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Occupational Wage Survey

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
March 1952

Bulletin No. 1105

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

Contents
Pfige
I N T R O D U C T I O N .................................................

1

THE CHICAGO A R E A .............................................

1

TABLES: - Continued

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE .................................

Pftgfi

12

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction
C-205
B a k e r i e s ........................................
C-2082
Malt l i q u o r s ...................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g ........................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ..............
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers .................
C-542
Meat c u t t e r s ...................................
C-5452
Milk dealers ...................................
C-58
Restaurants ...................... •••••••••••»••
C-6512
Building service ...............................
C-7011
Hotels ..........................................

29
29
29
29
30
31
31
31
32
32
32

15

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant w o r k e r s .....

33

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ..................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours .........................
E-3
Paid h o l i d a y s ...................................
E-4
Paid v a c a t i o n s ..................................
E-5
Paid sick leave •••••••..........
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ••••••........
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ••••••••••.....

34
36
36
37
38
40
40

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey ........... •••••••••••••••••

41

I N D E X .........................................................

43

TABLES!
Average earnings for selected occupations studied
on an area basis A-l
Office o c c u p a t i o n s ...............
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .......
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations •••••••
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
o c c u p a t i o n s ............... .......... •..... • •

3
9
10

Average earnings for selected occupations studied
on an industry basis* B-2071
Candy and other confectionery p r o d u c t s ... .
B-2337
Women'8 and misses' coats and s u i t s ....
16
B-235
M i l l i n e r y ................................
16
B-2431
M i l l w o r k .................................
17
B-336
Foundries, nonferrous .........................
B-3391
Forgings, iron and steel ••••••......
18
B-342
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware •••••••..••••
B-3439
Heating apparatus ••••••••.........
B-3444
Sheet-metal work ................................
B-3463
Stamped and pressed metal products .......
B-3468
Electroplating, plating, and polishing ••••••••
B-35
Machinery industries:
M a c h i n e r y ..... ......................
Machine-tool accessories - jobbing shops •••
Machine-tool accessories - production
s h o p s ............
B-3661
Radio, television, and related products •••••••
B-40
R a i l r o a d s ................................
28
B-63
Insurance c a r r i e r s ........




*

17
18
20
21
21
22
22
25
26
27
28

NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports
are available upon request for ferrous foundries
(June 1951), and wood furniture, other than up­
holstered (August 1951)*

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, I). C. - Price 25 cents

August 1, 1952

Introduction y
The Chicago area is 1 of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys.
Occupations common to a variety* of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on
a c ommunity-wide basis.
Cross-industry methods of sampling
were thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following
types of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional and techni­
cal; (c) maintenance and power plant;
(d) custodial, ware­
housing, and shipping.
In presenting earnings information for
such jobs (tables A-l through A -4) separate data have been pro­
vided wherever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Occupations characteristic of particular,
important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/
Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables.
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of
(or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such
as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, nonproduc­
tion bonuses and insurance and pension plans.

The Chicago Area
Nonagricultural wage and salary employment in the
Chicago area (Cook County) totaled approximately 2,150,000 work­
ers in March 1952.
Of this total, an estimated 810,000 were
employed in manufacturing establishments. Although manufacturing
activity in the area is considered highly diversified, the ma­
chinery industries
(electrical and nonelectrical combined) em­
ployed more than a fourth of all manufacturing workers in the
area. Other durable-goods industry groups of substantial impor­
tance included fabricated metal products, primary metal prod­
ucts, and transportation equipment.
In the nondurable -goods
segment of manufacturing, food processing plants accounted for
more than a tenth of the workers. Additional major segments of
the nondurable-goods industries included printing and publishing, apparel, and chemicals.

1/ Prepared in the Bureau*s regional office in Chicago, 111.,
by Woodrow C. Linn under the direction of George E. Votava, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau*s
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.
2 / See appendix table for listing of durable- and nondurablegoods.




An estimated 1,340,000 wage and salary workers were
on the payrolls of Chicago area nonmanufacturing establishments
in March. About 330,000 workers were employed in retail trade
activities, and an additional 165,000 were employed in wholesale
trade outlets.
An employment of nearly 200,000 workers in the
transportation industries attests to Chicago*s importance as the
nation*s leading railroad center.
The services industries em­
ployed more than 195,000 persons in such diverse fields as auto­
mobile and other repair shops, laundries and cleaning establish­
ments, hotels, theaters, radio and television stations, and
business service establishments.
Federal, State, and local
government agencies reported employment of 184,000 workers in
the area, and approximately 126,000 persons were employed in
finance, insurance, and real estate establishments. Building
construction, off to an early seasonal start, provided jobs for
89,000 workers.
Employment in communication and public utili­
ties totaled oyer 50,000 at the time of the survey.
Among the industries and establishment-size groups
surveyed by the Bureau more than 70 percent of the workers in
nonoffice jobs were employed in establishments having written
agreements with labor organizations • Three of four factory work­
ers in manufacturing establishments were employed in union
plants.
In nonmanufacturing industries the proportion of non­
office workers covered by union agreements ranged from more than
half in retail and wholesale trade to nearly complete coverage
in the transportation
(except railroads), communication, and
public utilities group.
Union contracts covered about 85 per­
cent of the nonoffice workers in services and finance, insurance,
and real estate.
Unionization was far less extensive among
office workers.
About a tenth of all office workers in the
Chicago area were working under the provisions of collective
bargaining agreements. The highest proportion of office workers
covered by union agreement provisions was reported in trans­
portation (except railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities; more than two-thirds the office workers in the in­
dustry group were employed under the terms of union contracts.

Occupational Wage Structure
Extensive formal wage adjustments were made ty Chicago
area establishments between January 1950, the base period for
the Wage Stabilization Board*s "catch-up” wage formula, and the
time of the Bureau*s survey.
Virtually all plant workers in
manufacturing establishments had received one or more general
wage increase during the period. These increases totaled 15 to
30 cents an hour for about three-fourths the plant workers
studied, with more than a fourth receiving between 25 and 30
cents • More than 40 percent of the nonoffice workers in trans­
portation
(except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities received similar increases; whereas, workers in whole­
sale and retail trade and services establishments received
smaller general pay increases.
Formal revisions in office workers* salaries were re­
ported in fewer establishments.
Office workers in the larger
manufacturing establishments frequently were granted increases

comparable to those given plant workers*
In other establish­
ments, however, pay raises for office workers were granted on
an individual basis in place of general increases*
Wage rates for nearly all Chicago area plant (nonoffice) workers were determined on the basis of formal rate
structures*
Wage progression plans setting forth a range of
rates for each time-rated job classification were somewhat more
common than plans specifying a single cr flat rate for each job*
Among the industry groups studied, single-rate plans were typi­
cal of nondurable-goods manufacturing, wholesale trade, serv­
ices, and finance* Piece-rate or bonus incentive payment plans
covered plant jobs in which nearly 40 percent of the factory
workers in manufacturing plants were classified* They were
either nonexistent or relatively insignificant among the nonmanufacturing industries with the exception of services estab­
lishments in which 10 percent of the nonoffice workers were paid
incentive rates*

Salaries of office workers in manufacturing industries
were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing*
In 27 of
the 35 office classifications permitting comparison, average
weekly salaries in manufacturing establishments exceeded those
in nonmanufacturing*
Within the nonmanufacturing group, how­
ever, office workers in wholesale trade and transportation (ex­
cluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
were paid higher average salaries in most jobs than workers in
manufacturing industries*
Wage rates for selected custodial,
tarehousing, and shipping occupations averaged higher in manu­
facturing industries for 10 of 17 jobs where comparisons were
possible*
In contrast, average wage rates for maintenance and
power plant jobs were higher in nonmanufacturing industries for
10 of 14 job categories permitting comparison*

Virtually all formal wage plans reported for office
occupations provided a range of salaries for each job* Very few
office workers were paid salaries based on single-rate plans,
and over a third worked in establishments that determined sala­
ries on an individual basis*

About a fourth of the plant workers in Chicago area
manufacturing industries were employed on late shifts in March
1952* Three-fourths of these workers were on second-shift
operations* The prevalence of extra-shift work among nondurable
goods manufacturing workers was nearly as great as that in the
durable-goods group. Almost all second- and third-shift workers
were paid shift differentials, divided almost equally between a
uniform cents-per-hour addition to day rates and a uniform per­
centage over day shift rates*

Established minimum entrance rates for hiring inex­
perienced plant workers were part of the formalized wage struc­
ture in a vast majority of the firms studied* Although entrance
rates ranged from less than 75 cents to more than $1*65 an hour,
$1 or more was the minimum rate in establishments giving em­
ployment to three-fifths of all plant workers* In manufacturing
industries 3 of 4 workers were employed in establishments with
entrance rates of $1 or more. A 75-cent minimum was the lowest
rate reported in manufacturing; wholesale trade; and transpor­
tation, communication, and other public utilities* Minimum en­
trance rates of less than 75 cents were found in other non­
manufacturing groups studied*

Regularly scheduled 40-hour workweeks predominated
among nonoffice workers in Msurch 1952*
Three of four plant
workers in manufacturing industries were scheduled to work 40
hours; most of the others were on longer schedules. Among the
nonmanufacturing groups, the proportion on this weekly schedule
was about the same in public utilities and wholesale trade.
In
retail trade and services establishments, a much larger propor­
tion were scheduled to work more than 40 hours. Forty-hour
weekly schedules existed for two-thirds the women office work­
ers in torch, with nearly all of the others working shorter
schedules. In finance, insurance,and real estate offices almost
two-thirds were scheduled to work less than 40 hours*




A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

Offa*

OcCHfudj/mi

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis In Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1952)

See footnote at end of tabl*.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), comunication, and other public utilities*
*» Finance, insurance, and real estate*




Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings V for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1952)

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and r eal estate.




Table A-l*

Otfdc* Occ**pal<a*U - G< tin *
m
—4

(Average str a ig h t-tin e weekly hours and earnings V Tor selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry d iv isio n , March 1952)

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Table A-l:

O ftic* O ccupation* - Continued

(Average straigfrt-ti»e weekly hours and earnings 1 / fo r s ele c te d occupations studied on an area
b a sis in Chicago, 111., by industry d iv isio n , March 1952)

See footnote a t end o f ta b le .
* Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s), canmunication, and public u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, insurance, and r ea l e s ta te .




0^443* QcC tpaiiO*ii - G< tinM*d
4
m

Table i-1 :

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings 3 / for sele c te d occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry d iv isio n , March 1952)

A erag
v
e

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

NUM
BER O W R ER RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM W LY EARNINGS O —
P OK S
E EEK
F
$
<
s
s
<
$
$
eekly 30.00 ?2 .S 0 35.00 3 7 .5 0 ljo.oo 1*2 .5 0 l*5.oo 1*7.50 lo.oo I 2 .5 0 15.00 17.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.0 0 7* .5 0 7*5.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
W
eekly W
2
hours
earnings and
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
32,50 35,00 37.50 Uo.oo U2.50 U5.oo U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 8 0 .00 85.00 90.00 95.00 ever

W en - Continued
om
DudU catinsr-machine op erators............... ..»
Manufacturing ..........................................
Durable g o o d s......................................
Nondurable goods ........................... . ..»
Nonmanufacturing .........................................
R etail trade ..........................................
Finance **
........ ........................ .

778
SET^
230
212
336
86
U8
ioU
80

39.0
39.0
39.5
38.5
38.5
38 .0

fo o
TO,5
37.0

U7.50
U6.50
U9.50
U3.00
U8.50
53^50
1*3.50
U7 .0 0
U9.00

Key.punch operators • • * . . . ........................... •
2,173
Manufacturing .......................................... .. " 882
Durable goods .........................................
631
Nondurable goods ...................................
251
Nonmanufacturing ........................................
1,291
Public u t i l i t i e s * t ....................... .., t
161
Wholesale t r a d e .......... ........... .............
151
Retail trade . . ................
166
Finance
...........................
7U0
Services ................................................ ..
73
Office g ir ls . ...................................................
986
Manufacturing ..............................................
U
3U
Durable goods . trt tt
tttTt
230
Nondurable good s................................. .
20U
Nonmanufacturing............................. ..........
552
Public u t i l i t i e s * ........ ...................
108
Who!esale trade
__ TtTtt, . tTT. Tfi
_
101
Retail trade . t . . . ______________ tt
72
Finance ** . . . ___T
___ r.....................T
210
Services . . . . . . . . . . . . ___. . . . . . . . . . .
61

39.5
39.5
39*5
39.0
39.5
Uo.o
39.5
Uo.o
39.0
39.5

Ul.50
U2.00
U3 .5 0
U1.00
U .0 0
1
U .5 0
2
U3.0 0

S ec r e ta r ie s...................................................... .
9.618
Manufacturing............................. ................
M 8l
Durable goods ............................... ...... • 2,678
Nondurable goods . . . ......................... ••
2,303
Nonmanufacturing.........................................
U,637
Public u t i l i t i e s * ...............................
231
Wholesale t r a d e ....................... . . . • • • •
885
Retail t r a d e ..................
l,U93
Finance * * ..............................................
1,107
Services .............................................. . .
921
Stenographers, general ................................. . 10,716
Manufacturing....................................
5,537
Durable goods .........................................
3,257
Nondurable goods ..................................
2,280
Nonmanufacturing ............................. ••••••
5,179
Public u t i l i t i e s * .....................
U56
Wholesale t r a d e ........................... .
1,003
Retail tr a d e ...........................................
60U
Finance * * ........................................
1,7UU
S e r v ic e s..............• • • • • .................
1,372

39.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
UO.O
38.5
38.5
39.0
39.5
Uo.o
39.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
UO
.O
38.0
39.0

65.00
'66.56

Stenographers, technical ...............................
Manufacturing ..............................................
Nonmanufacturing.........................................
Wholesale trade
Tt_ T ttt
t
Finance ** ......................................
Services .................................................

39.0
39.5
39.0
37.5
39.0
39.0

628
226
U02
60
80
2U3

39.5 51.50
39*5 T 3 .0 0 ..
39.5 5 3 .5 0
39.5 53.00
39.0 50.50
39.5 55.50
39.5 5 1 .0 0
39*5 5i.5o
8
38.5 U .0 0
U .O 56.50
O

3 9 .5 0

39.00
U3.00

66 .00

67.00
63.00
67.50
63.50
61.00
62.50
66.00
55.50
56.50
56*50
56.00
5U.00
57.50
56.00
51.00
52.00
56.50
59.00
60.50
58.50

_
-

20
2

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22
20

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58
uo
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39
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52
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11
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12
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37
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30
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182 268
Ul — 86“ 126
29
26
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63 102 1U2
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101 182 276
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See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




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17
10
c
i
f
1*
u
_
10
2
20
1
u
7
6
5
7
U
9
78
30
1
1
1U
*
*
“
17
7
25
17
53
U

_

3

k

li2
19
17
2
23

12
7
6
-

6

>

1
-

27
22
19
3
5
2
1
_
2
-

1U9

77
72
105
1
U2
1U
2U
2U
1
1
•
1

9
17
•

.
.
.

.
•
.
.
-

_

•

.
.
.
-

.
.
-

7 --------- 5
u
r
— r
-----5"
1
3

_

_
.

9
3

1

_

-

-

3

_

-

-

Table A-l:

O^lce Q ccMfmt tmi - Gantinumd
i

(Average straigfrt-ti»e weekly hours and earnings l / fo r selected occupations studied on an area
b asis in Chicago, 111., by industry d iv isio n , March 1952)

**

Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Table A-2:

PnA^eMdXMuU G4ut VecJuUCol OcCUfiattiHU

(Average s tr a ig h t-tin e weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry d iv isio n , March 1952)

1/
*

Hours r e f le c t the workweek for which employees receive th eir regular straight-tim e s a la ries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .

218313 0 - 5 -2
2




Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
U.S. D R EN O LA O
EPA TM T F B R
Bureau of Labor S t a tis tic s




Table A-3:

Maintenance and Pouted Plant Occupation*

(Average hourly earning* V for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1952)

Table A-3:

Maintenance and Pace* Plant Occupation* • Continued

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for nen in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1952)

V

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

2/
3/

Workers d istrib u ted as fo llo w s:
Workers d istrib u ted as fo llo w s:
Workers d istrib u ted as follow s:

U/

10 a t $1 to $1.05} 51 a t $1.10 to $1.15; 12 at $1.15 to $1.20) U5 at $1.25 to $1*30) U5 a t $1*30 to $1*35} 57 at $1.35 to $1.U0.
Ul a t $1.10 to $1.15; 12 a t $1.15 to $1.20;
at $1.25 to $1.30; b5 at $1.30 to $1.35) 25 at $1*35 to $l*b0.
Ul a t $1.10 to $1*15} 12 at $1*15 to $1*20; 37 at $1.25 to $1*30; U5 a t $1.30 to $1.35; 1 a t $1.35 to $1.U0*

*

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilitie s*

**

Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Table A i :
-i

G udiodial, 7(0a>ieUcuUUuf>, and SAipfUHf Occupation*

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1952)

N U M B E R OF W ORKERS R ECEIVING STRAIG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

s

s
i
s
$
$
I
S
f
<
$
»
t
«
s
s
9
9
s
*
•
f
9
1
t
9
Aaaa s
rra
hourly 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05- 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.ko 2.50
and
under r f .85 ,90 .95 1 .00 1.85 1.18 1.15 lt?0 1.25 1.38 1.35 I.I18 l.b5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.70 l.fiO 1.90 ?.00 ?.10 P.20 2.30 P l f P.50 over
tO
.ll
%

Occupation and industry division

o
f

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) ... .
Manufacturing ................... ......... .

1.038
81
8*

*
1.67
1.67

Crane operators* electric bridge (20 tons and over) ...

5U0
521
521

1.93
1.9'3
1.93

Durable goods... ........................ .

Manufacturing .............................. .
Nondurable goods ..........................
Nonmanufacturing... .............. ...........
Finance *# ....... ....... .................

1.53
2.695
l,93u " T 3 3
1,532
1.51
1.60
1*02
761
1
.51*
1.58
339

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men)........... .
Manufacturing ......... .......................
Durable goods .................. ...........
Nondurable goods .......... .................
Nonmanufacturing........................... .
Public utilities * ••••••............. ......
Wholesale trade.......................... .
Retail trade ............................. .
INv e u A RA
iek
Services ............. ................... .

1U.896
8,769
5,275
319*
,*1
6,127
632
522
1,727
1,861*
1,382

1.33
1.36
1.37
1.33
1.28
1.38
1.30
1.16
U*5
1.15

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women)............ .
Manufacturing ...................... ........ .

5.636
1,127
7*
17
380
1*,509

1.21
1.26
1.29
1.20
1.19
A''
.-?
1.23

Nondurable goods .............. ......... .
Nonmanufacturing ............................ .
DA. 1
ei4
Vi
JR
L

Order fillers .................... .............
Manufacturing ►..............................
Durable goods............................ .
Nondurable goods ......................... .
Nonmanufacturing........ ................. ».»•
Wholesale trade .......................... .
Retail trade ............. .............. ...
Services .................................

.................................... ..........
....... ..................................

Packers (men)
.
Manufacturing
.
.
Durable goods ................... ......... *
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufacturing .......... ........... .
Wholesale trade.......... .................
Retail trade................ .............

3,122
6*
18
5,191
2,056
1,395
661
3,135
1,91*7
808
37

1.50
1-1 7
*
1
.1*8
1
.1*6
1.52
1.1 8
*
1.63
1.1 7
*

6,575
k,7l*6
3,090
1,656
1,829
1,1*67
3*
13

T.mr

28
~ 2ir

2
2
2
_
-

-

-

-

;

-

-

-

20
1
1
19
13

-

16 276 138 H*5 316 539 658
- 20 h f
73 “TBT - w
59 1 5 138
*
”
_ 20
1
ik 1 * 137 150
16 276 118 131 2 * 357 370
13
8
9 10 10
18 19
29
3
8 105 U6 5 * 108 168 2 *
12
1
30
171 5k 58 126 150 85
72
_

-

!
-

-

.
72
16
lO
i
lu
*
16

-

-

-

-

-

.
_

_
-

-

-

-

17
31 138 169 190 2 *
- 20 1 7 67
*
35
5
12
*
_ 20 1 7 25 29
*
31 118 122 123 212
oo
t * 2 QO A7
20 yf
Oi
*
7J
i 16 106
*
• 13
a
~n
5
1j
j
2

-

l

-

2

-

2

l

2

2

1

2

6

1.1*3

1
.1*6
1.1*0
1.1*1
1.1*3
1.33

n
ii
3

-

8

-

.

18
*
20
20

:

6

8

-

6

8

28
20
8

U9
-

68

s r

53
21
9
12
32
6

56
26
6
20
30
25

62 132

5
3
5*
1
32
22

19
*

55 105 178 258
130 l *
17
*
il
19 72 33 118
28 13 97 23
8 20 1 8 117
*
8 36 102
2
6 12 12 13

391
235
1*
17
88
156
130
2*
1

19
*
11
**
5

21
17
*
36

n

HT

1062 1765 910 2568
"BBT H 06""55T 1372
16
1*
515 8 * 522 6 1
370 260 139 758
1196
177 659 2 *
19
18 21 52 129
13 85 100 39
38 51
95 119
g
A
1 2 926
*
13 1 2
* * 8 17 51

1 0 111 3321 308 280 213
*7
56 95 88 236 213
125
•l
77 ya. 80 76 211 87
*
1 8 22
*
15 12 25 126
282 55 3226 220 11
**
lA
.
i 69
IQ
to C
*
J-7
U 27^7 201 10
215
286 12 l *
l

1 "—81
9

19
21
9
12

-

83
53
28
1

29
27
23
1
*
2

1078 1188
"609"”520“
5* 1 5
18 * 0
61 70
1 6 668
*9
25 171
8* 20
1
8
11
*9
323 1 1
26 50

28
28
28

71 112
71 112
71 112

36
35
29
6
1

15
*
15
*
hh
1
-

7 1 696 161
7*
”529" i5o
1
306 527
359 102 lk9
11
109 67
1 k*
l
11
8
9
19
*
7
17
*
1
2
8

“

109
57
X0B1 50
108
50

26
15
15

85
85
85

-

2
2
2

„
-•

_
-

_

_
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

•

—

~

“

-

*

-

-

-

520
336
310
26
11
8*
137
38

639
12
*9
31
0*
125
210
151
59

753
671
270
10
*1
82
66
16

633
527
237
290
106
65
11
*

677
509
270
239
168
132
36

72
~

1
”

2

rt

1

2

6
66

1

16
16
16

-

-

-

•

•

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

5ki 231 517
51
257. 151
161 131
35
16
96 20
28k 80 k66
71
269 U6
3k 389
15
6

63
15
15

26
18
18

1
1
1

-

_
-

-

k8
8
kO

8
8

-

62
57
56
1

5k
38
38

72
68
68

5
5

16
16

k
k

”2 5
5 “"nrj

515
379
235
1**
11
136
97
33

2
*
*

-

2
2

652
12
*6
308
118
226
206
20

2

1

-

“

36
36
36

576 3U6 198 501 3 1 500 1021
1*
362 226 "IBS” l *
17T
l7
136 176 98 197 182 9k 97
36 80 19 165 11 92 50
**
10* 90 81 139 88 3 1 8 1
*1
1* 7 *
**
1
355 36 11 9 * 51 156 635
18 50 35 22
*
36 1 1 15
*
1 18
1
1
1
*
5

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), cosnunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




-

32
32
32

3
“

36

-9
5k 177 178 265 121 3 6 210 315 1*68 278 131 189
92 13k 195 287 2k0 183
29 186
3 * 98 176 232
i
123 172 250 132 103
172 201
26 95
29 125
89
61
8
37 108 80
1
* 31
3
3 11 23
20
2 33 29 35 15 28 228
95 102
3
79
« 18
•
20 15
60 102
1 10
*
21
3
5
3U

705 665 1161
~ w r 783
W
1 * 178 377
19
216 269 1 0
*6
3U0 218 378
7 18 109
59 20 13
210 130 202
k 10 1 2
*
60 1 0 12
*

10
*

_

20
“ 23

*

6 103 261* 308 117 153
T06- T C 7
6 1*0 ”237

693 229
kOk 221
366 198
38 23
8
289
282
k
k
7

U*S* DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

15
11
10
1
k
k

-

-

2
2
2

3
3
3

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

d
_

_
l_
l
6
1
5
l

"

-

-

Table A-U:

Gu&toduU, W atehtuUUu}, and S A lp fim f O ccupation* - C ontinued
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1952)

See footnotes at end of table.
*

Transportation (excluding railroads), coauKunication, and other public utilities.




