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Occupational Wage Suivey

Bulletin No. HOI

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commi**ioner




Contents
INTRODUCTION.......... .

1

THE NEW YORK CITY AREA . . .
..

l

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE
TABLESt
Average earnings far selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations
.......................... ................. ............
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .............. •••••••••••••••••••*..
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ...................... ......... .
A-4
Custodial , warehousing, and shipping occupations
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-2071 Candy and other confectionery products •••••••••••••••••.•••<
B-2337 Women's and misses' coats and suits ••••••••••.•••••••.... .
B-235
M i l l i n e r y .................................................... .
B-336
Foundries, n o n f e r r o u s ............................. .......... .
B-342
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware .......... ....... ••••..... .
B-3444 Sheet-metal work •••••••..... •••••••••••••••••...............
B-3463 Stamped and pressed metal products
B-3468 Electroplating, plating, and polishing •••••••••••••••.......
B-35
Machinery industries t
Machinery .......••••...... •••••...... ........ •••••......
Paper and printing m a c h i n e r y ............... ........... .
Machine-tool accessories ••••••......... ••••••••........ .
B-3661 Radio, television, and related p r o d u c t s ............... .
B-40
R a i l r o a d s .................. ....... •••••.....................
B-63
Insurance carriers •••••............... ••••••••...... ........

3
12
3.3

19

20
21

22
22
23
23
24
24

26
26
27
28

28

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ....... ......... •••••••..... .
C-205
Bakeries .....................
C-2082
Malt l i q u o r s ................................................................
C-27
Printing ...........................................
••••••••
C-41
Local tranAlt operating employees ••••••••••......
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers .............. ••••..... ••••••••....... ••••••
C-44
Ocean transport - unlicensed personnel .. ........
•••••
C-446
Stevedoring .................................
•••»•
C-58
Restaurants and cafeterias ..... ............
•••••••••••
C-591
Drug stores ••••.............
C-651
Building service •••••••...... . ..................... .............. ••••••••
.
C-7011
H o t e l s ......................................................

29
29
29
29
30
30
31
32
32
32
33
33

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates

34

for plant w o r k e r s ....... .......

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ••••••••................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ••••........... ••••••....... •••••...................
S-3
Paid h o l i d a y s .................................................................
E-4
Paid vacations
37
E-5
Paid sick leave •••••••••.... .................••••••................ .
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ••••••••••••••••••••••.... ....... ............ •••••••
E-7
Insurance and pension plans •••••••••••••••••••••............. ••••••...... .

38
40
40

APPENDIXt
Scope and method of survey ........... .............................. .

41

I N D E X ............................. ....... ...... ...........................................

43

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports are available
upon request for children's stltdhdown shoes
(August 1951),
women's cement process shoes - slip lasted (August 1951), wo­
men's cement process shoes - conventional lasted (August 1951) $
and ferrous foundries (June 1951)*
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 30 cents

July 3, 1952

35
36
36

Introduction y
The New York City Area is 1 of AO major labor markets
in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys ® Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis* Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant;
(d) custodial, warehousing,
and shippingo
In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A- l through A-A) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions®
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied an an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey® 2/ Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables® Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative, of prevailing pay practices®
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans®

The New York City .Area
Total population of the 5 boroughs comprising New York,
the w o r l d s largest city, was approximately 7,800,000 in 1950*
Nonagricultural employment in New York City was esti­
mated to total more than 3,500,000 in January 1952® Factory
employment was at a peak level with over 1,000,000 workers®
About three-fourths of these workers were employed in establish­
ments producing nondurable goods® 'jj Apparel firms, employing
more than 350,000 workers, constituted the most important manu­
facturing industry, numerically® An additional 118,000 workers
were engaged in printing and publishing, and about 77,000 were

2 / Prepared in the Bureau’s regional office in New York,
N* Y®, by Norman J® Samuels under the direction of Frederick W®
Mueller, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst® The
planning and central direction of the program was carried on in
the Bureau’s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations*
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey®
See appendix table for listing of durable- and nondurablegoods industries•




employed in food processing industries* Among durable-goods
industries, metalworking establishments accounted for a fourth
of the 250,000 workers* Establishments manufacturing nonelec­
trical machinery employed about 38,000 workers®
The city’s Importance in the field of trade made it
especially susceptible to the Nation-wide buying slump that fol­
lowed the post-Korea boom® Department store sales had declined
nearly 20 percent from the previous year® Nevertheless, New
York’s retail establishments employed approximately A6A,000
workers in January 1952 and another 365,000 were employed in
wholesale concerns®

New York handled about A0 percent of the Nation’s ex­
ports and nearly half its imports® About 3A0,000 workers were
employed by transportation, ccsnmunication, and other public
utilities industries® Firms furnishing personal and business
services, technical services, and entertainment gave employment
to more than 550,000 workers.
Contractual agreements between management and labor
organizations affected nearly 85 percent of the plant workers
in the firms within scope of the study® In manufacturing, 9 of
10 workers were employed In establishments having written agree­
ments with unions; in nonmanufaoturing, 8 of 10 were in plants
with labor contracts® Nearly 95 percent of the plant workers in
the public utilities group were employed in unionized firms,
more than 85 percent in services, 60 percent in retail trade,
and 70 percent in wholesale trade* Contracts covering office
workers were less significant, with only about 15 percent em­
ployed in establishments with written agreements covering office
workers. However, about a third of the clerical workers in non­
durable goods manufacturing firms, two-thirds in the utilities
division, and two-fifths in retail trade were in organized es­
tablishments o

Occupational W age Structure
Wages and salaries of nearly all New York plant and
office workers were formally adjusted upward between January
1950, the base date for the Wage Stabilization Board’s 10 per­
cent Mcatch-upw wage increase formula and the time of the survey.
These increases followed the same general pattern prevalent in
other areas - scattered increases in early 1950 and then an
acceleration in the later months prior to the effective date of
wage controls® At the time of the survey, only a few of the
establishments studied had wage petitions pending before the
Wage Stabilization Board® Since the date of the Bureau’s pre­
vious study in New York - April 1951 - a number of industry­
wide agreements were completed which provided wage increases to
large blocs of workers®

In the food and food products industry, A,000 bakery
and confectionery workers received a 10 percent increase 0 Other
increases were granted to 3#000 employed in the ice cream indus­
try# 16 cents an hour; and 15#000 milk dealer workers, $10 a
week® The Nation-wide meat packers agreement resulted In an
increase of 11 cents an hour® Among textile workers, 17,000
in printing, dyeing, and finishing had their hourly rates ad­
justed b y 6 cents* In the apparel industry, 65,000 womenfs cloak
and suit workers received an increase in piece rates; 8,000
furriers got $3 to $6 a week; and 8,000 millinery workers re­
ceived a5i»rcent cost-of-living increase* About 20,000 building
service employees were granted increases of from $2*50 to $4 a
week as a result of collective bargaining® In transportation,
more than 50,000 maritime workers received increases of 6®2 per­
cent in November or December 1951, and longshoremen got 10 cents
an hour above their base rates* Most of the public utilities
and communications workers had received increases since April
1951«
About 35#000 hotel workers had their weekly rates in­
creased $1*20 to $ 4 a week*
Wage rates for time workers were determined according
to formalized rate structures in firms employing about 80 per­
cent of the plant workers and 70 percent of the office workers*
Among all industries the predominant structure provided rate
ranges for individual occupations® In nondurable-goods manu­
facturing and service industries, however, firms with single­
rate jobs employed over 50 percent of the plant workers®
In durable-goods manufacturing and retail trade less
than 20 percent of the plant workers were in firms with a single
rate for each occupation® Practically all formal rate struc­
tures covering office workers provided for a range of rates*
Office salaries were determined on an individual, rather than an
occupational basis, in firms employing nearly half the clerical
workers in manufacturing, wholesale trade, and services*
Established minimum rates for inexperienced plant
workers were part of the formalized wage structure in most New
York firms® Although the minima ranged from under 50 cents an
hour to more than $1®50 for all industries, none was reported
below 75 cents in the manufacturing, public utilities, and
wholesale trade groups® Among manufacturing firms, the minima
varied by size of establishment* More than two-thirds of the
workers in the large durable-goods firms (500 or more employees)
and more than half the workers in nondurable-goods firms of
comparable size were employed in establishments with minimum




entrance rates of $1 or more® In establishments with 101 to 500
employees, minimum rates of $1 or more prevailed in durablegoods firms employing 4-6 percent of the workers and in non­
durable-goods firms employing a fourth of the workers* About
half the workers in public utilities and wholesale trade were
in establishments with minimum rates of $1 or more®
In retail
trade and services the minima were under $1 in firms employing
about 85 percent of the workers*
Average salaries of office workers were generally
higher in manufacturing than in nonmanufacturing industries,
whereas the reverse held for average hourly earnings of the
custodial, maintenance, and warehousing jobs studied*
In 15 of
25 office job categories permitting comparison, salaries for
women were higher in manufacturing than in nonmanufacturing
firms, and the same was true for 8 of 14- office jobs for men.
In 17 of 29 plant jobs where comparisons were possible, average
hourly earnings were higher in nonmanufacturing than in manu­
facturing industries, and among manufacturing industries, 85
percent of the jobs showed higher average rates in nondurable
than in durable-goods establishments®
About a sixth of the workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were employed on extra shifts and virtually all such
workers were paid a differential over day- (first) shift rates*
Among durable-goods establishments, the differential was usually
expressed in percentage form: 10* percent for A of 10 second
shift workers and 15 percent for another three-tenths of the
workers® Premium pay for shift work among nondurable-goods es­
tablishments was usually 5 ormore cents an hour for both second
and third shifts* New York*s machinery industry operated only
one extra shift and differentials of 10 to 15 percent prevailed
for work on this shift.
The workweek for virtually all women office workers
was A0 hours or less, with almost half scheduled to work a 35hour week* Approximately a third of the wcmen clerical workers
in durable manufacturing, retail trade, and services, and about
a fourth in wholesale trade were on a 4-0-hour week® There had
been no lengthening of the workweek for plant workers since the
previous study - A0 hours continued to be the predominant work
schedule® However, 1 of 8 plant workers in durable-goods indus­
tries were employed in factories with a workweek of 44- hours or
more* In nonmanufacturing, about 35 percent of the plant workers
in the utilities group and nearly 30 percent in retail trade
were scheduled to work more than 4-0 hours a week®

Table A-lt

O jjicm OccstfuU intU

(Average itraight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New fork, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, o cc u p atio n , and in d u s try d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
W
eekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1
W
eekly
*7.50 50.00 12.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 100.00 110.00 120.00
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) *
(Standard)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1
*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 100.00 110.00 120.00 over

Men
B i l l e r s , machine ( b i l l i n g machine) .................

B i l l e r s , machine (bookkeeping machine) • • • • .

301
267
39
90

38.0
38.5
36.0
38.5

«
52.00
51.50
1*9.00
55.50

29

38.5

54.50

Bookkeepers, h a n d ......... ..................................... ..
. 1436.
M a n u fa c tu rin g .................................. , ..................
387
D urahl a grind a f T t 1 T t t t t t I , f , t ^ TTTfItTt
115
NondnrablA grinds f»»T»»»»T»-»-T-r.-*Ttt
272
Nonmanufactoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
912
Piihl 1 p li+.i 1 i H on # T_T_. . . ______ ____,
166
Whnlanal a t r a r iA _____ . . T. . . T. . . . . . . . .
239
R atal 1 -brada
. . . . . T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91
Finance #*
31*7
S e rv ic e s • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • • •
129
Cen+.-pnl
t T t T t l t . tT . . TTtTt___ t it *
177

9
.

J 1 4 - . 79.00
74.00
37.5
38.0
72.50
74.50
37.5
80.00
37.5
82.50
37.0
38.0
79.00
38.0
71.00
37.0
84.50
38.0
75.00
82.50
35.5

_

.
-

Bookkeeping-machine o p e ra to rs , c l a s s A .........
N onm anufactxiring.............................. ..................
W holasala tr a d e .............................
FI nano a **■ . ............................................

271 .3 8 -0
21*9 37.5
37
38.5
207
37.5

62.50
62.00
62.00
62.00

Bookkeeping-machine o p e ra to rs , c l a s s B .........

329
275“
19
37

31
17

m

.

.

_

_

.

15

C alculating-m achine o p e ra to rs (Comptometer
ty p e ) ..........................................................................
N o n m anufacturing ........... .................................
W holesale tr a d e

68
1*8
37

3 6 .5
37.0
36.0

52.00
16.50
*
1*7.00

C alculating-m achine o p e ra to rs (o th e r than
Comptometer ty p e ) .................................................
Nonmami fa c tn ri ng . . . . . . . . . , . . . tTT. TTTttrt

62
56

37.0
37.0
37.0
37.5
38.0
37.0
37.0
37.5
37.5
1*1.0
35.5
38.0 •
36.5

62.50
60.50
59.50
61.00
62.50
67.50
62.50
60.50
60.50
59.00
63.50

2 Qh

C le rk s, accounting .......................................... ..
6,1*21
M a n u fa c tu rin g ....................................................... " 8 1 3 “
D urable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3U8
Nondurable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1*95
Nonmann f a c tu rin g . . . . . . . . . . . . . T. . . . . . . . . . 4,1*66
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
878
W holesale tr a d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,335
R e ta il tr a d e 7j . . . . . . . . . . T. . . . . . . . . . .
267
Finance
f , - . . . . . . . T. T. . . TTTTT. T- . 1
..-r 1,598
S e rv ic e s ...........................................................
388
C e n tra l o f f ic e s
1,112

.

_

6

7

6
|

7

1

]

6

3

7

26

"

8

26
0
7
2
ia
JO

1

9
3

6
6

_

.
“

J

-

-

3
3

1
1

2
2

2
2

1
J

-

2,

2

1
*

33
19

i
1*2 ! 23
23
30

53.00
53.50

P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ........................
W holesale tr a d e
Finance M r ............................, ..............
S e rv ic e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

26
2*

J

25
25
8
14

11
11

7

105
io 5
13
17

35
33
5
27

i

51.00
52.00
68.50
52.50
50.50
51*. 50

37.0
37.0
38.0
38.0
36.5
38.5

11*
ll*
5
9

30

-

-

-

1
*
-

23

1
1

14
ll*
11*

“

3
9

6
8

2
2

16
-

n* \ 89
-

21*9
27

16

8
2 i *
11*

12

6

202
28
7
1
21
11*1
21
16
0
81*
n

1*18
89
28
61
278
18
102
11
95
52
51

~

-

2
2

2

76
72
0
58

27
2l*

59
34

29
90

2U

OC

■
5
p
0
8

Q
91
£X

9
9
3

15
15

18
18

3

188
73
97
tf
i,A
**o
105

196
66
99
cc
UU
117
Jxf
0
c
aft
70
L
U
69
L
4
13
X9

21*
10
5
5
ll*
1
X
Q
7
h
4
*
-

36
36

14
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3)i
94
2

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£p
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199
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190 _ l 6 i _ 1 1 5 _
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65

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20
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233
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181*
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pw
9),
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li*0
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28 — 5“
221
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11*6
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1*6
1*5

1*81
76
on
1*6
977
30
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92
21*
100
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128

1*13
75
35
1*0
268
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71
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522 31*3
53“ 39
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621*
97
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ua
tjc
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1,91
**£X
1t /
i 90
191
xcx
9C
0
yp
<1
PA
106

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




6

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512
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86

565
73
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tu
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aA<
pop
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a ^p
106
it;
Ap
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AGP
8
197
Acf

270 235
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lJ»
J-4
991 202
73
ok
CQ
1,7
71
HI
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74
111
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17
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91
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O foce 0 cc44f%atdo*U » Gontinum d

Table A-l:

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 1/ far selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y . , by industry division> January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!
$
$
0c
eky
10
Wel
e k y W e l Jnder 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1 * .00 k2.50 k5.oo k7.50 5o.oo 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.oo 80.00 85.00 90.00LOO.00no.oo 120.
erig
anns
hus
or
( t n a d ( t n a d 30.00
S adr) S a d r ) t
32.50 35.00 37.50 ko.oo k2.5o k5.oo k7.5o 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.oo 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00100.00no.ooL20.00 over

Men - Continued
$
58.00
62.00
56.00
6k.00
50.50
51*.oo
67.50

Clerks, file, class A ............ .. .
.
Manufacturing................. .
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Wholesale trade .................
Finance ** .......... ..... .
Services ......... .............
Central offices ...................

208
16
165
56
8k
15
27

37.0
35.5
37.5
36.5
38.0
38.0
35.5

Clerks, file, class B ....... ........ .
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods ................. .
Nondurable goods ................
.. ............. .
Nonmanufacturing ..
Public utilities * ..............

718
80
U2
38
579
65
UO
um
39
59

ko.50
37.0
15
* .00
38.0
1 0 0 I kk.OO
*.
1 6.50
*
35.5
ko.oo
37.0
50.00
39.5
or t
1,7 nn
Hi .
uu
.300
38.00
36.0
ko.oo
37.5
36.0
U0.50

Finance ** .....................
Services....... ...............
Central offices ...... .............

38.0
38.5
39.5
38.5
38.0
37.0
38.5
37.5
37.0
38.5
37.5

67.00
60.50
59.50
61.00
67.00
65.50
67.50
61.00
68.00
69.50
70.00

1,558
k35
133
302
895
785
51
228

37.0
37.0
37.5
36.5
37.5
37.5
37.0
35.5

60.00
59.00
58.50
59.00
60.50
60.50
62.00
60.00

Clerks, order....... ..........
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Wholesale trade ................ .
Retail trade 2/ ............... .
Central offices ....................
Clerks,

n a v roll ...................... ....... .

Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ...••............. .
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * ....... .......
Wholesale trade....... .........
Finance ...................... ••
Central offices ................. .

918
376
152
22k
U65
167
73
66
95
6*
1
77

38.0
65.00
61.00
38.5
39.0 1 62.50
60.00
37.5
66.50
38.5
65.50
38.5
39.0
66.00
100
*.
68.00
71.50
36.5
59.00
38.5
36.0
78.50

.
132

5
!
5
-

132
132
-

5
-

_
-

2
2
2
-

_

-

-

•
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

12

19
6

-

-

;

-

-

-

- j
- i
-

- i

-

•
.
-

-

•
-

32 1 19
2
7
6
7

-

*

8
-

-

-

-

-

21
19

-

!

«

!

• S
-

-

2
“

60
10
8
2
29
3
7
3
12
k
21

23
;«
i ! 13
! 8
-

107 1 21.
-j8, i
—
kk 18 ! 38
3k
j 1
*
10 18 ! 3k
5 77 ! 5k
39
k 76
15
l
9 12

1 9

2
2
-

-

-

11
6
k
2
5
2
3
-

62
38
18
20
2k
12
12

21
21
19
2
“

8
8
7
-

k9 S 38 12
k
k
9
2
8
k
2
1
11
*
27 ! 3
20 j 3
97
t|
J
k 1 _
lk j
k
7
-

! 69
21
!
1 21
i ko
k
28
i i 1
7
6
6
•
1
1
2
8
-

-

8
8

-

7
7
-

5
-

-

ko
20
2
18
20
2
15

-

6
1
- i “
12 j 12

.
.
-

79 35
2
16
2
11
5
56 i 27
8 I 6

| _ ; 5
5
•

_

-

-

19
k
23
3
- 1 - ! 1
23
3 I 18
3
1 I 18
23
3
2
1
-

56 118 100
- : 13
k
- 11
2
k
56 89
77
8
n
52 76 ! 69
7
1
*
19
- 16

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




.
-

136
j n

.

I

i ii
I 117
| no
8

21
13
-

13
8
6
1
1

2k
31
2
26
16
13
2k
2
3 i 8

16
k
10
8
2

n
11
2 ! 5
2
5
6
9
9

29 ___3_
1
1
28
3
6
3

m

-

10k
-i£L- ko
16
29
k
lk
3
15
k
13!
U .9
29 S 76 !
,
1
I J 1 1
*
38
75 1 15
n
15 li
26
i 18 i l
7 ! 1
12
j 9 1 7
i
i 81 u_59_ 166 h 2 12 k8
3
15
23 12
33
57 kk
117
k6 kk
105
2
3
1
l
3
88
32
19
13
56
3p
lk
k
1
7

16

120

5
-

5

n
l
7
3

6
32
70
20
7
15
12
16
12

6
18
3
15
31
3
19
3
6
*

5

3
3
1
-

32
21
19
1
n

2
1
1
1

1
1

_
•
-

-

_
-

-

_
-! -' -

.
-

- 1 -

19

9
10
7
2
“

22
“

257 _ j o n 29k j iji- 120
.
8
3k ! 26
27
7
18
6
7
k
1
6
9
27 ! 20
k
181 228 i212
131 1 89
1
1
9 19
3
69
kk 5k
85
55 i
21
12 27
3 1 1
55 lk7 96 ! 59 13
16 16 1 n
19
5
k9 1 39 56 j 16 ; 2k
C
M

Clerks, general.... ........... ...... 1,850
225
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods .................. .
6k
161
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing ................... 1,321
Public utilities * ......... .....
k9
Wholesale trade ... .............
565
120
Retail trade 2/ .................
U82
Finance **................... . •
Services ......................
105
Central offices.......... :........
30k

_
-

3L
8
k
k
10
10
lk

225
57 j 102
21
19
81
38
100 117
72 102
6
lk
68
35

33
10
8
2
17
12
•
•
2
3
6

107
ko
25
21
55
20 !
;
lk
7
8
6
6

87
21
15
6
k3
k3 j
- !

2
3

67 137
50 35
19 29
9
31
17 8k
7 35
- 30
2
k
2 10
6
5
15

9L !
.
2k ! 23
19 ! 2
5 ; 21
1 6 j 26
*
35 : 2k
2
3
2
2k
?5

50
16
3k
kk
T k
8
19
13
1

..32.1
! 12
12
! 76
-

kl
3
20
12
! 5i
1
|
, 17
-

-

.
_
1 — 1 -

.
-

-

«
»
-

-

-

.
-

21
- j 37 ! 19
|
2
1
16 !
19
1
12
3
5
2
3 j 2 ! -

2
2

51 ! 16

!

.

-

j

-

•
i

-

.
-

-

-

2
-

-

15
10
5
2

50 ! 16
k9
16
1
-

-

-

-

-

25
37
10
6
2
k
6 ! k
16
22
i 20
k
<
•
12
2
5
3

k6
19
7
2
5 i
19 ! 10
k i 2
10
8
5
20
9

3

?

-

-

3
3
-

2
2
-

Ofoce Occupa tion l - CantiH m
u d

Tabie A .it

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

A erage
v
Sex, occupation, and in d u stry d iv isio n

Number

of

workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
,$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1* .0 0 1*2.50 i*5.oo U7.50 5 0.0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90 . 00 :.0 0 .0 0 L10.00 120 . 0c
0
%
and
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1*2 .5 0 l*5.oo 1*7.50 5 0 .0 0 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 6 5.0 0 70.00 75.00 8 0.0 0 85.00 90.00 100.00 L10.00 L20.00 over

Men - Continued
•
1*
6.00

611
75
1*36
31
151

37.0
37.0
37.0
36.0
3 ft, o

S e rv ic e s ......................................................
C entral o ffic e s • • • • . . ....................................

100
137
100

36.0
37.0
36.0

l|6,50
Jift/^O
1*0.00
1*8.00

Key-punch o p erato rs ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................................
F*
Ml- Il t t l -t t TT

63
51*
28

38.5
39.0
38.5

53.50
51**50
52.50

O ffice b o y s .......................................................
M anufacturing ...................................................
Diirflhl a
ti i i i t ti i t ' i i i i i i i i i ttt'
Nondurable goods ........................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................
P ublic u t i l i t i e s * ....................................
W holesale tr a d e ..........................................
Paf.fiHI 4*. vtfl<4o < /
%
................................ ...............
f?4«tanea * w
*
...........
nac ......................................... ... ........
C entral o ffic e s ...................................... .

6.207
1,067
220
81*7
3,878
1*68
1,166
256
1,018
970
1,262

36.5
36.0

37.00
36.50
38.00
36.00
36.50
37.50
38.00
35.50
36.50
31**50
39.00

S e c re ta rie s ............ *..............................................
Mami^nA+iirn n n .......................................
. ..

361*
75
1.0
4*
33
153
26

37.0
38.5

IX iplicating-m achine o p e ra to rs. . . . • ..................
M anufacturing .......................... .........................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................

Nondurable goods ........................................
111 i i i r t i r f i Tr‘ i _‘ - iT*
P ublic u t i lit ie s * ........ ...........................
UIU^\1 a c q I a 4* v*a /4a

®*infliTice
P n n f y»fll

^
■■
n f ^ X /iA a

..

P°
i

.................
......................

S tenographers, general
^ f ln n f Q /« 4 n <
ivt

f T. . (

i i i r ‘ r i r ‘ 111

( - - - - T-

N onm anufacturing...................... * ............. ...
^

JfT_*11|T|t1_|-1
___............... _

41B
A f f t n o o .......................

Sw itchboard o p erato rs

ii i ii t r f - r

............................................ .....................

S ervices ................... ...........................................................

59

5 3.0 0

l*l*.5o
)|6.00

3 9 ,0

3 8 .5

35.5
37.0
37.5
37.0
37.5
36 .5

37.5
36.0

237
22

j

1

59
no
93
85
12

38.0
38.0
37.0

-

11*

65

1
11
10

5

1
-

-

3
3
3

31

61
12
37
1

21
25

6
1
1 |

202
60

909
210

20
60 190
103
651
16
32
61
19
58 j Hi1
j-i*?
p
29
391*
1*8
39

_

11*80 939
11
li*3 2 * * 17l*
38
U6
11
**
99 206 128
597 985 592
56 136
87
195 l*ol* j 69
8
69 1 115
11*7 ! 190 1 276
130 i 11*0 | 152
261* 251 173

10 0 k

!

816
90
27
63
573
90
220
30
151
82
«3

1

61.50
60.50
59.5o

3

1
-

9 i
9 I
6

3
3 r

5

10 |
11
10
9
10 ; 3
i
!
37 | 33
6
1~1
1
18
3
11*

11*
3

_

;

1

5

3
-

i

1
1

-

-

-

1
1

-

1
1

_____k _

3
1
*

_
1
*

•

•

•
■

"

3

_
•

m

•

«

-

•

•

.

•

.

-

_

r

7
-

2
2
~

„
1
_
1

_
.

