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Occupational Wage Survey

PHOENIX, ARIZONA
March 1952

Bulletin No. 1103

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague • Commi**ioner




Contents
Page
I N T R O D U C T I O N .......................................................

1

THE PHOENIX METROPOLITAN A R E A .................................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E ...................................................................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office o c c u p a t i o n s ............................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ............. .......... *................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant o c c u p a t i o n s ........ *...............................
A-A
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping o c c u p a t i o n s ................................

3
6
6
7

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ...........................................................
C-205
Bakeries .........................................................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g .........................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ................................... ..........
C-42
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s .......... ....... ......... ......................

9
9
9
9
9

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .....................................

10

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions .................................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ..........................
E-3
Paid holidays ...............................................................
E-4
Paid vacations .................................................................
E-5
Paid sick l e a v e ....................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ...........................................................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ....................................................

10
11
11
12
13
14
14

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ...............................................................

15

I N D E X ................... .......................................................................

17

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents

July 10, 1952

Introduction 1/
The Phoenix area is 1 of U
O major labor markets in
which the Bureau of labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surreys#
Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community—wide basis#
Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations^
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping#
In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A - l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions#
Earnings information for those occupations character­
istic of particular
local industries is presented in Series B
tables for many labor markets included in the current series of
studies#
This supplemental eoverage, however, was omitted in
the survey in the Phoenix area# Union scales (Series C tables)
are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earn­
ings for several industries cr trades in which the great majori­
t y of the workers are employed under terms of collective-bar­
gaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are indica­
tive of prevailing pay practices#
Data were collected and simzmarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans#

The Phoenix Metropolitan A rea
The Phoenix Metropolitan Area (Maricopa County) had a
population of 332,000 in 1950# Somewhat more than two-thirds of
this population lived in Phoenix#
Excluding agricultural workers, wage and salary em­
ployees in the area in April 1952 numbered 89,200# About 1 in
6 of these was employed in manufacturing industries, chiefly in
food products, printing and publishing, and the fabrication of
metal products# During World War II and afterward, the area be­
came increasingly important in the manufacture and assembly of
aircraft parts#

l / Prepared in the Bureau* s regional office in San Fran­
cisco, Calif., b y William P# 0* Connor under the direction of John
L. Dana, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst# The
planning and central direction of the program was carried on in
the Bureau*s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations#




As the largest city and capital of Arizona, Phoenix
is the natural commercial and financial hub of the State# Whole­
sale and retail trade establishments employed 25,500 workers in
early 1952 — more than a fourth of all wage and salary workers
in the area#
The oity*s financial institutions, including in­
surance carriers and real estate operators, had A,200 workers#
Relatively high employment — 11,900 — in the service
industries attested to the attraction of Phoenix as a resort
area, particularly for the winter tourist trade# The construc­
tion industry employed 8,000 workers in April 1952#
Combined employment of the transportation, communica­
tion, and other public utility industries (including railroads)
was 9,600; Federal, State, and local government employees num­
bered 15,700#
Among the industry and establishment-size groups stud­
ied in March 1952, about two-thirds of the plant workers were
employed in establishments having written contracts with labor
organizations# Almost all plant workers in the public utilities
group of industries were employed under union agreement provi­
sions, whereas less than a third worked under similar conditions
in the service industries# In manufacturing industries, 85 per­
cent of the plant workers were employed in establishments having
union contracts#

Comparatively few office workers were employed under
union agreement terms#
More than 70 percent of the office
workers in the public utility industries were employed under
union contract provisions but aside from this group and the
wholesale trade group, unionization in offices was nonexistent
in Phoenix#

Occupational W age Structure
Wages and salaries of most plant and office workers
were formally adjusted upwards between January 1950, the base
date of the Wage Stabilization Board *s 10-percent wage increase
formula, and the time of the study#
Nearly all plant workers
in the manufacturing and public utility industries were employ­
ed in establishments that had made at least one formal wage
adjustment during the period#
The proportion of plant workers
receiving general wage increases was somewhat less among the
other industry groups studied, with only about half the workers
in wholesale trade and services receiving formal Increases.
Formal wage adjustments received by plant workers in the area
typically amounted to from 10 to 20 cents an hour in each in­
dustry group#
General wage increases for office workers were
somewhat less extensive than those for plant workers, probably
reflecting the tendency of many establishments to adjust salaries
of clerical workers on an individual basis rather than by formal
means#

Formalized wage structures for time workers were re­
ported in establishments employing more than 85 percent of
Phoenix plant workers#
Plans that provided a single rate for
individual plant occupations were more common than those pro­
viding a range of rates# Among office workers, two-thirds of
whom were employed in establishments which had formalized salary
structures, the type of structure in use almost exclusively
called for a range of rates for each job#
For other office
workers, salaries were determined on an individual basis#
Established minimum entrance rates for plant workers
with no previous work experience were a part of the formalized
rate structures for a large majority of Phoenix area firms#
No specified rate was typical of the area as a whole; minima
ranged from less than 50 cents an hour to more than $1.45. How­
ever, most of the workers were employed in establishments which
had minimum rates from 75 cents to $1#20.
Highest rates were
reported in the public utilities group of industries and the
lowest in retail trade and services#




Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing# In
13 of 25 office job classifications permitting comparisai, sala­
ries of workers in manufacturing plants were higher than those
in nonmanufacturing; average hourly earnings were higher in
manufacturing for 13 of 19 plant job categories for which com­
parisons were possible#
More than a fourth of the workers in manufacturing
plants in the Phoenix area were employed on late shifts in early
1952#
A large majority of these workers were paid shift pre­
miums
a cents-per-hour differential over day-shift rates#
The amounts most commonly reported were 4 and 5 cents for sec­
ond-shift work and 6 cents for third-shift work#
More than
scheduled to work a
than half the plant
than 40 hours, with

90 percent of women office workers were
40-hour week or longer in April 1952# More
workers were on a workweek schedule of more
a majority of these on a 48-hour schedule#

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
O jfoc* O ccH fuU iotU

Table A-ls

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Phoenix, Aris. , by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly We k y 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
el
e r i g ana
anns
hus
or
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 |47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
■--* -1
J
r -’
!

