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Occupational Wage Survey

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA
April 1952

Bulletin No.

1107

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commi**ioner




Contents
p»g»
i n t r o d u c t i o n .............................................................................

l

THE BIRMINGHAM METROPOLITAN A B B A ........................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE .............................................................

I

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
A-l
Office occupations ................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ......................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations .....................................
A -4
Custodial, warehousing, and shippingoccupations .............................

3
6
7
8

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an Industry basis*
B -63
Insurance carriers ......................................................

10

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction.......................................................
C-205 Bakeries ....................................................................
C-27
Prin t i n g ....................................................................
C-hl
Local transit operating employees ...........................................
C-h2
Motortruck drivers and helpers ..............................................

11
11
11
11
11

Entrance rates D-l
Minimal entrance rates for plant vorkers ....................................

12

Wage practices K-l
Shift differential provisions ...............................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ......................................................
E-3
Paid holidays ...............................................................
E-b
Paid vacations ..............................................................
E-5
Paid sick leave .............................................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses .......................................................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans .................................................

12
13
13
14
15
16
16

APPENDIX!
Scope aid. method of s u r v e y ...............

17

INDEX ....................................................................................

19

* BOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports are avail­
able upon request for auto repair shops (June 1951), ferrous
foundries (June 1951), and power laundries (June 1951)*

F or sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents

August 13, 1952

Introduction y
The Birmingham area is 1 of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys*
Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis.
Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilised in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping.
In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-A) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/
Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables.
Obion seales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

60,800 were employed by manufacturing firms. 2/ Workers engaged
in the manufacture of primary metals numbered approximately
29,000, with 5,250 employed by metal fabricating companies.
Food and kindred product plants accounted for 4,700 of the
manufacturing workers; another 4,250 were employed by firms
manufacturing transportation equipment.
Indicative of the commercial importance of Birmingham
is the fact that approximately 120,000 persons were employed by
nonmanufacturing concerns in April 1952.
Retail trade estab­
lishments employed 27,300 persons, with approximately the same
number in companies performing service functions.
Another
13,250 were working for transportation and other public utility
companies, 10,500 for wholesale trade firms; and 7,200 for
finance, insurance, and real estate establishments. The remain­
ing nonmanufacturing employees were engaged in mining, govern­
mental, and construction activities.
Among the industries and establishment-size groups
studied by the Bureau, unionization in Birmingham area estab­
lishments was generally confined to plant employees. Approxi­
mately three-fourths of the manufacturing, transportation,
communication, and public utility plant workers were employed in
establishments having written agreements with labor organiza­
tions. Fewer than half the plant workers in service and whole­
sale trade firms were covered by labor-management agreements,
and little unionization was found in retail trade or finance
companies. The only significant unionization among office work­
ers was in the manufacturing industries, where about 30 percent
were employed tinder terms of written agreements.

The Birmingham Metropolitan A re a
Population of the Birmingham Metropolitan Area (Jeffer­
son County) totaled 554,186 in 1950.
Of this number, about
298,720 lived within the city limits of Birmingham, reflecting
a n increase of over 10 percent since 1940.
Located in an area rich in a wide variety of natural
resources, Birmingham is one of the major centers of southern
industry. large deposits of coal, iron ore, and limestone - the
three essentials for making steel - are found in the area. Lead­
ing manufactured goods are iron and steel and their products,
cement, textiles, coke, lumber, clothing, and food.
Naoagrieultural waga and salary workers in the Birming­
ham Metropolitan Area totaled 180,625 during April 1952; of these

1/ Prepared in the Bureau's regional office in Atlanta, Ga.,
by Louis B. Woytych under the direction of Harry H. Hall, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. , The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau's
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




Occupational W age Structure
Earnings of a substantial number of plant and office
workers in the Birmingham area were affected by general wage
increases between January 1950 - the base period for the Mage
Stabilization Board's 10 percent "oatch-up"wage increase formu­
la - and April 1952.
A great majority of these increases took
place after the outbreak of hostilities in Korea.
After June
1950, almost 85 percent of the manufacturing plant workers and
over 55 percent of the office workers received general increases.
Approximately three-fourths of the plant workers in the public
utilities and wholesale trade groups and 50 percent of those in
the service group received formal wage adjustments during the
period. More than 85 percent of the office employees in the
public utilities group were granted increases, and about 50 per­
cent of those in the wholesale trade, retail trade, and finance
groups received formal wage adjustments.

2 / labor Market News. May 1952, Department of Industrial Re­
lations, Alabama State Employment Service, Birmingham, Ala., in;
cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Established minimal entrance rates for inexperienced
plant workers were part of the formalized rate structure for
all Birmingham establishments within scope of the Bureau's sur­
vey. More than four-fifths of all plant workers were employed
by firms with minima of 75 cents or more an hour - more than
50 percent were in firms with minimum rates of $1 or higher*
No formal entrance rates below 75 cents were reported by whole­
sale trade establishments and only a small percentage of the
manufacturing and public utility plant workers were employed in
establishments having minimum entrance rates below 75 cents.
Retail trade and service companies generally had lower entrance
rates than establishments in other industry groups.

.Wages for workers in manufacturing industries were
generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing.
In 19 of 21
comparable job classifications, weekly salaries of office work­
ers in manufacturing establishments averaged $2 to $13 higher
than in nonmanufacturing. Average hourly earnings for 16 of 19
plant occupations were higher in manufacturing firms than in
nonmanufacturing establishments.




Almost 30 percent of all plant workers employed by
manufacturing companies worked on extra shifts in April 1952.
Virtually all of these extra-shift workers were paid a shift
differential expressed as a cents-per-hour addition to day rates.
Second-shift workers normally received A cents an hour differ­
ential and most third-shift employees received 6 cents.
At the time of the survey, the prevailing scheduled
workweek was 40 hours for both women office workers and plant
workers. Almost half the women office workers in public utili­
ties, and finance, insurance, and real estate companies worked
less than AO hours whereas a majority of plant workers in whole­
sale trade, retail trade, and service establishments were sched­
uled to work more than 40 hours.
Three or more paid holidays were granted to more than
80 percent of all office workers and over 45 percent of the
plant employees during April 1952.
Six days were most common
far office workers and 5 days for plant workers.
Finance, in­
surance , and real estate companies granted more paid holidays
than other industry groups studied with about a third of their
office workers receiving 12 or 13 days a year.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
O ^ice. O ccupation*

Table A -li

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 3/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Birmingham, Ala., by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF W 0RKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNING8 OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Under 3 0 .0 0

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) 3 0 . 0 0

$
3 2 .50 3 5.00

32.50 3 5 .0 0

3 7 .5 0

*
s
s
$
%
*
s
s
s
$
$
t
t
<
»
l
$
1
3 .50 ! 0 0 42.50 i5.oo W.50 >0.00 ;2.5o >5.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 7 .0( 75.00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 90.00 95X0100.0C
7
|.0
0
and
100 125 I
( . 0 ) , 0 15.00 1 7 5 50.00 52.50 SS.CO 57.50 6 Q . » 6 2 . 5 0 . 65.00 70.00 75.00 8 0 .0 0 B .0 0 90.00 5 5 .0 0 UXWJO over
5
(.0

Men
R n n lr ira a n s ra . h a n d ..................................................................

m

39

*

llO
l.
IOO
t.
I c
n
bo.o
ld.5

88.00
72.00

72.50
75.50

1ft

_

-

-

-

_
.

_
-

.
-

_
-

-

•

-

9

65.00
71.50
59.50

•
-

-

•

7
1
6

2
1
1

-

16
3
13

33
IS
18

20
1
19

8

5

•
•

105
(.

62.00

-

-

-

-

197
123
7b
26

10.0
i
100
(.
39.5
lOO
l.

63.00
6b.5o
60.50
62.50

_
•
-

darks, ordar......................
Noonanufaetaring ...... ......... .
Wholesale trade...............

175
53
S3

105
..
125
).
125
(.

67.50
61.50
61.50

Clerks. s«T 0l l ....................
Manufacturing...................
Noxsanufactaring................
Wholesale trade ..... ......... .

108
92

105
(.
100
).
125
).
135
).

7U.0O
75.00
67.50
63.50

Office bars..... ..................

63
29
20

39.5

35.50

30
19

39.5
39.0

12
2
7
13

Clarks, «0 <v»inMnT ..................
Manufacturing ...................
Nonnanufacturing................

257
117
lt
lO

39.5
Ho.o
39.0

Wholesale trade ...............

8i
1

Clerks, general ....................
Manufacturing... ••••*.......... .
Nonaanufaetaring ................
Public utilities * .............

Tabulating-machine ooerators ...........
Honsamifacturiag.......... ..... .

16

12

_
*
.
u
“

-

-

_

-

2

.
-

•
-

_
-

?
2
2

2

3^ .50

73

105
).

5

8

2

8

b

8

20

11

5

22
16
6
2

20

5
1

12
10
2
2

16

2
2

6
b
2
2

9
7

7
13

1

12

12

6

21

20

20

-

7
7

5
5

-

-

13
13

5
5

1
1
•
-

2

11
3

1

1
1
1

•
_
.
.
-

8
L
u

n
6

9

3

6
6
6

i
)
u

5

“
2
2
2

9

8
b
U
l
>

.

2
2

-

-

3

Bill.rs. Muhin# (bookkecoins Metals.)...

.................................

39.0
39.0
Lo.o

13
3

2$
8

10

7

7

}n o
fT

39
33
20

b

100
(.0
38 I 0
5

Bookkacoers. haund...................

203

110
).

16 b

10.0
bo.5
100
).
bb.O
39.0

57.50
5(5
1.o
56.50

1

i
i

6 2 .5 0

a.
-

•

_
_
•
.

1

10
10
•

1
1

8
8
«
.

