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Occupational Wage Survey

TRENTON ,NEW JERSEY
March 1952

Bulletin No. 1104

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
I sms.

INTRODUCTION.........................................................

1

THE TRENTON METROPOLITAN AREA............................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE.............................................

1

TABLES!
Average earnings for seleeted occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ...
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .....
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations •
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shippingoccupations.....................

3
5
6
7

Union wage
C~15
C-205
C-27
C-41
C-42
C-541

9
9
9
9
9
9

scales for selected occupations Building construction.................
Bakeries..................................................
Printing..................................................
Local transit operating employees................................
Motortruck drivers and helpers..................................
Grocery stores and meat markets .................................

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ..........................

10

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ...................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ........................................
E-3
Paid holidays.....................
E-4
Paid vacations..............................................
E-5
Paid sick leave.............................................
E-6
Nonproduotion bonuses.................... ....................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans..........

10
11
11
12
13
15
15

APPENDIX*
Scope and method of survey ...........................

16

INDEX..............................................................

18

F o r sale b y the Superintendent of D o c u m e n t s , U. S. G o v e r n m e n t Printing Office
W a s h i n g t o n 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents

July 16, 1952

82d Congress, 2d Session

Introduction 1/
The Trenton area is 1 of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys*
Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis*
Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilised in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping.
In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Earnings information for those occupations character­
istic of particular local industries is presented in Series B
tables for many labor markets included in the current series of
studies* This supplemental coverage, however, was omitted in
the survey in the Trenton area* Union scales (Series C tables)
are presented in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational earn­
ings for several industries or trades in which the great majori­
ty of the workers are employed under terms of collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are in­
dicative of prevailing pay practices*
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Trenton Metropolitan Area
The population of the Trenton Metropolitan Area (Mer­
cer County) was approximately 230,OCX) in 1950* More than half
the total population lived in Trenton.
The other major city
in the area, Princeton, accounted for another 12,000 inhabit­
ants*
Situated between New York and Philadelphia, the Tren­
ton area benefits industrially from the transportation lines
serving these two cities* Manufacturing dominates the industrial
composition of Trenton and its environs* Of the 52,600 workers
within the scope of the survey, nearly three-fourths were em­
ployed in manufacturing firms, and half the entire work force

1 / Prepared in the Bureau fs regional office in New York,
N. Y., by Donald J* Blackmore under the direction of Frederick
W. Mueller, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst*
The planning and central direction of the program was carried
on in the Bureau’s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations*




House Document No. 541
were in 5 important manufacturing industries. There were 7,440
workers engaged in the fabrication of metal products; 5>110 in
the manufacture of pottery and related products, and 5>150 in
the production of nonelectrical machinery*
The primary metals
industry employed 3>200 and the rubber industry, 4,300.
Among the industries and establishment-size groups
within the scope of the Bureau’s study, three-fourths of the
plant workers were employed in establishments having written
agreements with labor organizations* The extent of unionization
varied widely in the different industry groups studied. In
manufacturing nearly 85 percent of the plant workers were covered
by union agreements* Except in transportation,
communication,
and other public utilities, where union coverage of plant work­
ers was virtually complete, plant workers in nonmanufacturing
industries were not extensively affected by union contract pro­
visions* The proportion of office workers represented by union
organizations was significant only In the utilities group, where
four of five workers were covered*
In other divisions, union
coverage among office workers was negligible.

Occupational W age Structure
Wages and salaries for most plant and office workers
in Mercer County were formally adjusted upward during the period
between January 1950, the base date of the Wage Stabilization
Board’s 10-percent wage increase formula, and the time of the
study* Eighty percent of the plant workers and more than half
the office workers received general wage or salary adjustments
during this period, usually on a cents-per-hour basis*
Most
increases ranged from 10 to 20 cents, although workers in a few
manufacturing and public utility establishments received in­
creases totaling as much as 30 cents an hour during the period.
Formalized rate structures for time workers were re­
ported in establishments employing a substantial majority of the
plant workers*
These were particularly prevalent among manu­
facturing companies, where 9 of 10 persons were employed by firms
having a formal rate structure. For plant workers, these formal
plans generally were divided evenly between those providing
single rates for each job and those providing rate ranges*
Among office workers, about two-thirds were employed in estab­
lishments with formal rate structures, which in nearly
cases
consisted of a range of rates for each job classification, ftie
remainder of the office workers were employed in firms that de­
termined salaries on an individual basis*
Established minimum entrance rates for inexperienced
plant workers were part of the wage structure for virtually all
Trenton firms* One-half the workers were employed in establish­
ments having minimum rates of more than $1.10 an hour*
These
comparatively high minima were found primarily in manufacturing

and public utilities firms, however*
In retail trade and serv­
ice industries, approximately 80 percent of the workers were
employed in companies with minimum rates of 75 cents an hour or
less*

Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing* In
17 of 18 office job classifications permitting comparison, sala­
ries of workers in manufacturing ranged up to $12*50 a week more
than those in nonmanufacturing, although the difference was gen­
erally between $4*50 and $8«
For plant occupations that cut
across industry lines, hourly earnings in manufacturing were
higher than in nonmanufacturing for 15 of 16 comparable jobs*
Most commonly, these variations ranged between 17 and 29 cents
an hour*

More than 20 percent of the workers in manufacturing
plants in Trenton were working late shifts in March 1952* Of
these, virtually all were receiving shift premiums — typically
a cents-per-hour differential over day-shift rates* Hie amount
most commonly reported was 5 cents for the second and 6 cents
for the third shift, although differentials up to 15 cents an
hour were reported in some instances*




More than 75 percent of the plant workers in Trenton
were scheduled to work a 40-hour week;
such a schedule was in
effect for almost 85 percent of the workers in manufacturing*
In the transportation, communication, and public utilities group,
40 percent of the employees were working more than a 44-hour
week, and in wholesale and retail trade a workweek of 4& hours
or more was in effect for approximately 15 percent of the work
force* Among office workers the workweek was -typically 40 hours
or less*
In public utilities establishments, for instance,
nearly 80 percent of the workers were scheduled to work 35 hours
a week, and in financial institutions nearly 60 percent were
working 35 to 37^ hours*
A shorter office workweek was not
-typical, however, in the service industries, where 40 percent
of the women office workers were scheduled to work more than 40
hours a week*
Typically, office workers in manufacturing, public
utilities, and financial Institutions received 2 w e e k s 1 paid
vacation after 1 year of service*
The predominant vacation
pattern for office workers in trade establishments was 1 week
after 1 year and 2 weeks after 2 years of employment*
In serv­
ice establishments, workers generally received 1 week after 1
year and 2 weeks after 5 years of service*
Almost all plant
workers were employed in firms granting at least 1 w e e k fs paid
vacation after 1 year of service, and 2 weeks after 5 years*

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
T able A-ls

ficCM/pCbtiOHA

(Average straight-time w e e k l y hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
b a sis in Trenton, N. J . , b y indus t r y division, M a r c h 1952)

S ee f o o t n o t e at end of table,




Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, N. J., March 1952
U.S, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Trenton, N. J., by industry division, March 1952)

See footnote at end of table.
*
**

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




:

Table A-li

Otficm Occu p at iOHdf - G tintinum d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Trenton, N. J., by industry division, March 1952)

1/
*#

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Gh A

Table A-2:

e c J u t io o l O cC U p x U iQ H d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Trenton, N. J., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Weekly t o . 00 15.0 0 10.00 §5.00 t o . 00 15.00
Weekly
and
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) under

45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00

Men
21
21

Manufacturing
Ksnuf&cturing ....................