Men
I
Bookkeepers, hand ................... .
Manufacturing .....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Retail trade ...................

53
13
40
25

41.0
40.0
41.0
41.0

$
73.50
83.50
70.00
69.50

_

_

_

-

-

-

_
-1

_
_
-

_
_
-

Clerks, accounting ...................
Manufacturing .....................
Nonmanufacturing..................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ................ .

84
13
71
12
24
25

Clerks, general .....................
Manufacturing.......... ..........
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Wholesale trade ................
Finance ** .....................

.70
20
50
22
24

40.0
40.0
40,0
40.0
39.0

57.00
60.50
55.50
57. 5
'0
54.00

!
-|

Clerks, order ........................
Nonmanufacturing........ .........
Wholesale trade ................

83
75
75

40.5
40.5
40.5

57.50
58.00
58.00

_
-

Office boys .........................
Nonmanufacturing ..................

14
11

39.5
39.5

39.50
39.50

Billers, machine (billing machine) .....
Manufacturing .....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ...................

76
12
64
21
15
20

40.5
40.0
40.5
40.0
41.0
41.5

44.50
52.50
43.00
43.50
47.50
42.50

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ...

42

41.0

40.50

Bookkeepers, hand ....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Retail trade .......... .........
Services ......................

42
40
13
17

41.5
41.5
41.0
42.5

68.00
68.00
69.00
69.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...
Nonmanufacturing ..................

28
20

40.0
53.50
40.0 i50.00

_

43.50
51.00
42.50
49.50
45.50
50.50

_

40.5
58.00
40.0 60.50
57.50
40.5
41.0 63.50
40.0 59.00
41.5 | 56.50

_

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15
151
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7
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Women

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...
Manufacturing .....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * ......................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail trade ...............................

168
14
154
20
14
35

40.5
40.0
40.5
40.0
41.0
42.5

9
1
_
6

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ui

7

3

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*
-1
____ 1

See footnote at end of table,
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




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|
Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Ari*., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LhBGR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-l*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected oooupations studied on an area
basis in Phoenix, Aria., b y industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
i$
$■
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2 7 . 5 0 30.00 3 2 . 5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 . 5 0 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 5 0 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.00 5 7 .5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 70.00 7 2 . 5 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0

ana
under

3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0

Woman

-

57.50

5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0

6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0

72.50

7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0

1

Continued

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
4 0 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .5
4 0 .0
4 1 .0

22

4 0 .5
4 0 .5
4 1 .0

4 5 .0 0
4 4 .5 0
4 2 .5 0

Clerks, accounting............ .
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing..................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ................ .
Finance ** ....................

259

4 0 .5

4 6 . .5 Q
_ ..

44
215
43
34
91
41

40.0
41.0
40.0
40.5
42.0
39.0

49.00
46.00
46.50
47.50
43.50
49.50

Clerks, file, class B ................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Retail trade ...................
Finance * * ....................

116
113
20
66

40.0
40.0
42.0
39.5

1
I
|

*
i 4 8 .0 0
> 4 8 .0 0
| 4 8 .0 0
5 2 .0 0
4 4 .0 0

38.00
38.00
40.00
37.50

Manufacturing .................. .
Nonmanufacturing................................................................
Wholesale trade ..........................................................
Retail trade ...................
Calculating-machine operators (other than
Camntometer tvne) ..................
Nonmanufacturing .............
Retail trade ..............

64
11
53
23
28

36

33

_

-

.

1-------

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2
2

5
2

2
2
2

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13
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12
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11
11
11

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5

3

3

8
3

7

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5!
2

6
6

8
1
7
3

6
2

4
4

-

-

4

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2

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2;

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__ L1 _ kl_21JL a __I . 3SL__ 4S __21__ 41 __ 1i
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5
5
-

4
4
-

23
21
-

-

3
3
3

4
4
2

57
55
9
27

18
3
8
4
3

1$
15
15

12
18
1
6
8
2

21
21!
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16

3
21
9
7
3

11 I
11
6
3

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22
6
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4
44
12
10
8
13

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j

Clerks, general .....................
Manufacturing.......... ..........
.........
Nonmanufacturing........ Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** ....................

238
48
190
49
43
46
47

40.5
41.0
40.0
40.5
40.0
41.0
39.5

48.00
50.00
47.50
49.50
46.50
44.50
50.00

Clerks, order .......................
Nonmanufacturing ..................

27
20

40.5
40.5

46.50
46.00

Clerics, payroll .....................
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * ..............
Retail trade ...................

68
13
55
20
26

50.00
41.0
51.50
40.5
41.5 49.50
41.0 I 47.50
51.00
41.5

Duplicating-machine operators .........
Nonmanufacturing ..................

15
15

40.0
40.0

7
|
1
l
I
i

-

_
_
-

-

8

12

10 i

10

7
7
-

8
8
-

12
6
6

10
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3
7
-

10
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41
6

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8

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24
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5
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5

9

5
41
4

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17
23
5
11
5

10
29
23
1
1
4

2
2

9

15
5
10
8
2

s
1
7
3
4

2

j
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1

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18
18 j
4
7
;
3
2

12
7
5
3
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1

17
7
7;

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2
2

3
3

2
2

9

2
;

-

24
24
2
2
6
14

31

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1
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2
“I
3
!
•
1
;

-

-

2

2
1
1!
-j
~

I

37.50
37.50

-

1

_
-i
2

2

•1
1
-

2
2

—j
-

*
“i

i
i
j

-!
-

-1
!

—!
“

i
—!

j

i1

j

-

-

-

5
1
2

3
3

4
4

5j
1
?j
1
4

1
1
-i
—

3
2
l
l

"
- 1
—
_

.

i

3
2
1
1
~

_
-

4
4

-

9
2
7j

l1
8
4
3

2

-

3
■
2

1|
;

-

i
See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.







Table A-lt

O fec* OcoHfxaiiMi - (’ om titumd
i

(Average straight-^tiine weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on a n area
basis in Phoenix, A riz., b y industry division, March 1952)

Table A-2:

P to fe lliO

H

c U

G 4 > ld

* )e c J m

ic a J i

O c C d tfu U iQ M A .

