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Occupational Wage Survey
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
March 1952

Bulletin No. 1102

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin * Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION..............................................................................

1

THE ATLANTA METROPOLITAN A R E A .............................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE...............................................................

1

TABIESI
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis iUl
Office occupations....................... ...................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations.........
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations •••••...................... ..........
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shippingoccupations .............................

3
&
&
10

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis B-35
Machinery industries.........................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers ...........................................................

12
12

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction............................. ..........................
C-205
Bakeries .....................................................................
C-27
Printing.....................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ............................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s ........................ ......................

13
13
13
13
13

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .....................................

14

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions................................ ...............
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ................. ........... .........................
E-3
Paid hol i d ay s .............................................................
E-4
Paid vacations..........................................
E-5
Paid sick l e a v e ..............................................................
E-6
Nonproduction b o n u s e s ........................................................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ..................................................

14
1$
15
16
17
19
19

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ................................... ........................

20

I N D E X .................................................................................... .

22

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents

July 10, 1952

Introduction 1/
The Atlanta Area ie 1 of AO major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surreys* Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis* Gross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilised in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations t (a) officej (b) professional and technical)
(c) maintenance and power plant) (d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping* In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-A) separate data hare been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions*
Occupations characteristic of particular, Important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 7 j Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables* Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices*
Data were collected and summarised on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Atlanta Metropolitan A rea
The Atlanta Metropolitan Area, composed of Cobb, DeKalb, and Fulton Counties, had a total population of 66A,033
persons according to the 1950 census* About half of these re­
sided within the city limits of Atlanta,
Nonagri cultural wage and salary workers
numbered
27A,A00 in March 1952, reflecting an increase of over 5,000
during the past year. 2 / From March 1951 to March 1952, the

1/ Prepared in the Bureau's regional office in Atlanta, Ga*,
by Louis B* Woytych under the direction of Harry H* Hall, Region­
al Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst* The planning and cen­
tral direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau's
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations*
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of sur­
vey.
1/ Atlanta Ar»» tto1ovm*nt and Wage Trends. April 1952,
Georgia Department of Labor, Employment Security Agency*




number of workers employed by manufacturing firms increased ap­
proximately 10,000 to a total of almost 72,000. This increase
was divided between manufacturers of durable and nondurable
goods, y
Transportation equipment manufacturers esployed more
workers than any other manufacturing industry, with almost 16,000
on the payrolls - virtually double that of the previous March*
This vast increase was primarily due to the expansion of the air­
craft industry* Food and kindred products ranked second in em­
ployment importance among the manufacturing industries with ap­
proximately 10,000 workers, whereas textile mills reported
9,700— a slight decrease from March 1951* Employment in apparel
plants was 6,000, a decrease of about 1,000 during the past year*
Attesting to the commercial importance of Atlanta, al­
most 75,000 persons depended on employment in trade establish­
ments for their livelihood. Approximately 32,000 workers were
employed in each of the broad industry groups of transportation,
services, and government) finance, insurance, and real estate
companies accounted for another 17,700. Trade employment was
down slightly from the previous March but the number of finance
workers increased about 2,500 during the year*
The proportion of manufacturing plant workers covered
by union agreements was almost twice as great among durablegoods industries as among nondurable-goods industries) about
6A percent and 33 percent, respectively*
The percentage of
public utility plant employees working under terms of collec­
tive-bargaining agreements approximated that of the durable-goods
group. The only other significant unionisation of plant employ­
ees was in the finance Industry group where about half of the
workers were covered* Almost half the office workers in both
the durable- and nondurable-manufacturing groups and public
utility group were employed by companies having labor-management
agreements*

Occupational W age Structure
Extensive formal wage adjustments were made by Atlanta
establishments between January 1950, the base period for the Vage
Stabilisation Board's 10 percent "catch-up" wags increase formu­
la, and the time of the survey* Mags changes affected fat work­
ers prior to the Korean conflict but were considerably more numer­
ous thereafter* More than two-thirds of the manufacturing plant
workers, three-fourths of the public utility nonoffics employees,
and about three-fifths of the plant workers in both the whole­
sale trade and finance groups were granted increases between July
1950 and March 1952*

y See appendix table for listing of durable- and nondurablegoods industries*

2

Formal wage increases for office workers also were ex­
tensive in the public utilities and wholesale trade groups.
Reflecting both general and individual wage changes,
average weekly salaries for office occupations in March 1952
ranged up to $13.50 over March 1951, although most jobs studied
showed a $4 to $5 increase. Almost all average hourly rates for
maintenance employees Increased over the previous year. The
predominant increases ranged from 10 to 15 cents an hour. In­
creases for custodial jobs ranged from 2 to 15 cents an hour.
Wages and salaries of workers for most jobs were high­
er in manufacturing industries than in nonmanufacturing. Where
job comparisons were possible, manufacturing job averages were
higher in 14 of 19 occupations. Weekly office salaries showed
the same tendency with 15 of the 18 comparable jobs of women
office workers showing higher rates in manufacturing firms.
Established minimum entrance rates for inexperienced
plant workers were a part of the formalized rate structures of
virtually all Atlanta firms within the scope of the survey.
Minimum entrance rates ranged from less than 35 cents an hour
to $1.31, with 75 cents being most prevalent. No rates below
75 cents were reported in manufacturing or wholesale trade, but
a majority of both retail trade and servioe employees were work­
ing for companies with entrance minimums below that rate.
Nearly a fifth of the manufacturing plant workers in
the Atlanta area were employed on extra shifts at the time of




the study. More than half of these extra shift workers were
paid shift differentials expressed most commonly as cents-perhour additions to day rates. Second shift premiums ranged from
2.5 cents to 15 cents an hour, with 8 cents being the amount
most frequently paid. Third shift differentials ranged from
5 to 16 cents an hour.
The scheduled workweek was 40 hours for approximately
two-thirds of the plant workers and over three-fifths of the
women office workers in all Atlanta industries. The workweek
for public utility and servioe groups was generally longer than
for other broad industry groups; more than a tenth of public
utility plant employees worked in excess of 48 hours and more
than a fourth of plant workers among service industries had a
48-hour workweek schedule.
Almost all Atlanta plant workers and more than threefourths the office employees within scope of the survey re­
ceived one or more paid holidays a year, with five holidays
being most common for all industries. The finance group granted
more paid holidays than other industries with more than 20 per­
cent of the workers receiving nine or more holidays a year.
About 12 percent of the manufacturing establishments,
employing approximately 30 percent of all plant workers in this
group, based their rates of first-level supervision on a fixed
differential above the highest rates of those supervised. Such
supervisory pay practices were relatively infrequent among estab­
lishments in other industry groups.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A -l:

O c C U p t U iO M

i

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry division, March 19$2)

**

Finance,

insurance,




a n d real estate.

B u r e a u o f L a b o r Statistics

0cc4 f ia t*o*U
4

Table A-l*

- Qon tim

nd

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, O a . , by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Atshaqb
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
«f
r
workers

(
30.00 32.50 3*5.00 3*7.50 Uo.oo 1(2.50 l 5 .oo U7.50 lo.oo I 2.50 55.00
Weekly
Weekly
Aumingn
hours
(Standard) (Standard) under
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 U 0.00 U2,5o U5t00 U7.50 5o foo 52.50 55 too 57»5o

57.50 60.00

t
$
*
*
62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 7*2.50 7*5.00 80.00 85.00

60.00 62,50

65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 as.oo 90.00

$

%

90.00
and
over

Men - Continued
$
Stenographers, general ....................

33

10.0
(

5o.oo

Tabulating-machine operators .............
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Finance * * ............. .. T,,,,,, ,,

1QU
61

39.5
39.0
39.0

60.50
55.00
53.5o

182

10.0
(
Uo.o
10.0
(
10.0
(
Uo.o
39.5

1(5.50
U7.50
5 o.oo
U2.50
U5.oo
UU.50

85
79

39.5
39.5

Ul.OO
lio.5o

li36
155
56

55.50
58.50

52a5Q

35

12

u

2
2
2

1
_

_

1

_

-

-

-

-

6

1
|
2

2
2

l
i
U

-

1

13

Hi
1U

11

6

h
u
2

6
U

1

1
1.
1
1

3
2
2

7
7

6

lU
3
-

6

6

2

-

2

1

1
8

11

U
u

2

1
1

1

2

“

-

-

2

-

“

•
»

—
e
.

21
6

7
U

2

2

-

Women

...

7U
50
2U
228

Bookkeepers. hand .........................
Manufac t u r i n g ..........
Durable g o o d s .............. ..., T,.,
Nondurable g o o d s ............ ..... T.
Nonaanuf acturing ....__ T,T ..
Wholesale t r a d e ........T..TTt.T
,
Retail t r a d e .......... .
,
Finance * * ................
S e r v i c e s .................. rt T

105

39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
Uo.o
39.5
Uo.5
38.5
Uo.5

i ,,,

. 3L63

u o .o

82

Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.5

n r n n ta rm .

namaanuracturing .......
Wholesale t r a d e ........... T
Retail trade .......

fwnmacLun

wp

mmM^

_
Durable goods ..._
Nondurable goods .......
Nonaanuf acturing ____
Wholesale trade .....
Retail t r a d e .............. r
Finance * * ....
Services .......
Calculating-machine operators
— (Comptometer tvne} ........
Manufacturing ..
---------------- ^^Manufacturing --FvKlic utilities * ........
Wholesale trade ..
Retail trade ...
........
Finance * * ....

**

wSS^

99

281
60
Ii3

60

11(2
21
598
95
35

60
503
152
5U
239
hi

121
93
63U
23

278
11(9
52

_
.
_
-

_

1
1

3

-

-

1

2
2

_
_

3
3

.
15
13

2
2

3
3

_

-

m

.

63
23
lU
9
U0

59.00
5U.oo
63.50
50.00
50.50
53.00

39.5
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5
39.5
UO.O
39.5
Uo.5

U9.50
U9.50
U9.50
UU.50
U7.50
U3.00
U2.50
U3.50

39.0
UO.O
39.0
37.0
39.0
Uo.o
39.0

1(7*00
" f e r
U6.50
U8.50
U8.00
U9.50
Ul.50

77
2
2
_

75

67
23
17

6

UU
36

13

18
1

_
_

.

13

3

9

-

2
2

U8

15
7

13
13

17
lU

12

3U
9

19

.