255
253

40.0
40.0
10.0
40.0

eMnm
ni*
Manufacturing

......

80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.0C 130.0C 135.00

a
♦
105.50
105.50
79.00
79.00

1
1

-

_

54
54

40.0
40.0

63.50
63.50

_

9
9

51
46

n«*a

C
$5.00 10.00 15.00 $0.00 95.00 100 . oc 105. oc 1 1 0 .O 115.0C 120.0C 1 25.0C 130.0C

8

Number
of
workers

3

Sex, occupation, and industry division

39.5
39.5

61.00
61.50

1
1

1-

1
1
3
3

8
8

28
26

9
9

6

6

39
39

37,
37

11
11

9
9

28
28
3
3

__19-_ . .
.
.
39
19

__ L_
1

_
-

_ __ 3_

.
.
3 ... __ 3_ . 10

-

-

3

3

10

-

-

_

-

_

20
20

_
-

3

___1 _
1

-

-

-

-

_

.1 4 .
14

11 .
11

7
7

-

-

-

-

_
-

3
3

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

Women

1/

.
11 . 14.
10
13

11

9

___ 1—

7

__ 2_ __ L
2

-

4

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, N. J., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A—3 s

M ain tena n ce a n d Powok P la n t O ccupation^

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Trenton, N. J., by industry division, March 1952)

N UM B ER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY E A R N IN G S OF—
Occ u p a t i o n a n d i n d u s t r y d ivision

Carpenters, m a i n t enance ... ...... ...... ............. .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................... ......... ......
Electricians, maint e n a n c e . . . . . . ..... ..........
..... ..........
M a n u f a cturing
Engineers,

Firemen,

s t a t i o n a r y ......................... .

stationarv b o i l e r ........... ........... .

Number
of
worker*

97
92
201
196
98
90
198
163
35
28

Average
hourly
eemings

9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
$
9
9
9
Jnder 1 .10 1.15 1 .20 1.25 1. 3 0 1.35 l .ko 1.U5 i .5o 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 . 8 0 1.85 1. 9 0 1 .95 2. 0 0 2.05 2.10 2.15 2 .20 2.25 2 .30 2.k0
*
and
L.10
1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.kO 1 . U 5 i .5o 1 .55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1 . 8 5 1 . 9 0 1 . 9 5 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2 .20 2.25 2.30 2.k0 over

*
1.78

2
2

1.91

1

1.91

1
“

1.76

“

l

1.77
6

l
i

6

1 .33

k

?\
l
11

k
k

k

1
1

1.L8
1.52
1. 3 0

22
21

26
26

10
10

1

13
9
8
8

10
10

11
11

U
11

u
10

11
11

IS
12

3
3

6
6

10
10

k
k

7
7

7
7

21
21

35
35

8
8

111
lk

2k
2k

5
5

18
18

3k
33

6
6

10
10

16
16

13
13

16
9

11
11

1
1

6
6

1
1

k
k

2
2

•

*
*

*
•

7
7

1
1

2
2

2
2

Ul
k3
1
1

n

1)4
lk

18
18

-

-

lk
lk

-

-

-

k

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10
9
9

2
2

21
17
k
k

3
3

1
1

*

•

•

-

*

-

*
“

-

“

-

1
1

2
2

13
13

16
16

6
6

1
l

17
17

1
1

7
7

k6
k6

23

26
26

17
15

5

L?

5

51
51

2

23

2

k2

3

15
15

19
lk
5

3

-3

13
11
2

l
1

8

2
2

3
3

•

6
6

2
2

l

1. 7 9

i

10
10

a
*
2

2
2

k

Helpers, trades, m a i n t e n a n c e ....................... ......
Manu f a c t u r i n g ................ ............................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............. .................... •••••
Piihl i r l t i 11 fi o c At _
i.
_
_ _ ______________ ...... ___
_

133
37
35

l.ii3
1.1*8
1 .27
1.30

M a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s • to o l r o o m
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................................... .

1 11
m

2.02
2.02

1
1

M a c h i n i s t s f m a i n t enance ...... .............................
MarmfQ/'fiiwnrirr....... .. ........... ........ _ _ _ _ .

2TJ
2 31

1 .96
1.96

1
1

7
7

9
9

M a i n t enance men. general u t i l i t y ........... ...... ......
Manufac t u r i n g
......................
Nonmanu f a c t u r i n g • • • • • .............. ...................

136

1.77

117
19

1.75
1.87

5
1

3k
3k

19
19

Mechanics, a utomotive (maintenance) ............. .......
Ma n u f a c t u r i n g • • • • • .................... .................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ........ ........... .................. .
Piihl-i
n . i H + ■ < « * ........................... .....
+.?» a

12ii

1.67
1 .75
1. 6 5
1. 6 5

13
6

k

23
101
92

2k
3
21
18

7
k

k
k

8
k
k
k

M e c hanics, m a i n t enance
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............. ......................... .

192
182

1.79

3

1.79

3

11
11

18
18

9
9

k

73
73

M i l lwrights .......................... .................... .

111
99

1.90
1.92

10
10

k
k

12

3

3

7

k

3

3

3

5

3

15

3

1

5

3

k
k

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................... ................

1 70

k
l

k
2

3
3

7
1
6
6

3
3
3

26
16
10
10

-

-

1

U
8
3
3

1
-

15
15

l
l

1
1

-

-

1
1

-

-

5
5

25
25

7
5
2
2

11
10
1

1
1

10

21

2
2

10
10

21

5

-

2k
22
2
2

-

-

k

19

5
5

1
1

l
l

8
8

26
26

Oilers .................................................... .
Manuf a c t u r i n g ......................... ................ ..

63

1.52

1

1

1

62

1.53

*
■

1

1

Painters, m a i n t e n a n c e ..... .......•• • • ......... .......... .
Manuf a c t u r i n g • • • • • ..... .................... .........

66
62

1 .72

5

7

1. 7 1

5

128

1.79

128

1. 7 9

2
2

30

1.87

3

30

1.8.7

3

25k

2.21
2.21

Pipe fitters, m a i ntenance
Maniifa
trtttttrrit

•• f, ,, « ____. « « T

S h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e .................. .
Mflnufaf't.n ri nir ............ . _____ _ . ____.............
T o o l - a n d - d i e makers .......................... .
Manuf a c t u r i n g ..................................... .