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Phoenix, A riz., March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Avkbage
Number
of
workers

Occupation 2/

$

$

$

52.50 55.00 57.50 io . 0 0 <32.50 <>5.00 17.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) under
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

Draftsmen, chief .....................

13

40.0

$
80.50

Draftsmen.................. .........

AO

40.0

74.00

-

-

Draftsmen, junior ....................

28

40.0

62.00

1

2

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

1

1

5

6

3

-

1

-

-

2

2

3

4

12

1

6

12

-

8

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

7

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly
hours.
2 / Data relate to men workers.

Table A-3:

A/cUH^eHOHCe Q 4ut PoW *k P la n t 0cO U f»atU m l

(Average hourly earnings JL/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Phoenix, A riz., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

Carpenters, maintenance .................................
DtiVtl 4a t f4
i

mm

..... .

....

Average
hourly
earnings

45
17
15

$

$
L.05

$

$
1.15

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 1.80 1.85 1.9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2.20

*
1.89
1.97
1.99

1.00

1.10

and
under
1^05 1.1 0 1.15

1.2 0

1.2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.5? 1.60 1.65 1.70 1-75 1.80 1 .8 ? 1.9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2.0 5 2 .10 2 0 1 2 .2 0 2 .2 5
9

1

21
10

1.93
1.94
1.79

Helpers, trades, maintenance ...........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....................................... .

85
19

1.37
1.42

2

66

1 .3 6

2

30
17
l?

1.78
1.72
1.85

193
181
167

1.75
1.79
1.75
1.75

129
123

1.81
1.82

Services

Maintenance men. general u t i l i t y ..................... .

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ....................
meaner
.. .
.......... ...
iifnuiM «

...

Mechanics, maintenance ..................................
H mi
ii
i i 4nm
«*
..
.
. . . ..
.....
.

25

12

_

-

-

1
10

___ 1 ____ 2^
3
3

15 ___ 2 _ — 16 ___Z_ ___5____ 52
2
4
4
3
2
12
15
5

5

1

...........................................

Engineers, stationary ...................................
HUfimonnfo/ifnisi *10 ....... ............... ............

5
5

2
2

48

3
3
3

6

2
2
2

-

-

13

-

7

4

9
9

-

4
4

-

-

1 .

5
5
5

4

2
2
-

-

10

8

6

7

1

2

3
3

46
6

35

11

6

13

21

1

2

4
3
1

4

1

6

5

51

8
8
8

10

2
2

51

18

40
37

35
33

11
9

6
6

13
13

3
18
18

1

1
2

75
75

1
1

30
30

6

1

6
6

3

3

j

22

Oilers ....................................................

Painters, maintenance ....••••............. ........ ..

1.45
1.44

17

1.80

___24___

1 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilit ie s ,




__

6_
6

_

16_ ___2J
2

14

5

5

Occupational Wage Survey, Rioenix, A riz., March 1952
D.S. D PA T E T O L B R
E R MN F A O
Bureau of Labor S ta tistic s

T able A -4:

G u A io J U tilr htJG>^eJ tG44&itUp, C M S itifh p 4 0 t^
L J&

/ifffid

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis in Phoenix, Aria., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
i
Aeae
vrg
$
h u l Under
ory
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95
erig *
anns
°^°
0.70 undei
.75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 I.40 1.45 1.50 lt55 1.60 I.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Guards ............................. ..........

33

1
1.45

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men} .............
Manufacturing......... ....... .......
Nonmanufacturing............................
Public utilities * ........................
Wholesale trade............ ............. .
Retail trade .............................
11

480
72
408
52
20
185
53
98

.97
1.19
.93
1.12
1.09
>89
.94
.88

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ...........

123

1.00

Order fillers ...................... ...........
Manufacturing..................... .......
Nonmanufacturing ............................
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade .............. ...............

224
58
166
116
50

1.33
1.24
1.36
1.34
1.40

Packers .......................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................
Wholesale trade............. ............ .

22
19
17

1.28
1.26
1.26

T__,,,,r___ t*iT--TTrr-rttrri t
-

2

1

12
12
7

33
-

5

33

68
68

33

6
56
6
|
”i

34
34
2
_
16
12
A

39
39
9
25
a
2

47
2
45
2
21
2
20

3

36
2
34
3

65
15 20
_
10
7
8 20
55
3
9
-!
I 2
32 ! 3 ! 7
: 2
20 1 «

6
24

1

39
22
17
1
3
3
2
g

25
9
16
9
_
7

15
15
13
_
2

3
3
_
_

16

5
2
3
3
_

_
_

4

_
_

5

6
1
5
3
2

15
12
3
3

1

_
_
_

2
2
_

I
!
i
I
!

-

l
!

J

;

!

-

~
-

-—
-

2
r
2
2
“

|

j
I
3

!

22

4

41

1

20 . -!
.
.

3

23

17!
7
10
2

3
3
3
~

37
31
6
6
-

_'
~

2
2
2

-

6

9

10

13

9
7
2

10
10
~

13 1 32 I 34 : 47
6 ; 32 ! 24 18
; 10 | 29
7

|

i
-

_;
—;

~!

~

-

~
~

!
! --_
—j ~

_
~

_
~

-

~i

_

_
-

_
~

7
7
-

~

8

i
Receiving clerks ...............................
Nonmanufacturing ............................
Wholesale trade.............. ........ .
Retail trade .............................

Shipping clerks ................................
Manufacturing...... ........................
Nonmanufacturing ............................
V L a I m e e la

+

66
43
25
18

42
22
20
16

1.43
1.35 -- Il!
1.32
1.40
—

1.43
1.53
1.32
1.26

-

'
-

_

-:

-

1.28
1.27
1.20

1

S e e footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_
-

-

-|

-

-

i
-i
|
i
2!
21
2

71
7
3!
4

_

-!
—

32 ! 34

3

2 10
5
5 r r i 10
5
‘ ! 10
4
4!
4I
—;

3
3
3
”

—

47

_

_

2 | 10 L * N
2 ! 61 10|
8
1
4
1 : 21 2

9
9
-i
j

15
9
i
9

4
4
!
~

'
i
-!
~
|

-

-

j ---

i

-|
_
i

—

—

_
~

-

-

1

|
i

2 ;
2
21

-j
_j
~!