5

11
6
5

10
b
6

1

2/

b

6

b

b

-

-

-

15
9
6

9
b
5
3

8

A
8
.
-

8
6
2
-

h
b

h
b

-

-

12
6
6

h
2
2

29

13

13
1
1

2

1

16
11
5
b

16
16
•
-

17
16
1
-

3

11

_
-

13
13

7

20

2

'

9

8

3
1

2

2

3

1
'

2
2

9
9

b
b

-

-

-

-

6
2
b
2

2
2

6
6

6
6

-

-

-

—

11
1

7

13

6

13
13
-

*

“

"

'

1

18
2
2

2
1

2
2

23

1

16

35

10

9

23

15

2b
7

10

8

1
1
_
.

1

1

_
.
_

16

23

18

17
/
.

5

21

10

13

.
.

•
-

•

-

.

6

5

•
lb

9

9

’

52.50

7
i
>

1

9

•

7

9

1

1

“

1

11
9

b
9

2

7

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham, Ala., April 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABQR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




18
12
6

2

b
2

3
3

9

A

5

_
_
u

3

2

3

18

'

20
U6
59
38

.
_
-

9

7

57.50

Hoosuufaetuzlng.................
Public utilities * ...... .......
Wholesale trade.... ..... ......
Ect.il trad. ..................................................................
Finance ** .............................. ......................................

75

22

1

2
2

h
— ip

25
a
b

9

•
.
-

110
(.0

78

8
6
2
2

•
-

i(\ .no

6
22

-

J

20
37

18
6
12

7
2

'

Billers. machine famine machine) .......

•

-

-

1
1

12

it

-

58.50
Sb.So

13
6
7

7

6

•
•
“

9

2b
10
lb

17

18
10
8

22
11

3t
fJo

6
2

a
.
I
t

ft
_
£

12

10
_

Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade.... ............

h

3

1

3

1

_

_

IO

m
m

m
m

m

10

2

b

10

_

3

“

.

“

-

•

Table A-l:

O ffice OcCMfuUiO*U> - G otU itU ted

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings V for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Birmingham, Ala*, by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F -

Sex, occupation, mod industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
Nme
ubr
$
$
$
*
o
f
ky
e l
e y W e l Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 UO.OO U2.50 U5.00 U7.50 S0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 55.00 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 62.50 65.00 7 0 .0 0 75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0 .0 0 9 . 0 1 0 0 .0 0
50|
w res Woks ee ig $
okr
anns
r
hu
r
(tnad (tnad 30.00
Sadr) Sadr)
0.0
32.50 35.00 37.50 Uo.oo 1 2 5 U5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 5 5 .0 0 57.50 6 0 .0 0 62.50 65.00 70.00-7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 1 0 0 1 ov.r
|,0

Women - Continued
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A **«
Manufacturing ................. ..
Momanufacturing ..................
Wholesale trade................

58
19
39
13

Bookteeping-marhin* operators, class B«,.
Manufacturing... *.............
Monmanufacturlng .............*....
Public utilities • ..............
Wholesale trade .................
fietail trade .,................ .
Finance « * .....................

363
52
311
21
39
96

152

U0 .5
uo.o
I
10.5
U3.0

*
5U.50
5U.56
5U.50

UO.O Ul.00
39.5 •51.00
U0.0 39.50
UO.O U5.00
Uo.o 39.50
U1 .5 39.50
39.0 38.50

«
-

•
•
•

15
15
•
9
3
3

U
U5
US
2
u
10
29

U
U6
-.
U6
1
1
15
28

6
.
70

•
70
U
u
19
U3

J~ l
6

73
5
68
3
11
27
27

2
2
?9
7
32
1
1
12
18

2
2
is
5
13
3
5

u
1

9
5
U
1

6
3
3
-

15
12

13
U
9
1
6
2

3

1
•
2
•

7
7

6

-

9 __7_
5
3
U
U
1
3
1
2
“

11
•
11

10
9
1
-

U
-

2 __I_
6
1
1
1
1
1

3

U
2

3

u

•

u

m

. __ 3 .J
•
2
•
1
•
1
-

u
-

-

u
u
_
_

.

.
•
.
-

.
.
-

_
-

“

•
-

_

.

•
•
•
•

•
_
-

1

16
12
.

1
•
1
-

1

Calculating-machine operators
(Cespto— ter type) .......... ........
Manufacturing..... .............. .
Monmanufaetaring................. .
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade... •...........
Retail trade ...................
Calculating-machine operators (other
than Comptometer tree) ....... .......
Manmanufacturing ..................
Wholesale trade ...... ......... .

67

UO.O
39.5
UO.O
Uo.o
U0.5
Uo.o

US.00
5.50
U2.50
U8.50
U5.50
U0 .0 0

81
7U
UO

39.5
39.5
U0.0

U0 .5 0
U0 .5 0
U0 .5 0

79k

U6 .0 0
U5.S0
U2.00
U2.50
U6.00
39.00

263
99

16U
13
60

Clerks. acoo«»*tA«g...................
Manufacturing ........ ........ .
Vonmanafactoring..................
Wholesale trade...... ..........
Retail trade...................
Finance ** .......... ....... .
Sendees .......................

19?
599
132
11
1*
77
u

39.5
bo.o
39.5
Uo.o
Ui.5
38.5
U1.0

Clerks, file, class A .................
Manufacturing .....................
Monmanufacturlng..................
Finance * * ..... ...............

79
30
U9
36

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0

U5.00
U9.00
U2.50
Ul.00

Clerks, file, class B ..... ...........
Boananufacturing ..................
Finance * * ........... .........

2UU
218
155

39.5
39.5
39.0

36.0 0
3U.5 0

Clerksf general .....................
Manufacturing............. .
Momanufacturing ................ .
Wholesale trade....... .........
Retail trade .............. .
Finance *» .....................
Services .............

1.078
277
SOL
13U
179
197
U9

U0.5
UO.O
U0 .5
Uo.o
U5.0
39.0
U3.0

U6.0C
U9.00
US.50
U5.50
Ul.0 0
UU.50
Ul.0 0

Claries, order ....... «............. .
Monmanufacturlng......... ........
Retail trade............... .

127
16
)
10

U0.5
Ui.5
Uo.o

Sl.So
U5.50
32.50

Clerks, payroll ................ ......
Manufacturing.................. .
Nonmanufacturing ........ ..........
Public utilities * •••..........
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ...................
Finance *# .....................

229
126
103

uo.o
UO.O
UO.O
39.0
UO.O
Uo.E
39.5

50.50
53.50
U7.00
U8 .5 0
U7.50
U5.oo
51.00

35
17
33
12

U7.5 o

35.00

.
-

12
.
12
•
3
9

.

7
7
2
1
-

6
3U
1
17
6

7

20

7
3

17
10

10
10

J8
2
36
29
3
2
-

6?
19
U6
.
9
1

101
32
69
16
9
U
2

7
3

8
3
5
2

15
•
15
15

U5
U5
35

16
16

95
20

90

•
-

.
-

2

8

2
.
•
•
2

8
U
3
•
1

•
-

1
1
-

u
u
-

68
66
U5

67
*7

i
.

U3
2
Ui
2
9
10
2

10
.
10
6

5
5
5

2
2
2

u
3
3

1

9

1?

u

•
u

.
“

-

'

1
1

—

u
u

60

u

-

1
8
2
6

“

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




to

32
3
29
1
5
21

a

75
10
26
23

1

8

u
3

1
—

s

15
•
3
U

21
i5
6
1
5
-

2?
i5
1U
1
2
11

15
lt
i
1U

16
i5
-

U
u
u

.
-

6
U

118

70
7
63

72
26
U6
12

Ul
6
35

92
*3
U9
9
2

29
10
19
1
8
8

18
3

n
107

U8
23
5
-

6
25
1U
-

7
-

7
u
3
2

7
7

5

U
12

27

20
7

1
6

7
5

2
2

2
1
1
1

•

15
5
U

216
3
3
183

7«

30~
60

152
56
96

16

21

18
2U
2

82
50
22

6
3
33
5

10
12
-

u

7
5

10
10

12

17
1
16
8

1?

•

2

16
6
10
3

2

3

1

7
u
3

•

25
17

8
3

u

9
69

5
7
•

5

2

10
u
6
-

22
1
a

U
-

6
1
5
.

2
2
-

1
•
1

1
1
.

27
16
2
8

36
12
2U
_
6
1U

6

2
u

u

.
•
•
_

“
50
19
31

6
1
5

56
i5
UL
2
2

20
k
16

2
2

22
u
18
6
7

.
-

1
1

6
5
1

18
6
10
2
.
2

U5
12
33
9
U

6
.

1
_

5
1

1

5
u

3
1

1
1

1
1

_

•
.
.
-

_
•
.
-

.
•
.
.

•
.

.
.

.
.
-

.
-

_
•
_

_
- . -

_

-

_
•
_
.

2
1

vt

_
-

8

•
.
-

1
1

6

a

3

k

1
3
1

5

is
1U
6

5

-

12
10
2
.
2

39

100
36

62
U

23
1
7
2

18
1
L2
25
17

6

15
8
7
U
3

1
*

•

u
30

71
10
61

•

2

9
•
-

3

11
)

11

22
5

7
2
5
5

62

10

a

8

2

11
5
6
1

9

15
9

6
3

2
7
2
3
U

n

U

10
2

1

3

2
2

2

9

1
1

6

3

.
-

-

1
1
.
-

10
.

3

U

2

1
,
2
2
1

1

&

1
1

6
5
1
1

1
1
1

-

•
*

.
“

m

2

-

1

•
2
2
-

1
1
•
•

_
•

_

•

•

5
5
-

•
—

*

*

-

-

*

O ffice Ocettpa tiOMi - GantiMMed

Table A -l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings V for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Birmingham, Ala., by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W EEKLY EARNINGS O F -

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
s
s
s
*
$
t
*
$
$
Under 30.00 32*50 35.00 37.50 U0 .0 0 52.50 15*00 17.50 5 0 .0 0 52.50 55.00 57.5o 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 65.00 7 0 .00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 |95*00100.00
i
«
and
30*00
3 2 .5 0 35.00 3 7 .5 0 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.00 5 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 55.00 57«5° 6 0 .0 0 62,50 6 5 ,0 0 70.00 7 5 ,0 0 30.00 85,00 9 0 .0 0 95.00 lOO.GO

Women - Continued
DuolicaMTia-marM«• ooerators ...... .

lb
i

50.0

m

2

7

MV*
Ker-cunch ooerators .................