25k

*

15
15

7

5
5

1?
16

6
6

9
9

18

1
1

-

7

k

18

8
8

k

2

k
k

2

7

k
25
2k
15
9

k
2
1
1

l
l

3

8
8

1
1
-

-

1
1

-

-

k
k

15

3
3

2
2

k
k

22
22

*
*

9
9

~

*
•

“

"

“

ko
ko

1

12
11

k

11

2

11

28

3

10

lk

1

Ui

28

3

10

lk

1

3k

3
3

11

11

22
22

9
9

1
1

6

**

-

-

6
2

3

15

6

3

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




l
l

3

__i
\J

k
k

29

6

5o
50

*
*

—

9
9

8
8

7
7

-

•

-

“

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

23
23

8

29

5

in

8

29

5

113

18
18

Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, N. J., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-U:

G

u

ito

d

ia

l,

fl0 a > i* ltO

4 * ii* u p /

a n d

S U

ip p iu p

O

c c u p a tio n ^

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 7 j studied on an area basis
in Trenton, N. J., by industry division, March 1952)

NUM B ER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY E ARNING S OF—
M __ ^
Occupation and industry division

"J

worker.

.___

hourly
earning.

s
Under 0.75

elect r i c b r i d g e

t

s

s

*

a nd

1

0.75

C r a n e ope r a t o r s ,

$
t
9
$
•
•
t
9
1
t
$
9
•
$
t
$
9
S
9
9
0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
<

.80

.85

.90

.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20

%

34
31

1.61
1.61

12

1.54

150
143

1.48
1.48

527
372
155
25
10
64
27

1.21
1.30
1.01
1.26
1.13
.95
.98

and c l e a n e r s (women) ............
.• ...... ........................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ..... ...................... .
R f c ' 1 t.furfp
ffai
__
Services tt.... ...................... .

122
54
21
10

.99
1.27
.78
.70
.87

................ ......... ...........
...............................

160
113
47

1.40
1.45
1.27

........................... ..............
••.............. •••••••••••.... .
Mnnnantifa^Mring .................. .

176
151
25

1.53
1.56
1.33

49
19

1.46
1.62
1.22

58
42
16

1.53
1.57
1.40

(under

20

tons)

..........

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...........................................

C r a n e opera t o r s ,
( o v e r 20 tons)

Guards

electric bridge
...........................................

...................................... .................

Manufacturing

.................. .......... ............ .

J anitors, porters, a n d c leaners (men)

....... ...... .

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................ .......... ............... .

............ ..................................... ••••
Public utilities * .............................
Uhnl esal e trade
Ret.ai 1 trarfe , Tr t __,,___ TTt.tt1ttt_ ^rrrT,.TT
_

Nonmanufacturing

FI nance

^Tf.tfT^1 T 1 rTTTTfT.^Tr.rT_TfT_...t.
,
t ^T .
..

Janitors, porters,
Manufacturing

Order fillers

Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing

Packers

Manufacturing

clerks .......... .......................
Manufactnfipg ,ltttttttttttrtI,,ltfttttTttrftt....t
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .................. ............

Receiving

Shipping

clerks

•••••.............................

Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing

...................

68

30

1
1

_

4
4

11
11

5
5

3

-

3

_

_

_

_

«
.

13
13

53
53

4
4

13
13

43
39
4
4

7
2
5
5

35
35
-

2
2

3
2

__ 5_ 16
3
5 13
*_

8

18

-

-

8

18

_

_

12
1

2
6

8
1

3
4

4

1

40

33
13
20

40

6

4

-

13
3
10
10

-

6

4

4

3

4 _43_
1
13
30
3
1
2
4

3
3

-

-

X L _J*2_ 14

53
44
9
3

3
14

2

17
3

12
2

2
2

4
4

2

-

-

2

32
15
8
3
2
2

1

-

12
2
1
1

_

12
12

16
16

21
17
4

103
101
2
1

40
38
2

17
17

6

39
31

32
29
3

8

17
2
15

15
15

_

_

6
6

-

-

-

_

1

1

_

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

_

11

1
1

-

-

14.
14

18
18

8
8

1

L

1

4

-

-

4

_

5
5

6
6

23
23

18
18
-

-

-

_

2
1
1
1

2
2

7
7

-

-

-

7
7

16
13
3

3

6
2

5

-

5

3
3
-

9
8
1

1

3

-

-

4
4

1
1

1

6

1

Q
7

4
10

2

2

9
A
•
f

-

-

10

-

-

-

2

-

21
21

-

-

-

4

5

6

1
1

%

4

3

4

3

3

3

1
1

1

6

7

-

6
1

7

2

o

1

2
J
.
1
X

7
i

J
i

8

3

2

-

1

-

•

-

4

3
O

7
1

32
28

5
4

9
9

4

n
/

2

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, N. J., March 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of labor Statistics

6

14

14
-

6
-

4

12
12

6
6

6

_

11
XX

-

-

1

3

1

4

3

1

o
A
1
X

X

4

3

1

1

1

8

3

7

2

6

6
O

J

o

n
(

X

P

1

3

J
H

'

1
X

1

4
'

3

L

11

J

'




o ver

‘

U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR

’

o

3
*

3

*
■

"

■
*

Table A-ij:

Q uiiodidi,

h i)a 'ld tO M A .iM ty , (U t d

S kippin g,

O c C M fta titU U -

G<uUim fd

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Trenton, N. J., by industry division, March 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY E ARNING S OF—

Occupation and industry division

Num
ber
of
w
orkera

$
%
t
$
«
$
•
t
t
t
»
f
$
Avenfe
1.9C $2.0C *2.1C *2.20
hourly Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 *1.65 1.70 1.75 ^L.80 $
earning! 1
and
0.75
1*20 htSL 1.60 I.65 1.7Q 1.75 1..T0 1.90 2.00 2.1C 2.2C over
.80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 h&L 1.30 i*2L 1 ^ 0

90
73
17
13

$
1.62
1*62
1.60
1.66

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ...... ....... ..
Manufacturing.............................. .
Nonmanufacturing................. ............
Public utilities * .........................
Wholesale trade.............................................. • ••••
Retail trade ........................................................ .

934
684
250
93
59
68

1.34
1.40
1.17
1.27
1.12
1.16

Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons) ................ ................
M fa pt.ur'i n o ____ ......_........_...............
on

59
22
37

1.29
1.40
1.23

Truck drivers, medium (li to and including 4 tons) •••
Manufacturing ............................... .
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
PAH/* iti1 if as ♦ _______________________
i.
i
Wholesale trade............................

325
75
250
14
134

1.49
1.59
1.47
1.58
1.61

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) ....
Manufacturing ................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
P , |i5 Ut i1it i * ttttiTttttTtttttitttttttrntt
,K
rM
U|in]a f | B t- a B ,,,,,,,,, ■■tttTittttrtrrit tittrr
*|] .p

147
40
107
61
46

1.55
1.72
1.49
1.42
1.59

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other
than trailer type) ............................ .
Nonmanufacturing..... ........................
W t t m s ]m +
Vrl
.
,,,,,,,, iriiiiiiiiiaitatriiiia

95
72

1.62
1.47

J \J

1 C7

Shipping-and-receiving clerks

..... .............

Nonmanufacturing...... ............... *.......

Nonmanufacturing....*........ *............... .

1
-

-

-

-

4
j.