4* Gu&toJticU, W andtatU tiuj,f and SAlpfUnp O ccupation* - Cont inued

Table A-

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2 j studied on an area
basis In Chicago, 111., b y Industry division, March 1952)

N U M B E R OF W ORKER8 REC EIV IN G STRAIG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation and industry division

o
f
wres
okr

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including 5 tons) •••

3,633
1,391

t
s
1
«
l
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
t
s
%
$
$
•
*
l
*
t
*
%
» . • ^
h u l 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.50 1.55 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.7 0 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.50 2.50
ory
erig
ann.
and
under
.80 .8$ t?0 t?5 1,00 1,05 1.10 1.1$ 1,20 It2$ it80 1,3$ 1,50 1,55 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.50 2.50 over
1
1.90
2.02

1

1 n£o
2,252
832
Qi
)9

2 .io
1.83
1.85

1

3,779
250

1.98
1.93
1#38

^

<00

Q

..

OC
Of
ol
o,
c&H
010

1 .f
Ot
1 07
A.7 (

Truck drivers, heavy (over 5 tons, other than trailer
type) ................
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••..... ....... .
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
P i I t nHUtlaa M.
iK-n
. ___ _____. ________
liiAlasala
.. .........
......
Ob -a41 fraH. .............. ...............
h

1.927
103
1,825
fi
tr
Oj
Xo
7«
0?
100

1.91
1.97
1.91
1.83
2.02
1.85

Truckers. Dower (fork-lift) ••»••••••••..... ••••••••
W m f r f i ' i r ________________________ _______
aiatiitu
Durable goods
A / H A -_....
vaa
......... ....__
Nonmanufacturing ............... .
D t o4n n+414 Maa *.
it
_____ . . . ______
.
Wholesale trade ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••*•

2.7U3
2,005
1,59U
Ull
738
U72
105

1.65
1.62
1.62
1.60
1.72
1.77
1.6 1

Truck drivers, heavy (over 5 tons, trailer type) •••••

a

J1 ^AAM M

* fun
1

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) •••••••••••••••
Manufacturing •••••••••••.....................
Durable goods ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods .••••••••••••••••••••••••••«•••
UAnnamifaefn%4n s ........ .......
« o
.....

Watchmen
Manufacturing •••••••••••............ .
rkim a #aa b
aK
I * /4

1.62
"1.61
1.62
771
1.59
35U
1
.71*
31
1.71*

5,887

1,051*
Nondurable goods •••••...... .
919
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2, i *
ri
55
551
Retail trade •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
11
*7
W
4nanr»o
jlk__ _ . . . . . . .
__ .
_
_ _ _ _ __ ___ _ _
_ _ _ _ __ __ _ _
_ __ _
_
182
Services ..
.......................................................
....................................................................
.
1,820




39
27

10

1

.

.

_

28

28

.

12

.

1

_

.

10
10
10

1

1
_

12

e
e

1.16
1.31
1.29
1.3U
1.05
1.25
1.15
1.22
1.21
.97

79
77
33
55
2
_

13
_

36

36
ort

16

_

-

93
1*6

79
26

16
*
17
*
16
20
11

20
59
lw
i
O
U
li
8

-

.

•
a
»

.
_

_

35
35"
35

20

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
» Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
*» Finance, insurance, and real estate.
y

57
57
57

10

1,156

i

39
-

i.

3
3

-

.

15 298 181 1556 751
12
11
38 316 269
12
10
19 150
73
1
19 166 196
2 287 153 1130 572
9
12 557 325
_ 230
50 1*21 U 5

m

10
10
10

1.99

i ;T25”

R .a-f 1 + a 4 i i i i i m i m n i m t m i i i m m M
a+
.f* « A
n

6
5
5

3

-

•

-

~T F

21 1755 ?1*1 110 235 196 299
“ 55" 90
70 20$ 76 ^"225"
1 2 50 1 2 165 17 131
*
*
if
*
1 1 0 28 50 59
*
95
21 1709 151 50 29 120
73
3
k2 07
59
l7
i
8
5
4f
13 20 ii* 30 20 33 20
52
20 30
8 1605
78
3
9 20 15

13

•

-

90 151
$0 u 5
59 55
1
59
50 27
36 27
5

8 21
— 8" 21“
5 17
5
5

-

2
2

-

95 192 518
95 186 399
55 155 375
50 32
25
1
6
19
9
9

761 161
$35 “ISO
527 110
50
107
1
227
96
m
56

170
>
289 5 2
252 51
1
57
250 118
221
80
10
5

369
369
”
_ 369
_
_
.

.

.
_
_

•

_

J k

-

i5
-

~

-

-

-

11

m

-

6
5

m

I
_
5

j,

126

10
6

5
m

11
3
8

.

_

-

36
3

-

„

3

13
6
5
2
7
7

-

m

m

2
2

2
2

-

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

83
77
35
53
6
6

39
36

15
2

_
„

38 _lSi 582 822 J O k _ k _
2
5
11
65
5
38 159 571 757 509
136 557 236
296 509
38 13 21* 225

129 166
97 153
25 35
73 109
32 23
1
9
29

—

1276 2325 120
15
1
- 4 • ak
»
2
75
13 26 125 — s r
2
12
26 59
10
3
76 62
1
8 1151 2251 118
6 789 1600
_
12 212
1
2 350 539 118

73 155 365
77 135 210
151 365
r ~ lJ
77 “I3T
36 81 321
52 128
95
5 115
37 60 53
25
2
2
15
2
2
15

232 203 213 229
H
ilt 268
182 137 ~ w
153 176 197
79 132 100
121 92 25
17
61 55 58 65 55 97
162 131 159 60 37 32
12
1
2
28 52 102 25
15
5
56 65 21 28 36
38 25 15
6
50
l 11
1

573
325
6
318
159

m

5

-

_

m

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
QaruLf OHd &U%t* GoMfectiOH&Uf P^oducU 1/

Table B-2071:

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
$
$
$
s
$
hourly Under 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.9C 2.00 2.1C 2.2C 2.30 2.40
earnings
- and
2/
3.90

.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1^

1-55 1.60 1.65 1,70 1,75 1,80 1,85 1.9C 2,00 2,iq 2.2C 2.3( 2.40over

Men

Candy makers, class A: Total ....................
Time...................
Incentive ..........................................
Candy makers, class B: Total ............................................................
Time ......................................................
Incentive ..........................................
Candy makers* helpers: Total ...........................................................
Time ......................................................
Incentive ..........................................
Dippers, machine 2 A > ..................................................................................
Dipping-machine operators* helpers 2/a .....................................
Filling-machine operators 2/a ...........................................................
Janitors 2/a ......................................................................................................
Machinists, maintenance 2/a ................................................................
Maintenance men, general utility jl/a..........................................
Mogul operators 2/a ................................. ...................................................
Mogul operators* helpers 2/a ..............................................................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand 2/a ........................................
Watchmen 2/a ......................................................................................................
Wrappers, machine 2/b . .............................................................................

454
249
205
381
277
104
421
305
116
92
33
39
418
no
181
114
218
493
n3
31

$
1.83
1.55
2.18
1.49
1.35
1.88
1.37
1.23
1.75
1.94
1.47
1.13
1.27
1.96
1.93
1.53
1.27
1.42
1.20
1.62

18
18
-1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

1
14

3 3
3 n
3 -

-

14

-

10
10

-

-

5
1

10
4
8

-

18
18

'

53
53

-

-

27

73

2

23
15
2

7
19
6
1

10
10

12
12

76
76

20
20

36
36

64
62
2
18
15
3
9

44
44

-

-

50
49
1
1
2

3
30

-

-

-

_

65

12

23

36

52
38
25
5

7
45
26

15
89
10
2

28
24
4

6
6

65
65
2
3
34

28
23
5

25
25

-

-

7

1

2
28
28
«.

5
20
47
1
1

'

17
9
50
2

14 60
14 59
1
15 30
26
9
6 4
8 31
6 8
2 23
2
_

•

24 54
1
6
19 29
20 20
31 16
10 «
1 1

‘

64
55
9
13
6
7
4

22
20
2
8

4
3
1
1
2
-

10
21
6
23

22
17
5
8
2
6
3

18
12
6
7
7
5

18
12
6
9
5
4
2

3
9
1

3
10

5
8

-

2
5

_
•

1
8
3
18
5

_
_
-

_

8
3

4
10
3
1
7

_

14
13
1

_

3

3

8
1

3

4
4

2
20
2

_

8

_

46

52

3

_

24
8

2
18

19

46
6

52
2

8
55

18
4

19
2

6

2

4
5

2
1
1

_
_

_
_

3

_

_

21
3
18
7
3
3. 4

27

_

.

8
3

2

„

1

5

5 _
3 _
8 16
20 8
1 6

55
4
7

1

«.

_
_

_
_

_

31
5
26
_
_
_

29
_

13
3
2

6
16

2
28

16
28

2
3

12
8

2

_

13
10
3

5

3

_
_

24

30

9

3

2

1

5

2

•

_

2
8

2

_

_

2

‘

Women

Dippers, one-hand 2 A ..............................................................................
Dippers, two-hand 2/b ...............................................................................
Dipping-machine operators' helpers: Total ...........................
Time .......................
Incentive ..........
Filling-machine operators } / & ...........................................................
Inspectors, candy: Total .....................................................................
Time ____f ............................. ..... Tr.
Incentive..............................
Janitors 2/a ......................................................................................................
Packers, hand, bulk 2/a ..........................................................................
Packers, hand, fancy: Total .....................
Time ...................
Incentive ...............
Wrappers, machine: Total ........................
Time ....... ....... .......
Incentive ..................

1/
(194-5
2/
2/

65
190
347
172
175
466
215
135
80
45
558
1,028
499
529
873
128
745

1.38
1.29
4
22 42
1.13
1.00
22 42
1.27
- 28
1.06
30 39
1.19
1.08
30 39
1.38
1.14
- 39
l.H
1.14 179 40
.96 4A78 3
1.30
1 37
1.28
32 108
1.09
32 108
1.31

2
3
5
16 24
8
22
56 63
19 40 49
4
3 16 14
46 118 102 106
1 n
15
6
15
_
1
5
5
5
3
32 89 148 73
14 162 86 150
11 151 33 92
3 n
53 58
74 58 23 45
31 12
4 24
43 46 19 21
20
4

9
16
7

2
10
26

10
18
56

4
14
9

2
6
18

2
6
n

6
2
4

2
2
1

4
2
2

4
10

7

26
20
4
2
2

56
13
14

9
4
10

18

_

_

2

_

2

1

2

1

2

3

1

14
2
12
23

4

26

4

4 1
2 _
4 30
28
4 2

2

26

11
1
4

1

2

1

2

3

1
_

_

26
16
9
7
30
44
87
24
63
75
49
26

-

18
47
2
45
18
-

18

-

23
32
8
24

6
_

-

-

.

_

3
6

5
6

3
5

3
2

5

2

61
34

8
1

6
6
1 241

5

2
2

5
1

2

14 34

1

1

2

1

13
32
1
31
27

27
12
12
56

17
68
3
65
14

29

27

56

14
61

_

_

_

6
8

9
24
1
23
29

-

-

2
3

1

_

_

1
1

_

_

_
_

_

1

1

1

1

3

1

1

-

241

_

3
2

3
_

2

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers primarily engaged in manufacturing candy and other confections (Group 2071) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Occupational Vage Survey, Chicago, HI*, March 1952
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Workers were distributed as follows: 78 at $.75 to $.80; 57 at $.80 to $.85; 43 at $.85 to $.90.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




16

W omen*d a n d Afi£de&r G o a ti and S u ii& 1/

Table B-2337*

Occupation and sex

Avenge
hourly
earning.
dJ

All plant occupations:

Total . .
.
Men
Women

Cutters and markers (all men) 2/a ...••••••••••••...
Inspectors, final (examiners) (6 men and
15 women) 2 / a ...............................
Pressers, hand (all men) y b ....................
Pressers, machine (all men) J / b ........ .
Pressers, hand and machine (all men) J / b ......... .
Sewers, hand (finishers) (men and women) % /b ......
Men 2 / b .... ...............................
Women 2/b ..................................
Sewing-machine operators, section system (men and
women) ^ / b .............. ...... ............
Men j / b ...................................
Women ] / b ......... ........................
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand (tailor) system
(men and women) 2 / b ............ ..............
Men 2/b ...................................
Women ,2/b..................................
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (all women) 2/a ••••••••••.

2,041
1,067
974

#
2.19
2.66
1.67

127

\

D.75

.95 1.00 L.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20

.80

.85

.90

4
2
2

37
37

34
5
29

33
6
27

12
1
11

12
1
11

_

_

_

_

1

1

_
_
2
2

_

_

_

_

_

2
_
2

-

4
4

-

5
5

2.86

21
69
27
126
432
43
389

1.74
2.96
3.84
3.02
1.83
2.07
1.80

243
92
151

2.16
2.39
2.02

516
436
80
27

2.76
2.84
2.37
.95

$
4.00
- and
3.60 3.80 4.00 over

s
t
$
$
$
s
s
$
$
s
*
$
$
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
L
*
.2 L3
Under 3.75 0.80 3.85 3.90 0,95 L.00 1.10 p , 0 f . 0 1.40

43
9
34

85
19
66

6

3

-

-

11
11

12
4
8

24
24

-

-

4
37
37

4
31
31

73
14
59

2

_

_

79 107
8
17
62 99

99
12
87

84
24
60

45
3
42

1
32
3
29

Vj
oW
0
0
0

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME H O U R L Y EA R N I N G S OF—
Number
of
worker*

82 161 140 109 128 141 119
49 93 84 86 100 114 108
28
68
56
27 11
23
33

91 105
27 52
64 53

60
54
6

54
47
7

34
30
4

38
33
5

77
72
5

1

m

1
1
34
1
33

5
1
4

1
1

4
1
3

4
1
3

8
1
7

8
1
7

11
1
10

13
2
11

15
15

15
2
13

6
6

6
4
2

7
4
3

2
1
1
1

6
5
1

13
7
6

-

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
-

-

-

2
2

4

6

2

~

1

11

2

_

21

36

21

10

6

3

-

1

2
13
14
28
28

3
1
5
14
6
8

7
4
10
21
3
18

9
5
8
22
3
19

4
1
1
13
8
3
5

6
2
13
-

6
1
8
•

4
4
6
1

-

10
3
“
“

2
7
20
1
1

“

1

"

21
11
10

25
7
18

22
15
7

20
14
6

12
8
4

11
10
1

4
1
3

9
2
7

4
1
3

1
1

3
“
3

16
13
3

26
16
10

_
-

2
1
1

19

2
5
11
42
4
38

9
5
4

16
7
9

9

1
6
28
4
24

1
1
28
4
24

65
51
14

46
36
10

45
37
8

45
41
4

45
41
4

60
55
5

23
20
3

26
26
-

12
11
1

22
19
3

43
41
2

'

1/ The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops with 8 or more workers in part of industry group 2337 as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the
Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing fur coats or single skirts were excluded from the study. Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with 4 or mare workers were also included. Data relate to a
September 1951 payroll period.
2J
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
3/ Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
.
.
Table B-235*

y

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME H O U R L Y E ARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2J

s
l
*
$
s
$
s
t
*
<
s
s
s
<
s
$
<
s
%
«
$
$
s
$
$
s
Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 I.25 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.0C 3.10 3.20
and
Loo
1.05 1.10 1.15 lt20 lf 25 1,30 1,40 1,50 1,60 1,70 1,80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80_?-90 3.00 3.1C 3.2C over

%

All plant occupations:

Total ...................
M e n ...................
Women .................

1,258
202
1,056

1.73
2.22
1.64

83
26
27
24

2.73
2.00
2.36
1.30

122 ! 68
15
107 68

36
2
34

23
3
20

a
41

21
2
19

55
5
50

96
4
92

73
9
64

2
3

9
3
2

-

3

20 11
3 2
17 9

10
3

7

21
12
9

65
5
60

37
5
32

43
11
32

51
22
29

39
10
29

26
8
18

a
7
34

31
14
17

4
5
~

2
2
1

3
■

3
6
2
“

15
6
~

5
5
“

4
1
3
“

2

1

-

-

12
5
7

8

-

2
2
1

4

2

4

6

3

2
18

4
12

6

3

22

11

1
12

4
2

18
9

12
2

22

11
3

12
4

2
3

82 117
15 11
67 106

65
4
61

1
1

15
11
4

48
19
29

£lant_0ggupal>p j
j ng
i
Men
Blockers, hand J / a ..................... .
Cutters 2 / b ................... ...............
Sewing-machine operators j / b ..... ...............
Shipping clerks % /b ............................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

2

3

-

"

1
4

2
2

4

1.83
1.33
2.19
2.08
2
1.76
2.12
2
1.55
35
1.03 5/47

-

11
10
1
“

12
12

1

-

-

1
-

_
7

6

8
/
4
4
16

-

1

8

-

7 4/19

2
“

3

2
"

4
“

-

4

“

4

2

4

-

-

2

2
4

4
2

1

-

2

2

24

4
1

2

1

-

2

3

24
1

Women
Sewing-machine operators:

Total....... .
TMmA
Incentive ............
Straw operators: Total............ .
TMmn
Incentive.......... ....... .
Trimmers 2/a ..................................
Preparers 2 / b .......... ....... ...............

93
39
54
288
33

255
473
95

_
6
6
16
14

_

16
2

4

y
4
4
0
2
9
2

3
3
19
4

-

7

11
6

25
11

6
72
6

16
36

9
9
40
3

14

55

8
23

14
47

26
29
39

23
25

3

-

13
J
4
9
19

5
5
22

“
3
1
15
1
14
9

6

1

1

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers engaged in the manufacture of women's, misses', children's, and infants' trimmed hats from felt or straw hat bodies and purchased millinery
material.
2 J Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
3/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly incentive workers.
(b) All or predominantly time workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111.# March 1952
U
Workers were distributed as follows: 5 at #3.60 to #3.70; 8 at #4.00 to #4.10; 1 at #4.10 to #4.20; 1 at #4.30 to #4.40; 4 at #4.60 to #4.70.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
3/ Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at #.75 to #.80; 7 at #.80 to #.85; 11 at #.85 to #.90; 26 at #.90 to #.95; 1 at #.95 to #1.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




V

Table B-2U31*

1/ The study included establishments with acre than 20 workers engaged in the production of millwork (Group 21*31) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (191*5 edition) prepared by
the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period.
2/ Data Halted to men workers. All workers were paid time rates.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

fy o U + u S /U e d .,

Table B-336:

1/

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME H O U R L Y EARNINGS OF—

3,329
3,322
7

$
1.69
1.69
l .U

$
$
$
s
s
$
s
$
$
*
$
*
$
$
$
[ n e 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1 .30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 i.5 o 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85
Jdr

1

Average
hourly
earnings

0
O
s
•

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Total ....................
Men ...................
Woman . T I T T t r T T T t . t . tf . T t I t T .

1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 i.5 o 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.65 1.90

26
26

8
8

66
66

66
66

123
123

105
105

_

1
1

9
8
1
15

_

38
37
1

16
15
1

160 567 179
157 565 179
3
2

276 152
27I* 152
2

116 161
116 161

82
82

20
7
7
13
7
1 35
8
1

13
6
7

12

6
10
-L
7

76
76

61*
61*

393
393

_

1

1

0
0
•

All plant occupations:

1.10

C
M

2/

$
$
$
%
%
$
t
$
2.00 2.1C 2.20 2.30 2.)*0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
and
2 .I9 2.2C 2.30 2.1*0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

21*8 87
21*8 87

1*5
1*5

6

3

30
30

30
30

27
27

15
15

112
112

1

65
65

1

1

_

_

1

_

_

_

1

1

h

3

50
50

Selected Plant Occupations - Men
Total ....................
Time ......... ......
Incentive ...................................
Core assemblers and finishers J ^ /a ...... ...........
Coremakers, hand 3/a .....................................................................................

598
1*81
117

R l e r it r ir d a r t s , m aint.pn annp y ' a

15
72
6l
115
166
135
31
262
121*
138
66
69
51*
25
203
17
20
12

Shippers and grinders:

i T . T , l t . . T. . , T. . . t t T . l t I t

Furnace tenders 3 /a .............................................................. ..
Mai nt.anan na man^ g a n a n a l rj+,i1i+ .y
t - i ............... i t t Molders, hand, bench 3 / a ................ .........................................................
MnlripTRj f1n n r*f

t ............. .............................................

T im a
fT
J n ro n f*jiro

tT

,

T

T. t ___ t _T T
. i t.... .

,
j

Molders, machines

Total ..........................................................................
Time.......................
Incentive ..................
P + t p * r f^,Tf, ma+.al ^/a i r
a . . r n nl‘a'i
t i
__
Permanent mold machine operators 2 / b ..............
Pourers, metal 3/a .........................
Sand mixers 3/a .............
Shake-out men 1 /a... ............ ..............
Stock clerks 3/a .........................................
Truckers, power 3/a .......... ................ .
Watchman ^/a

Inspectors, class

1/
2/

3/

1/
*

C

3/a

. . . . . . ............
•••••••••.... •••••••••••••••••

88
2i*8

88

1.1*6
1.1*3
1.59
1,5 l*
1.91*
1.75
1.66
1.69
1.87
1.99
1.91
2.33
2 .Oli
1.88
2.19
2.69
2 .Oil
1.51i
1.51
1.36
1.53
1.1*8

.89
1.1*7

36
33
3

_

_

-

_

_
-

_

-

_

-

_

-

_

-

1*1 102
31* 95
7
7
7
17
1
5

1

_
_

10

6

1,

7

_

_

7
1

11*

273
225
1*8
_




k

7
1

7

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

6
1
*
2

1
*
3
1

5
i
*
1

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
1

32
li

36

10

_

-

_

-

-

_

1

_
2
1
15
2
10

1
*
20
1
23
1

1
*

_

1
10
12
17
2
7

1

6

1
*

12

31

9

3

_

_
_

V 12

_
-

_
_

33
-

_

The study covered indeoendent nonferrou? foundries (except die-casting foundries) with 8 or more workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation o f s e p a r a te av e ra g es by method o f wage paym ent.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $.75 to $.80; 6 at $.85 to $.90; and 5 at $.90 to $.95.