Lt
f
g

7
r
A
0

-

-

-

12

3

-

17

12
12

3

17

ft
13

6

-

28

5

6
22

1
1

"

-

10
18
21
21

2h
2U

p

60
10

17

1

11 U
12
12

11
10
95
7

2
<

Ip3

16
108
52

a

102

88

13
15
U5
25

19

lU
32
k

158
13

1^9

*1

12
1 U7
1

36
3

30

86

U

18

12

32
3
13
13

10

*

22

1

6U

O
7

9

2

9

7
7

2
2

u
u

9

2

_

59
33
17

32

13

_

2

U7
t
p

7

9
9

5U

z

22
22
21
17

38

he

21
6

31
11
L

0

1

ho

62

89

U

17
U5
l
19
13

2
87
1
5U
29
p

ft

17

9
7

2
2
2

l
_
_

1
1

7
£

3U

3

22

7
7

hi
32

16

1

lU

6

1

”

2
2

5

1

3
ic

1

fi
t
pi
9

0
0

u

12
12

1
1

"

c
O
lp
u

_

11

P
1

7

10

“

10
2
2

1?
16
U

8

12
2
2

-

1

12

3

13

23

8

3

7

16
12
12

1
2
3

1
1

2

1
“

-

-

-

1
1
1

“

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

“

-

-

1

1

1

_

-

-

f
t

P
c
r
p

23

10

2
18

13

5

16

5

15
ip

U

8

UU
-B _

*
OO
47
1*
JO

9

1
1

9
17

3

g

9

c

p

17
L
u

11
2
1

1

g

7
f

16
0

Oft
<P

p
lU

135
27
n

50

32

10
JL7

13
g

13

U
U

10
if
t
XU

c

13

18
18

31

52
29
iSJ

6

17

5
7

-

2

-

10
3

UP

h

-

-

_

19

2
6
13

11
2

1
1

35
35

9

_

_

17
lU

ih

25

-

1

h

1
1

12

26

13

.

(excludin« railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
fxaance, insurance, and real estate.




15

58.00

8 8 8

Billers, machin* (bonlrlrMfiiog n u i M n a )
Nonmanufacturing .................

302

8

Billers, machine ( W i U n g jnanMn*) .......
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonaanuf a c t u r i n g .......................
Wholesale trade .....................

19
3
7
9

— 23 _
y

21

7

3

16

3
18

1
7

12
6

U

1)
•

9

5

U

U

g

12

1
- r ]11
1
2
8

1
8

-

-

8
-

-

-

-

-

Table A -l:

Qtfiem OceMfiaiitm*. - Qntttu tm d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVIN G STRAIGHT-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A aob
tbr
Sex, occupation, a n d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
at
workers

$

a

Weekly 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 3 7 .5 0 t o . 00 U2.50 J5.00 £ 7 .5 0 50.00 I 2 .5 0 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
Weekly
and
naming. and
hours
(Standard) (Standard)
38?85 32.50 35.00 3 7 .5 0 1*0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50 .0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 o ver

Wom e n - Continued
Calculating-machine operators
(ot h e r t h a n C o m o t o m e t e r t v ne^

....

Clerks, accounting ..............................................

197
165
29
10k

llO.O
110.0
U2.0
39.0

1.696

39.0
39.5
39.0
38.0
39.5
11 .0
)
38.5
39.5

~ 2 $ r

i^ iiiii

Public u t i l i t i e s * ...................

56k

R eta il t r a d e ..................... ..
Finance *» ......................... ...........
Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

156

360

Clerks, f i l e , c la ss A ..........................................
Nonmanufacturing ...............................................

Clerks, f i l e , c la ss B ; .......................
Manufacturing ..................................................

226

135
237
"g
im1
1U
13
809
13k
675
30
xb7
82
390

39.5
39.5
La a
QU.U
40 £
),A A

$
lili.50
U3.50
kk.00
1*3.00
1)9.00
19 .0 0
)
19.00
)
50 .0 0

50.50
1 9.00
)
1)3.50
1*9.50
1*6.50
13.0 0
)
I,* tin
1 no
,-a
In ftft
U .vA
-L J

_
_

-

k
11
_
_
■
a
_
_

-

R e ta il -trade .................................................
4M

C lerks, g e n e r a l ........................................................
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . T. TT. . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing ....................................
Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R eta il trade ........................................... ..
Finance ft* ............................... ................... ..

2
9

-

38.SO
1)6.50
37.00
1 2 .0 0
)
40 Cn
.57OV
38.50
4£ no

.A A
WSV

*7 nft
J (iW

2.72j>

liO.O

k7.50
53.00

2

16

l)5.oo
l|i.5 o

2

115.00
1)8 .00

2

Clerks, o r d e r ..................... ..................................
Manufacturing ............. .....................................
Monmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . _ t . T___ _
_
W holaanlm trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

189
50
139
89

39.5
39.5
39.5
10 .0
)

Clerks, p cv ro ll ............................................
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . T. . . r . . . . .
Nondurable goods . . . . . . . . _________ _
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Public u t i l i t i e s * ..................................
Whnl an al a trade ...................
m ^«»e/4a
41
Q Herne
sm

lil9
171
73
96

39.5
10 .0
)
1 0 .0
)

2lt8
86
76
6i
16

39.5
39.0
37.5
39.0
lin
1)U.U
li0 .5

.3 2

32

51*.5o
1*7.50
1 7 .0 0
*

2
2

96 11*9

4
X

4),

17
17

7
6

7
11*

2
23

68
20
I18
21*

118

220

118
72
27

180

265
71*
191

9
15

1
16
2

129
3

126
6
-i<
x>

5
76
r0

7
106

67

83
1

196
30

71
65

82

166

21*

75

3

30

26
10

____3^
“

3
2
_

_

_

2

•
_
1
_
1

_
2

21
21

Jo

63
32
19
28
38

16 -1*7-- __ 29 ..
16
29
1*7
O ft
C\J
1
*
5
28
23
1
.
2
<
*

1

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




28
28
k
21*

31

5 2 .5 0

55.00
57.50
53.00
50.50
50.00

33

96 iii?

X*
X

kjhgo.

52.50
1)3.50
15 .0 0
*

1

2

39.5
39.5
39.0
38.0
4Q £
J70
1)0.5
39.0

"T O "
U o.o
1,901
611
39.5
1*65 - 1*1.5
238
39.0

50

10
1*0
6

u

16

Hnrw iaw nfafltairing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TW 4 f n1 4 1 4 i4 M M .
V1 s

5

5
1

23
79

4
j

U i2 __ 7.6 .
8
32
1 1*
*
131*
*
11
3
n
26
XX
18
ii*
16
68
11
186
k
182

7l*
19
18

376

37

kl

9

9

7

11

7

5

10

20
5
11

6

13

37

6

3

7

5

8
7
2.

173 103

12 k
5

81
u*
67

117
5
108

8k
20
6k

98
12
86

n
6k

15

35

71
2k

lk
27
13

lk
27

3k
17

25

2
11

«
s

1(0

85
13
36
17

2

H*

_J2L
12

32

1*3

27- 4 23 16
8
k

4
i
99
cc
1
6

322
1(6

3
7

k
1

liO
16
12

2
2
12
11

1

k

21*

u*

86

91
11
**

19
1
1
18
1

1

5
1
*

5

16

2
9
2

26
2k
2

276

k

7

lk
XI)

xp

56

16

20

1

19

1*5, _ 1 S __ 27_ - I S ..
11
1
*
3
16
12
ia
15
11
12
k
23
10
3

1 3 , 3 6 ...
13
31

119
30
33
36
k

171. _IQ __ — I —
9
9
1
*
4
j
1
*
5

19

320
108

103
29

3
157 100
1*6
58
21
28
21
11
36 20
2
H*
16

10
6

0

8

1
44
JX
5
5

4
X

22 k 132
28
58
10k
1*0
21
36
37 18
12
6
6
5

37

59
21
9
12

30
11
2
9

38

19

7

15
15
X?

9

28
23

6
7

18

21

1

1

1

$

n

15

3

_
_

1

2
12

,12
2
10
10
_
_
_

12
5
7

7

3
3

_

16
1

lk
2
12
10
2

_

2

.

56
la

_
_
_

_
_
_
—
_

_
_
—
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
•

_

_

1

2

5

3
4

_

8

2k7 162
97
65
51*
2k

7
6
18

272
111
161
5
10
5
1
1

30
k

26

_

33
33
16
6
7

.

k
26
7

k

k

i

13

1

2

2

132
96
36

2Q
2
135

68

67
7

k7

9
k
5
1
2
2

_

15

7
2
5

19

5
7
7
1

_

3 ____2_

9
6

1
2
1

1
1
1

k
2
2
1

2
k

1

_

1

5
22
2

36

21
1
2

8

17

2

9

1

3

1

2

6 ..J.2
1
* 12
2

Ii9

.

j

4

81
166
1*6

.

2

j

1

166
6k

10

21
2
22

75

9
9

1

3
1

1
1

25

10
2
2

1)9
15
8
7

12
5
7

3k

13

10

22
1

7
6

8
1

k

3
3

2
i
1
1

_

_
.

_
_

_

2

3

3

1
1

2

_
_

_

_

3k ___ k_ ____5_ ____k .
2
28
3
3
22
6
6

1
1

_

5
5
2
3

_
_

_
_
_
.
_
.

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

1
1
1

_
_
_

Table A -li

Ofticm Occupa tion* - GontinumA

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / f o r selected occupations studied on an area
b a sis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry division, March 1952)

See footnote a t end o f table*
* Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s *
«* Finance, insurance, and real estate*




Tatele U t

0 H ie* QceMpcUianA Oontimsirnd
■

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry division, March 19$2)

1/
*
**

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,
Transportation (excluding railroads), comnunication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Ptof oU ianal and ^oclm ical O ccupation*

Table A-2:

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in A t l a n t a . Ga,, by industry division* March 1952}

Table A-3:

M

a in t e n a n c e

a n d

P o u to *

P

la

n

t

O c c u p a t io n *

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for men in selected occupations studied on an area
b asis in Atlanta* Ga., by industry d iv isio n , March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
werkum

Awns
hourly
Muminga

Carpenters, maintenance ................................
Nonmanufacturing......................... ...........
1 fr
---tTtirtTt--ttt i t i i i i
1 Iiiiaii a
FInanes ##• ...

362
161

1.70
1.58

Occupation and industry division

.

at

90
*7

261

1.92
1.91*
1.70
1.62

Sngineers, stationary ...................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Ra^al 1
..1t-TTt.r.r.1TTtTri(t(1 f I |

97
79

-

-

-

1
1

8

l

-

8

U

1
1

5

6
6
2

32
25

l Lli

Eleotrioians, maintenance ...............................
Manufacturing ........... .............................
Nonmanufacturing ................ .....................
Retail trade ......................................

-

1 .7 7

S e e f o o t n o t e a t e n d o f table,
* * Fin a n c e * i n s u r a n c e * a n d real estate,




s

»

1
68

Servioes ...........................................

•

t

1

t
t
t
t
•
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1 .7 0 1.75 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 * .2 0 *2.30
2
and
and
.85 .90 .95 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .1)0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1-55 1.60 I .6 5 1.70 1.75 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 ? .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 over

231*
27
11*

12
61*

1.51*
1.39
l yy
x. «
1.35

23

18
3

6
6
6

2

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

_

-

-

-

-

2

-

l
-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1

l
l

2
2

3
3

k

-

6
6

2

3

-

6

1
*
l*

$
3
j

13

2

23

12
1

-

-

-

-

2
2

22
1
1

-

17
17

1
1

1
1

13
13

3
3

U
1
*

2

15

1

2

10
10
9

13

2

6
-

6
2
2

8

6

7

5

5

c
7

-

-

53
1*3

Q
7

*5

-

16
10

23
-

J

20
3
3

1U
ll*
13

3
3
-

1

-

1
1

-

1

1
1

2
2

1
1

“

1

1

U
?

