87

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
1x0.0
3 9 .5
1x1.0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

21

I1I.0

S5.SQ-

Switchboard operators
Manufacturing
Nonaanufacturing •••••••••...... ...
Public utilities * .............
Retail trade ••••••••••••.... ••
Services ......... ........ .

129
ilfl
81
20
16
26

1x0.0
1x0.0
1x0.5
lxo.o
39.0
1;2.5

1x3.00
1x5.5b
lxi.50
1x8.00
31X.50

_
-

Switchboard operator-receptionists
Manufacturing ••«••••••••••••••••••.
Nonaanufacturing
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••••
Retail trade .............. .
Services ......... ••••••.... .

167
10 i;
1x9
21
13

I1O.0
1x0.0
1x0.0
3 9 .5
1x1.0
1*5.0

1x6.00
50.00
lxlx.00
1x5.50
3 9 .50
lxlx.00

.
.
•
"

Nonaarufacttiring •••••••••••••••••••
Finance # *

57
17
1x0
39

39.5
fo .0
39.5
39.5

52.50
58.50
1x9.50
1x9.50

_1

Transcribing-machine operators,
general.... ......... ............ .
Manufacturing
Nonaanufacturing •••••••••••••»•••••
Finance * * .......... ..........

162
102
60
29

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0

jx5±S..
U6.50
1x3.50
1x3.50

_
“

•
“

_
-

359
ia n

39.5
1x0,0
39.5
1x0.0
1x0.0
39.0

li7.50
52.00
1x6.00
50.00
51.00
1x3.50

*
-

_
•
-

.
•
•
-

-

-

•

-

“

3

33

140.0
1x0.0
39 .5
1*5.0
1|0.0
1x2.0
39 .0
1x0.0

1x2.00
1x5.50
39.50
1x2.00
1x1.00
la . 50
38.50
39.50

3

17
17
10
7

73
lx
69
2
9
12
1x0
6

207
17lx
5
21
2
139
7

212
57
155
6
36
9
95
9

Stenographers, general «»■
Manufacturing
Nonaanufacturing
Public utilities * ,
Wholesale trade •••<
Retail trade •«••••<
Finance **
Services •«*.••••••<

Stenographers, technical

Tabulatlng-aachine operators .... .

Manufacturing

Srpistsj class A
Manufacturing «»••••••••••••••»•••••
Nonaanufacturing
Public utilities * ..... ••••••••
Retail trade .................. .
Finance ** .....................
Typists, class B ..
Manufacturing
Nonaanufacturing ••••»••••••••••••••
Public utilities * ••••••••••••••
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••••
Retail trade ........ .
Finance ** •••••••••••••...... ••
Services .............. .

1/
*
* *

957
366
591
68
HiO
52
22k

2 )6

20
53
159
1,213
kk5

768
62
169
5U
1x32
51

•
•
-

52.00
1x7.00
1x6.50
51.00
1x5.50
1x5.50
1x6.00

kh.Q O

•

1
•
1
1
•
"

112
20
92
lix
7
11
37
23

110
13
97
18
lx
2
51
22

..

-

9
9
•
2
7
3
3
3
•
•

•

_
3
3

-

108 50
58
6
16
36
•

m

m

2

12
lx
8
8

60
83
26
26
7
23
1

3
3
2
1
•

6
1
5
•
•
-

37
27
10
2
_
•

9
3
6
2
2
-

18
5
13
lx
lx
2

6

k

1
3
.
2

•
•
“

7
1
6
•
6
“

2ix
lx
20
7
8
lx

20
7
13
5
3
3

23
6
17
10
•
3

28
6
22
10
•
“

23
15
8
3
3
1

16
9
7
6
•
■

3

- ji

2

2

17
1
16
16

2

V
1
3
3

*2

-

•
■

2
2

•
•

2
2

5
2
3
3

26
17
9
6

3

15

3
-

33

_
2
2

50
11
39

2

_

33

2

m

6
2

•
2
2

k

2
1
1
m

8k

50
3lx
1
12
lx

.
•

•

•

•

•

_

.

•
_
•

•
_
•

5
2
3
2
1

1
•
1
1

3
3
•

_
•
•

9
7
2
2

2
2 1------.
•
..
•

•
•

8

3
2
1

2
2

2
2

2
2

•

1
1

•

2
2

-

2
2

_

_

_

_

13
13

lx
lx
«.
•
•

•

1

1

2
m
m

m
•
•

•
•
•

2

6

6
6

8

2
2

k

1
1

«
.

33
32
1
1

8

39 ___ 28 ___ 65 ___ h k
22
12
65
k lx
16
27
2
22
lx
12
3

lx

1
,

52

3

2lx

1

_

2lx

1
2

28

.

Hours r e f l e c t th e workweek f o r w hich em ployees r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s and th e e a rn in g s c o rre sp o n d t o th e s e w eekly h o u r s .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , co m m u n icatio n , and o th e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




•
•

1
1

89
30
59
16
16
lx
15
8

122
1x0
82
7
26
5
Ix
lx

•

3
3

10

287
121
166
2lx
25
7
92
18

2

•

2
2

29

3
3

3

•

2

88

-

3
l
2

2

15
73
lx
19
1x7

25
6
19
10

lx
1
3

m

60
9
51
1
39 * 1x5

19
2
6
9

____ 2.
3

2

8

9
lx
3

2lx
3

.

11
8
3

13

___ k l ___2L
25
23
18
lx
3
lx
9
6

3

52
1x3
9
7

1x2
12

30

27

17

152
39
133
12
30
8
53
10

17
•
17

17

"

-

90
1x5
1x5
6
18
3
10
8

2 ____ k ____ I

n ___32_
1
11
30
28
•
2
5
6
5
2
12
2
lx

•

Table A-2:

P ^ O ^ e^ U a H a l C U td ^JccJ m ic a l O cC U fu U iO tU

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings V fo r selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Columbus, Ohio, by Industry division, April 1952)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Weekly
Weekly earning*
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

s

$

t o . 00 L 2 .5 0 J 5 .0 0 £ 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 I 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 lo .o o 12.50 $ 5 .0 0 & .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 J o .o o ? 5 .o o 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 1 00.00 105.00 110.00 1 1 5.00
and
and
under
5 0 .0 0 5 2 -5 0 5 5 .0 0 57.501 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 95.OO 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 over
L 2 .5 0 L 5 .0 0

Men

nrAftam«tn. * M ef ............................................

$

22
13

lil.O
Lo.o

9 7 .0 0
9 9 .5 0

Draftsmen..............................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................

170
131
39

LO.O
LO.O
L 0 .5

7 7 .0 0
7 9 .0 0
6 9 .5 0

Draftsmen. Junior ...................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................
Nonmanufmaturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

170
127
L3

L 0 .5

LO.O

6 7 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
5 9 .0 0

Manufacturing...... ........ ........

Tracers.............................
Manufacturing..................... .

26
26

L 2 .0

5 9 .0 0
6 0 .0 0
5 6 .5 0

-

-

2

3

.

2

-

-

-

2I

-

•

____ 1
3

1
1

-

-

5 8 .0 0

Lo.o

m
e

2

3

LO.O - 5 8 . 0 0
Lo.o

u
2 ------ sL
2
L

1
1

1L
11
3

-

.
-

_

-

-

1
1
-

“

-

-

.

_

.

-

_

■

■

-

-

“

-

-

6
3
1
1
“

“

3

1
2

_

*

“

8
3
5

“

1
1
"

_
■

1
1

_

10
10

k

L
■

2
2

6
1
5

5
1
L

29
17
12

2
1
1

26
15
11

____ I
3

-

6
6

1
1

8
8

12
11
1

6
6

6
6

2
2

3

-

13
9
L

75
W

10

1L
12
2

-

1

7
2 —
5

21
21
"

1

2
2

_

2
2

5

3

6
1

k

t
”

n
11
•

15
15

58
58

1

Women

Nurses, industrial (registered) .........
Manufacturing........................
Nonmanufacturing .................. .

5L
LI
13

LO.O
3 9 .5

-

2
2

2
-

2

13
9
L

5

1 ____k
1
L

_

.

l

1
1

1/

Hours r e f le c t the workweek f o r which employees receive th e ir regular straight-tim e s a la rie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,




Occupational Wage Survey, Colunbus, Ohio, April 1952
U.S. D R EN O LABO
EPA TM T F
R
Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s

Table A-3:

M aintenance and Powek P lan t Occupation*

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Columbus, Ohio, by industry division, April 1952)

Occupation and industry division

N ber
um
e
rf
wwI
mii

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Us

Us

Averts* f . 1 0
f .5 o f .5 5 i .6 0 £ .6 5 f .7 0 f .7 5 1 .8 0 i . 8 5 1 . 9 0 1 .9 5 1 . 0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 % .15 % .2 0 1 .2 5 ^ .3 0 * i.3 S %.k0
1 .3 0 i . 35 LkO
hourly
f a s 1 .2 0
etrninga and
and
under
1 .1 5 i .? n 1 ,? 5 1 ,3 0 1 ,3 5 l .k 0 l.li5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1.65 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 . 8 0 1 ,6 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 . 1 0 2 .1 5 2 . 2 0 2«?5 2 ,3 0 2f35 2 , 1(0 over

6k

Lao
1 .8 1

2k0

1 . 8k

6

193
k7

1 .8 7
1 .72

5
l

66

1 .6 6
1 .8 6

67
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Manufacturing
^nf^MArsi s t a t i o e n r

58
316
233
83
13
21

k0

............•••••••••

389
270
119
61
23
19
lk 2
1 U2

Haxdilnists. maintenance
Manufacturing •«•••*•............•••••••.......... . . . . . . ..........

lkilnera

tradee» mslntenanrs

.* ..-S
--- —

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

26

30

13
3

13
13

29

50
39

1

11

1

~TM ~

7
7

3

k
l

3

23
Ik
9

-

3
25
k

6

21

7
22

17
5

k

6
2k
13
ll
11

9

1.3k

39
22

17
16

189
78
51

nmimdl

*-----«---. . . .