-

3

-

3

2
- 1 --i
2
1
2

2
-I
2.
2

6
6i
-

2
2
2

6
1
51

1 ! 14
1 1 10 !
i 41

2

i

5
5
5

5

_

!

'

-

-

-

-

1

~

•
"
"

_

1

2

4
4

-1
“i

-

-j

'

-

_

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

i

!- - - - - - - - i

|




|

!

|

*
*

-

-;
J

Shipping-and-receiving clerks ....................
73
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . 48
.

_
~

-

-

1

1

1

26
26

-

-

26

-

2
2
2

16
7
7

4
4

-

-

2
2

6
6
6

10
10

2

'
i'
!

i

i

|

i

Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Ariz., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-4:

Custodial, Wa*a/iOiUiMf,tuid S /U ppittf Oeenpai itmA- QantiMMm
d
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis in Phoenix, Aris., b y industry division, March 1952)

1/
2/
*

Excludes preaiua pay for overtime and night work.
Study H a l t e d to m en workers except where otherwise indicated.
Transportation (excluding railroads), comnunication, and other public utilities.




C:

Union W age Scales

( M i n i m a m g * rates and straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between employers
and trade unions.
Rates and hours are those In effect on dates as Indicated.
Comprehensive listings of
union scales for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing far July 1.
1951 are available on request. Similar i n f o m a t i o n for these industries will be published for July 1, 1952.)

Table C-15:

B

u i l d in g

G

o tU

tb u c ttim

Table C-27:

P/utttU uf

Table C-42:

MtSfuc
&olrik
< m d

J uly 1, 1952

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Bricklayers .................................. $3,500
Carpenters ...................................
2.475
Electricians (inside wiremen) and fixture
hanosra .................................... 2 .500
Painters ......................... ...............
2.345
Plasterers ......................... M f t .T f T t l M
3.000
Plumbers ......................
2.500
Building laborers ............. ................ . 1.825

Table C-205:

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classifioatlon

Rate
per

Hours
per

AfSS, w e k
Book and lob shops
Coatpositar8, h a n d ............... <
Maohine operators ••••••••••••••,
Machinist o p e r a t o r s ....... .
P h o t o e n g r a v e r s .................. .
Areas assistants and feeders:
Cylinder p r e s s ............. •
,
Platen p r e s s ................. ,
Pressmen, c y l i n d e r .......... .
O f f s e t ....................... .
Pressmen, platen ••••••••....... .

$2,470
2.470
2.570
2.400

37*
37*
37*
37*

1.820
1.820
2.470
2.470
2.320

37*
37]
37]
37]
37*

2.470
2.590
2.470
2.590
2.620

37]
3737r
37] :
37*

2.740
2.470
2.590
2.470
2.590

37]
3737] ■
37] r
37*

&kU&
a&e>

July 1, 1951

Classifioatlon

Rate
per
*

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
F o r e m e n ......... ............
Mixers, overmen ••••••••••••
Machine and bench hands ....
Wrapping-machine operators •
Pan washers a nd greasers ...
Hand wrappers:
First 6 months ••••••••••.
Next 6 m o n t h s ....... .
T h e r e a f t e r ............... .
Bread and cake - feohine s h o p s :
Baking department:
F o r e m e n .................. .
Dough mixers, overmen ...
feohinemen, bench hands ..
Fan washers, e t c ........ .
Wrapping department:
Foremen ............
Maohine operators ,
Machine helpers:
First 3 months ,
Second 3 months
Thereafter .....
Flour dumpers .....




2S L

$1,750
1.592
1.531
1.367
1.037

a
44
44
44
44

Compositors, hand - d ay w o r k ...........
Compositors, hand - night w o r k ........ .
Maohine operators - d a y work •••••.....
Maohine operators - night work ••••••••<
Machine tenders (machinists) - d ay work
Maohine tenders (machinists) - night
w o r k ..................................
Pressmen, w eb presses - d ay w o r k ......
Pressmen, w eb presses - night work ....,
Stereotypers - d a y w o r k ......

Storeotypera - night work: ............... •••••<

.900 44
1.037
1.147

44
44
Table C-41:

1.953
1.337
1.705
1.166

40
40
40
40

1.650

40
40

1.540

1.111
1.166
1.287
1.287

40
40
40
40

Jtcl**40
foo 10*1

October 1, 1951

J h lp m

b l

July 1, 1951

r

r

C la ssific a tio n

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

B uilding:
Construction:
Buggymobile, 1 yard or le s s ....................... $1,865
Dump truck:
le s s than 4 cubic yards .....................
1.815
4 - 8 cubic yards ....................... • • • • • • • 1.840
8 - 1 2 cubic yards ................................... 1.890
1 2 - 1 6 cubic yards . . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 1.965
16 eubio yards or more .............
2.165
Other trucks:
le s s than 6 tons ................................. ..
1.815
6 - 1 0 tons .................................................. 1.840
10 - 15 tons .............................................. .. 1.890
15 - 20 tons ................................................ 1.965
20 tons and o v e r ........................................ 2.165
Spreaders ................................
2.165
Ross carrier • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . 2.190
•
Dumpster truck driver:
6 .9 cubic yards or l e s s ....................... .. 1.940
7 cubic yards and le a s than 16
cubic yards ....................................• • • • • 2.065
16 cubic yards or mors ...................
2.165
M aterial:
Dumpster truck • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 2.165
Transit-mixer truck:
Under 3 cubic y a r d s ........... ..
2.040
3 cubic yards or mors .......................
2.165
Water truck:
Under 2,500 gallons
1.865
2,500 - 7,000 gallons ............................. 1.990
7,000 gallons or mors ......................... ..
2.115
S te a l:
2-axle (under 6 ton s) ............................. 1.300
6 tons and over • • • • ......... • • • • • • • • • • • • 1.560
Ice:
S p ecia l d e liv e r y ............................................... .
1.130
Supply truck:
S in gle u n it • • • • ..................................• • • • • • • 1.175
S e m it r a ile r ........... .................. .......................... 1.275
Ice aream - S p ecial d eliv ery • • • • • • • • • ............... 1.125
Meat - W holesale.......................................................... 1.790
Milk - Sp eolal d e liv e r y ......... .................................. 1.100
O il:
Utadar 2,500 gallons .............................................. 1.990
2,500 - 7,000 g a llo n s ......................................... 2.115
Orar 7,000 g a l l o n s ................................................ 2.240
Railway e x p r e s s ........................• • • • ............................ 1.655