33

8
2

10

9

18
18

10
5

2

9
g

7
7
f

.

13

9k
93

20
20

7

1
1

-

39
30

1
1

8
2

2
2
1

5

2
2

7
3
1
*

12
1

1

-

1
1

10
.

-

1

-

-

-

7
-

5
.
-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Tabia a-3 :

M aintenance and Powme P la n t O ccupation^ - C ontinued

(Average hourly earnings y for nen in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry d iv isio n , March 1?£2)

*
**

Excludes premiun pay for over tin e and night work.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s), oonu nication, end ether public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e sta te .




Table A-4:

GudtodicU, WateJuuUinf, and Skipping Occupation*

(Average hourly earnings y for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, G a ., by industry division,"March 1952)

NUMBER OP WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

[Index
eemingi $
o.U5

s
t
s
t
*
9 t t
s
s
t
t
$
t
s
$
%
t
%
s
t
t
0.50 0.55 0.60 o.65 0 .7 0 0.75 0 .80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.U c 1.1)5 L.50 1.6 0 1 .7 0 1.80 1.90
and
.55 .60 .65 .70 .75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1 .1 0 1.1 5 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1)0 i.W i.5 c L.60 1 .7 0 1.80 1.90 over
1

1

» 0

Occupation and industry d iv isio n

Num
ber
of
workers

Crane operators, e le c t r ic bridge (under 20 ton s) .........
Manufacturing..........................................................................

118
92

*
1.U6
1.53

Guards..............................................................................................

253

1.51)

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ............................. ..
Manufacturing........................................................
Durable goods ....................................................................
Nondurable goods ..............................................................
Nonmanufacturing............................. ......................................
PnKHrt 11+/TH+.1** * .........................................................

.92
1.05
1.15
.97
.83
.98
1.03
.81
.78
.65

38

S e r v ic e s .............................................................................

3,127
1,330
598
732
1,797
2l*7
315
l|8U
3JU
3
U08

38

6k

1)6

Janitors, p orters, and cleaners (women) ...........................
Manufacturixw . . . . __ _________, . r________. T. . . r, T
Nonmanufacturlng ....................................................................
Wholesale trade ................................. ..............................
R etail t r a d e ......................................................................
Finance a* . . . . . . . . . . __ _________________T, __t , ,
Services .....................................T- - T____T. T, ____

1,117
16a
1,013
53
156
325
lt56

.53

1|8?

ko

.85
.50
.89
.55
.59
•35

Order f i l l e r s ................................................................................
Manufacturing..................... ....................................................
Nonmanufacturing....................................................................
Wholesale t r a d e ......................... , . Tt. l t , . rfr. t ) 1 t l ,
R etail trade ......................................................................

185
669
1)29
2l|0

1.23
l.ll)
1.17

Paclwra (wen) ............................................. ..................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................................
Durable goods .............................T- - TTI, , . TIIt . . . . .
Nondurable goods ..............................................................
Nonmanufacturing....................................................................
Mho!
■ trade . . . . . . . . . . . ____ , r 11
R etail t r a d e ......................................................................

658
226
73
153
1)32
321
99

Packers (women) ..........................................................................
Um
nwnrmfar.+.irrHng . . . __ . . . . . . TTTttt.
....
R etail trade ......................................................................

..3jg
1®
69

Receiving clerks ..........................................................................
Manufacturing..........................................................................
Durable g o o d s ......................................... , T___
Nondurable goods .....................................T. T,
Nonmanufacturlng....................................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ..........................................................
Wholesale t r a d e ............... ................................................
R etail t r a d e .................................................................... ..

1)18
102
1)0
62
316
108

R etail trade ......................................................................

Shipping c l e r k s ........................................................................
Manufacturing ..............................................................
Durable g o o d s ....................... ............................T___. . T,
Nondurable goods ..............................................................
Nonmanufacturlng ...................................................................
Wholesale trade ................................................................
R etail trade ......................................................................

_

3ft

6h

_
86
9

-

-

_

_

_

92

92

31

6k

9
77

11
27

96 107
9
9
87 107

1
1

_

«
•

1

1
1

1
*

1

3

3

2

10

5

296 299 397 183 138 l,i05 16ft 11)8 ??7
131) 137 11)5 la
33 a o 101) 76 a 8
21 12
26 61* 190
69
57
27
68 121) 29 33 183
28
78 12
77
86 162 162 252 11)2 105 195
61* 72
9
t
2
2
k l 68
10
qju
a
19
67
6
20 15
1)3 1)2 19 51*
7 1)2
<
7
1
66
61
22 22
90 19
50
2
1)2 30
72
97 12 11 ll)
8
1
6
28
10 18
31) 1)1

5n

37

15

17

15

17
20
in
X
U
10

-

3

-

? l 192

9

6

1)89 1)0 120

31 192

9

6

3

5

6
£

If

Mi
7
37
13
ll)
£
2

13
21

20
11
9

1 .1 0

21

9

19

1*3 127
2
3
h o 125
18 107
22
18

1.07
1.06
1.23
.98
1.07
1.11
.99

61

If?
18

62

63

-

-• -2 7

.
“

«
•
“

-

-

.81)
.85

102
386
11)9
61
88
237
11)8
89

1.23
1.22
1.28
1.32
1.19

10 17
6 102
51)09 21)
y

80

7

9

-

-

-

-

187

15
-

-

t

“

-

-

-

-

16

8
*

-

“

-

53
10
1)3
8
8

-

-

.

-

•

-

5o
H)

-

-

-

-

-

15
15
15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8?
29
60

la

5
5
57
5U
p

39
5
2
p
3h
3k
h

1

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

.

5
5

5

2k

9

10

10
19
X7
C
P
ll)

20
1)

72
65
31)
31
93
28
12
op
pi.
3U

30
1
29
9
c%

17
8
9

li5

10
5

2
2

9

7
7

3
3

2k

39
P7
o t
O
H)

29

37
1

11*
9

21
7
8
T
H)

11)
13

X
36

13
1

11
2

18
18

1
*
X

19
1

h5
38

91
16

7
1
1

16
0

26

1
18
15
3

38
7
7

5
2
3

9
5

6
6

18
5

6
6

8
8

23
23

6
6

6
6

3ft

z

17

?

M
*

1,6
I)3
II)
29
3

?n

?li
15

3

nX
X
1

O
/

5
c
2

-

-

-

31
I
27
8
19

39

6ft
27
ia
10
xy

?9
ll
18
xp
0
p

59
59
tjo
P7

26
9

35
1

If?
1

9
17
•L
f
13
1
4.

1

1
1.9

38

6
8

39

19

27
38
9

22

1
1

li5
-

69

13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

32
3

51*
6
8

30
ll)
8
g

1)8
1)8

16

36
2
X
T
31)
1X
X2
7
xp

39

9

O
7
10
0
p

6 I1

6

17

2
2

17
U7
7
1)0

U
1)

ol.
p*)
3)1
PU

55
5
5o
ko
),A O
ft
*)u 4U
30
7^
30 15
t r

-

-

-

31
12
19
1O
xy

ift

3?
3$

18
1O
X4
5

8
~ T ~

•

6

-

1,9

21
41

13
13

0
7
O
7

15

-

9

3O
X4
1

-

-

-

-

16
l

1

3

0
c

51

29

6
9
c
1
.
i)

23
-lC
xp
6
9
c

61
28
21)
1)

8

33

8
6
2

17
16

-

-

1
1
X

6
3
• 2
2
”

36

2

60
20

18
18
2

11
9

9
c

2
17
2 2A 7

118
118

-

ll)

10
10

i?n

15
9

-

21)
g

O
7
29

6

-

8
3
20
fc/
2ft
X

O t\
C \J

6

-

5

k

2
2

2

35
n
31*

16

_h8_ 22 _ i6 _ _12_ 10 - 4 12 10
6
la
9
5
c
1
.
8
Q
*
u 10
7
p

“

-

18
7

23
_=g”
15

1)3
36
7

.

-

k

5
c
p
I)
X

.

l
12 2
.

18
TL
H)
c
p

.

-

25

16

12
12
12

-

39
c
P

13

k

86

120

39

-

-

68

51)

-

3

_

30
36
21

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), ooamunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

31
12
3

1.17
1.11
.96
1.22
1.19
1.21)
1 .2 1
1.12

106

-

20

8

u

2

20
6
X))
17
3
2
1
H)

1
)

10

2
C
6
5
X

17
k

13
11

13

X

3
7

U
32 -*£— k l
3 13
2
3
11
30
32 8
32
8
22
8

X
X
2
9
4

■7
5
5
-

•

X
15

“
1

3

X

k

u
p

“

X

13

9
c

1

X

■3_
----«L 22
3
9
3
9
13
13
“

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, G a . , March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-^s

GudtoduU, WaAmUoulmQf a4id SUlpfUHf Oecm patiOHi - Gontinumd
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Atlanta, Ga., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIOHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Num
ber
of
worker.

Occupation and industry d iv isio n

1
*
*
<
t
<
<
<
«
9
9
9
9
9
9
t
t
s
$
$
9
9
9
Avans*
9
hourly Under 0.1*5 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.0 0 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.2 5 1.30 1.35 1 . 1*0 1.U5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80
M
ining*
$
0.1*5 • 50
• 55 .60 •65 .70 •75 .60 .85 .90 •95 1.00 1,05 1,10 1,15 1,20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.kO 1.1*5 1.50 1,60 1,70 l t 80 1.90

Shipping-and-receiving clerk s ...............................................
M anufacturing.................................................................. . . . »
Durable g o o d s ....................................................................
A« ' « e
T
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ............... ..........................................
Wholesale trade ................................................................

575
181
131*

$
1.35
1.1*1
1.37

39U
75
198
68

1.32
1.32
1.35
1.29

Stock handlers and truckers, h a n d ................. .....................
Manufacturing .............................................................. ............
Durable goods ....................................................................
Nondurable goods ..............................................................
Nonmanufacturing.......................................................

.91*
.95
1.02
.90
.93

Wholesale trade ..........................................................
R e ta il trade ........................... ...................... ....................

5,780
2,708
1,110
1,598
3,072
1,011*
1,083
965

Truck d riv ers, lig h t (under 1% ton s) .................................
Manufacturing ............................. ............................................
Nonmanufacturing............................. .............................. .
Wholesale trade ................. ..............................................
R eta il t r a d e ....................... ............... ..............................
Services ..............................................................................