1

IX
1

1
-

-

-

1
1

-

8
5
3
3

23
3
20
9
5

-

-

6
6
-

-

4
3
1

-

1

.
-

4
-

.

i

31
7
24
12
-

24 _5Q
12 27
12
23
3
20
-

3

8

-

3

-

.

.

.

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

43
37
6
-

6
-

3

12
e
?

8

3

7

2
2

-

-

86
5
81
53
3
25

7

^

79 135 116 122
56 107 114 110
2 12
23 28
- 12
24
18
1
3
1
1
5
7
1,

-

3

-

k . 10

36

42

30
30
-

3

3
j

0

19
19

30
21
9
3
_
6

92
91
1
1
-

1

4

-

-

-

-

13

70

12

3

-

6

-

13

12
1
11

56

3

3

28
28

16

g
■
a
j

1

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) .............
Mar^f^rvk^ipi ng
•«,»tT,,,r-TTT--T-rt»rt.

51
51

1.39

2

1 .3 9

0

17
17
A(

56
Q
j

Watchmen ................................ *.......
Manufacturing....... ............ ...... ......
NonmanufActuring ,_»Ttr.TTT.TTT...TTT..............

196
173
23

1.21
1.25
.87

10
10

13
13

5

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,

3

3
3

3

14
14

14
14

36
36

35
31
J
_
■
f

3
a

3
9

j

-

•
-

-

-

-

-

2

_

~

-

-

22
22

5
K
y

12
12

12

14
14

70

22
16
6

3
3

_
-

_
-

_
-

3

-

-

-

_
-

3
3
-

_
-

_
_

_
_

8
8

8

-

_
_

16

j

39
38
12

1O
14

18
18

-

_

L
O

31
31

4

12
12

-

_
_

-

5
5

16

-

16
16

-

70

3

_
-

8

-

-

4
1
3

3

_

-

22
10
12

I**

_

-

17

1.55

-

-

2
2

3

3

-

30
24
6

-

2
2

-

7
7

-

4

_
-

14
2
12
6

-

4

_
_

11
6
5
2

6

4
4

-

-

42

14
14

-

-

36

_

1

-

4

4

4
9

5

i
X

_
-

1

7

10

10
10

1
_
1
-

4
4

-

2
8

10

1
1

1

1

1
13

4
4

O

-

4
O
J

10

5

_

2 — 1_
O
c
3

Q

-

5

...31
31

11
>
6

168
168




_

j

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ......................
MAntifaefur)ng
,,,,tTTtT»Tr____

1/
2/
*

12 ... H - _ 1
_
A
O
O
7

16
16
16

2

6
6

11

-

8

_
-

.
-

_
-

6
6

2
2

16
_

_

_

_

O
6

01
Jl.

31

46
46

-

-

8
g

9

8

3

9

8

3

-

-

-

-

_

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wa g ® rat e s and m a x i m u m straigh t - t i m e hou r s p er w e e k a g r e e d u p o n through c o l l ective b a r g a i n i n g
bet w e e n employers and trade-unions.
R a t e s an d h o u r s are t h o s e in effect o n d a tes indicated.)

T a b l e C-15:

H

u ild itU

f

G

o H

Table C - 2 7 :

d tk u c tia n

P /U

f - G

+ tti+ U

o n iiM

M

O &

T a ble C - 5 U *
K

M a r c h 1, 1952

M a r c h 1, 1 9 5 2
Rate
per
ho u r

Classification

Hou r s
per
week

T a b l e C-205*

R

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

o k e k le l

Classification

Hours
per
week

Foremens
D a y w o r k .................................. $ 95. 5 0
10 3 . 0 0
N i g h t w o r k • • •••••.......................
Journeymens
90.50
D a y w o r k ............................... .
93.00
N i g h t w o r k ...............................
Machinist-operators s
90.50
D a y w o r k • • • ..... ....................... .
93.00
N i g h t w o r k •••••• • • • • • • • • ........ .
M a c h i nistss
90. 5 0
D a y w o r k • • • • • ...........
N i g h t w o r k • • ••.••.......................
93. 5 0
P r e s s m e n ................................
90.00

37 1/3
37 1/2
3 7 1 /2
37 1/3

Ra t e
p er
week

C a k e baki n g s
$89.00
F i r s t h a n d s .....................
83.00
Second hands
......... .........

Hours
per
week

Table C - U *
Q

p &

J

ld tu U

to

}

c a

l

^ Ik C

£ * H fU

H

37 1/2
3 7 1 /2
*0

td ti

0 4 f* * d

M a r c h 1, 1952
42
42

Rate
per
ho u r

Classification
H e b r e w bakings
F i r s t h a n d s .................. ...............
Second hands
.........................

Table C-27»

P A * U

tti* U

90.00
85.00

40
40




S

ta k e d

x * k k e 4 d

40
40
40

Rate
per
week

G r o c e r y and prod u c e departments:
A g r e e m e n t A:
A s s i s t a n t m anagers:
S u p e r m a r k e t s .......................
S p ecial develo p m e n t s •••••••••••••
P r o d u c e d e p a r t m e n t heads:
Styper m a r k e t s ......................
C l erks, checkers, a nd a l l others:
F i rst 6 m o n t h s
Sec o n d 6 m o n t h s .......... ..........
T h i r d 6 m o n t h s ............ .

T a b l e C-42:
R ate
per
week

Hours
per
week

M

a n

< U < V lts U 4 c k

d

a d e lp &

^ b k iu * * d

u

M a r c h 1, 1952

Classification

Rate
per
ho u r

Hours
per
week

M e a t and sel f - s e r v i c e m e a t departments:
C h i e f m e a t cutters ................ ..
B a c k r o o m m e n ........ ......... ....... .

W r a p p i n g - m a c h i n e operators:
F i r s t 3 m o n t h s .........................
S e c o n d 3 m o n t h s ........... ••••••••
A f t e r 6 m o n t h s ..... .............
W e i g h e r s , w r a ppers, a n d d e licatessen
slici n g - m a c h i n e operators:
First

3

m o n t h s ......

A f t e r 6 m o n t h s ..............

$ 98.69
107.55

37 1/2
37 1/2

88.69
97.55

37 1/2
37 1/3

91. 6 9
100.55

37 1/2
37 1/3

Brewery s
Br e w e r y be e r driv e r s ........................ $ 1 , 9 5 0
D i s t r i b u t o r d r i v e r s • • •.••........... ......
1.775
Liquor dr i v e r s ...... ............................
1.7 0 0
D r y freights

Hou r s
per
week

$75 . 0 0
70.00

43
43

74.00
6 9 .00

43
43

38.00
4 1.00
44. 0 0
4 6.00
4 8.00
50.00

43
43
43
43
43
43

Fo u r t h 6 m o n t h s ••••...... ••••••••
F i f t h 6 m o n t h s .....................
A f t e r 3 0 m o n t h s ........... .
A g r e e m e n t B:
Se r v i c e store m a n a g e r s :
F i r s t 6 m o n t h s ••••...•••..... . 1 / 4 8 . 0 0
Second 6 months
V , 54.00
A f t e r 12 m o n t h s ............... . 1 / 58.00
C l e r k s a n d checkers:
F i r s t 6 m o n t h s ..... ........... .
38.00
41.00
S e c o n d 6 m o n t h s ........... ••••.•••
44.00
T h i r d 6 m o n t h s ............. ••••
46. 0 0
4 8.00
F i f t h 6 m o n t h s ................
50.00
A f t e r 3 0 m o n t h s ....... .........