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
44
48
40
40
40
40

Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Aria., M§roh 1952
U.S. DEPAHTM5NT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

10

D:
Table D-l:

M

in im

M
inimum rate (in cents)

All establishments ............

u m

£ * U > U * H M t P & te A

10 0 .0

0.4
2.6
4.1
.5
1.9
5.4
.8
2.0
1.4
1.5
11.5
1.0
2.1
3.6
4.0
2.2
2.8
1.6

1 1 5 .......................

1.2
2.3

Establishments with n o
established minimum ••••

f a

,

P la n t

l4 J &

lk * > U

1/

Percent of plant workers in establishments 1
with specified
___________________________ minimum rates in A ll
Public
Wholesale
Retail
industries Manufacturing u tilit ie s *
Services
trade
trade
2/

Under 50 ...............................
50 . ................. .....................
Over 50 and under 55 ........
Over 55 and under 60 ........
6 0 ..........................................
Over 60 and under 65 ........
65 ..........................................
Over 65 and under 70 ........
7 0 ..................... . ..................
Over 70 and under 75 ........
75 ..........................................
Over 75 and under 80 ........
8 0 ..........................................
Over 80 and under 85 ........
85 ..........................................
Over 85 and under 90 ........
9 0 ..........................................
Over 90 and under 95 ........
95 ..........................................
Over 95 and under 100 . . . .
1 0 0 ........................................
Over 100 and under 105 . . .
1 0 5 ........................................
Over 105 and under 110 . . .
Over 110 and under 115 •••
Over 115 and under 120 . . .
1 2 0 ........................................
1 2 5 ........................................
Over 125 and under 130 . . .
1 3 0 .......................................
Over 130 and under 135 . . .
Over 135 and under 140 . . .
u o ........................................
1A5 and o v e r .......................

Entrance Rates

.5

1.3
4.4

2.2
.5

9.9
1.8
.5

3.2
.2
2 .6
8 .6
4.5

.9

1.8
4.2

___ 10 0 .0
2.7
•
10.1
5.1
-

3.0
2.1
4.4

3.5
1.4
21.4
4 .0
3.1
3.0
1.5
1.9
7.0
24.1
1.7

100.0
.
.
0.9
1.9
21.5
11.7
3.6
3.1
-

7.0
14.8
25.5
5.2
4.8

1 0 0 .0

_
13.8
4.3
8.0
.
10.9
1.7
25.3
9.4
2.3
.
4.2
3.8
3.8
-

.

100.0
3.0
21.0
19.5
3.8
7.3

5.5
_
17.7
5.4
4.6
5.1
23.2
3.4

6.6
2.9
_
.
.
_
.
13.7

.
4.0
5.6

_
.
-

.
.
.
.
.
.
_
.
.
.
.
_
.
-

4.1

22.2

1.8
9.0
7.0
3.6

8.8

3.7

2/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than
watchmen.
2 J Excludes data for finance, Insurance, and real estate.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other publio utilities.




E:

Supplementary W age Practices

Table E-l:

S tu ^ t

fa t H U

liO

tU

Percent o f plan t workers employed on each
s h i f t in a l l manufacturing in d u stries S h ift d iffe r e n tia l
2d
s h if t

_

3d or
other
s h if t

Percent of workers on extra s h if t s ,
a l l establishments ......................................

19.2

Receiving s h if t d iffe r e n tia l ...............

16.3

8.8

Uniform cents (per hour) .............
3 emits ....................................• • • • •
4 cents ........................................
5 cents ...................................
6 cents ................................. • • • • • •
10 cents ....................... • • • • • • • • • •
12 cents ................................. • • • • •

16.3
.7
7 .7
4 .0

8.8
.3

1. 4
2. 5

6. 8
.7
1. 0

Receiving no d iffe r e n tia l .....................

2.9

1.9

10.7

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Ariz., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT O F LkBCR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-2:

P E R C E N T OF OFFICE W ORKERS

Weekly hours

A ll establishm ents ............................................
Over 35 and under
hours ..........................
3?& h o u r s ...................................... .................. ..
Over 37& and under A h o u r s ..........................
O
AO h o u r s .................................... .........................«•
Over A and under AA hours
O
AA hours ............................................................... ..
Over AA and under AS hours ............................
AS hours .................................................................
1/
2/
*
**

All
industries

100.0
0 .2
3 .7
5.2
63.5
S.O
12.2
2 .9
A.3

2 / EM PLO YED
s

IN -

PE R C E N T OF P L A N T W O RK ERS E M PLO Y ED IN —

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance **

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

_
69.8
21.5
2.3
6 .A

95.5
.7
3.6
.2

57.2
7.0
31. a
A.O

11

ScJt& duU A W se&klif JtoufU

_

O.S
.9
28.3
33.6
22.8
9 .8

12.5
16.0
71.2
-

3.8

.3

A .l
2A.5
9 .8
13.5
A.9
A3.2

All
.
industries 2 / Manufacturing

|

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

7.8

O.A
2 .8
38.5
8.A
8.8
A.O
37.1

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

Public
utilities *

_
_
53.6
_
7.9
38.5

_
AO.O
A.8
3A.1
19.2
1.9

-

70.8
3.5
-

17.9

_

3.5

_
6.0
26.1
15.A
9.2
A3.3

5.3

_
2 .8
88.A

Data r e la te to women workers.
Includes data fo r in d u str ies in addition to those shewn separately*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s), oonmmieation, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .

Table E-3:

P

a id

g /ta U

d a y l

PE R C E N T OF OFFICE W ORKERS EM PLO YED I N -

Number o f paid holidays

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O RK ERS E M PLO Y ED IN —

industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

All
industries

A ll ost'ftblishiQBnts • • • • • • • • • • • # * • • • • * • • « •

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments providing paid
holidays .............................................................