218313 0 - 52 -3

23
20
3
10

6
7

25
1
5

18
5
7

1

5

6

3

_

llil*

36

16

1

5

2

11

1
1
X

23

6

1
8

1,
u

0
C

15

cr
p
c;
P

1

1
*

1
3
_
15
3
_

5

5

3
12
on

8

O

0

1

1

5

1
*

0
P

1

I

1
*

i

fill
01*
5

J.p
or
PP
7
1

O
O
C

56 23
1*0 6
16 17

8
_
8

13
6
7

13

1
9

6

6

68
1*
7
21

O
1

11*
11
3

13

9

6

2
_

5

-

2
_

1

1
*

7

6

2

2

2

10
1

_
_

_
_

_

_

1
*
3
1

1
_ 15
1
*

_

5

_

6

5

3
-

3

6
-

J

c
p
p

_

8
_
8

c

1

19
_

2

_

«
.

h

~

O

_

_
_

2

3

_
_

..

P

A
0
8
_
8
cc
pp
3

”
p

8
8
1

_

“

6

Data relate to an August 1951 payroll period.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., narch 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

9 *1041

Table B-3391:

O h JL

S t e e l rf-0 S U fA 4 l< jA

$
1 .5 5

1.60 1.65

$
1
$
1 .7 0 1 .7 5

$ ~
1.80

1,70

1 .7 5 1 .3 0

1,85 1.90

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Aeae
vrg
h u l Under 1 . 1*0
ory
erig $
anns
1 . 1*0
y
1.1*5

Chippers and grinders 1 / .................. .
^b
Die setters l*/a..................... •*....••<
Die sinkers U / a ................. ••••••••••••<
Drop-hammer operators, board, 1,200 lb- and under U/b
Drop-hammer operators, board, over 1,200
to 2,000 lb* U / b ........................ .
Drop-hammer operators, board, o-«er 2,000 lb* h/b •
Forging-press operators, hydraulic (vertical) |^b
Hammersmiths U/b
Heaters, forge, light work V b •••••«••••••••••»•.
Heaters, forge, heavy workjj/b ••••••••••••••••••<
Helpers, forge |$/b *.... ••...................
Inspectors, class A U / a ............ .
Inspectors, class 8 U / a ...... ........ .......
Inspectors, class C G / b ............ ...... .
Mechanics, maintenance U/a ••••••••••••••••••••*•<
Stock handlers and tracers, hand U/a ••••••••••*.
Trim-press operators, hot trim l / ••••••••«•••••.
*b
Truckers, power (forte-lift) U/b *•••••••••••••••••
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) U / b .... . >••••

31
19
37

$

1.1*5

3.08

21
16
26

3.21*
3.1*7
3.31*
2 .6 1
3 .0 0
2 .8 3
1 .9 6
1 .8 3
1 .9 5
2 .0 0
1.1*7
2 .3 2
1 .9 2
1 .9 0

102
105
1*18
19

U6

196
11*1
72
87
52
52

1

k\

1 .9 7
2 .7 9
2 .6 7

33

$
$
1 .9 0 1 .9 5

$
$
$
$
$
$ . $ - $ , $
2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 . 1*0 2.50 2.60 2.8 0 3.00

$3 . 2 0 |$3.1*0

1 .6 5

—:

1

m

m

1
i

i

2.00 2.10 2.20 2,30 2 . 1*0 2.50 2,60 2,80 3,00 3,20

3.1*0 3 . 6 0

1

-

I f 95

3.80

m
1

!
3

1

6

.

u

-

-

-

.

.

.

_

.

g/16
-

$
3 . 8 0 l *.00

.

_

•

3

-

1

!

-

1

-

•

9

16

i 12
-

1
1
2

9

-

-

30

1

-

2

3

2

-

-

.
-

.
1
2

.
1
*
1'
1 1
*
-

5

36
1

.
1
6
2

-

-

2
2
6

l i

8

.i

-

.i

3
2

3
8

6 !

5

-

3

-

1 !

7
.

u

5

.

2
1*

1
1

2
6

-

11

3
11

29
1*
21

1

1

.
2
2
2i
-;
1

3

11

-

u

3
3
2

8
10

-

-

5

3i

1

2!
.
2

3
2

2

2

-

1

2
2

1
*
2

31

1

1

2

-

•

i
*
_

1
1

2
.

3

5
3

1
*
2

2
3

3!
3!
8i
8
18 |

2

3
5

7
62

51
12

1*
1
19

10
7
9

1
5

1
*

.

1
*
10
5
32

19

9
11
57

.

19

u

1

*
—

1

12
5
11*!

1

i+.OQ

1i
1
i
-

2i

10

-

.

3

_

_!
1

.

-!
-

$

3.60

1
.

$

and

1.50 1.55 1.60

1
2.11

10

1.50

•

Number
o
f
wres
okr

G
O

Occupation 2/

-

33
2

16
1

1

8

13

l*
i
8i
_
J

6

8

7
68

19

•!
1

1
*
-

-

6
1

5
-

72

•
12
i

5
1$
19

.
•
1
•
“i

5

1!
1*
9
20!

J
J

2

a
3

—!

2
3
8

-|

5

.
.
-

_

2

1
-1

-

-

J
J

•
j

.
.
-

.

4
;

•
!
_1
-!
2i

i
|

over

4

4

4

J
4
4
H
4

-

2
1
*
3
6
7
13
50

.
•
•
.
-

y
The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of iron and steel forgings (Group 3391) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification u*nn«i (1945 edition)
prepared t y the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period.
o
y
Data limited to men workers.
y
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
f j
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages f y method of wage payment.
a
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
( a All or predominantly incentive workers.
f)
y
Workers were distributed as follows} 12 at #1.30 to #1.35; 4 at #1.35 to #1.40.

Table B-3l*2t

G r i t l e ’u f ,

a tfo w l

^ J o o l^ fC ^ n d

J lc fid w a r ie y

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS O F -

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

£/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
’
$
$
$
i
$
$
$ ,
p.85 0.90 0.95 pL.OO 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .1*0 1 .1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.30 1.35 1.90 2.00| 2.10| 2 .20 2.30 2.1*0
,
and
and
under
1,20 L 2 L
1*35 1,1*0 i l 5 1,50 i*55 1,60 1.65 1 ,7 0 1.75 1,80 1.85 1.90 2*00' 2*10’2, 2 ,30 2,1*0 enrar
U20J .95 1.00 1.05 1,10
20| ,
**
■
!

Men
Assemblers, class B: Total .......... ............
Time ....................
Incentive ...................
Assemblers, class C: Total ......................
Incentive .......... ......
Heat treaters, class A 3/a .................... .
Heat treaters, class B 3/a ......................
Inspectors, class B 3 / a .......................
Inspectors, class C 1/a .........................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A U / t Total ............... ........ ..
Time.........................
Incentive .....................
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class A 3 /a...............................
Turret-latne operators, hand (including hand
screw machine) class A 3/b ..................
See footnotes at end of table,




21
15
6
130
85
15
*
25
97
22
50

#
1.62
1.57
1.75
1.50
1.1*3
1.6 *
1
2.00
1.70
1.66
1.1*9

100
Ui
59

1.93
1.92
1.93

j
i
-

- ■ -

- '

-

-

- ;
- ,

- I
” 1
—f

11
*

- 1
- :
-

-

- 1 ~j •

“

“ ;

“

- ;
“

-

- j
~

"

-

-

_

-1
_

-

- ;

-

-

-

-

-

- j

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

31

1.97

-

20

1.82

- |

.
10
10

-

_
1
1
-

6

- 1
- , 1
*
- ; 2
-

_
8
8
1

1

-

1 -

6

20
1*
1

6
8

1
1

5;

_
. ;
9 17 27
1 1 16 ! 22
*
1
5
1
1
*
- < 2! 2
1
*

•
-

1
1

15
11
1
*
- i
1
*
- |

5;

6

6

- :
- ;
-

1

1

1
1

1
1
*

2
1
*

1
-

9

1
13

1

5
6

1
*
10
-

12
- 1

7
1
*

10

3

1
*

11
**
30
1*
1!
38
.

U

|
1

1
1

10

31
3
8

1

9

6

1

2

11
0
7
2
6

- i
-

-

-

- !

-

-

-

-

-!

!

3
3

1|
2

1
1
.
1

6

-

-j

-!

_
-

1

-j

!

-

8

2

6

6

2

1
2
2
2
-j

j

j

J

j
5

_
j
1

5
;

l|
10!
J

9!
_

_
1

_

_
_

5

-

-

-

-

10
l!
9
!

1
*

1
*

1

u

L

2
»
2

-

2

-

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-342:

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
worken

G

u tle to f,

o tta + u i

^ o o llfC

u id

< J ta /u h u a * m

y

-G

o s U in u m l

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Aeae S
vrg
2.00 ^ .1 0 *
2.20 *
2.30 *2.40
h u l 0.85 5.90 5.95 f.oo f.05 f.10 1.15 f.20 1.25 f.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 *
ory
e r i g and
anns
and
undex
2/
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 I.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 over

Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
fy*
t
Total........ ..................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B % /b .......................
Engine-lathe operators, class B ^/b ............
Milling-machine operators, class B 3/b ......... .
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class B 2/a ...
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B 2 / b ........ ....... .
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C t j \ Total .................................
m kia
....
Incentive
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C: Total............. ......
TMnw*
Incentive .................
Grinding-machine operators, class 0 y & ..... ..
Milling-machine operators, class C 2 /& .........
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class C j/a ..•
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C 2 / b .......... ......
Machine-tool operators, toolroom jj/a.... ••••.....
Polishers and buffers, metal 2 / b .................
Polishing-and-buffing-machine operators Jj/a... .
Set-up men, machine tools j / a .... ...............
Stock handlers and truckers, hand j / a ...... ......
Tool-and-die makers y & .................. ......

210
100
110

*
1.69
1.73
1.65

42
7
ot
f
28
24

1.64
1.70
1.76
1.73
1.70

45

1.67

568
417
151

1.49
1.46
1.57

147
so
oy
58
142
109
26

1.48
1.46
1.52
1.46
1.54
1.33

41
46
62
51
113
160
132

1.08
1.14

262

1.20

173

1.17

-

_

m

2

_

•
»
_

_

_

2

-

-

2

m

1

6
/
*¥
2

1
1

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
~

"

_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

•

-

_

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

11
-

1

1

-

-

5

1

1

-

-

•

-

13

1

5

1

•

10

45
16
29

30
16
14

33
13
20

29
17
12

22
21
1

4

1

13
1

6
2

12
2

-

2

O
<

4

2
2

3

9

2
“

2
2
r
5
4
10

8

16

4

2

6

J

4
2

1

2

12
n
1

16
9
14

2

-

<

O

12

27
23
4

67
59
8

89
81
8

33
26
7

74
62
12

60
46
14

39
17
22

56
46
10

64
38
26

23
16
7

7
7

13

1

5

1

3

26

19
IQ

6

1

-

5

-

-

-

-

7
2
12
4

5

_

1

6
36
16
"

24
8

25
7
18
5
20

14
1/

3
30
1
8

13
c
9
8
15
3
2

9

3
8
7
9

20
18
2
13
23
“

6

6
1

8

1
-

2
2

1

-

4

2

12

1
10

14
1
27

2
8

2
2
16
2

9
1
2

3
8
16

4
2
10

3
8
25
8
9

13
4

2
8

3
6

7
7

1
7

16

8

6

14

11

m
m

-

_

J!

2

6

3
3

1.52
1.74
1.83
1.49
1.83
1.33
2.19

403
63

•

_

6

-

6

-

m

_

6

_

~

~

“

3

41

44

40

2

-

-

-

-

-

„
-

-

3

1

-

-

15

9

5

-

-

17

21

12

29

29

13

_

_

_

Women
Assemblers, class C jj/a .........................
Inspectors, class C i / a ...... .
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 2/a, y ..............................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C jj/a......... ...... .....••

30 90
* 12
-

-

34
10

29
~

46
“

80
31

45
2

14
2

_

8

16

30

69

61

50

10

6

8

16

24

65

32

18

2

18
2

14

-

1
2

_
“

1

2

2

4

2

2

1

_

1

_

_

1
4
4

i/ The study covered firms with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of cutlery, hand tools, and hardware (Group 3 - ) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition)
42
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period.
2J
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night- work.
y
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
i j
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




Table B-3U39*

Occupation and sex

o
f
wres
okr

jle o t u U

f A p p & u d u A

3/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
t
t
s
s
t
t
»
1
$
$
1
•
t
t
*
s
1
t
l
s
«
S
s
s
t
t
I
h u l 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40
ory
e r i g and
anns
under
2/
l.l? 1.20 1.25 1.20 ! • ? ? I.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 I.85 1.90 U 2 X 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 over

Men

Chippers and grinders 2/a ........................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiple-

$
2.09
1.75
1.61
1.86
1.39
1.73
1.44
1.69
1.29
1.72
1.94
1.85

Maintenance men, general utility 2/a ..............
Fhintars, finish j j / h ............................
aVaaw
e
rlace A */
t
5o
......
Power-shear operators,
class Bi Total ,t. T. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
33
12
TIti
p©
21
Incentive ........................
Punch-press operators,
class B: Total ..............................
1H
TMtoa ,
T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
Jn
tro
i i - ii
98
112
Stock handlers and truckers, hand 2/a .............
Tool-and-die makers 2/a .........................
45
Welders, hand, class A J j a .......................
33
36
Welders, hand, class B 2 /a .......................
8
Welders, machine, class A 2/a ....................
37
Welders, machine, class B: Total .................
Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
» t - _ _ _ _ . . . T t __
17

1.65
1.60
1.68

i •

1.73
1.46
i r
1.77 i
1.42
2.20
2.14
1.76
1.34
1.71
1.55
1,90

-

1

1
1

1
1

36
36

9

9

6

9

9
2

21

9
2

2

4

5

2

1
1
5

8

3

30

1

1

_

-

_

_

4
1
3

3
1
2

2
1
1

-

9
6
3

4
7
2
5

1
16
10
6

12
6
6

3
7

4
13

7

13

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

13

2

12

5
1

1
2

1
3

-

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

10

2
2

•
e

_

-

74
-

2
-

8
-

-

-

-

-

5

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

2
4

5

2

5
4.
1

_
-

18
4,
14

1

-

1

7
1
6

3

-

25
22
3
-

1
1

1

-

-

1

-

2

2

9

49

5
4
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

()

£
14

2
3

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

3
3

3
3

1
1

1
1

-

-

4

3
1
2

_
2

5
«.

6
4

2

4

14
2
12

11

_

4
4

-

1

3
_

_

20

8
8

8

9

15

9
6

1
1
1
1

2
1
1

11

13
3
3

_
10

2

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

-

-

_

—

«
•

3

2

3

_

3

_

9

9

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

9

9

2

3
1

1

6
24

15
-

3
-

3

-

-

2
-

1
4

-

4
4
2

—

5

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

2

2
2

9
5
4

14
8
2
6

5

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

-

1
16
1

1

-

_

3

18
43
4
39

2

1 0

Incentive ................

1H
210
94
116
58
8
8
20
50
37
54
12

Assemblers, class A 2/a .........................
Assemblers, class B: Total ......................

-

U

6
-

5

-

2

Women

Assemblers, class C 2/a

1/
in the
2/
2/
(J

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
.

1.40

-

-

1

3

1

-

1

5

-

1

-

-

-

-

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of commercial and domestic heating and cooking equipment (Groups 34-32 and 3439 except electric stoves) as defined
Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 9 - edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget, Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period.
145
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111,, March 1952
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages ty method of wage payment.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Workers were distributed as follows: 4 at $2,50 to $2.60j 2 at $2,70 to $2.30.
-




S h e e t -M

Table B-3UUU*

e t^

W

o tk

y

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING BTRAIGHT-TIM1 HOURLY IARNINOS OF—

N ber
um
o
f
w
orker*

Atoms*
hourly

$

Linder 1.05

1.05

v

t
*
%
1
t
s
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 i.u o 1.U5 1.50 i.5 5 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80

O•
O
•H

Occupation and Sex

8

t
t
1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 *2.30 *2.1*0 2.50 2.60
and

1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.U0 1.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.1*0 2.50 2.60 over

Men
al*as D ..............................................................
»a
Assemblers, class C .......... .
Janitors .... ............ .............**..*«•
T.nrwmf ■ a n «1. . . “ *'
li.___________________ ___________
Power-brake operators, class A ........................... ...........
Power-brake operators, class B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-sheat operators, c l a s s g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-shear operators, class B .................................... ..*
Punch-press operators, c l a s s A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Punch-press operators, class B ........................................ .
Sheet-metal machine operators,
miscellaneous Machines

...................................

Sheet-metal workers, production......................... ..............
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ....................................
Tool—and—die makers
Welders, hand, class A
Welders, hand, class B

%

26
73
18

la
Hi
3U
11
U3
17
138

1.67
1.1*1*
1*31^
2.15
1.85
1*59
1.81*
1.51
1.68
1.1*6

29
55
60
07
C
(
55
75

1*23
1.31

m

1
*

6

3

m
m

m

7

2

1

10
8

11

*

2

m
1

-

.

•

-

9

2

2

l

-

•

1

13

39

9

23

3

1
3

1

2

5

12

«e

1
,

O
c

1
,
4
]
i

8

•»
17

_
5

1
x

2

2

3

9

18

13

8
2
13

j.

7
7
23
11*

m

«
»

7
f
8

6

2
2

17
1

1

1.72
2.16
1.1*6
2.18
2.01
1.69

28
8

_

8

10

c

X

O
7

p

1

*

0
C

0
c

2

“
“

9

1

1

1

1

1

O
C
U

in
XU
0
c

7
I

11
5
*
1
J
L
1
,
4

*

”
2

7

8

3

X

z

X
”

2

1

5
0
0

0
0
1
.
u

“

c

_
-

2

U

*

*

“

2/21*

1
li
2

3
1
1

2

0

5

•
*

"

X

j,

lf\
ft
O

1

“

z
O
2

■
a
P
2

XU

c
0

TO
Xc

1
9
c

p
9
c

0
c

5
1

“

“

-J
X

10
li

2

3

1
*
3
2

6
1

Women
Assemblers, class C . . .
Punch-press operators, class

B

......... ... .............. t t

1

J

%
J

•a

5

2

2

1.
u

X

3

1,
4

2

"

y

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of sheet-metal products (Oroup 3 * * ) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (191*5 edition)
llh
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget* Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period*
y
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work* All or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis*
y
All workers were at $2*70 to $2*80.

Stam and Pe A d
ped
l &e

Table B-3463*

M

e tc U

Ptoxtuetc y

N U M B E R OF WORKERS R EC EIV IN G STR A IG H T -T IM E H O URLY E A R N IN G S OF—

1 _

i

1.05
I f 30

ll5
1.35 1.10 I . i i.5o 1.55 1,60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2,Q0 2.10 2.20 2.30! 2.1i0 2.50
|

Die setters y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspectors, class c y ........................................................................................ ..
Maintenance men, general utility
.......... .
Mechanics, maintenance V .......................
Power-shear operators, class A
*••••••••••••••••••«
Power-shear operators, class Bs Total .••••••••••••••
Time .............
Incentive ••••••••
Punch-press operators, class A
•••••••....... ••••
Punch-press operators, class Bt Total ••••••••••••.••
Time.........
Incentive ........
Tool-and-die makers
• • • • • • • • • • • ....................................................... ...
Stock handlers and truckers, hand
............................................. ..

y

y

y

y

y

|
1

17*
.1

203
62
112
28
70
151
126
25
1*
10
559
365
1l
9i
270
321

1.7 i
l
l
*9li
1.69
1.31
1.28
l.Wi
1.68
•1.39
1.33
1.52
2.25
1.25

3:
12
531
230
301

1.31
1.29
1*23
1.33

I . I 18

-

.
l
i
l
i
-

16
16
-

2i
l

-

• i

-i
20 16
20 | 16
|

2.60
and
over

1

!

i

$

s1

1.10 '1.15 il.?0 1*25

Men

$

,
1

y

$
$'
1
$
$
!$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
|$
$
^ $
$ w $
Under1.05 1.10 1.25 1.20 i.25 1.30 1.35 | . * 1.1 5 1.50 l.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.8511.90!
110 *
1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.3012.1*0

♦

Average
hourly
earnings

«

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

7
-!

-

-i
. 13
1
12

-i
-|
.
2i
1
22
2

!

15
.
.
.
- i
.
17 Hi
17 12
.i 2

-

-

-

•
-

27
16
11

30
27
3

19
*
ll
ii
5

59 22 82
1 7 ! Hi! 56
*
12 1 8 | 26

25

61

58

•

-

10

1
7

1
15
11
l
i

1 32
13 101
13 18
83

-

-

-

i

-

1

9
2
_j
.
81
8!
.;

!

-

8*
1
80
U

.

58

20

25 j
19 j
*
8I
ia!

17 36
39 17
10 ' 5;
29 12

23

1
17
3
5 13 17 20 29 2 *
6|
2
l 11 15
i
2! 8
l
3 l i 22 ! 13s
7 15
.
_
1!
2; 2
2
. 12! 1 19 ! 8 i 7 i 2 11
_
8 10 | 111
li
_ I _'
_
•
8 ! 6 ! 11
1
_
•
.
1
-|
l
i
6 16 12
ia! 16 12 : 8
52 1 la 12 17 21
7 10
5
. |
.
2
35!
9 12
u
3
8
17! 37
9
7 10
9
3
.
.
l
i
11 i i
- :
-

361 10
.
10
8
2
1
6
.
i
_
.
i
6
U*
9 12
9
1

12
7

9

9

_

8
2

3
8

_
_

1

2

1
2
l
i

.
_

_

2
!
71

21
j

.
!
2

_

J
J
.
!

_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_

!

l
i
..
_

i

6

.
!

_
_

_
—:
_

25

92

30

25

29

-

-

-

-

-

25 h/26

-

Women
Inspectors, class C 3/ • • • • • • • ................................................................ ..
Punch-press operators, class Bt Total ...........................................
Time . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incentive • • • • • • • •

l
i
£

12 167
61 158
n lj

!
17

11
1*

I
i

19
19

—:

Hi
23

12
11

l
i
12

2
2

.