10

39

-

8
8

-

-

13

2

1

-

12
1

2

3 1552
679
- 31*5
- 331*
3 873
168
. 226
3 1*79

722

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.97
.83

.
-

.
-

-

803
215
588
230
21*7
no

.96
.99
.96
.92
.86
1.26

_

_

-

-

Truck d riv ers, medium (l^ to and including 1 tons) . . .
*
Nonmanufacturing...................................................................
................ P»iK 4n 1+ 1■Mas ■ST. r. flT. I . tll
l
1 .-* *
Wholesale t r a d e ................................................................
R etail t r a d e ............... .......................................................

2,636
2,055
1,260
1*08
368

1.02
1.06
1.10
1.02
.93

Truck d riv ers, heavy (over 1 to n s, t r a ile r t y p e ) .........
*
M anufacturing.................................................................. ..
Durable goods ....................................................................
Nondurable goods .............................................................
Nonmanufa c tu r in g ................... ...................... ..........................
Wholesale trade ................................................................

520

Truckers, power ( f o r k - lif t ) ..................... . ............................
M anufacturing....................................................................... ..
Durable g o o d s ......................... .........................................
Nondurable goods ..............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ................ ................................................................................ ......

•9 9

___L

-

-

1

-

-

108
108
108
-

1
*
1
*

-

-

1
*

_

_
-

1
*

_

-

i
_
u

_

_

-

_

_

-

17 151
26
17 125
-> 72
17
1*
7
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1.21

321

1.20
1.35
1.57
1.02
1.06

a

95
65
l6 l
li9
53

Truckers, power (other than f o r k - lif t ) ............................................
M anufacturing ..................................................................................................................

89
61

30
30

528
273
112

.97
1.03
.98

161

.91
1.09
•89
.86
.72

_
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

1.06

255

30

17
3

16

39

26

17
22

13
13

36
36
-

5k
$

1*9
25
9
H*

6
6
6
-

18
18
18
-

n

30
22

5

63
kk
19
16
3
-

28
13
15
13
1
1

6? 100
6l
95
2l*
33 75
1 16
*
6
6
6
-

20
8

82
1*6
30
16
36
36
19
9

1.52
1.51*

Watchmen............................................. .............................................................................................
Manufacturing ................................................................................................................
Durable goods ..................................................................
Nondurable goods ..............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
PuKI 1n nt,'? 1++ m -s
.1
__TT- . 1. . ttl

63 205
21* 37
39 168
51
39
99
18

3k _ k l __1*5.
8
20
8
20

W J lrtl o s s l a
R p + ’. f l i l

U hnlA nala

rrrTatTTaaaat
t , , -

f.r s tr ltt

T- Ti Ttt ia tn tt

■

T I T 1 T T 1 T T t r i l i I 1

I

Tiir

■

--t«

. T _ r _ _ . . T ............................. r

R eta il trade ..........................................................................................................
Services .......................................................................................................................

57
60

70
31

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
11*
3

•90

n

n
n

22
8

5
a
12
9

-

8
12
12

8

6

_

5

.

_

.

>

-

-

6

-

9

9

17

17

5

6 103
75
62
13
8 28

53
30

6
21*
23

26
_

11*
9

6

_

3

_

2

2
6

'

23
k

-

-

1
1

1
*
19
12

9

8

5

2
1

1

9
10

3?
3
36
8
28

29
26
x

38 H*5
31 n 6
31 60
56
7 29

_

_
_
-

6

'

99 116 26
18 18
79
21
18 18
58
20 98 6

-

5

5

_
-

98
*

2
1

*

k
1

9

21+

9
9
.

2k
k
20

6
6
-

.
_

13
k
9
9
_

k
i*
-

6
5
1
1
-

1 ? 108
19
13
13
13

6
--

95
-

5
1

29
3
1
2
26
6

1
1
*

32

79
37

32
-

37
1+
2
1*2

10

53
13
1
12
kO

-

10
3

ik
1
*

5

5

37
a

12
5

_

_

_

-

U

-

-

10

7
*

x
x

2

1
*

5
2

5

20
3

'

3
1

_

_

3

1

102
15
V
77
10

_

-

-

38

-

18 _ J £
10

1
_
-

10
1

5

lk
-

6
-

2

-

8
-

12
k

52

5
5

lk
lk

6
6

2
2

8
8

k
k
k

6 19
6 18
6 18

16
15
15

6
6
6

29
28
28

9
8
8

-

-

-

-

-

1

12
n
8
3
1
x

1

1
x

23

9

5
5

28
28
28

19
19

1
1

1
1

2

1

x

_
-

1

x
1
1

k
3

n
1

6
3

8

_

_

3
3

-

-

-

19

8
8

-

-

-

_

_

26

3

26

3
_

1

-

_

-

9

3
'

1

5
16
16

1*3
5
38

-

3

1
*
*

k

5
5
-

52

-

x

k_

16 _J32 __ 12 lk
- 126
35
- 126
35 6
16
k lk
10
6
6
1 lk
*
~
~
*

1 12
.
-

3
kk
n s
6
18

____

ko _ k 2 _ 2 5 18
18
21
5 10
18
2 8
3
3
20 18
28
22
10
1
2 8
22
25
2 18

1*0
ko
ko
-

x

3
3

25

5

19
1

2

17
12

15

n
n
-

28
1

1
1

58
37

5

1
1

20
9
xx
k0
20
8

7
-

3
3

97
35
10
62
18
13

_15
lk
lk

n 2 _12&. _ 1 Z
31 _13^ 1*82
2
9 130 1*68 128 109 12k
31
X 3 1*66 126
X
99
_
6
2
2
8
2
2
2
9 n
kl
-

60

3
3

-

6?
39
30
30
-

10

2

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Workers were distributed as follows? 13 at $2 to $2.05; U at $2.20 to $2.25.
All workers at $.k0 to $.1*5.
.
.
.
Workers were distributed as follows: 15 at $.25 to $.30; 291 at $.30 to $.35; 96 at $.35 to $ 1 0 7 at $ 1 0 to $ 1 5
.*;
.*
.*.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




25
25

8 _ 2 6 __ 5fl
8 k6
2 30
6
16
8 18
12
5
8
12
2

39
10
10

6
6

■

1/
7/
3/
1/
*
"/
5
¥

-

i . q5

1*5
12
5

-

1+27 21*8 521+ 512 185 181
80
279 1*6 205 57
85
2 13 13
1*2 68
11
**
17
**
U
l* 38
235 11 192
11*8 202 319 1*55 105 96
X 80
120 177 393
56
56
11*
67
51* 79
8
81
26
76
2
25

_i66. 216 J & L _JZ5_
- 25T 132 369
33
36
288 12
_
81* 11
72
**
a
- 151* 1*8 37

1.00
1.13
1.30
1.33

160

681*
390 356
165 11*5
225 211
332 328
21*
36
159 181*
137 120

_

1.08

86
129
305
120

13

9
1.90
and
over

.

_

_

_
-

-

-

-

_

_

**
'

'

‘

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-35:

M

a c U

it u t o f

9 t u !U u & u & i

1/

6

Machine-tool operators, production, c la ss A ...................
Machine-tool operators, production, cla ss B k / .....
D rill-p ress operators, s in g le - or
Machine-tool operators, production, c la ss C k / ..........
D rill-p ress operators, s in g le - or
m ultiple-spindle, c la ss C .............................. .
Machinists, p rod u ction ......................................... .
Stock handlers and truckers, h an d........... ................... .
Tool-and-die makers (other than
tool-and-die jobbing shops) ....................................

0.90

8.9?

1.0 0 i.05 1 . 10

i m
x«ux

5

l

x,?

o
7

2

32

3
10

5

b

1.60

15

.97
1.58

5

1 .3 k

-

-

-

-

-

32
55

1.15

-

-

-

-

3

X#«|

17
126
ou
1h

1.83
1.59
1.36

—
"l X
10
X

1.17

h9

1 .(6

oA
•yo

f

fa ?

1.30 1.35

23
21

10

7

1
,
H

21*

1
3

-

3

8

8

27

2
6

6

-

-

-

-

2

I

«

•

1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1*20

t

i.?5

2.00 2.05 2 .10

t

7

15

£
2

l

h

8

2

6

10

1
8

3

-

27

1

36

1

1

1

1
21

5

-

3

6

f

1.6 0 1.65 1 .7 0 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05

-

1

h

22

2

-

-

-

-

.

32

-

-

_

_

.

1

-

h

1

k

5

i.??

l

10

k

1

1.50

i . 5o 1.55

1

k

8

1
18

6

3

7

8

6

13

28

9

1

5

1

1

1
0

-

6
2

19

1

1

-

l.Uo fa?

.95 1.0 0 1.05 1.1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 l.liO 1.U5

$
J.OX

1*3
23
87

31

Welders, hand, c la ss B .... ...................

and
under
.85 .90

C
M

28
82
98

CO

y

0.80

•o

Occupation 2 /

I

O

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

N ber Ao s*
um
tm
hourly
o
f
inings
w
orken M

-

23

2

2

1

1

7

y
The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in nonelectrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19U5 edition) prepared
by The Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were included. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers. All workers were paid on a time basis.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
y
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




Table B-63:

G & W

U e tU *

l/

C:

Union -Wage Scales

(Minimtu wage rates and maximum straight-tim e hoars per week agreed upon through c o lle c tiv e bargaining between
employers and trade-unions. -Rates and hours are those in e ffe c t on dates ind icated.
Comprehensive lis tin g s
o f union sca les for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing for July 1.
1951,are available on request. Sim ilar information for these industries w ill be published for July 1, 1952.)
Table C-15*

B

u

ild

in

g

G

o n d iiu c U o n

Table c - 205 :

July 1, 1991

C la ssific a tio n
B r ic k la y e r s .........
Carpenters
E le ctric ia n s . . . .
Painters
P lasterers ...........
Plumbers ...............
B uilding laborers

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

BcdzesU&i

Table c-205*
July 1 , 1951

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Working forem en............... .................................
Mixers, overmen......... . . • • . * • • • • .............. ..
Roll-machine operators
.................... . . . .
D ividers, d ep ositors, wrapping-machine
operators, and checkers
.......... • • • • •
Holder operators, stockmen . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mixers' h e lp e r s ................. ...............................
Icing-machine operators ............... ................
Oven feeders and dumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pan-washing-machine operators; r o ll
panners, female ............................................
TWisters, panners, packers, catchers,
carton makers, flo u r dumpers, and pan
g r e a s e r s ..........................................................
Hand ic e r s (cake), wrappers
Agreement B:
Bread:
Foremen.... .
Dough mixers, ovenmen ....................... ..
Dividermen • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Moldermen, roll-machine operators,
and henchmen ............................................
Oven loaders and dumpers ............... ..
Dough mixer h elp ers, pan g rea sers,
s e t - o f f men, and bread rackers
( a l l a fte r 6 months) • • • . • • • • • • • • • •
Cake:
Foremen ....................... ...................................
Mixers • • • • • ........... ............... . . • • • • • • • • •
Ingredient s c a le r s , scaling-machine
operators, flo o r la d ie s ..................... ..
Supervisors ..................................................
Cake-wrapping-machine operators . . . . .
le e r s , checkers, wrappers, packers . .
Greasing-machine operators ...................
Helpers, male, (a fte r 6 months) . . . . .
Shipping:
Shipping clerk s ................... ......................
Wrapping-machine operators
Bread checkers . . . . • • • • ............... .
Cake checkers
Wrapping-machine helpers (a fte r 6
months) • • • • • • ..........................................
Bun tra y ers, hand w rappers................. ..
Crackers and cookies:
Agreement A:
Sponge and sweet mixing:
Head m ix e r s ............. ......................... ..