.

43
43
43
43
43
43
43
43
43

91.00
80.00

43
43

72.00
6 5.50

43
43

53.50
58.50
63. 0 0

43
43
43

4 3 .50
4 8 .50
53.00

43
43
43

40
40
40

F i s h a n d p o u l t r y department:
C h i e f fi s h a nd p o u l t r y clerks ••••••«.••
F i s h a n d p o u l t r y clerks •«•.......
F i s h clerks, f e male

73.00
59.00
52.50

43
43
43

1.425
1.210

45
45
45
45

D e l i c a t e s s e n department:
Chief d e l i c a t e s s e n clerks:
F i r s t 3 m o n t h s ••••...............
A f t e r 3 m o n t h s •••••••••••••••.....
D e l i c a t e s s e n clerks ..........•••••••••

63.50
66. 0 0
52.50

43
43
43

1.750
1.850

40
40

Truck, t ractor-trailer:

9 9.19
103.55
87.50

37 1/2
37 1/3
3 7 1/2

Over 6 t o n s ...... • • • • • ..................
L o c a l c ity d r i v e r s ............. ............
H e l p e r s ........................ .
B u i l d i n g constructions
D r i v e r s ..................................
E u c l i d ........................................

1.550
1 .400

1/

2 1 7 5 2 6 0 - 52 - 2

eS U f

M e a t cutters:
M a l e .................................. ..
F e m a l e .......... ....................... .

B o o k a n d job shopss
F oremens
D a y w o r k • • • • ...... ................... .
N i g h t w o r k .................. ............
Jo u r n e y m e n s
D a y w o r k .................. .
N i g h t w o r k ......... .
Machinist-operatorss
D a y w o r k ....... ...................... .
N i g h t w o r k • • • • • ............. ............
Machinists s
D a y w o r k ............................... .
N i g h t w o r k ............................. ..
Pressmen

\
B us operatorss
F i r s t 3 m o n t h s .............. .........
$1,590
N ext 9 m o n t h s ..... ......................... .
1.630
A f t e r 12 m o n t h s ...................... .
1.660

Hou r s
per
week

f

M a r c h 1, 1 952

Classification

Q /tO &

/e a t M

Classification

37 1/2
37 1/2

M a r c h 1, 19 5 2

Classification

M

M a r c h 1, 1952
Rate
per
week

Newspaperss
B r i c k l a y e r s .............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3 , 1 0 0
C a r p e n t e r s ••••«•»• • » • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • * • «
2,900
E l e c t r i c i a n s ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3,250
Painters
2,^ 7 0
Plasterers
3,100
P l u m b e r s .............................. .
3*000
B u i l d i n g l a b o r e r s ............ ...................
1*900

in d

Pl u s UC o f sales.

Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, N.J., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10

D:
Table d -ii

Entrance Rates

Minimum Znldanoe Rated fo i Plant 'W&UieAd \]

E:

Supplementary W age Practices

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
•minimum rates in Minimum rate (in cents)

An
industries

y
All establishments ..........
Under 6 0 ....................
6 0 .........................
Over 60 and under 65 ..... .
6 5 ..........................
Over 65 and under 70 ........
7 0 ..........................
Over 70 and under 7 5 ...... ••
7 5 .........................
Over 75 and under 8 0 ....... .
8 0 .........................
Over 80 and under 85 ....... .
8 5 ..........................
Over 85 and under 90 ••••••.••
9 0 .........................
Over 90 and under 95 ••••••«••
9 5 .........................
1 0 0 ........................
Over 100 and under 1 0 5 ..... .
1 0 5 .........................
Over 105 and under 110 .......
n o ........................
Over 110 and under 115 *.•••••
1 1 5 ........................
Over n 5 and under 120 ...••••
1 2 0 ........................
Over 120 and under 125 ......
1 2 5 ........................
Over 125 and under 1 3 0 ..... .
Over 130 and under 135 ......
1 3 5 ........................
Over 135 ............... •••••
bstablishments with no
established minimum •••••••»

V

"J
2
3/
*

Manufacturing
establishments
with 501 or
21-500
more
workers
workers

100.0

100.0

0.7

.
0.6

l.l
.3
3.0
.3
1.5
1.0
12.1

.h

2.3
U.3
3.3
2.1i
2.1
J*
.2
3.8
1.U
*3
3.0
5.1
2.5
2.6
22.8
2.1
5.U

.h

7.1
5.U
•U
2.1

.2

1.0
15.1

5.6
8.8
U.7
6.3
5.7
_
.6
7.5
3.9
.9
2.6
2.3
6.8
3.1
7.6
5.7
_
U.6
1.2
5.U

100.0
.
2.5
-

h.o
-

.
2.6
.
2.0
7.9
-

3.3
U2.6
10.6
_
16.1
8.U
-

Table E—l 3
Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

.
_
.
.
1.1
2.2
9.3
12.3
I8.ii
12.9
-

.
18.8
6.6
16.6
2.6
lii.9
_
6.1
-

-

-

27.6
16.2
-

.7
7.6
1.9
11.1

13.1

Services

.6
3.6
.2

(3/)

-

100.0

Shift differential

100.0

-

1U.7
20.3
6.U
39.5
8.U
6.5
.
a.2

2.2

Percent of plant
workers employed
on each shift in
all manufacturing
industries
2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

-

3.6
23.3
3.U
lU.ii
3.5
30.5
1.8
-

10.5

2.U
-

-

Lowest rates formerly established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
hess than .Q5 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




g ju jt ^bitffJM ntieU PdOitUiond

-

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments • • • • • ........ .

13.2

6.2

13.2

6.1

Uniform cents (per hour) .........
U c e n t s ........ ........ ••••
5 cents .....................
6 cents
..............
6 3/5 cents ................ .
7 c e n t s ..... ................
7 1/2 cents .................
8 cents • • • • ..... ................. .
10 cents • •• • • ................. ..
12 c e n t s ............................
15 c e n t s ............................ .

9.5
2.3
5.3
.h
.2
.2
.
.3
•h
Q/)

U.l

Uniform percentage • • •• • •.............
5 p e r c e n t ...................................
7 1/2 p e r c e n t ...........................
10 percent ..................................

3.7
1.8

Receiving shift differential ......

Receiving no differential

1/

• •• •••. •••

~h

-

1.9
<2/>

-

.6
1.1

.1

.8
.U

*9
•2
.
2.0

1.6
»U
.1

Less than .05 of 1 percentr
Occupational wage Survey, Trenton, N. J., March 1952
U.S. DLPARTMLNT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-2:

ScU&dul&d Tifs&eJiLf Jfoirt4>

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS 1 / EM PL O Y E D IN —

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

Weekly hours
All
industries

All establishments ...............

..