• ;

3

•

2

2

23

11

12

2

-

-

3

-

2

2

3

16

!

-

y
The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonautomotive stamped and pressed metal products (Group 3 * 3 as defined in the Standard Industrial Classifi­
16)
cation Manual (191*5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget* Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period*
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
y
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment} all or predominantly time workers.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
V Workers were distributed as follows: 2* at $2.60 to $2.70} 2 at $2.70 to $2.30.
i
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Table B-3U68*

2JUct^plati4Uf, PlatUu}ia#d PoluUuif

y

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY XARN1NG8 OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

A venge

hourly
earnings

2/

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

Undei 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70
$
and
1.00
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1*20 3*22. 1./,0 1*41 1,50 liil l & L I U > 1.70 1*25.-L*SQ 1*20 2.00 2 ,1,0 2.20 2*^0 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 over
1

Men
$
2 10
1.07
1.76
Maintenance men, general utility 2/ ...............
_
1.58
512
P o .P » ?/ ...............................................................................................................................................
1 + T «
5
10 47
685
1.25
Pl&tsrs* halpars
••• ••••••
> tr\
2.24
i on
Time .............
2.38
308
Polishing-and-buffing-machine
71
operatorss Total ............. ................
1.74
39
1.51
Time ............
32
2.02

1

d l - -1,

A—
-

1/

00

1.15

_
77

25

2

l

_
78

24
79

36
81

16
60

5
30
52

38
36

1
82

11
38

6
52

1
1

4
4

1
1

2

8

6

5

17

2

_

4

_

_

_

_

44
23
21

56
1
55

19

53

15

15

45

8
7
1

19

53

15

15

13

1

3

4

1

13

1

3

4

1

5
40 10

26

_

47
41
6

23 46
15 15
8 31

56
29
27

1

2

3

1

1

11
10
1

2
44

2

3

1

45

U

1

32

2

2
2

1

4
15
18
8
10

4
.

61
56
3
3

AO*

211

_

1

_
84

25

6

15
14
1

_

_
_

—

Women
Pla+.ot*et V
tal T a O e
^ v /f
k

16

26

16

30

17

51

1/ The study covered firms with more than 7 workers engaged in all types of electroplating, plating, and metal polishing (Group 3468) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
, ,,
^
.
. , .
3/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.
l j
Workers were distributed as follows* 16 at $2.70 - $2.80; 12 at $2.80 - $2.90; 4 at $2.90 - $3.00; and 13 at $3.00 and over.

Table B-35*

M o c U iM * * 4 f

J

h

& UA& UM A.

if

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY RARIVINOS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

A venge

hourly
earnings

2/

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

Undei 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60
$
and
1.00
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1,40 1,45 1,50 1,55 l^Q. il*&1 1*20. 1.75 1.80 0*81 i l * 2 0 2*Q0 2.10 2.20 2*20. 2.40 L2*20 2,60 ov?C

Machinery 3/
Men
1,732
1,373
Incentive
359
2,821
Time ......................... 1,313
1,508
Incentive
2,510
1,724
Time ...... ..... ...... .
786
Incentive ••••••»•••••«»•.»•«»

See footnotes at end of table




$
1.93
1.91
2.01
1.77
1.64
1.88
1.48
1.39
1.66

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_

.
.
_
_
1
1

3
_
3
51
51

_

_

1

_
_
_
_
_
1
_
1
9 27
4
_
_
8
9
4
_
_
1
1 18
226 262 148 152 358 384
216 238 81 119 312 305
10 24 67 33 46
79

5

15

5 15
369 171
310 80
59 91
213 193
141 136
72
57

51 44 117
38 71
46
6 46
5
225 348 218
198 318 154
27 30 64
111 107 29
7
54 58
57 49 22

223 181 49 412
215 176 35 356
56
8
5 14
164 106 530 162
19 29 49
135
29 87 501 113
58
35
54 52
1
2
2
52
51 58
33

276 274
210 222
66
52
47
405
405 47
17 35

39
4
35
18
18
7

24
_
24
5

7

4

6
_
6
2

13
_
13
4

2
_
2
3

-

-

-

-

5
4

4
1

3
5

2
7

1

5

7

-

17

35

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

MacUinVuf DnJUuibiaA 1/ - C on tinu ed

Table B-35

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
wre*
okr

f
s
$
s
1
t
t
<
s
$
s
<
Aeae
vrg
$
l
t
t
t
t
•
h u l Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 *2.40 *2.50 *2.60
ory
erig $
anns
and
2/ 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 over

Machinery 3/ - Continued
Men - Continued
Electricians, maintenance L J b. ....................
Inspectors, class A £/a .........................
Inspectors, class B i j a .........................
Inspectors, class C i j a . .........................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 4/a ...............
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A j$/: Total ............................
Time ..........................
Incentive ......................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class A: Total ............................
Time ..........................
Incentive ......................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A i j h ........................
Engine-lathe operators,
class A: Total ............................
Time..........................
Incentive ......................
Grinding-machine operators,
class A: Total ............................
Time..........................
Incentive ......................
Milling-machine operators,
class A: Total ............................
Time..........................
Incentive ......................
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class A: Total ............................
Time ..........................
Incentive ......................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A: Total ..............
Time .............
Incentive ........
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B £/: Total... ........................
Time..........................
Incentive ......................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class B: Total ............................
Time ..........................
Incentive ......................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B: Total ....................
Time ...................
Incentive ..............
Engine-lathe operators, class B: Total .........
Time.......
Incentive ...

See footnotes at end of table,




383
746
1,145
640
1,110

$
2.02
1.91
1.74
1.53
1.33

10

6,000
3,564
2,436

2.00
1.99
2.03

-

522
123
399

1.99
1.93
2.01

-

-

1

10
31

25

10
13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

a

_
_
_
_
9
4 33 19 38 58
83 200 238 114 111

_
_
7 60
54 38
56 150

12
_
10
56 99
73 150
27

7 28 37 62 113
3
4
52 21 122 82 49 240 63
91 188 117 303 179 13
7
91 14 38
9
2
8
1

44 111 133 613 541 1555 1089 1115 382 203
22 95 97 440 171 1154 687 516 203 104
22 16 36 173 370 401 402 599 179 99

-

-

-

-

-

-

36

18

-

-

-

-

-

_

36

18

-

-

_

-

_

-

22

_

-

-

_

-

-

_

22

-

3
1
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

_

520

1.94

-

-

-

-

971
838
133

1.98
1.97
2.05

-

-

-

-

_

995
520
475

2.08
2.12
2.03

-

-

-

-

-

775
416
359

2.01
1.98
2.05

134
66
68

2.10
2.03
2.17

967
640
327

1.98
1.98
2.00

3,524
1,915
1,609

1.80
1.72
1.90

-

-

_

_
_

_

_

346
170
176

1.79
1.65
1.92

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
_
-

529
234
295
411
291
120

1.74
1.61
1.84
1.77
1.72
1.91

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

28
16
12

_
_
_

25
22
3

5

5

2

-

16
15
1

55
55
1
1
_

8
5
3

18
16
2

36
21
15

-

-

-

-

2

1

11

-

-

2

1

11

5
£

1

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

14

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

14

-

-

-

_

18
10
8

30
_
30

16

222

25
20
5

7
7

-

_

_

-

1

_

_

-

_

1

24
20
4

_
_

3
_
3

10
10
-

2
_
2

6
1

_

_

79
48
31

33
11
22

20
_
20

89 114 130
33 48
3
56 66 127

16 10
_ _
16 10

_
_
_

3
_
3

3
3

31

26

19

7

3

1

2

1
_
1

1
1
_

1
1

46 122 170 150 187 127 111
17 25 77 79 n 2
87 75
40 36
29 97 93 71 75

52
41
11

5
1
4

2

44
o
n
13

43 124

30 270 177 140
24 229 149 n o
6 41 28 30

45 156 173 221
1/ 102 116 j yJj
L
31
54 57 116
38
35
3

28
11
17

49
19
30

33 18
rt
O
30 16
9
9

2
_
2

2

4

6

1

4

6

1

3

1
1

3

3

3

16 14
3 1
13 13

4

6
_
6

75 138 216 246 434 432 720 405 279 272 169
53 119 161 199 344 308 482 123 47 26
3
22 19
55 47 90 124 238 282 232 246 166

36 14
_
36 14

7
_
7

6
_
6

4

3

9

4
26
20
6

9

94 152 264 262 115
81
53 194 208 85
13 99 70
54 30

4

2
2

_

3
_

2
_

59
6
53

1
1

11
10
1

13
40

83 21
68 16
15 5

26 150
22 149
1
4

_

-

98
52
16
_

3

9

17
15
2

4

7
7

4

6
6
_

8
8
.

27
25
2

24
20
4

59
48
11

36
29
7

51
2
50

78
33
45

24

4

13

3

3

1

4

4

24

4

13

3

3

1

4

4

17
7
10
5
5

17
13
4
48
47
1

74
50
24
17
13
4

94
80
14
25
22
3

52
36
16
74
68
6

26
3
23
66
46
20

70
9
61
67
58
9

43
_
43
50
27
23

18
_
18
23
5
18

62
6
56
17

12
_
12
10

2
_
2
7

3

_

-

-

_
_
_
_
_

17

10

7

3
2

_

2

_
_

_

_

_

_
_
_
_

Table B-35s

M ackm atuf OnAuAbUmi

lA

6o*tinM *A

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
wres
okr

1
*
$
9
9
9
1
t
l
•
t
9
9
«
t
t
9
9
s
9
*
t
f
Anti|t
h u l Undei 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.30 1.35 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 *2.60
ory
erig *
anns
and
1.00
2/
1,05 1,10 1,15 1,20 1.25 1.3 0 1 ,3 ? I.40 1.45 1,50 1 ,55 1,60 1,65 1,70 1.75 1.30 1.3? ± £ Q _ 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 over

Machinery 3/ - Continued
Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B j / - Continued
j:
Grinding-machine operators,
class B: Total ............................
Time........................ ..
Incentive ......................
Milling-machine operators,
class B: Total ............................
Time ............. .............
Incentive ......................
Screw-machine operators, automatic,

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B: Total ..............
T
-fpa
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C £/: Total............................
Time ..........................
Incentive ......................
Automatic-lathe operators, class C
..........
Drill-press operators, radial, class C L j * . .......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C: Total ....................
Time...................
Incentive ..............
Engine-lathe operators, class Cs Total .........
Time.......
Incentive ...
Grinding-machine operators, class C: Total ......
Time....
Incentive .
Milling-machine operators, class G: Total .......
Time.....
Incentive .
.
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C: Total ..............
Time.............
Incentive ........
Machine-tool operators, toolroom i j a ..............
ni e+e
rw //
t
a
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ^/a .............
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) £/a ....
Welders, hand, class A: Total ...................
T^mo
Welders, hand, class B: Total ...................
Time..................
Incentive .............

See footnotes at end of table,




$
1.87
1.78
1.93

576
271
305

1.82
1.72
1.91

97
28
69

1.88
l!88
I.89

636
40
-7

1.80
1 7/
- •«f
L *
T cn
x.V L
J

-

OOQ

Time..................... .

522
229
293

3,038
1,732
1,306
28
96

1.53
1.44
1.65
1.54
1.55

_
_
_

1,029
549
480
217
91
126
527
254
273
344
177
167

1.51
1.40
1.64
1.56
1.53
1.58
1.56
1.42
1.69
1.56
1.51
1.63

-

378
187
191
671
329
1,909

1.56
1.48
1.65
2.02
1.37
l!47

1,458
1,196
817
483
334
606
452
154

2.34
2^18
1.98
1.88
2.12
1.78
1.70
2.00

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
_
1

—
-

1
_
1

3
_
3

1
1

9
6
3

9
4
5

24
16
8

20
10
10

72 45
45 29
27 16

76
66
10

43
18
25

79
15
64

73
20
53

54
54

8
a

2
2

2
2

-

“
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15
11
4

29
25
4

26
21
5

31
25
6

65 65 127
54 43 76
11 22
51

31
6
75

50
10
40

42
42

33
33

10
10

2
2

-

-

-

_

2

3

23
13
10

-

-

-

-

-

3

39
9
30

-

2

21
6
15

9

_

47 83 234
36 53 211
11 30 23

32
9
23

49
4
45

35

32
3
29

4

2

4

-

-

35

4

2

4

_

80
80
1

97
97
7

86
86
1

78
20
58
1
3

12
12
1

1
1
-

4
4
-

“

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

6
1
5
-

2
1
1
-

5
_
5
-

81
68
13
-

_
_
_
_

5
5
1
1
_
_
_

—
_
_
2
1
1
-

5
5
_
_
-

25
24
1
10
_
10

-

-

-

-

_
_
_

_
_
-

-

_
_
-

10

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

22
20
2

-

12
9
3

16
15
1

24
14
10

40
33
7

113 137 173 283 357 315 265 148 267 277 104 146
9 47
109 115 111 219 281 204 150 69 177 151
4 22 62 64 76 111 115 79 90 126 95 99
2
- 2
1
3
3 10
3
3
2 18
8
6
4
- 2
- 10 20 13

9

1
1
~

66
66
1
1
_
21
20
1
1
1

74
58
16
3
2
1
14
14
_
8
5
3

91
57
34
16
3
13
19
11
8
9
5
4

77
50
27
22
16
6
54
36
13
46
39
7

58 138 103
33 91 57
25 47 46
27
9 13
12
1
5
4 12
15
28
54 29
19 46 12
8 17
9
43 27 25
6
27
5
16 22 19

46
34
12
6
6
27
27
14
3
11

62
45
17
13
8
5
36
19
17
68
53
15

79
24
55
36
26
10
38
12
26
48
34
14

21
21
4
4
31
5
26
12

29
10
19
31
15
16
42
42
6

38

42

41

20

6

—

3

-

-

~

38
6
6
17
17
12

42
3
3
22
22
5

41
2
2
28
—
28
6

20
9
9
25
20
5
9

6
3
3
1
1
1

-

—
1

3
1

-

-

“
1

12

6

12

5

6

9

1

1

1

-

-

1

3
2
1
-

16
13
3
-

21
15
6
-

35
28
7
3

61
45
16
5

38
21
17
1

38
8
30
10

28
18
10
5

8

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

8 10
77 207 275
32
51

7
23

1

2

1

-

11

39

34

59 131

86

52 154 1255

17

47

8

6
26 9
4
6
22 9
28 9
7
30 20 109
1
3

18

-

2
1
1
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

10
10

-

1
1

-

_
-

1
1

3
3

a

40
1
1
1
4
4

55
28
27
-

-

-

-

2

4

20
20

1
1

31
26
5

2
38
31
7

4
83
83

37
35
2

6
90 36
90 36

17
35
33
2
47 20 155
5 141
a
6 15 14

18
33
64

58 56 94 379 250 222 300 6/99
2
80 170 228 429 141 47 45
31
—
68 266 115 48 33
92
7
_ _ 11
2
38 174 64 36
11
30 92
7
51 12 31 92
8 11 18 11
76
2
35
3
5
64
8 11 18 11
12
2
35
5
3

M adunotof StAulbUmi. 1/ - Con tin u ed

Table B-35i

-O
O

Occupation and sex

A ««|i
t
hourly Under f.00 i.0 5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 i.5 5 1.60 1.65
M
roinp t
2 / 1.00 1,05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.2? 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70

2.50 *2.60
1.75 1.30 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 1.20 1.30 *2.40 $

-O
ui

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

N ber
um
of
w
orkera

1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.3O 2.40 2.50 2.60 over

and

Machinery 3 / - Continued
Women
Assemblers, class C ^/b .........................
Inspectors, class B &J&..........................
Inspectors, class C ^/a .........................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C $J\ Total ............................
Time ..........................
Incentive ......................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C: Total ....................
Time ..................
Incentive ..............
Engine-lathe operators, class C ^/a .............
fVri nrt i ng—
mnehi n*» np o ratj^re

M ask fl / / «

Milling-machine operators, class C

£/b

..........

m

$
1.34 7/31 134
1.44
1
1.33

13

92 104 108 183 324 103 307 107 145
- 20
10 10
1 35
8 168
23
44 39 45
5
9 40

798
413
385

1.33
1.30
1.37

25

21

1

24

3
18

17
4
13

16
8
8

56 148
39 122
17 26

521
266
255
73
96

1.29
1.27
1.31
1.34
1.42
1.41

25

21

1

11

14
7
7

55 134
39 114

24

3
18

15
4

16

-

-

-

1

-

~

2
~

1,955
100

68

“

53

-

20
1

13
1

~

~

66

23
43

71
9
3

55
10
-

32 48
- 3
11 17

23

4

3

-

10
2

36

-

6

-

9

6

12

2

-

-

-

-

22

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

92 109
65 52
27 57

70
43
27

49
13
36

31
13
18

36
18
18

13
3

11
2

1

-

10

9

3

9

6

12

2

2

72
34
38

45
33

17
3
14
5

14
9
5

6

9
3

8

3

8

4

2

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

“

-

40
4
36

26

2
6
16

51

6
20
K
J

6
16

9

4

12
2
10
11

3
3
2

1
5
1

27

5

5
22

1

6
2
2

1

5
3

-

-

-

-

-

8

3

8

4

2

-

3
3
_

2
~

2

2

2
-

~

1

2

“

_

5
2

14

3

-

Machine-Tool Accessories - Jobbing Shoos
Msn
Assembl

, p.lflss A !^/t\

,

t __

Inspectors, class A lj a .........................
Inspectors, class B ij z . .........................
Janitors, porters, and c eaners ^ / a ...... TTTT....T.
l
.
Machine-tool operators, production, class A ij a,
...
Engine-lathe operators, class A ij a ............
Grinding-raachine operators, class A 4/a .........
Milling-machine operators, class A £ / a . ..........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A L j a ..................
Machine-tool operators, production, class B ij a,
...
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B ^/a .....................................................
Grinding—machine operators, class B id a ............... TTMilling-machine operators, class B jj\a .......................
Machine-tool operators, production, class C ^/a,
...
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C ^ / a ...... .................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ^/a .............
Tool-and-die makers ij a .........................
Welders, hand, class A ^/a .......................

18
31
18
81
617
14-5

2 .0 0
2 .1 6

1.65

3

3

3

7

2

18

12

29




2

5

7

13

3

3

1

1

96 104 169 103
6
49 68 16
47 13 77 75
2
14 18
3

48
_
41

11
1
1

_
_

_
-

_

_
_

-

-

_

3

2
1

3

2

1

1

8

53
5
3
5

10

6

80

51

38

12
12

7
24

3

1
5

4
13

1
15

4,

_
-

20

6
22

21

54
25
256

1.78

1

9

5

1.69
1 t8Q
1.75
1.48

1

1

1

1

6

15

46

3
14

2
6

2

1
24

35

19

8

38

22
8

5

18

1

J
4
2

2

2
4

2.17
2.19
2.23
2.03

263

19
60

40
319

1

2 .0 1

124
24
1,458
7

1.44
1.42
2.34

106

1.08
1.24

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
-

_
_

2

_

20

32

28

44

_
_

12

20

1

3

_

_

9

_

2 .0 1

32

20

8/30

15

6
2

23

11

4

5

6
10

13
1

2
6

2

~

2

-

1
-

3

1
_

2

-

1

_

_

_

-

20

-

-

-

58

56
3

_

_

_
1
2

1
___
See footnotes at end of table,

2

2

2
1
2

/
4
2

5

1

1 .2 2

Women
Assemblers, class G L jn . T.,. r....................
.
Machine-tool operators, production, class C i j s . .....

2

94 379 250 222
2

300 6/99

Table B-35*

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
wres
okr

M acJU nV u} O n& uA btiU l/ - C o n tin u ed

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
t
t
$
9
$ ,
«
9
$
t
•
$
<
t
I
$
$
t
Arenas
h u l Under 1.00 £.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 £.30 1.35 £.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 £.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60
ory
erig 1
anns
and
2/ 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 over

Machine-Tool Accessories - Production Shoos
Men
Assemblers, class A l j a .........................
Assemblers, class B i j a . .........................
Assemblers, class C l j a .........................
Electricians, maintenance L J & .....................
Inspectors, class B i j s . .........................
Inspectors, class C lJ b. .........................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ^/a ...............
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A
: Total ............................
Time ..........................
Incentive ......................
Engine-lathe operators, class A: Total .........
Time........
Incentive ...
Grinding-machine operators, class A 4/b .........
Milling-machine operators, class A y b ..........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A L j b ..... ............
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B j / Total ............................
>:
Time ..........................
Incentive..................... .
Engine-lathe operators, class B: Total .........
Time........
Incentive ...
Grinding-machine operators, class B U a .........
Milling-machine operators, class B £ / b ..........
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C j/: Total ............................
>
Time ..........................
Incentive............ .,........
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplfcspindie, class C i j o . ........................
Engine-lathe operators, class C: Total...... .
Time ........
Incentive ...
Grinding-machine operators,
class C: Total ............................
Time..........................
Incentive ......................
Milling-machine operators, class C L jb ..........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C t j a . ..................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ^/a .............

39
20
77
24
57
48
117

$
1.94
1.73
1.37
1.89
1.74
1.52
1.33

437
144
293
42
15
27
203
50

2.06
2.02
2.08
1.98
1.91
2.02
2.09
2.06

2
2
1
12
3

1
6
10
5

-

-

-

-

12

8

23

-

4

1

5

1
15

1

-

1
1

3

5

-

4

2

73

4
5

5
12

1
1

21
2

5
9

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

1

1

2
1
-

8
-

1
1
2
1
4
-

9
1
2
3
11
-

6
1
5
3
-

12
4
10
5
-

3 11
1 7
2 4
3
2
1
1 3

20
6
14
3
3
17

33
18
15
5
4
1
14
4

67
8
59
12
1
11
21
10

-

6

6

18

4

Ill 14
87 24 14
2 4
- 2 4
54 4
12 4

57
34
23
7
5
2
23
14

7
7
1
1
2
2

6
6
4
2

5
1
2
11
3

1
-

-

-

“

127 103 27
49 45 10
78
58 17
4 1
14
- 5
4 1
9
31
59 25
26
5

21
21
18
3

9
9
6
1

6
6
4
1

5
5
2

-

-

-

-

-

9
9
2
2
4
3

-

-

-

-

~

2

1

2

5

5
3

18
5
13
3
2
1
8
4

20
11
9
3
1
2
8
2

46
24
22
3
3
16
4

34
14
20
8
5
3
7
10

59
34
25

36
12
24

46
25
21

51
25
26

24
7
17

4
4

10
10

4
4

7
7

3
3

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

6
4
3
1

36
6
6

2
6
6

3
3

3
9
7
2

2

1

-

2

-

1

~
-

”

~

~

-

“

2

1

-

2

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
10
4
7

26
19
7
7

7
2
5
8

10
10
6

22
12
10
4

14
10
4
10

6
4
2
4

3

5
5
5

2
2

7
7

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

4
24

13
8

1
12

3

8
5

5

7

4

19
6

6
3

14
1

3
1

20
17

4
1

3
1

1
1

1
1

2
2

44

1.95

347
184
163
33
16
17
147
60

1.80
1.73
1.31
1.82
1.78
1.85
1.79
1.84

_
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

1
_
1

-

3
3

3
3

1
1

7
5
2

10
4
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

3

1

6

455
229
226

1.51
1.46
1.56

-

1
1
-

2
1
1

_
-

3
3

15
11
4

16
10
6

34
21
13

41
26
15

52
33
19

46
23
23

77
59
22
37

1.46
1.49
1.42
1.53

-

1
1
-

2
1
1

-

1
-

1
1
-

1
3
2
1

5
6
3
3

16
5
1
4

7
7
3
4

156
87
69
74

1.52
1.45
1.60
1.52

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

1
1
1

11
10
1
1

2
2
8

19
11
8
3

8
7
1
7

45
64

1.51
1.41

-

“

“

-

1

1

1
2

1
9

113
59

1.41
1.41

_

2
2

1

1
1

12
11

10
6

14
5

-

-

Women
Machine-tool operators, production, class C ^/b, j> ...
/
Grinding-machine operators, class C L J b. .........