-

17

2
11*

-

-

-

11
**
12
2
10
15
2

82
19
8
11
59
1
*

ia
1
X

30
7
1
2

21
2

5
15
1

i|i

0

iii

10

8
1
5

5

n

1
1*

2

37

15
2

58

39

27

6

38
22
13

29

6
1
*

15
15

27

10

7
1

6
6

9

21*
21*

1
1

8

5

7

l*

-

•

p

m

8

21*

29
2
17
2
10

1*
3

2
2

“

•

.

.

-

“

-

-

-

55
1
XJ
nJL
X
2

31
2
2

5

2
0
P

12
2
10
17
■W

18
31*
12 -----5~!
in
lv
p
2 ! 1 i
i* '
1

-

^

3
1

1 :

1
M

7

.
.

_
.
.

5

-

-

2

c

10

8

20
20

_

m

n

8

17

2
8

- |" T

IQ
*7

Xf

6

5

-

1
-

2

2

-

-

-

18
2

21*
7

_

1

•

■
j1

i 60
! 3
! 2
! 1
6
1 22 i 27
«.
! 5 |
! * ! 19
1
6 ! 1
1
6 i 2
6
11
1
*
35

2

-

-

j.

81*
1*3
19
21*
30
1
17

2

•

7
3

1

1
*
1
*

m

7
3

9

2
8 j

i

_

19
9
9

.
7

2

.

15
9
6
1

L
u
]_

-

1

1
1

7

■

5 6 .5 0
6 3.5 0

58.00
58.50
5U.50

n

|

1

_

21
1

1

13

„

-

20

8
3
6

1
-

319 ! 277
1*1 i 39
7 ! 17
22
3U
120
157
18
21*
101*
1*9
1
12
12
30
11
16
121 118

!

1

1*2
11
*

11
19

1
33
2
12

12
12

51*
7
la

!

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




21
13
2
6
6
21
35 ! 1 1
1
9

3

m

-

5

131
11
*
92
1

82.50

38.0
38.0
37.5
38.0

m

-

1*2
1

67

70 .0 0
76 .0 0

17.0
P(
3A X
p o .P

105

13
5

58
2
55

76

8
21*
8

„

76.50

•57 0

1*2
3U
2

21*
3
16
1
2

-

73 .0 0

37.5
37,0
36.5

-

12
*
*

77.50
77.50
81.50
72.50

P>.P

-jo A
XJJO

12
12

33
5

1
*

17

Pf

t

1
•

2

12

0
7

_

_

-

-

.

i

\

-

-

O fo c *

TableA.lt

O e C H p a tiO H A ~ G o n tiM

M

ld

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on
basis in New York, N. I. , by industry division, January 1952)

Number
of
worker.

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

area

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

hi

$
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.oo 37.50 ko.oo k2.50 k5.oo k7.50 50.00 52.50 15.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 LOO.00 L10.00
1
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 ko.oo k2.50 k5.oo k7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 L00.00 LLQ.00L20.00

$
120.00
and
over

Men - Continued
1.597
69
lO
i
29
1,073
66
208
109
665
25
k55

36.5
37.0
38.0
35.5
37.0
37.0
38:5
38.5
36.0
38.0
36.0

*
62.50
63.50
66.00
60.50
61.00
63.50
76.50
58.00
56.50
62.50
66.00

Transcribing-machine operators (general) •
•

29

37.5

U7.50

Typists, class A ........................................................ .

133

36.0

6k. 00

Typists, class 8 ................... .
| A . •nr
|
i.

289
U1
229
ikk
31
19

38.5
V7.0
j 1
■oO
a.
00 ^
37.0
36.5

U6.50
U7.50
U6.00
17
, .<0
HI O W
U7«00
50.00

2,761
700
359
3kl
1,769
95
775
26^
U80
156
292

37.0
36.5
36.5
37.0
37.5
37.0
37.5
38.0
36.0
39*5
36.5

51.00
51.00
51.50
50.50
50.50
! 5k. 50
| 52.00
i kk.50
i 51.50
k6.00
53.00

1.115
8k
1,016
323
83

36.5
36.0
36.5
37.5
38.0

55.50
51.00
56.00
50.50
59.50

Tabulating-machine operators ..........
Manufacturing....................
Durable goods........... *.....
Nondurable goods...............
Nonmanufacturing ....... ...........
Public utilities * ............. .
Wholesale trade • • • • • • • • • .................. ..
Retail trade 2 / . . . l ............ ...................
Finance * * .................................................
Central offices.............................................

~
-

•
-

7
7
-■
7

17
17
-

-

3
•
3

67
6k
1
63

k8
7
7
25
6
•
19

115
2
2
92
1
3
12
76

-

17

k

3

16

21

27

7

8

7

.

7

78
51
3
11
7
30

7k
2
2
60
•
k
13
kl
2
12

73
3
1
k7
2
2
15
22
6 i
22

132
3
2
1
91
8
2
8
68
tL

38

93
2
2
58
8
•
9
ko
1
31

209
10
6
k
lk2
k
8
13
113

218
lk
6
8
129
7
23
22
77

57

75

lk9
2
2
103
17
3k
1
k9
2
kk

96
20
17
3
57
3
20
9
25
19

83
1
1
k6
3
33
8
2
36

65
m

k6
2
36
5
3
19

66
35
1
32
2

m

m

-

•
-

•
-

31

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

« !
- |
-

-

-

i
j

C m < ee Jih
M m
Penl« >1
m

..
.
_

. . ....... __._
.
.....
...

1

5

?

2

2

k

1

22

7

26
2o
Ik
6
2

93
22
68
58
7
3

k6
6
35
2k
11
5

18
3
lk
2
2
1

31
4
17
15
2
8

k

22
27
10
2 1

7
2
1

199
56
30
26
128
2
31
27
kl
27
15

261
93
26
67
137
9
25
2k
k7
32
31

363
86
36
50
2k8
6
92
k8
76
26
29

k07
lib
53
65
221
16
13k
12
5k

212
30
19
11
16k
5
60
22
53
2k
18

3k6
100
75
25
197
23
113

k9

37
6
31
2k
1

91
22
69
kk
2

95
10
85
72
2

71
5
66
25
lk

8k

188
20
161
23
25

27

|

22

k2

13

16

22

15
15
15
I

|

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) ......
Manufacturing .................. .
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade •••••...... .....
D aAa4 4mm J O /
1 » a
Finance *«■................. .
Central offices • • • • • • • • • ... .. .......
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) • • • •
Retail trade 2/ ..............................................
Services... ....................................................

-

•

1
1
1
•
•
•

—
k
-

1
i

!
!

i
• {
i i
i

-

-

•
•

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), coaaaunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




339
66

6
32
3
3k
*
*
k o ! k8 270
5
1 ! 2
117
u
21 , 30 ! 7k
6 i
1
56
12 1 k
18
12
3
" |
"

m
-

69
9

k° ;

k

-

9
-

9
9

33
7
26
26

<

68

-

77
38

133
16
9
7
9k
5
52

272
105
70
35
155
13
118

37

2k

23

12

197
6
191
27
8

281
k
277
29
13

17
2
2
11
1
3

33
2
2
25
6
13

6
3
3
3
•
-

1
1
-

lk

7

6

3

1

22

k

6

-

12
1
11
k
7

3
2
1
1

3
1
1
1

11

-

-

-

56
13
-.
13
21
1
6

2
2
•
-

•
•
-

<

52
k

-

2
_ 1

11
-

11

»
*
-

m
m

GUia*

Table A-l*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. I., by industry division, January 1952)

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 10.0 0 1*2.50 l*5.oo 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 100.00 n o . 00 120.00
*
$
and
3O.9O 32.50 35.00 37.50 10 .0 0 1
*
*
*2.50 1 5 .0 0 l*7.5o 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 LOO.00 L10.00 L20.00 over

Women - Continued
Bookkeepers, hand............ .......

Services • • » « . . . « . • • .* • • • • • • • • • • • • * • •
Pan+ ntfll
.......... ... ...

1 . 381*
$08
196
31?
820
118
98
96
315
56

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A . . . . 1.6U5
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
223
Durable goods
131
92
Nondurable goods • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••«••••• 1,331
Public \ r t r i T ^ vtTrsiitttiritrTtt
1*0
Wholesale trade
23U
Finance **■ ...... .............
Services *.•••.•••••••. ...... .
Central offlees •••••*«*•.•*•••«.*.•••••

81
886
90
91

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B . . . . 6, 01*8
Manufacturing *...*.*...................
1*85
Durable goods •.*•••••....*.«.*•*•••.
186
Nondurable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Nonmanufacturing
PiihHn u t i U t i e R *
.....................
Uhols.sa.1 e tr a d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Retail trade 2/
Finance ** . .T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S arvinns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R ep tral of fl

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type)
..... .....
Manufacturing *...... .............
Durable goods

299
1*,920
53
723
355
3,501
288
61*3

it* 986
1*93
96
Nondurable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
397
Nonmanufacturing ....................... 2,71*8
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ....................................
291*
81*6
Wholesale trade .....................
R e ta il tra d e 2/ .. ............ ....... . . . . .
r.r
61*$
Finance
805
158
Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Central offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,71*5

37.5
37.5
38 .0
37.0
38.0
36.5
37.5
39.0
37.0
38.0
36.5
36.5
36.0
36.5
36 .0
37.0
36.5
38.0
3 8 .0
36.5
37.5
35.0

$7.50
56.50
57.50
59.50
: 57.00
55.50
61.50
56.50
56.00
60.50
59.50

36.5
37.5
37.5
37.5
36.5
36.5
37.5
39.0
35.5
37.5
36.0

19.0 0
*
5U.5 0
52.50
56.00
1*7.50
50.50
53.50
15.0 0
*
1
*6.00
55.50
51*. 50

_

.

18.00
67.00
68.00
66.00
68.00
7U.00
68.50
63.00
69.50
66.50
71*. 50

52.50
51.00
51.50
51.00
52.00
5U.50
53.50
50.50
50.50
52.50
53.50

91*
25

59

17
11

25
69

1*6
13

7
2

25

2

21*

kl

11*6

188
29
21
8
151*

139

3
11
131

33
8
79
6

27

k6

17

1

____

_

1_

9
7

1

j

1

5

63

12
9

_

—■

8
1*6

17
9
1*5

5

!
j

1

1*5
1

8
26

9
2

m

1__ 3 !
_
,
!

.

128 i 525
3
3

8

I !

*
*

8
3

-

7
3
3

15

-

33
!

1
”

81*5

21*
9

3 ! 3
110 522
1
3
3
2
20
101* ! 1*95
1
3

8
-

_

~

I !

"

!

12
6

18

1
3

15

1

~

15
807

2

3

11*0
650
12

1

26

12
1
10

61*9

9
612
6
88

669
51
19
38
520
8
62

69
1*1*5

1*25

15
6

u

16
9

22
i

92

275
39
it
35
171*

598
77
5
72
353
21

7

89
2
8
787
56
32

21*
61*5
57
27
51*6

11
86

Q
16

9
5

695

82
26
56
531
10
159
33
290
39
82

2
7
It

65
38

1*2
21

TO
JO
25
2

21
21

pj
e

126

I
t
1*08
7
1

6
31*6

5

53

22
216
50

55

2

i£
2

9
9

9

18

276
1*7
29
18
219

185
20
20

i
t

60
2
131
22
10
517
70
11*
*
26
381*

267

-9
2

11
18
198

23
17
151*

12

1*0

195

328

33

63

33

11*
1*9
210

i
t

85

2

31

11*8

1*5

105
63

53
17
2
25
5

153
18
16
6
109

12
112

7

161*
61
28
■
so
pp
98

6
1

I
t

2

95
9
97
7

230
69
C
(Q
07
10
160
22
26
12
26
71*

255
102
UP

207
35
8
27
168
3
38
16
96
15
U

1*6

H*o
13
*
2
11
*
68
23
3
21*

18

Kl
Of

123
oc?
00
on
Px
12
26
19
30
pw

233
63
16
)i7
Hi
169
TP
It
J?
17
PP
70

1*5
----- 5"
6

1*6

3U

31*

69
19
O
JO
11
**
23
11
5

1
10
10
7
2
5
3

65

8

3
2

21

19
7
7

5
3

10
“
9.
7

7

1

2

16

1
n

20
7I
4
2 — h2
0
c
■p
L
27
8
32
0
7

12

2
i
X

3

12
6
5

12

65

1

17

3

1 ---1-

1

19

1
it

2

• '
_ 1

8

19

52
1

H*

22
1

12

“ j

2

it
2
32

y

25
3

3

9

3

2

2
12

21*

77

55

29

5

373
21

1*1*3
2b
2

177
3

103

21*

3
no
15
33
53
it

*

5 * i 323
1
1
*
?y
It
1*0

8
121
15
8

~

See footnotes at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




28
17

27

9

1
i
36.5
37.5
38 .0
37.0
36.5
36.5
37.0
37.5
35.5
37.5
36.5

„

2

9

it
25
200
1
31
76
76

16
91*

16
35
78
1*0
5
62

1*2
80
190

20
168

595

by
11
58
358
36
163
58
79
22

168

871
111
1*5

1*31*
Zb
it

66

22

1*39
29
226
63
101

223

20
321

1*8
1*5
1*9
73

8

185

666
70
15
55
312
62
80

68
82

6

15
176
28

66

278
33
85

26

1*2

11
**

90
28
139

20

12

281*

176

c
0

61*

53

8

9

3
it

it

p

3

33
9
8

5

11
*

13

3

1

1

•

•

•

•

“

1

-

-

-

O fo c *

Table A-i:

O c c u p a tio n ^ - C o n t in u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, January 19$2)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
%
eekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 ao.oo a2.5o a5.oo a7.5o 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 8$ .00 90.00 LOO.OOn o .o o 120.00
Weekly W
earnings 1
and
(Standard) (Standard) 30.00
32.50 35.00 37.50 ao.oo a2.5o a5.oo a7.5o $0.00 52.50 $5.00 57.50 60.00 6$.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 8$ .00 90.00 100.00 n o .o o I20.00 over

Women - Continued
Calculating-machine operators (other
than Comptometer type) .............
.............
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing

%

72$
U6
675
8U
537

36.5
35.5
36.5
39.0
36.0

$1.00
1*9.00
$1.00
1*8.$0
51.50

Clerks, accounting ..................
Manufacturing ....................
Durable goods............ .
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ... ..... .......
Retail trade 2 / ........................................
Finance ** ....................
Services .................................
Central offices.............................................

9,63a
1,375
1*89
886
6,979
578
1,690
1,151
2,1*21
1,139
1,280

37.0
37.0
37.0
36.5
37.0
36.$
37.0
38.0
36.0
37.5
36.5

50.50
$2.00
51.50
52.50
50.00
57.00
52.50
1*6.$0
1*7.50
50.00
51*.5o

Clerks, file, class A .......................................
Manufacturing ....................
Durable goods......... ....................
Nondurable goods .............. ..
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Public utilities * ..................................
Wholesale trade ........................................
Retail trade 2 / ........................................
Finance * * ................... .
Services .....................................................
Central offices.............................................

2,1*57
1$8
81*
71*
1,751
170
352
33
858
338
51*8

36.5
37.0
38.5
35.5
37.0
37.5
37.5
38.0
36.5
37.5
35.5

52.50
5l*.oo
1*8.00
61.00
51.50
j 57.50
52.50
1 1*7.00
S 5i.o o
1*9.50
! 55.oo

Clerks, file, class B .......................................
Manufacturing.................................................
Durable goods ............ .................. .

8,922
781*
239
51*5
6,82$
$20
798
1*33
1*,003
1,313
1,313

36.5
36.5
37.5
36.0
36.5
37.5
37.5
38.0
36.0
37.5
36.$

: 1*1.00
: 1*2.00
l*i.5o
; 1*2!$0
i 1*0.50
! 1*6.50
! 1*1.50
! 39.50
I 1*0.00
i 39.00
1 1*1*.5o

3,880
731*
191
51*3
2,627
$22
366
963
283
519

36.$ ' $6.00
37.0
$1.$0
$l*.oo
37.0
5i.o o
37.5
36.$
57.00
38.0
57.50
38.0
55.oo
53.50
3$.$
39.0
58.50
36.0
56.oo

Finance ** .............. ..... .

Nonmanufacturing ............................................
Wholesale trade .............. .
Retail trade 2 / ................
Finance * * ........ ............
Services......................
Central offices ...................
Clerks, general .....................
Manufacturing................ .
..
Durable goods ••••...............
Nondurable goods ...............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade 2/ .................
Finance ** ....................
Central offices... ........... .

_
“

-

-

-

-

-

i*

.
_
.
_
.
*
~
- |
- i
_ !
- !
26
1
25
19
6
_
.
_
_
-

a
h

139 389 576 1172
10
20
36 16a
17
53
10
20
19 ' i n
866
129 31*1 503
6
ia
36 2 n
29
i*
i 1 219 151 ia7
21* ! 118 ! 51* . 177 a30
72
! 6 | 39 I 125 | 11*2
28
37
21*
21*
- ;

1$
6
6
9
9
-

17
1*5
a
- i a
20
17
—
6
15
11
5
21
-

388 | 60$
- ! ioo
4
96
! 31*9 1*52
17
1 1 j 83
*
j 18 ! 8
| 21$ ! 177
i 112 ! 167
| 39
53
j
.
.
•
-

73 : 206
20
5
- ; 15
61 ; 16a
2
13
- i 19
1
15 l 107
2a
aa
12 ; 22
1759
96
55
1*1
ia58
; 28
| ia7
' 100
1062
121
20$

1652
! 128
72
56
i 1277
: 99
! 131
106
i 7 ia
227
2a7

_ , H7
53
53
61
60
1
3

132
56
n
a5
59
2a
35
17

ia?6
106
3/
67
1279
26
! 85
123
888
I 157
91

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




no
a
_
10
100
a
8
a (
87

55
6
a9
5
1*1

in
8
103
16
77

87
6
81
8
73

128
6
122
n
91

671 n 2 a
76a 108a
76 ~ 2 y T 103 198
88
69
55
17
59 11*9
3a H*3
602 | 733
799 i
525
32
ao
ao
a5
177 121 1 11*8 | 173
77
67 12a
75
18 9 I 299 ! 21$ ! 297
52 21$ ! 119 ! ^ a
88
59
70
! 153
161 ; 276 278 296
8 ' 17 1 30
11
n
9 ! 28
7
8 ! 2
1
129 220 175 ! 231
22
10
3
8
22
6$ ! 53
a2
2
16 1 3
5
100 ! 62 156
69
1*2
19
33 . 23
21 ! 48
86
35
971
n5
21*
91
713
77
100
29
381
126
11*3

20
20
2
16

37
a
33
a
19

620 788 376
67
33
?a
22
30
2a
9
aa
a5
aa5 603 26a
92
36
a6
na
157
87
29
27 n 8
187 152
65
j aa i sa l a7
108 n i j 79

920
31*7
62
85
569
122
239
a6
93
69
20a

L
. l58
! 8
8
108
ia
10
3
j 76
5
1
*2

198 U g _ |
2
5
2
2
3
127 108
31 i n
37
15
1
1
as i 36
321 23
a6
69

28
•
28
16
10

! 726 | 398 372 221
12
72
a3
6
n
! 7l
8
a
37
\ 6k 1 61
j 592 |i 232 150 ! 76
6a | 88 ! k l
a
9
na
aa
37
1
i 23 1 15
7
i 30$ i 68 i 1*1
5a
8
8 6 ' 2a
n
| 62 ! 9a 179 133

222 S 552
67 ! 170
21 ! U0
a6 130
121 338
52
17
12
50
92 166
5a
3a

353
60
20
ao
229
57
ao
12a
-

aa - 6
a

301
9a
12
82
168
5a
31
76
2
39

73
3
66
6
58

2$8 1 161
8
ia
8
ia
: 189 112
11
i *6
j a7 | 29
|
1
79 : 63
8
; a7
U1
! 55

-

17
1
16

37

16

12

-

209
5a7
26
159
50
26
109
123
299
5a
17
as
83
12
3
66 ! 31
s a j 2a
6°
89

126
10
10
8a
31
ia
30
a
5
32

53
9
2
7
2a
n
13
20

L za i-jl
L
a

61 i

29
10 |
16
6
13

7

105
2

3a
7

3
-

7
53
ia
3
25
n
31

2
9a
aa
a
1
ao
5
9

7
2a
1
a
ia
5
3

3
1
2
“

267 269 29a _$62_J a68
13
29
33
2a
57
2
n
n
13
23
18 ! 2
22
20
3a
S 20$ 207 aa6 356
203
36
2a i 20 i a7
65
36
30
ao | 36
31
120
28
87
89 130
28 123
1
21
3
88
59
35
5a
51

no
19
19
76
21
17
25
5
15

9a
23
11
12
a7
10
13
2
17
5
2a

12
12

39
2
37

!
,

16
15
2
13
1

1
- i
1
1
-

-

18
3
8
7
33

ne
a3
8
35
68
13
17
a
7

-j
■- !
-

“

"

•

-

-

-

9
9
- i
1
8
“

•
* ;
-

-

-

-

-

-

2a
3
3
21
1
6
12
2
“

19
3
3
16
2
a
10
-

6 ___ SJ
3
3
3
3
2
- i
- j
-1
2
2
1
.
-

-1
- ;
* 1
*
-

,43 ._ 4 2 __ m
11
5
n
—
5
30
29
31
20
6
30
1
22
11
9

- ;
- |
-|
•
_
*
-

-

“
-

•
-;
-

-

O ffice O ccupation* - C o n tin u e d

Table A-l :

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 3/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) $

!$

8

Number
of
workers

i

Sex, o cc u p atio n , and in d u s try d iv isio n

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1*2.50 l*5.oo 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00

$

T$~

. oo lio <
oo
90.00 L . | .
<

30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 jlOO.Qo|l-10. Qoll-2Q.00

Women - Continued
r
50.00
50.50
53.00
50.00
50.00
51.50
147.00
U5.00
l*9.oo

2,1*81*
612
135
1477
1,U95
769
396
183
377

37.5
57.0
37.0
37.0
38.0
38.0
39.0
38.0
36.5

Clerks, payroll...........
Manufacturing .........
Durable goods.......,
Nondurable goods ... .
Nonmanufacturing ..........
Public utilities * ..•.
Wholesale trade ........
Retail trade 2/ ........
Finance ** ........ .
Services....... .
Central offices ........ .

1,029
337
692
1,637
281*
21*8
377
1*00
328
250

56.00
37.5
38.0
53.50
38.0
52.50
38.0
514.50
37.0
56.50
55.50
36.5
37.0 61.00
53.00
38.0
36.0 ! 59.50
514.00
38.5
35.5 6U.50

Duplicating-machine operators
Manufacturing ......... .
Durable goods...... .
Nondurable goods .......
Nonmanufacturing...... .
Public utilities * .
....
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade 2/ .......
Finance ** ......... .
Services ..
.. ...... .
Central offices....... .

544
11
83
22
61
391
21*
105
57
181
2U
70

Clerks, order ........... .
Manufacturing ....... .
Durable goods
Nondurable goods .......
Nonmanufacturing.......
Wholesale trade ..... .
Retail trade 2/ ..... .
Services ........... .
Central offices ....... .

36.5
37.5
36.0
38.0
37.0
37.0
36.5
37.5
36.5
38.5
35.5

! 1*6.00
i 1*3.50

i I48.OO
j U2.00
j I46.50
! U6.50
i I47.50
U5.oo
I47.00
10-.50
1*7.50

Key-punch operators.... .
Manufacturing......... .
Durable goods.... .
Nondurable goods.... .
Nonmanufacturing ..........
Public utilities * ... .
.
Wholesale trade •••••..
Retail trade 2/ .••••..
Finance * » ......... .
Services ...........
Central offices ........ .

-a a g jjj- - , A 5
37.0 ii9.50
383
37.0 U9.50
237
ll*6
50.00
36.5
2,612
37.0 U8.50
211
37.0 , 52.00
38.0 : 56.00
316
39.0 l*8.oo
277
36.5 i U6.50
1*592
1*9.00
216
36.5
52.00
8314
35.5

Office girls .................
Manufacturing ......... .
Durable goods ....... .
Nondurable goods .......
Nonmanufacturing .......
Public utilities * ... .
.
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade 2/ .......
Finance * * ..... .
Services......... .
Central offices ........ .

-.2,391

229

h
0

189
1,627
Uoo
268
26
8UU
89
535

36.5.
36TfT
38.5
35.0
36.5
36.5
37.5
39.0
36.0
37.0
36.5

i

16
12

•
•
.
-

-

1

-

-

i

i
-

j

-

„ i

i

-

_
-

16

-

16

-

:

6

•

2

-

- !
- !
- 1
-

38.00 _ i i _
38.50
39.00
•
38.00
37.5°
51
38.50
36.00
•
1*1.50
37.50
U7
37.50
1
4
38.50
"

i

1
j
1




100
21

..

-

21*
1

l*

1*8
1*9 j.
no '
37
10 ! 6 i
27 ! 3i* i
11 ! 9 i
- j
-

1
1 1
4
7 ,

-

-

!
!
8 !
1 ;
- i
-

2
39

8
U
214
1
*
2

1
4

17
10
10
2
7

79

"
*
«
-

253
38
38
153
22
33
91
7
62

109 231
- ! 11
13
7
7
6
1
*
86 1 199
79
2 ! 3
j 28
h
.
2 1
82 168
75
- i 12 ; 19
229
16
11
5
H47
1
*
77
U
52
10
66

j 579

555
35 | 90
l
9 ! 2
! 26 ; 88
1*18 1*01
1 80 150
101
37
_
3
207 20I*
30
7
126
61*

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
215116 0 — 52------ 2

336 137 371 168
56 132 | 58
177
62 ! 35
52 j 21
80 ! 37
115 ! 15
152
83 228 101
22
*32
7
23
21*
17
! 33
10 i 51
57
31*
19
19 ! 62
21
32
27
59
15
11
7
1
*
9

21 !
11 ;

31
36
36

-

_
-

3
51*
28
35
16

90
21*
11
13
60
27
1
*
7
15
7
6

- 1
;

58
16
1
*
12
1*0

6

-

16

-

211
61
28
33
131*

31
1*6 !

Hi

-

■
#
-

•
-

i
!

1
28

1
4

-

18
88

-

-

!