Table C-27:

P

July 1 , 1951

♦2.900
2.200
2.600
2.200
2.500
2.750
1.130

C la ssific a tio n

B a kebU l- Gont inumd

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

♦1.430 40
1.380 40
1.280 40
1.280 40

1.230 40
1.230
1.100

40
40
1.040 40
.990

40

.990 40
.990 40
1.550 40
1.350 40
1.270 40

1.240 40

| Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

C la ssifica tio n
Crackers and cookies: - Continued
Agreement A: - Continued
Sponge and sweet mixing: - Continued
Mixers
Mixers* h e lp e r s ........................... ..............
Sponge baking:
Head bakers
Machine captains
Bakers ................................... ..
Rolleruen ....................................................
Sweet baking:
Overmen ...................................
Dough feeders, machine set-up men . •
S calers, weighers, dough ................. ..
Icing:
Head mixers ...................... . • • • • • ..............
Mixers ................. . . ......................................
Mixers* helpers ..........................................
Floormsn ......................... .............................
Machine operators, helpers • • • • • • • • • •
Packing:
Supplymen........................................... ..........
Pastemen, assemblymen............... • • • • • • •
Wrapping-machine o p e r a to r s ...................
Sponge packers, bundlers (hand) . . . . ,
S titc h e rs, fo r m e r s...................................
Sweet packers, c lo se r s, weighers . . . .
Agreement B:
Foremen ........................................................
M ixers.............................................. .................
Ovenmen, loaders ..................................... ..
Wrapping-machine operators, cuttermen,
and scalers ................................. ..................,
Dumpers, enrobers, squeeze bagmen, hand
wrappers, packers, and women helpers .

P A in

♦1.546 40
1.331 40

1.700 40
1.590
1.524
1.469

40
40
40

1.381 40

1.326 40
1.172

40

1.573 40
1.491 40
1.436 40
1.271 40
1.161 40

t lH

40
40
40
40
40
1.150 40
1.326
1.183
1.161

1.275
1.075
.925

40
40
40

.875

40

.825

40

1.350 40
1.220 40
1.190 40
1.120 40
.980 40
.930 40

1.656 40

Table C-4 1 :

C la ssifica tio n
Book and job shops:
Bindery women....................
Bookbinders
........
Compositors, hand ............
Electrotypers
Machine operators ............
Mailers .................................
Photoengravers................. .
Press a ssista n ts and feeders
2-color presses ..........
Pressmen, cylinder • • • • • ,
2-color presses . . . . . .
P e r fe c to r ........
Rotary and o ff s e t p resses, 17 x 22 inches
through 22 x 42 inches
O ffset presses under 17 x 22 inches
Rotary, sheet feed, f i r s t ,
Rotary, sheet feed , second
Pressmen, platen
Stereotypers ...............................

J lc

O p & u d U u p

•

q

8

o

*U

tu

*td

Rats
per
hour

c

a

C m

l

<J 'U

Hours
per

♦2.533
2.613
2.533
1.975
2.107
2.693
2.853
2.535
2.643
2.801
2.909
2.533
2.641

U

U

U

p lo y m

m

*

October 1 , 1951
ftete Hours
per per
hour week

C la ssifica tio n

Busses and tra ck less tr o lle y s :
F irst 6 months • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • ♦1.330
7 — 12 months ....................... ..............................
1.390
After 1 y e a r .............
1.430
Feeder busses:
P lrst 6 months
1.280
7 - 1 2 months .................................................Tttf. , T. 1.340
After 1 year ................................... ..
1.380

M

“

-

/ o to k b u u o k

•a n d

d ta lp &

U

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

40
.990 40
.950 40
.950 40
.940 40
.940 40

m

1.381

Q

.980 40

1.120

U

m

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work ...........
Compositors, hand - night work . . . .
Machine operators - day work • • • • . .
Mailers - day w o r k ................................
Mailers - night work • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Photosngravers - daywork ..................
Photoengravers - night' work . . . . . . .
Pressmen, web presses - day work • .
Pressmen, web presses - night work ,
Pressmen-in-charge - day work . . . . .
Pressmsn-in-charge - night work . . .
Stereotypers - day work • • • • • • • • • • •
Stereotypers - nigh t work .................

1.436

1.040 40

1.400 40
1.330 40
1.250 40

J

C la ssifica tio n

Table C-42:
Table C-27*

a

July 1, 1951

bate Hours
per
per
hour week

♦1.250
2.415
1 2 .4 8 0

2.608

2.480
2.270

2.693
1.637
1.680
2.427
2.533
2.459
2.598
2.427
2.309
2.235
2.427
2.667

Hours
per

C la ssifica tio n

Helpers
Hakery
Beer - Keg drivers ....................... .
General - Freight, c it y d elivery • • • • •
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Film d rivers:
F irst 3 months
Over 3 months ..................... • • • • « • • • • •
Grocery:
Chain store ...........................
Wholesale ...................................
Meat - Packinghouse:
Agreement A:
C ity drivers . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Meat, dairy, and poultry drivers
Agreement B ................................... ..
Paper.......... %...............
Railway express:
Pick-up and d e liv e r y .............
Money pick-up ............................... ..

♦l.OOO
•950
1.320
1.423
1.150

40
40
48
40
48
1.020 48

1.200 40
1.380

40

1,200 48
1.250
1.325
1.530
1.450
1.310

40
40
53
40

1.635
1.775

40
40

Occupational Wage Survey, A tlanta, Ga., March 1952
U.S. D R EN OF LA O
EPA TM T
BR
Bureau o f Labor S t a tis tic s

14

D:

Entrance Rates

ZtUtoOHM H at& l jo * P la n t W m A bAA,

Table D-l *

1/

E:

Percent o f plan t workers in establishm ents w ith s p e c ifie d
minimum r a te s in -

Supplementary W age Practices

Table E -l:

S

U

i^

t

fts U M

t iit O t U

Manufa ctu rin s
Minimum ra te (in cen ts)

Durable
Nondurable
An
goods
goods
WholeR e ta il iServ­
indusPublic
s a le
Establishmenta w ith _
t r ie s
u t i l i t i e s * trade trade ic e s
1001 or 21-250 251-1000 '1001 or
2/
21-250 251-1000
more
more
workers workers
workers iworkers
workers
workers
\

A ll establishm ents .............

100.0

35 or under ............................
Over 35 and under A .........
O
AO ...............................................
Over A and under A5 .........
O
A5 ...............................................
Over A5 and under 50 .........
50 ...............................................
55 ...............................................
Over 55 and under 60 .........
6 0 ...........................................
Over 60 and under 65
65 ...............................................
Over 65 and under 70 .........
7 0 ............... ...............................
Over 70 and under 75 . . . . .
75 ...............................................
Over 75 and under 80 . . . . .
8 0 ...............................................
Over 80 and under 85 .........
85
Over 85 and under 90 .........
9 0 ...............................................
Over 90 and under 95 .........
95 ........................................... . .
Over 95 and under 100 . . . .
1 0 0 .............................................
Over 100 and under 105 . . .
1 0 5 .............................................
Over 105 and under 110 . . .
n o .............................................
.Over n o and under n 5 . . .
Over 115 and under 120 . . .
1 2 0 .............................................
Over 120 and under 125 •••
Over 125 and under 130 ..*
Over 130 and under 135 •••

3 .1
2 .0
2 .0
1 .3
.3
.5
7 .3
.5
.2
.5
.A
.5
1 .1
.5
.8
29 .A
1. 0
6. 2
5.8
A.9
2 .6
1 .9
.7
1.A
2. 3
(i/)
5 .5
9 .6
(3 /)
.8
1 .9
.5
.3
•8
2 .5
.8

Establishm ents w ith no
esta b lish ed minimum • • • •

100.0
-

-

A5.0
n .i
22.7
11.5
2 .6
-

_J.Q .Q
Q __
100.0
-

100.0
-

100.0
-

y

-

-

-

2 .2
A7.9
13.5
A.2
6 .9
2.2
5. A

29.5
12.2
7.A
10.0
-

_1QQ.Q__
A1.0
-

100.0

100.0
2.0
•
8 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12.6
5. 2
16.0
23.6
A.2
1A.8
2.A
2.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.3
8. 0
A.A

7.1
25. 2
-

-

-

-

-

A9.3
1.3
1 .9
A.9
•A
2 .0
3 .7
7 .2
7.0
A .l
3 .0
A.O
3 .2

-

-

-

-

8 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1*2
-

25.9
12.7
18.7
A.6

3.A
3.5
-

-

-

7 .1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 .8
-

57.7
12.9
-

1 6.1
6 .5

.1

-

-

A1.3
17.7
-•
-

6 .7
-

-

1. 1
_

Lowest ra te form ally esta b lish ed fo r h ir in g e ith e r men or women plan t workers other than watchmen*
Excludes data fo r fin a n ce, insurance, and r e a l e s t a te ,
Less than .05 o f 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other pu blic u t i l i t i e s .




1ill--- "
m a m ifactur*ing
indu
[ p 8

Shift differential

-

-

-

A.3
8 .6
A .6
-

Nondurable
goods

Machinery
industries

2/
2d
shift

Percent of workers on
extra shifts, a n
establishments .............

L2,7

5t0

9*9

1*9

15.4

8.0

2.8

Receiving shift
differential ............

7.8

1.5

9 .1

1.5

6 .7

1. 6

2.1

7.8

l .A
-

9.1
-

1.3
-

6 .7
1 .8
.2
.7
2 .8
—

1. 6
-

2.1
-

1.2
.
_

.8
_
_

Uniform cents
(per hour) ...........
2 1 / 2 cents .........
3 l/2 cents ........
A cents
5 cents ............
6 c e n t s .............
7 1 / 2 cents ........
8 cents .............
9 1 /3 cents .........
10 c e n t s ..... * .....
10 1 / 1 0 cents ......
15 cents ••••*••••••
16 cents ......... .