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 3$) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 9
1 4-5 edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were also included. Data relate to a November 1951 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/

lj

Includes data for machine-tool accessories for which separate data are presented.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.

5/
6/
7/
8/

(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Workerswere distributed as follows: 85 at $2.60 to $2.70; 8 at $2.70 to $2.80; and 6 at $2.80 to $2.90.
Workerswere distributed as follows: 13 at $.90 to $.95; and 18 at $.95 to $1.
Workerswere distributed as follows: 12 at $.90 to $.95; and 18 at $.95 to $1.




R a d io , ^ J eU a iilo n , a n d R e la te d P sio d u ctb y

Tabi« b -3 6 6 1 :

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS O f—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
y

$
$
$
s
$
$
s
S
$
$
$
S
Is
s
s .
s
Under 0.90 3 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1.10 1 . 1 5 1 . 2 0 1 . 2 5 1 . 3 0 1 . 3 5 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1 . 5 5 1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5 1 . 7 0 1 . 7 5 1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2.30 2 .1 * 0
2 .5 0
|
end
0 .9 0
# 9 5 ItOQ i ,Q 5 U I O 1 .1 5 l , ? 0 1 . 2 5 1 . 3 0 1 . 3 5 l . l 'O l . l i 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 5 5 1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5 1 . 7 0 1 . 7 5 i . f l n 1 . 0 0 P .fV l p . i n 2 . 2 0 2 . 1 0 2 . )»0 2.«?0

Men
Assemblers, class C 3 / .................................................................................
Carpenters, maintenance J / ..........................
Die setters y ........ T . ................ .
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, else* 0 y ..... ..................TTtTtttt
Guards y ............... 7*......................... T
Inspectors, class A V ........................... Ttt
Inspectors, class
...................... .
Inspectors, class C %/ ..............................
Janitors y ....... 7*............................... t
Machine-tool operators, toolroom y .................
Machinists, i a"n+.enan/'o y
n 5
._
(
wan. crAnArol
1/
Punch-press operators, class B If ..... ......... ...
Repair operators y .................................
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class B 3 / ......
Set-up sen, BArhin* taels a/ .
“
Stock clerks y .....................................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand y ............ ,TT
.
Testers, class
1 / ... ...........T..Tt1It
,tl , ,
Testers, class B y ................ T.T.TTttT ,,,, ,
Tool-and-die makers y ..............................
Trouble shooters y .................................
Truck drivers y ....................................
Light trucks (under 1& tons) .....................
Medium trucks (l£ to and including U tons) .......
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C V .........................
Winders, coil y .............. ......................

1 ,0 9 9
27
1*7

16
39
232
160
189
71*8
327
38

%
1 .3 1
2,01*
1 .7 3

1,120
1a
31
236
1*55
105
37
21
16

1*1*9
2.01*
1.30
1.71*
1.58
1.1*7
1.23
1.81*
2.06
1.76
1.1*1
1.62
1.70
1.71
1.57
1.1*0
1.89
1.68
2.36
1.87
1.68
1.60
1.78

12
35

1.58
1.36

9k

180
23h
278
8
71
UiO

A?
c

61*

1*2

38

28

22

32

1*1*

68

eft
P-*>

12*J
XO

8
3

Z'
12

m

__

8

m

-

-

k

m

m
k

-

JP
-

7
l

6

8

_.
-

6

12

13
2

-

13

u*

31*
11

-

23

8
1

-

2
1*3

1*9
53

111
72 39

50
1*0

1*7
7

1*8
-

18
5

26
5

1*
1*

-

-

-

-

1*

8

OP
7C

a 7P
I k

I
.
4

1
X

O
0

1A
XO

1
X
1f
t
XO
111.
44

17
if

1

1,7
4f

no

1*3

21*

8

c

91
O

13 155
i
,
4

1f
t
XU

19
X£

3

76
n

37

(y

11*
23

19
X£

1
<
2 27
8
13
71 112 108 138 156 i n 121*
2

-

eft
PX

-

O
£

c?
p

0
c

9
C

-

1

1
X

26

_

2
7

6

19
XC
*

IX

7

5

99
44

XX

31*

1*2

7

80

11*
52

9
A
33

10
5

1*5

26

9
4
:

9
IO
xy

04
et
f
PP

Pt

7

f

22

.

2

_

2

-

l
*

_

23
36 11*8

Ii
f
JO
91

2

1
1*
1*

•

1

1

i
,
«
*

aA
po

c
£

u*

10
1
1

2
1

O
a

30
2
2
-

-

7

1

m

e
m

2

*

9

z
0

3

37 15
1

2

*

*
*
•

*
*

1
1

11*
19

2
91
41

2

-

-

2
7

1
X

■

$h

-

-

-

•

ao
Jx

12

1.
4

20

n
aA
C 10

61

18 31*1*

5

18 31*1*

8

ap
ie

IX
U
p

9
1.
4
1.
4
0
0
ax
XO

“

*
1A
XO

1
7

i
,
4

2

3
0
0

a
p
-

1

99 X/f
50
2 5
1*9 103 208
1
13 n
5
5
8
6 1

2

21

a
P

aA
XO
a 1.
l4
a
P

-

-

7

1,
4

1

33

1

m

i
.
4

2

28

*

k
m

53 133

-

-

•
•

11

99

1/102

m
m

_

-

3
«
•

.
4

10

35

*

*

"
*

O

*

-

-

1*
1*

61

o

3

5

1

P

p?
c
11*
1*9
2

rf

13

2

01
7J

XU

__

8

50

66

O
£

101*

-

-

Women
Assemblers, class Ct

T o t a l ..... ...................
T i m e .... ................. t
Incentive ............ .
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C y .................................................
Inspectors, class B 1/ ........................................... rTr
Inspectors, class C y .......... ...................
Janitors y .........................................
Punch-press operators, class B y .................. .
Repair operators y ................................ .
Solderers 3 / ............................................................ .
Stock handlers and truckers, hand y ............... .
Testers, class C> Total ............................
T i m e ..........................
Incentive.................. .
Winders, coilt T o t a l ...... .........................
Time ..............................
Incentive....................... .
Wirers, class C* Total .............................
T i m e ............. .............
Incentive ..................... ...

9,507
6,031a
3,1*73

1.25
1.22
1.32

85
1*0
1,100
1*6
286
221
1,378
101
293
221
72
967
1*60
507
2,230
1,991*
236

1.31*
1.1*8
1.33
1.27
1.1*0
1.50
1.22
1.10
1.30
1.30
1.28
1.29
1.21*
1.33
1.23
1.25
1.08

256 Jill* 1*21* 1*62 596 523 653 1176 1672 812 662 313 279 578
136 21*6 266 291* 1*26 333 1*1*9 991* 1385 281 510 161* n8 1*32
120 168 158 168 170 190 201* 182 287 531 152 11*9 161 11*6
-

11

.

28
_

_

•

82

28

11*
21*
2

m
m
m
12
8
96
1*0
56

28
16
1 12

_

29
1
2

15
2

«
.

81*

51
12
12

78
52
11*
8
6

2

2
2 12
62 38 100
1*0 21* 58
22 11* 1*2
92 11*0 79
60 81* 70
iy
32 56

31

apa

61
62
62
50
12

6
51
6
23
85
23
11
12

7a

27
1*6

pa),
CJ\J

•

_

77 1*6
11 11
32 31
2
6
289 218
1*
71 50
69 1*8
2
2
68 71
38 19
Jv
52
apa 376

■X 7
t
Pf f

1
.
4

172
P f*
4

10 21* 29
7
6 10
11*0 389 11*0
a
1. 10
4
P
38 10 16
2
1* 60
20 273 108
9

7
2

1*8
1*8

1.
4 llf

17
13
1,7
4f

k 39 19
76 28
tQ JOi 282
1,7
4f

12

a<a

P PP

8

PO C
c AP

20

1,
4
1,
4

X7ft f
A
u a fO 79
1,
4 178 79

2

.

_

„

75

2
7“
?
*p

n

1.
4

2

8

39
8
1*1*

23
1*9
1*
1*

59
80

5
10

_

2

-

-

a
y
5

2
2

2
2

on I P O
A
cy
22 101
16 28

ap

4

1 1,
14
a 1,
■L4

25
1
21*

aa
A?
9
h
4

PO

P4

tA
?

pu

1,
4

a,
)

P4
a4
«
PJ

5

_

ap
1,
U

i
i
1,
u

l,

1,
4

4

“

_

1

_

_

m

-

-

-

“

-

-

1X
X1

11
•U

_
3

*

c
O

“

1,
4
j
.

“

3

i
.
4

-

1

VI

13

3

-

XX

4

”

i,

"

L
0

"

“
“

“

-

“

"

“

“

4

y The study covered establishments with more than 50 workers engaged in the manufacture of radio, television, and related products including electronic apparatus and component parts (Group 3661) as
defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (191*5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
3/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment) all or predominantly time workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
U/ Workers were distributed as followsi 8 3 at #2 .5 0 to 82.60; 19 at $2 .6 0 and over*
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR




Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B -h P » (^ c U J ^ lO C u l^

28

1/

NUMBER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

N ber
um
of
workeri

Occupation and amx

Average
2 1 0 215
.*
hourly £•35 f l o f.U5 i.5o f.S5 i.60 1 . 6 5 i.70 1.75 1.80 i.85 1.90 f.95 1.00 1.05 $.10 1.15 1.20 2.25 2.30 *2.35 * . * *.|
earning* and
and
under
2/
2
2 U QYBXL,
.0
1 L2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35_J *0 _ * 5
iJlO 1.U 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1-7n l j i 1 .8 0 1.85 1 9 . 1.95 2.00 2.05 2 * C
5

Men
*
1.90
1.98
1 AO
1.50
1.98
1.93
1.98
1.98
1.70
1.80

368
519
1,362
<82
12
*0
1*
12
232
19U
216
,*7

Stock handlers and truckers, hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

20
lo *
*l

66

28

66

82 931 336
1*
1
19

8

32

8 531
36

21 59U
2

U
5

5

213

1

518

11

28
208 880

32

5

2
68

1

12
*0
103
182
11
9*
1
3

29

21

3

9

6

6

10

1
*

8

15

10 H*7
1

Wtaasn

9

1 <0

cay

A ye

no

o
y

The study covered railroads (Group UO) with more than 100 workers as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 9 * edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
119
Excludes premiua pay for overtime and night work.

OtUu/iQM&e GcwU&U* 1/

Table B-63*

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Aymaob
Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earning.
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

S
$
s
t
$
t
s
$
s
*
1
s
$
*
$
$
(
$
$ _
* w $
*
*
5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00100.00 L05.00no. 00
fc.50 35.00 37.50 10.00 U2.50 [
ana
inder
*
*
37.50 10.00 12.50 *5.00 17.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75.OO 80.00 85.00 90.00 ?J.OO LOO.00LQ5.00 L10.00 over
*

}f.00

Men
Clerks, accounting..................
Clerks, actuarial ....................
Clerks, correspondence, class A ...........
Clerks, file, class B ................
Clerks, general.............. .......
Section heads .......................
Tabulating-machine operators
Underwriters .............................

217
65
173

id

183
U*3
100
839

38.5
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.0
38.5
38.0

*
59.00
65.50
67.50
12.00
*
59.00
91.00
60.50
78.50

lA ft
JO*\J

ii9
U e»yU

38.0
38.0
38.0
39.5
38.5
38.5
39.0
38.5
38.0
38.5
39.0
38.5
38.0
39.0
38.0
38.5
38.0

50.50
1*8.50
63.00
51.00
50.50
39.50
18.00
*
16.00
*
52.00
1*8.50
50.00
6 * 00
1.
51.00
51.50
50.00
1.9 cn
68.50

1
2
-

-

-

7
f
2

10
1
*
1,

U
6

6
1
3
0
4
22
1
5
3

26
1
1
X
11
1
5
l

1

17
2
5

H*
3
1

u*
5
2

23
6
21

l*
i
5
15

38
10
35

U0
13
3U

11
2
26

1
U
1U

1
2
6

8
2

10
2
9
20

3*
1
6
10
17.

18
2
3
5

29
7
7
16
*

8
3
1
*
31

11
10
15
68

6
38
16
123

20
33
9
88

_
28
2
86

1U
62
6
98

.

-

U7
1
59

'37
17
7
1
*
8
5
57
13
39
<9
10
11
*
56
9

76

86
7
20
2
21

11*

18

1

-

2
Ut

10
1
10
10
1

11

2

3
10

11

-

2
-

2

2

17

38

37

22 2 / 6 9

U7

5U

33

23

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

15

*

5

u

-

-

y y t

Women
_
Clerks,
Clerks,
Clerks,
Clerks,
Clerks,

accounting ...........................................................
sotuari e l ........................
correspondence, class A .........................
correspondence, class B .........................
file, class A ...................................................

Clerks, general .....................
Clerks, premium-ledger-card ...........
Clerks, underwriter ..................
Premium acceptors ...................
Section heads .......................
Stenographers, general ...............
Tabulating-machine operators ...........
T ■ f-a - class A ................... ......... .
s
Typists,
Underwriters....................... .

XX4
760
83
88

167
175
1«1*22
980
261*
356
13
*9
79
10
*3
798
66
501
1,535
11
0*

-

.j
i

2

I

1ft
XU
5
15

i.i,
i***
22

1

“

356
80
20
J
.

17
X|
85
6

5
128
5

9
112
13
8

279
88
13
2
11
XX
8

lfO
.t
UU4
60
33
33

I
t

11
1*2
al
l*
79
13
*
22
65
1

3
l l*
A,
AI
U

9**
153
11*

jO

2
-

3
-

8
2

28
6

72
8

5

Ah
O*
*

1 A9
X04

9ii7
.**1

621

19

19
*
32
1U
,
lA
*
158
53
1*8

y
a
Q fi

11
8
119
9

Ai
O*
917
<*l

10
11*
00
44
n*3
31
15
*
19
,
Ua
13
10
102

5
79
<
■

1i
f7
1

51
26
11*8
38
1*2
70
20
3*
1
192

iy

5
Itt
ff

1UU

7t
f
1U

0
4

1

i
6

11
27
88
6
37
1t
f

1*2
Ut
11
**
Ot
f
4V

73
103
9

39
69
6
31
1t
f
XU
1
*

5

5
5

1t
f
XU
1
*

7
2

1
*
2

16

8

11

1

17
4
2
13
10
2
9
4

19

6

2

3

30
2
2
1ft
XU

5

57
12
3

39
20

16

15

5

•

-

-

“

6

9

18

3

38

2

2

“
2i

“
-

-

-

3/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 9 * edition) prepared by the Bureau of the
119
Budget.
2/
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
2/
Workers were distributed as follows* 29 at *110 to *115J 17 at *115 to *120j 18 at *120 to *125j 15 at *125 to *130j 10 at *130 and over.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
t/
Workers were distributed as follows* 5 at *110 to *115j 16 at *115 to *120j 7 at *120 to *125j 3 at *125 to *130j 6 at *130 and over.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimal wage rates and m v-iwinn straight-time hours per week agreed upon
a
and trade-unions.
Rates and hours are those in effect in Chicago
union scales of wages and hours far bakeries, building construction,
July 1, 1951 are available on request. Similar information for these

Table C-15:

BitildUtXf Gott&tlUcttiWl

Table C-205:

Rate
per
hour

13.175
Bricklayers
Carpenters .................................. 2.950
Electricians ................................ 3.030
Painters ......... .................. «... 2.750
Plasterers «..«.«.«..««...«.«••••• ••••••...•« 3.175
3.000
Plumbers .........................
Building laborers ........................... 2.150

Hours
per
week
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0

Table C-205:
July 1, 1951
Classification
Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Retail - Bread and cake:
Agreement A:
First hands ........ ••••••••••••••
Second hands ••••••..... ........
leer8, after 1 year •••••••••••.••••
General bake-shop helpers, after
1 year .............. ........ .
Pan cleaners and greasers, after
6 months •••••••.....
Agreement B:
First hands, spongers, overmen .....
Second hands •••••••......... .
Third hands:
First 6 months .•••••••.... ••••
6 - 2A months ««•••••••..... .
2A - 36 months ...............
Wholesale - Bread:
First hands, mixers, overmen ••••••••..
Second hands, bench or machine hands,
molders, dividers ••••••••.••......
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Foremen
Oven operators, mixers, doughnut
operators .......................
Bench hands, ingredient scalers,
divider and depositor operators,
cooky-machine operators, oven feeders
and dimnpers, floarmen ••••••.... .
Molder operators, wrapping machine
set-up men, dough dumpers •••••••••••
Grease-machine operators, experienced
bake-shop helpers •••••...........
General bakery helpers ••••••.••••....
Inspectors, floorladies •••••....•••••
Bread and dough panners, doughnut tray
packers, hand-icers, make-up girls ••
Wrapping-machine feeders, order fillers
and selectors, cooler girls .......
Unskilled general bakery helpers
(women) ............. ............




fcah&Ue*, - GontiHUQll

Table C-2082:

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1952
Classification

through collective bargaining between employers
on dates indicated.
Comprehensive listings of
motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing far
industries will be published for July 1, 1952.)

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.770
1.720
1.3A5

42
42
42

1.260

42

1.140

42

1.750
1.700

42
42

1.050
1.240
1.540

42
42
42

1.675

40

1.625

40

1.770

40

1.660

40

1.630

40

1.510

40

1.400
1.290
1.280

40
40
40

1.210

40

1.160

40

1.090

40

Classification

M frlt jCdXjfU&lA

Muroh 1, 1952
Rate |Hours
per
per
hour week

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement B:
Bread department:
j
Group leaders... •••••••••••••••••j 11.765
Mixers, overmen................. j 1.660
Divider operators ......... ...... 1.610
Molder men, oven dumpers and
feeders, henchmen, dough dumpers.. 1.560
Helpers .......... ............. 1.400
Inside bakery cleaners
1.290
Cake department:
Cake mixers, icing mixers, doughnutmachine mixers, overmen, ingredientmen, first scalers •••••••.... 1.620
Bake-shop helpers, dumpers .......
1.360
Inside bakery cleaners ••••••••••••• 1.250
Helpers, vcmen:
First month.... ..... ........
.960
After 30 days
1.010
After 6 months ........... ••••• 1.060
After 1 year ••«••••••••••••••••• 1.110
After 3 years .......... ..... - 1.160
Agreement C:
Cake mixers, overmen, ingredientmen,
first scalers ................. .
1.620
Pan washers ••••••.................. 1.250
Dumpers, crumbers, greasers, inside
bakery cleaners............... .
1.200
Helpers, men:
First month................... . 1.080
After 30 days........ ..... .
1.200
Helpers, women:
First month.... ...............
.960
After 30 days ................... 1.010
After 6 months •••..•••........... 1.060
After 1 year .......•••••••......
1.110
After 3 years ................... 1.160
Doughnut shops:
Doughnut and chocolate enrobingnachine operators........ .
1.500
Utilitymen............... ...... 1.300
Foremen (vosien) ...... •••••••••••• 1.180
Packers (women):
Start.............. .
.960
After 6 months........... ..
1.030
After 1 year ••••............ . 1.080
Pie and pastry shops:
Pie shops:
Ingredientmen, overmen, cooks, dough
mixers .................... ••••••• 1.370
Bough breakers, fruit mixers, service-*
men, helpers ............. ••••••••• 1.140
Pie-machine operators, cream toppers,
oven helpers (women) ............. 1.020
Wrappers, cream pie fillers, fruit
cleaners, plate washers, sorters,
inspectors ........ ....... .
.940

40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Brewing department:
Brewers ............................. H.943
Temporary help ................
1.876
Apprentices:
First year ..•••••••... .
1.678
Second year ...... ................ . 1.815
Bottling department:
Regular .•••••.................... .
1.837
Hiring rate (first 6 months) ............. 1.730
Laborers:
Regular. •••• ...... ......... ......... . 1.793
Hiring rate (first 6 months) .... .
1.724
least workers:
First m e n ....... ................ TTtt 1.910
Unclassified ........ ...... .
1.860

Hours
per
week
zn
40
40
40
40
40
40

in
in

PA4*U>iH*f

Table C-27:
July 1, 1951
Classification

Book and job shops:
Bindery women:
Gatherers, collators, stitchers, cover­
ing and thread severs, mailers, blank
book severs, paging and numbering ma­
chine operators.... ..... •••••••••
Automatic stitcher feeders, folding or
ruling machine feeders, machine oper­
ators, rotary perforating and punch­
ing machine operators, table work­
ers . ...... ........•••••.........
Bookbinders - Commercial or edition
binding:
Forwarders - cloth, leather, job)
finishers) operators: paper cutters)
paper joggers) sheet straighteners,
trimmers, gathering machines, auto­
matic stitching machines, covering
machines, combination gathering and
stitching machines, folding machines,
automatic feed (l), automatic feed
perforating machines............
Operators-in-charge - stock and cutting
machine ..... ........ ........
Operators, folding machine automatic
feed (2) ........................
Operators in charge of gathering,
stitching and covering machine com­
bination ................. .
Operators, folding machine automatic
fsed (3) ........................
Compositors, hand....................
Electrotypers .......................
Machine operators ........ ••••••......

Rate Hours
per
per
-fegPT.....MWfc.
.