. . .

...

H eehuies. maintenance

2

Pipe fitter's, maintenance

Ihnnfafifm^ n^r ( i i i t i r t i a

11

^ n t t e i t a l workers, maintenance

M H #nm e4m
m H 4bM o

i 11 •11

11

i ai i 11 i Ma r

28

12

9
11

9
3

■

•

-

•

•

•

1 .7 3
0 .7 3
1.72
1 .7 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

1

17

2

1

16

2

5

30

3

22
8

17
16

3
-

3

1 .5 8

29

k
k

32
32

-

k
k

-

8
8

21
21

Ik
lk

13
13

-

-

_

21
16

k
k

53
53

38
36

26

2

3

-

-

at

_

•

A
7

I

3
k

m

-

3?
8
31
23

17
i5

1

-

1

-

5

1

5

2

2
2

k
k

k
3

8
8

k7

12

1
1

3

29
16
13
7

25
2
23
22

27
25

1 . 7?

ik7
3
ikk
112
2k

16

k
12
12

21
21

9

10
8

2

•

k
k

____ 2 ____ft

2

3

2

2
1

____ a

2

1

k
k

10

9

2

1
1

**

**

•

3

k
k

-

-

-

-

6

1

8
2k
2k

8 ___ 1 .
1
8

2
2

•

11 _ J l
3
9

k
3

2 .2 0
2 .2 1

2
2

32
5
5
17

_ 2 1
21

k

2
23
22

6

1

2

6

1

5 _ J k , k k ____k ____ 1
1
k
kk
lk
5

6

6

6

6

8
8

1
1

__ 2 1

19

9 ___ L __ 2 6
1
22
9
k

T
55 ____ 1 ____ 3 ____ 1 .... - S____ i
1
l
3
55
•

•

•

•

2

2

{
2

9

9 ___ k
k
9

8
9
9

2

16
13
3

12

19

1

9
3

3

1

16

9
7
2

3

8
7

•

1

3
3
-

2
2

7

13
7
7

:

6
'

•
•

___1 5

*

— lk
A

15

:

1

•

3 ___ 2 .
3
9

1
1

m

8

5
3

9
9

m

•
____ 3

3

l
l

m

____k ___ ft __ 15

k

2

15
10
10

2
2

3
5

“

2

13 ___ 2 .
2
13

___ 1

5

-

2
2

_ 1 1 ___ I

2
1

1

m

-

-

___7. ___ 6. __ 2k __ 3SL _ 2 1 ___ k ____1 ___ 6
6
38
l
6
k
2k
23
7

12
12

5
5

3
3

3

2
2

1 .8 0

10

1

8

A

1

2

1 .92
1 .92

2
1
1

2

6

7
k
3

1

1

W _ l£ .

2
2

1
1
1

18 ___ ft. _ l f t
11
18
7

1
1

2
2

2
2

•

2
1

6

m

1
1

1

8
8

89
27

1 .8 6
1 .8 6

_

_

1
1

1

k

3
1
2
1
1

1 .6 8

11
11

1

1
1

k
k

1

1 .6 7
1.7k
1 .6 5
1 .6 5

3
3
25
25

7

k

•

352

21

2
2

1
1

1 .9 0
1 .9 1

3<3l

20
20

20

11

18

3

•

257
2u5

30
28

29

2

1
1

•

UO
39

16
16

1
1

6

•

1 .5 1
63
6o ~ W ~
1 .7 6
51
il
1 .7 5

5
5

12

19

-

1 .7 3
1.72
1 .7 5

k
k

16
k

1

•

307
ok
2k3
193
27

2
2

35
31
k

26

-

~ W ~

QLlmrs . .................... ......................... ......................... ..............................
Manufacturing •••••••••••••..........

20

1

2
1

-

111
71
kO

Public u t i l i t i e s ...............................................................

U6
30
16

k
5
36
33
3

-

20

entonative (m latan tn o e)

20
18
2

8
8

15

7
13
7

U t6

163

— — J—
—*

8

5

2

1 .9 6
1 .9 6

25
32

IW m 1 *--- * A d

3
3

8

18 8

Msnhlns tool o p erators, toolroom
Manufacturing

-

7

lJi6
U »3
1 .5 5
1 .5 6
1 .3 3
lekk
U »7
1 .3 8
1 J »0

-

26
26

30

30

35
35

2
2

8 _ _ U _ k l _ kk ___26
_
8
13
U3 kk
76

2/59

59

' |
V

y
*

excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Workers were distribu ted as follows t 1*9 a t $2*50 to $2*55} k a t |2.60 to $2.6 5 ) k a t $2.65 to $2.7 0 j 2 a t $2*70 to $2.75*
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .




Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A- 4:

G udtodial, 'kJa’t&luuUtiu}, and S kippin g Occu p at ion*

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in ColumbusJ Ohio, by industry division, April 19$2)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Aveng*
hourly
earnings

$
1.55
i.$5

•
9
t
9
*
9
s
t
t
s
t
$
9
9
1
9
9
9
$
$
$
t
9
Under 0.70 0.7$ 0.80 0.8$ 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.0$ 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.2$ 1.30 1.35 1 .1 0 1.1*5 i.5o 1.55 1.60 1.6$ 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.8$ 1.90 1.9$
*
and
0.70
*
. . 0 £SL
1.3$ 1 .1 0 lOiSL a > $ ,a pLSS. a ~ 6 a
1,.7Q 1».7$. I , 8 1 m 1.90 1.95 over
.75 n8Q .85 „90 «95 1 .0 0 1 .0 $ 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25

$

9

9

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tens) .....
Manufacturing ....................................

7U
7+
1

Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and over) ...
Manufacturing ............................. ......

110

no

Guards .... .........................................
Manufacturing ....................................

20$
200

1.1*6
1.1+6

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ...............
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................ .
Public utilities
........................... .
Wholesale trade .............................. r
Retail trade .... ..............................
....................................
Finance
Services ......................................

1.396

1.09
1.19

3/80
Ik

18
-

1.00
1.20

66

18

-

-

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) .............
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Retail trade .......... T............ ,,..
,

196

__ n

___ 6_

1.56
i.$6

686
710
92
12U
2$3
11$
126

Ik
122

60

.79

.89
1.09
.77
.79

989
$03
U86
186
281

Packers (men) .......................................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing ...T.............................
Wholesale trade ..............................

379
269

10$

1.31
1.38
1.13
1.13

Packers (women) .....................................
Manufacturing ....................................

733
710

1.10
1.10

clerks ....................................
Manufacturing ............................ ......
Nonmanufacturing .................................

Receiving

clerks .....................................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Wholesale trade ...............................

Shipping

1+0

30

-

-

1.28
1.26
1.29

1.55
1.57
1.51
1.53

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

6

17
17

58
58

-

-

-

-

-

1 8 l 65 _ _8I_
* _
2$
2*
1
19
1 0 63
*
29
_
2

-

-

71
3$
36
7

60
7
53
_

29

21
18
22
kk

-

1*
1
1$

M 8

6

10
*

“ _

_

18

2

32
-

30
3

8

6

9

22

16

20

2

7
13
13

52

1

6

-

_
-

1

1*

-

-

_
_
-

-

-

1

1*

-

_

_

-

_

20

9

2

13
11

2

2
2

2

1
1

-

-

59

30
53
2*
1
l*
l
9

127 _.9.2_,
36
91

8
19
22
2*
1

29

68- 66
_
12
l*
l

<

16
*
8

27
15

6

18

10

5
$
$

6

6

_

6

1
*

3

2
2

-

2

15
5

28

17
7

11

21

10

15
*

16

7
3

20
2$

12

22

17
9

3

3

3

10

6
16
*

9

25
5

$

1

2
3
2

6
22
7
15

18
1*
1

12
12

15
*
11
**

120 139
8 * 119
1
20
36

1
6

1
2

23

16

6

1

7

55

9

22

3

22

6
2

1*8

1.31+

1 .1 0
+

++
___ Z3: . 1 .11
$0
1.1*9
23
1.33

119
79

-

l.Oii

1.01
1.01

Order fillers .......................................
Manufacturing ...... .......................... .
Nonmanufscturing.................................
Wholesale trade ...............................
Retail trade ..................................