106

IS
ff
tt

36.5
1^0

53.50

m

7

7

i
)

5

5

b

5i.oo

$

i

5

1?
10

to

<

) 9 AA
(t

75
«;
So
20

39.5
£o.o
39.5

37.00
39.00
36.00

Secretaries............... *..... .
Muadetviiii..................
Xoanaxrafacturing .............. .
Public utilities • ............

593
22b
269
53
11
|
59
100
36

39.5
4o.o
39.5
50.0
11.A
(
51.0
38.0
51.0

56.50
59.50
55.00

SteiKwr«uh*r». roeral.............. 953
Menofiietorlng.................. ill
Scocamfactaring................
S|
12
Public utilities * ......... .
159
Wholesale trade ........... .
131
72

Retail trade *........ .......
Flume. * * ..................
S m l e n ................... .

Stenorrcrherc. technical............
Kcnufccturlng............ ......
Nonaanufacturing ............... .
Retail tr«d» ................
Switchboard ODcrmtor-rcceotioniste.....
Manufacturing ........... ........
Hownafactnrlng ................

.

.......................

Tabulatinc-aschiae aerators.........
Voasarntfecturing .......... .

Manufacturing..................
Hozuaanufactaring ................

17
m

•

n

16
X
12
8

15
2
i3
8

6
•
6

6
1
5

8
7
1

2

15
3
13
•
4
1
6
"

10

1

5

21
4

10
1

1
•

5
•

15

JtA
52^50
50.50
51.50

•
•

•
1
2

.
7
2

•
1
-

5
1

5
9
-

50.0
50.0
50.0
39.5
50.5
lOO
l.

58.50
51.50
56.50
52.00
58.00

m

.
-

1
1
-

2?
2
25
-

5,
1
I
t
50
6
3

6 7 .0 0

50.0

50.5

35.00

155
55—
9
6

50.5
39.5
51.0
11.
( <

3
5

2

5

22

3
5

2

5

5
i*
f'
53.50
9
50.00
39.50
9

2

30

50.0
5o.o
50.0
5o.o
5o.o

53.50
U&.oo
5 0 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
3 6 .0 0

m

n?
y r

81
15
27

5
16

.

m

LO
15
26

1
5
12
8

96
31
67
19
20

132
65

t

67
15

20
5

-

3
2

5
1

1

1

93

58
55
5
l£
10

15
3

in
7

11
1

1
5
5
-

100
55
56
9
25

n6
74
38
10
11
8

6
5
1

7
6
1

17
12

s
1
5
£

3

5?
ho

19
11
8

54
32
22
2
5
1
10
26
10
16
10

2

16

3

IS

9

5

3
5

n
5

3

5

7

7

1

2

22

22
8
15

7
3
5

15
2

-

•

22
21
2
8
7

6
“
52
29
13
11
-

25
H
15
3
2
5

1
36
17
19
15

5

1

1

13
7

1

2

3
3

5
5

5
5

5
5

3
2
1

•

14
7
7
5

25
13
12
n
1

-

-

3
1
19
12
10
2

16
3
13
13

4
1
3

1

2
2

.

5

1

_
-

•
-

10
10
m
•
.

•
•

1

1

1

1
1

•
.

•

.

•
-

m

. •

m

6
5
1

1

-

2

8
5
5
3

7

«
.

2

1
1

—f -

23
16
7

5
2

z 1
13
5

•
3

x1

m

.
•
-

•
.

•
•
•

1

1

36
u
22
2

1

6

3

30
23
7
3
_
2
2

1
1

1

25
6
18
8
)
,
A

ki

20

1
7

1

x

2

3

Vi
8
26
2
8
6
11
3

5

2

3

2

9

9
1
,

11

5

7
t

3
19
K

8

1
1

3
3

_

8

6

8

m

5

9
7
2

1

5

13

5

r

1

7

3

17

5

2

1

2

2

3
3

15
2

5

11

21

5
—

8

13

J
l

0

6

11

3

2

5

11
•
-

2
•

n

8
8

9
•

V *

39.0 52.50
3S3- 53.00

61
6
55
12

1

-

55.50
50.50
59.50
36.50

m

See footnotes at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




13

8

3

51.5
39.5
53.0

107
uo
67
3U
30

5

3
-

12

39
35—
20

17
1A
8

•
-

Ui>
w
95
25
29
33

2$

13

2

1?

10

5

Office sirle .....................
Manufacturing
Homunofaeturliig ................

3

5

5

6
8

5

5

1

5
H

r

IS
7
8
8

?
1

4
ji

h

3
1

6
6
.

5

e

2
2

.

2
2

•

_

Oj/f/Ux O ccupation* - C ontinued

Table A-li

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Birmingham, Ala,, by industry division, April 1952)

Averaue
Sex, occupation, and industry division

o
f

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

worker*

s
*
*
s
*
$
$
s
*
t
$
*
>
t
1
$
$
s
$
$
$
3 0 .0 0 32.50 35.00 3 7 .5 0 16.00 112.50 U5.00 117.5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 55.00 57.50 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 65.00 7 0 .0 0 75.00 8o.no 85.00 90.00 95*00 1 0 0 .0 0
and
illso 35^00 37.50 1 6 .0 0 l 2 5 J£*SQ If 50.00 52.50 55.00 S i ', j o 60 * o 62^50 6560 70.00 75.00 8 0 .0 0 65.00 90.00 95.0010060
a.
i.0
f .59
$

Number
Weekly Under
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) $

3 0 .0 0

Vonen - Continued
Tmlata. alias i ........ .........
HuMfaeturlaf..................

116
60
88
16

58
T r o ir ta .

oil*. B

.................................................................

39.5
i0 .0
|
19*5
16*9

lio 5

81
32b
3k
169
13

k/

*
**

10

v g *n

20
88

1/
2/
3/

1 2 .0 0
(

iS w
i’
1 6 .0 0

^.50

-

-

_
_

-

10
9

39.5 3 7 .0 0
19*5 p t a r
39*5 iji5*50
10 -0
^
Vj.S0
10 . 0
(
39 J ?
3 9 *5

ii.b o

100
«.

3
1
3
26
6
IR

70

~

12
r
7

in

67

67

98

6U

98
k

13

6k
10

kL

23

16

10

10
59

2

6
2
29

: 6 "

3U.00

3$

6

2

3k

’2

15
6
9

16
12

U
u

6
6

m

5
5
_

k

7

3

k

10
1
9

k

7

3
1

3

_

.

.

9
2

•

m

3

6

_

.

k

k

m

3

22

1

i

1

15

10

£ / io

22
2

6

10

35*50

39
17

k

ko

27
2
16

6
3

5

e
6

k
1

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
All workers at $105 to $110.
Workers distributed as follows: Hi at $22.50 to $25; 2 at $25 to $27.50; Ha at $27.50 to $30.
All workers at $27*50 to $30.
Workers distributed as follows: 2 at $25 to $27.50; 6 at $27*50 to $30.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Tata.

1/

k-2 > Piofaiteonal and *1octutical Occupations

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham, Ala., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table a-3: Maintenance. and. Poute* Pla n t Occnpationi
(Average hourly earning* V for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Birmingham, Ala., by industry division, April 1552)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Caroenters. maintenance................. .
Manufacturing ......... ..................
Nonmanufactuzlng.... .................. ..

*
$
s
$
$
N m e Ae a e
u b r vrg
hul
ory
o
f
ann* n e
w r e * erig I d r 0.85 0*50 0.95 1*00 1*05 1*10 1*15
okr
$ 8 .90
.5
.95 1*00 1 .0 5 1*10 1.15 1*20
t
1.60
1
321
1
- .
.
1.79
27?
- 1
~
1
b2
1.89
9T %
1
15

Electriciuis. maintencnc* ....................
Manufacturing ................ ...........
Nonmanufacturing........ ......... .......

506
TBT ~
19
15

1.89
1.89
1.88
lfl
Jf

Engineers* stationary .............. ..........
Nonmanufacturing .............. ...........

269
36

1.71
1*61

Firemen, stationazy boiler........ .......... .

7i
l
66

-

-

-

i
t
“

/.
1.U 3 1 2
1*16 ■n r
“

m

-

1

-

Jk_

-

•

l
l

2
•

-

6
6

m

m

??
22

t

m

m

i
i
|
,

.

-

-

.

•

.

3

3
1
2

1

2

Machinists* maintenance ............... ......
Manufacturing......... ........... ......
Nonmanufacturing ..... ............ ..... .

876
662
Hi

1.88
1.88
1.73

-

-

Maintenance am. mural utility...............
Manufacturing...........................
Nomanufactaring...... ..................

171
105
66
15
18
23

8
l.bS
l.b?
8
1.3?
1
l*k6
i
i_l w /
i| | °A

5

Mechanics* automotive (maintenance).... ....... .
Manufacturing...........................
Nomanufacturing.........................
Public utilities * .................... .
Wholesale trade ........................

llO
li
119
321
109
150

1.53
1*70
1.17
1.18
1.52

2
2
“

-

18
16
18

•
-

Manufacturing ............. ......... .... *
Nonmanufacturing ................ ....... .

526
I99
t
2
7

1.7l
1.71
1.79

-

.

•

•

Millwrights ...............................
Manufacturing ......... ..................

378
338

Manufacturing............. ..............

1.38
1.35

Painters, maintenance............. ...... .
Manufacturing................. .... .....

121
86

1.71
1.70

Plumbers, maintenance..... ....... ..........
Manufacturing....... ....................

Ik
12
27
25

1.81
1.80

153
153

1.87
1.87

2
1
1

-

6
6
-

•
-

7
7

?
1
1

10
10
-

2
2
•

1?
11
1

•
-

3
3

l5
2h 1 |
13 ib5
11

5

-

-

-

3

-

1
1

-

-

.

9
8

-

b
b

2
2

13
13

7

_

1
1

_

_

_

•

n
21
-

6
6

12
-

_

17
12
1
8
_

1? 13
10 13
2 -

20
20
.