H.415

36 1/4

1.374 36 1/4

2.433 36 1/4
2.533

36 1/4

2.502 36 1/4
2.543 36 1/4
2.585 36 1/4
2.593 36 1/4
3.050 36 1/4
2.632 36 1/4

Occupational W age Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B u reau of labor Statistics

Table C-27:

pAittUtUf - Go4liiH44*<t

Table c-27:

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Book and job shops: - Continued
Machine tenders (machinists) ........... $2,632
2.345
Fhotoengravers ....................... 3.000
Rotogravure •••••................... 3.062
Press assistants and feeders:
Senior assistants:
Presses 25 x 38 in. and larger:
1 2-color; 1 perfecting, over
46 x 65 in. bed; 2 automatic
Miehle units (29 x 41 in.) •••• 2.385
Single cylinder; in-charge-of
varnishing machines, offset;
coupon ....................
2.357
1 double impression, 2 sheets to
1 cylinder, 1 or 2 colors .... 2.440
Folding machines, hand-fed:
Feeders....... ...... ......... . 2.357
Feeders arid operators, 1 machine ••• 2.416
Folding machines with automatic sheet­
fed equipment:
1 machine...................... 2.474
2 machines........ ............. 2.543
3 machines ...................... 2.626
Assistants on folding machines;
paper jogger ••••••............
2.385
Stoak cutters:
C a flat machines ................ 2.474
t
Man-in-charge ................... 2.574
2-color, sheet-fed rotary presses:
Harris-Claybourn, 47 x 72 in.,
Cottrell, 36 x 48 in............ 2.426
Single rotary presses:
Single rotary; automatic- or sheet­
fed rotary; Cox Duplex, Goss Comet
and Cox-O-Type single flat-bed •••• 2.385
Color presses:
McKee 4-oolor (roll or automatic
sheet-fed); McKee 5-color; Claybourn 4- and 5-color ••••••••.•••• 2.426
10-color web perfecting:
First assistants ........... .
2.467
Second and third assistants ••••• 2.426
Junior assistants:
Pony Miehle (2); Miller 2-color,
22 x 30 in. (2) ............... 1.940
Kelly 25 3/4 * 28 3/4 in. (2);
Miehle horizontal (2).......... 1.899
Kelly 16 l A * 21 5/8 in. (2);
Miehle vertical (2); Miller auto­
matic platen (2); Kluge automatic
platen (2); Harris 2-color auto­
matic, 14 x 18 3/4 in. or less
(2) .......................... 1.899
Kelly, 28 1/2 x 35 1/2 In. (2).... 1.927
Feeders on miscellaneous presses:
Hand-fed platen........ ......... 1.899
Hand-fed cylinder....... ........ 1.940
Hand-fed Colt's Armory and
Universal ..................... 1.913




Table C-27:

P A in th U f- C o n tin u e d

Hours
per
week

36
36
36
36

1/4
1/4
1/4
1/4

36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4

36 1/4

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Horn's
per
week

Book and job shops: - Continued
Pressmen, cylinder presses:
Sheet-fed, flat-bed:
2 single-color, single cylinder;
1 2-color double cylinder; 1
double cylinder perfecting; 1
single-color, single cylinder and
not more than 3 platen job presses:
46 x 65 in. and under........ . $2,662 36 1/4
Bed size over 46 x 65 in. •••••••• 2.690 36 1/4
Special type presses:
2 single-color, single cylinder
MLehle units, Hiller Majors, or
No. 2 Kellys (or any single paired
with them except Miehle 7/ 0 ) ....
2.690 36 1/4
1 or 2 single-color, single cylinder
Miehle 7/0s (74 in.) or one 7/0
and any single paired with it; 1
single cylinder 7/0 Miehle and not
more than 3 platen job presses •••• 2.717 36 1/4
1 Cox Duplex, Hoe Duplex, Goss flat­
bed or Cox-O-Type (or any press of
similar type) ••••••••••••••••••••• 2.759 36 1/4
Pressmen, platen presses:
3 or less................ .........
2.469 36 1/4
2.497 36 1/4
4 hand-fed ••••.....................
5 hand-fed ......................... 2.538 36 1/4
6 hand-fed......................... 2.579 36 1/4
Proofers on 1 job press; proofers on 1
power proof press .............. ..
2.662 36 1/4
Pressmen, rotary presses:
2.828 36 1/4
1 2-color sheet-feed ................
1 3-color sheet-feed •••••...........
2.883 36 1/4
1 4-color sheet-feed............... . 2.966 36 1/4
3.048 36 1/4
1 5-color sheet-feed
.....
1 sheet- or web-feed, 70 in. or over;
1 4-color ............... •••••••••• 3.021 36 1/4
1 5-color....
3.103 36 1/4
1 Miesel ........................... 2.910 36 1/4

36 1/4
36 1/4
36 l/4
36 1/4
36 1/4

36 1/4
36 1 /4
36 1/4
36 1/4
36 1/4

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work .••••......
Compositors, hand - night work........ .
Machine operators - day work ••.........
Machine operators - night work ••••.....
Machine tenders (machinists) - day
work ........ ..... ................
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
work.... .........................
Mailers - day wor k ..... .............
Mailers - night work ••...••...........
Photoengravars - day work.... ........
Fhotoengravers - night work...... .
Pressmen, web presses - day work:
Agreement A ••••... ••••••••••.......
Offside colormen and register men rotogravure......... .........
Agreement B •»•»••••••••••••••••••••••<
Registermen - rotogravure ••••••••..

P/UttUtUf.- Continued
July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

2.759
2.910
2.759
2.910

36
36
36
36

1/4
1/4
1/4
1/4

2.759 36 1/4
2.910
2.253
2.497
2.979
3.228

36
37
36
36
36

1/4
1/2
1/4
1/4
1/4

2.587 37 1/2
2.653 37 1/2
2.679 35
2.857 35

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Newspapers: - Continued
Pressmen, web presses - night work:
Agreement A ..................... .
$2,929 35
Offside colormen and registermen rotogravure................... 3.000 35
Agreement B ...... ..... ...... ...... 3.051 32 1/2
3.243 32 1/2
Registermen - rotogravure ........
Pres3iaen-in-charge - day work:
Agreement A .............. ......... 2.760 37 1 / 2
Rotogravure and color presses •••••• 2.893 37 1/2
Agreement B ....... ................ 2.857 35
Pres3men-in-charge - night work:
3.124 35
Agreement A ................... .
Rotogravure and color presses ..... 3.267 35
Agreement B .......................
3.243 32 1/2
Stereotypers - day work:
2.600 37 1/2
Agreement B ..... ......... ....... . 3.051 33 3/4
Agreement C ............ ..... .
2.737 37 1/2
Agreement D ..... ............... .
3.600 30
Stereotypers - night work:
Agreement A ••••••••............... . 2.836 36 1/4
Agreement B ••••••••................ 3.169 32 1/2
Agreement C ......... ••••••••••••••»• 3.062 35

Table C-41:

Jtocol 'J'U M lit

Qp&uUiuf CmfUoyeei.
Ootober 1, 1951
Classification

Rate
per
hour

2-man oars:
First 3 months •••••..... •••••••....... $1,620
4 - 1 2 months .............. ........
1.650
After 1 year •••••........... ....... .
1.670
Night c
ars ........... ...... .
1.720
1-man oars:
Dav ...................................... 1.770
Night...............................
1.820
1-man busses:
Dav .................. .......... ... . 1.770
Night ...............................
1.800
Elevated and subway railways:
Motormen:
First 3 months ••••••••••............ 1.627
4 - 1 2 months ................. ••••• 1.636
After 1 year .................... .
1.681
Conductors (regular) ............... .
1.636
Conductors (extra):
First year .......... ............. . 1.608
After 1 year .......••••...... ..... 1.636
Guards (regular) ...................... 1.618
Guards (extra):
First 3 months ••••••••••••••••..... . 1.590
4 - 1 2 months ................. ••••• 1.600
After 1 year ....................... 1.640

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Table C^l:

JloCcU

Table C-42:

October 1, 1951

Motor coaches:
1-man busses:
$1,670
First 6 months ......... ......... .
1.720
Second 6 months .......... ..... .
After 1 year ••••••..... ••••....... . 1.840

d te lp &

M

per
week

40
40
40

*

July 1, 1951
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Armored oar .................................. $1,780
Baggage:
City delivery ••••••.... ..... ........ . 1.625
Depot to hotel ................. ..... .
1.515
Bakery:
Commissary -tT.T___ T..rT..T.rTr.._ rr*. 1.710
_
_
Cracker ......... .
1.906
Pie-truck and supply.................. . 1.455
Transport ........ ..... .............. 1.479
Yeast •••••................ .......... . 2.000
Brewery and distributor:
Extra and transfer •••.......... ........ 1.655
Helpers:
Bottle ........... .
1.243
K e g ............................... 1.521
Building:
Construction:
4-*dieel
1.925
6—wheel ................................ 2.025
Excavating, paving, grading, sewer,and
plastering:
Agreement A:
4-wheel, 2 tons or less
1.750
4-vheel, over 2 tons .............
1.900
6-wheel................ ........
2.000
Agreement ~B>
4-wheel, 2 tons or less ........... 1.750
4-wheel, over 2 ton s ............ . 1.900
6-wheel •••••••••.......... ...... . 2.000
Material:
Agreement A:
1.640
4 tons or lass
......... .
Over 4 tons .....................
1.700
6-wheel, over 7 tons .............. 1.850
Helpers .................... .. 1.500
Cement ....... ............ .
1.500
Face brick........ ...... .
1.640
Agreement B (brick hauling):
4-wheel ......................... 1.800
6-wheel........... .............. 1.900
1 .6 4 0
Helpers.... ........... .
Helpers, trailers ••••••........ 1.570
Agreement C (roofing material) ...... . 1.960




Table C-^2:

Continued

HOUT8

M ototibutck 2>biO0*d

a n d

-

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
48
45
48
48
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classification
Butter and eggs - Wholesale:
Delivery drivers ...................
Coal:
1 1/2 tons........................
2 tons......... ............ ..... .
Over 2 tons and tractor used with same
trailer ••... ......... .
6-wheel, over 12 tons ..............
Tractor, with different trailer .......
General:
Cartage:
1 and under 2 tons ..............
2 and under 3 tons ...............
3 and under 5 tons ............ .
5 and under 7 tons ......... .....
7 and under 10 tons ••..... .
10 and under 20 tons .........
20 tons and over ................
Semitrailers, 5 terns and over ....
Hauling:
South side:
1 1/2 tons ..................
2 tons ............. .
3 tons •••••..................
5 tons ......................
7 tons ............ ...... .
10 tons ...••................ .
20 tons and over ••••••••••... .
Parcel delivery:
Less than 2 tons •••••...... .
2 and under 3 tons •••••••... •••••
3 - 5 tons.....................
Traotor-trailers ................
Meat:
Jobbers - Wholesale •••••••••••••••••••
Paoking house:
Local:
1 ton and under....••••••••••••
Over 1 and under 3 tons ........
3 - 5 tons •••••••..... .......
Over 5 tons......... ........
Helpers - Over 5 tons .......
City tractors .....
Dump-cart tractor....... .....
Delicatessen and special
delivery ...................
Moving:
Furniture .........................
Helpers ........................
Piano .... .................. ••••••
Helpers.............. .........
Machinery:
1 and under 2 tons......... .....
2 and under 3 tons •••••.... •••••.
3 and under 5 tons
5 and under 7 tons ••••...........
7 and under 10 tons...... .......
10 and under 20 tons ............
20 tons and over ........... .....

d4*AioSltsuiC.fi 1
^bbiiiBtod

Jfe lp & u - C ontinued
July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Table C-42:

A4xUo*lbu4ck 3)toiaebd

<*nd Jielp&U

Ofie^atiHJf £*MfUo4f**A, - Continued

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,650

40

1.740
1.770

40
40

1.800
1.870
1.940

40
40
40

1.750
1.800
1.850
1.900
1.950
2.000
2.050
1.900

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.750
1.800
1.850
1.900
1.950
2.000
2.050

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.750
1.800
1*850
1.900

40
40
40
40

1.880

40

1.735
1.805
1.880
1.900
1.550
1.900

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classification

1.735

40

1.660
1.580
1.780
1.730

40
40
40
40

1.850

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.900
1.950

2.000
2.050
2.100

2.150

Hours
per
week jr

Newspaper and magazine:
Afternoon papers ..................... $2,059 42 1/2
Morning papers
2.360 37 1/2
Magazines .......................... . 2.059 42 1/2
O i l ................................... 2.063 40
Railway express ••••••.... .......... ••••• 1.810 40
Helpers ............... .............. 1.680 40
Soft drink and mineral water:
Extra drivers ........................ 1.750 40
Helpers ................. ....... ••••• 1.250 40

M&ot QutteSU

Table C-542:
March 1, 1952
Classification

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

Head meat cutters •••••••••••••........... $91.00 42 1/2
Journeyman meat cutters ...... •••••••••••••. 84.50 42 1/2
Apprentices:
First year...... ....................
Second year ••••••••••••••••.......... .
Third year ...........................

59.00 42 1/2
65.00 42 1/2
71.00 42 1/2

M ilk %eaU*i

Table C-5452:
March 1, 1952

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Clerks:
First 3 months ..............
Second 3 months ...... .......
After 6 months........ ......
Chief clerk .................

$1,545
1.655
1.765
2.177

40
40
40
40

General dairy workers:
First 3 months •••............
Second 3 months ..............
After 6 months ............ .

1.820
1.875
1.930

40
40
40

Inside workers:
Assistant foremen ............ .
Butter and cheese makers .....
Butter wrappers .............
Foremen ................ .
Foremen over 20 men ........
Homogenizers ••••••••••••••••••.,
Inspectors, milk, and buttermilk
Pasteurizer men ...... ........

1.985
1.985
1.600
2.067
2.205
1.985
1.985
1.985

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classification

1.630

Rate
per
hour

Jbecl&ti, “ Co*UiH44md

Table C-5452:

March 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

Inside workers: - Continued
Pasteurizer men processing over 15>000
lb. per hr. ........................ $2,067
Refrigerator m e n ..... ............. .
1-985
Refrigerator men May 1 to November 1 ••••• 2.067
Testers ....................... .
1.985

Hours
per
week

40

O
A
40
A
O

Re4taUfcatU&

March 1, 1952
Classification
Culinary:
Keymen:
Butchers, bakers, cold meat .......
Pastry cooks .....................
Roast, fry, or broiler..... ......
Second cooks .......... .........
Soup or fish cooks ...............
Non-range workers:
Carver, oyster or steamtable........
Chicken or fish butchers ••••......
Pantry or vegetable cooks .........
Sandwich men or pastry service ••••••
Skilled cooks:
Head butchers or bakers ...........
Head cold meat cooks ............ .
Head second cooks or night chefs .*••
Head soup or fish cooks ...........
Sugar decorators or assistant
pastry chefs.... .......... ••••

Rate
per
week 1/

Hours
per
week

♦74-40
74.40
74.40
74.40
74.40

48
48
48
48
48

67.80
67.80
67.80
67 80

48
48
48
48

80.40
80.40
80.40
80.40

48
48
48
48

80.40

48

Waitresses:
Waitress hostesses (plus tips).... .
Waitresses (plus tips) ..............

53.60
27.60

Waiters:
Waiters captains (plus tips) .........
Waiters (plus tips) ........... .....
Bus boys ...............................
Miscellaneous:
Bar porters...................... .
Carvers, steamtable men ..............
Check room attendants, washroom
attendants...................... .
Combination bus and porters •••••••••.••
Combination food checker and cashiers..•
Counter personnel ...................
Clean up men, pot washers, utility
men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dishwashers, runners ........
Doormen .............................................. ..

Grill m e n ....................... .
Tegetable men and women.............
Pantry girls .......................

\J

Plus meals.




RujicUtU}, £& hU
CJ&

Table C-7011:

Classification

cMateU*

March 1, 1952

March 1, 1952

Classification

Table C-58:

Table C-6512:

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Coal passers:
Class A and B buildings ............... ♦1.655
Unclassified buildings ................ 1.610

40
40

Electricians $
Guaranteed 44 hour workweek ••••.... ••••
Non-guaranteed workweek ............ .

2.135
2.190

40
40

1.400
1.430
1.094
.947

40
40
40
40

Agreement A:
Bartenders:
Public .............. ..........

40

1.430
1.460

Rate
per
month

Classification

Elevator operators:
Class A office buildings:
First 6 months ...... .............. .
After 6 months ....................
Class B office buildings:
First 6 months ................... .
After 6 months ................... .
Loop hotels ............ ........ .....
Apartment buildings ........ ..........

AA

Elevator starters:
Class A office buildings...... ...... .
Class B office buildings
........

1.585
1.555

40
40

Firemen:
Class A and B buildings.... ..........
Unclassified ..................... •••••
Loop hotels ..........................
Dairy industry ............... ...... .
Breweries .......................... .T
Cold storage ......... .......... .....
Department stores ••••••••. . .
.

1.845
1.800
1.990
2.090
2.090
1.950
1.925

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Janitox*s:
Class A buildings:
First 6 months ....... ............ .
After 6 months
Class B buildings:
First 6 months ....................
After 6 months .....................

1.410
1.440

40
40

1.365
1.395

40
40

48
48

Janitresses and matrons:
First 6 months •...•••••••....... .••••••
After 6 months ........... ............

1.210
1.240

48
48
48

48.60
67.80

48
48

Oilers:
Class A and B buildings ...............
Unclassified buildings ................
Loop hotels ..... .•••••............. .
Cold storage .................. .
Department stores ............ .........

1.810
1.765
1.990
1.950
1.925

40
40
40
40
40

48.60
43.60
53.60
42.60

48
48
48
48

46.60
43.60
53.60
68.60
46.60
48.60

48
48
48
48
48
48

Operating engineers:
Office buildings:
First class buildings ............ .
Second class buildings........ .
Unclassified buildings ••••...........
Dairy industry ...... ................ .
Ice cream manufacturing............ .

2.140
2.090
2.040
2.475
2.475

40
40
40
40
40

1.928

40

2.130
1.980

40
40

Window washers:
Office buildings .....................
Contract shops:
Hazardous .........................
Non-hazardous

-Hfifik-

U ^238.27
y 249.12
y 281.67
y 257.01
y 290.87
1/ 290.87
y 345.55
y 319.51

48
48
48
48
48

y

Culinary:

48

Fry, roast, or broiler cooks •••••••
Head butchers or bakers..........
Head broiler or head ice cream....
Head roast or fry; head room chefs
or banquet chefs; head second
cooks or night chefs; head soup or
345.55
fish; head swing cooks •••••••••••
Pastry cooks or bakers j second cooks
or cold meat decorators; soup or
319.51
fish cooks; swing codes •••••••.••
257.01
Vegetable cooks or ice cream men ...
Miscellaneous:
191.91
Vegetable or pantry •••••..... .
Miscellaneous:
2/ 230.00
Captains, dining rooms
Captains, room service ........... 2/ 253.00
Dishwashers; glass girls; kitchen
178.36
men •••••••••••••••....•••••••••«
Housemen; vacuum men; curtain men
and girls:
200.20
Class A .....................
183.20
Class B ......................
178.20
Class C ...... .............. .
Maids; cleaners; scrubwomen:
Class A ......................
176.54
162.20
Class B .....................
158.20
Class C ................. .
, 215.28
Telephone operators..... ..... .
129.48
Walters and bus boys ............
140.38
Walters and bus boys ......... ..
Waitresses ............ .........
118.82

40
40
40

y
y
y

48
48
48
48
48

y

40
40

63.35
32.88
36.00

Hours

y
y
y

Classification
Agreement B:
Maids:
Night maids; cleaners;
scrubwomen...... .
Head linen room help ....
Linen room help ••.••••••
Inspectress-supervisors ;
night housekeepers; as­
sistant housekeepers ••
Vacuum girls ••••••••••••
Receiving clerks; head
housemen; head vacuum
men ............... .
Housemen; vacuum men;
curtain girls; curtain
m e n ................
Lobby porters .........

1/

Plus Beal*.

2/
2/

Flue meals and tips*
No meals plus tips*

48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

Hours
Rate> per morith___ per
Class A Class B Class £ week

♦153.22 ♦149.92 ♦145.92
175.92 175.92 165.92
169.42 163.92 155.92

48
48
48

180.22
165.92

175.92
160.92

48
155.92 48

180.22

175.92

48

175.92
170.92

170.92
165.92

165.92
160.92

48
48




33

D:
Table

d- i i

M in im u m

Entrance Rates

C sU n a n c e . R a te d fa n P la n t W a n k e n d

y

P ercent o f p la n t workers in estab lish m en ts w ith s p e c ifie d minimum r a te s in Manufacturing
Minimum rate (in cents)

All establishments ................................
60 or u n d e r ........................................
Over 65 and under 7 0 ........ ......................
Over 70 and under 75 ..............................
Over 75 and under 80 ..............................
Over 80 and under 85 ..............................
Over 85 and under 90 ............................. .
Over 90 and under 95 ..................... .........
Over 95 and under 100 .............................
Over 100 and under 105 ............................
Over 105 and under 110 ............................

All
industries
2/

100.0
2.0
.6
•3
•4
6.8
1.3
1.9
2.3
3.5
.3
3.0
1.6
3.5
4.1
8.0
2.6
3.0
3.2
4.1
3.4
3.1
6.2
.9
3.4
1.0
3.1
1.4

Durable goods

9.7
5.4
4.3
3.1
3.3

5.4

8.2

4.6
7.2
4.5
13.2
4.1
5.6
3.4
-

1.3
4.3

3.4
6.5
11.4
4.1
3.7
-

3.4
.2
34.4
11.7
-

_

2.4

Over 155 and under 160 ............................
Over 160 and under 165 ............................
165 and o v e r ............ ..........................
Establishments with no established m i n i m u m .......

5.8

Information not available ............ .............

.3

Over 150 and under 155 ............................

1/
2/
#

21.9
6.3
13.3
1.9
5.8
5.9
9.9
3.2
1.4
1.1
.7
.8

12.1
5.5
6.6
3.8
16.9
14.9
-

6.9

Over 140 and under 145 .............................
Over 145 and under 150 ............................

5.5
4.5
2.9
27.3
8.9

2.6
2.0
.6
1.8

-

Over 135 and under 1 4 0 ............ ...............

.1
2.7
.2

100.0

4.5
4.9
14.6
12.0
-

-

7.5

100.0

100.0

-

Over 130 and under 135 .............................

100.0

100.0

.3
3.0
2.4
.2
•6
.1
1.3

Over 125 and under 130 ............................

Retail
trade

100.0

-

Over 120 and under 125 ............................

Wholesale
trade

100.0

.5

Over 115 and under 120 ............................

Public
utilities*

100.0

9.0
5.8
4*0
13.0
.6
4.7
1.4
4.4
1.7
11.3
5.2
.4

Over 110 and under 115 ....................... .....

Nondurable goods

Establisbments with •
251 or
251 or
101-250
101-250
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers

15.4
-

.7

5.3
3.8
11.3
4.1
6.7
2.6
3.4
1.7
2.2
-.
3.9
.1
5.6
.3
15.5
-

2.4

1.6
-

7.6

1.8
.2
-

1.0

3.5

2.6

-

-

-

5.8

-

4.1
3.8
2.2
5.8
1.8
-

.5
2.0
.7
2.1

2.1
4.2
21.0
-

5.5
5.2
3.4
5.2
.7
1.6
1.2
11.2
2.6
2.3
5.3
1.0
2.2
-

5.7
5.3
2.1
1.9
11.5
2.3
1.8
2.2
1.7
.2
3.6
.7
3.5

7.7

6.2
*9
3.4
4.6
1.6
.2
12.1
2.4
1.1
.8
1.5
-

Services

.5

3.3

.2
3.2

1.2
-

-

4.6

26.1

.5

.9

5.4

-

.4

-

Lowest r a te s form ally e sta b lish e d fo r h ir in g e it h e r men or women p la n t workers o th er than watchmen.
Excludes data fo r fin a n ce , in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
O ccupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 1 1 1 ., March 1952
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT O LABOR
F
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

3ii

E:

Supplementary Wage Practices

Table

E-l:

S

h

if t

jb i^

e 4 ^

* U

itU

P A M

M

A itX H d .