1*2
11
11*

382 275
79 1 72
22
11*
50
65
255 183
131* 111
68
62
39
3
20
1*8

-

12
1
*

-

162
31*
10
21*
111*

1*8
2

-

.
- i

271*
63
23
1*0
161
78
1*3
26
50

81
31

H*2
18

29

i

ll*

f
h

21
1
63
17
9
3
19
1 1 5
*
2
21*
7
7
16
6
31*8
! 31
22
i 9
1 278
! 5
|
1
! 79
; 171*
! 19
39
1*32
20
12
8
287
116
1
*
10
11*8
9
125

50
26
3
23
22
1
*
1
*
11
1
2
2

>
!

|

! 7
! 1
*
; 1*6
l
i
! 8

376 1*80
26
71*
12 | 1*6 !
28 !
m
267 j 350
28
7
21*
23
26 i 21* !
186 | 222 !
21* | 53 !
83
56 i
H+l
6
1
5
103
17
13
1
*
51
18
32

9
9
23
6
3
12
2
36

71*
8
6
2
58

569
25
21*
11
**
15
276
11
**
75
11
*+

_

31*
5
1
*
25
10

321*
101*
16
88
180
96
61*
20
1*0

151* 132
39 ! 13
*
5 ! 1
31*
9
106 ! 89
51*
69
38
1

139
22
_

22
55
35
10
10
62

_

30

9
21*3
92
35
57
123
29
1
*
30
8
52
28

i
!
;
!
!

170
61
12
1*9
91*
57
12
21
15

99
52
22
30
11
**
27

1
3

157 1*68 311 169
53 “ W
U7
\ 20
15
35
12
38 128 ! 72
99
93 299 ! 171
68
38
9
15
26
38
1*3
35
85 1 8 ; 12
11
22
79 ! 26 :
55
20
1*8
7
15 ;
11
1*8
1*1
23 |
I

.

6
2
3

33

I
!
I

1

11

8 , 21 I

2

k

258

20
«

25

530

1
*

8

m

m
m
1
*

3

1
*

i
:

;

W

29
1

3 i
13 !

_ J
iq

11
9
1*2
11
115

17
2
7
7 ------ T ----- f5
5
2
2
1
2

3

1
2
5

9

1
*

1
1
1

*6
7
5U

1
U2

17

j

11 j

22

91
11*3 ------ j KT
2
3
1
7
72
91
12
3
23
1*5
2
1*6
2n
8
16
1*2

!

9

II
2

18 ;
11 :

1

2U5 ! 258 |
17 T T
50
12 ! H* 1
33
5
3
261*
11*5
28
u*
36
18
5
30- 60
30
162
50
72
22
10
25
96
183
71

13

15
1
*
j 3
2
1 6
i
! -

j

16 1

21

-

2 3 j___ 3

7

1*9

1
*

1

33

1 !

143
T

it

_

•

•

29
2
5
17
1
*
1
-

13

J±k

3

15 1 __ L . ...3.5- ___ S_
_

? 9 .. ....6?
9
9

J£.

2 |
20

120.00

and
over

d jC C tiJ flG f it t f t A

Table A-l:

- ^0#

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New fork, N. T., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 LOO.00 no.oo 120.00
anns
h u s erig
or
and
( tnad (tna d $
S a d r ) S a d r ) 30.00
* .00
32.50 35.00 37.50 1 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 100.00 no.oo 120.00 over

Women - Continued
Secretaries ........................
Manufacturing............ ........
Durable goods.... .............
Nondurable goods ...... .........
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade 2/ ...*.... .........
Finance ** ....................
Services •••••.................
Central offices..... ....... .

25.286
4,021
790
3,231
Hi,817
917
l,086
i
1,006
U,873
3,935
6li8
,ii

36.5
36.0
37.5
35.5
37.0
37.0
37.0
38.0
36.0
37.5
36.0

65.00
64.50
65.00
61 . 0
*0
6*
1 .00
68.50
66.00
61.00
66.00
*60.00
66.50

Stenographers, general.......... .....
Manufacturing...................

36.5

Nondurable goods ...............
Nomanufacturing.... .............
Public utilities * ... ......... .
Wholesale trade ..... ...........
Retail trade 2/ ................
Finance * - ....................
*
Services.......... ...........
Central offices ..................

20,627
3,073
1,030
2,043
13,725
lJ$U7
3,800
591
5,895
1,892
3,829

37.5
36.0
37.0
37.0
37.5
38.0
36.0
38.0
36.0

! 52.00
" 5ltbo
1 54.00
i U9.00
! 52.00
! 51.50
! 53.50
1*9.00
51.00
52.00
53.00

Stenographers, technical..............
Manufacturing....... ............
Nonmanufacturing..................
Public utilities * •
..............
Finance ** ........... .........
Services ........... ...........
Central offices ...................

1.234
31
802
100
439
156
401

37.0
39.0
37.5
37.0
37.5
38.5
36.0

60.00
60.00
! 58.50
! 67.00
57.50
58.00
62.50

Switchboard operators............ .
Manufacturing....................
Durable goods ••••••... .
Nondurable goods... ............
Nonmanufacturing..................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ........ .
Retail trade 2/ •••*.... ..
.. .
Finance ** .....................
Services ......................
Central offices..................

6.162
705
221
U1
8i
4,874
433
81
2*
6*
10
1,565
l, i 2
ll
583

38.0
37.0
38.0
36.5
38.5
38.5
37.5
39.5
37.5
39.0
36.5

! 51.50
; 53.50
51.00
i 54.50
| 51.00
! 53.00
56.50
U9.50
! 51.00
, 1*8.00
55.50

Switchboard operator-receptionists ......

2,142
754
295
459
1,316
126
116
**
1C.
l
•LpU
2*
10
350

37.5
37.5
38.0
37.5
37.5
07 f
i
37.5
07 £
37.0
38.0

51.00
50.00
1*9.00
50.00
51.50
tx. 00
51.50
io
.
51.00
52.00

.3 0 0

_

a
m
•
•

2
.
-

-

2
“

JiQ m
**7.tA *

Nondurable goods... ............
Nonmanufacturing................. .
O/
Finance * » ....................

79
9*

3 6 .5

_
.
•
_
-

-

-

16
•

•
! 16
! "
- i 16
-

3

2
_
-

.

160
12
6
6
128
4
7
10
102
5
20

26

22
6
•
16
4

54
9
7
38
jm
t

|
3
430
1 10
*
! 21*
13
3*
lo
13
51
i
|

_

-

j
- j

- i
-

•
-

-

18
-

m

_
-

18
-

-

17
«
•
1
-

„
-

»

_

-

•
-

- 1 14
14
-

10
83
• ; m
.
m
10
83
11
•
25
17
10
30
•
18
18
•
18
_

.

..
.

1*
1

1
-

! 144
10
10
.
.
133
8
25
i 61
39
; 1
2J

!

6
*
*
! 6
19
14
5

•

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




54

•
3
_
3
-

-

-

2

121
8
8
no
2
4
10
27
67
3

346
62
20
42
277
12
12
12
118
123
7

649 800 2037 i28t 2245 2049 1393
682
182 i54 ~ 5 W i5o 378 238
6
10
81
46 194
56
13
126 148 517 140 297 192 488
427 509 1079 760 1383 1066 2679
36
56
56
23
75 126
13
in
293 334 882
55 219 133
102
160
61
79 142
74
33
72 137 155 216 369 409 852
170 ! 207 547 ! 355 505 ! 169 677
40 | 137 | 428 | 374 484 7US 1032

3715 2646 1884 1016
T§2
0 * 162
397 2 1
n8
46
109
29
364 288 158 133
2180 1454 n 26 613
68
89
47
194
724 461 333 192
69
77
94
41
867 630 429 2n
318 226 181 122
1053 795 554 241

Hi?1 1591 2652 1918 3173 1634 27# 1616 1818 818 j 327 122
11
6*
29
13
617 192 651 219 2** ' 116 248 | 1 1
367 2h i
236 139 123 I 82 105 i 71
n
26
9
69 ! 9 5
49
80 1 121 1 3 * 143
258 221 548
93 1 18
4
91
415
l
80
972 999 1694 1312 2005 1044 1952 !no3 1227 485 221
15 ! 13
5
135 131 150 188 163 140 | 286 i 114 157
36
131 185 338 260 835 217 ! 677 I 375 463 207 ! 42
2
2
90
50
42
61 f 25
50
52 138
41
15
32
* 8 811 598 648 520 610 | 526 404 162 114
546 1 1
86
108 127 305 ! 225 309 125 318
5o ! 5
63 153
212 345 341 414 517 • 371 529 397 343 169
77
29
26
2
24
14
10
407
U2
19
2?
354
37
14
58
115

130
n
184
69
58
n
n5
53
12
35
15

30
1
9
1
7
1
20

48
1
28
4
23
1
19

146
3
97
1
50
10
46

4? 164
8
1
16 131
4
3
13 i 31
44
32
25

123
78
6
40
32
45

507 1013
4o
89
n
39
50
29
440 888
22
13
80
16
34 !4l
n6
245
261 400
36
27

619
89
39
50
490
53
93
66
169
109
40

752
109
21
88
579
61
93
49
240
136
64

568 644
ou
65
14 i 21
63
51
365 489
62
27
105 109
61
54
201
123
56
56
138
71

230
ll4
29
85
92
23
17
1
X
8
43
24

240
62
28
34
178
1
73

449
172
39
133
248
8
79

206
87
49
38
106
16
42
16
26
6
13

31
28
-

27
1
3

165
73
38
35
89
JO
12
26
15
21
0

J

jj-

41
32

07
‘ 1

50
84
29

273
47
13
34
226
15
81
4l
16
73

42 ___1
n
9
2
22
4
3
19
4
1
9

253
7
186
14
137
32
60

154
92
19
38
19
62

112
1
87
48
33
6
24

33
2
7
7
24

33
5
4
4
24

363
17
9
8
284
52
86
29
65
52
62

72
20
,52
10
*4
36
114
40
n6
98
86

227
3i
2
29
177
48
33
7
80
9
19

129
33

77
21
7
14
44
26
12
6
12

8
«
.
8

96
2b
18
10
67
11
19

167
6l
15
46
106
18
31

74
10
2
8
64
19
25

7
1

6
6
6
-

.
-

9
28
1

17
40

12
8

9

24
88
3
27
34
5
19
8

-

1
6

-

901
123
25
98
533
32
253
15
147
86
245

6
-

«
•
6
15
-

661
142
31
in
354
63
54
7
142
88
165
9
9
•
•
9
_1
12
1
1
.

342
58
58
155
7
20
17
71
40
129

75
37
37
26
1
6
5
12

63
32
6
26
27
17
1
9
4

-

•
•
>
“

.
—
-

“

•
”

11
13
-|
•
»
13
13
-

•
•
—
“

-

•
-

-

•
-

»
-

«
-

I

“
!

3
3

1| 3

-

.
6

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-■

-

-

-

_

-

-

15
15
“
•
-

a
.
•
-

-

-

-

Office Occupation* - Con tin u ed

Table A-l*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings \ j for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y. , by industry division, January 1952)

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 to.oo to.50 to.oo to.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 100.00110.0c 120.00
Weekly
hours
earnings %
and
(Standard) (Standard)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1; . 0 U2.50 to.oo to.5o 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 $ .0 0 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90,00 LOO.00110.00120.0c over
00

Women - Continued
Tabulating-machine operators ........... 1,083
Manufacturing...................••
"TO —
81
Nondurable goods............ .
3+
l
Nonmanufacturing..... .............
756
30
Retail trade 2 / .......... .... .
Finance ** ....................
to8
120
Services............ .........
212
Central offices ................. .

36.5
3.5
61"
36,5
35.5
36.5
39.5
36.5
36.0
37.0

§5.50
5h ; o "
o
59.00
56.50
55.00
U9.50
53.00
56.00
57.00

Transcribing-machine operators, general ... 2,233
205
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing... ..... ......... 1, 0 ;
51
Wholesale trade ................
U76
890
Finance * » .... ................
Services .................... .
119
Central offices ........ .......
51
2;

36.0
36.5
36.5
37.0
36.0
37.0
36.0

50.50
to.00
50.50
53.50
1; . 0
95
U6.50
52.50

Transcribing-machine operators,
technical ........ ........ .........
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Central o f f r e ------------r-t------r T
i*s
T

36.5
36.0
36.0

5U.00
52.50
52.50

109
59
23

51.00
53.00

Typists, class k .................... 6,951
Manufacturing ........................................................... — 575^
Durable, goods
.......... ........................
317
Nondurable goods ........................................
258
Nonmanufacturing .................................................... 5,158
Public utilities * ..............
568
81
6;
Wholesale trade................
Retai 1 trade O j .......... .
110
Finance ** „............... .
2,757
Services..... ..... ..... .
859
Central offices ............. ..... 1,218

36.5
37.5
38.5
36.0
36.5
36.0
37.0
38.5
36.0
37.5
35.5

Typists, class B ......... ...... ....
Manufacturing ......... .. ........
Durable goods ...................................................
Nondurable goods ............................................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................... ..
Public utilities * ...... .
Wholesale trade ...••........ .
RetaiT_ trade 2 t . u .f-.t-t--- - - J
tj'
---Finance * * ....................
Services............ ........ .
Central offices............... ....

37.0 to.oo
36.5 1 to.5o
38.0 i l l . 0
ii 5
36.0 to.5o
37.0 i£.5o
;.0
37.5 1 7 5
37.0 to.00
39.0 1 1 5
*.0
36.0 U2.00
37.5 to.oo
36.5 U6.50

13,688
1,857
6;
18
1,209
10,111;
722
1,3 1
3;
763
5,768
1,527
1,717

t o . 50

! 56.50
I 5o.5o
! 52.50
5U.50
to.50
175
;.0
53.50
I 52.50

*

m
-

-

*

1
-

-

-

h

.
•

_
1
1
•

_
1
1
”

- i

1
-

h

-

-

!

-

-

6
_
-

6
-

-

151
1
15
m

6
-

130
5

.
.
61
5
10
18
9

327

2

2

2
2

1 i 29
1 ! 25
j J
*

2+
1
1;
1
2

to
1
+
6

732 ltou 908
96
131
13
39
95
21
36
57
6 n 1103 6 1
5;
58
63
97
39 223
55
6
35
31
too 680 i 376
91
63 111
87 190 158

693
9;
1
62
32
toi
30
52
21
233
95
168

U92
to
3U

h

i
t
-

"

3h

86
20
37

3
79
6
72
12

79
to
32
5

3
113
8;
1
21
15

239
69
153
12
88

186
89 128
27 r i i - 31
O,
]
22
2;
1
6
3
7
78
U;9
37
•
•
1
22
123
to
8
7
10
2;
1
19

161 ! 190
1 1 17
132 1 1
2;
68
to
83
to
U ! n
28
to

I63

31
~ ~ ir

u

6
3
O
C
1
2

2
57
6
11
29
to

3
1
22

M

3$

38

81
to
27
6
82

I67
15
10$
56
16
+
1
to

7
5
1

1
;
1
3

n
2
3

9
1

5to
23
22
! 1
| 381
1 28
1
I 6;
i
t
too
to5
137

323
21
13
8
203
11
57
2
39
9+
1
99

1*33
2+
1
15
9
308
32
86

to2 too
81
85
26
35
50
55
2U9 2U8
20
62
96
36
12
16
107 1 105
10
33
102
77

158
18
10
8
82
to
21
1

5

1

27
1
1
26

3
1

$

1

m

3

•
_
_

.

1
1
-

2

2

.
-

-

19

8

1
+

22
18
n i 13
10 ; 5
1
16
1

1
+

u

l

h

k

-

“

-

-

58
-

mo
-

2

3
3

1
1

•

_

_

600
! to

1 20

123
17

r w ~

215
5
U
1
120
13
to

190
8

92
29

to
9

9
3

3
3

6 j
6 !

3
3

287 1139 1823 12831 1919 1969
8 133 126 ! Uto 261 366
82
5;
1
5; I ito 118
1
72 ! 306 ito 2 1
8
8;
79
256 959 1559 205U 1388 ito7
12
6
6 ; 126 139
1
93
- f I
i 6 277 259
t
37 l *
3
92
91 183 2 ;
i7
53
.3
2 1 7U* 987 1367 676 655
16 108 259 220 217 311
23
17 138 330 270 186
+

970 1299
133 . 160
28
81
105
79
660 891
39
8U
171 223
32
28
3to 312
71 2to
2U8
177

n

353
16
129
5
178
25
9;
1

8
17U
99
32

29
U8
«
2+
1

9
38

3
6

3

6 i
- j
« 1
•

3

79
111
101

25
37
90

18
25
8

12
12
15

6
5
1

-

167
20
3
17

91
8
5
3
61
31
6

12

11

1

1

to
3
58

22
2
22

U
1
+

TO
31
31

27
6
21
8

-

_

_

m

•

«
m

-

-

-

m
m

m

8
•

•
•

32
16
32

k

m
.

-

-

m
m

„

m

•

10
•
2

_
.

6

„
-

_
m
m

27

_

.
.

_
m

.

_

1

m
m
m
m
m

_ |

c

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2/
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




102
2

|

! 21
512
11
0;
31
1 6
- ! 38
U8 i 101 338
3 i u I 5 ! 33
17 j to
*
*
! 6
1

162
11
11

70

3to 230
12
to
229 180
76
2U
168
92
33 ! 11
70
38

- ! to
52
• 1
1

-

135
7

162
22
103
25
70
5
37

-

;

85
1

21
0;
27
l;
l0

•

-

9+
1
3

7
38
«
25
1
8

-

i

53
7

«
.
23
6
11
2
to

2
! to.

63
-

59 120
17
51
62
30
2
18
57
10
5
12 ! 7

1
;
"

•

h

„
8
1

m

1

1

P *ofodlioual an d 7ecJuU cal O ccu pation*

Table A-2t

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEK:l y e a r n i n g s o f —

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
Under 35.00 40.00 45.00 $
| oclio.oodo. 00 d o .00d o .00 \80.0<
0
50.00 55.00 lo.oo I5.OO lo.OO $5.00 lo.oo 85.00 lo.oo *95.Cf00.0Cdo. 00 do. 00 l o .

*
and
35.00 40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 110j CL20.00L
40.00 L50.00160.00L70.00180.00 over
30.00 L
O
1

Men
Draftsmen, chief ...................
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing .................
Public utilities * .............

615
278
263
10
246

39.0
39.0
40.0
36.5
40.0

122.50
112.50
136.00
89.00
137.50

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

_

_

_

-

—

_
-

-

—

—

—

-

3
3

—

10
10
-

_

3.419
Manufacturing .............................................. ......................
929
869
Durable goods .................
f n r i » > a goods ...................
inhrVl
60
Nonmanufacturing ................. 1,924
Di«W14*
«
45
Wholesale trade ...............
45
10
Retail trade g j •..............
18
Finance ** ...................
Services .._...................... 1,806
566
Central offless ................ .

39.0
38.5
38.5
38.0
40.0
37.0
36.5
39.0
38.0
40.0
36.0

92.50
83.OO
83.00
85.00
98.50
82.50
83.00
87.50
74.00
100.00
87.50

Draftsmen, junior ..................
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods .........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .................
Sefiiie s s , t t t r . r t . . . ___. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Central off!gab tttttTT.T...___ ......

1.107
35^
346
10
680
625
71

39.0
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.5
40.0
36.0

68.00
57.00
57.00
57.00
75.00
76.50
62.50

_
-

Tracers ........................ .
Manufacturing ............................................................................

310
95

40.0
40.0

56.00
51.00

10

Draftsmen ..................................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................................................
Central offices .................................. ..................................

48
32
13

38.5
39.5
36.0

78.50
81.00
71.50

Draftsmen, junior .........................................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ........... .....
Services .................... .

59
14
38
32

38.5
37.5
39.5
40.0

63.50
65.00
61.50
65.00

Tracers ..........................

15

38.5

57.50

_

_

68.00
65.00
61.00
71.00
67.00
68.00
64.50
69.50
68.50
75.00

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

:
—

:
_

-

_

8
6
6
—

—

_

_

_

_
-

_

_

-

_

.

2

—
2
_

48
25
24
1
19
_
16
_ 1 4

42 143
12 tin
9 in
3
24
23
9
13
8
7

6

30
16

-

15
10

83
53

38.
-ISO- 266
97 100
74
33
65
87 100
33
—
—
10
9
2
26 104
14
5
5
8
12
“
_
m
m
8
1
1
6
90
1
9
8
62
27
3

—

2
1
1
-

278
73
66
7
156
7

6
1
1
142 181
49 90

!101 ! 82
: 23 1 6
! 22
5
1
! 1
67
i 75
65
75
3
9

101
59
57
2
24
9
18

139
88
87
1
45
36
6

127
32
31
1
87
86
8

26
13

61
1

49
2

_

8

3

-

34
32
2
2

22
22

-

-

-

387
fu*
1112
! 2
182
! 11
! 6
i 2
1
4
137 162
86
91

342
114
105
9
142
1

85
-

72
-

—

—

130

—

32
29
3
25

282 353
37 47
37 44
—
3
179 250
-

65
28
32
—
32

50
15
31

293 ,333
47
24
22
43
2
4
229 302
1

140
17
16
1
121

98
40
1?
1
15

—

31

61
13
48

.flL- 22
12
10
10
23

76
9
67

-

—

—

46

67

20

10

_

_

.

.

—
-

13.....
3
3
10

-

-

-

—
-

-

-

—

—

-

11

-

228
17

1

_

_

_

_

10
2

-

-

_

1

1
178 239
66 56

_

_

—

—

—

_

300 |121
2
7

4
4
-

—
-

-

-

..

_

—

—

—

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

1_

-

_

_

,

30

-

438
143
133
10
205
15
8

49
49

-

81
81
4

37

-

—

70
70
2

130
130

7
5

—

6
5
1

-

-

-

35
35
2

-

—

—

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

2

_

_

_

„

-

—
_

Women

Nurses, industrial (registered) .......
Manufacturing ............. ........
Durable goods ...................................................................
Nondurable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing ..................................................................
Public utilities * ...................................................
Retail trade g j .............................................................
Finance ** *.................. .
Services .................... .
Central offices ..................

592
158
93
65
340
61
75
131
36
94

37.0
37.5
38.5
35.5
37.5
38.5
38.5
36.5
40.0
35.5

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

'

-

_

3
3

-

—

—

—

_
_

_
_
'

8
3 I ^
2
6
4
3
2
6 ! 2
•
_
8
4
4
4
—
_

_
_
-

!

12
7
7
—

5

_

2
3

43
10
9
1
33
7
18

_

_
-

8

'

2/
2/
*
**

2 | 3
2
3

3
9
4
5
5

9
2
5
5

2
1

3
3

-

-

—

—

3

4

65
19
16
3
45
10
1
23
3
1

102
3d
19
19
54
8
16
26
4
10

19
17
1

121
18
12
6
78
9
21
27
4
25

12
12

-

-

—

—

_
94
31
18
13
49
8
9
20
9
14

4
2
—

_

_

81
17
6
11
36
10
4
14
7
28

38
3
2
1
30
7
6
11
6
5

22
7

14

4
4

-

4

5

_

~

-

7
7
2

-------

8

1

3

!

3
1

2

'

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours*
Excludes limited-price variety stores*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
Finance, insurance, and real estate*
U.S* DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Table A-3,

M aintenance an d Powm* P la n t O ccupation*

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

o
f
wres
okr

1

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ , $
$
$
*
h u l Under1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 . 1.45 L.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 * . 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
ory
1*0
2.40
erig f
anns t
and
1.00
1*
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1. 0 1.45 i.5o L.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over
**

OC
D

1.884
548
258
290
1,315
379

«
°.
°
H

Carpenters, maintenance ......................
Manufacturing ................... ........
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods ................... .
Nonmanufacturing.................. .......
Retail trade 2/
............... ......

1.83
1.79
1.86
1.89
2.11
1.78
1.68

Electricians, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing.... ........................
Durable goods .............. ...........
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Puhlic uti1iti
.
Who! ss l i trrf .............T....... ..T.
a f .ait
.
Retail trade 2 / ....... ......... .......
Finance ** ............................
Services.... .........................

2.013
787
355
432
1,213
271
36
179
U08
319

2.01
2.11
1.87
2.30
1.95
1.91
2.13
2.09
2.00
1.81

Engineers, stationary ........................
Manufacturing .......................... ..
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Fublic utilities # ............................
Wholesale trade ..... ......... .........
Retail trade 2 j ........................
Finance *-*............................
Services ........ .....................

2.029 2.01
749 2.12
1 * 1.84
19
600 2.18
1,269 1.95
120 2.19
45 2.30
122 2.22
430 1.97
552 1.79

Firemen, stationary boiler....................
Manufacturing ............................
Durable goods..... ................... .
Nondurable goods....... ........... ..
..
Nonmanufacturing............. ............
Public utilities * .....................
Retail trade 2/ ........................
Finance **-.............................
Services.... ........................ .

1,i79
l
l
513
1*
12
371
963
125
72
432
317

1.62
1.69
1.52
1.76
1.59
1.80
1.51
1.62
116
.(

Helpers, trades, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing....... ....................
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable goods .................. .....
Nonmanufacturing ............ ........ .....
Public utilities * ......................
Retail trade
.................. ......
Finance *# .............................
Services ...... ..... ............. .
Central offices ................. .

2.426
1,110
378
765
1,262
604
117
2*
19
,123
21

ll9
.i
117
.(
1.36
1.53
1.51
1.52
1.53
1.53
1.27
18*
.1

Services..... ........................