9A.7

91.7

97.A

1 0 0 .0

92.5

99.8

57.9

6 8 .0

5.3
37.5
16.0
33.7
-

_
6 ,7
7.7

6.3
27.2
3 .9
20.5
-

A2.1

to 5fc days ...................................................
days ...............................................................
7 d a y s ...............................................................
8 d a y s ............. ..................................................
9 days ...............................................................
9fc days .............................................................
1 0 days .............................................................
1 1 days .............................................................
1 2 days .............................................................
1
6

Establishments providing no paid
holidays .............................................................

All

2 .5
28.6
12.7
3A.0

5 .A
75.5
6.3
A. 5

1 .1

-

l.A

-

1 .2

5.0
8.2
5.3

1 .1

7. 5
.6
8 8 .2

-*

_
16.7
63.9
19. A
-

-

8.3

2 .6

1 / Includes data fo r in d u str ies in addition to these shown separately*
* Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s), oosmunioation, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, insurance, and r e a l e sta te .




7.5

2 0 .6

A .l
5.5
A.6
19.2
31.A
.2

.

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Servioee

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

78.7

7A.7

1 0 0 .0

68.9

12.5

2.3
32.0
11 .A
22.3
-

5.0
60 .A

-

1 .6

2A.1
57.A
18.5
“

15.0

_
32.5

32.0

2 1 .1

6 .6

-

6 .7
•

53.6
-

21.3

25.3

'

2 1 .2

-

31.1
-

-

31.1

87.5

Occupational Wage Surrey, Phoenix, i r i s . , March 1952
U.S. D R EN O LA O
EPA TM T F B R
Bureau o f Labor S t a tis tic s

12

Table E~U s

P aid fy& ccilonl (tyobm al PaouM ohA)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Vacation p o licy

A ll e8tablishnent8 ............ ...............................

All
industries

Manufacturing

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

All
industries

y

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Servioes

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments with paid vacations . . . . . .

9 7 .6

96.1*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

5 9 .8

9 0 .1

9 2 .9

9 8 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .9

5 2 .1

1 w eek ..............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s.........................
2 weeks .......................................... ................ ..
Over 2 w e ek s......... .........................................

l*l*.o

1*1.6

70.1*

1*3.2

6 9 .5

1 0 .8

2 9 .1
.5

5 6 .8

1 year o f service

Establishments with no paid
v a c a tio n s ...................................................... ..

•

51*. 8

.1

•

2.1*

~

-

25.6

68.1*
.9

82.1*

76.1*

3 9 .9

8 9 .2

3l*.2

2 0 .8

1 0 .5

1*1*. 3
5 .1
1*8.7

6 7 .1

3 0 .5

3 2 .9

1 9 .5

1 2 .2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1*0.2

-

$ 3 .5

9.9

7 .1

1 .9

l* .l

1*7.9

-

-

3 .6

-

•

_

2 years o f service
Establishments w ith paid vacations • • • • • •

9 7 .6

96.1*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

5 9 .8

9 0 .6

9 2 .9

9 8 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .8

5 2 .1

1 week ............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ................. ..
2 weeks • • • • • • • • ................. ................• • • • •
Over 2 weeks ................... .................. .

1 3 .7
3 .8
8 0 .0
.1

3l*.l
6 .3
5 6 .0

1*.9

3 0 .1
1 .5
68.1*

1 0 .7
1 3 .9
75.1*

•2

1 2 .2

1 8 .8
5 .1
71*. 2

1*.6
1*3.1*

3 8 .2
1*.0
5 5 .6

3 2 .6

1*7.6

1*7.8
3 0 .0
1 5 .1

52.0

9 9 .8

3 8 .5
1 2 .9
3 9 .2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Establishments with no paid
vacations ......................................... • • • • • • • •

2.1*

3 .6

1*0.2

9.1*

7 .1

1 .9

2 .2

1*7.9

Establishments w ith paid v a c a tio n s ...........

97.6

96.1*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

5 9 .8

9 0 .6

9 2 .9

9 8 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .8

1 w eek ......... ....................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...................
2 w eek s....................... .....................................
Over 2 and under 3 w e ek s..........................

9 .6

32.6

2 .3

1 3 .0

2 .8

.2
•

8 .2

2 0 .7

5 .2

3 .8

1 5 .5

3 2 .6

8 5 .5
lu l
1 0 .2

5 1 .6

1 7 .6
1 .7
7 1 .3

9 6 .2

8 2 .3

1 9 .5

-

•

9l*.6

.5

•

1 9 .5

5 years o f serv ice

m

81*. 2
1 .1
2 .6

m

6 3 .8

9 7 .2

«•

8 7 .0

9 7 .2

-

-

-

5 2 .1

9 .9
7 2 .2

8 3 .0

-

-

-

9.U

7 .1

1 .9

-

.1

-

2.1*

3 .6

Establishments w ith paid v a c a tio n s ...........

9 7 .6

96.1*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

5 9 .8

9 0 .6

9 2 .9

9 8 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .8

5 2 .1

1 week .................................................. ...........
Over 1 n d under 2 w e e k s ............. ...........

2 .6

1 .5

2 .3

9 .9
-

2 .8

.2
-

8 .2

5 .2

5 .2

3 .8

3 2 .6

9 .9

-

1 5 .5

2 w e ek s............................................ ................
3 w e ek s............................................................
Over 3 weeks ....................... ..

62.7
2 8 .3

9 1 .3
3 .6

1 7 .0
62.1*
1 8 .3

7 0 .8
1 9 .3

9 6 .8
.1*

$1*.2
1*5.6

$ 1 .6

8 1 .0
6 .7

8 8 .6
7 .6

1 9 .5

-

-

-

-

ia . 1
16.1*
2 5 .5

8 0 .5

•
-

1 2 .1
1 .7
6 6.5
6 .0
1*.3

-

-

-

1*0.2

9.1*

7 .1

1 .9

2 .2

1*7.9

3 weeks .............................................................
Over 3 w e e k s ........................................... ..