3 5 hours................... .. ......
Over 3 5 and under 3 7 ^ hours ..........
hours ..........................
Over 3 7 $ and under 4 0 hours..........
4 0 hours ........ ..................
Over 1*0 and under 4 4 hours .......... ..
4 4 hours..... .....................
Over UU and under 1*8 hours...........
4 8 hours ...........................
Over 1*8 hours ..................... .

1/
7/
*
**

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 8 .6
2 .2
1 0 .2

0 .1

7 8 .9
.

3 .1
6 1 .6
2 .0
1 .3
.2
.8

4 .4
9 .3
4 .6
8 0 .7
.5
.4
m

-

2 1 .1

-

-

-

1 6 .6
.
7 4 .9
5 .5
3 .0

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

0 .4
3.JU
7 0 .7
H i. 3
5 .7

•

-

-

5 .5

Finance**

1 0 0 .0

Services

I

Ail
^ .
industries 2 ( Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

||

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 .2
1 .6
2 .8

1 .5
1 .5
3 .6
-

2 0 .2
-

3 .U

3 9 .0

-

3 .5
3 7 .3

-

-

5 5 .i t
5 .9
1 6 .8
7 .6
1 0 .9

7 7 .5
2 .1
2 .4
4 .3
5 .9
2 .2

8 3 .4

Public
utilities*

1 0 0 .0

5 8 .9

1

. 0

2 .5
4 .3
2 .2

«
3 1 .9
9 .2

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

7 1 .7
.7
6 .6
6 .1
6 .6
8 .3

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

_
.
5 7 .2
1 0 .9
8 .7
7 .6
1 2 .1

ServioM

1 0 0 .0

1 0 .5
_
2 9 .9
2 5 .1
1 5 .5

1 9 .0

3 .5

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3:

P aud J fo lld a ifi

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Nunfcer of paid holidays

All establishments..................
Establishments providing paid
holidays ...................... .

2 or

4 days ....... .
days.........................
6 days........ .. ................
7 days.........................
days........................
8 days................ .. ....... ..
9 days................ .. ........
10 days .................................................... .. .....................
11 days ................. ..........................................................
12 days .............................................................................
5

l\

Establishments providing no paid
holidays..................................................................... ..

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilitiee*

Wholesale
trade

Finance**

Services

Ali
industries 1 /

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.9

99.0

99.9

100.0

94.5

100.0

94.3

85.7

85.7

90.7

100.0

88.0

75.6

.4
.3
60.1
8.8
.8
3.3
15.4
.9
.1

.6
a.

78.9
13.7

4.6
-

1.9

m
m
m

65.7
16.8

•

lt 2
i.

-

-

-

-

-

_

11.0

80.1

61.5
15.1

60.9
18.1

19.5

43.3
32.2

88.0

75.6

-

-

-

2.4
3.3
.1
.1
1.3

2.9
1.2

43.6

-

-

2.6
15.3
6.6

.2

-

-

-

.
_
_

•

27.6

■

-

14.3

14.3

9 .3

-

5.0
.7
-

.1

1.0

.7

-

86.7

16.8

-

-

-

-

.
-

9.0

-

"

-

70.4

-

.1

2.4

-

94.1

8.6

-

8.8

1.1

•»
-

1/ Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), coiununication, and other public utilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and real estate.
•




Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

.4

5.5

7.2
2.4

-

5.7

-

-

12.0

-

-

24.4

Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, N. J., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-4.1

P

a id

V x ^ c a tU

u U

( r f- o k m

a l P to H u l t i m

l)

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy

All establishments......... ........

Mnfcuig
auatrn

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti t ae
eal rd

Fnne*
iac*

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.6

99.9

100.0

100.0

99.6

100.0

87.2

62.6
37.0
-

_
93.0
7.0

Al
l
id s r e
nutis

Al n . a u a t r n
l
id s r e 1 / M n f c u i g
nutis

Pbi
ulc
uiiis*
tlte

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti t a e
eal r d

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

92.0

59.5
27.7
-

8I
1.8
3.6
11.2
-

88.2
i.
i6
7.2
-

li9.2
50.8
-

80.6
19. U
-

82.0
17.8
-

73.2
18.8
-

12.8

.i
i

.2

8.0

100.0

87.2

99.6

93.0
7.0

5U.6
32.6
-

56.8
25.5
17.3
-

12.8

.U

100.0

87.2

99.6

100.0

_
72.ii
20.6
7.0

20.6
_
66.6
-

9.7
.2
86.6
.5
2.6

7.8
.3
89.9
.7
1.3

12.8

.i
i

87.2

99.6

100.0

100.0

20.6
_
5.0
10.6

9.7
.2
5l.ii
2.8
35.1
.i
i

7.8
.3
51.7
3i
.i
36.8
-

_
ilO.O
60.0
-

12.8

.h

1 year of service
Establishments with paid vacations ....
1 week............... ......... .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks......... .
2 weeks..... ...................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.... ......
3 weeks .........................
Establishments with no paid vacations ...

18.7
7.2
71.5
1.5
.7 .

12.5
12.1
72.8
2.5
-

19.6
8
0.ii
-

.i
i

.1

99.6

99.9

100.0
19.6
8
0.ii
-

52.6
_
i7i
i.i
-

.i
i

2 years of service
establishments with paid vacations ....

100.0

99.6

1 w eek............... ..........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks .........................
3 weeks ........................ .

12.5
6.5
78.U
2.2

7.1
11.0
79.3
2.5

establishments with no paid vacations ...

.i
i

.1

establishments with paid vacations ....

99.6

99.9

100.0

100.0

99.6

1 week ..........................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks... .
2 weeks...................... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks....... .
3 weeks .........................

3.3
.3
90.2
2.2
3.6

1.3
.5
9 h .8
3.3

i.
i6
_
91.1
-

13.8
_
86.2
-

10.9
85.2
3.5

.*
1

.1

Establishments with paid vacations ....

99.6

99.9

100.0

100.0

99.6

1 week ................. .........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks .....................•••••
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...........
3 weeks........................
Over 3 weeks......... /........ .

3.3
51.0
U5.o
.3

1.3
_
61.8
36.8
-

i.
i6
10.8
_
8ii.6
-

13.8
_
5U. 9
_
31.3
-

10.9
_
62.6
_
26.1
-

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

.i
l

.1

35.8
6i 2
i.
-

33.1
66.5
.i
i

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

92.0

57.5
31.9
10.6
-

1*9.2
50.8

50.9
i*9.1
-

56.5
ii3.3
-

58.9
33.1
-

.2

8.0

5 years of service

establishments with no paid vacations ...

h .3

.i
i

-

_

81.6
I8.ii

100.0

99.8

92.0

16.2
83.8
“

29.9
62.ii
7.5

12.5
79.5
-

.2

100.0

8.0

100.0

99.8

92.0

16.2
58.9
2U.9
-

29.9
i 5•2
*
2* 7
i.
-

12.5
.
6* 7
1.
6i
.*
8.U

.2

8.0

-

15 years of service

1/
*

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0
_

_
ii3.8
_
56.2
-

.i
i

_

5 i.o

Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, N. J., March 1952
D.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-5:

P a id

S

ic J l J* £ 4 S 4 * 6

(Q o * m < U

P s U H A U lO H A )

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Provisions for paid sick leave
All
industries

All establishments ........................