6

33
33
7
26

64 122 173 258 376 117 100 273 161 42 11
2 50 67 153 122
zr 7
w ~%1
2 11 51 60 39 40 26 13
4 _
- 39 16 93 83
_
6
6 11 6
7
62 72 106 103 251 61 74 250 146 36
2
- •6
8 23 17 33 28 107 120 29
ic oo
.
i3 O
.;
4o 36 5o UP c y
P *c oo 26 7
*
I
22 30 40 18
2
6
38
-

8 __ 3
_
_
8
3

93
li
li
_
82

30
_
30

61 115 253 259
3 51 103 151
3 37 63 74
- 14 40 77
58 64 148 108
12 93 57

_
“

_
8
-

_
3

_
7
75

_
16
14

8
18
28

10
10

38
-

28
18
18
10

68
6
6
_
62

29 231
1 38
1 14
_ 24
28 193

17

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2

_
-

_
”

_
“

_
-

■

_
•

_
2

-

-

-

_
-

20
- - - - 20

_
-

_
-

_
-

l
-

16
-

_
-

22
-

- - 20
16
1*
1
6
8
2

6

8

_

_

16
7
9

5
2
3

l

22

-

-

l
-

4
1*
1

2
-

6
-

h2

92
82
7*
1
8
10
x
9

60
26
26
34

78
26
26
52

5
8
21

27
22
5
17
5
x

98
65
10
*
25
33
29
x

17
31

11
11
31
28
x
2

_

-

-

6

6
n
xx

-

_
10
76
9
9

4
-

3

_
-

67
1
28
38
79
18
12
6
61
25
5
18
13

83
83
18
65

_
_
38

13
18
21

3

7
17
31

87 190 280 189 231 287 74
14 95 163 31 38 161 56
10 15 57 11 12
5
4 so 106 20 26 -161 51
73 95 117 158 193 121 13
O
9 18 22
13
X 23
3
3
7 21 32 10 4
4
36 49 29 86 51
75 5
31 24 59 38 96 13 4

_
38

_
10

_
56
6

6i
56 l 1
11 28
*
28
10
*
15 136
l
3
l
- 17
13 1 1
1*

62
17
l
,
13
45
3
4
21
17

67 170
8 64
Q 45
19
59 104
3
_ 5
4
34 72
20 23

275 273
131 64
16 11
115 53
144 208
40 35
10 17
43 130
50 26

82 119 230 550
16 90 89 209
*
17 76 32 56
29 14 57 153
36 29 1 * 341
11
6 24
g 187
g
2
20 144
o
g
26
J

628 145
318 20
37 17
281
3
309 125
5
259
17 45
10 32
16

_
-

70
53
12
11
*
17
10
7

3
1 24
24 166

231 265 213 129 65
106 65 61
11
101 36 14 10 3
5 29 47
5 8
124 199 146 113 54
21 13 59
12
0
9 11
5 15
10 10 35 19 57 12
30 72 121 17 11 19
n
16 15 49 42 -

63
21
21
42
8
7
14
12

17

8

5
43

6
7

32

8

_

6

_
_

1

66
5

_

_
_
8
_

6

2

See footnotes at end of table*
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




84 26
69 14

33
20
10
10
13

45 73
1 U 6f
|
1
27
20
3

48
5

48
3
3
45
1
36
8

35
23

_ ■»
_
_
.
_
_

_

_

_
_
-

_
_
_

-

-

-

41 124 31
35 122 30
_
35 122 30
6
2

3
_
_
3

3
2
_
2
_

3

_

23
12
8
4

4
2
-

79 121
10 89
_
10 89
69 31
10 12
.
Uc
n£L
lp
2
17
»
10
2
"

.
_
_
_

_

-

_
_
_
_

_

_

_

1
_ 1
_
_ 1
_

_
_
_

69 14
15 12
15 12

_

-

_
2
-

_
“

48 18
11 18
_ 11 18
37 _

_

-

_
"
1

_
_
13
1
,
*
*
9
36
~1 F

_
18
18

_
14
4

_
_
_

_
_
_

1

_
-

1
_
-

-

_

_

_

_
_

_
_
_
_

18
8
11

-

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
„
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_ _
_ _

_
_

_

13

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

Table A-3*

M aintenance an d P oumx P la n t Occupat ion <* - Con tin u ed

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$„ $
$ „ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$. $ , „ $_ $ , $
$ . * r1 $
.*
.* .*
Under1.00 i.o5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 1 0 1 1 5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 1 0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.0C
and
$
1.00
.*
.* .*
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 1 0 1 1 5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 1 0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2,80 2.90 3.00 over

$

Machine-tool operators, toolroom
Manufacturing ............

M

-

1.86

12
12

_ L
_
7

382

26
26 123

_ ^ 8_

110
38 110

10
*
10
*

6
6

9
9

k

1
*

5
5

2
2

'
Machinists, maintenance
.. .
Manufacturing ..
Durable goods . .
..
Nondurable goods ,
Nonmanufacturing . .
.

1 .1 0 0

Maintenance men, general utility
Manufacturing ..... .
Durable goods .........
Nondurable goods .......
Nonmanufacturing .........
Public utilities * .....
Wholesale trade ........
Retail trade 2/ ........
Finance
............
Services .............
Central offices ..........

2,062
930
312
618

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Manufacturing .............. .
Durable goods... ...... .
Nondurable goods .........
Monmanufacturing ............
Public utilities * ............

Wholesale trade ..........
Services .................

Mechanics, maintenance .
.
Manufacturing ........

Durable goods ...,<
Nondurable goods .
.
Nonmanufacturing ...
Public utilities *
Retail trade 2/ . .
.
Finance * * ........

Services .......

Millwrights ...
Manufacturing ,

826

211
**
582

272

1,106

302
li
li
131
302
257
26

2,875

111
***
3*
1
11
*0
213
,*0
1,620
560
109

1.927
1,099
273
826
816
177
86
300
2.
15

152

2.03
2.01
1.87
2.07
2.07

1.75
1.91
1.77
1.98
1.62
1.83
1.66
1.66
1.55
li0
.|
2.06

I.8I
1
T7&T
1.59
1.88
18*
.1
1.78

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

12
-

-

3

2
-

1
-

-

' 55
-

5U
-

1
*
-

87 132
13

18
6

-

2
2

1
1

-

55
-

5U
-

1
*
3

13
7* 132
1
-

6
12
-

-

-

-

-

55
-

5*
1

1

2
5
19
*

17
51
6*
1

7
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

'
1.92
1.98
1.76

-

-

-

-

-

2.06

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_j
3

-

_

9
8
8

32
_

12
2
2

8*
1
-

-

1.73

18*
.1

2.00

1.92
1.86
1.66

-

”

-

-

~

1.88
1.87

-

-

-

“

3
-

-

3

-

1

32
12

10
7

8*
1
8*
1

-

-

1

20

3

-

3
-

6
6

36
6
6
- ' 61 _
I
- 30
3

58
2
2
56

3
-

-

1
29

1
55

7
7-!
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

72
72
72

5
1
*
1
3
1
1
-

-

-

_ ! l_
1
*
1
*
-

-

-

-

-

-

98 2 * 1167 161 379 3 * 66 120 151
16
13
1
2 80
*
2
3 71 125 85 11
2
6
6
8
1
1
- •
11
2* 7
80
1
10
*
9
17 63
*
0*
16
7 172 1 1 2 76 338 3 * 63 lo 150
5
1*
33 78 959 70 2 1 109 23 15 16
2 17 1 * 3U 21 132
* 18
13 90 73
2
2
29
*
” 11 11

7
6

“ j
_ 1

-

-

-

-

6
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"-

11
8

1
1

38
38

66
6*
1

2
2

_ J 2_

32

36
36

15
15

8
3
1
1
1

1
-

38
-

6*
1
2
2

2
-

32
-

36
-

15
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

'

'

'

'

3 * i l 289 108 163 63 176
1 l*
32 io5 232 100 107 5l 92
28 19 63 1 3 11 12
1
*
*
*
**
1 56 169 57 63 39 88
*
8 56 12 82
2
9 57

21
8*
169
133
36
115
3
32
12
60
8

379 221
187 108
16 20
*
1*
1 1 88
188 113
137 66
2
30
1* 11
1
6 20
1 1*
1
1
*

90
2
5
17
8
58
51
1
3
3
7

8*
1
32
23
9
18
*
10
16
2
2

76 298
13 2 1
* 6*
18
3
25 261
33 23
21
5
3
3
5
9 10

1
*

6
6

11
11

20
20

50
19
*

15
13

-

11

"

18
25 1 * 19)4 38O 288 106 190 120 169
10
10 99 1 * 270 130 31 50 38 121
10 3
8 60 51 15 25 21 12
3
*
- 61 80 219 85
6 29 26 118
106 158 7 139 7
18
*
19 5 *
*
1
5
15
5
2 11 52
8
3 16 57 26
1
1 1* 21 15
2 6 20
1
2
18 23 35 101 18 70 2
*
8 19
9 51 . 2
15 2
5 28
'
2
2

1
1
*
1 “ T
1
1
*

10
10

65 196
26
12
*
13 27
13 15
39 1 1
5*
2
13
*
1 19
* *
8 26
27 3*
1

'

-

-

_

-

2.00

-

_

e
8
8

15
12
12
3

12

-

'

25
7
1
6
18

3
3
3

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

‘

32
23

7
6

7
7

1
1

~

1
1

Table a-3:

M aU ttenanoe an d Pow*k P la n t O ccupation* • Q fm tin n od
f

(Average hourly earnings 1 for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O ccupation and in d u s try d iv is io n

O ile rs ...............................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ..........................................................................
D urable goods ...................................................................
Nondurable g o o d s ............................................ ..
N onnanufacturing ...................................................................

Number
of
workers

$
$
$ _ $
$
$
$
Average
$ , $
$
$
hourly Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 1 .2 0 2.30 2.1*0 $
2.60 2.70 1.80 2.90
2.50 $
earnings 1
1.00
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 l.5 o 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2 .2 0 2.30 2.1*0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
$
1.63
1.58
1.52
1.59
1.71

S erv ic es ..............................................................................

185
281
55
226
20l*
71
37
67

P a in t e r s , m a in te n a n c e ........... ...................................................
M anufacturing .........................................................................
D urable goods ................... .......................... ....................
Nondurable goods .............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................................
‘ v T r n +nT* ac -it
DiVI »
?
R e ta il tra d e 2 / ..................... .......................... ..............
Finance
.........................................................................
S erv ic es ..............................................................................
P.O pq’l
r^+.’
t i i i i t i i i r ti i i t i i i
ti i i tti i i a i

2,019
279
86
193
1,720
202
li|2
688
682
20

1.73
1.9l*
1.73
2.03
1.691 ft?
2.05
1.69
1.57
1.81

P ine f i t t e r s , m aintenance .................................................... ..
M anufacturing .........................................................................
D urable goods ................................................................. ..
Nondurable goods .................................................................................. ... .....................

1*32
270
1*9
221
160.
£o
P7

1.96
1.95
1.78
1.98
1.98

T )nW i

n+-i 1 i

+5a c
*

1.86
1.1*2

579
1.77
bO
2.01
1.73
1*9U
31* . 1.91*
1.65
229
1.67
163

S h e e t-m e ta lw o rk e rs , maintenance ......................... ..
M anufacturing' .........................................................................
D urable g o o d s ................. .................................................
Nondurable goods .................................... ................
N onm anufacturing.................................. ................................

11*6
1.85
-------85“ .. t ,
1.80
21
65
1.85
60
1.87

1/
2/
*
**

1
1

-

8
5
2
3
3

1
1

51*
51*
21

12
6
6
6

27
15
3
12
12
12

1
-

23
11
12
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

3

1

21

6

-

-

-

-

10
10

35
3
3
32

23

-

18
18

23

_
-

_
18

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

_
10

_
32

_
_
_
- 172 25
23 211 112

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

110
79
32
1*7
31
21

210
3
3
201*
oo
£7
_
3
21* 85
81*
57
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

58
1*2
1
*
38
16
11,
2

10

81
81

386 11+
1+
7
3
7
3
383 137

-

-

2.16
1,1*87
1,1*83 ... 2.15“
1,1*0*
2.17
1 Oil
-*-•74
39

10
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
-

-

-

Q

- -

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




11
11
11
-

199
35
15
20
157
•P
t;
11*
117
19
7
1

2 22
2 22
2 16
6

X .U J

Plum bers, m aintenance ...............................................................................................................
M anufacturing ............................................. ..................................................... .............................
Nonmanufac ta r in g ................................ ..................................
R e ta il tra d e 2 / . . ...........................................................
Fi nanr*p
__ . T. . . . . . .
r.
S«r*iri rpq __ r __ t ____ Tt rTTf. T. T___1IT. T. 1TtT

T ool-and-die makers ...................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g .................................. .................. ....................
D urable goods ................... .................... ..........................

1
1
1
-

-

“

-

-

26
26

60

31*

52

31*

52
3
32
17

-

60
-

-

21*
2

g
52

15
19

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

'

"

‘

6
----- 5
6

60 22
6
9
51* 13
1
1*5
9 12

20
1 1
1
19

27
2
2
25

7
1
12

20

1+1
2
2
39
36

-

18
-

16
16

3{+
2l*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

18

16
-

21*
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

198 122
21*
65
1
61* 21*
130
98
53
3
57
1*2 28
32
13
3

26
1
1
25

8
-

3
3

-

1
*
-

18
+
10

-

-

8

3
-

-

1
*

10
38

-

-

-

8

-

-

2
36

-

-

1
*

-

-

-

-

6
£1

29
18

-

38
38

-

-

-

-

-

6

18
11

38

-

-

-

-

-

25
25
25

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

80
10
1
9
69

176 155
1*8 33
30
9
39
3
128 117
),-a
UP 26
32
7
62
51
16
7
5

93
31*
13
21
58
11
**
5
9
1

1

li*lf
117
9
108
27
07
^1

81
1*7
8
39
31*

11
8
8

68
5
2
3
63

53

61
18
1*3
1
*
25
j.

1+7 33
31* 7
12 26
2
1
9 22

53
12
26
5

5
5
2
3
~

1*9
53
22
5T
6
3
16■ 38
8
31

-

9
9
9

93
93
76
17

80
76
76

8
60
-

-

3

31
7 I
1
*
3
22

13
11

Q
7

OO
O

5
5
5
~

$
3.00
and
over

67
2
62
-

1+7
2
11
**
6

.

7
2
5
5

38

2
1
1
1

15
2
1
1
13

136 213
136 213
136 205
8

1
* 11
1 “ in
*

2
2

h
-

235
235
222
13

1
*
7

2

289
289
288
1

3.59
159
159

2)*1
2l*l
21*1

Table A-4*

C u stodial, W atelta u litu }, a n d SU ipfU n f Occupation*

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME I^KrRLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) ....
.
Manufacturing......................... '...

Number
o
f
wres
okr

72
52
20

$. $
$
!
s
s
s
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aeae
vrg
h u l fader 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50
ory
erig \
anns
and
>.75
5
80 85 90 ,9 1.00 1.06 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1 70 i an 1 on p.nn 2 10 2.20 2 IQ 2.40 2.50 over
1
1.77
1.60
? 21

24 25
24 2$

Guards......................................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .........................
Nonmanufacturing.................... .......
Public utilities * .......................
Retail trade 2 / ..........................
Finance ** ..............................

3,400
772
388
384
2,624
303
80
1,663

1.42
1.37
1.32
1.42
1.44
1.43
1.32
1.55

-

_
-

Janitors, porters, and eleaners (men) .............
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .........................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Public utilities * .......................
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade 2 / • ........ .................
Finance ** ..............................
Services ...............................
Central offices ...... .....................

21,361
4,772
1,350
3,422
16,232
1,461
538
2,986
6,426
4,821
357

1.23
1.25
1.23
1.27
1.22
1.36
1.31
1.10
1.36
1.06
1.51

_
-

49
24
24
25
25
•
-

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ...........
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .........................
Nonmanufacturing ....... ....................
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade 2 / ..........................
Finance « ..............................
Services......... ......................
Central offices ............................

10,623
326
139
187
9,969
143
475
6,305
2,571
328

1.08
1.15
1.21
1.11
1.07
1.18
1.11
1.10
.93
1.30

Order fillers ................................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................... .
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade 2 / ..........................
Services ...............................

3.161
1,356
463
893
1,785
1,191
508
14

1.48
1.34
1.30
1.36
1.59
1.58
1.60
1.30

Packers (men) ...... .........................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .........................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Wholesale trade ......................... .
Retail trade 2 J ..........................
Services ...............................
C
en+.ral offMo *
*«
,,
, ,
._,,t ,

6.320
2,588
970
1,618
3,643
1,410
1,859
312
89

1.30
1.30
1.28
1.32
1.30
1.40
1.22
1.32
1.51

.
439
70
70
369
121
248
"

812
168
17
151
644
16
117
3
508
-

15 388 191 665
- 13
2 13
2
- 13
2 11
15 375 189 634
- 14
4 17
- •- 10 25
15 375 175 578
- 18
_
-

-

4
4
4
-

_
_
_
_

-

-

17
17
17
-

6
6
6
-

1124
235
58
177
889
8
52
319
510
-

1527
238
79
159
1279
5
376
898
10

86 224
44 28
37 24
7
4
42 196
- 30
3
4
1548
435
149
286
1113
9
37
307
127
633
-

1396
142
45
97
1254
41
19
364
372
458
-

88
27
16
11
61
8
43
1838
303
101
202
1533
86
26
362
942
117
2

43 103
8 30
7
4
4 23
35 73
1
8
3
19 55
1113
170
98
72
934
122
77
119
176
440
9

882
240
144
96
633
121
52
254
48
158
9

80 247 256
8 159 65
7 32 32
1 127 33
72 88 190
11
1 41
4
5
3
37 64 130
966
253
105
148
696
47
37
132
217
263
17

1553
555
206
349
988
70
49
127
579
163
10

1278
593
143
450
617
142
22
138
200
115
68

679 513 800 1232 4449 354 399 344 264 147
- 33 16 25 55
7 46 62 24 17
- 12
4 19
9
5 32 15 20 12
- 21 12
6 46
2 14 47
5
4
667 480 745 1206 4390 320 339 226 187 53
- 20
2 14 62
1
3
4
2
23 53 36 95 85 54 50 18 29
118 345 444 967 3951 118 92 11 155 25
2
8
526 62 264 138 325 46 38 13
12
1
4 27 14 16 53 77
- 39
29
29
25
4
-

24 208 119 128
24 127 84 47
12 23 20 31
12 104 64 16
- 81 35 81
- 79 19 76
- 14
4
1
1
1

84 104 206 136 252
12 102 32 92 H I
• 19 42 38
12
- 102 13 50 103
2 174 44 108
72
- 42
- 18
72
2 132 44 81

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6 110 124
6 14 18
6 10 12
6
4
- 96 106
- 29
4
-

3

543
247
130
117
296
161
112
5

93 117 191
60 71 8l
60 38 10
33 71
33 46 no
32 22 76
1 24 28
6
-

93
56
33
23
37
15
21
1

409 158 534 436 420
198 44 46 18
9
98 38 46 10
9
- 8
100
6
2n 114 488 418 4 n
53 25 14 12 84
8 4 23
3
89 62 432 387 324
1731 2885
277 494
73 41
204 453
1432 2368
56 498
20 28
69 83
1234 1626
53 133
22 23
38
5
5
12
2
21

44
3
3
41
9
3
22
4
-

95 141 240
49 91 *4
6 39 28
43 52 56
46 50 152
10 29 125
36 19 25
2
1
-

658 263 440 420 486 250
235 71 202 160 144 71
57 46 113 59 81 47
178 25 89 101 63 24
421 192 238 254 342 175
67 120 48 69 42 45
342 46 186 159 112 129
12
8
4 26 188
4
,
2
6

2
2

485
181
118
63
297
157
140
_
7

742
232
19
213
506
279
162
56
4

11
1
10

2

8

2

g

?1
40
40
11

24
10
10
12
2
- _
11 10

1

1357 632
386 154
67 16
319 138
880 431
209 32
22 44
38 19
536 289
75 47
91 47

85
13
7
6
61
16
43
2
n

72
16
1
15
50
34
16
6

57
3
3
22
4
18
_
32

14
14
14
•
-

3
3
_
3
_
_
-

•
_
_
•
_
_
_
-

_
-

16
-

40
_

-

-

.

_

_

_

14
14

-

-

-

-

-

2

•
40

-

•
-

491 410 313 263 28
_
345 142 32
- 55 34 32
_
• 290 108
141 266 281 257 28
82 187 239 53 14
43 74 34 165 13
- 1

42
7
_
7
35
34
1

657 281 204
469 114 42
157 28
3
312 86 39
178 115 161
54 102 148
11
119 2
5 8
1
10 52

46

_

_
46
45
-

_
_

45
5
1
4
36
.
.
6
22
4

23 40
1 40
1
- 40
22
13 8 -

_
_
-

•
_
"

_
-

_
_
-

•
-

-

•
-

.

«

_

- ■ .

•

-

_
_
-

•
_
-

-

18
•
18
14
4

13

78
_
_
78
78
_

_
_

-

10
7
2

«
.
_
_
_
_

_
_
-

_
•
_
•
-

_
_
_

•
•

_

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y . , January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table

A~At

Q iU toJU al, W atal umUH^ , an d S h ip p in g Oc etp atto Mi

- G o *U vut*d

2J

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations
studied on an area
basis in New York, N. I., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

939
825
79

A venge
hourly
earnings

s
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50
|
and
0.75
0
«8C_*85 .9 .95 1 .0G 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 over

*
1.25
u s r

1.15
1.19

16
_
_

1*714
— 625~
261
365
1,068
187
577
21
73
20

H nnm am if*ant.iT plng

Wholesale trade
Retail trade j/ ................................
Services

1,759
858
361
497
873
289
464
114

1.48
1748" _
1.45 _
1.50 _
1.48 _
1.52
1.46 _
1.43 _

2,082

Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable goods .........................

1.53
1.45"
1.39 _
1.50 _
1.57 _
1.59 _
1.41
1.37
1.41 _
1.62

1.57
I.48
1.68
1.66
1.58
1.62

WrnTiw«mif*iir»'hii'rlng

Wholesale trade ................................
+-nn<4<* " /
3

.

.

.

Services ••••»••»••».•»•»•.••♦»•••••••»•«»••»«••

11,926
5,401
2,565
2,836
n m n a n g
6,438
PuDlic utilities * ............................. 1,093
Wholesale trade ................................ 3,074
Retail trade j/ ................................ 1,811
250
Services

Stock bAndleTS and truckers, hand ...............
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...................................... ................................... ..................
Nondurable goods • • • • • » » • • • « . » » • » • » • » » « » » • • • • » » •
W

Truck drivers, light (under 1 - tons) ........... .
&
M a n iif a o t fi i r l n g . « . • • • £ • • • « . • • • • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Durable goods
Mrtnrnpnnf*fi/»‘f, rn H n g
.

Wholesale trade ................................
Retail trade
...................... .

-J E T

1,260
477
41
436
776
295
154
54

_

■
a
_
_
_
_

_

2
2
2
_
_ ■
_

41
15
15

26 65
~26~ 52
10
13
1
4

29
29

65
45
20
11

74
58
16
16

72
67
5
5

10 381
1 366
9 15
5 15

87
78
7
7

29
6

85
38
28
10
47

63
15
13
2
48
13
34

76 119
16 U
16 19
_
25
60 75
17 14
40 56

88 151
80
12
7 12
6 68
75 71
7 25
63 32
3
2 14

83 178 152 162 117 31
34 ll7 74 7l 47 10
8 7
25 44 41 19
9 73 33 52 39 3
44 60 75 88 64 19
_
_
34 19 15
40 56 45 48 44 _
_
6
4
2
1 4
4 24
4
1
6 2
5
3
3

53

16
12
6
6
4

4
2
2
2

6
23

4
_

2

21

29
5
17

_

2

7

_
_
_

73
37

79
46

_
_
_
_

37
36
13
17
6

46
33
14
18
1

43
38
16
22
5

26
26

13
13

87
8b

_

_

7

3

_
_

_

_
7

_

_
3

_

_

7

3

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

26

13

60
60

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

3

_

_
_

3

3

60

1.46
1.45 _
1.25 _
1.62
1.47 _
1.69 ■ _
1.51 _
1.32 _
1.15 _
1.81
2.11
1.40
2.18
1.63
1.62
1.54
1.64

_
_
_
_
_

12
12
_

_

1.61

274
614
1,177
816
38
112

83§ i 1.51

Durable goods
Nondurable goods

«.

6
6
6
_

_

_
_

_

_
_

86
1
1

83 167 577 480 480
72 97 95 ■ w 1243“
44 22 133 144
72 53 73 56 104
11 70 482 291 209
1
_ 52 283 142 59
5
3 155 141 139
8 10
6 15 44

6

_

_

_

6

_

6

_

_
_

_

41
12
12
_

5
32
31
1
30
1
_

292
153
120
33
127
6
35
86

6

6
6
6

—

_
_

6

39
8

1
48
16
4
12
32
25
7
27

12

63
5
4
1
58
19
39
47
27

12
15
13
_

27
20
15
3
1

215116 0 — 52------- a




5

81 n o 138 173
57 60 36 18
_
38 35 29
7 18
19 25
18 49 97 150
4 13 46 34
14 35 46 89
1
5 27
14
14
11
3
_

61

19

18
1
42
17
22

47 n 2
35 38
8
5
27 33
12 74
8 40
_
1
_
30

674 277 595 533 426
421 33"r i w 4l3 253
306 79 291 335 197
115
9 55 78 56
245 183 241 109 172
8
3 46 54 18
82 70 69
38
109 62 103 86 111
5 15
5 15
51
26
—

2

2

6

—

2

2

_

1

13

673
432
333
49
235
9
50
137
39

10

15
—

7
26
18
8

|
See footnotes at end of table.
#
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_

3

10

6

23

15
14

7
_
_
6

33

23

99
81
71
10
17
3
14
63
34
5
29
29
25
2
1
586
387
230
157
198
30
25
112
31
78

21

_
21
57
42
_

—

3
1

2
2

3
3

—

96 243 100 102 57
59 185 72 39 —
_
_
23 103 14
31 82 58 39 _
36 56 23 61 57
17 25
5 25 26
18
9 18 36 <_
_
1
22
31
62 232 249
29 111 145
16 94 33
13 17 112
33 121 104
32 80 77
10 16
8
1 14
540 1828
331 “615
134 61
197 555
203 12U
42 82
95 766
62 153
4
40
—
_
_
40
28
12

_

620
171
26
145
447
35
332
78

2

296 314
H 5 48
43 4
102 44
151 266
137 102
5 1
11
1208
14l
60
81
1065
482
492
91

89 228 256
8
65 10
10
6
2
4
6
55
24 214 248
153
_ 26 67
_ 15
22

-

—

60 178
20 10
_
4
20
6
40 168
17 18
6
23

65
2
-

2
63

—

-

1

9
1

—
-

1

-

1
8

3
3

-

-

1

-

_

_

—
_
_
_
-

16
15
15

_

—
_
_
_
_

—
_
_
_
_

22

_

43
39

63
2b

15

6

_

_

39
4
3
1

26
37
14
23

—
_
-

—
•

15
12
3

_

31

10

5
14
92
89

10
21
19

_

»

49
—

_
10
53 49
40
5
_ , 11

_
—

_
_

_

6
_
_

19

21 270
606 108 119
_ 90
187
292 58 28
1
127 50
_
_

1

-

98
29
4
25
69
16
53

_

1
—
-

1
_

8
10
78
73

3
_
-

5,
,
_

96 121

-

_

_

18

-

_

_

606 129 339
_
21 270

66
10

-

_

36

11

49
17

11

25
24
1

60 651
651

17
32

-

1
-

1
-

7

_
_

46
-

•

—

_

-

_

_

60

46

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

4
—

_ .120
— ~120”

651
_
_
60
_
_
_
_
_ 221
— “22C

_

46

_

220
1

4

_ 120
_

.
.