.5

••

■

-

-

-

Establishments w ith no paid
1*0.2

2.2

1*7.9

15 years o f serv ice

Establishments with no paid
vacations ...........................................................

y
*
*»

m

-

luO

-

2.1*

-

3 .6

Includes data for Industries I n addition to those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), consnnication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

-

-

1 .8

Occupational Wage Surrey, Phoenix, Arts., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

T&hls E-5s

P aid S ic k JLeaae. ($o*m al PAGuUfotU )

PEECENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ......................

All
industries

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

2 2 ,4

27.1
-

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

S«vi«.

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

2 .6

22.5
9.3
4.1
4.4
•4
4.3

36.4
5.0
31.4
-

Public
uiiis
tlte*

AH
industries4 /
100.0

Manufacturing

100*0 _

Public
uiiis
tlte*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

29.1
-

2 0 .6
8 .2
1 .2

Sendees

... 1 0 0 .0
..

6 months of service
Establishments w ith formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ........... .......
3 days ................................
5 d a y s .................................
6 days .................................
1 0 days ...............................
12 days ...............................
Establishments wi t h no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

1.4

27.1
-

2 .6

27.5
16.1
3.1
8.3
-

77.6

72.9

97.4

72.5

77.5

6 3 .6

43.4
1.5
4.1

66.5
-

51.3
-

.7
.9
3.9

6.3
58.2
-

38.9
18.4
3.1

33.8

2 .6

28.4
8.1

5 6 .6

33.5

71.6

43.4
1.5
2,6

.7
.9
3.9

66.5
6.3
60.2
-

17.7

56.6

33.5

71.6

43.4
1.5

66.5
-

28.4
-

1.5
3.6
9.2
6.7

-

-

1 0 0 .0

7.6
2.5
1.3

1 .8
.1
1.9

-

_
-

20.4

6 .2

5.0
-

2.5
-

6 .2

92.4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

70.9

79.4

1 8 .2

2.3
-

37.2
-

35.3

30.7

11.7
-

5.1
-

_
-

1 0 0 .0

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................
3 days .................................
5 d a y s ........... .....................

17.5

1 2 days ...... ....... ................ .
15 days .............................. .
22 d a y s .................... ..........
26 d a y s ...............................
3 0 days .................... ..........
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

1 2 .2

2 .0

6 .8

9.3
4.1
5.1
5.6
4.3
-

-

5.4
-

4*4
5.0
41.9
-

61.1

6 6 .2

48.7

28.4
-

38.9
-

51.3
-

8 ,1
2 .6

1 0 .6

33.8
9.3
4.1
5.1
5.6
4.3
-

1 0 .6

2 .6
17.7

-

-

1 0 0 .0

2.5
1.4
2.7
2.7

2 .0
.8
1.7
4.3

2.3
-

81.8

18.2
2.5
1.4
2.7
.2.7

.1

2 2 .1
6 .2

8 .2
1*2
7.8

1 .6
6 .2
-

25.5

1.9
-

5.7
-

97.7

6 2 .8

64.7

69.3

2.3
_
-

37.2
_

35.3
-

30.7

11.7
.

5.1
_

-

5.7
_

_•
_
_

1 0 0 .0

2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ........... .
3 d a y s ............................... .
5 days ......................... .
6 days
............ .............
1 0 days ............... ........ .......
12 d a y s ...............................
15 days ............................. .
22 days ...............................
26 d a y s .................. .............
3 0 d a y s ...............................
Establishments w ith no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

2 .6
19.0

1 2 ,2

18.4
3.1

5.4
-

9.4
41.9
-

61.1

6 6 .2

48.7

38.9
-

33.8

51.3
-

-

6 .8
-

-

1 0 0 .0

2 .0
.8

2 2 .1
6 .2

8 .2
1 .2
7.8

1 .6
6 .2
.

1.7
4.3

2.3
_

25.5

1.9
_

81.8

97.7

62.8

64.7

69.3

18.2
2.5
1. 4
2.7

37.2
_
_

35.3
-

.9
1.7
4.3

2.3
-

_
_
_
_
_
_

30.7

2 .6
2 .0

2.3
_
-

_
_

.1

1 0 0 .0

15 years of service
Establishments w ith formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................
3 d a y s ........... .....................
5 days .................................
6 d a y s .................................
1 0 d a y s ........ .......................
12 d a y s ............................ .
15 days ............................ .
26 days ...............................
6 0 d a y s ...............................
Over 6 0 d a y s ..........................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ........... .......

y
*
**

2 ,6
2 .6
1 8 .1
12.2
.9
.9
3.9
.7

6.3
60.2
-

17.7
_

56.6

33.5

71.6

8 .1
2 .6
-

18.4
3.1
2.3
8.3
•
_

6 .8
6 1 .1

includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately,
nri ( A r ti«ri-fngr railroads), cnmnninlnation, and other public utilities,
*f
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




9.3
4.1
5.1
5.2
4.3
.4
5.4
_

6 6 .2

9.4
41.9
48.7

_

1 0 0 .0

11.7

_
_

2.5
_

8 .2
1 .2
7.8

_
_

_
5.7

6 2 .8

_
_
_

_

1.9
97.7

_

1 .6
6 .2

25.5

.1
81.8

2 2 .1
6 .2
2 .6

64.7

69.3

1 0 0 .0

Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Ariz., March 1952

U-S# panPARTVEWT cf* UBOt

Bureau o f La b o rStatistics

14

Table E-6s

NoHfM cUtjUton

Includes data fo r in d u stries in addition to those shown separately*

\> Unduplicated to ta l*
*
Transportation (excluding

r a ilr o a d s), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s *
Finance, insurance, and r e a l estate*

Table E-7:

U jiA 4 4 A X 2 4 U > e

O H c l P -e * tU O H >

P

la n t

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type o f plan

A ll establishm ents • • • • • • • • • • • ......... •*. *••
Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2 / • • • • * • • • • ................... ..
L ife insurance ..............................................
Health insurance ....................... • • • • • • • • •
H osp ita lisa tio n • • • • • • • • • • • .............• • • •
Retirement pension • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans • • • ............... ........................ ..