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

100.0

100.0

100.0

22.3

30.1

Wholesale
trade

Finanoe**

100.0

100.0

100.0

13.1

_

Retail trade

14.2

26.6

Services

....

All
industries

100.0

.

100.Q

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

_

Retail trade

.

100.0

Sendees

_

100.0

$ rairtfag pr.gergjfig

Establishments w i t h formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e .......... ..........

2 days ...................................
3 or 4 days ................ ............
5 days ..................................
6 days ..................................
9 days ..................................
10 days .................................
Over 10 days ...........................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

_

1.2

_

_

7 .2

.

-

.

-

.

.

.

-

-

-

.1

-

9.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.4
5.8

4.2

-

11.7
3.5

-

-

-

«
•
-

14.5

-

1.0

1.0

“

77.7

69.9

100.0

86.9

85.8

73.4

30.0

41.2

1.3

14*2

16.5

33.4

_

7.8
6.4

10.1
4.5
-

10.0

6.7
6.4

.8
.2
6.3
3.7
.4
9.9

-

9 .0

0.3

-

.8
.3

.3
-

-

6.6
3.4
-

100.0

98.8

99.7

2.2

100.0

90.0

10.2

1.0

91.0

13.6

100.0

1 y ear of service

Establishments wi t h formal provisions
T or paid sick l e a v e ....... ............

3 or 4 days ............................
5 days ..................................
6 days ..................................
9 days ..................................
10 d a y s .......................... ......
12 days .................................
15 days .................................
20 d a y s ........................... .....
Over 20 d a y s ..... ...............
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ...................

.3
6.6
1.0
.4
15.2
3.3
•4

_
9.0
-

-

-

-

-

“

~

98.7

85.8

2.1

24.4
4.5
.6
1.2
1.5

70.0

58.8

.7

1.3

-

_

_

-

7.2
4.2

6.8
5.8
-

3.9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

66.6

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.7
3.4

-

■
-

“

-

*
“
•

•

•

~

-

-

89.8

86.4

.5

-

•

3.5

’
100.0

99.0

97.8

See footnote at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, N. J., March 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




.

-

-

11.7

83.5

.

.2
.3

.1
.8
.3
.5
.3

-

6.8
3.5

10.2

.
-

U.S.

100.0

100.0

DEP-hRTMENT OF LABOR

Hi

P a id S ic Jz Jlj& aae (tf& im a l Pa ouUUu U )

Table E-5*

-

GotUum m d

P E R C E N T O P O FFIC E W O RK ERS E M P L O Y E D IN —

Provisions for paid sick leave

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

R etail trade

Finance**

Services

All
industries

.

^

M anufacturing

100.0

100.0

100.0

_ 100.0

100.0

_ 100.0

3 0 .0

41.2

1.3

14.2

16.5

33.4

7.8
6.4
-

_

_

6 .8

7.2
4.2

5.8

-

-

-

6 .8

-

3.9
-

3.5
11.7

-

100.0

100.0

2.2

100.0

All establishments

2 years

All
industries

P E R C E N T OF PL A N T W O RK ERS EM PLO YED IN —
Public
u tilities*

W holesale
trade

R etail trade

1.0

_ 100.0

100.0

10.2

100.0

Services

13.6

100.0 _

of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave............

3 or 4 days
5 days...
6 days...
9 days...
10 days •..•
,
12 days . ..
..
15 days ....
20 days .. ..
.
Over 20 days
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............. .

_

_

6 .6

9 .0

1.0
•4
10.7
3.3
4.5
1.1
2.1

-

1.3
-

.3

16.8
4.5
7.5
1.9
1.5

•
-

-

-

-

•2
.1
.8

.3
.5
.3
*
*

_

10.2
-

•2
.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.7
3.4

-

-

-

-

-

3.5
-

89.8

86.4

10.2

21.8

-

*

70.0

58.8

98.7

85.8

83.5

6 6 .6

30.8

41.2

1.3

14.2

26.7

.

_
1.3
-

7.8
6.4
-

-

7.2
4.2
-

97.8

99.0

3.7

33.4

100.0

2.1

.2
.1
•8
.3
.5
.3
1.5

.2
.3
.5
1.1

96.3

97.9

100.0

100.0

1 aea9 gtii
5 rn i tsg
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....... .

3 or 4 days .
5 days... .
6 days... .
9 days... .
10 days . ..
..
12 days .
....
20 days .. ..
.
Over 20 days

.3
6 .6

1.0
•4
5.8
3.3
5.6
7.8

9.0
8 .6

4.5
9 .4
9.7

6 .8

5.8
3.9
10.2

6 .8

3.5
11.7

'
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave................

69.2

58.8

98.7




_
-

10.2
-

_
6.7
3.4
3.5
8.2

-

'
85.8

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

2 J

*
-

73.3

66.6

100.0

100.0

89.8

78.2

100.0

Table E-6:

No*tp/lQcUuitiOH. BoH*U>ei

P E R C E N T O P O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —

Type o f bonus

All
Industrie.

Manufacturing

Public
u tilities*

W holesale
trade

R etail trade

|

F inance**

P E R C E N T OF PL A N T W O R K ER S EM PLO Y ED IN —
All
industries

Services

M anufacturing

100.0

100*0

100.0

100.0

R etail trade

Sendees

100.0

..... 100.0

100.0

100.0

1Q0.C.

100*0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ......................................................

36.4

32.0

1 .4

67.5

58.9

89.7

29.8

30.3

28.6

9.3

80.0

53.7

13.4

Christmas or year-end .................• • • • • • •
P rofit-sharing • • • • • • • . .........• • • • • • • • • •
Other

32.5
4.8
1.2

26.8
5.6
1.3

1 .4
-

67.5
10.1

53.4
14.3
-

85.5
4.2
-

29.8
-

28.3
3.9
.6

26.2
3.6
•6

9.3
-

80.0
6 .6

52.0
10.9
-

13.4
-

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses • • • • • • • • • • • .......................• • • « • • . .

63.6

68.0

98.6

32.5

40.7

10.3

70.2

69.7

71.4

90.7

20.0

46.3

86.6

■
*

•W

.4

Information not a v a i l a b l e .........• • • • • • • • • «

(2/)

*
■

*e

100.0 _

W holesale
trad e

100.0

A ll establishm ents • • • • • .........

100.0 __

P ublic
u tilitie s*

(2/)

(2/)

1/

Includes data fo r Industries in addition to those shown separately.
Unduplicated t o t a l.
3 / Less than .05 o f 1 percent.
▼ Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, insurance, and rea l e s ta te .

2/

Table E-7:

9*U44A&*U>e O H cl P & tU fM l P lo H *
P E R C E N T OF PL A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —

Type o f plan

A ll establishm ents .......................• • • • • «• «• •
Establishments with insurance or
pension plans £ / .........................
Life insurance • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Health insurance
H osp italization ..........................................
Retirement pension .....................................
Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans .........................
Information not a vailab le .............................