110

-

6

16

_J*_
1

3

56

37

2

-

-

-

8
6

_

20

63

2li3

38
2$

188

21*

_

-

26

10

2$

12

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_

_
_

_
-

3

1
+

2
2

9

_

1

1

_
1

1

_
_

2

1

-

-

-

-

3 * 12
1
3 * 12
1

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

13
13
-

38

7
7

_

_

-

139

59
56

8

1*3
1*3

8

8

6

_

_
_

1*

121*

3

-

-

-

1*0

k

1*0

1
*

12
12

-

-

72 .
72

8
8

11

2

5

2

-

219461

0 - 52 - 2




_

3

6
6
6

_
_
_

_
_

-

-

-

6

2

_

ia
ia

-

•

■

_

k
k

5
5

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

1*
1*

3
3

-

3

16
16

7
5

9

1

2

2

10

U*

1

10

1

1

1

_

12
2

1

1

1

6
3
10
1*

6

22

13
9
9

8
1
*
1*
1*

1
1

-

-

2

9

2

2

9

2

1
1

1

-

9

7

7

7
2

1

1*

6
6

3

2
2
_

10
10

3.
*3

-

$
1

_

7
7

'

‘

1*

3

1*

'
See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_

_

3

1
*
1
*

3

_
_

8

32
32

25

3

_

-

_
-

1

22

2

1 18
* +
1 18
* *

_
_

9

59

3

-

3

10

1*

-

-

136
1
*

5

1*

1
*

kk

16

99

1

28

32

21
38

2

2

12

21*

_

-

-

17

6

k
k

_

_

17

100

_

_

11
*+
11
**

5
1
*

11

30
30

-

_
_
_

23
18

5$
15
*

50
50

21
21

— 3L
3

33

2$3
2$3

22

_
_

2
2

3

l£

19

Ik

1*
1

1
*
1
*

3

76

13
13

2

6
6

66

7

13 ' 27
2$
13

_

57

5

-

8
8

-

1

22

7
7

-

1

73

5

-

_

51

5

-

_

13
3

1
1

20

57
13
*
l*
l
13

-

27
26

6
6

89 • $0
1 6 la
*
13
*
9
6
1*
1
12
1
*
3

1

66
66

20

8
8

9
9

-

12

20

2

12
12

9
9

6

_12_,

5
-

___ 2_

'

Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

GudtodicU, 'kJa’iduuUintf,, and S kippin g Goou p a titmA Qontinumd
-

Table A-ltt

f

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2 studied on an area
basis in Columbus, Ohio, by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF--

Number
of
worken

Occupation and industry division

Shlnning-m nrf-receivlng clerks

Wholesale trade
.

.............
....

L.987
1,11)1)
8it3
280
270
289

1 .3 5
1.l a
1 .2 8
1 .3 9
1 .2 1
1 .2 5
XmCp

192
ilO
68
77

................. . .

_

562
2 $6
306
litlt
58
pQ

l«li6
1 .5
1.1)2
1 .3 2
1 .3 8

Ii87
70
&
lillt
236

213
— 3 —
16$
86
307
21)2
65

Manufacturing.............. ......... ••••••••••

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ............................... .

VAVM ^EA4nv»4ntv

UVa* a m« 1
I

a

......

..

7
7

LI)
6
38

30
9
21

70
12
58

25
1)
21

Hi?
116
33

2
5

31
7

1)
17

31)
21)

12
9

15
18

1 .5 1
1 .5 2
1.1)8

Truck drivers, heavy (over h tone, trailer type) ....
W M a^m «4
em ^n v
__________ _.............._ ___ ..
_
I n — rmnf nnti n tnn ....... . ..... .....
tt
~~> '
.
______

4

U




111
6
8

7
1
6
6

15
7
g
6
2

35
11)
21
19
2

lli
l
13
8
$

13
9
£
1
3

39
29
10
9
1

8

W

2li2
lfi9
jjjy
5V
»

-

-

•

51i
Hi
1)0

57
29
28

208
U tl
67

220
11)0
80

156
37
119

1
39

6
18

57
10

33
1)7

31)
85

Ii26
285
11)1
137
It

113
51)
59
51
8

-

_ 2 5 _ _li5_ ___ L
3
I*
3
l
22
1)1
1)
18
39

5
32
32

6
2
1)
3

27
-

-

2
1
1

—12-

2

35
32
3
3

_JiS_
33
32
16
7
13

X

n

1
9
9

-

-

-

27
25
2

-

2
3

X

& ~

69
62
7
k
3

33
16
17
3
11)

97
1
96
85
11

21
20
1

17
1
16

1

16

8
8

-

21i
21)

2
2

It

31)
1)
30
21
9

19
19

~

2

7
7

37
5
32

2

1

2

3

2
1
1

k

8
8

21
10
n
n

5

3

t
2

1
3

t

j

17
9
g
g

2

2
2

10
3
7
1

6
6

-

-

1
1

10
lj
g

19
13
5

2
2

5
3
2

1)9

15
15

93
79
11)

30
21*
6

61
21
1)0

U
11

13
13

3
3

1)
27

22
e
s

1.
a

80
80

-

5

5

2

2

7
7

8
8

5

6

9

5
U
1

<

U)
lilt 192
1)1) 189
3

6
6

9
8
1

3
2
1
1

It
1)

16
15
1
1

3

-

___ 1 .
1

6
6

9
1 .9 5
and
ever

—
_

m
m
m
m

m

5
5

“

“

-

-

no
no

1
1

-

-

13
13

Hi
2
12

9
«
m
9

3
3

1
x

-

___ 1
3

10$ ...
1
lolt

9
72
72

18
1)5

it

3

19

237
236

1 .5 1
1 .5 1
1 .2 1
1 .2 5
1 At
.9 8
•70

22

237

1 .6 2
1 .5 9

55
~

•

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night w rk .
Study lim ited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Workers distributed as follows! 33 a t $ .5 5 and under $ .6 0 ; 26 a t $ .6 0 to f .6 5 ; 21 a t $ .6 5 to $ .7 0 .
M/ Workers distributed as follows!
5 a t $«$0 and under $ .6 0 ; 2 a t $ .6 0 to $ .6 5 ) ltl a t $ .6 5 to $ .7 0 .
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), connunication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
2/
V

157
35
122
90
26
6

ii
h

1.1)9
1*1)8
1 .5 0
I .6 1

. .. . . . . . . . . .

Truck drivers, heavy (over I tons, other than
t
trailer type)
ng iiitiitit.i.Ktiiiiiiiiiiitiitiiiiti
IffniiEinTiiifinlur^nrr
DntilHn
. .. _____ ___ . ........ .

11
2
9
9

1 .6 0

______ ___

Truck drivers, medium (li to and including l tens) ••
i

Dm^e 41 ^nm«4m . * . .........................

7
1
6
3
3

1 .3 7
1.1)1
1 .3 6
1.
At 07
1 .3 5

Truck drivers, light funder l i tons) ................................. ..

Qm^e41 ^e/4m

$
l. i l
ll
1.1) 5
1.1) 1)
i .li5
1.1CL

207
83
12U
78
Ii6

fm n d l.r* and truckers. hand —.-,•••••••• ••.••••«

9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
s
$
$
t
$
$
$
t
s
9
9
Aren*.
hourly Undei 3 .7 0 *.75 0 .8 0 0 .8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 L O O L 0 5 LIO L.15 1 .2 0 L.25 L.30 1 .3 5 1.1)0 1.1)5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 L 9 0
M
inings
$
0 .7 0
l e & j 1 * 4 2 . 1 * 4 1 h l£ L 1 * 2 1 l* 8 (^ i * & i l i 2 0 i i 2 l
*75 *8p •8*5 ,9 0 #95 U9Q 1 .0 $ L 1 0 L i 5 H-f2p 1*25 L3Q L.35 L.iiO l.ii$

-

____k

h

It
2
2
2

3
3

63

90

3

63

90

3

-

_
___ 1 ___ 1 _ 1 5 ___ 2
1
X
1
2
lit
lit

2
2

e
»

10
10

6
6

11
11

61)
61)

1
1

-

-

-

-

5

7
7

“

_10
10

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

5
10
10

It
Jt

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-1*0* fo U b u H t tU

3/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF

Occupation

y

Number
of
workers

} l

nndei
1 .5 0 1 . 5 5 1 * 6 0 1 . 6 ?

1*9
131
736
26
627
28

» • • * • (**.• **• • • • • « **• • • • » » » « *•

T ill
8$

Janitors and cleaners •••••••••••••«••••••••••••••••••

_.. ...... . ..

95

1 .7 9
1 .9 8
1 .7 0
1 .5 0
1 .9 8
1 .7 9
2*01
-1 cffl
1*68

Truck drivers ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

5
3

6

8

263
8

27
28

32

m

l

29

3

1. 9 5

s
2 .0 0 2 .0 5

2 ,0 0 2 ,0 ?

h

m 126
e

2

m
m m
m m

m m m m
m 627
?
23

1

17

U68

s
1 .9 0

2&2Q.

I .7 0 k l l 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 ?

%
Carpenters, mnl

leg

$
Average
hourly £ i j 0 £.1*5 £ 5 0 1 . 5 5 1 . 6 0 1 * 6 5 1 . 7 0 1 . 7 5 1 . 8 0
earnings
and

63

67
20

<17
1

52

m

h

m
e

23

m

m

y
The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the railroad industry (Group 1
*0) as defined in the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual {1 9 h 9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data relate to men workers.
"V Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B -6 3 :

Occupation 2/

Clerks, accounting
Clerks, Hie, class A ••••••,
Clerks, Hie, class B ......
Clerics, general.......... .
Key-punch operators «••••••.,
Premium acceptors........
Section heads....... .
Stenographers general.....
Tabulatlng-machine operators
Typists, class A ......... .
Typists, dess B ...........