5
1

19 2b

3
3

b6

2b
2

f
i
$

h _
I
}

6
6

5 11
1
5 lb

1? 5?
17 5o
2 2

5
5
5

i _J2_ 8
t
6
9
•
1
9
3
-

b5
7
2b

-

3

i




_

l
l
b

6

6
6

1
i
t

2
2

.

5
•

-

-

1

1
1

1

•
•

zz 13
19 11
3 2

16

6

hi
28
IS
5

3
3

?
2

bS

32
9
23
9
5

10
10
-

2
2
-

.
-

10

6
1
5
2
2

17
2
15
1
-

3 _i£l 7
7
12
20 b
25
25 3
20
2b
1
2 3

20
6
lb
5
6

If l|
f l
U7 lb

h?

_
??

22
-

?h
88
6

2k
5

19

15

s

2
2

11
10

3
3

•
-

11
11

•

i>
i
lb

2
8
26

n 10
11 16
- 1

9,
1

21
5

•

3

Vt
15

3
1
22
9
9

5
5
5
11
11
“

80
1
79

2

15
6
9
2
-

5

1
10
b

m
m

ii

15
12
3

1

-

2

,6
8? | n
82 b06
-

6
b
2

5

92

i? 8?
t
b3 62
b 16 _
12
b •

i 10
.
6
ii b
L
7
2
5
5

6
2

5, 17?
1
S2 172
•
2

2
2
-

h
h
bb

I
,

l
l
3
1

2

79

l
l
b
_
-

-

ol k>
i J
9b la
- 1

10 1?
15 IS
b 2

20
lb
6

56
53
3

12 ?
6
12 21
- b

<7 inA
57 106
2

1 3
*
1 35

.

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime sod night work.
Workers distributed as follows: 8 at $2*10 to $2.15; 10 at $2*15 to $2*20*
Workers distributed as follows: U at $*55 to $.60} U at 8*75 to 8*60| U at$*80 to #*85*
Workers distributed as follows: 2 at 8*70 to 8*75} 6 at 8*80 to 8*85*
Workers distributedas follows: 6 at 82*10 to 82*15} 3 at 82*15 to 82*20} 3 at 82*25 to82*30*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*

y
3/
W
y

1

m

•
•

2

5

76
70

3 /I
8

1.87
1.87

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance........... .
Manufacturing ...........................

1 ,2 5

s
s
$
s
$
:
s
f
*
$
*
1
»
s
$
$
s
<
1*25 1*30 1.35 UhO Ui5 i*5o 1.55 1*60 1.65 1 .7 0 1.75 1*60 1.85 1.90 1.95 2*00 2.05 2*10
and
, ) .|
1,60 1,95 X JS L 1,75 1,90 ;,95 ia20 1 ^ 5 hoo
L30 i±2L 1 1 0 L l 5 i,?o 1
. * 2 over
11

1.86
1.86

133
119

$
1*20

*
?3 p>
23 25

1
,
b

2
7
27

,
39 16
39 U6

56

7
7

1
1

13

-

-

-

6
6

1
1

9 _1_ 2
8
3 2

hi
la

1?
10

l?
15

10
10

106
106

m _

16

_
_
.
-

•
-

1

lg
12

1
_
-

5
5 '-

-

-

-

-

.
-

3
3

_
_

_

m
. _

2
2

13 32
13 32

3
3

6
6

I
,
b

c
;
5

9
9

1

-

b7

2
2

3

6
6

«
.
12
d /1*

-

_

-

-

-

10
10

21

60 19
19

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Birminghma, Ala*, April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of LaborStatistics

-

-

_
i
i

Q uiiadicd, hOa>ieltoui,iH^r and S k ip p in g O ccupation*

Table A-li*

(Average hourly earnings V for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Birmingham, Ala*, by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

wa v .
vk i

hourly

21
2)

!

8

1

1

i

$
e

|

1

Occupation and industry division

s
l
t
t
t
<
<
*
•
s
t
t
t
»
• , * . t
t . $ . *
*
s
l
«
s
t
U d r 0.35 0 .6 0 0.65 0.70 0 .7 5 0.80 0 .8 5 0.90 0.95 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1 . s 1.20 1 .25 1*30 1.35 l l O 1.U5 1*50 1.60 * . 0 i.so 1*90 2.00 2.10
ne
.i
1
17
and
0 .5 5
,(
. G .65 . 5 .75
6
6
7
iT
.i .i
. ( ,f . ( . C .(
t< ■?5 1,00 1,95 111 1.15 l ? l.?5 l.K 1.35 l l O l ' 5 1.50 1 . c 1 7 l 8 1 ? P O ? 1
??
1
1

?l
l

?9

95

60

5

1
1

-

| li 38
, i
k lk * r

9

-

9

-

k
l
l

-

ik
8
6

6
6
_

•
-

_
_

_
•

„
•

•
_

.
.

•
-

_
.

?
2

6
6
0

10

13

?
2

_

5
5

•

.

•

3

1 .5 2

1
1

60
216
223

1.3k
1.36

Janitors* porters* and cleaners (men)... *........ 1.553
Manufacturing...........................
£55
Hormenufaeturing............ ............ . 1,096

.83
1.07
.73

Manufacturing............................

87
«9
in
r
Janitors, sorter*, end cleaner* ( o a n ..........
ure)

109

—

f,)
|J
k?

6
-

-

1 1 16
8 )

70

18 :

9
61

16
*

.1
0
3
*68 Vi 1 36
l
l
*7k
If 67 6
,
.5k
.ftft

12
9

-

-

0

21
57

Q
15

23

9

23

18
)
15

21
58

-

62
55
27

5k
20
3k

k

76
30

31

-

52

71

7k

3
1

|5
i
15
*

*

18
5
13

19 6k
)
3
7
5

71
3

51
51
2

3
7
37

21
8
13
13

6

3

20

8

?
8

L

20

<
5

g

3
1

73

1?

3
1

31
31

73

19

31

3

18

5

75

160

3
3

1

7k

9

5 1 ) 25
/13

IS
0

0

3

3
7
37

126 282 116 Ilk
. 3) 16 29
l
18
69 128 2 ) 122 85

i
t

h

-

69

75

33
0
.if

-

1?

?

7
t

17

c

1

1
,

3

1
I? 1
t
12 11
)

6I
1
6k

6
6
0

8
7

51

1

9
375

i.ee

322

1 .0 2

66

inC
.*

219
iMi

Memuoufacturing.........................

1.31
1»b6

7t

•

.

.

-

1
1

1

36

75
L

16

Q

h
k

k7
5
£

13

1
5,
1
5*
1

17

0
15

R o - v t * clerks...........................
aei-n

129

Shicnsina-end*receivins clerks.......*..........
Manufacturing......... ..................
Nonsanufacturing .................... .
Retail trade..........................

1t9*

259
121
138

117
.)
I.6 7
1.30

226_ 1 .3 1
146
117
.)
106
1.13
1T
10
.99
63

29k
93
201
118
72

1.10
1.20
.9 7
1 .0 9

.96
.87

.96
1.18
.86
.92

.

.

_
-

.
-

_

_
-

.

-

•
-

l
l

.
-

k

j
l

k

-

5

k

2

2

16

11

9

22

k

5

1

1

1

16

9
9

8
k
b

2

12

_

1?

13

12

13

-

5

?i
|

3

?3

2k

1
2

23

11
1
10

h
k
-

■k k
I
t
k

1

-

-

.
-

-

m 29
29
- • 29

-

7

-

iu
i>
i
•

9
«
9

22
.
22

-

10
10

2
?
.
29

?
2
-

-

-

9

22

-

10

12

-

7

23 16?

n

7

23

_
n

.
7

12
-

m

lkk
16
- 96
23
32

78 16? 1?8 166 1 t
f7
26 ill So 56 7k
52 58 78 110 113
.
2 52 22 38
Il 51 22 22 1
l
1
11
*)
5
k 66 11

22

la

25

12

22

12

22

13
11

kl
3
5

16

11
7
k

22
16

,
17 17
10 12

k7

16

k7

<

c

2?
6
lk

56
36
20
20

IP
8
2

k
k
-

2

-

187 10? 225
no
50 208
77 52 17
36 32
2
25 20
9
16
6
•
_

_

16
-

8
7
1

55
55

•
.
.

“

_

5
13
9

i
*

3?

5

9
10

-

18
lk
k

-

2

n,6 4k
66 111 20
kO
k
5
2
k
3
2 36
2
“

65
59
6
1

18

18
-

-

7

-

-

-

17
10
7

??

22
_

_

2

2? 10
27
7
2 3

79
19

0

6

•

Il 165
f
89
17
1 76
1 76
•

2

0

5

5

106

-

.

•

•

1
1
_

_

6
5
1

10
10
-

7
e
.

1
-

3

3

.
>

n

7
-

-

9

2

h

J
t

See footnote* at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
*» Finance, insurance, and real estate*




lk

1,90

2.105
Manufacturing... ......... ............... 1,196
Moaaanufacturlng..................*......
907
Public utilities * ......................
287
Mholeeaie trade ........................
31
6)
Retail trade ....... *..................
256
Track driven, llsht (under li tons) ............
Manufacturing ....................... ....
Monmanufacturing .............. ...........

ik

8
|
,

1.18

56

Manufacturing ........................ .
Mcaaanufacturlng *.................. ..... .

8

1.26

i5
l
8U
il
l

Boouaufactuxlng ........... .............. .

l
i

5
-

7

6
1

10

6
6
0

17
17

_42L_12_
19
5
8
k
2
2
-

12
28 12
k • k •
•

•

-

-

-

6

?