_

_

_

Table

k-At C u stodial, W a^JuuU m /f r tu td SA ipfU np Oeeufkatioml ■ GonUnumd
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations £/ studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNING S OF—

Occupation and industry division

o
f
wres
okr

s
$
$
$
s
s
s
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
s
s
s
$
*
$
$
$
%
s
h u l Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.0C 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50
ory
erig 1
anns
0.75
2.J5Q over
L . QJU2Q nsQ -2mDQ. 2.1Q 2.20 2.30
U
I s A Q 1.45 1 m3Q J iQ . J . 7
.60 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1*10 1.15 1.20 1.2? l,?o

' 00?

*
1.80
1.77
1.6?
1.81
1.80
U36
1.66

498
174
316
174

1.95
1.87
1.99
2.08

Truck drivers, heavy (over A tons other than
trailer type) ..............................
Manufacturing ............ ........... ..... .
Nonmanufacturing...........................
p i li e> irMH . las * TtTT.Ttf.T.T..T.tT__t.... T
ih
tT
Retail trade
..........................

4,954
673
4,271
1,238
1,244

2.05
2.01
2.06
1.82
2.04

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ......................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ................... ....... .
Nondurable goods .........................
.. ..........
Nonmanufacturing............ ..
o
riirf.-rT_r t
T .rf---..rTP-rrTr-rrtt
Retail trade
..........................

889
518
198
320
371
106
45

1.73
1.62
1.47
1.71
1.89
1.82
1.78

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) .......... .
Manufacturing.... ..... ....................
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable>
goods .........................
Nonmanufacturing.... ....... ................

275
74
35
39
201

1.86
1.64
1.65
1.62
1.94

Watchmen.... ................................
Manufacturing..... .................. ......
Durable goods .............. .............
Nondurable goods .........................
Nonmanufacturing.............. ........... .
Public utilities * ....................... .
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade 2 / .... .....................
Finance ** ........ ............ ....... .
Services... ....................... .....
f.r'ro
'A»h»1
roa tI_ ITT.T1TTr.T..I , T
*
1
II ,
T

4,595
i,i6o.
539
561
3,442
661
177
463
1,402
739
53

1.25
1.26
1.23
1.28
1.25
1.26
1.23
1.12
1.35
1.11
1.69

Truck drivers, medium (14 to and including 4 tons) .
..• 7*298
Manufacturing ....... ................. .
l
1,540
336
Nondurable goods .......................
.. 1,224
5,738
2,1^2

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) ....

i/
2/
2/
*
**

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

.
-

•
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

•
-

34
8

44
16

38
4

8
26
13
13

16
28

4
34
14

52
36
20
16
16

29
24
3
21
5
0

8

90 190 1360 2881 1291 603
[235 90 232
67 ~T04 n g r 1
64 99 Q
7* £Q 24 18
3 71 366 179 66 214
23 36 896 2635 1201 368
g 641 601 436
Q
9
Q
35 21 76 94
16 0 0
7
35

3 105
96
9

4
4

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

12
12
12
-

_
-

6
6
6
-

16
16

-

3 23
3 23
2
3
- 21
- -

36
~ w

6
30
-

n
8
8

24 183
22 172
10 101
12 71
2 n

53
39
16
23
14

6

-

-

~

15
5
10
”

n
n
-

n
3
62
-

62

68 n o
51 49
6
31
20 43
17 61
12

56
6

-

4

_
4
7
50

-

<

73 23
27
9
*
46 O3
9a
*
£9
*

_

6
6

14 619 951 120 1606 90 324 1188
- 22 _ 3l4
u ~T95 83
421 868 n o 1584 90 10 U88
421 727 on
20 20 n94 - 10
-

22
22
A

-

-

-

.
_
_
-

_
_
.
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

95
10
85
76

83
35
yn

48 152
37
20 16
28 21
- 115
£0
9<
- 14

85
30
6
24
55
3/
21

14
_
_
_
14
i/

12
12
12
-

79
16
16
_
63

31
6
6
25

n

40

29
28
_
28
1

10

3

_

_
_
-

_
_

_
_
1
-

_
_

_
_
_
_

89 102 156 372 349 214 201 508 301 342 283 230
56? 232
33 51 44 13 75 “ 55" 26 63 172 86 69 51 95 77
- 16 54 81 71 10 31 68
33 20 32
9 60
7
31 12
4 15 68 10
9 91 15 59 20 27 70
69 105 328 336 139 133 482 236 170 195 159 273 463 139
1
3
9 98
2
29 20 18
378 57 17 29
_ 13
_
21
30
29
2
37
9
4 10
8 22
5 71 10 14 41 15 105 19 60
7 10
9
3
28 120 45 97 237 417 24
18 79 210 76 39
48 32 89 16 14 24 42 24 23
43
5 62 121 n 6
4
n
2
2
(
9 16

10
28
51

22 36 208 221 172 19
2" i r "208" • r 5 5 _
0
28 _
13 208
• 221 144 18
2Q 17
g
ooi
1A
144 xo
~

7C
f9
75
/
9

3

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




8
S
2
6
-

n

_

n
23
9
4
4
6
£

91 105
36 _
_ .
36 _
55 105
£
4 -

75

54
f4
>
54

10?

6
6
5

_

_
.
in

- 105

.
0
0

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

_
_
_

.
.
_
_

_
_
_

_

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations

Table B-2071 s

Gcuutif and OUidl GonfactiOH&Uj, P ao JLioU

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Average
hourly
earnings

Occupation and sex

<?.75 <f.80
and
under
jJO fS L

6.85

8.90

8. 95

L oo £.05 £.1

£.15 £•20

1.25 1.30

.35

i.l*o i.l*5

1.50

$
1.55

1.60

1.65|'l.7C(l.75| 1.80|l.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30
i
and

•20 -Jl 1*00 IgOi 1* 2 0 . 1*11

M i

1*30.

1*31laiia i *

h i 1 * 5 0 . JU55

1.6Q 1*65 lalfi.1 1 1.80 1*20 2.00 2.10 !
*

2*3°1 over

Men

Candy makers, class A 3/ » ............
Candy makers, class B 3 / a ...........
Candy makers* helpers / * ...........
Dippers, machine ^ a ..... ...........
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 3/a
Machinists, maintenance 3/a ..........
Maintenance men, general utility 3/e <
Mogul-machine operators' helpers 3/a .
Stock handlers and truckers, hancf"3/a
Watchmen 2/e ....................... .

131*
l»
i6
371*

.............
Candy makers* helpers
Dipping-machine operators' helpers 3/b ,
Filling-machine operators 3 / b ......... ,
Packers, hand, bulk* T o t a l ........... ,
T i m e .........
Incentive ....
Packers, hand, fancy ^/b ..............
Wrappers, machine 3 / a ................. ,

11*5

3

20

98

16

203
1*0

227
65
115
**

80

365

876
217

I
1.58
1. 1*0

1.07
1.53
1.05
1.87
1.76
1.09
1.07
1.03

h

37

1*1

83

1

38

25

1
*

1
*
38

11

1
30

6

2

-

-

-

-

3

17
2
17

1*9
2*
1
3
21*

2

15
23

5

19
117
50

131*

2

5

7

.99
1.07
1.07
1.06
.98
1.08

1.02
1.00

1
115

10*

11*
23

8

1*9
9
10
*
81
lit

1
3

20

3*
1

10

31

8
1

1
*
3
1

10
10

7
13

2
-

3

11*

19

12

20

35
9

33
3

5

2

3

2

5

1

3

5

3

-

8

-

1
1
*
1

2

1
1

1
3
3
1 -

1

1
*

1
5

30

8

8
1

1*8

25

10

27

68

10
3

3
3

5
1
5
1
..............................................................................

l

12

18

12

17

11

33
1
*

35

25

h

18

10

29

35
32

25

k
11
**

18

10

5

7

30

73
5

8

100 105
21

20

20

25
53

1*0

. i/
study covered establishments with more then 20 workers engaged in manufacturing candy and other confectionery products (Group 2071) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
' e/ • 5 r ioi° Pr«Par*d by
Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a February 1952 payroll period.
T/

cl

P !y f°r
“i * * WDrk*
J-naurricient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
r
*11 or p « d « i „ m t l y t i » writ.™.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. I., January 1952
n S. DEPARTMENT OF T
Bnr..u of U b o r Statistic,

Women,'d and MUteAr Q oati and S u til

Table B-2337:

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-T; /ME HOURLY EARNING S OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

36,321
21,164
15,157

$
2.40
2.69
2.00

y
All plant occupations: Total ...................
Men..................
Women....... ......

$ „
s
$
$
$
%
$
$
%,
*
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 i.4o i.5o 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 $
3.80Loo
and
bub
undex
.80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 L.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 i.5o 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.202.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 over
132 118 260 190 118 828 770 767 730 L066 1181 855 1563 1617 897 3537 3274 4229 3513 2743 2879 1696 1215 602 287 1253
54 51 103 83 42 396 223 308 290 291 398 324 524 633 282 1426 1266 2459 2349 2266 2680 1557 n3o 565 249 1214
39
78 67 157 107 76 432 547 459 440 775 783 531 L039 984 615 2i n 2008 1770 1164 477 199 139 85 37 38

Selected Plant Occupations
Cutters and markers (1,622 men and 9 women) 3/ ......
1,631
380
Inspectors, final (examiners) (men and women) 3/ ...
303
Men .....................................
77
Women ...................................
Pressers, hand (2,576 men and 33 women) ..........
2,609
Tims....................................
1,019
Incentive ................................
1,590
Pressers, machine (all men) ....................
1,121
Time.............................. .....
365
756
Incentive......................... ...... .
Pressers, hand and machine (all men) . . ... .....
. ..*
919
238
Time..... ...... .................... .
681
Incentive................................
Sewers, hand (finishers) (men and women) ......... . 11,017
6,827
Time ..................................
4,190
Incentive ..............................
2,772
Men.....................................
Time ..................................
1,885
Incentive .................... .........
887
Women...................................
8,245
Tine ..................................
4,942
Incentive .......................... .
3,303
Sewing-machine operators, section system
6,418
(men and women) ............................
Time ..................................
4,105
Incentive ..............................
2,313
Men.....................................
2,551
Time..................................
1,553
Incentive ..............................
998
3,867
Women............ .......................
2,552
Time..................................
incentive ............... ...............
1,315
Sewing-machine operators, single hand (tailor)
7,696
system (men and women) .......................
3,322
Time..................................
Incentive ..............................
4,374
6,680
Men.....................................
3,006
Time ......................... .........
Incentive ..............................
3,674
1,016
Women ................................... .
316
Time.......................... ......
700
Incentive.... .........................
436
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (19 men and 417 women) ....
Time ....... .............................
411
Incentive................. .............. .
25

3.11
2.25
2.39
1.66
2.86
2.59
3.04
3.10
2.78
3.26
3.48
2.96
3.66
2.24
2.26
2.22
2.54
2.53
2.55
2.15
2.16
2.13
2.23
2.13
2.41
2.55
2.40
2.78
2.03
1.97
2.13
2.74
2.93
2.60
2.83
3.00
2.69
2.16
2.23
2.13
1.05
1.04
1.23

1
_
_
_

_
_

5
5

3
3

_
_
_

_
-

4
1
3

_
_

_
_
2
2

_
_
_

13
13
_
_
_

.

_
4
1
3

_

2
_
2
1

2
2
-

_

21
3
18

1

_
_
.
.

_

_

2
1
1
_
_

.
_
.
.
_

3
4
2
2
1
_

1
_
_

2
1
1
_

1
2
1
1
_

_
_

_
_
_
_
19
17
2

1
_
_
_
72
69
3

1
22
_
22
89
86
3

53
52
1

_
18
16
2

2
6
.

6
638
253
385
58
25
33
580
228
352

-

141 177 194 143
12 33
24
117 177 182 n o
84 89 110 132
.
33
•84 89 n o
99
57 88 84 n
_
12
24
33 88 72 n
30 4
29
1 4

23
1

_
62
61
1

-

-

-

95 105
23
95 82
56 49

1' 23
1
1

_
_

-

25
2
23
68
21
47
40
13
27
17
17

307
203
104
54
31
23
253
172
81

_
_

_
_

-

11

12
40
16
24
24
17
7
2

70 321
48 235
22 86
3 64
36
3 28
67 257
48 199
19 58

_
_

_
_

-

3
3
1
2
101
11
90
11

76 104 166
17 70 84
59 34 82
12 28 16
1
1 25
11
3 15
64 76 150
16 45 83
48 31 67

_

28
4
24

1
18
11
7
5
2
3
8
1
7
1
1

24
4 25
73 107 130 217 287
40 59 37 121 154
33 48 93 96 133

.

_

_

_

23
23

2
3
_

275
94
181
33
11
22
242
83
159

_

_

_

-

13
11
2
23
1
22

416
190
226
61
12
49
355
178
177

_

_

_

-

.

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

73 107 154 221 312
40 59 37 121 154
33 48 117 100 158
.
24
4 25

_

1
_
-

_

_
_
_
_
.
_
_
_

_
3
2
1

_

_
_
_
29
28
1

_

3
1
2
1

_

_

_

2
1
1
_
_

1
1
1

1

_

_

_

_

47
47

28
4
24

_
_

_
_
_

_
.
_
.
.

_

1

_

11

3
2
1

1

1

_

_

_

1
1

_

11

21
3
18
_

_

.
_
_
.
.
_
_

_

45
11
34
34
11
23
11
_
11
39
37
2

-

56
39
39
14
14

_

49
56
23
33
7

2
5

658
449
209
76
18
58
582
431
151

2
2
2
-

27
3
24
15
-

15
1
.

1
478
108
370
47
7
40
431
101
330

24 40 145
34 99 42
33 96 42
1
3
159 174 301 278
97 89 101 96
62 85 200 182
85 42 n e 143
56 18 74 38
29 24 44 105
74 16 74
16
3 15
58 13 59
1408 1587 1975 1577
933 1195 1549 1337
475 392 426 240
192 316 718 701
114 234 585 630
78 82 133 71
1216 1271 1257 876
819 961 964 707
397 310 293 169
68
42
42

170
38
37
1
316
151
165

n

2

30
82
85
30
55
567
281
286
325
234
91
242
47
195

540 345 160 51
1
6
3
6 1
3
-

-

-

-

319 209 149 101
166 135 14 n
153 74 135 90
86 137 76 57
24 52 32 1
62 85 44 56
157 57 32 81
72 46 26 6 81
85 n
166 85 79 45
1
1 13
153 84 78 45
52
5 20 22
1
1 13
4 19 22
39
80 59 23
114
- 114 60 59 23

16
-

51

-

_
_

-

35

225

-

n

35 4/214
34 152
12
13
21 140
34 5/284
12
22 5/284
37 101
-

37
4

-

101
89

-

-

4
33
33

12
12

186 495 489 193 999 666 804 509 343 148 102 148 63
85 378 396 106 756 438 474 393 189 82 38 104 4
101 117 93 87 243 230 330 n 6 154 66 64 44 59
4o 199 170 59 268 177 384 341 162 111 77 134 5o
24 149 128 14 204 104 212 280 120 79 34 104 4
16 50 42 45 64 73 172 61 42 32 43 30 46
146 296 319 134 731 491 420 168 181 37 25 14 13
- 4
61 229 268 92 552 334 262 n 3
69
3
34 21 14 13
85 67 51 42 179 157 158 55 n 2

53
2
51
5o
2
48
3
3

165
1
164
149
1
148
16
16

188
18
170
188
18
170
—
n
-

64
17
47
64
17
47
-

235
235
224
224

149 541 612
34 69 179
n 5 472 433
126 434 402
22 24 57
104 410 345
23 107 210
12 45 122
62 68
n

695
224
471
624
200
424
71
24
47

667
203
464
563
190
373
104
13
91

1023
658
365
970
650
320
53
8
45

1352
1010
342
1305
988
317
47
22
25

713
503
210
702
492
210

n
n
-

533
304
229
522
304
218
11
-

89

n
-

n

1 / The stu d y covered re g u la r ( in s id e ) and c o n tra c t shops w ith 8 o r more workers in p a r t o f in d u s try group 2337 as d efin ed in th e stan d ard i n d u s tr i a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n Manual (1945 e d itio n ) p rep ared
by The Bureau o f the B udget. E stablishm ents m anufacturing f u r c o a ts o r s in g le s k i r t s were excluded from th e s tu d y . C u ttin g shops w ith 1 o r more workers were in c lu d e d . Data r e l a t e to a September 1951
*
p a y ro ll p e rio d .
2 / Excludes premium pay f o r overtim e and n ig h t work.
3 / I n s u f f ic i e n t d ata to p erm it p re s e n ta tio n o f s e p a ra te averages by method o f wage payment; a l l o r predom inantly time w orkers.
V Workers were d is tr ib u te d as fo llo w s: 29 a t $1* to $4.20; 27 a t $4.20 to $ 4.40; 57 a t $4.40 to $4.60; 52 a t $4.60 to $4.80; 1 a t $4.80 to $5; 1 a t $5 to $5 .2 0 ; 23 a t $5.40 to $ 5 .6 0 ; and 21* a t
$5.60 to $ 7 .60.
5/ Workers were d is tr ib u te d as fo llo w s: 59 a t $1* to $4.20; 52 a t $4.20 to $4.40; 69 a t $4.40 to $4.60; 41 a t $4.60 to $4.80; 35 a t $4.80 to $5; and 28 a t $5.20 to $ 7 .6 0 .




Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT JOF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-235:

O ccupation and sex

A ll p la n t o cc u p atio n s:

T o ta l ............................................
M en ..............................................
Women............. ............................

Number
of
workers

10,345
4,593
5,752

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average Under $
0.90 0.95 L o o 1.05 L lO 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50. 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80
hourly
earnings t
0.90
2/
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 .60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85
*
92 289 151 252
58 102 311 123 187 286 164 176 226 113 152 279
93
2.15 1067
94 163
42
11 104
2
21
56
22
90
2.65
47
71
12
30
433
13
13
24
13
3 90
14
1.76
81 185 127 205
56
81 149
634
51
89 240 102 174 230 142 164 136
83 149 189

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.85 1.9C 2.0C 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
1.90 2.0C 2.1C 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50
365
94
271

300
28
272

379
98
281

276
68
208

399
ns
281

42

52

166 1142
20 899
166 243

S e le c te d P la n t O ccupations
Men
d o c k e r s , hand Jj/b ............................................................... ..
B lo c k ers, machine % / h .................................................................
C u tte rs j / a ......................................................................................
Sewing-machine o p e ra to rs : T o ta l ..........................................
Time ......................................
I n c e n t i v e ....................... ..
Snipping c le r k s 2 / a ....................• • • • .........................................
Straw o p e ra to rs : T o ta l .............................................................
T i m « t t f T t . - T r r T T . . T.
,,
T

965
153
193
1,141
850
291
340
875
361

3.52
3 .84
2.54
2.69
2.49
3.25
1 .71
3.37
2 .5 1

-

2
2

2

35
2

8
-

_

2
2
14
2
2

_
-

7
-

2
2
2
2
2

_
1
-

2

2

2
-

7
7
14
3

2
3
3
3
-

1
-

6
2

_
2
13
7
6
46
-

O
<

Women

_

_

2

1
6
6
13
7

1
-

19
16
3
47
2
2

7

9

7

24

5

1
2
2

-

2
9
9
58
4
O
<
C

-

8
8
51

-

-

n
(

3
22
14
14 1 22
5 16
17
16

16

18
10
87
3 620
- 561
59
3
1 129
~ 125
4

•

M illin e rs 2 / b ............................................... ................................ ..
Sewing-machine o p e ra to rs : T o tal ......................... ..
Time ......................................
Straw o p e ra to rs ^ /b ............................................................... ..
Trimmers: T o t a l ............. ..............................................................
Time .......................................................................
In c e n tiv e .............................................................

497
297
231
66
271
3,252
116
3,136

1.63
2 .0 6
2.00

6
10
10

2
12
12

13
6
6

8
4
4

11
-

15

105
54
51

13
11
2

_
45
45

27
27

16
33
33

o on

2 .7 4
1 .95
1 .1 1
1.98

3
-

29
-

20
-

-

2
-

57
57

20
20

_
65
11
54

67
13
54

42
1
41

-

-

28
-

40
14
14

7
2
2

7

116
116

4
90
6
84

2
126
126

2
140
140

-

-

43
3
-

17
-

37
-

69
15
8

3
-

30
7
-

28
15
15

13
-

64
2
62

4
48
48

_
110
no

79
79

75
8
67

_
106
8
98

2
169
2
167

3
252
252

7
48
28
on
2
220
220

19
16
16
6
153
153

13
41
34

n
(

_
7
-

_
78
78

f

6
13
210 153
_
210 153

2
160
_
160

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$ , $
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3 .2 0 3.30 3.40 3 .50 3.60 3.70 3.80 .3.90 4.00 4.10 4.2C 4.30 4 .40 4 .5 0 4 .60 4.70 4.80 4.90 5.00 5.10
and
2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3 .60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4.20 4.3C 4 .4 0 4 .5 0 4.60 4.70 4.80 4.90 5.00 5.10 over
A ll p la n t o cc u p atio n s:

T o tal ....................................................
M e n ..................................................
Women ................... ..........................

567
310
257

119
46
73

204
136
68

204
136
68

86
35
51

131
113
18

185
147
38

56
25
31

152
123
29

66
45
21

72
64
8

54
53
1

129
117
12

7l
16
55

46
45
1

40
37
3

47
45
2

92
92

72
71
1

124
124
-

53
46
7

87
68
19

41
41

18
18
-

11
61
111
108
3
8
119
HR
1

43
2
2

11

28
59
8
8
g

25

53

44

6

42
-

16
6

_
6

7
-

20
-

4
-

35
-

74
-

35
14

78
28

40
6

_
-

18
-

16
2
14

6
8

38
38

-

-

24

-

-

-

-

-

34

-

_

24

_

_

_

_

34

9
7
A
■
a
76
164

2

11
60

3
53

6
55

31
20

164

60

53

55

20

4
4

94
94

106
106
-

_
.

.

81
6

16
18

7

-

-

-

6

7

_

_

_

6

SeJ,ssfrefl.. dant_0£S ugatigE g
Men
B lo ck ers, hand 2 / b .............................. .......................................
B lockers, machine , 2 / b ............................ .............................. ..
C u tte rs j^/a ..........................................................................................
Sewing-machine o p e ra to rs : T o t a l ............. ............................ ..
T m
M
.. T_r r _ TT . t TT_Tt __
In c e n tiv e ........................... ...
Snipping c le rx s jj/a .........................................................................
Straw o p e ra to rs : T o t a l ................................................................
ma
,
T _ ~
In c e n tiv e ......................................

-

14
20
20

-

14
8
6

1
1

10
75
67
8

33
7
26

63

17

-

-

-

14
87

7

23

10
10

87

7

23

2

12

37

18

4

25

73

9

25

9

10

18

22

18

-

34

16

18

4

7

66

2

12

37

18

4

25

73

9

25

9

10

18

22

18

-

34

16

18

4

7

66

-

-

10
10

33
14
19

Women
M illin e rs i / b ................................ .......................... ...................... ..
T mo
M

I n c e n t i v e ......... .................... ...............................................................

9
•a
y

7

8

O
J

O
y

4
14

8
14
18

5
26

10
19

16
5

14

18

26

19

5

■
2

8
-

1
-

4

8

10
45

1

-

2

-

1

-

7
-

3
16

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

8

45

1

-

2

-

1

-

-

16

-

-

-

-

-

1/ The study covered establishments with 8 or more workers in the millinery industry (Group 235) as defined in the standard Industrial Classification Manual prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data
relate to a March 1952 payroll period.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LaBQR
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




Table B-336*

O c c u p a t i o n and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Under

^ 0 4 4 n A /U e lr

A /o

m

J

U H U

w

1 /

WUKJCVJIiltO J
NUMB•ISA
$
$
$
$
s
s
$
2.00 *2.05 *2.10*2.15*2.20*2.25
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.701.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95

and
*
2/ 1.00 1.0? 1.10 1.1? 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.751.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.2C 2.25 over
“1 --1
15
3
1 14 3
41 93 63 137 143 81 127 99 119 70 51 95 32 52 121 34 56 129 5
1.46 16 u
1,645

S e l e c t e d Plant OccuDations - Men

239
103
8
77
24
76
209
112
146

1.37
1.73
1.62
1.39
1.55
1.77
1.70
1.73
1.17

7

-

_
-

-

-

10

_

16

23

_

7
-

-

14
a

13

2
-

-

37

38

10

50

17
-

24
9
8
7

3
-

30

15
7
27

72

4
7
1

3
21

19
5

3

9
31

3
1 .2
4 2
2
2 18

9
9

21
2

6
14
3

-

5

3
9

7

9
40

2
4

3
10

2
19

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
1

-

1

1

—
1

-

X

-

26 15
25 4
14 4

3
~
7
17

6

X

15
51
15

2

'
-

6

5

1/ The study covered independent nonferrous foundries (except die-casting foundries) with 8 or more workers. Data relate to a July 1951 payroll period.
|/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. All or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
2/ Includes 76 women workers.

G u tU ruf, affcutd *J o o U ,tm i J ta fiJ w a to i/

Table B-342*

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

/
—
i
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGSjjb f
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
•
$
$
.,
0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2 1 0 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.60
and
undex
.90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.1? 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.6? 1.7011*75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.4C 2.6C 2.80

Man
%

Assemblers, class C 2/a •
.....
Machine-tool operators, toolroom J / .•
2b
Polishers and buffers, metal~2/b ....
Foli3hing-and-buffing-machine operators

Tool-and-die makers J/a ...........

2

11
21
145
49
67

1.16
1.79
1.50
1.48
2.14

_

248
137
111

1.16
1.13
1.19

9 ‘ 16
2
9 14

23

1.35

-

_

_

_

_

_

7

6
_

8
1

1

1

4
_

-

-

-

-

2
1

_

_

17
1

8
3

2
3
-

7
7

1
4
18

2
7
10

2
-

1
3

3
5
1
4

2
56
1

6
3
-

6

3
1

1

-

7

4
7
3

9

21

_

-

1
-

“
“

8

-

8

4

_

_

Women
Assemblers, class C: Total .....
Time...
Incentive
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class C 2/a • *
•

-

26 59
6 45
20 14
-

-

23
21
2
1

6
5
1
-

23
17
6

13
8
5

10
3
7

-

39
30
9

1

2

4

-

9

-

7

2

1

1

1

7

2

1

1

1

-

4




1

5

1

5

~

1

5

1

5

-

_

2

The study covered establishments .1th more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of cutlery, hand tools, and hardware (Group 342) as
(1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) An or predominantly incentive workers.
1/

_

-

1______
_
defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DE P A R I M E N T o f l a b o r

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Bl**trM*talWo»k

Table B-3A44J

1/

NUMBER OF WORKER 8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occup a t i o n 2 /

Average
hourly
earnings

, r.