Number
of
workers

102
19
29U
82
73
1*8
50
130
36
132
377

O tU u n & H & e

38.5
1*0.0
39.0
38.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.0

$
1*7.00
1*1*. 50
37.50
51*. 50
1*2.00
U5»50
55.50
1*5.50
1*8.00
1*1*. 00
39.00

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A
vebagi 3/

Weekly Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

(Z o A S U eS lA s

$
$
s
s
$
s
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
s
*
*5
32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1*2.50 1 .00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 6 0 .0 0 62.50 65.oo 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 .0 0
32n8°
under
32.50 35.00 37.50- JiO.OO liJ>.5n 1:5. Q 1:7.50 50.00. 52.50 55.00, 57^5.0 ,60.00 62.50 [65.00 ■61*5,0 7Q.0Q T U 50 75.00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 9 0 .0 0
Q
S

8
-

16

12

9

U3

105

62

3
62

1

12

10
5
2
30
3U

2
-

17

-

1

-

•

8

-

-

3
130

-

7

-

12
2
2
102

-

16
-

22
2
37
85

7
6

3

-

9
1

28
2
U2

2
6
U
23
15
39

hz

21*

21
la
-

7
1*

13

5
21*

3
3

1
*

7

•

10

•

•

•

•

•

•

6

•

8
13

3

9

1

2

-

-

•

•

•

•

9

-

-

17
2

6

h

-

6

y

The study covered establishments with 21 or more workers in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (191*9 edition) prepared by the
Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data relate to women workers.
y

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Mage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OS' LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and mg-Hmmw atrai^xt-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade-unions.
Bates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated. Comprehensive listings
of union scales for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing for July 1,
1951 are available on request. Similar information for these industries will be published for July 1, 1952).

Table 0-15:

B tU lduU f Go*Ut>LUcUo4t

Table C-205:

bate
per
hour

$3,150
Bricklayers ............ ............ .
Carpenters .................................. 2.550
Electricians ................................ 2.625
Painters .................................... 2.200
Plasterers .................................. 2.750
Plumbers ..................................... 2.750
Building laborers .............. .........
1.763

Table C-205:

hours
per
week
Uo
1)0
1)0

10
)
10
)
Uo
U
O

BkUl
o&e

July 1, 1951
Classification

Bate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Mixers, ovenmen ..................... $ 1 ,5 3 0
Oven feeders and dumpers............. 1.U 30
Bench and machine operators.......... 1.U 00
Bake-shop helpers, bread packers.... . 1 .2 8 0
1 .2 8 0
Women rackers, packers (buns).... .
Agreement B:
Bread department:
Mixers, oven operators ............
Mixers' helpers, molder
operators ....... .............. .
Pam rack washers ..................
Boll department:
Mixers, oven operators ............
Wrapping-machine operators ...... .
Wrapping-machine helpers.... .....
Hand icers and wrappers (women) ••••
Cake department:
Mixers, ovenmen, decorators ........
Machinemen, depositors ............
Cooky-machine operators...........
Machine helpers ...................
Pan washers and greasers .......
Hand.leers and wrappers (women) ••••
Shipping department:
Wrapping-machine operators........
Wrapping-machine helpers,
packers and shippers ............




Table G-27:

-

UO
Uo
UO
UO
UO

1 .5 0 0

UO

1 .3 7 0
1 .2 0 0

UO
Uo

1 .5 0 0
1 .3 7 0
1 .2 5 0
1 .0 8 0

Uo
uo
uo
Uo

1 .5 0 0
1 .3 7 0
1 .2 5 0
1 .2 0 0
1 .1 5 0
1 .0 8 0

uo
uo
uo
Uo
Uo
UO

1 .3 7 0

Uo

1 .2 5 0

Uo

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement Cs
Mixers, ovenmen ........... ........ . $1,530
Oven helpers, feeders, dumpers ........ 1.U30
Dividers, molders, hand wrappers,
1.U00
mixers' helpers..... ..............
Molders' helpers,.pan greasers,
bread rackers, flour blenders,
wrapping-machine helpers ........... 1.280
Agreement D:
Mixers ...............................
Oven operators ........... ...........
Tray-oven feeders and dumpers ....... .
Bench hands, oven feeders and
dimpers, molders, depositors.... .
Helpers, panners, packers....... .
Agreement Ei
Dough mixers, overmen ................
Dividemen, moldemen, wrapping-ma­
chine operators, bread panners,
dough mixers' helpers
Bread rackers, bend: and machine
helpers, truck loaders and helpers...
Agreement F:
Dough mixers, ovenmen ................
Oven loaders and dumpers.............
Dough mixers' helpers, moldemen,
bread panners................... .
Bench and machine helpers, wrappingmachine helpers, truck loaders and
helpera, bread rackers .............
Pie and pastry shops:
Pie m i x e r s ........................ .
Ovenmen ................................
Crackers and cookies:
Head m i x e r s ............................
Ovenmen, pan pullers......... ..........
Mixers' helpers ........................
Feeders, greasers, cleaners, helpers
(men):
After 30 d a y s .......................
First 30 days..................
Packers, box formers, wrappers ..........
Women helpers, first 30 days ........... .

PoniU
fittf

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

Ju ly 1 , 1952
Classification

BkUA Gmti a
o&e> i mt
d

U
o
Uo
Uo
Uo

1.U00
1.375
1.320

Uo
Uo
Uo

1.270
1.150

Uo
U
O

1.530

Uo

1.U00

Uo

1.280

Uo

1.530
1.U30

Uo
Uo

1.U00

Uo
U
O

1.U00
1.375
1.210

U
O
Uo
Uo

Book and job shops:
Bindery women........................................................... *1 .3 1 5
2.U10
Bookbinders ...............................................................
Compositors, hand .................................................. 2.U10
Electrotypers ..........................................................
2.U75
Machine operators .................................................. 2.U10
Machine tenders (m achinists) ........................... 2.U10
Mailers ......... ................................................. ............ 2.160
Press a ss is ta n ts and feeders .......................... 2.030
Pressmen ( a l l presses) ...................... ................. 2.1*30
S te re o ty p e rs............................................................. 2.UH
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work ...........................
Compositors, hand - night w o rk ......................
Machine operators - day w ork...........................
Machine operators - night w ork..............
Machine tenders (m achinists) day work .................................................. ..............
Machine tenders (m achinists) night work .............................................................
Mailers - day w ork................................................
Mailers - night work ............................................
Photoengravers - day w o rk ......... ..
Photoengravers - night work .............................
Pressmen, web presses - day work
Pressmen, web presses - night w ork..............
Stereotypers - day work .....................................
Stereotypers - night w o rk ...................... ..

Hours
per
week
37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37

1 /2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2

37
37
37
37

1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2

Uo

1.370
1.250

Rate
per
hour

Uo

1.280

C la ssifica tio n

2.573
2.7 0 6
2.573
2.706
2.573

37 1 /2

2.706
2.193
2.3 2 6
2.933
3.093
2.U93
2.600
2.505
2.6 1 1

37
38
38
37
37
37
37
37
37

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

m

3/U
3/U
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1/2
1 /2
1 /2

Table C -41: JB g C & I
October 1 , 1951
d a s s i f i c a tio n

1-man ca rs, busses and coaches:
1.080
1.010
.950
.870

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

F i r s t 3 m onths................................... ..................... $1,520
U - 12 m onths.................... .........................
1.550
After 1 y e a r ............................................................. 1.5 7 0

U8
UB
U8

____
Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table C-^2: M

/o t o k b u ic k

3 b*U u m *d

Table C-541r Q /M O eA 4f S t o k e d

- G o n tu U tm d

Table 0 -5 4 1 : Q d& C & U f S t o r e d • G o tU in U o d

<and Jtelpmbd
Ju ly 1 , 1951

June 1 , 1952
Bate
per
hour

Classification

Bakery - Biscuit ........................... I1.U25
Beer - Brewery...................... .
1.1*12
Helpers .................................. 1.312
Furniture ................................... 1.300
Helpers .................................. 1.250
General - Freight*
Agreement At
Local cartage*
1 - 6 Booths •••••••••............. 1.1*25
7 - 12 n o n t h s ..... .............. . 1.U50
After 1 y e a r ...................... 1.1*75
Helpers:
1 - 6 months ...................
1.325
7 - 1 2 m o n t h s .................. 1.350
After 1 year
1.375
Peddle run ................. ......
1.600
Agreement B ......... .................. . 1.550
Meat - Packing house*
Agreement A ............ ................
1.700
Agreement B ............... .............
1.690
Railway express'........................ •••• 1.607

Hours
per
weak

50
l*o
ho

5*
1
5*
1

1
*8

18
*
16
*
18
*
18
*
18
*
18
*
5U
18
*
50
10
*

Table C -541: Q /U M >eSU f S t o k e d
June 1 , 1952
C lassificatio n
Agreement A*

Bate
per
week

Bate
per
hour

Bouts
per
week

.