6
6
•
-

•
_

8
-

-

“

2
•
-

•

-

-

-

•

•

“

m

1

3

15

6
6
-

•

Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham, Ala., April 1952
U.S. BBPAKTMBHT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table a—
lit

Cust odial, W ateU oulinf, and S k ippin g Occupation^ - Continued
(Average hourly earnings V for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Birmingham, Ala., by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVIN G STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

o
f

wr e s
okr

:
t
t
*
S
9
1
9
<
t
1
t
• . t
1
$
t
t
t
»
9
<
9
9
h ul Under 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0 .7 5 0 .8 0 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 1.2? 1.30 1.35 l.UO 1 1 51.50 1.60 1.70 1 .8 0 1.90 2.00 2.10
ory
.*
0 .5 5

Vhol.nl. trod. ........................

311
139

t
1.18
1.45
1.1k
1f
n
1.08
*92

Truck drivers. b u m ( m r k t m . trailM. tro.)...
Msnsfseturlcg ...........................
■nantwtariil
.......................

62k
129
k95
3k0

1.19
1.15
*96

150

l.k3
l.ko
1.05

Sk

.) ?
_s2° _t2i 1.00 1.0? i.1 0 1.1? 1.20 1 .2 ? M ° 105 1 1 0 1 k5 l.?C 1.60 1.70 1.80

_J0 _il£

1.U9

272
2)
10
2k

and

_^o

1.19
1.23

Tmelr drivers* eedimm (l& to and Including k toms) . .
.

1 ,2 1 6

k&4.
75k

Manufacturing............... .......... .

>anutKtvlii(........................ .

yo?

-

k

9

-

-

-

-

-

k

9

_

.
_

-

.
k

•
9

96
30
66

52

5k
12

33
19

1 .1 6

52

k6 135
26
k5
20 90
15
k k2
16 33

16

95
65
33

kT 121
8
k
k3 113

10
6

25
8

31
12

13
10

-

_kz_
21
26

9
2

16

_

_ 1 no 12$
2
6 36
96
3 10k 90
96
10k 90
96

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

Ik
12
2

77
17
10

1
1

6

__6
_
6
6j

59
3

56

__6 _19
6
9
m 10

1 _32_
1 12
- 20

130
57

2?
Ik
8

1|
|
5
9

3

k3

53
17
36
36

6

2

bO
22
18
10

96

23

96

18
18

68

6
6

«
,

h
h

9
1

23
23

Track drivers, heavy ( m r k tan*, othar
Truckers, sonr (fork-lift) ...................
Mamifmetering ...........................
Kcrmurafacturlng.........................
Truckers- oarer father thee fork-lift).....
Kenufeetwiiif........... ...............
Henfeettoiag....... ........................
■nwnrmfsctnirlsg ............... .............
Public wtilitiea * ..... .........
& + • <- iMih .............................
*.• \

—
362
2k9
133
30
52
26
17

k

3k
16
16

10
5
5

5

1.10
1.22
.89
.93

10

•62

k
2/6

-

-

-

7

k

3

7

k

3

-

•

2
2

2
1

n

10
-

-

-

-

ik
9
5
k

?k
12
12

1

5

7

»0
10
10
10

20
7
13
-

1

19
k
15

V

10

13

37

7
3

9

-

15

5

12
12

-

- -3 -

35
15

20

10
10

5
2
3
n

78
21

7
2

.

-

t

L

$

k

1

Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.




-

-

Workers distributed as follows* U2 at $ .3 0 to $.35) 30 at $.35 to $.k0j 1 1 * at $.1*0 to $.k5l 9 at $.U5 to $.50} 17 at $.50 to $.55*
Workers distributed as followst 12 at $.25to $.30j 2 *at $.35 to $.k0} 16 at $.k0 to $.k5) 9 at $.1*5 to $.50) 6 at $.50 to $.55*
1
Workers distributed as followst 16 at $.25to $.30) 57 at $.U0 to $.1*5} 26 at $.U5 to $.50} U2 at $.50 to $.55*
Workers distributed as follows: 136 at $.25 to $.30; 79 at $.30 to $.35} 32 at $.35 to $.1*0.
Workers distributed as follows: 1 at $.1*5 to $.50} 2 at $.50 to $.55*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

221412 0 — 52------ 2

-

•

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

•

•

2
2

6
6

9

-

15
5
10

-

.

k
L

16
16

k
k

5

-

-

ho 3
7
k0 33
k
•
k

3

23 26
lk 26
9
6L
6

*

•

3
3

.
•

?.oo ?.10 over

3

107
k
7

5 33

3

•
-

6k 17k
5 77
59 k7

1 .9 0

91

5

7

3

7
7

7
.

7

7

_

7

20
26

_

_

7

_

.

.

7
7

h
k

99
39

_

m

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
GaA/UeSUs

Table B-63:

A verage

2/

Number

Occupation and sex

worker*

Weekly
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)
Weekly

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Under
$
3 0 ,0 0

$
$
t
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
%
*
*
<
$
<
$
$
$
$
*
32.50 35.00 37.50 10 .0 0 U2.50 U5.oo 1 7 5 5 0.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.oo 67.50 7 0 ,0 0 75.00 80.00 8 5 .0 0 90,00 95.00
*.0
and
i.O *. 0 *.0 *.0
32.50 3 . 0 31*50 l O O 1 2 5 1 5 0 1 7 5 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.W 80.00 85.00 9 0 . 0 0 95.00 over
50,

s

3 0 .0 0

Men

18
23

Section heads
Underwriters

39.0
39.5

3*
1
26
77
97
3*
1
36
62
2
2
22

38.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
100
*.
38.0
38.0

t
75.50

2
2

2

3
2

5
1

1

10
i
>

1
*
5
1
3
2
-

2
i
*
1
1
2
7
1

72.5 0

1
*

I
t

2

2
1

1

1
*

3
1
*

2
3/ 8

Women
Clerks*
Accounting .............,...........
File, class A ............ .........
File, class B .....................
General...........................
Premium-ledger-card .................
Underwriter.............. .........
Key-punch operators ...................
Premium acceptors
........ .........
Section heads..................... 5.
«
Stenographers, general ................
Tabulating-machine operators ...........
Typists, class B .....................

ui

16
96

uo.o

39.0
39.5
38.0
100
*.

135
*.0
1 1 .5 0
*
3* 50
1.
135
*.0
39.50
130
*.0
110
*.0
39.50
57.50
120
*.0
52.00
37.00

1
1
2
-

12
8

1
1
6
2
~
15

2
3
11
*
3
11
1
5
1
5
25

7
2
17
u
6
5
5
1
8

18

5
5
2
2*
1
1
5
17
1
1
2
2
17

2
8
1
*
18
7
2
7
1
9
6

8
8

12
2
i*

2
7

10
-

i
*

2
6
5

3
-

1
-

1
2
3

21
1

2
2
3

1
1
*

-

i
*

2

7

-

-

1

2

1
*

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

“

3
-

-

u

8

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19U9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget,
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,
2/ All workers at $9$ to $100,
Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham, Ala., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indioated.
Comprehensive listings
of union scales for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing for July 1,
1951 are available on request. Similar information for these industries will be published for July 1, 1952.)
Table C-15)

liu.ild.UiXf. Go*tdt>lUctiOXi
July

Qak&Uei. - Go*iti*U*ext

Table C-205: J

1, 1952

July
Rats
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$3*000
2.2 i
10
2.600
2.250

Classification

10
*
Uo
Uo
Uo
UO
Uo
Uo

2.520
Building laborers ..................... .

Table C-205:

2.650
1.225

H a h & U e i .

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread:
Mixers ...................... .
Holder operators ...................
Oven operators ................. .
Wrapping-machine operators.... .
Wrapping-machine helpers ..........
Stockroom helpers, and packers •••••
C heckers........ .................
Cake:
M i x e r s ..... .......................
Oven operators .....................
Oven feeders and dumpers
Bake-shop helpers, pan greasers,
and packers ......................
Wrapping-machine operators,
head leers ..... ••••••••........
leers and wrappers ••••••..........
Agreement B:
Bread:
Mixers ............................ .
Head overmen ................ ......
Overmen ............................
Holders, henchmen ........ .........
Machine wrappers, utility men •«••••
Packers, shippers ..................
Bake-shop helpers «........... .
Crackers and cookies:
First floor:
Mixing room:
Head mixers ....................... .
Mixers .......................... .
Bake shop:
Machine operators •••••••••...... .
Machine feeders ••••••••••••.«••••••
Machine helpers
Sponge-oven bakers ................
Sponge-oven helpers; trayers,
sponge oven ......................
Dough rollers, sweet-oven bakers ...
Sweet-oven helpers ................




Hours
per
week

*1.390
1.215
1.355
1.165
.965
1.0U0
1.095

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
UO
Uo

1.390
1.355
1.070

Uo
Uo
Uo

l.0Uo

Uo

1.080
.985

Uo
Uo

1.1U5
1.0U5
1.020
.970
.870
.795
.820

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Crackers and cookies: - Continued
Second floor:
Sponge packers ........................ *0.990
Wrapping-machine operators ...........
.930
.800
Packers, helpers, female ••••••.......
Wrapping-machine operators •••••••••••• 1.080
Machine helpers, male; helpers,

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
UO

1.260
1.1U0
1.060

Uo
Uo
Uo

1.260
1.080
.800
1.260

Uo
Uo
Uo
UO

1.160
1.110
1.090

10
)
Uo
Uo

Third floor:
Cold-rocm packers ...................
Head mixers
......... ••••
Mixers, wrapping-machine
operators ..............
Helpers; mixer helpers ••••••••••••••••
Fruit cake:
Scalers, bakers
Wrappers, packers, scalers, checkers'
helpers, pan washers, toppers ••..»...••

Hours
per
week

Uo
Uo
Uo
UO
Uo

.990

1.1U0

Uo
Uo

1.080
.800

UO
Uo

1.100
1.0U0
.800

Uo

July 1 1951
,
Rate
per
hour

Hours
par
week

Photoengravers ........................
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder assistants •••••.... .........
Platan feeders «........ ••••.........
Pressmen, cylinder •••»•••........ •••••..
Rotary press
Tension man •«••••••••»...... •••••••••
Pressmen, platen
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day woric............ ... ............
Night work ............................
Machine operators:
Day work ............................. .
Night work •••••••••••••••••«•••••••••.
Machine tenders (machinists):
Day woric.... ..•••»•••..............
Night woric.... .......... ............
Mailers:
Day woric .............................
Night woric .......................•••••
Photoengravers:
Day woric ••••••......... ..............
Night woric ...................