_ T, ,
,

r

$

$

2

2

1
X

i m
XeU^

3

2

1.66
2.07
l!l6

59

36
+.nr*If h fln H l Arm oni4 + T*iir*lrOY»Q
Wa 1/4 at*a
h fin ri
r* 1 s a a ik _ _ ( (
liin l ^ nt* a
k en /4
a lia s H

Vionri
i i
-i ri i a

, ,
i i i

t ,

$

-

-

/
4

2

10

-

-

4

$

$

$

$

$

s

*

$

$

s

s

*

t

1
X

3

-

Q
O

5

-

-

a

*

2

J

20

7

O
X

I 50
-*-• 27

12

8

n
l

i
X

Q
7

2

1

O
X

•
T
X

4

2

2

1
X

4

o
X

o
X

-

1

" ,

4

2

2

4

-

2

X

J

4

2

a

o
<
o
x

over

2

1

p 25

13
20

ii

$

$

16

c
0

IQ
S h e e t - m e t a l machine operators, miscellaneous
m a c h i n e s ........................ .......................

$

$

and

1 23

28
7

$

.85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2,30 2,40 2,$0 2,60 2,70

♦

,

$

$

$

under

2/

Assemblers, rises 0
. . r ______
•Tnni
pnr fur a
a nH nlaonora

S

0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.1C 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70

2

2

X

2

j

4

i/ Tbe study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged In the manufacture of sheet-metal products (Group 3444) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
(1 4 5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
92 J Data limited to men workers. All or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

T B 6 Stam ped and P laited Metcul Product* 1/
able -34 3:
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.65 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2,20 2.30 2.40
.mi
undex
2/ ■
1
0
,95 1.00 11. 5 1,10 1,15 1,20 1,25 1,30 1.35 1,40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.60 1.65 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.A0 over

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

99
14
26
93
428
81
80

1
1.93
1.72
1.21
1.48
1.29
1.23
2.18

82

1.30

Men
Die setters....... ....................... .
Mechanics, maintenance ............... T..,trTttT,t,
Power-shear operators, class B ..................
Punch-press operators, class A .......... ........
Punch-press operators, class B ...................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ................
T o o l —and—die m a k e r s .................... ..... T____, , , , , , ,

Q
7
_
_
16
9

4
4

41
63

l
11
1

34

4
41
19

47
4

4
13

6
44
11
13

9
3

51

Q
7
1

2
J
4

7
r
J
56
13

g
A?

10
o£

o
X

l
4
1K
xp

L
4

1

n
(

8
in
XU
5

X

2
Q
7
2

c

5
n
±

J

TO
XX

3

£
O
<

4
~

20

10

24

1

9

12

5
”
“

1
5

5
”

14

Women
Punch-press operators, class B ..................

17

13

2

15

1

8

10

4

5

2

2

l/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonautomotlve stamped and pressed metal products (Group 3463) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. All or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, H. I., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Table B-3468:

SAecitoplatUufr Piatuu},<Mtd PoiuUbtf 1
/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF-

Number

Occupation 2/

o
f

workers

Average
hourly
earnings

1/

Platers' helpers .............................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Polishers and buffers, metal.....................................

. . . . . . . .

16
20
218
329
499
00

*
w#7J
1 80
1*49
1.07
1.64
1.20

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ ,
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00
ana
under
.80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20
$

1

2

_

-

_

-

_

-

_

-

12

31

35

22

-

-

-

a
8

35

-

8

1

2

2
3

-

1

6 10
23 48
8 12
2 1

12
40
7
2

3

26 17
20 1
3
22 16
5 1

3

19

4

-

-

37

18

28
9
21

1
25 22
-

-

112 65

2
13

2
21

1
1

3

2
-

-

-

-

-

49

34

15

51

-

_

-

-

14

-

-

16

-

8

4

1
______ 1

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers engaged in all types of electroplating, plating, and metal polishing (Group 3468) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers. All or a majority of workers in all occupations were paid on a time basis.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-35:

M a c U U tm * 4 f

O n S u ib u m A

1 /

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.30 1.90 2.00 2.102.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70
$
and
0.85
.90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2,202.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 over

Machinery 2/
Men
Assemblers, class A £/a .......................
Assemblers, class B f j a .......................
Assemblers, class C: Total ....................
Time ..................
Incentive ..............
Electricians, maintenance jj& ..................
Inspectors, class A £/a .......................
Inspectors, class B L j a .......................
Inspectors, class C i j h . .......................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ( J a .............
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 4/a, 2/ ••
Drill-press operators, radial, class A lj a ...............
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A ( J k ......................
Engine-lathe operators, class A L j& ...........
Grinding-machine operators, class A 4/a ........
Milling-machine operators, class A L J o . .........
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A l j a . .
.
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A lj a ..........................................
See footnotes at end of table.




1,692
1,089
577
399
178
88
194
124
80
328
2,455
158

*
1.95
1.70
1.38
1.36
1.40
1.94
1.99
1.64
1.35
1.23
1.90
1.91

116
640
278
522
116

1.79
1.91
1.96
1.90
1.92

319

1.89

-

-

-

10

-

10

-

-

-

5

-

5

-

-

-

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

50
40
10

23
10
13

43
37
6

-

24

8
28

2
15

2
34
32
2

2
34

4
21
11
10

4
49

2
35
12
23
4
6
64

2
59
45
14
2
4
51

26
49
40
9
4
18
26

23
23
14
9
1
15
6

1
5
9 249 392 412 317 199 59
32 248 252 166 226 61 11 12 6
30 91 28 45 16
3
3
4 3
8
24 78 14 34
8
6 13 3 4 11
.
3
3
4 3
14 15 27 26
5 1
8 37 20 28 49 19 4
26 36
6
4 32
9
2
19
7
4 10
54 149 450 606 529 352 215 53
17 26 22 57 18 18 4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1
35
2

40 29 14 18
5
29 118 184 100 111
16 64 28 66 54
3 99 127 123 71
12 43 44 11
7

58 120

71

45

32
6
2

11
2

2

_
_
_

-

29

1
4

_
_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_
__
- _

3

4
-

f
1

17

11

11

-

-

-

1
_
_
_

3

_
-

_ _
_ _

_

-

4
5
2

8
3
-

4
7

3

-

-

3
1
-

-

-

-

-

2 1
87 11
16 11
38 10
4 2

1

13

4
4

_

-

_

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-35:

McuJtin&uf J n A u Vbtfml 1/

-

Qnntinumd

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING BTRAIffHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
Under 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 $ , 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60
1.60
*
0.85
.90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70

Machinery 3/ - Continued

Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B j / Total ..................... ..
>:
..
Time .........................
Incentive ....................
Drill-press operators, radial, class B I j a . .....
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B i j a ......................
Engine-lathe operators, class B 4/ a ........ .
Grinding-machine operators, class B 4/a........
Milling-machine operators, class B y a . .........
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class B £/a . .
.
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B i j a . ................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C j / Total ..........................
>:
Time ........................
Incentive..... ...............
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C y & .....................
Engine-lathe operators, class C ^/a ...........
Grinding-machine operators, class C ^/b ........
Milling-machine operators,
class C: Total ..........................
Time ........................
Incentive ....................
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class C lj& . . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C j j a ................
Machine-tool operators, toolroom ^/a .............
Machinists, production i j a .....................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand a ............
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) £/a ..........................
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) £/a . . .
Welders, hand, class A £/a .....................
Welders, hand, class B i j a . .....................

%

1,335
1*192
143
41

1.60
1.58
1.75
1.65

-

-

-

-

105
185
132
378
36

1.58
1.64
1.67
1.61
1.60

-

203

1.64

768
632
136

1.35
1.34
1.39

10
10
-

20
10
10

_
_

10
10
-

25
20
5

5
_
5

35
30
5

158
77
129

1.28
1.36
1.26

10

_
20

_

_
_

20
5
_

_
5

20
5
_

109
94
15
13

1.44
1.39
1.74
1.31

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

91
222
107
483

1.41
1.63
2.02
1.32

531
413
91
90

2.09
2.13
1.84
1.82

79
338
24

1.20
1.16
1.39

-

-

10
10

30
30

21
21

5
5

118
118

22 39
22 38
1

59 293 312 181 192
53 274 289 142 165
6 19 23 39 27
16 13
8
4

6

3

2

3 6
11 16
2

7
5
3

35
42
IQ
J7
.
35
16

24
96
11
60
9

8
21
o.
s
46
1

_

_

10

71

47

53
38
15

83
73
10

81
66
15

39
39
_

44 81
37 76
7 5

88 125
73 116
15
9

10
9
10

21
5
5

27

7
10
1

16
5
11

2
29
24

4
4

12
12

11
Q
7
2

5

2

10
6
4
3

_

18
10

3

20

4
27

40

4

16

26

26

5
_

_

_

_

-

_

-

_

5

_

10

_

10

7

_

13

6
_
6

_
„

4

4

_
_

_
_
_

_

_

42
4
9
9

_

8
8

1

_

5
5
7
34
34

_

2

_

13
12
1
1

_

24

8
5

14
5

18
24

56 218 86

9
_

See footnotes at end of table,




6
20 10

12
9

6
13

6
96

_

_
_
_

±(

81
3

14
2

6

3

27

37

3

_

1

_

_

23
12
11

34
22
12

5

3

_

3

_

1

5

3

_

3

_

1

3

11

1

5

_

1

_

2

_

1

3

1

3

_

1

_

_

3

1

3

2
15
32

29
36

16
10

40
32
7

76 29 63
48 200 71
2 1
13

_

_

_ _

-

10

_
_
_

17

6
12

9
18
2

1
78
7

_
_

_

_

_

_

2

15

-

on

12

-

-

8
26
4

17
2

2
2

4
4

9

2
6
9

_

53 114
7 15
30 32
9 39

1

11 _
9 10

10
75
28

14

50

5

5

-

-

-

Women
Assemblers, class B 4/a .......................
Assemblers, class C £/a .......................
Inspectors, class B 4/a .......................

_
_

17
26

_

n
101

6

_

5

43
25
18

2
15
11

2

2

2

_

_

_

_

10

Table

MacU i n v u f Jtkludfa'/sd 1/

b -35:

-

Gontlmmd

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A K ( J H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation and sex

Num ber
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
*
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
*
$
*
Under 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 *
2.60 2.70
f
t
and
0.85
.90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 over

Pacer and Printing Machinery
Men
%
7

Assemblers, class C i j a ........................
Electricians, maintenance i j a . ...................
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 4/a, j / ...
i
p * o l Ao»i . T o
r A f pif i n *
il aIooc A ^/n (
l
Drill-press operators, single- or multipleen v/1a
i t3
aoc A //
o
Engine-lathe operators, class A 4/a ............
ri* 4n r voti no nparc+at» aIaqc A //t
V*!
p n/Vn
. o
f
. . (.._
.
Milling-^nachine operators, class A y \ > .... .....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A i j a .......... ......
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4/a, $ / ...
Drill-press operators, radial, class B 4/a ......
Engine-lathe operators, class B 4/a ............
M 11 A if/H no
l
nt'^
nae P ly / (
n
iiii*i
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B 4/a .............
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 4/a> 1 / ••
•
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C 4/et......................
Engine-lathe operators, class C 4/a ............
Milling-machine operators, class C 4/a .........
Turret-lathe operators* hand (including hand
screw machine), class C 4/a .................
Machine-tool operators, toolroom 4/a .............
Stock handlers and truckers, hand 4/a .............

88
32

03
1
1.60
1.97

_

_

_

8

4

-

_

_

8
7

2

4
12

45

_

6

6

4
4

1 3i
/
1.99
2,00

57
187
126
282

1.88
1.96
2,06
1.99

76
308
24
34
123

2.00
1.77
1.72
1.79

54
87

1.79
1.55

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

8

-

-

-

-

23
12
33

1.50
1.38
1.57

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
-

4
4

-

-

-

-

12

23
243

44
9

5 69 276 156 -y? 51
|,
12 4
54 121 13 11
2 1
1
15 10
3
1
4 14 13
6
7
31

20
6
2
-

11
2
-

-

-

-

11

6

3

4

4
4

1
4

1

20
5
2

14
2

55 152 321 188 138 19
8 44 18 13

13

2

4

70
914
83

1

2
38
12

2

12
12
14
10

5
35
20
66

2 1
39 1
16 2
30 10

1
4
5

'
8
3

4
2

3

3
1

18
6

13
4

2

1
-

-

-

-

-

14 18
49 51
15 37
52 103

8
7
77 116
8
4
7 22
28 49

1

28
1

1

6

57
11
5
16

16

6

5
14

7
9

9
14
11

6

3

2
4
8

1

4

4

3

1

4

2

-

4

-

39

9

2

_

_

,82

1.58
1.97
1.37

29
5

13

15 159

14

6

3

3
3

-

1
3

-

1

-

-

-

-

3

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 14
7 5
- 9

4
-

-

5
-

-

-

29 63

75

1

1
6

27
18

2

1

15

Machine-Tool Accessories
Men
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 4 / a ..............
Machine-tool operators, production, Class A 4/a> 1/ •
Engine-lathe operators, class A 4/a ............
Grinding-machine operators, class A 4/a .........
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4 / a > 2 / • • •
Engine-lathe operators, class B 4 / a »•..........

42
12 0

42
19
153
24
±yU

Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die

1.08
1.94
1.96

10

_

_

_

_

5

_

20

5

_

_

_

2
10

-

18
4

14
-

2 .1 0

1.43
1.63
1

10

10

-

10

10

20

O OQ

-

30
-

-

12

4

2

10

4

9

2

10

17

15

28
4
56

42
14
5

2
2

8
4

26
22

4
7

22

4
6

20

53 114

40

76

14 50

10

7

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition)
prepared by the Eureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were included. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2 / Includes data for paper and printing machinery (Group 3554 and 3555) and machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) for which separate date are also presented.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
2

/

Includes d a t a for ODerators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




Radio, le U u tiio n , an d R elated PAoduati. U

Table B-3661:

Occupation, grade, and sex

WlpB
Vki

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$ , $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
f
t
h u l Under0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.UO 1.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.1)0
ory
$
and
0.95
y
1^00 i*05_1.19 1.15 1.20 1*25.1.30
1.1)0
i.?o 1.55 1.60 If65 J . 0 J , 51.80 1.8? I.90 1.95 2.00 2.10-2.20 2.30 2. over
.7 .7
1)0

%

All plant occupations:

Total ..................
M en.................
Women................

12,773
7,558
5,215

1.28
1.30
1.26

80
U9
31

76 55U 913 1723 1619 1 ) 9 1 7 ) 1167 912 501 378 1 1 198 2U9 193 161 66 102
1L 71
)3
71 325 6U5 703 1085 790 873 7 1 513 321 216 257 138 179 11)8 133 5U 95
7)
5 229 268 1020 5 1 659 901 393 399 180 162 156 60 70 U5 28 12
3)
7

111
,)7
262
103

1.16
1.26
1.11)

13

26 231 233
5
7
5 n
3

27

1.55

-

-

-

137
62
60
U5
15U
135
353
*152
366
75
386
3)
16
21
591

1.28
1.79
1.67
119
.)
1.18
1.U3
1.27
1.22
1.19
1.U3
1.35
1.61
1.23
1.26

-

-

-

-

8
-

-

-

-

-

-

U5

8)
16
88
295
lh
U59
831

1.15
1.37
1.32
lli
.l
1.23
1.25

26 57
18 51
8 6

19
13
6

_
_

_

_
_

6
5

2 10
5

5

_ _
_ _
..
_ _
1 _
_

_

72 28
58 22
11) 6

11
9
2

9
3
6

23
15
8

Selected Plant Occupations - Men

Assemblers, class C ..........................
Inspectors, class C ................... .
Janitors, porters, and clsanars ......................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B ..................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C ..................................
Machinists, maintenance..... ..................
Machinists, production ........................
Maintenance men, general utility............... .
Punch-press operators, class B ... ............ ..
Repair operators..... ........................
Solderers ...................................
Stook olerks ................................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand..... .........
Testers, class B .............................
Testers, class C .............................
Trouble shooters .............................
Truck drivers.................... ...........
Wirers, class C ....... ..... .................

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23

10
13
88

-

-

2

11)

-

-

-

-

-

5
_

-

13

179 19U 102 281
37 71 39 15
6
19 26 12
-

-

6

12
_
3
7 62
8
2
15 127
5 1)2
29 25
10

83

-

-

-

13
77 123

-

32
_
19
12
60
12
22
1
)

15
)

89 69
33 22
2
11

-

12

-

1)6

-

18

10

C
P

1

6

7
.
13

3

1

2

_
2

1

2
2
_
15

_
2
22
.

2 U
12
6

15
1
3

8
2
1

7
U

2
93
5

31
21)
53

3
52

1
5
2U

i

2

2

2

26
13

9

13

3

n
l

.
3
2
5
2
5

-

.

95 165

.

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

10

79

3

- 5 7
5 7
27 2
19 82
U _
11) 1 3
)
16 3
68 6
1 8

•

7
1
58
18

_

7

55
20
17

1
)
15
15
3

1
)

_
1
1

_
18
70

5
_

3

_
_
_

_

86 17
_ 1

_
_
_
_
_
1

_

11)
5

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_ _
_ _

_

_

_

_
_. _

_

13

Selected Plant Occupations - Women

Assemblers, class C ..................................
Inspectors, class B ..........................
Inspectors/ class C ...........................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ........... ......
Solderers ..................................
Wirers, class C ............................ .

13

129 116

237

2

1
18
33

1
2
10
110

13

U ) 81 1 )
l
19
5 10 11
27
11 Uli
7
2
188
71 3U
92 196 2 )
13

7) 3
1
3U 10
90
21)
*7
n

09
7*

60 97

2

c

c

9

*
*

1 / The study included establishment® with more than 50 workers engaged in the manufacture of radio, telev isio n , and related products (Group 3661) as defined in the Standard Industrial C lassification
Manual prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a November 1951 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. All or a majority of workers in each occupation wore paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, New lark, N. Y., January 1952




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-1*0:

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STBAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNING S OF—

$
$
$
$
$
s
s
Aeae I
vrg s
hul
ory
e r i g 1 1 5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80
anns . *
and
3/ un^ex
1.55 1.6Q 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85
$
1.95
17

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation 2/

Carpenters, maintenance .......................
Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons
and over) .................................
Electricians, maintenance....... ..............
Helpers, trades, maintenance ...................
Machinists, maintenance ...................... .
Mechanics, maintenance .........................
Painters, maintenance .........................
Pipe fitters, maintenance ......................
Plumbers, maintenance....................... .
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ...............
Truckers, power (fork-lift) ........... .........

296
l*
i
736
1,313
290
281
197
191
37
3,519
15
1*

1.92
1.98
1.71
1.99
1.99
1.96
1.99
1.97
1.71
1.66

-

-

-

-

3
_
.
1
_
_
11
36 1 2 *
66

-

-

3
.
_
.
2

-

_
_
58
-

-

_
1
_ .
_
.
800 117
**
. _ k
_
. 3
.
_ .
_ _
_
1 6 39 1786
*7
67 12
-

s
$
s
$
s
S
1.85 1.90 1.95 2,00 2.05 2.10
and
1.90 1.95 ?.00 ?.05 2.10 over
111

1 52

5

6 1
16 679
. 5*
1
_ 198
_ 208
_ 78
. 166
. 36
_
- -

_
k

6
„
12
_
_
_
-

6
5
_
38
_
7
-

11
1*

1

_ _
11 26
_ _
57 2k
69 _
65 _
l * 11
l
1 _
_
- -

1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

A/ The study covered railroads (Group 40) with more than 100 workers as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2 J Data United to men workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-63:

G&lSUeSU' V

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
Occ u p a t i o n and sex

Clerks, accounting ......
Clerks, a ctuarial ...........
Clerks, file, class A ...... .
Clerks, file, class B ...... .
Premium a c c e p t o r s .......... .
Section heads ............... .
Tabulating-machine operators
Underwriters ................ ,

Number
of
workers

Weekly Under
Weekly
earnings $
hours
(Standard) (Stag^rd) 32.50

$
s
$
$
$
|$
s
s
$
s
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
32.50 35.00 1*0.00 1*5.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00100.00105.
0c110.00U5. oc120.00125.0C 130.0C11*0.00

35.00 1 0 1 5.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00
* .00 *

7 0 .0 0

C
75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95,00 WQ.QC 105.00 uo.oc U5.W A20.0C 1?5.QG130.O LliQ.QC

And
o v e r ..

$
1*59
86
1*6
81*
72
260
218
1,1*52

3 5 -0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .0

13*
,15
365
63

36.5

5 1 .0 0
5 5 .5 0
5 6 .5 0
1*5.50

31*

-

101
1*0

73

-

-

-

_

-

-

36
-

2
15
3

67.00
106.00

-

-

-

-

5 9 .0 0

-

10

86.00

“

”

k
~

11
3

-

-

11
2

3*
1
1*

90

91

2
10
3
10
3
11
38

1
21
-

22
6
1*1*
80

27
1
7
19
3
1
*

30
119

13
1

5

1
*

10

23

15

_

6
1

5

9

5
2

12

1

1*
19
28
11*1*

2
5
21*
161*

57

12
1
6
1*1

2
5

20

70

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

■
_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

7

1
16

-

32

8

1*

9

17

16

1*6

1*1

10

2
171

109

70

77

50

136

65

57

37

11

19

29

5

1

6

26

1

-

Women
Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g .......... .
Clerks, actuarial ...............
Clerks, correspondence, class A
Clerks, correspondence, class B
Clerks, file, class A ...........
Clerks, file, class B ......... .
Clerks, g e n e r a l ......... .......
Clerks, p r e m i um-ledger-card ....
Clerks, und e r w r i t e r ............
Key-punch operators ............
Section heads ...................
Stenographers, general .........
Tabulating-machine operators ...
Typists, class A ................
Typists, class B ................
Underwriters .....................

261*

330
2,261*

833
727
21*5
720
31*2
2 ,8 3 3
312
1 ,0 7 1
3 ,8 5 5
67

3 6 .0

1*9.00
5 1 .0 0

71.50

16

119

-

-

53

-

-

-

-

12

35.5
35.5
36.5
36.5
35.5

5 8 .0 0
1*9.50
3 9 .0 0

36

50.00

-

-

3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 6 .5

1*9.00
5 2 .5 0
1*6.50
6 3 .0 0
5 2 .0 0
5 2 .0 0
1*6.00
1*3.00
7 5 .5 0

-

1
*

-

-

-

28

-

-

10

10

-

-

-

290

-

-

78

157

“

“

18
1 ,1 7 0

15
*

329
56
-

1*

300

_

8

39
87
86

73
6*
19
185 215

101*
8
107

99
1*8 ;
177 !
3:
173
395
35
1*69
35
1 ,0 3 9 1 ,3 6 8 |

■

282
1*2

-

196
1*3
219
1*3
656
80
375
556

■

56
63
6*
1
l*
i
11
5*
211
1*8
105
50
589
59
130
1*26
1*

98
119
6
55
1*8

15
120
25
52
1*7
76
307
112
1*0
207

132
13
11

27
28
1*

95
1*9
31
26
60
1*01*
22
17
20
8

21
6
11
12
10
30
8
8
50
281*
2
5
1
*
23

6

1*
8
5

3 1

71

9

3

9
3
3
2
1*
2

1

1

2

8

10

-•

6
1

5

5

5

l u

3

1

-

1

-

-

1

“

-

-

-

“

-

_

_

~

~

|

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 9 * edition) prepared by the
1l9
Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
”
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. I., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wag® rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through c o llective bargaining between employers and
trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in e ffe c t on dates indicated. Data relate to the 5 boroughs unless otherwise indi­
cated. Comprehensive lis tin g s of union scales for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing
for July 1, 1951 are available on request.
Similar information for these industries w ill bs published for July 1, 1952.)

Table C-15:

R u lld u U

Table C-205:

f G o 4 U P l4 4 c tiC 4 t

April 2, 1952

PI
.
•
.
•
.
.
.

kour#
per
week

$3,250
3.000
3.300
2.830
3.500
3.150
2.150

35
35
35
35
30
35
35

y

3 / Brooklyn and Queens, $3,100.
/U & l

C lassification
Bread and cake - Hand ahopst
Agreement At
F irst hands, oven workers, mixers •••••
Second hands
Agreement Bt
Foramen • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .......... .............
Bench and seoond h a n d s.........................
Third hands • • • • • • • • . • • .............. ............ ..
Agreement Ct
F irst hands, oven markers, m ix ers........
Oven loaders and dumpers .........................
Wrapping-machine operators . . • • • ............
Agreement Dt
F irst hands • • • • • • • • .................. ................
Second hands
Helpers ............ • • • • • ............... • • • • ........... .
Hebrew baking - Hand shops*
Agreement Ax
Foremen, f i r s t hands
Second hands, third hands ................••••
Agreement Bt
F irst hands, overmen .............. ................
Seoond hands
Agreement Ct
Foremen, f i r s t han d s.............. ..................
Mixers, ovanmen • • • • • • • • • • .............. •••••
Seoond hands • • • • • • • • .........• • • • • • • • .........
Bread and cake - Machine shopst
Agreement At
Bread departmentt
Mixers, ovenmen ............................. .
Benchmen..............................
Oven loaders and dumpers ....................
Wrappers, head packers and
checkers . . • • • • .......... ....................
General helpers • • • • • • • • • • • . . ............
Cake department t
Depositors, ingredient scalers,
benchmen, f r y e r s .................. ........... ..