Grocery department*
Clerks - Men o r womens
Less than 6 months
servloe ..................................... ♦36.90 ♦0.820
6 - 12 months Berrios ............ 1*0.95
.910
12 - 18 months serv ice ......... i*i*.10
.980
1 8 - 2 1 * months serv ice . . . . . 1*9.05
1.090




1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5

G lassification

June 1 , 1952
"Rale ” ■Rele­
per
per
week
hour

Hours
per
week

C lassificatio n

"Rale
per
week

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
weak

Agreement A* - Continued
Grocery department* - Continued
Clerics- Men o r Homan: - Oontimaed
21* - 30 months serrioe ••••• ♦5U.00
More than 30 months
s e r v i c e ...............
57.60
Head grocery clerks
72.00
Head produce clerks - Hew
sto re s, or sto res to be re ­
modeled - average weekly
sto re sales*
♦7,500 - ♦12,000 ...................... 6 5 .2 5
♦12,001 - # 7 , 5 0 0 .................... 6 8 .8 5
♦17,501 or m o re ........... ..
72.00
P art time clerks-M en or women*
Less than 6 months
s e r v i c e .....................................
•
6 - 1 2 months serv ice ...........
More than 12 months
service ............... ............ ..
Meat department*
Book room cu tte rs - S e lf service m a rk e ts..................
Female meat d a r k s :
Less than 6 months
s e r v i c e ........... ..
6 - 1 2 months service ••••••
12 - 18 months service .........
16 - 21* months service . . . . .
More than 21* months
serv ice .....................................
Head meat cu tte rs - Hew sto re s,
o r sto res to be remodeled average weekly sto re s a le s:
♦1,1*00 or l e s s ................•••••
♦1,1*01 - # , 0 0 0 ................. ..
♦2,001 - ♦2,75b * ......................
♦2,751 - # , 2 0 0 ........................
...........
# , 2 0 1 or more
Journeymen - meat cu tte rs . . . . .

Agreement B:
♦1.200

1*5

1.280
1 .6 0 0

1*5
1*5

-

1*5
1*5
1*5

.770
.81*5
.920

-

76.50

1 .7 0 0

1*5

3 8 .7 0
1*2.75
1*7.70
52.65

.860
.950
1.060
1.170

1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5

57.60

1.2 8 0

1*5

78.00
82.50
87.00
91.50
91*. 00
72.00

.
1 .6 0

1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5

Grocery department*
Clerks and checkers Men o r women:
Less than 6 months
s e r v i c e ...................................... ♦39.00 ♦0.867
6 - 12 months service .............. 1*2.00
.930
1.0 0 0
12 - 18 months service ......... .. 1*5.00
1 .1 0 0
1 8 - 2 1 * months serv ice «••••• 1*9.50
1 .200
21* - 30 months serv ice •••••• 5B.00
More than 30 months
serv ice .......................... ............ 57.50
1.277
6 5 .0 0
1.1*50
Heads, eoffee-dairy goods .••••• 6 5.00
1.1*50
Beads, produce .................................. 75.00
1.670
Meat department:
Female meat counter cle rk s:
Less than 6 months
3 9 .0 0
s e r v i c e ............. .......................
6 - 1 2 months service ............. 1*3.00
12 - 18 months service ........... 1*7.00
1 8 - 2 1 * months s e r v i c e ......... .. 52.50
More than 21* months
serv ice .................................. ..
57.5 0
Heads, meat:
Special development sto re s •• 8 0.00
Super markets .............................. 9 0 .0 0
Journeymen meat cu tte r s :
F i r s t or box cu tte rs •••••••• 76.50
Regular journeymen .................... 72.00
P a rt time counter clerks Men or women:
Less than 6 months
s e r v i c e .......................•••.•••
6 - 1 2 months service •••••••
12 - 18 months serv ice ••••••
More than 18 months
serv ice •••••••••••••••••••
-

-

-

1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5

1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5

-

1*5
1*5

1.600

1*5
1*5

.850
.900
.9 5 0

-

1 .000

-

D:
Table D -l*

M

in im

u m

Entrance Rates

Z n P u m

oe

H

a te A , f a *

P

la n

t

W

m

JL

s

* *

1 /

E:

Supplementary W age Practices

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates in Table E-i:

Manufacturine
An

2/

All establishments .........

100.0

Under 5 5 ....... ...........

3.4
1.0
.3

55 .................................................................

•u

Over 65 and under 70 .......
70 .........................
Over 70 and under 75 .......
7 5 ........................
Over 75 and under SO .......
S O ........................
Over SO and under 85 .......
S5 ........................
Over 85 and under 90 .......
9 0 ........................
Over 90 and under 95 ........
9 5 ........................
Over 95 and under 100 ......
100 .......................
Over 100 and under 105 ......
105 .......................
Over 105 and under 110 .....
n o .......................
Over 110 and under 115 .....
115 .......................
Over 115 and under 120 .....
120 ........................
Over 120 and under 125 .....
125 .......................
Over 125 and under 130 .....
1 3 0 .......................
Over 130 and under 135 .....
1 3 5 .......................
Over 135 and under 1A0 .... .
Over 140 and under 145 .....
Over 145 and under 150 .....

(1 /)

5.3
.5
3.3
.2
3.9
3.4
1.7
.8
2.0

1.0
2.0'
2.2
3.6
.8
4.3
6.7
4.2
3.0
1.0
14.3
5.9
.1
.6
2.1
.3
.8
4.2
1.3

-

-

_
_

_
_
_
_
0.7
_
1.0
_

_
3.6
_
8.2
5.1
-

.5
_
3.9
_
19.6
2.8
32.4
9.5
-

.1
1.4

-

Establishments with no
established minimum ......

5.5

4.0

Information not available ...

1.3

l/
2/
*

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.0
.8
5.5
4.6
2.0
6.3
3.6
.3
5.1
_
34.2
14.9
_
_
3.0
.7
8.2

_

_

_

-

-

-

_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
4.0

_
_
_
36.8
_
4.3
_
3.5
_
9.0
_
_
_
2.2

_

_
10.6
16.1
_
-

_
_
_
3.6
_
15.5
_
5.5
13.2
7.1
20.7
_
_

_
14.1
1.9

_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_

_
_
_
_
15.2
14.2

_

1.1
5.6
_
_
_
_
_

1.5

-

-

1 .1

-

_
_
_
_
_
0.5
_
13.0
3.3
2.3
21.9
_

22.3
17.6
5.4
15.3

_
_

^

tn

_
23.3
2.6
14.9
.8
5.1
S.9
_
.8
2.5

_
8.7
_

8.8
1.6
1.8

_

.5
23.8

4.6
1.3

10.0
_

5.8
6.0
3.0

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
n .2

_
_
_

6.7

_

_
1.0
9.7

_
_
_

ATL
indus-tr ie s
3d or
2d
other
s h ift
s h ift

S h ift d iffe r e n tia l

Percent o f workers
on ex tra s h i f t s ,
a n esta b lish m e n ts.............

t ia i P

A

a a iiio n i

.8
_
.5

_
_
_
4.7

6 .3

7.1

Uniform cents
(per hour) .................
4 cents .....................
5 cents ................. ....
6 cents .....................
7 cents .....................
7 .5 cents .................
8 cents .....................
10 cents ...................
12 cents ...................
13.3 cents ...............
15 cents ...................

.9

4.7

_
_
_
_

_
_
.1

_

3 .9

2 .5

1 4 .7

2 .4

1 5 .9

2 .3

1 0 .9

2 .5

13 .5
1 .5
4 .7
.2
.8

1 .8
_
.1
.9
.4
.2
.1
.1

1 4 .3
2 .0
4 .1
.3
(1/)

1 .5

1 0 .9
_
6 .3
_
3 .4
_
.1
.7

2 .5
_
_
_
1 .4
_
.3
.6
_
_
.2

-

6 .0
.2
U/)
.1
-

-

(1/)
_
-

7 .9
_

.2
1 .0
-

.3
-

-

_
_
_
-

.2
.2

_
-

(1/)

.1
.1

F u n day's pay fo r
reduced hours ...........

1 .1

.6

1 .4

2 .6

1 .2

2 .8

1 .6

1.5

_

17.2

13.6

5.9

1.3

5.2

_
-

2 .1
'

l/

Less than .05 of 1 percent.

-

1.0

_
-

_
_

-

.4

.8

Receiving no
d iffe r e n tia l ...................

_
_
_
_
_
_

2d
s h ift

•able
Is
3d or
other
s h ift

1 8 .7

Uniform percentage . . .
5 percent .................

_
_

.7

_
_
_
_

Receiving s h if t
d iffe r e n tia l ...................

Duriable
go<ads
3d or
2d
other
s h ift
s h ift

3 .6

5 .8

1.3

1 1 .0

lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




jb ifa e A

Percent of plant workers employed on each
shift in all manufacturing industries

100.0

_

5 .1

5.2
5.1

4.7
_
_

100.0

100.0
9.6

_
-

_
5.4
_
_

2/

100.0

_
_

-

J t ifa

H

1.2

65 .................................................................

.9

Public idholesale Retail
Services
Establishments wit 1 utilities* trade
trade
251 or
251 or
21-250
21-250
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers

100.0

S

Nondurable
goods

0
c>

Over 55 and under An
60 ........................
Over 60 and under 6 5 ..................

Durable
goods

s
i

Kininum rate (in cents)

Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF 1AB0R
Bureau of LaSor Statistics

Table E-2:

S c k & d u l& d

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS

All
indus­
tries

A l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .......................................................
U nder 3 5 h o u r s .................................................... ..
3 5 h o u r s .............................................................................. ..
O ver 3 5 and u n d e r 37& h o u r s ................................
3 7 i h o u r s ...............................................................................
O v er 37^ and u n d e r UO h o u r s ................................
1*0 h o u r s ............................................................................ ....
O v er UO and u n d e r UU h o u r s ................................ ..
UU h o u r s .................................................................................
O ver UU and u n d e r U8 h o u r s ...................................
1*8 h o u r s ................................................................................
O v er U8 and u n d er 5 0 h o u r s ..................................
50 h o u r s .................................................................................
O v er 5 0 and u n d er 5 6 h o u r s .......................... ...
5 6 h o u r s .................................................................................
6 0 h o u r s ......................................................................... . . .
O v er 6 0 h o u r s ....................................................................