All
industries

-

M anufacturing

Public
utilities*

W holesale
trade

F inan ce**

100.0 _ _ .100*0.
_

100.0

100.0

..... 100.0

W holesale
trad e

100.0

100.0

100.0

R etail trade

Sen d ees

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

90.7

91.7

100.0

79.9

64.6

100.0

58.2

81.9

85.6

100.0

63.8

56,5

59.4

85.4
75.7
72.7
53.2

89.7
83.0
88.8
59.3

99.9
95.3
17.5
84.6

59.0
43.7

45.6

32.1

45.4
15.0

37.6
29.1
44.0
9 .9

74.7
67.5
73.1
48.2

80.7
74.9
80.5
54.3

90.7
71.2
52.7
60.0

43.6
25.1
57.4
16.3

36,2
30.2
37.9
14.1

41.8
26.8

6 4 .6

85.8
56.3
96.5
49.9

9.3

8.3

20.1

35.0

-

41.8

18.1

14-4

36.2

43.5

40.6

'**
■

.4

(2 /)

-

«*

TJnduplicated t o t a l .

* Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s), conxnunication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, insurance, and real e s ta te .




Public
u tilitie s*

M anufacturing

100*0

1 / Includes data for in d ustries in addition to those shown separately.
2/

jJ Less than .05 o f 1 percent.

Services

All
industries 1 /

R etail trade

3 2 .2

*
*

(2 /)

L
_

*
■

4 2 .4

23.3

(2 /)

Occupational Uage Survey, Trenton, N. J., 1-larch 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

Appendix - Scope
With the exception of the union soale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations i (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A). The covered industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey
of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for offioe clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment1# full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offioes (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women offioe workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Beoause of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

17

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN TRENTON, N. J., l/f
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MARCH 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied

V

Number of
____establishments_ _
_
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions............ .................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .........................
Wholesale trade ••••..................
Retail trade ............. ...... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Services 2 / .........................

21
21
21

369
175
194

135
59
76

52,590
39,600
12,990

35,160
26,800
8,360

5,140
2,970
2,170

21
21
21
21
21

17
42
86
17
32

9
19
23
10
15

3,400
1,490
4,600
1,200
2,300

2,830
820
2,300
980
1,430

1,020
120
300
630
100

1/ Trenton Metre noli tan Area (Mercer County)*
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels| personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




18

Index

* 3 0s nO
>
0s
0 s vO 0NvO

ir\ to

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952

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vO

3,
3,

O t"* IS O^n vO
O




3,

Mechanic, maintenance............. ••••••••••
Millwright............. .... .......... ....
Motortruck driver........••••••••••••.......
Nurse, industrial (registered) ..............
Office b o y .................................
O i l e r .................... .................
Operator (local transit) ............ ........
Order filler.............. .
Packer .............. .............. ...... .
Painter (building construction) .............
Painter, maintenance .................. •••••••
Pipe fitter, maintenance ........... ..... .
Plasterer (building construction) •••••••.....
Plumber (building construction) ••••••••......
Porter
.... ••••••..... ..
Pressman (printing) .........................
Receiving clerk ••••••••••.......... ••••••••••
Second hand (bakeries) .................. .
Secretary •••«•••........... ••••••••••••••••••
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance •••••....... ..
Shipping clerk .......
•••••••••.•••••
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ••.••••••••..... .
Stenographer .•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Stock handler .................... ...... .
Store manager (grocery stores and meat markets)
Switchboard operator
Switchboard operator-receptionist ........ .
Tabulating-machine operator •••••«•••••••••••••
Tool-and-die maker
Transcribing-machine operator ••••••••........
Truck driver
Trucker, hand ..............
Trucker, power...........
Typist .......................••••••••••••••.
Watchman • .... ..... .......... ••••••••••••••

\0 n
O

B i l l e r , m a c h in e
............................... . . . . .
B o o k k e e p e r, h a n d
B o o k k e e p in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r
............ . . . . .
B r ic k la y e r ( b u ild in g c o n s t r u c t io n ) , • • • • •
C a lc u la t in g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r • • • • • * • • • • • •
C a r p e n t e r ( b u ild in g c o n s t r u c t io n ) • • • • • • •
C a r p e n t e r , m a in te n a n c e ............................. • • • • •
C h e c k e r (g r o c e r y s t o r e s an d m eat m a rk e ts )
C le a n e r ...................................................• • • • • ................ ................ ..
C le r k , a c c o u n t in g • • • • • .......................................................................................
C le r k , f i l e ...............
C le r k , g e n e r a l ........................ • ........... ♦
..................3 ,
C le r k ( g r o c e r y s t o r e s a n d m e a t m a r k e t s ) « • • • • • • • » ...................... ..
C le r k , o r d e r .............................................................................................. ................
C le r k , p a y r o l l ...............................................................................• • • • • • • • • • •
C ra n e o p e r a t o r , e l e c t r i c b r id g e
D ra fts m a n ..................................................................................
D u p lic a t in g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r ............ . ................ ..
E l e c t r i c i a n ( b u ild in g c o n s t r u c t io n ) ............... . .
E l e c t r i c i a n , m a in te n a n c e . . . . . . . ....................... . . .
E n g in e e r , s t a t i o n a r y .............• • • • • • • • • • • ................
F ire m a n , s t a t io n a r y b o i l e r ............. • • • • • • • • • • • •
F i r s t h a n d ( b a k e r ie s ) • • • • • • • • • • ..................• • • • •
G u a rd .............................................................................
H e lp e r , m o t o r t ru c k d r i v e r • .......... . . . . . ................
H e lp e r , t r a d e s , m a in te n a n c e
J a n it o r ......................................................................................
K e y -p u n c h o p e r a t o r • ............................ • • • • • • • • . • • • •
la b o r e r ( b u ild in g c o n s t r u c t io n ) ......................
M a c h in e - t o o l o p e r a t o r , t o o lro o m • • • • • • • • • • • • •
M a c h in is t , m a in te n a n c e • • • • • • • . • • • • • • • .......... ..
M a c h in is t ( p r i n t i n g ) ............................. .................... ..
M a in te n a n c e m an , g e n e r a l u t i l i t y • • • • • • • • • • • •
M ea t c u t t e r ( grocery s t o r e s a n d m e a t m a rk e t s )
M e c h a n ic , a u t o m o t iv e (m a in t e n a n c e ) • • • • • • • • • •

0s nO V » vO V > Va) V >
*
*
*

fees







THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
City

Mss

BLS Bulletin No.

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey
New Orleans, Louisiana
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
San Franci sco-Oakland, California
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, Washington
Worcester, Massachusetts

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1075
1064
1067
1068
1081
1074
1070
1060
1082
1042
1071
1058
1069
1076
1078
1057
1077

This report was prepared in the Bureau's
muni cations may be addressed to:
Robert R.
Bureau of
341 Ninth
New York,

20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
25
25
15
15
25
20
20
20
15
15
25
15
20
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cent8
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Middle Atlantic Regional Office

Behlow, Regional Director
Labor Statistics
Avenue
New York

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics1 regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, construction and housing, and work injuries*




The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102