*1.210
2.285
2.U85
2.520
2.U85
2.U85
2.5U5
2.250
2.586
1.590
1.185
2.300
2.300
2.175
2.300

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 3/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
UO
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
UO
UO
37 1/2

Rate
per
hour

Newspapers: - Continued
Pressmen, web presses:
Day woric ...... ................ ••••••
Night work ........................ .
Preesmen-in-charge:
Day woric .......... ..................
Night woric ••••••••.... .•••••••......
Stereotypers:
Day woric
Night woric «•••••••••••........ .

Table 0-41: J l o c o l

*2.U63 Uo
2.815 35
2.619 Uo
2.993 35
2.333 UO
2.U33 Uo

*7, i 4 U t i
U

October 1, 1951

1-man cars, busses, and trolley cars:
First 6 months ..........................
7 - 1 2 months .........................
After 1 year .........................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
par
week

*1.470
1.U90
1.520

U8
us
U8

Rate
per
hour

Hours
par
weak

l.y;
oAc
.820

Clsssification

10
)
Uo

.820
.850
.to
fn
.900

10
)
Uo

M ata'i.t'uich
<cutd Jfelp&M,
July 1, 1951

Classification

Grain:
Agreement A
:
Regular truck ........ .......... .
Trailer-truck ............ •••••••.
Agrsasnt B ............. .

Grocery - Chain store ••••.............. 1.100
2.5U3 37 1/2
2.6U3 37 1/2
2.5U3 37 1/2
2.6U3 37 1/2
2.5U3 37 1/2
2.6U3 37 1/2
2.070 UO
2.170 UO
2.613 37 1/2
2.773 37 1/2

Hours
per
week

Q p& iatU vj. C u ifilo if— 4.

Table 0-42:
Book and job shops:
Bindery women
Bookbinders ........................
Compositors, hand •••.••••••••••••••••••••
Electrotypers •••••••.... ........... .
Machine operators ..............
Machine tenders
Machinist operators ••.••••••••••••••••

1 1951
,

Classification

10
)
Uo

Table C-27: P A X S i t i M f y

Classification

P/u4
iti*U f - GoutUi*ted
July

.800

July 1 1951
,
Rate
per
hour

Table 0-27:

1 1951
,

1 .050

Railway express:
Pick-up snd delivery ..... .......... 1.600
Money pick-up ••••••••........ .
1.680
Transfer:
Agreement A
:
Drivers:
First 6 months
.790
Second 6 months ............. .
.830
After 12 months ........ ••••••••• .850
Helpers:
First 6 months........
.690
Seoond 6 months ..............
.730
Agreement B ...... .... ....... .
1.100
.850

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
40

Uo

Occupational Wags Survey, Birmingham Ala., April 1952
0.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

D:
Table

d- i i

Entrance Rates

M-UUtttunt Z+tPianoe. R ate* fo i P lant 'kJanJtsAA. y
P ercen t o f p la n t workers in estab lishm en ts with sp e c ifie d
minimum r a te s in -

Minimum r a t e (in c e n ts )

A ll
in d u s trie s
2/

A ll establishm ents .......................

1 0 0 .0

Over 4.0 and under 4.5 ..................
45 ..........................................................

5 .4
1 .7
.5

5 0 ..........................................................
Over 50 and under 55 ..................
55 ..........................................................

lls
.8

Over 60 and under 65 ..................
6 5 ..........................................................
Over 65 and under 70 ..................
7 0 ..........................................................
Over 70 and under 7 5 ..................
75 ..........................................................
Over 75 and under 30 ..................
3 0 ..........................................................
Over SO and under 35 ..................
35 ..........................................................
Over 85 and under 90 ..................
90 ..........................................................
Over 90 and under 95 .........
9 5 ..........................
Over 95 and under 100 .......

.4
.2
.7
1 .2
1 .6
1 3 .1
.6
1 .6
2 .4 ­
1 .7
3 .1
.3
1 .3
2 .1
1 .3 ­
.5
2 .5
-.5
.9
1 .0
5 .7
2 .7
2 .7
2 9 .1
1 .6
.1
.5

I O C .........................

Over 100 and under 105 ..............
105 .........................
Over 105 and under 110 ..............
Over 110 and under 115 ..............
115 ........................................................
Over 115 and under 120 . . . . . . .
Over 120 and under 125 ..............
Over 125 and under 130 ..............
130 .......................................................
Over 130 and under 135 ..............
Over 135 and under 14.0 . . . . . . .

workers

1 0 0.0

-

workers

1 0 0 .0

-

Public
u tilitie s *

Wholesale
trade

.8

-

30 .2

2 .5
2 .1
1 2 .0
7 .6
5 .4
6 .5

1 0 0 .0

“

_

-

1 0 0 .0

-

1 0 0 .0

_

1 0 0 .0

2 1 .7
5 .0
3 .2

4 1 .2
1 7 .6

1 0 .0
5 .4

6 .2

-

-

3 .0

4 .4

2 7 .6

3 2 .0

1 3 .7
2 2 .9
3 .0
.1
4 .0
4 .1

S h ift d iffe re n tia l

a m

-

9 .3
3 .4
5 .4

5 .0

-

-

-

1 .8
2 .5

1 .5
-

1 4 .1
9 .0
1 3 .0
9 .7

1 5 .3

5 .4

.

7 5 .0

Percent o f workers on e x tra s h i f t s ,
a l l estab lishm en ts ....................................

1 7 .8

1 1 .8

R eceiving s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ............

1 6 .6

1 1 .3

Uniform ce n ts (p er hour) ..............
2 ce n ts .............................................
4 ce n ts .............................................
5 ce n ts .............................................
6 ce n ts .............................................
7 ce n ts .............................................
10 ce n ts ...........................................
20 ce n ts ...........................................

1 6 .3

1 1 .2

1 1 .6
1 .0

P u ll day’ s pay f o r reduced
hours ........................

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
7
1 4 .0
1 .3
.3

.4
.5
1 0 .2
(1/)

.
1
.3

.1

R eceiving no d i f f e r e n t i a l ........

1 .1

.4

Inform ation n ot a v a ila b le ..................

.1

2 .0

4 .6
6 .3
2 .9

-

-

-

1 .7

-

.
1

-

-

workers employed
on each s h i f t in
a l l m anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s
3d or
o th er
s h ift

1 2 .1
5 .3
1 1 .5
1 1 .0
4 .2

2 .9
2 .2
1 5 .0

U U O H ^

2d
s h ift

3 .3
7 .4
1 3 .4
6 .0

-

-

P

6 .7

3 .1

-

.5
3*2
3 .8
1 .6

3 > llle / L 6 4 t t ic U

S erv ices

1 0 0 .0

2 .5

3 .2
5 .6

5 .2

llilt

P r a C tiC C S

„

2 .4
3 0 .7

S

W ag C

workers

3 .7
4 .1

Lowest r a te s form ally esta b lish e d f o r h irin g e ith e r men or women p la n t workers o th er than watchmen,
Excludes data fo r fin a n c e , in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .
T ran sportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




Table E - l t
R e ta il
trade

5 .4

.5

1/
2/
*

Manufacturing establishm ents
with 1001 or
21-250
251-1000

S u p p le m e n ta r y

-

l/

Less than .0 5 o f 1 p e rce n t.

Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham, A l a ., A p ril 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f la b o r S t a t i s t i c s

Scheduled. Wj&eMif JtoufU.

Table E-2*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS
Weekly hours
Al
l
idsre
nutis
All establishments....... ........
35 hours .......................
Over 35 and under 37$ hours .........
37i hours ................ *..... *
Over 37^ and under 10 hours........ .
*
UO hours ........................
Over UO and under UU hours ..........
UU hours .......................
Over UU and under US hours..........
18 hours.......................
*
50 hours ....... *...............
Over $0 hours ...................
y
y

*
**

100.0

100.0

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woe a e
hls l
tae
rd

100*0

Mnfcuig
auatrn

100.0

if

EMPLOYED IN—

Rti tae
eal rd
100*0

_
U.3
U.7
5.1
65.U
.
9
7.0
2.U
2,2
1.0
•

-

88.5
•
2.3
1,0
“

-

U3.6
11 9
1.
.5
12.1
<
*
•
2
1.7

-

Fnne*
iac*

Srie
evcs

Al
l
Idsre 2 M n f c u i g
nuti* / a u a t r n

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woe a e
hls l
tae
rd

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

m

-

8,2

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED I —
N

-

76.7
U.7
12.8
U.0
1.8
"

-

8.8
5U.8
•
16.1
10,0
6.1
2.2
•

18.1
10.2
1U.5
56.8
•U
•
“

-

7.6
62.9
.5
1.5
23.9
3.6
“

.u
1.0
1.0
1.3
72.2
.5
3.U
7.0
6.1
U.o
3.1

All establishments.....................
Establishments providing paid holidays ,,

All
industries

..............................
d a y , .............................
6 d a y s ..............................
7 d a y s ............................. .
8 d a y s ...............................
1 1 days .............................
1 2 days ..............................
1 3 d a y s ........
...................
Establishments providing no
paid holidays .........................

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 3 .8

6 2 .1

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .8

1 0 0 .0

7 0 .1

.9

_

_

_

_

-

-

2 .3

3 .7

•U

3 .2

7

2 .1

3 2 .5
.6

1 7 .0

3 3 .9

U 2 .1

•

U.8

-

1 .9

-

-

U.5

2 6 .5
1 .9
6 2 .5

3 7 .9

3 5 .2

U.0

-

1 .0

-

-

♦U

.U

5 2 .3

-

8 .3

1 .6

1 6 .2

5U .3

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately,
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

.3
.8

*
**

-

1.2
91.7
3.7
2.3

50.9
•
17.U
1.7
1.9
7.7
2 U
0.