All

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

(3 / )
.8
1 .3
6 .7
1 5 .9
7 1 .9
1 .6
.9
•2
.7

(y >
1 0 .2
8 8 .5
-

Durable
goods

1 0 0 .0
.1
1 .6
9 6 .8
.8
.7

Non­
durable
goods
1 0 0 .0

_
2 7 .U
7 1 .9

Public
utili­
ties*
*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

k 1 0 0 .0

_

_

1 0 0 .0

—
. U .3
•
9 U .3
1 .U
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

■

“

~

”

-

.6
.5
.2
•
-

-

-

-

PERCEN T OF PLANT WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

EM PLOYED I N -

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

W e ek ly h o u r s

3/

J ftm /U

.7
-

-

-

Finance**

Services

y

.1
1 .3
8 2 .9
1 0 .0
1 .6
.3
3 .8
-

1 0 0 .0

2.U
3 .1
5 .1
U 9 .7
3 9 .7
•

1 0 0 .0

.3
7 .0
2 6 .9
-

,

U 2.7
7 .7
1 1 .6

-

-

-

3 .8
-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

,

All
indus­
tries

*

“

1 0 0 .0
.U
1 .5
5U .7
U*9
2 .0
1 1 .9
1 5 .2
1 .9
1 .3
U .6
.2
1 .0
•U

All

1 0 0 .0
_
2.U
6 2 .7
5 .0
.7
1U .6
1 0 .1
1 .6
1 .U
1 .5
-

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

_
6 1 .2
6 .6
1 8 .7
7 .6
2 .1
1 .8
2 .0
-

Public
utili­
ties*

1 0 0 .0

_

_

9 .8

-

-

6 7 .0
3 .0
2 .2
1 8 .0
-

-

-

-

*

**

”

U 6 .7
1 .9
1 2 .0
2 0 .5
1 3 .8
5 .1

Whole­
sale
trade

1 0 0 .0
_
.
6 6 .2
1 5 .0
2.U
2 .2
5 .8
5 .2
3 .2
•

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0
_
U 2 .0
5 .5
5 .6
1 1 .2
20.U
3 .5
1 0 .8
.8
•2
•

Services

1 0 0 .0
6 .2
.
2 5 .1
1 .5
6 .3
5 6 .2
U .7
-

Data re la te to women workers.
Includes data fo r industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .0 $ o f 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .

P idid effolidcufl

Table E— I
3

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

Number o f paid holidays

All
indus­
tries

MANUFACTURING
Public
Utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .9

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

7 5 .9

8 2 .0

7 8 .6

9 2 .2

7 5 .1

8 9 .6

6 8 .6

2 8 .5

1 .U
1 .3

1 .8
1 .9

_

1*. ii

-

-

•

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

All establishments..................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments providing paid holidays

9 9 .U

9 9 .2

I d a y .............................
3 d a y s .......................... .

.6
(2 / )
.1
.1
7 0 .8
1 7 .0
9 .U
.8
.6

1 .3

-

U.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .3
89.1 s
5 .5

k da y s ...........................................................
5 d s y s ...... ....................
6 d a y s ........................... ,
7 d a y s ..........................
8 d a y s ..... ......................,
9 d a y s ..........................
II days .......................... .
Establishments providing no paid
holidays .................

1/

j/
*
**

.

.6

9 6 .8
.5
*6

9 9 .3

-

9 9 .3

•

-

“

.7

2 6 .9
2 9 .5
U3 .6

-

-

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

1 .1

-

•

3 .8

All
indus­
tries

y

_

.

2 .3

.3

-

-

-

.3

-

-

3 9 .U
UU.6
1 0 .8
2 .9
2 .0

1 3 .2

■

"

.8

9 1 .1
1 .7
1 .9

Includes data fo r ind ustries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .0 5 of 1 percent.
Transportation (including r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .




PERC EN T OF PLANT WORKERS EM PLOYED IN

Manufacturing

-

-

-

9 9 .7
-

8 U. 5
-

•1*

.k
6 7 .7
2 .7
2 .0

-

-

-

“

21*. 1

All

.3
7 5 .7
.8
1 .5

Durable
goods

.k
7 8 .2

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

_

7.1*
7 .7

-

_
-

.
•

.

5*2
81.1*
3 .0

Retail
trade

Servioes

.7
.

6 7 .5
3 .3
6 .3

32.1*
2 8 .6
1 U. 1

-

_

.

•

.

6 7 .9

21*. 0

_

-

•
•
-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

21.1*

7 .8

21*. 9

10.1*

31.1*

7 1 .5

1 8 .0

_

.1

Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 1952
U.S. D RTM T (F LA R
EPA
EN
BO
Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s

P a id V & gg U Io h A ( fy o k m a l P /um aU I o h A )

Table E-4*

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EM PLO YED IN—

PERCEN T OF OFFICE WORKERS EM PLOYED I N -

Vacation policy

M a nufac turing

M a n u fa c tu rin g

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

*

indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

3/

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

I
All establishments......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100*0

100.0

100.0

99.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.7

100.0

98.1

97.9

98.3

96.9

100.0

100.0

97.5

97.8

-

73.U
1.5
23.0

5.3
71.0
23.7

72.1
.7
2L.7

L.o
69.2
2L.6

2.5

2.2

100.0

97.5

97.8

5.3
50.5

37.3
6.0
53.5
.7

L.O
69.2

2.5

2.2

1 year of servioe
E a tablishments

with paid vacations.....

Under 1 week .........................
1 week ........ .......................
Over 1 mad under 2 w e e k s ........... .
2 w e e k s .... ........................

_

LL.9
5L.L

Establishments with no
paid vacations ......................

•L

23.9

7.7

62.8

-

.

-

-

76.1

92.3

37.2

(2/)

•

(2/)

86.9
2.7
10. L

■

*

_

-

.

.

58.7
Ul.3

6U.0
36.0

L5.L
53.3

30.7
69.3

•L
7L.2
1.2
22.3

1.3

-

1.9

98.1

■

•

-

-

-

70.5
27.8

82.6
6.3
8.0

93.3
.8
5.9

2.1

1.7

3.1

97.9

98.3

96.9

2 years of service
99.6

Under 1 week .......................
1 week .............................
Over 1 snd under 2 w e e k s ............
2 w e e k s .......... ..................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ............
Establishments with no
paid vacations ......................

25.6
.8
73.2
-

.

*L

100.0

100.0

_

Establishments erith paid vacations .....

_

8.6

7.0

12.3

-

-

-

91. U
-

93.0
“

87.7
-

(2/)

(2/)

100.0

100.0
_

-

19.6
L.8
75.6
-

-

100.0
_
L3.5
-

56.5
-

*

100.0
_
22.7
1.9
75.U
-

■

98.7
_

100.0
_

U5.1

30.7

-

-

53.6
-

69.3
-

1.3

-

•L
52.7
8.5
36. L
.1

-

_

-

56.9
11.7
29.3

57.9
11.6
28.8
"

5U.1
11.8
31.0
-

1.9

2.1

1.7

100.0

3.1

.
50.6
.8
L8.6
■

-

Lli.2
•

-

2L.6
“

5 years of service
100.0

Establishments with paid vacations.... .

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 w e e k .............................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ..... ......
2 weeks ............................
Over 2 snd under 3 w e e k s ............
3 weeks ............................

16.0
.1
81.2
1.2
1.5

3.0
•2
93.1

3.0
.3
96.7

8U.5

-

-

-

3.7

-

12.6

{2/)

(2/)

(2

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

3.0

1.9

Establishments with no
paid vacations .................... .

/)

2.9
-

“

100.0
«.

97.3
2.7
-

-

100.0
7.1

100.0
9.5

100.0

100.0

98.1

97.9

98.3

96.9

U5.1

1L.3
85.7
-

11.1
.9
82.3
2.L
l.L

7.1
1.3
85.0
3.6
.9

3.1
1.7
90.7
2.8
-

19.5
67.5
6.3
3.6

1.9

2.1

1.7

•

-

88.5
2.0

51.8

-

-

•

100.0

97.5

97.8

15.8
8L.2
-

17.5
75.3
.7
L.o

LI. 2
•
56.6
"

2.5

2.2

3.1

-

92.9
-

100.0

3.1
-

•

*
*

•

.8
99.2
-

15 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations.....
1 week ................ .............
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............
2 w e e k s ............................
Over 2 mad under 3 weeks
3 weeks ............................
Over 3 weeks ................... .
Establishments with no
paid vacations •................... .

f

100.0
.

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.1

97.9

98.3

96.9

7.1

9.5

.5

li 3
l.

10. L
.1
72.8
2.0
11.9
.9

6.5
77.3
3.0
9.6
1.5

3.1
82.6
2.8
9.8
~

17.2
60.5
3.8
9.1
6.3

1.9

2.1

1.7

3.1

3.3

2.7
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

75.6
.3
20.8
-

86.5

88.1

82.7

75.1

90.0

77.7

-

•

-

-

-

8.9
-

15.U
-

2L.0
2.7
73.3
-

56.6

-

36.3
-

15.U
-

%9.5
-

8.0
“

( 2/)

(2/)

10.8
-

(2/)

Includes data fo r industries in addition to those shown sep arately ,
le s s thmi .0 5 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s ,
r'n en se, insurance, ami r e a l e s ta te .