-

9 .9
.3
5.3
1 .3
3. 3
.3
.2
-

Durable
goods

3d or
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
2d
other
other
other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift

M t9

A.5
A.7
2 .1
A.7
1 .6
.8
29.7
2 .2
1 .0
2.7
2 .2
2.3
3. 9
19.3
1. 6
A.9
5.5
3 .8
2 .5
-

-

-

-

. L
2/
j/
*

100.0

Percent o f p lan t workers employed
on each s h if t in -

.9
.1
1.3
1.6
.1
3.2

.7
.5

1.9
.5
-

-

5.6
-

.1
1.1
-

•2

.1

.1

.1

.8
.1
.1

-

•A

.2

-

-

-

-

•1

-

-

•2

Uniform percentage ••••

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other

-

.1

-

.2

-

-

.8

•A

8.7

6.A

•••••••••••••••••

Receiving n o
d i f f e r e n t i a l ...... .

y
2 j

.1
.1
•2

A.9

3 .5

.6
-

.2
1.3

-

.7

Include s data fo r in d u s tr ie s in a d d itio n to th ose shown separately*
No workers employed on 3d or oth er s h ift*

Occupational Wage Surveys A tla n ta , Ga., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s

Table E-2

15

Sclt&dul&d Wj&eJtbf Jlou/U*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS 1 / EMPLOYED IN-

Weekly hours

All establishm ents ..............................................
35 hours • • • • • .........................................................

Over 35 and under 3 7$ h o u r s ...........................
37$ hours ..................................................................
Over 37$ and under 1*0 h o u r s ...........................
1*0 hours .......................... ..
Over 1*0 and under 1*1* hours .......................... ..
1 1 h o u r s .............................................................. ..
**
Over 1*1* and under 1*8 h o u r s ...................... ..
1*8 hours ..................• • • • ..................... ...................
Over 1*8 and under 50 h o u r s ........................ ..
Over

50

hours

............... ..............

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

100.0
1.6
2.6
18.2
8.7
61. 2
1.8
2.7
2.3
.5
.2
.2

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

o.5

1.0

•

-

-

17.3

1.8
-

32.9
.7
56.2

•U
76.1*
1.6
3.2

96.6

-

-

•6

.6

-

-

3.3
5.7
•
1.2
-

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

l* .o

m

3.1
5.1

8.1

5.9
66.0

•
23.8
•
1*.2
•1

Finance**

3.3

•

-

-

-

<2/>

All
indus­
tries

y

100.0

100.0

m

77.1
.8
1.6
9.2
1.0
1.5
.5
.2

Durable
goods

All

•
18.8

1 00.0

100.0

0.1*

0.2
7.2
13.2
30.8
1*8.5

•
76.8
5.1
2.6

Services

0.9

.3
2.7

i* 7 i*

.1

-

2.5
2.5
•

•

1.2
*
*

66.7
1.6
2.9
6.8
U.5

.7
3 .0
3.1*

100.0

100.0

_

8.3

86.2
1.1
1.1*
1 .6
2.1*

93.3

79.5
2.2

. 1*

.7

1.2

Public
utili­
ties*

1 00.0

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

o.l*

2.1*

,3

78.1*

36.1*
5.1
3.8
12.6
21.5
1.8

26.8

100.0

1.7

0.3

m

59.1*
l*.l*
11.2

Non­
durable
goods

.

1*.3

_
55.5

2.7

3.3

2.1*

•1*

1*.7
•
.1
.8

5.5
26.1*

5ll*
5.7
1*.2
1.1
1*.8

12.6

11.1*

27.0
27.6

8.3
8.1

2.6

'

1/
?/
3/
*
**

Data r e la te to women workers.
Includes data fo r In d u str ie s in add ition to those shown sep arately.
Less than .0$ o f 1 percen t.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e .
Table E->3:

P a u d

J k

d

u

la

if i

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Number o f paid h o lid a y s

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.1*

99.2

100.0

99.7

100.0

96.5

76.6

.
2

.3

.5

1.1
1.1*

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

A ll e s t a b lis h m e n ts .............................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

E stablishm ents providing paid
h olid ays ........................................................... ..

99.2

9 8 .2

9
8.8

1 day .................................• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
2 d a y s ..................................................................
2 days ......... .............................. .......................
$
3 d a y s ...................................
1 days .................... ...............• • • • • • ............ ..
*
1 d a y s ................................................................
*$
5, d a y s ..................................................................
5 $ d a y s .............................................. .................

6 d a y s ........................................................ • • • •
6$ days ••••• .............................. .
days .................................................................
8 d a y s ...................... .
9 days ............................ .
11 d a y s ...............................................................
12 days ..................................................................... ..
7

E stablishm ents providing no paid
h olidays ........................................... • • • • ............ ..

~U
y

*
«*

•
1
.
1

•

(2/)

•
•

1.0
1.6
(2/)
10.78
.1*
30.8

2

.
2
.7

•
•
•
.5

•

2 0 .3

•

-

69.1
•

78.0

.1*

1 .0

.3
37.5

•
-

2.0

5.8

3.2

2.1

•

-

(2/)

-

-

-

-

-

-

.8

1.8

1.2

.8

•

.3

1*.7

•
8

2.2
-

2.6

io.5
-

Services

m
m

•

1.2

82.8

.9
•
•
-

-

1*7.1*
-

l* .l

57.5
3.8
-

1.6
8.1
6
.2

56.3
•

»

.
8
38.7

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

6 9 .6

7 *.o
1

y

.
1

•
1
-

37.3

•

27.3

.6
«
-

in clu d es data fo r in d u s tr ie s in addition to those shown sep arately.
Less than .05 o f 1 percen t.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, in su ra n ce, and r e a l e s t a te .




PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

31.6
.1*
2.7

2

6.0

-

15.8

1.3
-

20.2
17.0

•

3.0

•
1

•
1*.3
2.3
.5

6 0 .3

10.8
•
•

12.1

.3
1.7
2.5
•1*
3l*.8
.9

2 9 .8

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

65.5

87.7

81*. 7

„

2.0
-

1.1*
-

2.6
-

-

2.0

•

-

15.9

28.1*

28.5

-

•

•

27.1*

50.8
-

•
-

22.1*
1*1.6

56.7
-

-

-

3 .3
.1*
-

3.6

(2/)

-

•
-

7.1
*
-

6. 1
*

M
-

1*
*2

86.2
5.3

22
.
2 .5
5.8

«
1*0.7
2.9
31.3

5.6
•
-

61*.8

•
9.3
16.3

1.
*8
63.7
3.2

31.8

•

1.7
-

•
•

1.8
-

2.3
.3
•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.5

23.1*

30.1*

26.0

3U.5

12.3

15.3

13.8

35.2

5.7
»
-

»

•

•
-

•

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 195*
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

Paid V&oattonl ( fyobmal P/uhUMohA)

Table E-4:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Vacation po l i c y

All establishments ................... .

All
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

Public
utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .6

1 0 0 .0

99.8

99.1

1 0 0 .0

81».7

90.9

90.6

87.7

93.3

97.8

_

.7
79.1*

1.3
83.8
-

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

98.3

98.7

98.8

.3

3 1 .0

1.5
50.9
-

33.3
•

58.5

.3
66.7

2.5
63.3
•

1*6.3

33.0

65.3

1*1.5

1.7

1.3

1 .2

1 .1
*

Finance**

Services

y

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

88.9

90.0

87.2

1 ye a r of service
Establishments with p a i d v a c a t i o n ..... .
Under 1 week ............ ...............
1 w e e k ..................................
Over 1 and u n der 2 w e e k s ..............
2 weeks .............................. .
Establishments with n o paid
v a c a t i o n s ............... ............ .

_

*

15.1
l.l*
83.3

6 3 .0
-

3 6 .1

.

«

•

2.9
•

27.7
•

.3
67.1
-

75.3
•

5U.1*
-

3 6 .6

57.3
-

7l*.3
•

97.1

57.0

23.5

io.5

2 .6

1 8.0

1*3.1*

52.3

32.7

12.9

15.3

9.1

9.1*

12.3

6.7

2 .2

1 1 .1

1 0 .0

1 2 .8

-

•

.2

.9

99.8

99.1

1 0 0 .0

81*. 7

91.1

90.6

87.7

93.3

97.8

88.9

90.0

89.8

3.8
1 .1*
91*.6

H*.l*
.5
72.9
11.3

2 .6

11*. 2

51.8
3.2
3U.1*
1.7

3 1.0
-

6 6 .8

-

26.3
-

23.5
3 .7
61.7

31 . 6

2.3
61**7
3.5

72.3
8.5
6.9
-

6 7.0

-

69.6
l*.l
16.9

1*7.1*
8 .1*

63.8
3.3
22.7
-

15.3

8.9

9.1*

12.3

6.7

2 .2

1 1 .1

1 0 .0

1 0 .2

81*. 7

91.1

90.6

87.7

93.3

97.8

88.9

90.0

89.8

9.7
2.3

2i
*.2

16.3
•

3 1 .8
•

6.9
•

17.5
3.7

2 2 .1
1*.8

61.5
•

87.1
-

50.1

-

71.1*
-

6 3 .6

3.5

22 .8
1 .6
6 3 .0
•2

1 .1

3.5

-

-

-

3.8

l*.l

11.9

1.9

15.3

8.9

9.2*

6.7

2 .2

1 1 .1

1 0 .0

1 0 .2

88.9

90.0

89.8
1*5.8

1*2 . 1

-

2 years of service
98.3

98.7

9 8.8

98.6

1 0 0 .0

1 w e e k ..................................

ll*.l*

58.5
.

2 5 .6

O ver 1 and under 2 weeks ........... .
2 weeks .............. ..................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks •••••••••••••

1*5.0
-

9.3
.

81.5

1 .8

53.7
-

1*0.3
-

73.0
-

1.7

1.3

1 .2

Establishments with pa i d v a c a t i o n s ..... .

98.3

98.7

98.8

1 week ...................................

5.0
.3

9 .0
-

7.3

8 7 .8
1 .2
li. 0

89.7
-

91.5
-

1.7

Establishments with p a i d v a c a t i o n s ..... .

1 week ........................ ..........
2 w e e k s ......................... .......
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ............ .
3 weeks ......................... ...... .
Over 3 weeks ................. ..........

.1

Establishments with p aid vacations ••••••

Establishments with no paid
vacations ........................... .

.6

•

1 .1*

90.7
-

■

-

97.1*
-

.2

.9

99.8

99.1

1 0 0 .0
•1

•

-

-

2 .6

5 years of service

Over 1 and u nder 2 weeks ..............
2 w e e k s ........ ..................
Over 2 a nd u n d e r 3 weeks •••••••••••••
3 weeks ......................... .
Establishments with n o pa i d
vacations .............................. .

-

98.6

11 .1*
87.2
-

1 0 0 .0

3.1
•

1 3 .0
.8

95.8
-

88 .1
8 .6

69.8
1.3
11*.2

•2

.9

1 .1
-

-

•
97.1*
2.5
-

6 8.1

-

66 .1
*

.