-G

o tU

itU

Table c- 2 0 5 *

te d

July 1, 1951

Bricklayers .........
Carpenters . . . • • •
E lectricians ••• •
P a in te r s ............
Plasterers • •• •• •
Plumbers • • • • • • • •
Building laborers

Table C-205* B o h e
July 1, 1951

IZ a h & U & 4 ,

Rate Houra
per
per
hour week

$2,033 i|0
1.920 1 0
*
1.891* 1*8
*
1.769 1 8
1.665 1*8
<
2.100 1 0
1.919 1*0
1*0
1.971
2.01*1* 1*0
1.881 1*
0
1.656 1*0
2.500 1 8
*
*
2.375 1 8
*
2.133 1 8
2.000 1 8
*
2.21*1* 1*0
2.181 1 0
*
*
2.081 1 0

*
1.735 1 0
1.635 1 0
*
1.555 1*0
1.505 1*0
1.1*95 1*0
1.615

to

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine ahopst - Continued
Agreement At - Continued
Cake department* - Continued
General helpers ••••••••••••••••.••
Helpers (women).... •••••••••••.••
Agreement Bt
Dividers, molders ...•••••..... ••••••
Flour d u m p e r s ...... ....... ..........
Bakery helpers •••........ ...........
Agreement Ct
Oven loaders and dumpers ............ .
Head slioers or wrappers, checkers ...
General helpers •••••••••••••••••••.••
Agreement Dt
Tray-oven operators ..•••..... •••••••
Confectioners .......... ....... .......
Ingredient scalers, kitchen helpers,
bench h a n d s .... ••••......... ••••••
Agreement Et (cakes, pies, cookies)t
Packers and f l o o m e n .................
Wrappers and icers (women) .... ......
Agreement Ft
General helpers •••••...............
Women w o r k e r s ................
Agreement Gt
Foremen ........... ...... ......rt*t**t
Miscellaneous workers ................
Agreement Ht
Mixers ................__ -.tf,,tTtttt
Oven helpers, blenders, panners ••••••
Bread wrappers ............ .
Agreement It
Molder operators, mixers' helpers
(bread) ............................
Wrappers and packers (women)
(cake) .............................
Agreement Jt
Ovenmen, mixers .......... ••••••••••••
Bench h a n d s ..............••.•••••••••
H e l p e r s ............................ .
Agreement Kt
Mixers, benchmen, o v e n m e n ....... .
Second class packers, h e l p e r s .......
Third class p a c k e r s .... ........... .
Hebrew baking - Machine shops t
Agreement At
First h a n d s ...... ................. .
Seoond h a n d s ...... ........ .......
H e l p e r s .......... ............... .
Agreement Bt
First h a n d s ....................... .
Second hands •••••....................
Helpers ..............................
Crackers and cockiest
Agreement At
Flour dumpers ................. •••••••
Fig aid jam mixers',
marshmallow beaters ...... ........ .

R a h & U e d ,* G o n tU m a d

July 1, 1951
per
hour

liours
per
week

$1.1*65
1.260

to
to

1.635
1.535
1.1*75

to
to

1*0

1.1*55
1.105
1.395

to
to

1.635
1.585

to

1.355
1.110

Crackers and cookiest - Continued*
Agreement At - Continued
Bake-shop general h e lp e r s ............ .
Feeders, sugar wafara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General helpers (women) ................ .
Agreement Bt
Baking departmentt
M ixers.......... ............................... ••• •• ••
Mixers' helpers .......................................
U tilitym en.................................................
Icing and packing departments:
Mixers ...................................
General helpers (women) . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$1,320 1*0
1.150 10
1.050 1*0
1.575 1*0
1.550 10
1.355 10

1*0
1*0

1.525

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

C lassification

1*0

to

Table C-2082* M
a lt J liq
January 1, 1952

u V U

10

Hours
per
per
week week

C lassificati on
1.1*95
1.260

1*0

2.180

to

1.220

10

to

1.680 10
1.580 10
1.510 10
1.585 1*0
1.260 1*0
1.91*0 10
1.81*0 to
1.71*0 to
1.725 to
1.325 10
1.225 1*0
2.268 1*2
2.125 1*2
1.696 1*2
2.125
1.992
1.S92

1*5
1*5
1*5

1.505

l*
a

1.1*55 10

Apprentices*
First 8lx months .......... •••••
Second six months... ...... ..
Second year....... •••••••••••••
Brewers aid bottlers... ....... .
Electricians, maintenance... .
Engineers
..... .
Firemen .........
••••••
Machinists, maintenance ..
.. ......
Oilers ...............................
Platform men (loaders and unloaders) •
Plumbers and pipefitters, maintenance
Stablemen aid yardmen ............
Table C-27: P /U +
July 1, 1951
C lassification

1.520 10
1.190 1*0

$63.61 3 #
6U.61

7
65.61 3 f
3783.81

91*.80

37*
37*

101.50

A0
88.80 A0

85.80

86.30

83.81
85.80
77.81

37
3737
3737*

ttitU f

1 S T hours
per
per
hour week

Book and job ahopst
Bindery women*
Box g ir ls on folding machines.......... ..
$1,108 36*
Gathering-machine f ille r s - in , book
examiners, wrappers • • • • ..........................
1.028 36*
Hand collators, stitch ers, pasters, and
coverers ................ . . . . . . . . . . . ......... .
1.232 36*
Machine sewers ................................... .
1.232 36*
Pasting-machine operators, Singer or
McCain stitcher operators..................... • 1.121 36*
Bookbinders*
Agreement At
Automatic machine feeders, unskilled. •
.998 36*
Occupational Wage Survey, Hew York, N.T., January 1952
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table C-27:

pA dnttiU f - C o n tin u e d

Table C-27:

P/U nti*U f - C o n tin u e d

Jlo c a l <K vHAdt
l'

Table C 4-1:
-

O p & u U in f S m p to tf e e i - C o n t i n u e d

July 1, 1951

July 1, 19>1

C lassification
Book and job shops: - Continued
Bookbinders: - Continued
Agreement A: - Continued
Book trlm ers (f la t or table t r ie ) ,
stitch ers, sheet cutters ..............
Hand sheetmen, folding-machine
operators, book trimmers, stock
cutters, sheet and plate cutters,
auashing-sMchine operators ..........
Agreement B:
Assistant operators on combinations
and folding machines, jogging
machine operators.................. ..
Blankbook binders; operators of
f la t machines; die machines;
band cutting maohlnes.........• •• •• •
Manifold table workers.........• •• •• ••
Operators of Kast inserting and
stitching machines, Dayton
3-knife trimmers ..............................
Compositors, hand............................... .
Electrotypers • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • . . ......... »
Machine operators; machine tenders
(machinists) .... .................
Photoengravers
Press assistants and feeders:
Floor help - M .• .• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • »
en
Floor help - toman .......................•••••••
Miehle automatic pony, Kelly #2,
Babcock automatic, M iller Major
Simplex, Premier O.E., Miehle la ,
sheet-fed rotary, and double sheet­
fed rotary presses . . . .......... ..
Color cylinder and perfecting
p r e s s e s ........................................... .
Platen presses; Miehle v ertica l or
horizontal; M iller Hi-Speed or
S im p le x * Kelly A, B, C, Clipper, or
automatic jobber; C and P cylinder
presses ...................................... ..
Utilitymen on web presses; assistants
on cylinder presses over b2
Inches .......................................................
Pressmen, cylinder:
Cylinder presses (over 68 i n .) ,
perfecting presses, sheet-fed rotary
presses, multi-web tick et presses ••
Permanent provers, sheet-fed rotary
presses with color, presses with
bronzing attachment................ .
Pressmen, platen:
1 to 3 presses; 1 automatic press
20 in . or under ........................ ............
2 automatic presses, 20 in . or under,
2 Webendorfer presses ..........................
2 automatic presses, over 20 in .; 1
2-oolor Harris press, 15 x 18 in . . .
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day work .................. ........... .......................
Night work ...................... .........................
Machine operators and tenders:
Day work . • • • • • • • • . .............. • •• • • • • « • • .
Night work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mailers:
Day work.......................................................
Night work...................................................
Photoengravers: .............. ..................................
Day work
Night- work................ ...................................




Rate tHours
per
per
hour week

♦2.11:8 36*

2.228 36*

October 1, 1951
Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

C lassification

Newspapers: - Continued
Pressmen, web presses:
Day work
♦2.717 36*
Night work.......... • • • • • ......... • • • • • ........... 3.01:5 33*
Pressmen-in-charge:
Day work
2.921: 36*
Night work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.269 33$
Stereotypers:
Day work
2.560 37*
Night work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.192 31}

1.913 36*
2.16b
2.139

a

Table C-41:
Q p &

J lo c a

ia t u u j

C m

l

<J 'U 2 n d i t
fU o fo e i

October 1, 1951
2.21b 36*
2.U83 36*
3.000 37}
2.U83 36*
3.285 35
1.100 36*
1.01:8 36*

2.138 36*
2.166 36*

1.651 36*
2.111 36*

2.513 36*
2.588 36*
2.190 36*
2.2U0 36*
2.290 36*
2.828 36*
2.966 36*
2.828 36*
2.966 36*
2.22b 37*
2.b86 3b}
3.062
3.365

3
4

C lassification
Subways:
Conductors:
F irst position:
F irst y e a r ........ .......... ................. .
After 1 y e a r ........ ............................
Second position • • • • • • . ...........• • « • • • • . .
Platform men • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • .............. ..
Road motormen:
F irst year ....................................... «««•••
After 1 year • «•• •.................. •••••«• •••
Yard motormen:
F irst year ........................... . • • • • • • • • • • •
After 1 year .................. ............................
1-man cars:
Brooklyn-Queens Transit Lines:
F irst 6 months • • • • .............. • •.•• « • • • • •
7 - 1 2 months ................. ..........................
After 1 year • • • • . . . . • • ..........
Busses:
Avenue B and East Broadway Transit
Company:
First 6 months • • • • ........ • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
7 - 1 2 months............ ..
13 - 2b months .......... .
After 2 years
Brooklyn Bus Division Comprehensive
and East Side Omnibus Corp-,
Queens Bus Division:
F irst 6 months
7 - 1 2 months.............................................
After 1 y e a r ........ .....................................
Fifth Avenue Coach:
Drivers:
F irst year
Second year • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • •
After 2 years
Double-decker drivers:
F irst year ............................. ..
Second year
After 2 years • • • • • • ........ • • • • • • • • • •
freen Lines:
F irst 6 months
7 - 1 2 months
1 3 - 1 8 months • • • • • • • • • • ........................
After 18 months

TKflT Hours
per
per
hour week

♦1.530
1.580
l.b70
l.b20

bb
bb
bb
bb

1.800 bb
1.850 bb
1.690 bb
1.750 bb
l.b70 bb
1.580 bb
1.690 bb

1.360
l.bbO
1.500
1.600

b8
bB
b8
b8

l.b70 bb
1.580 bb
1.690 bb
1.615 bb
1.625 bb
1.675 bb
1.715 bb
1.725 bb
1.775 bb
l.b8b
1.527
1.591
1.735

bb
bb
bb
bb

Rate Hours
per
per
hour weak

C lassification

Busses: - Continued
Jamaica Busses, Inc.:
F irst 6 months .............. • • • • • .
7 - 1 2 months............. • « .« • • . .
13 - 18 months .............• • • • • • •
After 18 months • • • • • • • • • • • • •
New York City Omnibus Corp.:
F irst 6 months ..........................
7 - 1 2 months...................... ..
13 - 2U months . . . ; ..................
After 2 years • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Queens-Nassau Transit Lines:
F irst year .................................
Second y e a r ............................... ••••
Third Avenue Ry. Transit System:
First 6 months .............. .
7 - 1 2 months • • • • ..............
1 3 - 1 8 months ................ ..
19 - 2b months................. . . . « •
After 2 years
Tri-Boro Coach Corp.:
F irst 6 months . • • • • • • « ............
7 - 1 2 months ................. ••• •••.
1 3 - 1 8 months ......................
After 18 months • • • • • • • ......... «.

Table C-42:

M

< U < V lt > U ic k

♦1.370
l.b30
l.b90
1.600

b8
b8
b8
b8

l.b25
1.525
1.575
1.675

bb
bb
bb
bb

1.U30 bB
1.600 b8
1.350 b8
i.boo b8
l.b50 b8
1 . 5 0 0 b8
1.600 b8
1.350
l.b30
1.515
1.600|

b8
b8
b8
b8

S b U O & ld
'

e u te t J fe lp e > U

July 1, 1951
d a s sific a tio n

KE? Hours
E £r

Beer:
Chauffeurs.......... ............... ............... ..
Helpers ............................ • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Trailer and 6-wheel truck, hook and
unhook
Trailer and 6-wheel truck, load and
unload • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « .
Building:
Construction:
D p truck • • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « «
um
6-wheel, 3-axle tractor and
tra iler • • • • • • • • • • . . ...............••• •• •«
Material:
Lime, bride, cem ent...........• • • • • • • • • • •
Lumbar ...............................
Sand, gravel, aid concrete mix • •• • • •
Second-hand b r ic k ........................ ...........
Butter and egg:
Agreement A - Market:
5 tone
Agreement B - Purveyor:
li tonff
Agreement C - Expressmen md
Purveyors:
'

♦1.963 bO
1.838 bO
2.050 bo
2.100 bO
2.000 bO
2.125 bO
2.100
1.760
2.000
2.375

bo
bO
bO
bO

1.80b bO
1.832 bO
1.700 bO
1.725 bO
1.675
1.725
1.550
1.275

bo
bO
bo
bO

Tabi«

c-42t

M ato bb u ick SbUueed

Tabia c-42*

<*nd cMelpmM. - C ontinued

M ato tib u tck 2>biaetd

< m d

• C

Table C-44t

Q & e & n

-

fystli&en&ed P& M onuol - Con tinued

o n tin u e d

January 2, 1952
C la ssifica tio n

Rata
P«
u-JffiSE.

Clothings
Cost, drass, and packaga delivery
Helpers • • • • • • • • • • • • ..........
Coal and fu e l o ils
Coalt
Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn and water
yards in, Queens...................................
B ail yards in Queans .....................
Fuel o i l ...........................................................
Department store ........................................... .
Trailer .............................. .
Food - Wholesale narketi
Agreement A .................................. .
Helpers .......................... ............. ..
Extra drivers • ..................... •••••.••••<
H elp ers...................• • • • • • • ......... .
Other than 4-wheel, single-axle
trade.... ••••••••••......... .
Extra drivers ................... • •• • • • • • • • • • .
Agreement B .................... ........... ........... .
Fruit and produce*
Markets
3 tons and under ........................ ••• •• •.
4 t o n s ...................................................... .
5 tons .............. • • • • • • • • • • • ................... .
7 i t o n s .................................................... .
Purveyors
H elp ers..................................................... .
General truckingt
Agreement At
1 ton auto and under .....................
2 t o n s .........• • • • • • • ........................... .
3 t o e s ...................• • • . • • • • • • • • • ......... .
4 tons ................................ .......................
5 t o n s ........................................ ..
7$- tons • • • • • • • • • • . . . • .............. .
Six-wheel reach- or pole-truck,
tr a c to r -tr a ile r , third-axle trucks
Load or unload • • • • • • • • • • ............ .
Do not load or unload ............ .
H e lp e r s..................................................... .
Agreement Bs
2 t e n s ...........................................................
3 tons ............................ ..............................
4 t o n s ......................................................... .
5 t o n s .................. ...................................... .
?$- tons .........................................................
Six-wheel reads- or pole-truck,
tra c to r -tr a ile r , third-axle
trucks
Load or unload • • • • • • • • • • • ...............
Do net load or un load.......... •••••••
Helpers • • • • • • • .....................................
Agreement Cs
1 ton auto and under • • • • • • • • • ............ .
2 t o n s ............................ .............................
3 t o n s ........................................ .................
4 t o n s ........................................................ .
5 tons ............................ .
7J- tons • • • • • • • • • .............. .......................
Six-wheel reads- or pole-truck,
tra c to r -tr a ile r , third-axle
trucks
Load or u n lo a d .............. • • • • • • ......... .
Do not load or un load .................
Helpers • • • • • • • • • • ............ .




Hours
per
jq«L.

•1.375
1.100

40
40

1*844
1.001
1.844
1.675
1.900

40
40
40
40
40

1.389
1.222!
1.500;
1.333

45
45
45
45

1.778;
1.889!
1.713!

45
45
40

1.765
1.815
1.840
1.903
1.575

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.667
1.692 ,
1.717
1.742!
1.767 i
1.830:

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.980!
1.830 !
1.542 I
!
1.743 !
1.768
1.793
1.818 !
1.880

40
40
40

2.030

40
40
40

1.880
1.593
1.748
1.773
1.798
1.823

40
40
40
40
40

1.910

40
40
40
40
40
40

2.060
1.910
1.623

40
40
40

1.848

C lassification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Grocery - Wholesale .......... • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •1.693
40
Helpers ........................ .. ............... ..
40
1.603
Laundry*
Cleaning and dyeing - R e t a il .............................
48
.895
Cloth sponging • • • • • • • ..........................................
1.750
40
Helpers ...................................................
1.400
40
Linen supply - Non-coamercial • • • • • • • • • • • 1.570
42
Helpers • • • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • ................ ..
1.230
42
Office towel - Non-commercial ................ ..
1.610
38
Linen supply and towels - W holesale........ 1.480
43
Shirt ..................................... .......................................................... 1.350
43
Meats
Branch h o u se ........................................................... ..
40
1.975
Hotel supply*
Agreement A ............................................« . . . ................. 1.750
40
Agreement B • • • • • • • • ............... ................................. 1.975
40
Pork d e liv e r y .......................................................... 2.000
40
Slaughterhouses
Agreement A .............................................................. ..
1.975
40
Agreement B ............................. • • • • • • • ...................... 1.945
40
Milks
Retails
40
Foremen .............................. . . . • • • • • • • • • • • .............. 2.013
Route riders .................... .. ................... • • • • ................. 1.938
40
Wholesales
Foremen .......................................................... 2.013
40
Routemen • • • • . • • • • • .......... .. ......................... 2.088
40
Transportation - after 6 months .......... • • • • 1.900
40
1.638
40
Newspapers
Agreement As
Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.067
40
Night ............................................................... 2.266
40
Agreement Bs
D ay................................................................... 2.149 • 40
Night .... ............................................................ 2.353
37
Paper and miscellaneous products*
i to 2 t o n s ............ .............................................................. 1.800
40
Helpers ............................... .................................................... 1.375
40
Private sanitation ................................................... .................. 1.625
40
Helpers
1.450
40
Railway express .............. .............................................................. 1.775
40
I .575
Helpers
40
Money d e liv e r y .......................................................................... 1.830
40
Table C-44s

(S c e O H

-

fy u tie n n in d P& iA onnet
January 2, 1952
Type of ship, department, and classification

Rate Hours
per
month week 1 /

Dry cargo and passenger v essels l /
Deck departments
Day mens
Boatswains*
Vessels over 20,000 tons
(passenger)
•400.26 40
Vessels o f 15,000 to 20,000
tons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386.95 40
See footnotes at end of table,

Rate
Type of ship, department, and c lassification per
month
t o , rarg?
7Em e 3n I f - continued
Deck departments - Continued
Day mens - Continued
Boatswainst - Continued
Vessels of 10,000 to 15,000
tons
........ .................. .
Vessels under 10,000 tons • •• •• • • • •
Vessels under 10,000 tons
(passenger) ..................................... .
Boatswain's nates .....................................
Carpenters*
Vessels over 20,000 tons
(passenger) .......................... ............
Vessels o f 15,000 to 20,000
tons ....................................................
Vessels o f 10,000 to 15,000
t o n s ........ ................... ........................
Vessels under 10,000 tons • •• • • • • • •
Carpenter's m a tes............ ........................
Storekeepers ...............................................
Watch mens
Able ■eases . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boatswain's m ates.....................................
Ordinary seamen...................... • • • • • • . . • •
Quartermasters...........................................
Watchmen .......................................................
Sagine-rocm departments
Day mens
Assistant electricians • • . • • • • • • • • • • • •
Deck engineers ................ .........................
E le c tr ic ia n s .................. .........................
Plumbers - m ach in ists................ .
Refrigerator engineers ...........................
Storekeepers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • •
Unlicensed junior engineers •
(freight ships)
W ipers...........................................
Watch mens
Firemen - watertenders ............................
Oilers
Oilers (d iesel) ...................................
Unlicensed junior engineers
(freight ships) .....................................
Watertenders .............. .......... ............. .
Stewards' departments
Freighters*
A ssistant cooks ..................................... ..
Chief cooks ..............................
Chief stew ards........ .
Messmen........ ............... ..
Second cook-bakers
Stewards-cooks (coastwise only) ••• •• •
Passenger vessels*
A ssistant storekeepers*
Class l and II vassal* ......................
Chefs*
Class I v essels • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Class II vessels .............. ..
Class I II v e s s e l s ........................ .
Class IV v essels ...................... ••• •••
Chief bakerst
Class I v e s s e l s ....................... .
Chief bakers and confectioners*
Class II v essels . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Class III and IV vessels
See footnotes at end of table,

Hours
weekj

•381.68 40
♦363.73 40
381.68 40
324.42 40
359.65 40
349.67 40
343.68
329.51
323.52
319.53

40
40
40
40

262.89
277.77
226.26
262,89
262.89

40
40
40
40
40

359.48
329.51
448.72
372.14
415.42
319.53

40
40
40
40
40
40

362.81 40
274.56 40
262.89 40
262,89 40
286.54 40
299.51 40
262.89 40
259.56
299.51
325.63
226.26
272.87
325.63

40
40
40
40
40
40

252.89 40
584.55
571.24
452.69
439.37

40
40
40
40

380.77 40
432.71 40
382.76 40

j

Table c-jui

Q&ean ^Aanbp&U

'U n L c e n ie d P& U onne l

-

Table C-44*

- Cont inued

January

January 2, 1952
Bate
Type of Ship, department, and cla ssifica tio n per
month

Hours

k / ~

$272.*f
Chief butchers J
Claea 1 and XI Teasels •••••••••••• ♦362.11
Class i n r essels • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 343*14
Chief arev oookst
Class I Teasels • ................ .......... . . . 372*76
Class II and III Teasels • • • • • • • • • • 332.31
Chief linenkeepers ........ ...... ..... 272.87
Chief pantrymens
315.50
Class I and n Teasels ....... .
Class m and 17 Teasels • • • • • • • • • • 299.51
Chief silTsrmans
Class I Teasels . • • • » • • • • • • • • • • « • • • 272.87
Chief stewards t
689.77
Class I Teasels ........ ..
Class II Teasels .................................. 676.44
Class I II and 17 Teasels • • • • • • • • • • 459.35
Chief storekeepers s
Class I and XI Teasels • •• •• • • • • • • » 286.20
226.26
Deek stewards • • • • • • • • • • • • ................ .
Galley u t i l i t y ............................................ 226.26
General u t ilit y • • ........ ............... .
226.26
Headwaiterai
Class X Teasels .................................... 307.50
Class X Teasels • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • • • 294.18
X
Messmen............................................. ........... 226.26
Second stewardst
Class X Teasels • • » • • • ........ .
416.73
Class X Tassels • • • • • • • • • • • • • ......... 403.40
X
315.50
Class X X and 17 Teasels............ ..
X
SilTsrnen .... ......... ........
239.58
226.26
Stewardesses..........
Storekeepers*
Class X and 17 Tassels • • • • • • • • • • • 286.20
X
Third stewards t
Class X Tassels « • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • . • • 286.20
Class X X T e a s e ls .............................. . 266.21
X
Valters and waitresses ........................... 226.26
Yeoment
272.87
Class X and X Teasels.................
X
Class X X Teasels • • » • • • • • • • • • . • • • • 252.89
X
\ J

Deek departments
Day mens
Boatswains • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • •
Carpenters
Deek maintenance (AB)
Vatoh mens

344.49
324.63
286.19

Ordinary seamen........................ ............... .

266.21
232.92
272.87

See footnotes a t end o f table.




40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

^ A

G

n

lf &

U

-

2 ,

Table c - ^ 6 t

1952

Rate
Type o f ship, department, and cla ssifica tio n per
month

Dry cargo and passenger Teasels ] / - Continued
Stewards' departments 3 / - Continued
Passenger^ressels: - Continued

Tanteara

O o & G U

S te & e d o tU n tp

'M nU aenled PeM onnel - C ontinued
January 2, 1952
Hours
par
.
week 2 /

Continued

Itagina department t
Day meni
E lectricians ....................................... .
$418.72 40
M ach inists.............. .................................... 342.13 40
Storekeepers • • • • • • • • • ................ • •• •• •• 292.85 40
Unlicensed junior engineers .................. 332.81 40
V ip e r s.................. ........................................ 259.55 40
Vatoh mens
Firemen ....................................... ..
259.55 40
Oilere
..............................f 266.21 40
Vatertenders ............................................... 266.21 40
Unlicensed junior engineers ............ .
299.50 40
Stewards' department*
A ssistant c o o k s.............................................. 279.52 40
Chief c o o k s................ ...................... • • • • • • • . 312.84 40
Chief stewards • • • • • • ...........••%•••........... .
345.62 40
Galleymen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232.92 40
226.25 40
Second cooks and bakers • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • 279.52 40
226.25 40

Longshoremens
General cargo, including barrel o i l when
part of general cargo, and general cargo
hauled in refrigerator space with abovefTeesing temperature
Bulk cargo, b a lla st, and a l l coal eargoes,
coal loading and trimming) cement and
lime in bags • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .....................
Hides, wet) creosoted poles, t i e s , and
shingles) cashew o i l , naphthalene and
soda ash in b a g s ...................... • • • • • • • • • • •
Refrigerator space cargo—
meats, fow ls,
and other similar oargo transported a t
or below free sing temperature) rates
to be paid f u ll gang • • • • • • ...........• • • • • • •
Kerosene, gasoline and naphtha in cases
and barrels, when loaded by case'o i l
gangs, and with a f l y ........................... .
Explosives and damaged cargo • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Table c -5 8 t
l / W scales and hours per week are those in e ffe c t
age
cm Deoember 16, 1951, for Atlantic and Gulf Coast ship
operators under contracts with the National Maritime Union,
CIO. D etails of changes are given in the footnotes fo l­
lowing. The Vage Stabilisation Board approred similar
changes for members of the Seafarers' International Union,
AFL, e ffe c tiv e M
ovanber 1, 1951.
1. On a l l Tassels carrying explosives la 50-ton lo ts
or over, and on a l l v essels carrying sulphur,
cement, cyanide, e t c ., in bulk lo ts of 1,000 tons
or over, 10$ of basic monthly wages i s added while
such cargo i s aboard, or la being loaded or un­
loaded.
2 On vessels operating in described areas of China
and Korean coastal waters, a per diem allowance
of |2 .5 0 and an "Area Bonus" of 100$ of dally
basic wages i s added.
3. 0b vessels attacked, fired upon or struck by mines
of either b elligeren ts, resulting In physical
damage to the v essel or injury to a crew member,
a "Vessel Attack Bonus” o f $125.00 sh a ll be paid
to each crew member.
7 j The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week at sea. At sea, watoh men normally work 56 hours
per week with 16 hours (Saturday and Sunday) paid at the
overtime rate. Day men at sea are given compensation (which
i s included in th is basis monthly wages) in lie u of Saturday
and Sunday work at the overtime rate. In part both day nan
and watch men receive overtime rates for work on Saturday and
SundiT*
2 / The naximm straight-tine hours which may be worked
per week at sea and in part. Members of the .stewards1 depart­
ment normally work 56 hours per week at sea with 16 hours
(Saturday and Sunday) paid at the overtime rate. In part
overtimei i s paid for work an Saturday and Sunday.
4 / Vage scalesi m hours per week are those in e ffe c t
~ and
on July 15, 1951,as i
approved by the Vage Stab ilisation Board.