-

1.1

2.8
37.8
5
.5
8.6
10.0
2.9
2U.U
8.0

-

100.0
7.1
18.8

-

-

8.9
29.0
10.8
2U.0
13.9
10.U
3.0

20.1
2.8
u.o
U0.8
6.U
•

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

1 0 0 .0

2 .9

5i

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 ,0

d a y ................................
d a y s ...............................

5 ,day,

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

1 0 0 .0

U days .............................. .

y

-

100.0

_

P a id JtnlidcufA .

PERCENT OF 6F FIC E WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number of paid holidays

1

_

Srie
evcs

Data relate to women workers,
Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately,
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3

3

100.0

Rti tae
eal rd

1 0 .0
2U

1 .3

U2

2 .2

•
1U .2

1 0 0 .0

U6

.2

1 .1

2 3 .5

2 3 .1
8

.U

*

3 0 .2

9 0 .9

7 7 .5

8 2 .9

1 6 .7

3 .5
•2

•
-

.3

5 3 .8

“

6 9 .8

Retail trade

Servioee

1 0 0 .0

U6

.5

.

1 .1

3 .8

U.5

.
-

3 .3

3 0 .7

1*2

1 5 .8

*

2 9 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0*2

1 3 .0

-

1 0 0 .0

-

.2

1 0 .5

1 0 0 .0

-

1 9 .9

.5

1 0 0 .0

-

-

-

Wholesale
trade*

2 .1

.9

2 1 .9

9 .1

Public
utilities *

Manufacturing

U.3

.5
2 .1

.U
-

_

Ali
industries ] 7

U 2 .9
3 .7

1 1 .2

U1

.9

-

U7 *U

8 .3

-

-

6 .9

U .5

3 7 .3
7 .0

1 2 .1

1 7 .7

3 .0

“
“

3 .7

-

*

2 .0

•
-

9 .1

2 2 .5

U.S

-

1 7 .1

5 3 .5

Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham, Ala*, April 1952
U.S. DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-4,

P aid V&aaiiotM (fyonmal P/uuUiiatU)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Vacation policy

All
industries

All establishments ...............

1 0 0 .0

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Finance**

Services

All
,
industries 1/ Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 year of service
Establishments with paid vacations....

99.6

99.7

1 week............... .. ......
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.........
2 weeks .....................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks..... .. •. • •

3 .9
2
3.6
62.3

20.7
9.0

Establishments with no paid vacations

•. •

7 0 .0

.6

98.1

62.9

62.9

-

2 .8

69.7

3U.h

32.6

m

-

.6

98.1

50.3

1 0 0 .0

.3

.8

1 0 0 .0

.
5
98.3
1.2

93.8

96.9

57.1

51.5
3.2
60.2

32.1

-

-

-

2 .2

3.t
Ll

36.6
.1

-

1.9

1.9

-

.
7

98.1

98.1

1 0 0 .0

99.3

93.8

96.9

16.5

2.
57

30.3

67.2

6 8 .6

8 2 .8
.8

69.6

6 .2

1 0 0 .0

67.9
•

5.1

81.1

90.5

96.8

55.6
•
26.0
1.7

67.6
22.9
-

82.5
16.3

18.9

99.3
66.9

9.5

3.2

81.1

90.5

96.8
71.1
«
•
25.7
-

“

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations... .

99.6

99.7

1 week..................... .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.........
2 weeks .....................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........

16.9
.
3
80.3
3.9

2 0 .0

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

.
6

.3

99.6

99.7

6 .2
.6
8 8 .0

h .6

•
70.7
9.0

1 0 0 .0
8 .0

•
92.0
-

2 *8

.
5
•
98.3
1.2

-

.8

69.0
-

63.6
2 .2

1 0 0 .0

1.2
61.9
3.2

30.5
69.5
-

62.1
37.3
1.7

39.8
•
50.7
“

18.9

9.5

3.2

8 1 .1

90.5

96.8

29.5

55.6

69.9
1.7

35.1
52.5
2.9

61.6
•

18.9

9.5

3.2

81.1

90.5

96.8

29.5
•

55.6

1.7
3.7

29.6
52.6
•
»
8.3

18.9

9.5

3.2

1.9

1.9

-

.
7

6.2

5.1

-

98.1

98.1

1 0 0 .0

99.3

93.8

96.9

1 0 0 .0

23.6
•
75.7
•
-

15.6
•
75.3
2.7
*
L

6.9
-

5 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ••••..
1 week ............ ...........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.........
2 weeks......................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks .....................

_

8 6 .1

3.9
.
9

9.0
-

.
6

99.6

99.7

week......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks............. ........
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks.....................

5
.6
.
3
72.2
3.9
17.6

6.6
•
77.9
9.0

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

.
6

.
3

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

7.8

1 8 .6

-

-

3.6
67.6
8.5

1.9

2.3
•
97.7
*

.
3

Establishments with paid vacations... .

1 0 0 .0

1.9

98.1

98.1

7.8
•

13.3

89.5
.8

.
5
•
98.3
1.2
-

.
7

6 .2

8 6 .8

3.2
-

6.5
-

8 6 .6

6.9
-

5.1

-

15 years of service

1

2
/
*
**

8 .2

1 0 0 .0

23
.
$2.2
65.5

8 8 .6

.
8
.9
1.9

Includes data for industries in addition to those ahown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2 .8

69.6
•
1 2 .6

1.9

1 0 0 .0

99.3

93.8

.5

23.6

16.6

65.2
•

71*0
2.3
5.9

66.7
1.2
33.6

1 0 .5

.
7

6 .2

96.9
6.9
.
8 2 .2

3.2
2 .6

5.1

1 0 0 .0

6.5
5 5 .1

•
38.6

6 6 .2

m

38.6
3.0

Occupational Vage Survey, Birmingham, Ala., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Paid S lc Ji dl/taae. (%Q*mal PjuhUUomA)

Table E-5:

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ...............

Al
l
idsre
nutis
100.0

Mnfcuig
auatrn
100.0

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

100.0

100.0

Rti tae
eal rd
100.0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Fnne*
iac*

Srie
evcs

Al
l
au a t r n
idsre 1/ M n f c u i g
nutis

Pbi
ul c
uiiis
tlte*

W o eae
h lsl
tae
rd

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0-

100.0

100.0

100.0

3.8
.
7
1.5
1.6
-

2.I
t
.
2.I
t
-

7.0
6.1
.
9
-

2.0
.
3
1.7
-

9.8
9.8
-

6 months of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave *.... ........
Under 5 days ..................
>
5 days ......................
6 days ......................
10 days .....................
15 days .....................
Over 15 days ................. .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............ .

Rti tae
eal rd

Sne*
ede
100.0

■
I.t
6l
.
1
l.
t5

-

9.0

.t
I
1.1
1.3

lt 2
i.
1.7
9.I
t
2
.7
.t
I

8.3
8.2
.
1
•
-

21.6
18.3
.
8
2.5
-

11.0
11.0
-

28.7
.
8
1.3
20.8
5.8

83.6

85.8

91.7

7.t
8l

89.0

71.3

100.0

96.2

97.6

93.0

98.0

90.2

100.0

22,7
.
1
l.
tS
I.
t9
1.0
2.7
I.
t6
l.S
3.I
t

15.0
1.7
9.I
t
•
.
8
2.7
.t
I

23.3
8.2
-

2t3
1.
2
.2
9.5

15.0
.
1
.
-

36.7
18.3
.
8
2.5
.t
I
Ht.7

28.7
.
8
1.3
I.
t2
5.8

6.8
.
6
.
6
.
8
.
6
1.0
.
5
2.I
t
.
3

21
.t
21
.l
-

19.6
6.1
5.7
.
9
6.9
•
-

6.5
.
3
1.7
•
l.
t5

20.8
3.1
5.6
6.7
-

3.8
-

11.6
1.1
10.5
.
-

-

l.
t0
1.0
•
3.0
-

77.3

85.0

76.7

63.3

75.7

71.3

8.t
8l

93.2

97.6

80 .t
l

93.5

79.2

96.0

27.9
.
1
3.5
l.
t8
1.0
3.8
3.7
«
.
1.5
1.0
3.1
5.I
t

15.5
1.7

62.3
-

.
8
2.7

2 3 .2

.
1
.
2
38.8

36.7
18.3
.
8
2.5
1.1
ltO
l.
-

2t3
1.
2.2
9.5
8.8
3.8
-

28.7
.
8
1.3
I.
t2
12.3
I.
t3
5.8
-

11.6
1.1
10.5
-

6.8
.
2
.6
.
8
1.0
1.0
.
5
2.I
t
.
3
-

2.I
t
21
.t
-

19.6
11.8
.
9
6.9
-

6.5
.
3
1.7
•
I.
t5
-

20.8
3.1
£•6
6.7
51
.t
-

U.o
1.0
3.0
-

72.1

8t5
1.

37.7

63.3

75.7

71.3

8.t
8l

93.2

97.6

8.t
0l

93.5

79.2

96.0

30.1
.
1
2.8

62.3
15.1

52.2
18.3
.
8
2.5

.
2
16.9
i

*.
7
15.5
«
u
ltO
l.

2t3
1.
2,2
8.8
9.5
3.8
-

28.7
.
8
1.3
l.
t2
•
12.3
10.1
-

11.6
1.1
io.5
-

8.6
,
2
.6
.
5
l.S
1.6
.
6
.
3

2.h
-

3.1
2.i
t
.
5
8.2

15.5
9.i
t
1.7
.
8
2.7
.
5
.t
I

l25
l.
5.7
7.8
-

10.6
.
3
1.7
U.l
-

20.8
3.1
6.7
5.6

llO
1.0
3.0
-

51
.t
-

“
-

69.9

8t5
1.

37.7

l78
t.

75.7

71.3

8.t
8l

9.t
1l

8.t
9l

79.2

9 6.0

-

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............
Under 5 days ................. .
5 days ......................
6 days ......................
8 days ................. .....
10 days .....................
12 days .....................
13 days .....................
15 days .....................
Over 15 days .............. .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............