1 .1

-

-

3.1

1.3

1 .2

1 .1
*

-

98.3

98.7

98.8

98.6

1 0 0 .0

99.8

99.1

1 0 0 .0

81*.7

91.1

90.6

87.7

93.3

97.8

5.0
57.2

9.0

7.3
77.8
-

1 1 .U
7 6 .2

1 .1

13.0
32.2
.5
53.1*
-

.1
56 .6

9.7
70.1*
-

22.8

21*. 2
58 .2

16.3
59.5
-

3 1 .8
56 .8

6.9
53.7
-

17*5

2 2 .1

1 8 .6
*

i*l».l*

1 1 .0

3.1
56.9
•
39.8

11.9
-

1*.7
-

37.2

2 2 .8

-

9.1*

12*3

6.7

2 .2

-

'

■

12.3

1*5 .8
3.3
38.8
«
.

15 years of service

Establishments with no pa i d
vacations ............................

1/

*
**

77.1
-

3l*.l
1.9

1 2 .6
-

13.7
-

1.7

1.3

1 .2

-

-

1*3.5
55.1*
-

1 .1
*

Includes data fo r in d u s tr ie s i s ad d ition to those shown sep a ra tely .
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s) , communication, and oth er pu blic u t i l i t i e s ,
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s t a te .




-

.2

.9

3 6 .8

3.5

52.5
.5
15.1

6.5

1 .1

.2

15.3

8.9

•

8 .2

-

-

•
-

1 1 .1

2 .6

m

20.9
-

1.9

1 0 .0

1 0 .2

Occupational W age Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1952
O.S. DEPARTMENT OF L ABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17

Paid Blok Jljtaae (#o*m al PaouM ihU)

Table E-»51

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

P rovision s fo r paid s ic k lea v e

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

1 /

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

30.2

15.1

5.9

6 .2

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

E stablishm ents w ith form al p ro v isio n s
fo r paid s ic k l e a v e .......................................

23 .7

4 0 .0

67.1

1 .3

25.2

22.2

8 .7

2 4 .1

9 .0

14 .1

14.9

30.6

2 days .................................................................
3 days .................................................................
5 d a y s .................................................................
6 days .................................................................
7 d a y s .................................................................
10 d a y s ................................. . ......................... ..
12 days ...............................................................
21 days . . . ...................... ..................................

.A
.9
7 .7
7 .1
5.2
2 .2
.2

.
7 .1
2 9.2
2 .8
.9

12.0
49.7
3 .8
1 .6

1 .3
-

_
3 .4
1 .7
2 0 .1
-

2 .0
17.6
2 .6
-

.
6 .6
2 .1
-

_
7 .7
8 .6
7 .8
-

3 .0
4 .6
1 .4
-

1 .0
.9
10.0
1 .1
1 .1
-

14.9
-

30.6
-

E stablishm ents w ith no formal p ro v isio n s
fo r paid s ic k l e a v e ..................................... ..

7 6 .3

6 0 .0

32.9

98 .7

7 4 .8

77.8

9 1 .3

75.9

9 1 .0

85.9

85.1

69.4

100.0

69.8

33.6

4 3 .6

67.1

9 .9

32.9

4 0 .9

17.0

34.4

17 .1

19.1

15.3

30.6

.8

39.8

.
1.7
49.7
14.1

_

A ll establishm ents ..............................................

6 months o f se r v ic e

(2 / )

_
-

12.7
8 .5
9 .0
-

_

_

4 .8
1 .1
_
-

.
5.2
1 .0
_
_
-

84.9

94.1

93.8

27.4

14.1

15.1

.7
4 .7
9 .7
_
-

1 rea r o f se r v ic e

Establishm ents w ith formal p r o v isio n s
fo r paid siQk lea v e .......................................
1 d a y ....................................................................
5 days .................................................................
5& d a y s ...............................................................
6 d a y s ..................................................................
7 days .................................................................
10 days .....................................................................................................
12 d a y s .....................................................................................................
15 d a y s ............................................................ ........................................
20 days ......................................................................................................
21 days ...............................................................
22 days ...............................................................
24 days ...............................................................
E stablishm ents w ith no formal p ro v isio n s
fo r paid s ic k l e a v e ................................. ..

.7
6 .0
.2
7 .8
.3
8 .0
5.5
1 .2
1 .3
.2
1 .4
1 .0
6 6.4

_

1 .0
2 9 .7
12.0

-■
1 .0
8 .9

_

4 .6
24.5
3 .8

2 0 .1
2 .6
3 .3

_

1 .8
7 .4
-

-

-

-

-

7 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.6
-

-

-

2 .9
7 .0
5 .0

_
-

56.4

32.9

90.1

67.1

59.1

.9

83.0

2 .6
3 .3
-

1 .2
6 .2
14.3
4 .4
2 .4
65 .6

_

3 .9
6 .1

..

5.7
1 .4

1 .9
.4
10.8
1 .1
2 .7
2 .0

-

-

_
-

.
_
.1
.1

-

82.9

80.9

See footnotes at end of table,
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Ga., March 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and r e a l estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




.4
14.9

_
_
30 .6

-

-

-

_

.8

12.8
_

_
_

-

-

-

_

-

..

_

5.2
8 .5
19.6
6 .5

_

9 .7
2 .4

_

1 .8
6.5
_

_

_

_

5.2
9 .6
.3

5.8
_

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

1.5
1 .0

-

-

84.7

6 9 .4

99 .2

60.2

72.6

85.9

84.9

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF L ABOR

18

Paid S io k Jl&aae (rf& im al PAaaUioni)

Table E-5:

-

Con tin u ed
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments

M

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

anufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

1 00.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.8

40.5

2 9 .4

14.1

1 5 .1

-

-

11.5
9 .7
3 .2

1 .8
2 .7
-

-

-

9 .6
-

—

2 .5
1 .5
1 .0
“

-

-

-

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 /

100.0

100.0

1 00.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 00.0

3 9.7

4 6 .0

71.2

9 .9

77.7

42.7

1 7 .0

3 4 .4

17.1

20 .0

1 6 .4

3 2 .9

_

_

_

_

.

.

1.7-

-

4 .6

-

2 9.7

4 9.7

—
_
_

17.3
—
2 .6
5 .0

3 .0
6 .1

30.5

-

-

1 .8
.4
10.1
1 .1
2 .8
2 .7
.9
.1
.1

-

_

1 .0

2 .6
3 .3

_

2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....... .
1 d a y ..........
5 days
5 k days .........
6 days.... .....
7 days ..........
10 days.........
12 days .........
15 through 21 days
22 days .........
2 - days .........
4
25 days .........
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............... .

.7
5 .4
.2
7 .2
.3
8 .3
4 .9
4 .5
1 .4
1 .0
5 .8

_

_

1 .0
.

1 1 .0

1 4.1

6 .6

4 .3

5.7

2.3

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

60.3

54.0

28.8

4 2 .8

4 6 .0

7 1.2

«.
_
_

24.5
3 .8
5 .0

1 .8
2 .5
_

—

1 .2
6 .2
9 .7
7 .0

-

6 .6
1 .4

.4
-

14.9

.8

-

-

1 .1

2 .4

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

5.2
8 .5
1 9 .6
6 .4
.8

5.2
—
9 .6
.3

-

12 .7

39.8

5.9
6 .9
5 .0
-

-

90.1

22.3

57.3

83.0

65.6

82.9

80.0

83.6

6 7 .1

99.2

59.5

70.6

85.9

84.9

9 .9

7 8 .0

42.7

4 1 .4

3 4 .4

17.1

23.6

16.4

32.9

.8

6 1 .0

2 9 .4

1 9 .4

15.1

1 .8
.8
1 4 .4
-

2 .6
1 .2
6 .2
9 .7
4.6
5.7

_
3 .0
6 .1

30.5

.8
-

11.5
9 .7

1 .8
1 .7

_
5 .2

6 .6
1 .4
-

-

4 .4

-

-

-

2 4 .4

-

.

-

-

4 .4

-

_

-

15 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ........

_
29.7

1 .7
«.
49.7

r
_
1 .0

5 .0

3 .8

6 .6

_

_

1 d a y ........................
5 days
5 k d a y s ........ ..........
6 days ......................
7 days ......................
10 days
12 days • • • . . . ........
15 or 18 days •••••
20 days ........ ...........
21 through 25 days
44 days • • .......... .
50 days ..................
60 or 66 days • • •. •

.7
4 .5
.2
7 .0
.3
6 .9
5 .1
1 .7
3 .5
2 .4

Over 66

5.5

-

-

-

44.8

1 .8

57.2

54.0

2 8.8

90.1

22 .0

57.3

d a y s ......

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave............ .

.
6

3.3
1 .1

1 .0

_

2 .4
6 .0
.9
_

1.0

4 .9
_
-

17.3
2 .6
4 .2

-

24.5
3 .8
-

-

-

_

_

-

3 .6
5 .0
2 .7

-

2 .3

-

-

-

—

_

4 .1
1 0 .3
1 .6

_

l/ Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
2/
*
*#

Less than .05 of 1 percent*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

5.5

—

-

_

2 .0
.4
9 .9
1 .1
2 .8
3 .0
.5
.1
•1
1 .1
(a / )

—

“

“

~

58.6

65.6

82.9

-

-

-

1.1
-

-

2 .4
-

-

_
1 .6
5 .2
8 .5
19.6
6*4
-

_

.4
14.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

2.6

7 6 .4

—

83.6

67.1

99.2

—

-

9.6

-

-

-

3 .2
-

-

10.6
-

.3
-

1.0
1 .5
-

•
6

19 .7

70.6

-

-

-

5.3

-

—

—

1 .9

3 9 .0

-

80.6

84.9

Table E-6:

N onftficdiuUdan HonuLeA

19

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type o f bonus

M

All
Indus*
tries

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN
M

anufacturing

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

y

anufacturing

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

1

A ll establishm ents • • • • .....................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

E stablishm ents w ith nonpr eduction
bonuses
•••••.......................

U3.6

32*0

21.8

U 6 .5

18.3

U5.6

71.8

Christmas er year-end • • • • • ......................
P r o fit-sh a r in g ................................................
Other ...................................................................

10.6
3.3
2.0

26.5
8.1

18.0
8.0

U3.5

llt.9

69.0

-

-

-

2.0
1 .U

U3.5

Establishm ents w ith no nonproduction
bonuses • • • • • • • • ................................................

56.U

68.0

78.2

53.5

81.7

2/

V
2/

*
* *

8.3

100.0

100.0

U2.6

6 1 .5

U5.7

35.6

28.0

U2.8

22.1

56.3

75.9

U6.6

61.5

U3.2

31.5
5.6

23.2
7.1

39. u
U.2

•

U6.6
.

-

53.8
2.5
2.U

75.9

-

19.3
2.8
2.U

1.5

-

38.5

6U .U

72.0

77.9

U3.7

2U.1

53.U

1.2
2.1

3.U

38.2
U.3
3.U

5U .U

28.2

57.U

•

•
-

3.3
.9
5U.3

Includes data fo r in d u str ie s 1a add ition to those shewn sep arately.
Unduplioated t o t a l .
Transportation (exeluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s t a te .