100.0

100.0

100.0

97.5

97.8

-

15.8

.8
50.6
L8.6

•
55.3
28.9
“

17.5
73.1
.7
6.2
-

3L.9
62.9
“

2.5

2.2

Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-5*

P a id & 4*cJz Jlj& Q 4U 6 (% O A m o l P a Ou M OHA ')

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EM PLOYED I N -

Provisions fo r paid s ic k leave

PERCEN T OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M nufacturing
a
N
on­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

A
ll

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishm ents with formal provisions
fo r paid s ic k leave ........................................

ii3.3

ii3.3

ii5.8

37.3

5 6 .7

1 3 .6

2.5

5 days .................................................................
6 -days .................................................................
7 days .................................................................
10 days ...............................................................
12 days ...............................................................
13 days ...............................................................
15 days . .............................................................
20 days ...............................................................
21 days ...............................................................
Over 21 days ....................................................

30.0
3 .3
.2
h .o
2 .6
.8
1 .6
.3
.3
.2

2 8 .U
ii.5
7 .7
.li
2.3
-

3ii.O
.7
7.2
.6
3 .3
-

H i.6
1 3 .6
9 .1

ilil.o
12.7
-

1 .3
2 .1
1 .0

-

-

-

-

-

2 .9
il.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

Establishm ents with no formal provisions
f o r paid s ic k leav e .......................................

56.7

56.7

51i.2

A ll establishm ents .........

indus­
tries.

.............

Services

1 0 0 .0

A
ll
indus­
tries
1/

1 100.0

M ufacturing
an

Public
utili­
ties*

W
holesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 00.0

A
ll

Durable
goods

N
on­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

1 year o f s e rv ic e

61.9

27.7

15.2

2 1 .3

26.5

5 .o

lii.9

1 3 .ii

lii.l
8 .0

lii.l

1 9.9

25.il

2.9
-

lii.9
-

5 .2
5 .9
.5

2 .5
-

1|7.0
2 .5
7 .8
ii.6
-

-

-

-

-

2 .1

-

-

62.7

ii3.3

86.ii

9 7 .5

38.1

-

_
-

-

5 .3
5 .3
.

-

-

.2
.3
.6
(2/)
d /)

-

-

-

.5
.9
-

-

1 .1
-

2 .1
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

72.3

8ii.8

78.7

7 3.5

9 5 .0

85.1

8 6 .6

99,5

9U.7

-

5 .6
-

-

.5

_

.8
1 .0

_

.5
_
_

_
-

-

-

2 y ears o f serv ice
Establishm ents with formal provisions
f o r paid s ic k leav e .................................

U3.3

U3.ii

ii5.9

3 7.3

5 6.7

1 3 .6

2 .5

61.9

27.7

1 5 .2

21. it

2 6.7

5 .0

lii.9

1 3 .ii

.5

5 .3

5 days .................................................................
6 days .................................................................
7 days .................................................................
10 days ...............................................................
12 days ...............................................................
13 days ...............................................................
15 days ...............................................................
20 days ...............................................................
21 days .........................................................
Over 21 days ....................................................

ll.ii
3 .3
.2
22.6
2 .6
.8
1 .6
.3
.3
.2

28.5
ii.5

3 ii.l
.7

Hi. 6
1 3 .6

.ii
1 2 .7

1 .3

_

.5

lii.l

12.9

2 0 .0

2 5 .6

2 .9

.8

5 .2

_

5 .3

Establishm ents with no formal provisions
fo r paid s ic k leave .......................................

56.7

-

-

7 .7
.ii
2.3

7.2
.6
3.3

-

9 .1
-

-

ii3.6
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 6 .6

5 ii.l

62.7

ii3.3

See foo tn otes a t end o f t a b le .
*
T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s ,
Finance, insurance, and re a l e s ta te .




-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

2 .1
1 .0

-

-

-

.2
1 .5
.6

-

-

-

-

.5
.9

-

2 .1

1 .1

5 .9
.5

-

-

-

-

-

2 .5

ii9.0
7 .8

8 .0
-

-

-

-

-

2.9
il.2

-

iu6

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .1

-

-

5 .6
-

86.it

9 7 .5

38.1

72.3

-

lii.l

-

-

-

-

-

(2/>
(£/)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.8
1 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

8ii.8

7 8 .6

73.3

-

_

_

_

.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

9 5 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

85.1

8 6 .6

9 9.5

9ii.7

Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 19^2
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-5*

P a id S ic J i j£/*au<6 (tf& im a l Pa ouM ohA) - Qontim m A
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Provisions fo r paid s ic k leave

A ll establishm ents .............................. ..............

M ufacturing
an

A
ll
indus­
tries

A
ll

Durable
goods

N
on­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100 .0

1*7.1

1*3.1*

utili­
ties*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

1 00.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100,0

100.0

1*5.9

37.3

8 6.1

1 3 .6

2 .5

61.9

27.7

.1*
1 2 .7
7.9
1*3.6
21.5

1 .3
2 .1
1 .0
1*.2
5 .0

2 .5
-

.5
2.5
7 .8
6 .5
1*1*.6
-

Finance**

Services

A
ll
indus­
tries
1/

Manufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

W
hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 00.0

5 .o

1*6.9

13.1*

-.5

5 .3

2 .9
2 .1
-

.8
1*.0
ll* .l
2 8 .0

5 .2
5 .9
.5
1 .0
.8

.5
-

5 .3
-

73.3

9 5 .0

5 3 .1

8 6 .6

9 9 .5

91*. 7

A
ll

Durable
goods

N
on­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 7.6

21.1*

26.7

li* .l
8 .0
5 .6
-

13.1
.2
.3
.9
(£/)
1 .0
2.1

20.0
.5
.9
-

25.6
1 .1
-

72.3

82.U

7 8 .6

5 years o f serv ice
Establishments with formal provisions
fo r paid s ick leave .......................................

_

5 days .................................................................
6 days ................................................................
7 days ................................................................
10 days ..............................................................
12 days ..............................................................
13 days ..............................................................
15 days ..............................................................
20 days ..............................................................
21 days ..............................................................
25 days ..............................................................
Over 25 d a y s ....................................................

11.1*
3 .3
.2
2 .2
3 .6
.8
1 .8
11*.8
.3
5 .5
3.2

28.5
1*.5
2.9
.1*
2.3
1*.8
-

3l*.l
.7
1 .1
.6
3 .3
6.1
-

11*. 6
1 3 .6
7 .1
2 .0
-

Establishments with no formal provisions
fo r paid s ick leave .......................................

52.9

5 6 .6

51*.l

62.7

1 3 .9

86.1*

97.5

3 8.1

Establishments with formal provisions
fo r paid s ic k leave .......................................

1*7.1

1*3.1*

1*5.9

37.3

86.1

1 3 .6

2 .5

61.9

27.7

1 7 .6

21.1*

26.7

5 .0

1*6.9

13.1*

.5

5 .3

5 days .................................................................
6 days .................................................................
7 days .................................................................
10 days ............................................... ..
12 days ..............................................................
13 days ..........................................................
15 days ..............................................................
20 days ..............................................................
21 days ..............................................................
30 days ..............................................................
1*0 days ..............................................................
50 days ..............................................................
52 days ..............................................................
60 days ..............................................................
Over 60 days ....................................................

11.1*
3 .3
.2
2 .2
3 .6
.8
1 .8
1 .9
.3
.2
.3
5 .5
.2
12.7
2 .7

28.5
1*.5
2.9
.1*
2.3
1*.2
.6

3l*.l
.7
1 .1
.6
3 .3
6 .1
-

H*.6
1 3 .6
7 .1
2 .0

.1*
1 2 .7
7 .9
-

1 .3
2 .1
1 .0

2 .5
-

.5
2.5
7 .8
6 .5
-

H *.l
8 .0
-

13.1
.2
.3
.9
(2/)
-

20.0
.5
.9
-•
-

25.6
•
1 .1
-

2 .9
2 .1
-

.8
1*.0
-

_
.5
-

5 .3
-

2.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .1
-

-

1*1*.6
-

-

(2/)
iTo
2.1

-

-

-

-

-

5 .2
5 .9
.5
1 .0
.8
-

52.9

5 6 .6

86.1*

97.5

3 8.1

72.3

7 8 .6

73.3

15 years o f serv ice

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h n o formal p r o v isions
f o r p a i d s i c k l e ave .....................

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1*3.6
21.5

51*.l

62.7

1/

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.

1/
*

13.9

Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1*.2
-

_

-

5 .6
-

-

82.1*

-

-

li* .l
2 8 .0

9 5 .0

5 3 .1

-

8 6 .6

-

-

-

-

99.5

-

91*. 7

Table

£ -6 3

ftOnfM o
ducAdOH, &0M4U&1

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

Type o f bonus

PERCEN T OF PLANT WORKERS EM PLOYED IN

M an ufacturing

All
indus­
tries

A ll estab lish m en ts..............................................

M a n ufac turin g

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade •

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 .......................... ............ ...................
/

33.it

39.0

27.1

67.3

2.it

73.9

62.9

16.7

ll.
tt6

37.8

27.3

21.1

it6.e

17.1

Christmas or year-end .................................
P r o f it-s h a r in g ......... ................................
Other .................................................... ...............

29.0
14.2
1.8

32.1
5.0
3.1

23.5
1.0
lu
ll

52.7
Uu6

2.0

68.9
5.1

16.7
3.1

-

30.3
1.1
13.2

35.5
2.6
1.2

26.6
1.2
1.5

21.1
.6
2.0

U3.9
3.0

-

55.1
10.lt
.1

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses..................................................................