-

-

8.8

1 6 .6

2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............
3 or days ..................
5 days ......................
6 days ................. .....
7 or 8 days ..................
10 days..................... .
12 days ................. ....
13 or lU days .................
15 days .................. .
18 or 20 days .................
22 days .....................
Over 22 days ..................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............

9.h
-

.9

•

15 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............ .
Under 5 days............... .
5 days .................... .
6 days ......................
10 days ......................
12 or 13 days ..................
15 days ........... ..........
18 through 22 days .............
30 days .................. .
50 through 65 days .............
Over 65 days ..................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............

h.9

3.3
3.7

1 .1

.1

-

1/ Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
* « Finance, insurance, and real estate.
-■




.0

2.I
t
-

2.3

2 9 .0

97.6

57.5

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham, Ala., April 19^2
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-6j

NoapswduGiian Botuti& l

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Type of bonus

All
industries

Sendees

Retail trade

S rvioes
e

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

63.9

89.9

59.6

U6.0

37.1

26.8

17.6

60.8

82.9

ll9
t.

U5.5
1.0
1.t
7l

8U.1
5
.8

U6.0

31.7
5.1
.3

17.6

80.6
2.3

-

•
*

52.5
3.7
I.
t7

ll9
t.

•

2..
00
6.8

-

52.6
57
.
1.3

“

•

36.1

10.1

UO.U

5*o
1.

62.9

73.2

8.t
2l

39.2

17.1

58.1

2.t
1l

22.5
1.t
0l

21.I
t

*

“

Establishments with no
nonproduction bonuses ....... .........

52.3

67.1

78.6

Includes data for Industries In addition to those shown separately,
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7>

C O t J P-e*ti40*l

PAattl

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of plan

All establishments .....................

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2 / .......*......
Life insurance ......................
Health insurance................... .
Hospitalisation ......................
Retirement pension ..................
Establishments with no
insurance or pension plans ...........

*
**

Wholesale
trade

100.0

32.9

2/

Public
utilities*

100.0

39*0
6.0
2.7

1/

Manufacturing

100.0

U7.7

Zj

Finance**

100.0

.

1/

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
All
industries Jy

100.0

Christmas or ye a r - e n d..... ......... .
Profit-sharing.............. .
Other ......... ......................

*
**

Wholesale
trade

100.0

All establishments.... ,...............
Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/...................

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

All
industries

100.0

Manufacturing

100.0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

All
industries

1/

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

. 100.0

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

83.3

81.0

9.t
2l

70.0

79.5

96.5

69.3

70.6

7.t
8l

87.3

137
*.

6.*
21

1.t
6l

80.5
193
*.
160
*.
ll.
tt3

79.1
5.t
6l
65.0
51.7

91.2
58.0
21.3
81.5

70.0
62.6
62.6
2.5

78.0
35.6
L0.2
5I
.t

87.3
35.6
18.9
63.2

69.3
6.7
26.7
12.1

66.1
I88
t.
57.0
U3.7

7.t
2l
57.5
73.1
57.8

8* 2
1.
60.8
29.6
65.2

137
*.
25-7
25.7
U.6

60.0
31.I
t
28.9
3.9

1.i
6l
5.6
1.t
3l
3.0

16.7

19.0

7.6

30.0

20.5

3.5

30.7

2 .I
9 t

21.6

12.7

56.3

37.6

83.6

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately*
Unduplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Services

Occupational Vage Survey, Birmingham, Ala., April 1952
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17

A ppendix — Scop

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered In compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations t (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (a) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A). The covered Industry groupings are i manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




id Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data b y industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also exoluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office olerioal, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight­
time salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 oents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table sumn&rizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

18

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED
INDUSTRIES IN BIRMINGHAM, ALA,, l/ AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, APRIL 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied

1/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ................ ........ ........
Manufacturing « o t o o i e o t « o o o o e o o o t o o « o » « o » o o c
N onmfinufsctunng o « e e « o « » « « i o o o i t « i « » t « t « » o o
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities o o o o « o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o « o o o o o *
Wholesale trade » o i ( « « o o » o o o o « « « M « * t o « o o
Retail trade ............ .......
Finance, insurance, and real estate . . o . .
Services 3/ o t c « e « * i o t e * « i c * e « « M « « » t o « o o

21
21
21

795
21*6
51*9

181
50
131

102,300
60,800
11,500

58,31*0
37,960
20,380

8,71*0
3,590
5,150

21
21
21
21
21

55
11*6
198
75
75

20
31
35
2*
l
21

8,1*00
8,500
ll*,l*00
1*,600
5,600

6,91*0
2,980
5,710
2,31*0
2,1*10

1,620
91*0
720
1,600
270

21

33

15

2,158

1,279

866

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 1 /
*
Insurance carriers...... .

1/ -Birmingham Metropolitan Area (Jefferson County).
?/ Total establishment employment.
3/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
memEership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
h/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.




19

Index
lass

Page
Biller, machine ..............................
Bookbinder (printing) ............... ............. ........
Bookkeeper, hand ..............................
Bookkeeping-machine o p e r a t o r ...................... ...... .
Bricklayer (building construction) .......... ........... .
Calculating-machine operator ................
Carpenter (building construction) .............
Carpenter, maintenance .......................
C l e a n e r ............ ........... ........ ............... .
Clerk, accounting .................................. .
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ............ .......
Clerk, f i l e .................. ...................... .
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) .................... .
Clerk, g e n e r a l .... .................................. .
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) .... .................
Clerk, order ............... ....... .......................
Clerk, payroll .......... ................... ..............
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ........ .
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ............. .
Compositor, hand (printing) ................. ....... ......
Crane operator, electric bridge ..........................
Draftsman ...................
Duplicating-machine operator ..............................
Electrician (building construction) ......................
Electrician, maintenance ...........................
Eleotrotyper (printing) ............ .......... .......
Engineer, stationary ......................................
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r ..........
G u a r d ...........
Helper (bakeries) .........................................
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r ...............
J a n i t o r .........
Key-punch o p e r a t o r ............
Key-punch operator (insuranoe carriers) ...........
laborer (building construction) ...........................
Maohine operator (printing) *.............................
Machine tender (printing) ..........................
Machinist, maintenance ..................
Mailer (printing) .........................................
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y ..............
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ............
Mechanic, m a i n t e n a n c e ........
M i l l w r i g h t ..... ...................
Mixer (bakeries) ......................
Molder (bakeries) .......




3
11
3
4
11
4
11
7
8
3, 4
10
4
10
3, 4
10
3, 4
3, 4
10
10
11
8
6
5
11
7
11
7
7
8
11
11
8
5
10
11
11
11
7
11
7
7
7
7
11
11

Motortruck driver ........ ........ ....... ................ .
Nurse, industrial (registered) ....... ...................
Office b o y ....... ....................................... .
Office girl ..........................
O i l e r ......................................................
Operator (local transit) ................................ .
Order f i l l e r ....... ........... ................ ......... .
Overman (bakeries) ....... ........... ........... ..........
P a c k e r .... ............. ..................... ........... .
Packer (bakeries) .........................
Painter (building construction) ........
Painter, maintenance ..................
Photoengraver (printing) ..................
Plasterer (building construction) ........................
Plumber (building construction) ......................
Plumber, maintenance ..............
P o r t e r ........
Premium acceptor (insuranoe carriers) .......
Press assistant (printing) .............
Press feeder (printing) .........................
Pressman (printing) ....................
Receiving c l e r k .................................
S e c r e t a r y ...........................
Section head (insuranoe carriers) ........................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ........
Shipping c l e r k ....................
Shi pping-and-receiving c l e r k .............................
Stenographer .............................................
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ........
Stereotyper (printing) .................................
Stock h a n d l e r .... ...............
Switchboard operator ....................
Switchboard operator-receptionist.........
Tabula ting-machine operator .............................
Tabulating-maohine operator (insurance carriers) ........
Tool-and-die maker ........................................
Transcribing-machine o p e r a t o r .....................
Truck driver ............................... ...............
Trucker, hand ......................
Trucker, p o w e r ........
Typist .................
Typist (insurance carriers) ....................
Underwriter (insuranoe carriers) ...........
Watchman ................
Wrapper (bakeries) ........................................

U. S. GO VERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 —1952

11
6
3
5
7
11
8
11
8
11
11
7
11
11
11
7
8
10
11
11
11
8
5
10
7
8
8
5
10
11
8
5
5
3, 5
10
7
5
8, 9
8
9
6
10
10
9
11




THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available from the Superin­
tendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. for the following communities:
BLS
Bulletin
. I e ■■
. f. ■
.

City
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Buffalo, New York
Cincinnati, Ohio
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Detroit, Michigan
Hartford, Connecticut
Houston, Texas
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Los Angeles, California
Memphis, Tennessee
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota

1045
1044
1085
1096
1056
1043
1041
1066
1086
1059
1084
1075
1064
1094
1067
1099
1068

Mas
20
15
25
20
25
20
20
20
25
20
20
20
20
25
15
20
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
oents
oents
oents
oents
cents
oents
cents
oents
cents

This report was prepared in the Bureau's

Oils
Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey
New Orleans, Louisiana
Norfolk-Portsmooth, Virginia
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providenoe, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Rochester, New York
Salt Lake City, Utah
St. Louis, Missouri
San Franoisoo-Oakland,
California
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, Washington
Worcester, Massachusetts

Southern Regional Office.

BLS
Bulletin
_
— Sa._
1081
1074
1088
1070
1060
1082
1042
1071
1058
1087
1069
1095

25
15
15
15
25
20
20
20
15
20
15
25

oents
cents
cents
oents
oents
oents
oents
oents
oents
cents
oents
oents

1076
1078
1057
1077

25
15
20
20

cents
cents
oents
oents

Mss

Communications may be addressed

to:
Brunswick A. Bagdon, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Room 664, 50 Seventh Street, N. E.
Atlanta 5, Georgia
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for consultation on
statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, con­
struction and housing, and work injuries.




The Southern Region includes the following States:
Alabama
Louisiana
South Carolina
Arkansas
Maryland
Tennessee
District of Columbia
Mississippi
Texas
Florida
North Carolina
Virginia
Georgia
Oklahoma
West Virginia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102