T a b l. E - 7 :

9<*t&4*SUi*tC*e. Otul

P - € 4 ti4 0 * t

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type o f plan

M

All
indus­
tries

All

M

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

E stablishm ents w ith insurance or
pension plan s
•.....................

92.9

96.3

98.U

93. U

L ife insurance ................................................
Health insurance ...........................................
H o sp ita lisa tio n • • • • • • ............................... ..
Retirement pension ..................

88.6
U8.3
61.2
52.0

95.8
61*.0
8U.9
30.9

98.U
78.U
87.1
16.3

92.2
13.3
*
81.8
51.7

E stablishm ents w ith no insurance or
pension p l a n s ....................................................

7.1

3.7

1.6

6 .6

1 .1

2/

100.0

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

>8.9

89.9

90.1
6U.5
27. 1
*
75.8

8U.5

Includes data fo r in d u s tr ie s in add ition to those shown sep arately.
Unduplicated t o t a l .
tran sp ortation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and ether pu blic u t ilit ie s *
Finance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a te .




Whole­
sale
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

y

100.0

100.0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

anufacturing

A ll establiehm ente ..............................................

*

57.2

anufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
60.7

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

All

•

100.0

100.0

92.6

99.7

61.8

8 U .0

89. l t

90.9

87.9

93.U

82. l t

77.9

97.0
ui.u
6 3 .3

56.1
26.8

63.7
56.2

85.9
U3.3
60.1
65.5

59.9

10.2
12. It

81.2
57. 1
*
65.6
25.0

88. l t
68.1
77.8
17.5

90.9
70.1
80.2
18.8

86.1
66.3
75.6
16. U

87.3
63.3
50.9
52.5

78.0
U2. l t
60.3
27.1

72.3
U8.3
59.6
35.2

10.1

7.U

.3

38.2

16.0

10.6

9.1

12.1

6.6

17.6

22.1

U l * .l

100.0

60. l t
33.5
U5.6

1.3
39.3

Occupational Wage Survey, A tlanta, Ga., March 1952
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT O LABO
F
R
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s

20

Appendix — Scope

With the exception of the union soale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was oolleoted by riait* of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered i compiling
n
earnings data for the following types of occupationst ( ) office
a
clerical, ( ) professional and technical, ( ) maintenance and
b
o
power plant, and ( ) custodial,warehousing, and shipping ( a l s
d
tbe
A-l through A-A). The covered industry groupings are i manufac­
turing) transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities) wholesale trade) retail trade) finance,
insurance, and real estate) and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained ina rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted beoause they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.
Among the industries inwhich characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum else of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each Industry (see fol­
lowing table). Although else l a . e frequently varied from
idt
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
Jobs, data far these jobs were included only far firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion oflarge than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings Information excludes premium pay tor over­
time and night work. Monproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
ooaeissians for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical,they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid) average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The mssber
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time
waikers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment’ full-time
s
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the Individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question,except in the section relating to woswn office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
speoifio benefits may be smaller. The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision far a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN ATLANTA, QA.,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BI THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MARCH 1952

Number of

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied

Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

Studied

21
21
21
21
21

1,437
401
168
233
1,036

242
67
24
43
175

21
21
21
21
21

99
293
306
148
190

21
21

28
66

2/

l/$

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In estahl ishments
studied
Total

Office

161,500
65,700
32,800
32,900
95,800

79,510
34,500
20,240
14,260
45,010

17,240
3,730
2,710
1,020
13,510

24
42
40
35
34

19,700
21,100
30,100
12,400

12,500

14,900
5,790
13,780
5,780
4,760

3,290
2,130
2,620
4,530
940

15
23

2,269
5,655

1,709
2,759

1632,275

Industry divisions in which occut>ations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ..................................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods 2/ ........................
Nondurable goods 4 / ....................
Nonmanufacturing...........................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ............................
Wholesale trade ....... .................
Retail t r a d e ............................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Services 5 / .............................
Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Machinery industries ...........................
Insurance c a r r i e r s ...................... .......

2/

1/ Atlanta Metropolitan Area (Cobb, DeKalb, and Fulton Counties).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworkingf lumber, Furniture, and other wood products) stone, clay, and glass products! instruments
related products!
miscellaneous manufacturing•
4/ Food and kindred products! tobacco! textiles! apparel and other finished textile products! paper and paper products! printing
publishing! chemicals! products of petroleum and coal! rubber products! and leather and leather products.
5/ Hotels! personal services; business services! automobile repair shops! radio broadcasting and television! motion pictures! nonprofit
membership organisations! and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included*




22

Index
Page

Page

Assembler (insurance carriers)
.... ...•••••...... ...
12
Assembler (machinery) ..... ............. ..... •••••••••••
12
Biller, machine ••••••....... ............. ...... .......
3, 4
Bookbinder (printing) .................... ••••••••••••••••
13
Bookkeeper, hand ..... •••••••.... .... ...... .
3, 4
Bookkeeping-machine operator.......... ••..... •••••••••••
3, 4
Bricklayer (building construction) ••••....... .......... .
13
Calculating-machine operator •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3, 4, 5
Carpenter (building construction) ..... ............ ......
13
Carpenter, maintenance ......... ••..••••....... ••••.... •
a
10
Cleaner ..... ........... ........................ .......
Cleaner (machinery) .............. .......... ...... .
12
Clerk, accounting
..... ..•••••..... .
3, 5
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••••••••••
12
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) •••••••••••••••••••••
12
Clerk, f i l e ...... ................ ............... .
5
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ••••..••••••••.... ..... .
12
Clerk, general ................. ..... ............ ......
3, 5
Clerk, general (insurance carriers)
12
Clerk, order
.... .
3, 5
Clerk, payroll .................. .................... .
3, 5
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ..........
12
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ..................
12
Compositor, hand (printing) •••••••••••••••••••.... •••••••
13
Crane operator, electric b r i d g e ...... ...................
10
Draftsman ••••••••.......... ................ ............
a
Drill-press operator (machinery) ........ ............ .
12
Duplicating-machine operator ............ ................
3, 6
Electrician (building construction) •••••.••.... •••••....
13
Electrician, maintenance ................................ .
a
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) •••••••••••••••••••••»
12
Electrotyper (printing) ................ .
13
Engineer, stationary .....................................
a
Fireman, stationary boiler •••••••••••••.....
•••••••
9
Guard •••••••••••.•••••••••••••••••••••••....
•••••
10
Helper (bakeries) ............... ....... ............... .
13
Helper, motortruck driver
13
Helper, trades, maintenance ..............................
9
Janitor ......... ••••..... ••••.......... ..... •••••••.••
10
Janitor (machinery) ••••••...... ........ ................
12
Key-punch operator....... ...... ........ ............ .
6
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) •••••••••••••••••••
12
laborer (building construction) .................. .
13
Machine operator (printing) ..... ....... •••••••.... .
13
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ........ .
12
Machinist, maintenance
..... •••••
9
Machinist, production (machinery) ••••••....... ...... .
12
Mailer (printing) ..... .................... ••••••..... .
13
Maintenance man, general utility ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
9
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ...... ............ ..
9
Mechanic, maintenance
........ •••••••••••••••••••
9
☆

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1952 0 — 215965




Mixer (bakeries) ........ .......... ....... .
Motortruck d r i v e r .... ................ ........... .........
Nurse, industrial (registered) ..................... •••••••
Office b o y .......... ••••................ ............ •••••
Office g i r l ................................................
O i l e r .......... ........... ....... ....... ................ .
Operator (local transit) .................. ................
Order f i l l e r ...... ..••••••••••••........... .
Overman (bakeries) ••••••••••.......
................... .
Packer .............. ....... ............... ........ ........
Packer (bakeries) •••••...... ............. ••••••••#••.....
Painter (building construction) .............. •••••••••••••
Painter, maintenance ••.••••••...... ••••••••••.......... .
Photoengraver (printing).... ...... ••••..... ........... .
Pipe fitter, maintenance •••••.............................
Plasterer (building construction) .•••••....
Plumber (building construction).
..........
Plumber, maintenance............................••••.......
Porter ......................................................
Porter (machinery).... ......................... •••••••••••
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ..........•••••••••••
Press assistant (printing) ....... ........ ........ ........
Press feeder (printing) •••••••.....................
Pressman (printing) •••••••••....... ••••••..... ...........
Receiving c l e r k ................. •••••••••••••..... •••••...
Secretary ...................... ••••••........... ........ .
Section head (insurance carriers) ..................... ••••
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Shipping clerk ......... .......... •••••........ .......... .
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ..........
••••
Stenographer ••••••......... •••••...................... ••••
Stenographer (insurance carriers) .................... ••••••
Stereotyper (printing)
Stock handler ••••••...........
Stock handler (machinery) •••••••••••...... ••«•••.........
Switchboard operator •••••••...... •••••••••••.............
Switchboard operator-receptionist•••••••...................
Tabulating-maohine operator •••••••••...... ••••••...... .
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) ..........
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ............ ••••••••••..... .
Transcribing-machine o p e r a t o r ....... •••••••••........ ..
Truck driver ..........
Trucker, hand .......... ••••••...... ......... .
Trucker, hand (machinery) ..................................
Trucker, power ......... •••••••.......... •••••........ •••••
T y p i s t .........
Typist (insurance carriers) •••••..••........
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ..............
Watchman ••••••••••••••••••••••.......
•••••
Welder, hand (machinery) .......
Wrapper (bakeries) ........ •••••••••........... ••••••••••••

13
33
$
3
°
9
13
3.0
13
3.0
13
13
9
13
9

13
13
9
10
12
12
13
13
13
10

6
12
9

10
11
4,

6
12
13
11
12

6
7
4, 7
12
12

7
11
11
12
11

7

12

12
11
12

13










THE OCCUPATIONAL WAG® SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S* Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
Sxiaa.
20 cents
1045
15 cents
1044
1056
25 cents
20 cents
1043
20 cents
1041
1066
20 cents
20 cents
1059
20 cents
1075
20 cents
1064
1067
15 cents
1068
25 cents
1081
25 oents
15 oents
1074
1070
15 cents
1060
25 oents
1082
20 cents
20 oents
1042
1071
20 cents
1058
15 oents
1069
15 cents
1076
25 oents
1078
15 oents
1057
20 cents
1077
20 cents
This report was prepared in the Bureau's Southern Regional Office. Communications
may be addressed tot
Brunswick A. Bagdon, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Room 664, 50 Seventh Street, N. E,
Atlanta 5, Georgia
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.>
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Tens
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Nevark-Jersey City, New Jersey
New Orleans, Louisiana
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
San Franoisoo-Oakland, California
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, Washington
Worcester, Massachusetts

Alabama
Arkansas
District
Florida
Georgia

The Southern Region includes the following States:
Louisiana
South Carolina
Maryland
Tennessee
of Columbia
Mississippi
Texas
North Carolina
Virginia
Oklahoma
West Virginia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102