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in -

All mailufacturing industries 1/
Shift differential

All industries
2d
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments .................
Receiving shift differential .......

3d or
other
shift

17.3

___1*2

16.9

5.7

Uniform cents (per hour) ........
4 cents .....................
5 cents .....................
6 cents .....................
7 cents .....................
7.5 cents ...................
8 cents .....................
9 c e n t s ......... ............
10 cents ....................
11 cents ....................
12 cents ....................
12.5 cents ..................
13.8 cents ..................
14- cents ....................
15 cents ....................
20 cents ....................

7.5
1.6
1.9
.4
.3
.1
.3
2.3
.3
(A/)
.3
-

3.3
(A/)
.1
1.5
.1
.1
.1
(A/)
.9
.1
.1
.1
(A/)
.2
(A/)

Uniform percentage ..............
5 percent ...................
7 percent ...................
7.5 percent .................
8 percent ...................
10 p ercent...... ............
12.5 percent ................
15 percent ..................
20 p ercent.... ..............

9.0
1.6
(A/)
.2
6.7

2.1
-

Other ..........................
Receiving no differential ..........

See footnotes at end of table.




.3

.2
-

(A/)
.3
1.5
.1
.2
-

.4

.3

.4

.2

Nondurable goods

Durable goods
2d
shift

..
.

3d or
other
shift

*

...

17.9

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

Candy and other
confectionery
products
3d or
2d
other
shift
shift

Forgings,
iron and steel
2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

Cutlery, hand
tools, and
hardware
3d or
2d
other
shift
shift

15.9

6.0

14.0

5.7

32.6

8.8

10.9

1.1

17.9

5.9

H.7

5.2

13.6

5.5

31.0

8.8

10.7

1.1

7.1
2.0
1.4
_

3.2
.1
1.9
.1
.7
.1
.1
.1
.1
-

8.2
.7
2.8
1.1
1.1
.8
_
.9
.1
.7
-

3.4
.1
.3
.4
.4
.3
1.3
_
.1
.4
.1

9.3
3.0
1.9
2.2
2.2
_
-

4.9
_
_
.7
_
4.2
-

25.7
14.4
_
11.3
-

8.4
6.7
_
1.7
-

7.6
_
4.8
_
2.8
-

1.1
.2
.4
_
.5
_
_
-

2.7
-

5.6
1.4
3.8
-

.8
-

3.1

.5

5.3
1.2
4.1
-

.4

.4

4.3
.7
3.6
-

.6
-

(A/)
.1
.4
3.1
.1
10.7
1.6
(A/)
.2
8.3
.5

.1
.1
(A/)

(A/)
.5
2.0
.1
.1
-

-

.3

-

.9

1.0

1.2

.8

-

.6
-

.4

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago,

.2

1.6

-

-

.4

-

-

3.1
-

-

-

.2

111., M a rch 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B u r e a u of Labor Statistics

35

Table E - l:

S U ijft ^bi^eA~a*Uial P tow U otU

•

G omU mu*d

Percent o f p la n t workers employed on each s h i f t in -

Shift differential

Heating apparatus

Sheetmetal
work
2/

Stamped and pressed
metal products
3d or
other
shift

3d or
other
shift

1/

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

6.6

0.5

8.9

18.6

5.5

18.0

Receiving shift differential ............

6.6

.5

8.9

16.2

5.5

15.9

'2.4

14.6

Uniform cents (per hour) .............
4 cents ...........................
5 cents ............................
6 cents ............................
7 cents ........ ....... ...........
7.5 cents .........................
8 cents ............................
9 cents ............................
10 cents ...........................
11 cents ..........................
12 cents ..........................
12.5 cents ........................
13.8 cents ........................
14- cents ............... ...........
15 cents .................... ......
20 cents ...........................

.5
_

10.2
4.0
1.6

3.2
-

14. 6
7.1

-

1.1
1.1
-

2.1
2.1
-

1.9
.2
.1
.4
1.2
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

7.8
7.8
-

6.0
5.1
.9
-

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments .......................

Uniform percentage ................ .
5 percent .........................
7 percent .........................
7.5 percent ....................... .
8 percent ..........................
10 percent ........................
12.5 percent ......................
15 percent ........................
20 percent .........................

.5
_
-

6.1
-

6.1
-

-

.5
.5
-

2d
shift

3.7
.9
-

1.9
_
.8
-

2d
shift

1.0
6.5
* -

-

_
-

.5
2.3
2.3

2d
shift

14.6

3d or
other
shift

--3.P—
3.0

lit/)
(A/)
_
(4/>
-

_

-

1.3
1.3
-

.3
.3
-

7.6

0.1

9.7

24.4

5.9

7.1

.1

_
-

.1
-

-

2.7
1.3
.9
.1
•4

5.9
5.2
.7

4.4
.1
4.3
-

.4
.4
-

_
-

2.1

.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.0
2.9
.1

9.3
9.3
-

-

3d or
other
shift

~5,9...

-

12.7
.5
.1
.4
11.2
.5

2d
shift

24.4

-

-

XloulU^ UCJ.CVXp IUH^
and related
products

9.7

-

-

-

_ _0 0
^_.v_

Machine-tool accessories Jobbing
shops
Production shops
_2 /
3d or
2d
2d
other
shift
shift
shift

rmcninex-y
industries

i McU bl OpjLclOllig ^
plating, and
polishing

24.4
7.9
16.5
-

-

-

Other ................. ...............
Receiving no differential ...............

1/
2/
2/
4/

Includes d ata fo r in d u s tr ie s in a d d itio n to those shown se p a r a te ly .
No workers employed on 3d or other s h i f t .
Includes m ach ine-tool a ccesso r y estab lish m en ts a lso shown se p a r a te ly .
Less than .05 o f 1 p ercen t.




2.4

.5

(.&/)
-

< /)
a
(V)
(V)

-

36

S ch ed u led 'kJ&ehly JfouAA,

Table E-2:

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS

Weekly hours

EMPLOYED IN—

l /

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

A ll e sta b lish m e n ts ...........................................*

100.0

Under 3 5 hours .....................................................
35 hours ................. ............................. ..
Over 3 5 and under 3 7 ^ hours ..........................
3 7 ^ hours ........................................................ ..
Over
and under hO hours . . . . . . . . . . . . .
hO hours
Over hO and under hh hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
h h h o u r s ........................................................ ..
Over iiii and under L8 h o u r s .......................... ..
ii8 h o u r s ................................................................. ..
Over U8 and under 5 2 h o u r s ............................
5 2 h o u r s ............................ ..........................................
Over 5 2 h o u r s ......... .................................................

Durable
goods

All

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Inform atio n n o t a v a ila b le .............................. *

100.0
1.6
2.1

100.0

12.1
65.0

lh .l

6 .5

12;. 3
6 3 .7

12.1

2.0
6.6
25.2
17.8

7 5 .1

U 6 .8

1.6
.6

1 .9
#7

-

-

100.0

100.0

1 .7
h .O

100.0

#3

100.0

6.8

H e

1.8

5 .h
7 6 .h

A

C

1 .5

89.6
2. i

2 9
Co7

9 h .l

9 f
/. 7
9K
O O^

-

-

-

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

2U.5
■ o
acj

.*A
o

1
.

.6

#
9 .9

8

2

ft* 7
90. o
■o
1
9*7
ft A
9 .0

-

"

-

-

-

-

Public
utilities*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100,0

100.0

*■

ii.ii
ft n
O.V

1 Ji
J-.ii

-

100.0

ft ft
679

.it

.2

100.0

o .5

1.6
l.h

All

9 .A

1.2

-

2 .3
h .5
13*1

All
indus­
tries
y

0.2

100.0

Services

•7
>
1
.A
79 n
( t.U
J ..9
p *
9 .0
p A
9 .0

in £

(J /)
ji <
U .9
•9
(3 /)
75?9
i.
•U
9 O
ft.9
1 ft
9 .9

2.1

i u
a. n
i 9
A. i

-

"

O Q
2.0
•3

7ft 9
fO.ft

7A . 0
P
(0

9 ).
ft.U

i. n
U .o
1 ft

A .A

I. 1
.

*
*

1 9
A.ft
1 Ji
A.U

.9

0.5
1.6

1.0

Q /)

1). 9
AR. C

"

0.6

•5
Oa Q
00o0
*•

A .9

ft f
o.7
2 .5
T* o
x fl
0 A

i. n
u .u

n 1.
3*4
1© 7

1 .3
m
m

11.2

u.u

O.0
2 fl

*
*
•5

6 2 .3

h 6 .1

•7

0*1
*A /
1
10* o

3 .8

13.0
.8

-l l, o
JULUc

1*1

-

l.h
7 6 .3
o r
2.0

1*8

-

7 9

1.6

-

~

*■

3 .6

1
.
*u

3 .1

2* 2

-

2.0
*"

ii2 .2

ft
•9

-

-

Retail
trade

Services

Data r e la te to women workers.
Includes data fo r In d u stries in ad d ition to those shown sep arately.
Less than .05 o f 1 percent.

Table E-3:

P aid Jpdidayi.

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number o f p a id h o lid a y s

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts ................................ ............

100.0

100.0

100.0

E stablish m en ts p ro v id in g p a id h o lid a y s . .

98.6

99.2

99.2

7 | days ...............................................................
8 d a y s ......... .......................................................
8£ d a y s ............................ ..................................
9 days ........... ....................................................
10 d a y s ............................................................ .
10| days ............................................................
11 days ...............................................................
E stablish m en ts p ro v id in g no p a id
h o lid a y s ..............................................................

l.h

.6
(2/)

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
tra'de

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.3

99.2

99.5

100.0

100.0

87.2

89.8

89.1

88.1

91.3

98.9

96.6

97.0

62.0

„

1.6

Services

.1

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

98.h

18.1

12.0

57.3

81.0
2.h
6.2
2.7

1.5

1.3

17.1

-

-

-

-

.2

-

.5

3.1

-

23.2

-

..

..
-

h .l
-

_

10.0
6.1
7.0
7.5
.2
3.9
3.3
h3.9

5h.2
2.5
2h.l

-

h.2
6.9

-

-

-

•

-

«

-

-

-

-

-

-

.8

.8

.7

.8

-

.5

All
indus­
tries

y

18.7

.1
97.8

1 / Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
7 / Less than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroad s), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




Finance**

68.1

3

.3
(2/)
6675
.h
li.i
l.h
h.8
1.7
2.1
.8
1.0
8.5

O
O

All
indus­
tries

1 to h d a y s ............................................. ..
5 d a y s .................................................................
6 days ............................ ................................. ..
6£ d a y s ......... .................................... ................
7 days .............................. ..................................

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M a n u f a c t u r in g

-

5.h
-

..
.

2.2
.h
78.2
.1
h.o
(2/)
37h
(£/)
1.2

All

1.2
.1
82.1
.h
h.9

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

1.2
.2
86.2

1.1

_

73.3

3.h
39.9

•

1.2

ho. 2

lh .6

-

.5

.

-

-

15.h

5.7

12.7

91.3

hlu8
.6
2.7

-

8 h .l
.9
lO.h
.7
-

.5

-

.8
_

.
„

_

.9

.3

•h

-

1.1

-

-

-

12.8

-

_

_

-

10.2

10.9

11.9

8.7

1.1

3.h

3.0

-

-

Whole­
sale
trade

-

-

_

•h
38.0

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
U.S. D PA TM N O LA R
E R E T F BO
Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s

Table E -4:

Pctid V&c&ttonl (rf-okmal P/uuUHohA)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation p o licy

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts .............. ..................... ....

M
anufacturing

PERCENT OF PLANT W
ORKERS EMPLOYED INM
anufacturing

A
U

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

W
holesale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9

97.1

99.2

99.8

99.7

100.0

100.0

97.8

100.0

90.0

68.it
31.2
.it
-

_
1.8
..
98.1
-

22.0
71.9
2.3
.9

2.2
77.2
1.2
16.9
.3
l.it

3.3
82.7
1.8
10.0
2.0

it. 8
88.7
2.1
i t.l
.
-

69.9
1.1
22.8

67.9
.
31.it
.7

it5.5
U8.8
3.5
-

65.it
33.7
.9
-

7it.2
lit. 6
_
1.2

.1

2.9

.8

.2

.3

97.1

99.3

99.9

99.9

100.0

100.0

_
5it.it
3.2
36.2
6.2

_
32.7
.5
66.1
.7

26.0
5.2
63.1
3.5
-

-

-

2.2

A
ll
indus­
tries

Finance**

Services

A
ll
indus­
tries
1/

A
ll

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W
hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 y ear of service
Establishm ents with paid vacations

99.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

Under 1 w eek .......................... ...................
1 week ..........................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ......................
2 w e e k s........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s.................. ..
3 weeks ........................................................

.2
22.3
1.1
75.2
.2
.8

.5
19.6
2.6
75.5
1.8

.8

*
8.6
86.U
5.0

Establishm ents with no paid vacations ••

.2

25.6

it.O
69.6
~
-

11.7
88.3
-

30.1
69.9
-

-

-

-

6.2

2.2

-

10.0

2 y ears of service
Establishm ents with paid vacations . . . . .

99.8

Under 1 w e e k ...................................... .
1 w eek .................................... .....................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks . .* ................
2 w e e k s................................................ ..
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s................ ..
3 w eek s..................................................... ..

.9
93.2
.6
1.0

Establishm ents with no paid vacations . .

.2

hoi

100.0
_
6.2
1.5
89.7
.8
1.8

100.0
7.7
2.3
88.7
1.3
-

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9

3.3
91.7
5.0

_
3.8
.9
95.3
-

_
1.5
2.1

_
1.7
97.9
.it
-

_
99.9

-

-

-

1.9
it5.8
6 .it
it3.5
.3
l.it

2.9
55.2
9.0
30.8
2.0

.1

96.h

10.it
81.0
2.3
3 .it

it.2
55.9
11.6
28.2
-

2.9

.7

.1

.1

99.9

97.1

99.3

99.9

99.9

-

97.8

100.0

90.0

_
16.2
82.9
.9
-

39.8
l.it
it7.6
1.2
10.0

5 y ears of service
Establishm ents with paid vacations .........
1 w e e k ........................ ................................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s............ ..
2 weeks .......................................... ............
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .................... ..
3 w e e k s...................................... .................
Over 3 weeks .................................... . . • • •
Establishm ents with no paid vacations . .

99.8

100.0

100.0

.7
-

oh

.7
-

92.0

96.8

i t .l
3.0
-

92.5
it.l
3.0
-

.2

-

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.8

100.0

90.0

6.7
83.9
l .it
8.0
-

_
99.3
.7
-

•
8U.3
10.3
5.U
-

.8
99.2
~
-

.5

96.8
.it
2.3
-

3.1
.3
87.2
2.0
1.7
3.5

3.9
85.8
.9
9.it
-

.5
81.3
l.it
1.3
-

-

2.2

5.8
73.6
2.9
lit.8
-

3 .it
2.6
88.2
1.5
3 .it
.2

3.7
3.8
87.7
1.8
2.9
-

2.3
5.6
89.5
1.9
.6
-

.1

..
93.2
2.7
i t .l
-

-

.8
1.7
-

100.0

_
90.8
9.1
-

2.9

.7

.1

.1

99.9

97.1

99.3

99.9

99.9

100.0

100.0

97.8

100.0

90.0

Ut.O
5.9
it8.it
1.6

5.7
U9.1
2.3
39.9
.1

2.9

1.3
1.0
38.9
5.1
53.6
-

6.7
it3.it
l .it
it8.5
-

23.7
11.1
65.2
-

3.1
50.5
it0.2
it.O

3.1
39.it
57.5
-

5.5

itl.3
3.5
50.9
.2

3.0
.7
it0.3
3.9
52.0
-

79.2
5.3
-

.1

2.9

.7

.1

.1

-

-

2.2

-

10.0

5.5

10.0

15 y ears of se rv ice
Establishm ents with paid vacations .........

99.8

100.0

100.0

1 w eek ...................... ............................... .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ......................
2 weeks ........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s .......... .
3 w e e k s................................................ ..
Over 3 w e e k s.............................................

.7
36.7
it.5
56.9
1.0

oh

58.3
-

.7
38.8
.8
59.7
-

Establishm ents w ith no paid vacations . .

.2

-

-

1/
*
*-*

-

37.2

h.l

100.0

100.0

-

.8
12.1
16.7
70.it
-

5 i.it
iii.il
7.2

•it
20.7
78.9
-

-

-

-

-

100.0
3it.2
10.3
55.5

100.0

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




.5

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

38

Table E-5*

Paid. S io k Jl/eaae (% o*mal pAOaiiiOMA)
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

M anufacturing

M anufacturing
Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ......................

Al
l
indus­
tis
re

Al
l

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

uii
tl­
te*
is

sl
ae
trade

Rti
eal
t ade
r

Finance**

Srie
evcs

Al
l
indus­
tis
re

Al
l

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

y

Public
uii
tl­
te*
is

Whole­
sl
ae
trade

Rt
e ail
trade

Sr
e vices

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

31.6

Uo.5

UU. 3

33.5

33.8

26.3

5.8

31.9

25.0

7.U

U.7

5.9

2.1

18.8

16.3

6.8

12.2

3.6
1.3
3.8
U.3
7.8
5.7
5.U
-

_

.1
2.2
.9

_

_

_

_

* 2.5
1.6
3.8
3.5
.6
-

.9
(2/)
2.5
-

l.U
(2/)
3.U
.5
.6

_
.2
-

.7
3.5
1.6
1.0
-

2.1
7.1
1.5
-

1 year of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

_

_

_

_

_

_
3.0
l.U
.6
.1
.7
-

3 or U days ..........................
5 days ...............................
6 days ...............................
7 to 9 days ..........................
10 days ..............................
11 to lU days ...................... ..
15 days ..............................
16 days ..............................
20 to 2U days ........................
Over 2k days .........................

.7
8.U
2.5
.5
10.1
2.2
2.5
1.1
3.1
.7

11.6
3.1
19.0
.3
1.8
3.1
1.6

11.6
3.1
20.0
.5
2.8
U.8
1.5

11.6
3.0
17.2
1.7

6.5
-

7.7
3.2
2.7
6.5
5.U
.6
-

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ...................

68.2

59.5

55.7

66.5

66.2

73.7

9U.2

68.1

32.0

Uo.5

UU.3

33.5

33.8

27.5

5.8

31.9

19.3
.1
3.3
U.6
-

-

7.5

.k
2.2
.3
.2
.U
.7

92.6

95.3

25.0

1.9

U.3
-

8.0
1.1
.7
5.5
.7
.3
-

9U.1

97.9

81.2

83.7

93.2

87.8

2.1

18.8

21.6

6.8

12.2

-

_

.

8.0
1.1
.7
1.0
.7
2.5
.3
2.0
5.3

.7
3.5
1.6
1.0
-

1.3
7.1
.9
.8
(2/)
-

78.U

93.2

.3
1.0

75.0

_
12.2
.7
1.6
-

-

(2/)
.1
l.U
-

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

k days ...............................
5 days ...............................
6 days ...............................
7 or 8 days ..........................
10 days ..............................
11 to lU days ........................
15 days ..............................
16 days ..............................
18 days ..............................
20 days ..............................
Over

2h

days .........................

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

.6
7.2
2.U
.7
5.U
2.0
3.0
.3
1.1
6.0
1.2
2.1

68.0

_

_

_

_

9.1
2.8
.8
9.5
.3
U.8
-

8.1
2.6
1.3
11.8
.5
.6

11.0
3.0
5.2
12.6

19.3
.1
3.3
U.6
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9.6
2.0
1.6

1U.8
3.1
1.5

_
-

6.5
-

1.7

-

59.5

55.7

66.5

66.2

-

_

7.7
3.2
2.7
1.1
5.U
.6
-

3.0
l.U
.6
.1
.7

2.9
2.7
1.2

72.5

-

-

9U.2

7.6

U.7

5.9

»

_

_

_

1.8
5.7
5.U
6.0

7.2
5.5
1.6
.2
6.1
3.6
.2
.6

2.1
1.0
.3
.3
.3
.2
(2/)
2.3
.1
1.0

68.1

75.0

3.1
1.8
3.8

k.3

92.U

-

(2/)
(2/>

(2/)
3.9
.6

2.8
1.0

95.3

Gee footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor statistics




l.U
-

.9

9U.1

U.E.

_
.2
-

1.9

97.9

_
12.2
.7
1.6
-

U.3
-

81.2

-

-

.7
l.U

87.8

D e PARTI'Ie NT OF LABOR

39

Table E-5:

P aid BicJt j£aa#6 ( QoAmal PAO
uiiiotU) - QotU itmtd
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

P rovisions fo r paid sick leave

A
ll
indus­
tries

M
anufacturing

W
holesale
trade

Retail
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT W
ORKERS EMPLOYED IN
Manufacturing

y

Finance**

Services

A
ll
indus­
tries

A
ll

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W
hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

A ll establishm ents ..........................................

A
ll

utili­
ties*

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

it0.5

itit.3

33.5

36.6

27.5

31.U

3 i.9

25.0

8.6

it.7

5.9

2.1

20.0

21.6

l i t .l

12.2

8.1
2.6
9.9
.5
1.3
1.3
it.3
1.2
it.2
10.9

11.0
3.0
it.6
2.3
10.9
1.7

19.3

.1
2.0
5 .it
_
_
_
1.3
6.5
2.0
-

7.7
3.2
2.7
1.1
2.7
5 .it
2.7
.8
_
1.2

3.0
1.3
.6
.8
_
_
.1
_
_
25.6
-

2.1
.7
.3
.2
.7
(2/)

.9

l.it

_
(2 /)

_
(2 /)

_

12.2
_
.7
1.6
1.0

8.0
1.1
.7
1.0
.7

.7
3.3
1.6
_
.2

1.3
3.9
.9

_
2.0
2.5
.3

_

.3
.1
.6
.9
2.7

_
_
_

6.0

7.2
5.1
_
1.6
.6
6.1
_
it.2
_
_
_
.2

100.0__ 100.0

Services

100.0

5 years of service
Establishm ents with formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave ....................................

35.1

5 days ............................................................
6 days ............................................................
7 or 8 days ..................................................
10 days ..........................................................
12 of lit days ..............................................
15 days ..........................................................
18 days ..........................................................
20 to 26 days ..............................................
30 days ..........................................................
35 or hO d a y s .......... ...................................
50 days ............................ .............................
Over 50 days ................................................