1/
*
**

All
industries

Public
utilities*

100.0

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

All
„ . Manufacturing
industries

100.0

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

ioo. o

85.3

91.8

95.5

81.9

8U.0

77.8

55.9

68.3

81.5

72.5

7.t
Ul

62.2

39.6

61.6
59.0
60*6
58*5

7U.3
79.2
80.U
66.1

29.5
32.6
31.7

70.6
70.0
78.6
3U.U

73.U
55.9
58.6
58.8

33.5
28.0
28.0
23.6

51.3
55.3
56.9
38.9

61.2
67.7

90.8

69.U
75.3
69.3
25.3

50.9

U9.U
56.1
U9.1
56.7

62.8
61.7
63.5
12.9

51.5
U7.7
5U.0
28.2

22.2
36.6
36.6
17.9

1U.7

8.2

U.5

18.1

16.0

22.2

UU.l

31.7

18.5

27.5

25.6

37.8

60.U

Includes data for in d u stries in addition to those shown separately*
Unduplioated to t a l.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s *
Finance, insurance, and r e a l estate*




Public
utilities*

70 .0

Occupational Wage Surrey, Phoenix,
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT O LABO
F
R
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s

Ari a. , March 1952

Appendix - Scope
With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations s (a) office
clerical * (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A) • The covered industry groupings are s manufac­
turing) transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and reed estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

15

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 oents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

16

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN PHOENIX, ARIZ., l/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MARCH 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Num1ber of
establ Lshments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
__________studied______________
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occuDations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ••••••••••.... ......... ........
Manufacturing ••••...... •••••••••••••.... ••
Nonmanufacturing .•••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .............................
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ..... ........... ......... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ••••••
Services 2/ ••••••••••••••••...... .

21
21
21

404
78
326

127
24
103

34,600
10,700
23,900

21,550
7,800
13,750

4,750
1,170
3,580

21
21
21
21
21

47
59
138
26
56

14
23
35
12
19

6,100
2,500
9,500
2,100
3,700

4,310
1,160
4,610
1,580
2,090

1,300
300
560
1,300
120

i / Phoenix Metropolitan Area (Maricopa County) •
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadeasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organisations; and engineering and architectural services.







6
7
3, 4

4
3, 4
3, 4
4
9
6
4
9
6
7
9
9

6
7
9
9
9

6
6
6
9
9

Office b o y ...... ........................... .......
Office girl .........................................
Oiler .......... ..... ........... ••••••••••••••.••.... •
Operator (local transit) ...... ........... ••••••••.....
Order filler............. .................. .
Overman (bakeries) .............
..•••••••
Packer ........... .......... ..... .
Painter (building construction) ...... ......... .......
Painter, maintenance ••••••••••••••••••••••••••.... ......
Photoengraver (printing) ......... ........... .
Plasterer (building construction) •...... ............. .
Plumber (building construction) •••••••••.... •••••••••••...
Porter.................. ..........................
Press assistant (printing) ................... •••••••••••
Press feeder (printing) ............. ............ .
Pressman (printing) .••••••... ••••••••••••••••••.... •••••
Receiving clerk •••••... .......... ........... .
Secretary •••••....... ............ ...............
Shipping clerk.... •••••••••.......... ............ .
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ........ •••••••........... .
Stenographer..... ...... ........ .
Stereotyper (printing) •••••••.... .......•...•••••......
Stock handler..... ........... ............... .......
Switchboard operator..... ....... ............. .
Switchboard operatox^receptionist ....... .......
Transcribing-machine operator............. .......
Truck driver... ................................. .
Trucker, hand .................. ............. .
Trucker, power....... ..............
Typist ......................................................
Watchman..... ............ ••»•••••••..... .
Wrapper (bakeries) ..... ............... .............
☆

vO s j vO

9
3
3
3
9
4
9

vO 0>VJt 0 & 0 & 0 & v n v x \ J i 0 & N O v J i ^ ^ J V A ^ > O N O \ O ->J\0 v£> v O C h vO

Bench hand (bakeries)
.......... ••••
Biller, machine ...................................
Bookkeeper, h a n d ..... ............................
Bookkeeping-machine operator...... ............. ....... .
Bricklayer (building construction) ••••••••••••••••••*••••••
Calculating-machine operator ..............
•••••••••
Carpenter {building construction) •••••«•••»••••••••••••••«•
Carpenter, maintenance .............. ............... .....
Cleaner ........... ............ ................... .
Clerk, accounting...... .
Clerk, file ........... ................... ...............
Clerk, general •••••...... ............. ................ .
Clerk, o r d e r .... .................. ......................
Clerk, payroll..........
Compositor, hand (printing) •••••......
Draftsman •••••••••••••••••••....
Duplicating-machine operator...... .........
•••••
Electrician (building construction) .... ............... .
Engineer, stationary ••••••••.....
...»
Guard .......... ................ ......... .......... .
Helper (bakeries) .......... ....... ......................
Helper, motortruck driver ......... .
Helper, trades, maintenance •••••••••••..•...... •••••••••••
Janitor ••••••••••...........
laborer (building construction) ............
Machine operator (printing) .... ..... ••••••••............
Machine tender (printing) .................. ••••....... .
Maintenance man, general utility ....... •••••.... •••••••••
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Mechanic, maintenance ........
Mixer (bakeries) ....... ......... ........ ..... .
Motortruck driver ........ ........... .......... .

VA W

17

Index

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1952 0 — 2115964













THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S* Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
City
BLS BHUetjQ N0.
PgLcg
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey
New Orleans, Louisiana
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
San Francisco-Oakland, California
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, Washington
Worcester, Massachusetts

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1075
1064
1067
1068
1081
1074
1070
1060
1082
1042
1071
1058
1069
1076
1078
1057
1077

20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
25
25
15
15
25
20
20
20
15
15
25
15
20
20

cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents
cents

This report was prepared in the Bureau's Western Regional Office. Communications
may be addressed to:
Max D. Kossorl8, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Room 1074, 870 Market Street
San Francisco 2, California
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices.
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries , construction and housing,i
The Western Region includes the following States:
Arizona
Oregon
California
Nevada
Utah
Colorado
New Mexico
Washington
Idaho
Wyoming


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102