66.6

61.0

72*9

32.7

26.1

37.1

83.3

55.it

62.2

72.7

78.9

53.2

f
* *

-

-

•ll
97.6

y

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

-

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

8L.8

66.5

U5.U

16.3

•
.8

71.2
7.7
5.9

62.1
5.7

39.0
6.3
•1

82.9

15.2

33.5

5iu6

Retail
trade

Services

Includes data for Industries in addition to those shown separately.
Unduplicated t o t a l .
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .

Table E -7 :

O H < I P ^ d U d O d t P lo t t A

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

Type of plan

PERCEN T OF PLANT WORKERS EM PLOYED IN -

M anufacturing

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

M a n u fa c tu re 0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

All estab lish m en ts.............................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans z j ..............................................

86.3

92.2

96.8

8 1 .2

83.it

75.it

Life insurance .............................................. ..
Health insurance ...........................................
H o sp ita lis a tio n ..............................................
Retirement p en sio n ........................................

8 1 .1
77.3
71.1
52.2

90.5
89.8
86.7
ltlt.6

95.5
96.0
95.8
U0.1

7 8.6
7U.8
6 5 .2
55.U

6 1 .6
7 7 .5
5 6 .1
5U.1

63.lt
5U.1
50.3
37.lt

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ................................................ ..

10.9

7.8

3.2

18.8

16.6

2U.6

Information not a v a i l a b l e ...............................

2 .8

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

y

100 .0

100.0

6 1 .5

9lu 3

5U.o
5U.5
3U.1
31.7

9U.2
7 9.7
79.7
77.2

7.9

5.7

30.6

All

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

6 7 .0

8 2.3

9 3 .3

6U.8
50.5
L6.0
21.2

7 2.7
7U.1
6 5 .2
3 1.3

8 7 .3
8 9 .5
83.0
38.6

33.0

1 2.8

6.7-

it. 3

*

It. 9

100.0

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

100.0

100.0

95.7

85.7

9 ii.l
9U.3
9 3 .9
38.6

6 5 .9
7it.6
U9.3
38.6
lit. 3

m

"

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

76.1;

5 2 .7

52.0

58.2
76.5
53.7
32.5

6 2 .1
lt7.1
U5.6
29.it

itit.6
ltlul
28*7
19.3

itit.5
30.1
31.0
.1

-

23.6

23.5

1*8.0

23.8

•

100.0

'

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data fo r in d u stries in addition to those shown separately.
Unduplicated t o ta l.
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .




Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio, April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

20

Appendix - Scope
Vith the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform Job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations s (a) office
olerioal, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A). The covered Industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of tne broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




td Method of Survey
of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment1s full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the seotion relating to women office workers
of the table sumnarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

21

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN COLUMBUS, OHIO, f /
a
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, APRIL 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
u

Numb** of
r
establi shments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ............................
Manufacturing...... ..................
Durable goods 2/ ••.......... .......
Nondurable goods fa/...... ..... .....
Nonmanufacturing.... .... .............
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ......................
Wholesale trade •••;................
Retail trade ......................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Services 2 / .......................

21
21
21
21
21

$A0
255
130
125
585

201
75
48
27
126

114,700
64,900
47,600
17,300
49,800

69,400
43,370
36,520
6,850
26,030

11,700
4,860
3,910
950
6,840

21
21
21
21
21

58
132
217
76
102

14
30
37
19
26

9,100
6,900
19,100
8,400
6,300

5,700
2,490
10,400
4,380
3,060

1,380
640
1,160
3,270
390

21
21

7
38

7
8

8,715
5,664

8,715
3,203

2,530

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Railroads ................................
Insurance carriers ................ .......

1/ Columbus Metropolitan Area (Franklin County),
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products;
miscellaneous manufacturing.
f / Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper
a
products; printing and publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
5/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broacasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
£/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.




22

Index
Biller, machine .... ............
Bookbinder (printing) •••••..... .....
Bookkeeper, hand •••••••••••...... .
Bookkeeping-machine operator •...... .
Bricklayer (building construction) ....
Calculating-machine operator •••••••...
Carpenter (building construction) .....
Carpenter, maintenance.... ..........
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ••••
Cleaner ............. ................
Cleaner (railroads) •«•*•••••••.... .
Clerk, accounting .............. ••••••
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers)
Clerk, file ..........................
Cleric, file (insurance carriers) ••••••
Cleric, g e n e r a l.......
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ...
Clerk (grocery stores) ••••••••••••••••
Clerk, o r d e r .......... ...... .......
Clerk, payroll .......................
Compositor, hand (printing) ....... .
Crane operator, electric bridge .......
Draftsman ............ ...............
Duplicating-machine operator ••••.....
Electrician (building construction) •••
Electrician, maintenance.... .
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) ••
Eleotrotyper (printing) ..............
Engineer, stationary .................
Fireman, stationary boiler ••••••••••••
Guard ..................... ....... .
Helper (bakeries) •••••••••••••••••••••
Helper, motortruck driver ............
Helper, trades, maintenance ..... ..
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads)
Janitor.... •••••.... ...............
Janitor (railroads) ........ ...... .
Key-punch operator ........ ...... ••••
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers)
Laborer (building construction) •••••••
Machine operator (printing) ••••••••*••
Machine tender (printing) .......... .
Machine-tool operator, toolroom •••••••
Machinist, maintenance ••••••••••••••••
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) ••••
Mailer (printing) ........ .
Maintenance man, general utility ••••••
Meat clerk (grocery stores) ......... .
Meat cutter (grocery stores) ••••••••••
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ••••
Mechanic, maintenance ••••••••••••.••••
Millwright..... .....................




8

Mixer (bakeries) •••••••...........................
12
Molder (bakeries) .......
••
•
12
Motortruck driver •••••••••••.............................. 13
Nurse, industrial (registered) .....
7
Office boy...............
3
Office girl...........................
5
Oiler •••••••••••••••.........
♦
&
Operator (local transit) ................. ..........
12
Order filler..............................
9
Ovenaan (bakeries) ...........................
12
Packer....... •••••••••••......... ...............
9
Packer (bakeries) .......
♦
12
Painter (building construction) ....
••••••••.••
12
Painter, maintenance... ........
&
Painter, maintenance (railroads) .... .............. ♦•
U
Photoengraver (printing) .......
12
Pipe fitter, maintenance..........
&
Pipe fitter, maintenance(railroads)
U
Plasterer (building construction) ...............
12
Plumber (building construction) ............ ....... .
12
Porter ....................................
9
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ....................... 11
Press assistant (printing) •••••••••........
•
12
Press feeder (printing) ••••••••......
12
Pressman (printing) ..... ......... ................
12
Receiving clerk........... ............ ....... .
9
Secretary.......
5
Section head (insurance carriers) ...................
11
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance...................
8
Shipping clerk...................... •.......... .
9
Shipping-and-receiving clerk................
10
Stenographer ............... ••••••••••••••..........
6
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ...................
11
Stereotyper (printing) ..•••....
12
Stock handler ....
10
Stock handler (railroads) •••••••... ........... .
11
Switchboard operator ..........
6
Switchboard operator-receptionist ............ ••••••••••
6
Tabulating-machine operator ......... •••••.... .......
3, 6
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) .......
11
Tool-and-die maker .......
8
Tracer....................
7
Transcrlbing-maohine operator .....
•••*•••••
6

8

Truck d r i v e r ....... ...... ........................... ••

12

8
11
9

11

3 ,4
11
4

11
3, 5
11
13
5

3,
3, $
12
9
7

5

12

8
11
12

8
8
9
12
13

8
11
9
11
5
11
12
12
12

11
12

8
13
13

8
8
8

10

Truck driver (railroads) ... ......... .

11

Trucker, hand ..... .••••••••.... ..................... .

10

Trucker, hand (railroads) ........ ........ .
Trucker, power
.... ...... ........ ••••••.... .
Typist ••••••........
Typist (insurance carriers) •••........ •••••••••.... .
Watchman ....................
Wrapper (bakeries) ............. .......... ...... .

11
10
6
11
10
12

☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0— 1952







T HE OCCUPATIONAL MAGE SURVEY SERIES

In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available from the Superin­
tendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. for the following communities:
BLS
Bulletin
-No*.,—

Giii
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Buffalo, New York
Cincinnati, Ohio
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Detroit, Michigan
Hartford, Connecticut
Houston, Texas
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Los Angeles, California
Memphis, Tennessee
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
This report
dressed to:

1045
1044
1085
1096
1056
1043
1041
1066
1086
1059
1084
1075
1064
1094
1067
1099
1068

was prepared in the

BLS
Bulletin
No.

Ciiy
20
15
25
20
25
20
20
20
25
20
20
20
20
25
15
20
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Bureau's

Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey
New Orleans, Louisiana
Norfolk-Portsmouth, Virginia
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Rochester, New York
Salt Lake City, Utah
St. Louis, Missouri
San Francisco-Oakland,
California
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, Washington
Worcester, Massachusetts
North Central Regional Office.

Price

1081
1074
1088
1070
1060
1082
1042
1071
1058
1087
1069
1095

25
15
15
15
25
20
20
20
15
20
15
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1076
1078
1057
1077

25
15
20
20

cents
cents
cents
cents

Communications may be ad­

Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for consultation on
statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, con­
struction and housing, and work injuries.




The North Central Region, includes the following States:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky

Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Montana

Nebraska
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102