‘ it.5
1.2
1.1
1.5
3.2
2 .it
2.9
3.1
it.7

9.1
2.8
8.0
.3
.9
.8
3.7
it.6
2.7
7.6

Establishm ents with no formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave ....................................

6U.9

59.5

55.7

66.5

63.it

72.5

68.6

68.1

75.0

35.3

it0.9

itit.9

33.5

36.6

27.5

31.it

31.9

7.2
2.9
.h

it.it
3.8
.9
1.8
5.7
3.9
5 .it

_
_
_
(2/)
TV

_
»

_

•

_

.5

.2
.2

3 .it

it.O

1.7

91.it

95.3

9 it.l

97.9

25.0

8.6

it.7

5.9

7.2
5.1
_
1.6
.2
6.1
.it
it.2
_

2.1

.9

l.it

_
(2 /)

_
(2/)

it.3
.2

3.2
.8

1.0

l.it

_
7.3

_

5.3

.7

80.0

78.it

85.9

67.8

2.1

20.0

21.6

lit.l

12.2

_
_

12.2
_

8.0
1.1

.7
3.3

.7

1.6

1.3
3.9
.9

15 years of service
Establishm ents w ith formal provisions
fo r oaid sick l e a v e .................... * .............
5 days ............................................................
6 days ............................................................
7 or 8 days ..................................................
10 day s ....................................................................
12 or lit days ..............................................
15 days ..........................................................
18 days ..........................................................
20 t o 26 days ..............................................
30 to hO days ............ .................................
50 days ..........................................................
Over 50 days ................................................
iistablishm ents with no formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave ....................................

7.2
2.3
.3

9.1
2.8
-

it.9
1.1
1.0
1.5
2.8
.9
3 .it

7.2
.3

9.9

6iu7

8.1
2.6
8.6
.5

11.0
3.0
it.6

19.3
.1
2.0
5 .it
_
_

3.2

.it

.7

.8

13.5

1.3
6.0
1.9
.5
lit. 7

11.0

6.5

2.7
1.1
2.7
5 .it
_
it.7

59.1

55.1

66.5

63.it

72.5

it.5
2.0
.3

1.7
2.2

3.3

1/

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.

2/

L ess th a n .0 5 o f 1 p e r c e n t .

*
**

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




7 .7

3.0
1.3
.6

_
1.3
_
6.9
.9
1.8
5.7

.8
_
.1
_
25.6
-

15.3

.2

68.6

68.1

75.0

_

_

_

.7

.3
.2

.5
(2/)
.2
.3

(2/)
.9
3 .it
91.it

_
_
_
_

_

-

_
_
_

.7

1.6
1.0

1.0
.7

.2
_

.8

1.0

3.2
l.it

.2
1.9

it.3

_
8.1

7.3

3.7

_
it. 5

_
_
_
_

95.3

9U.1

97.9

80.0

78.it

85.9

_
_
.1

.2

_
2.0

.7
8 7 .8

Table E-6

f\! a n p A xd 4 4 > cJ U o n

fc o n n ie A

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of bonus

M anufacture

M anufacturing
All
indus­
tries

All

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

y

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0
.- "

100.0

All

I
All establishments........ ........ .

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

loo.o

; 10O.O
h

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/ ........ ................. .

37.9

39.8

38.6

U2.0

9.0

U2.3

13.0

55.2

U8.3

31.3

3
it.5

30.6

U3.1

7.8

3U.2

27.5

31.it

Christmas or year-end ... ..........
Profit-sharing..................
Other....... .................. .

29.0
6.2
I.2
t

30.9
7.1
2.8

30.6
6.5
3.0

31.5
8.1
2.i
t

7.0
2.0
-

36.0
7.1
.8

11.3
2.9
-

38.2
8.2
11.9

38.1
U. 9
8.5

25.0
5.0
2.7

25.9
6.8
3.8

23.it
5.1
i.
to

31.3
10.6
3.5

7.6
.2
“

27.9
7.2
.t
i

27.5
*
*

30.0
l it
.

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ........... ..............

62.1

60.2

61.U

58.0

91.0

57.7

87.0

ii.
tt8

51.7

68.7

65.5

69.it

56.9

92.2

65.8

72.5

68.6

Includes data for Industries in addition to those shown separately,
Unduplicated total,
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
■ * Finance, insurance, and real estate.
a

X f
y

a n d P-enbion PXani

Table E-7:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of plan

M anufacturing

M anufacturing
Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.5

98.1

97.8

83.3

96.3
87.it
2it.O
85.5
2.2

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

All establishments .................

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2 / ..................

92.3

97.8

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

y

Public
utili­
ties*

All
indus­
tries

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

.

Life insurance .........
Health insurance .................
Hospitalization. . ............. .
.
Retirement pension ......... ..... .

85.0
7ti
i.t
56.2
62.6

91.7
87.0
68.6
6it.l

91.5
92.0
76.0
62.7

92.0
78.0
55.0
66.8

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans..... .......... •••••

7.7

2.2

2.5

1.9

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), comrranication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1 /
y




100.0

100.0

100.0

82.it

95.3

71.1

9U.2

97.8

98.6

96.3

97.9

79.5

86.6

73.it

68.9
it7.5
5!t.7
it8.6

77.it
7it.2
61t.O
52.2

86.2
63.7
62.9
73.2

60.it
it6.3
it9.8
32.6

82.5
83.1
72.2
it7.2

88.8
89.9
79.it
it8.9

6l.U
93.7
86.0
51.6

83.0
82.0
6it.9
it3.2

9lt.O
89.5
it5.1
61.0

59.7
55.2
52.5
It0.8

67.0
6it.2
63.3
it7.5

59.9
59.3
59.6
18.8

16.7

17.6

i.
t7

28.9

5.8

2.2

li
.t

3.7

2.1

20.5

13.it

26.6

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111,, March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Appendix - Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A). The covered industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions o As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Bach group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN CHICAGO, ILL.,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MARCH 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers In
establi shments
studied

2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

l/9

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
______ studied

l.m.ooo

516,600
278,000

188,600

117,550
47,450
31,380

89,400

16,070

Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ............................. .
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods 2/ ....................
Nondurable goods y ...... ..........
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ........................
Wholesale t r a d e .......... ..........
Retail t r a d e ........ ...............
Finance, insurance, and real estate .
.
Services 2 / .........................

101
101
101

101
51

101

51
51

2,934
1,332
784
548
1,602

478
199
124
75
279

115
537
204
302
444

35
58
58
48
80

55
49
34
24
54
14
58
26
21
94
109
569
392
141
36
98
6
151

21
21
18
10
16
11
18
15
13
28
27
95
53
26
16
27
6
36

674,800
456.400

218.400
436,200
83,800
73,800

138,200
68,200
72,200

238,600
67,000

14,300
102,600
28,700
26,000

70,100

17,020
4,450

22,660
19,830

6,140

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Candy and other confectionery p r o d u c t s ..........
Women18 and m isses9 coats and suits .............
M i l l i n e r y ............. ........... ...............
Millwork ..........................................
Foundries, nonferrous ............................
Forgings, iron and steel .........................
Cutlery, hand tools^ and h a r d w a r e ............ ... •
Heating apparatus ................................
Sheet-metal work .................................
Stamped and pressed metal products ..............
Electroplating, plating, and polishing .... .....
Machinery i n d u s t r i e s ....... ........ ............
M a c h i n e r y ............................. .......
Machine-tool accessories - Jobbing s h o p s ....
Machine-tool accessories - production shops...
Radio, television, and related products .........
Railroads .........................................
Insurance c a r r i e r s ............ .......... ........

21

v

8

8
21
8

21
21

21

8/

21
21
8
21
21
8

8
51
Id

21

----------

13,217
2,334

1,406
1,615
4,282
5,168
5,736
2,974

1,561
8,516
3,398
106,746
95,063
5,305
6,378
a , 348
a , 469

30,020

10,417
1,664
1,028
995
3,304
5,007
3,482
2,471

1,173

68

49

166
376
333

400

26,668

383
137
303
83
8,219
7,296
153
770
3,215

a , 469
17,582

12,457

1,258
5,038
1,754

46,688
38,675
2,323
5,690

1/ Chicago Area (Cook County).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworkingj lumber, iumiture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products;
miscellaneous manufacturing.
lJ Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
5/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with 4 or more workers were also included.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.




Index
Page

Assembler
Assembler
Assembler
Assembler

(cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) .....
(heating apparatus) ............ ...... ..
(insurance carriers) ................. ..
(machinery) ................... .

Assembler (radio, television, and related products)
Assembler (sheet-metal work) ........................
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery) •••••••••••••••
Bartender (hotels) ........... ............... .
Bench hand (bakeries) •••••••••••.... ...... ........
Biller, m a c h i n e .... ....... ........... .
Blocker, hand (millinery) ............ ..............
Bookbinder (printing) .......................... .
Bookkeeper, hand ........... ................ ........ ................
Bookkeeping-^nachine operator ........................................
Brewer (malt liquors) •..... ....... ........................ .
Bricklayer (building construction) ...................... ...........
Cabinet maker (millwork) ............ ........... ........ ............
Calculating-machine operator ..............
••••••
Candy maker (candy and other confectionery products) ...... .
Carpenter (building construction) .... ....... .
Carpenter, m a i n t e n a n c e ........••••................ ......... ........
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ...... ••••••...... .......... ..
Chipper and grinder (heating apparatus) •*.••••...... ..............
Chipper and grinder (iron and steel forgings) ................. •••••
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) ..................
Cleaner • •.... ............... ........ ••••••.................... .
Cleaner (railroads) .............. •••••••............................
Clerk, a c c o u n t i n g ..... .................
••••••
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ........... •••.•••••..... ••••
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) ............. .......... .
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Clerk, file ...... ............... ••••••••••..... ••...••........ .
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ......... .
Clerk, general .................•••••....... ..... ....... ............ .
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) .................•••••••••••.••••
Clerk, order ............ ........ .........
Clerk, p a y r o l l .............. ........ ......................... .
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ....... .............
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ••••........... ......... .
Compositor, hand (printing) ............................ ....... .
Cook (restaurants) ...................... ................... ...... ..
Coremaker, hand (nonferrous foundries) ••••••••........... ....... .
Crane operator, electric bridge ..................... •••••..........
Cutter and marker (women*s and misses* coats and suits) ........ .
Cutter (millinery) .......... .................... ...................
Die setter (iron and steel forgings) •••••••..••.... ........ ...... .
Die setter (stamped and pressed metal products) ....................
Die sinker (iron and steel forgings) ................... .......... .
Dipper (candy and other confectionery products) ........... ........
Draftsman ...................... ............ .............. ...........
Drill-press operator (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) .... ......
Drill-press operator (heating apparatus) .......................... .
Drill-press operator (machinery) ............•••••••••............ . 2 3
Drop-hammer operator (iron and steel forgings) ............. ........
Duplicating-mchine operator ••••••••.... .............. ......... ...
Electrician (building construction) ..... ............. ...••••..... .
Electrician, maintenance .................... ..................... .
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ............................. .
Electrician, maintenance (radio, television, and related products) ••
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) ...............................
Electro typer (printing) .................... ............. ........ ..
Elevator operator (building service) ..... ••••......•••••..... .....
Engine-lathe operator (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) ..........
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ................ .................. 2 3




Engineer, s t a t i o n a r y ................................ ........
Filling-machine operator (candy and other confectionery products) • ••
Fireman, stationary boiler
Foreman (milk dealers) ................. .......... .
Forging-press operator (iron and steel forgings) .................. .
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) .... ......... ••••••....... .
Grinding-machine operator (cutlery, hand tools, and
hardware) ................ .................................... .
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) •••.••••••.............. •••••• 2 3 ,
G u a r d .... ........ ••••••••••••.......... ................
Hammersmith (iron and steel forgings) ............................ .
Heater (iron and steel forgings; ................................... .
Heat treater (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) •••••••............
Helper (bakeries) ........... ......... ••••••......... ...... •••••••••
Helper, motortruck driver ........ ....... •••••••••••••..... •••••••••
Helper, trades, maintenance ................. ........... ........... .
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ................ ••••••••••••
Homogenize!* (milk dealers) ............................. ••..••••••••
Inspector (candy and other confectionery products) .................
Inspector (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) ....... ....... •••••«•
Inspector (iron and steel forgings) ................ ••••••......... .
Inspector (machinery) ••••••••.... ............. •...••••••••••••••••
Inspector (radio, television, and related products) .... .••••••••••
Inspector (stamped and pressed metal products) ................ .
Inspector, final (examiner) (women*s and misses* coats and suits) ••
J a n i t o r ................... •••••••••............................ .
Janitor (building service) .......... ....... ............. ••••...... •
Janitor (machinery) ............ ....... .......... ............ .......
Janitor (railroads) ..... ...................................... .....
Janitor (sheet-metal work) ......................................... .
Key-punch operator ............... ................ ••••••••........ .
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) .......................... .
Laborer (building construction) ............. ................... ..
Lay-out man (sheet-metal work) ..••••••••••.... ....... •••••••......
Machine operator (printing) .......................... ...............
Machine tender (printing) ............... ........... ••••••........ .
Machine-tool operator, production (cutlery, hand tools,
and hardware) ...... ...... ......... ....... .......... ........... ..
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ................. ••••• 2 3 ,
Machine-tool operator, toolroom ................ •••••••......... .
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (cutlery, hand tools, and
hardware) .... ••••••........................... .
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (radio, television, and
related products) ............... ••••••............. .......... ..
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) ............. .... .......
Machinist, maintenance .............. ................. ............. .
Machinist, maintenance (candy and other confectionery products) ••••
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) .................. .
Machinist, production (machinery) ................. ......... .
Maid (hotels) ................................. ................. .
Mailer (printing) ............................................. ••••••
Maintenance man, general utility ................ ............... .
Maintenance man, general utility (candy and other confectionery
products) ...... ...................................................
Maintenance man. general utility (electroplating, plating,
and polishing) ........ ........ ..................................
Maintenance man, general utility (nonferrous foundries) ......... .
Maintenance man, general utility (stamped and pressed
metal products) ................... ............................... .
Meat cutter (meat cutters) ..................... ...... ............. .
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ............................... .
Mechanic, maintenance ....... .............. ............ ........... .
Mechanic, maintenance (iron and steel forgings) ..... .
Mechanic, maintenance (stamped and pressed metal products) ........
Milling-machine operator (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) ......

10
15

10
31
18
17

19
2 4 , 2 5 , 26

12
18

18
18
29
31

10

28
31
15
18 , 19
18
2 3 , 2 5 , 26
27

21
16
12
32
2 3 , 2 5 , 26

28

21
7
28
29

21
2 9 , 30
30
1 8 , 19
2 4 , 2 5 , 26

10
19
27
24

10
15
28
24
32
30

11
15

22
17

21
31
11

11
18

21
19

Index - Q on t in m d
Page

e
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ............. ....... .
Millwright ...................................................
Mixer (bakeries) .................................... ........
Mogul operator (candy and other confectionery products) ....
Molder (bakeries) .......................... .................
Molder (nonferrous foundries) .......... ........... .........
Motortruck driver ............ ......... ••••••........ •••••••
Nurse, industrial (registered) ..................... ........
Office boy ...................................................
Office girl ..................................................
Oiler ........................................................
Oiler (building service) ....................................
Operator (local transit) ......................... ......... .
Order filler .....................•••••••••••••••••..........
Ovenman (bakeries) ......... .......................... .
P a c k e r ........................... •••••........ .............
Packer (candy and other confectionery products) ........ .
Painter (building construction) ........ .................. .
Painter, maintenance .................. ............ .........
Painter, maintenance (railroads) •••••••..... .
Pasteurizer man (milk dealers)
Patternmaker, metal (nonferrous foundries) .................
Photoengraver (printing) .................... .............. .
Pipe fitter, maintenance ........ .......... ............ .
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ............ ...........
Planer operator (millwork) ...................... ...........
Plasterer (building construction) ......................... .
Plater (electroplating, plating, and polishing) ............
Plumber (building construction) ......... ....... .
Plumber, maintenance ................ ......... ....... ...... .
Polisher and buffer, metal (cutlery, hand tools, and
hardware) ........ ................. ........ ••••••...... .
Polisher and buffer, metal (electroplating, plating, and
polishing) ................. ............ ••••••••..... .
Polishing-«md-buffing-machine operator (cutlery, hand tools,
and hardware) ............ ........... ••••••......
Pollshing-and-buffing-machine operator (electroplating,
plating, and polishing) ........... ............ .
Porter ••••••••.... ......... ................... ............
Pourer, metal (nonferrous foundries) ...... ••••••••....... .
Power-brake operator (sheet-metal work) .................. .
Power-shear operator (heating apparatus) ....... ...........
Power-shear operator (sheet-metal work) ....................
Power-shear operator (stamped and pressed metal products) ••
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) .................... .
Press assistant (printing) ................ ........ .
Press feeder (printing) ..........................
Presser (women's and misses' coats and suits) .... .........
Pressman (printing) ................................. ........
Punch-press operator (heating apparatus) ................ .
Punch-press operator (sheet-metal w o r k ) .... ......... .
Punch-press operator (stamped and pressed metal products) ••
Receiving c l e r k ........ .
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) ........................... .
Repair operator (radio, television, and related products) ••
Rip-saw operator (millwork) •••••••.................. .
Sand mixer (nonferrous foundries) ................ .
Screw-machine operator, automatic (cutlery, hand tools, and
hardware) ..... ................... ......... ..............
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) ....... •••••••
S e c r e t a r y ........................ .......... ................
Section head (insurance carriers) .......... ...... ..........
Set-up man. machine tools (cutlery, hand tools, and
hardware) ................. ............. ..................
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women's and misses' coats and suits)
Sewing-machine operator (millinery) .............. ..........




23, 24,

2 5 , 26

11

29
15
29
17
31
9
4
7

11
30,

32
31

12
29

12, 13
15
29

11

23
31,

32
17
30

11
23
17
29

22
29

11
19

22
19

22

12
17

21
20

21
21

23
30
30

16
30

20

21
21
13
32
27
17
17

1 8 , 19
2 3 , 24
7
23
19

16

16

Sewing-machine operator (women's and misses' coats and suits)
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries)
Sheet-metal machine operator, miscellaneous machines
(sheet-metal work) ...... ........... •••••••••...... •••••••.
Sheet-metal worker, m a i n t e n a n c e....... ........... .
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) ............ .
Sheet-metal worker, production (sheet-metal work) ••••••.....
Shipping clerk
................... ............. ••••••••••••
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ....... ................. ........
Stenographer ........... ................... •••••..... ........ .
Stenographer (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .... .......... ........ •••••
Stereotyper (printing) ....... •••••••••..... ...... •••••••.•••
Stock clerk (radio, television, and related products) ••••••..
Stock handler ........ .............. •••••••••..... •••••••••...
Stock handler (candy and other confectionery products) .......
Stock handler (machinery) .... ................ ....... .
Stock handler (railroads) ••••••...... ................... .
Stock handler (sheet-metal work)
Straw operator (millinery) •••••..... •••••..... .
Switchboard operator ....... ............................. ......
Switchboard operator-receptionist................ ••••••••••••
Thbulating-machine operator .... ................ •••••..... .
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) •••••........
Telephone operator (hotels) ........ ..................
Tester (radio, television, and related products) .........••••
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women's and misses* coats and suits)
Tool-and-die maker ................... •••••....... ............
Tool-and-die maker (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware)
Tool-and-die maker (heating apparatus) ........................
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) •••••.... .................•••••
Tool-and-die maker (radio, television, and related products) •
Tool-and-die maker (sheet-metal work) .............. ...... ••••
Tool-and-die maker (stamped and pressed metal products) .....
Tracer .......................... ..............................
Trimmer (millinery) ..... ......... ............................
Trim-press operator (iron and steel forgings) •••••••••......
Transcribing-machine operator ............................. ....
Trouble shooter (radio, television, and related products) ••••
Truck driver ........... ........ ......... ......................
Trucker, hand ........ .................................. •••••••
Trucker, hand (candy and other confectionery products) ..... .
Trucker, hand (machinery) .......... ........... ..............
Trucker, hand (railroads) ..... ...................
Trucker, hand (sheet-metal work) ..............................
Trucker, hand (stamped and pressed metal products) *••••••••••
Trucker, p o w e r ..................... ...........................
Trucker, power (iron and steel forgings) •••.•••••••••••••••••
Trucker, power (nonferrous foundries)
Trucker, power (railroads).... ...... ............. ...........
Turret-lathe operator, hand (cutlery, hand tools, and
hardware) ........... ................... ...... ..............
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ...................... .
Typist ................ .......... •••••............ ............
Typist (insurance carriers) .............. ......... .
Underwriter (insurance carriers) .... ••••••••••••••••••••••••
Vaiter (hotels) ............. ....... ............. ...... .
Waiter (restaurants) ...... ................. ...... ...........
W a t c h m a n ...... ................... ............................
Welder, hand (heating apparatus) ................ ••••••...... .
Welder, hand (machinery) •••••••.... •••••.......... ••••••••••
Welder, hand (sheet-metal work) ................ ......... •••••
Welder, machine (heating apparatus) .......... ....... .
Winder, coil (radio, television, and related products) •••••••
Wirer (radio, television, and related products) ........ ••••••
Wrapper (candy and other confectionery products) •••••••••••••
Yeast worker (malt liquors) .............................. .

16
17

21

11
23

21
13
13
7
23
30
27
13
15
2 4 , 2 5 , 26
28
4,

21

16
8
8

32
27

16

11
19

20
2 4 , 25
27

21
21
9

16
18

8
27
13, H
13
15
2 4 , 2 5 , 26

28

21
21

14
13
17
28
1 8 , 19
2 3 , 2 4 , 2 5 , 26

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0-1952

8
28
28
32
32

14

20
2 4 , 25

21
20
27
27
15
29

THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are nov available from the Superin­
tendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. G. for the following communities:
BLS
Bulletin
-Ng.,...
...

City
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Buffalo, New York
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Detroit, Michigan
Hartford, Connecticut
Houston, Texas
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey

1045
1044
1085
1056
1043
1041
1066
1086
1059
1084
1075
1064
1067
1068
1081

BIB
Bulletin
Price
20
15
25
25
20
20
20
25
20
20
20
20
15
25
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents
oents
oents
cents

, . A __

City
New Orleans, Louisiana
Norfolk-Portsmouth, Virginia
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Rochester, New York
Salt Lake City, Utah
St. Louis, Missouri
San Francisco-Oakland, California
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, Washington
Worcester, Massachusetts

This report was prepared in the Bureau's North Central Regional Office.
dressed to:
Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6, Illinois

1074
1088
1070
1060
1082
1042
1071
1058
1087
1069
1095
1076
1078
1057
1077

Prtss
15
15
15
25
20
20
20
15
20
15
25
25
15
20
20

cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents
oents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents

Communications may be ad-

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for consultation on
statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, con­
struction and housing, and work injuries.




The North Central Region includes the following States:
Nebraska
Illinois
Michigan
Indiana
North Dakota
Minnesota
Ohio
Iowa
Missouri
South Dakota
Kansas
Montana
Wisconsin
Kentucky


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102