.

Rate Hours
per
per
hour _ week

C lassification

$2,100

40

2.150

40

2.250

40

2.300

40

2.300
4.100

40
40

P eitc^ toa n U , G /a{etesual
a n d JLuncUtooomi
January 2, 1952
Rate
per
Veek

C lassification

$42.00
Bar beys
Bartenders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60.00
Captains (restaurants)
63.00
72.00
Cooks ..................................
Countermen (cafeterias)
58.00
Dishwashers
45.00
Hostesses ............ .......................... ..................... ..
53.00
Service bartenders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68.00
27.00
V aiters, waitresses,
busboys

Table C-5911

3 b ,U U f

Hours
par
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

S tO to O i

January 2, 1952
C lassification

Rate
par
week

Apprentices in pharmacy « • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • $45.00
Chefa .................................... ..................... ..
60.00
Cigar darks*
Agreement A
. . . . . . . . . . 55.00
37.50
Agreement B

Hours
per
week
44
44
44
44

Table C-591:

2 b * U if S t o M

l - G o H tim tm d

Table C-651:

R u d id u U f S & u tic e

January 2, 1952

January
Rate Hours
per per
week

C lassification
Cosmeticians:
Agreement A ................. .
Agreement B ........ ........ .
Drug and sales olerks:
Agreement A •••••.... ..... .......
Agreement B ....... ......... .....
Agreement C ....... ........ .....
Head soda men:
Agreement A ............ .
Agreement B .....................
Registered pharmacists:
Agreement A .............. .•••••••
Agreement B .......................... ........................
Agreement C ••••••.............. .
Sandwich m e n .... ....... ...........
Soda fountain dispensers .............
Stockmen, porters, pantrymen, dishwashers,
cashiers:
Agreement A ............... .
Agreement B .......................................
Waitresses:
Agreement A ... .................
Agreement B ..........................................
Agreement C ........ ....... ••••••••

Table C-651:

B

u ild in g

150.00 44
33.00 44
55.00 u
37.50 a
60.00 u

75.00
64.50
80.00
55.00
50.00

45.00
37.50

44
u
44
44
44

44
44

2 /

1 /

Office "A" ...............
"B" ...............
"C» ...............
Apartment "A"... .........

...................

"C".............

S& U M C &

Rate Hours
per per
week week

Assistant starters:
Loft »A".......................... ♦61.83 40
"B» ..........................
60.65 40
«C“ ........ ...M ...tt.tfMTtrftttt 59.00 40
Office "A" ......................... 63.83 40
"B"............. .....’
.......
62.58 40
»c» .......... t.... tt...T.rtttf 60.83 40
(2/)




Classification

Rate Hours
per per
J£S2L

64.58
62.65
60.00
65.83
64.58
62.83

40
40
40
40
40
40

Bar boys ............. .......... .
Bartenders (public bars) ...........
Bartenders (service bars) ........ .
Chefs:
Banquet chefs ...... ...... ......
Sous chefs ................••••••••<
Working chefs ................. .
Silvermen:
Headmen ................ .........
Dishwashers ..................... .
Silvermen... ............ ....... .

♦37.00 40
53.00 40
57.00 40
67.00 40
74.00 40
62.00 40
42.00

40
37.00 40
37.00 40

Dining-room employees
Bus boys ...........................
Captains ...........................
Hostesses ........ ...........
.. .
Waiters and waitresses ............... .

74.00 40

29.00 40
45.50 40
40.00 40
23.00 40

Hotel service employees

Loft "A".................
"B" .................
"C" .................
Office "A" ...............
«Bn .......... .
»Cn ..... ....... .
Apartment "A" .............
"B» .............
"Cn .............

60.58
58.65
57.00
61.83
60.58
58.83
55.57
53.26
50.95

40
40
40
40
40
40
48
48
48

2/ Class designations refer to the gross area of a build­
ing: "A" - mare than 280,000 square feet} "B" - more than
120,000 square feet and not over 280,000 square feet} and
"C" - 120,000 square feet or less.
2/ |1.19 an hour. Normal workweek is 25 to 35 hours.
Table C-7011:
January 2, 1952
Classifioatlon

Handymen:

See footnotes at end of table.

40
40
40
48
48
52.80 48

♦67.83
65.83
64.83
57.41
55.10

Others:

to a

Loft "A" ..........................
65.83 40
»B" ............. ............
62.90 40
"C" ............. ............. T 61.00 40

a tto i& U , - G 0 4 itU u € * t

Bar and kitchen employees - Continued

Starters:
Loft "A"..... ............
"B"..... ............
»C" .................
Office "A" ................
"B»... ............
»C"... <...........

Table C-7011:

January 2, 1952
Rate Hours
per per
week geek_

Manhattan - Continued

Window washers..... ••••••....
33.00 44
30.00 44
29.48 44

Manhattan

Cleaning women ............... .

1952

Handymen: - Continued

60.00 u
70.00 4 4

January 2, 1952
Classification

Classification

2 ,

- G o * ttU U 4 * d

Rate Hours
per per
week week

Bar and kitchen employees
Bakers:
Head bakers ......... •••••••••••••. . . ♦62.00 40
.
Others ....................... .. ..... 57.00 40

Bellmen:
Agreement A ...... ........ ...... .
Agreement B .......... ..........
Check-rocm attendants ........... .
Doormen and footmen ..................
Elevator operators:
Agreement A .......................
Agreement B .....................
Agreement C ....................
Elevator operators (service):
Agreement A ........ ........ .....
Agreement B ......................
Elevator starters............... .
Furniture polishers ..................
Housemen:
Agreement A ............... ......
Agreement B ............. .
Linen-room girls:
Agreement A ........ ....... .......
Agreement B ....... .......... .....
Agreement C ............. ...... .
Maids:
Maids and lobby floor maids .........
Bath maids ............ ...... .
Porters:
Agreement A ..... .............
Agreement B ................ .
Agreement C ............ ........ .
Telephone operators:
Agreement A ..... ......... .......
Agreement B .......... ............
V a l washers
f.l
... •••••••••....... .

19.30
23.37
33.20
30.00

40
40
40
40

40.60 40
40.25 40
43.60 *40
41.70
44.70
45.00
43.00

40
40
40
40

41.00 40
43.00 40
34.90 35
34.33 35
36.00 40
34.40 40
35.40 40
41.00 40
40.25 40
38.00 40
39.00 3 f
7r
43.00 40
47.00 40

D:
Table D-l*

M d tU m U m

Minimum rate (in cents)

All establishments .........................
Under 5 0 .................................
Over 50 and under 5 5 ...... .................
Over 55 and under 60 .......................
Over 60 and under 6 5 ............ ..... .....
Over 65 and under 7 0 ....... .......... .....
Over 70 and under 7 5 ........ ...............
Over 75 and under 8 0 ..... ................. .
Over 80 and under 85 .......................
Over 85 and under 9 0 .................. .
Over 90 and under 95 .......................
Over 95 and under 100 .......................
Over 100 and under 105......................
Over 105 and under 110... ..
.. .............
Over 110 and under 115................. .....
Over 115 and under 120......................
Over 120 and under 125............. .........
Over 125 and under 130 .................. ••••
Over 130 and under 135............. .........
Over 135 and under 140... ....••••••••••. . .
.
Over 140 and under 145........... ..........
Over 145 and under 150 ........••••••.
.. •••••••

Entrance Rates

fs 4 * t> U iM C e

P lo t U

ItJ/ O k U e S U

1/

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified minimum rates in Manufacturing
Nondurable goods
Durable goods
All
Public
Wholesale Retail
trade
Services
i
ents with
industries
utilities*
trade
501 or
501 or
y
2/
101-500
101-500
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers
100,0
0.9
1.0
.9
.8
.
8
•2
1.1
.
3
.4
.1
.2
13.9
3.1
4.9
3.1
3.3
8.5
7.2
4.8
1.2
5.4
8.2
1.5
1.3
3.1
.9
2.9
1.3
1.2
1.1
1.8
1.3
.6
.2
2.8
.4

.
3
.
2
1.2
.
1
.
2
.
3

Over 150................................ .

3.9

100.0

100.0

_
19.2
6.1
10.4
10.7
2.1
5.5
16.2
4.9
.
8
5.0
1.4
2.8
2.6
4.3
6.5
.7
-

.
8
-

3.1

Establishments with no established minimum......

100.0

-

9.0
1.4 ,
1.7
16.5
2.4
8.7
15.2
2.4
3.9
17.7
4.3
10.0
6.8
-

38.5
2.0
8.9
.4
4.3
7.1
8.7
1.0
1.1
2.3
5.6
.6
2.7
3.5
.
8
2.4
1.4
5.3
.4
1.5
.9
.6

100.0

100.0

_
14.2
8.4
11.1
2.8
2.9
2.9
5.7
5.4
9.8
3.4
1.6
(A/)
5.7
5.5
3.9
9.5
1.7

1.0
3.1
4.3
5.3
4.4
3.3
5.9
19.5
11.6
.4
.1
3.2
.7
1.6
4.8
.7
2.7
.4
3.7
1.9
.9
*6
1.3
10.3

15.5

5.5

7.5

13.0

.
8

8.7
3.1
5.7
.
7
7.7
4.0
.
5
6.4
1.6
4.9
2.7
10.5
8.3
4.9
(A/)
-

1.8

100.0

. 100.0

3.4
2.9
5.1
10.9
3.8
3.7
6.2
22.6
9.2
12.3
2.7
1.5
8.0
2.0
1.7
.7
-

1.3
3.3
7.9
6.9
7.0
1.4
2.3
3.3
•8
2.1
11.4
10.2
3.4
5.7
3.1
12.8
3.9
1.6
.4
2.4
(A/)
2.4
(A/)
(A/)
.3
•6
.5
1.6
-

3.3

3.4

■
“

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2/
y







E:

Supplementary Wage Practices

Table E-i:

S U i$ t

P M

a U io tU

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in All manufacturing industries 2/
Shift differential

B r able
u.
All industries
goods
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
shift other shift other
shift
shift

Nondurable
goods
3d or
2d
shift other
shift

Candy and other Cutlery, hand
confectionery
tools, and
products
hardware
2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

0.1

7.9

3.0

4.5

0.2

2.5

0.2

7.1

7.9

3.0

4.5

.2

2.5

.2

6.9

-

2.7
2.7

.2
.2

_
-

.
.

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ...............

a^5

.2.6

11.9

1.3

,_n.2_

3.3

3.0

Receiving shift differential .......

11.2

2.5

11.9

1.3

10.7

3.1

2.9

Uniform cents (per hour) .......
2.8 cents .................
4 cents ........... .......
5 cents..... .............
Over 5 and under 7 cents .....
7 cents... .............. .
7.5 cents .................
8 to 10 cents .............
10 cents .................
Over 10 and under 13 cents ...
13*8 cents . . , ... ..... .
..,
Over 13*8 cents ............

7.2
.1
.2
1.7
.8
.4
.6
.2
.3
.
4
2.0
.
5

1.9
.4
.1
.1
.2
.4
.7

2.9
.3
.9
.
8
.9
~

.6
.2
.
4
-

9.9
.1
.1
2.3
1.3
.2
1.0
.3
.7
3.2
.7

2.6
.6
.1
.2
.
3
.3
1.1

2.4
2.4
“

Uniform percentage..... ......
5 percent ................ .
7 percent ................ .
7.5 percent ...............
10 percent ............... ..
12 percent ................
12.5 percent ............. .
15 percent................

3.9
.2
.3
.1
2.0
.1
(2/)
1.2

.5
(2/)
(2/)
.4
.
1

9.0
.1
.7
4.6
.4
(2/)
3.2

.7
.3

.4
(2/)
.3
.1

-

“

.7
-

.1
.5
.1

.1
.3
-

Stamped and Electroplating, Machinery
pressed metal plating, and
industries
polishing
products
2/

-

*
5

.6
.6
-

-

-

-

-

-

"

“

-

-

"

.
"

6.0
-

3.0
3.0
-

-

-

1.8
1.8
-

-

2.5
2.5
-

.2
.2
-

-

7.3

-

-

.5
-

-

-

T
_
J
-

“

1.3

6.8
3.2
1.1
2.5

‘

“
Other ...... .................

.1

.1

-

(2/)

.1

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Receiving no differential .........

.
3

.1

-

-

.5

.2

.1

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

l/ Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
2 J No workers on third or other shift.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 1-2*

S ch ed u le d Tlfj&eJiLf cMou/U

1/ Data relate to women workers.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
V
Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
k / Less than .0$ of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table 1-3:

P & id J fo liA a ifl

PERCENT OF OF!’’ICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number of paid holidays
All
indus­
tries

All establishments.... .......

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

I Manufacturing
S

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

M anufacturing
Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

Central

O ffio e s

All
indus­
tries

£/

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.7

98.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

91.9

95.3

93.2

96.6

76.5

Under 5 days................ .
5 days
6 days ...................... t
.
6^ days........... ........ t
(
7 days .............. ....... f
7^ days ............... ..t.ffttr
8 days......................
8^ days ..... ........ .
9 days......................
,
9£ days......................
10 days ......................
10^ days ............ .........
11 days
l l £ days .........................................................................
12 days ............................................................................................
1 2 $ days.................................................................................. t
t
13 or more days .........................**

( 3/ )

3.5
1.
*8
17.9
.9
2* 7
1.
2.3
10.3

1.
*8
.
7
28.5
2.3
20.7
21
.*
18.1

.7

1*6
17
23.1
1.1
30.1

7.8
1.1
37.2
3.8
19.2
3.2
10.5

9.2
6.1
11
.*

10.2

18.5

5.1

20.5

Establishments providing no paid

holidays

..

2.9

.1
6.7

f.h

1 .1

13.6
•U
8.2
11
.*
7.1
.6
8.5
l.U
121
*.
.
7
11 .*
1
.5

16.5
1.0

22.8

25.1

0
32.7

1.1
16.3

12.2

.7

.5

1.*
61
1.7
12.6
»0
y

1? 7
1-J 0

“

.2
71
.*
1.6
1q n
11
A#A
21#
0
i 1
A# 7
18.5
.8
1.*
81
2 •' 3
‘ <

1 0 -s
J ..P

2.8
0 f
t
/•v

O
•y
AA
*
•O
c
A J
O# 0
•J
7 1

n

3.1*

0
( 7 •y

#2

0
•
0

1 n
A«U
37 O
-if # y
1 )l
-L.U
11 £
A.A
1 £

•
A
1 .1
AA

•A

1.0
.
7

o ii
3«U

0 0

l A
A .O

A A
0*0

AA 0
O O .^

1#3

6.7
£

7

3

-» h
1.5

Q
/>

-

2.8

•A

oh
2 *0
1.
9
.
2
it 1
.
13.U
1.1
81
.*

12.9
.
7
13.0
11
.*
19.9

iS2
1.8

12.2

•
3
2.9

10 U
1
13 . .

1.

e
.

4 .0

28.3

*
•

(3/>

.3
•
3

1 .7

n i
L L .i
C •
a

.2

J

i n
A.U
70

2 .1

1/ Excludes limited-price variety stores.
2 j Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
3/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




17
*6

**

3TB
1 .1
2.7

3.2
1 .0

-

3*7

M

“

•6

a/>
2

•*

.
1

-

2.2
3.6
-

.

k .7

a?

.
9
37.7
—

-

.2

-

"

~

"

"

U .7

6.8

a?

1 1 .*
1

2.*
61
-

1.3

Services

100.0

y

9.*
71

93.5

7.5
1.0
9.6
59.2
7.1
1.6

.3
33.3
l*l
i.*
2* 6
1.

?8
11
.*

3.6

H ’
-

-

31
.*

7.7

8.8
-

-

1.5

-

-

3.U

-

-

-

-

*

“

8.1

2.*
11
23.8
1.*
31
.5

•6

-

•

99.9

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

Establishments providing paid holidays .
.

Whole­
sale
trade

“

-

-

23.5

•1

2 .6

6.5

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Tatis E-U:

p a id fy&c&LioHl (rf-ofaHcd PAOu ii> Hl )
iO

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

M a n u fa c t u r in g

Vacation policy

All
indus­
tries.

M a n u fa c t u r in g

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

Central

O ff io e s

y

All
indus­
tries

2/

Public
Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

y

Services

100.0

100J)

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.8

99.1

100.0

98.7

99.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.0

100.0

98.5

97.0

100.0

95.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.7

Under 1 week......... ......... .
1 week... .....................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..........
2 weeks ........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..........
3 weeks .......................
Over 3 weeks ...................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

_

39.1
1.9
59.0

U.6

7.6

2.7

18.7

-

29.5

-

57.1
U.7
38.2

-

-

.U
_

90.7
1.7

.3
1.2
98. U

12.U

95.2

53.2
3.0
U3.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

*

6.U
.1

71. U
1.1
2U.2
Q/)

~

10.1
2.0
86.0
•6
~

1.2
69.6
7.7
21.5

_

20.3
2.0
76. U

5
65.3
U.2
20.5

_

8.6
.9
89.8
.3
.2
■

2
52.5
U.o
35.3
.6
3.3
2.6

establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

.2

.9

-

1.3

.2

99.8

99.1

100.0

98.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.5
.6
95.U
1.9
.2

5.8
2.5
90. U
.It

10.8
3.7
85.5
-

.3
99.7

.3

-

98.0
1.7
-

.9
91.7
7.U

-

3.0
1.8
93.3
.6

*

-

-

-

-

.2

.9

-

1.3

-

-

99.9

99.3

100.0

98.9

.it

.2

.5

All establishments ..................
1 year of service
establishments with paid vacations....

-

(3 /)

.1
-

.ti

8U.5
.3
l.li
-

-

97.3
-

-

•

•

■

1.5

99. li

100.0

6.7
.It
85.lt
5.5
1.U

-

.1
1.2
96.2
2.3
.1
.1

-

-

_

61.1
9.U

-

10.3
.2

63.8
1.0
U.l
12. u

-

U.9

-

3.0

100.0

62.7
2.1
19.8
-

-

1.0

-

_

«.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.3

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations....
1 week ........................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..........
2 weeks .......................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..........
3 weeks ...................... .
Over 3 weeks ............... ....
Establishments with no paid vacations ..
.

(2/)

-

-

99. It

99.2

100.0

98.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.8

_

2 5 .6

3U.8
12.8
U0.6

12.0

8.U
57.6
1.6
3.6
2.6

Ul.3
17.0
39.5

10. U

-

37.3
1U.U
Uo.2
•
7.2
.1

9.3
85-9
U.8

51.6
U.9
Ul.2
.1

.6

.8

99.5

99.2

100.0

98.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.5

3.7
.6
79.1
3.1i
10.1
2.6

6.U
1.2
81.8

5.1

7.2
2.0
76.7

2.2

1.8

1.1

.5

.8

99.5

99.2

100.0
-

-

-

.6

-

-

-

2.2

10.3
.2

-

1.3

-

-

72.1
1.0
U.l
12.U

78.6
9.U
-

-

-

-

-

-

2.2

-

•

5 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations....
1 week...... ......... ........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks .......................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks....... .
3 weeks.................. .....
Over 3 weeks ...................

.1
•U
76.1
7.9
15. U

100.0
-

100.0

100.0

.3

.2

100.0
-

-

-

“

-

"

-

1.1
63.8
18.8
16.2
.1

.1

.7

-

1.1

-

-

-

-

Establishments with paid vacations....

99.9

99.3

100.0

2 weeks .................. .....
Over 2 and under 3 weeks........
3 weeks.............. .........
Over 3 weeks......... .

.1
27.2
1.0
67.U
U.2

•U
U2.3

.2
66.0

.5
29.U

19.2

-

-

-

-

39. U
17.2

33.8

Ii2.$
26.5

79.7
1.1

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

Q/>

-

-

-

-

-

-

68.2

99.7

51.0

97.5

-

-

69.3
7.0
23.5

30.7

.1

-

-

U7.U

2.5

9U.U
1.7
3.6

99.9
.3
.2
73.1
5.8
20.5

100.0
_
-

88.5
-

n .5

-

-■

.1

-

-

89.9

.

.

85.3
9.U
3.5

75.5
6.0
17.U

2.5
l.U
85.9
1.U
7.3

-

-

1.5

-

-

9.7
.1

5.0

12.6
.2

77.U
1.0
7.0
12.U

-

1.3

-

1$ years of service

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

V

\

.1

.7

“

98.9

100.0
-

1.1

Excludes limited-price variety stores.
Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0

100.0

.3
U6.3
1.7
51.7

.2
U2.1

-

100.0
-

53.8

10.8
1.8
83.0

3.9

U.1*

-

99.9
.3
U3.6

100.0
-

55.7

27.7
.5
71.8

-

-

.3

.1

3.3
55* U
2.1
35.5
3.2
.5

5.3
65.8
.2

27.8
.1
.8

100.0

98.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.5

2.9
67.3
.5
29.3

6.8
6U.8

2.2
31.0
1.0
52.5
13.3

1.8
60.3
9.U
28.5

1.1
U6.0

2.5
81.3

-

-

26.9
.2

1.3

_

50.7
2.2

(V )

1U.7
1.5

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-$i

Paid SlcJz jUj&OOe (tyoAmal pA04AiUQ4*i>)
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Provisions for paid sick leave

M anufacturin'

M anufacturing
All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

Centxal
Offi e
cs

2 /

All
indus­
tries

All

U

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

trade

Services

1/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100,0

.100.0

100.0

100,0

100.0

100.0

100.0

25.5

29.7

18.7

35.7

25.6

22.8

35.4

21.3

23.1

31.6

13.6

8.2

11.3

6.3

13.4

35.0

25.0

11.2

3.1
9.2
3.8
.
6
5.8
1.1
1.0
.1
.8

2.7
7.3
5.5
1.8
10.1
1.8
.
5

4.1
.3
1.3
3.5
6.1
1.9
1.5
-

1.9
11.1
7.8
.8
12.3
1.8

18.9
4.3
1.1
1.3

4.5
2.0
4.8
.4
8.7

.5
5.1

1.4
8.7
12.7
1.3
8.6
2.3

3.0
7.2
8.2
2.3
1.7

7.7
1.6
.1
.1

1.1

•

-

-

-

1.3

~

1.0
14.4
1.8
2.4
2.8

1.1
5.9
2.6
1.1
2.0
.2
.5
•2

2.1
1.0
1.4
.9
5.9
-

-

1.0
9.2
4.1
1.2
3.9
.1
.
3
.7
2.6

1.1
3.5
.
5
.4
2.7
-

-

4.3
9.7
4.1
1.8
1.4
-

3.0
6.2

-

2.3
17.2
5.4
1.7
1.8
7.0

(2 /)

2.6
”

1.7

74.5 •

70.3

81.3

64.3

74.4

77.2

64.6

78.7

76.9

68.4

29.3

35.5

29.3

38.8

29.9

25.4

37.4

23.1

25.3

4L.1

2.0
10.5
1.1
.4
5.5
2.6
1.9

1.0
12.8

2.6
15.1
5.4
1.7
5.6

4.3
12.9

3.0

.4
11.8
1.7
.9
12.0
1.8
1.7
•
2
5.0

1.3

.2
7.1

1.0
6.4
.
6
1.2
6.5
5.2
.3
1.4
2.7

70.7

64.5

70.7

61.2

74.7

6 f i a h of sepyice
fotg

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave
Under 5 days ....................
5 days ...... ..................
6 days ...... ........... .......
7 to 9 days........ .. ......... ..
10 days .......................
12 to 14 days...... .. ...........
15 days ................. .................................................................
20 days ................................................... ........................ ..
Over 20 days ............... .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............ .

-

-

_

-

(2 /)

-

-

-

-

-

~

9.4
.7
1.9
.9
.5
-

86.4

91.8

88.7

93.7

86.6

65.0

75.0

88.8

18.3

12.0

17.4

8.7

16.6

45.3

30.3

17.3

.4
5.4
1.0
.4
2.3

1.0
4.9
2.6
.9
5.9

5.9

2.6
9.7

8.0
2.9
5.5
6.8
12.8

1.4
6.9
3.2
1.1
3.4
.
3
.5
.4
1.1

_
_

1.9
.7
.8

3.6
5.0
9.8
2.3
7.0

_
_

1.4
8.5
15.6
1.3
15.0
3.3

( /)
2
11.4
1.6
.1
1.9
.1

_

_

-

2.1

.7
2.1

•
2

2.6

.4
2.1

a/)

“

58.9

81.7

88.0

82.6

91.3

-

-

.7

•

-

-

1 vear of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...............
Under 5 days ....................
5 days ......... ...............
6 days ........................
7 to 9 days ....................
10 days ........................
12 or 13 days ..................
15 days ...................................................................................
20 days ...................................................................................
Over 20 days ....................................................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................................................

2 .3

-

.2
7.3
1.9
4.8
-

_
11.4
2.5
1.3
14.5
1.8
-

1.7
19.6
.
3
-

4.0
1.8
1.4
1.1
-

70.1

3.9
2.5
.4
6.6
3.1
2.7
4.9
1.3

74.6

_

7.0

_

1.9
2.7
_

1.3
-

-

62.6

76.9

3.8
1.3
-

_
_

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
#* Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




-

.9
~

83.4

54.7

_

69.7

(i/f
2.2
82.7

Table E-5*

ftc U d

S

lc J l JI& G 4 M 6

(Q o b m

a l P a O v M O H A ’) -

PERCENT OF OFFICE W 5RKERS EM]PLOYED IN
<
Provisions for paid sick leave

M a n u fa c t u r in g

Al
l
ids
nu­
tis
re

Al
l

Drbe
ual
gos
od

Non­
drbe
ual
gos
od

Pbi
ulc
uii
tl­
te*
is

all establishments ..................

Woe
hlsl
ae
tae
rd

Rti
eal
tae
rd
y

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN_
Fnne*
iac*

Srie* Central
evci
Offloes

M a n u f actu r in g

Al
l
ids
nu­
tis
re
y

Al
l

100.0
ssasss&s

__1QQ^Q_

100.0

100.0

100.0-

100.0

100.0

25.4

37.4

23.1

25.3

41.1

19.0

3.9

1 5.1
7 .1
1 .7
3 .4

Drbe
ual
gos
od

Non­
drb e
ua l
gos
od

Pbi
ulc
uii
tl­
te*
is

Woe
hl­
sl
ae
tae
rd

Rti
eal
ta e
rd

Sr i e
ev c s

y

lOG.O

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................
Under 5 days ............. .•••••<
5 days »•••••••........
6 days ................ •••••••••< *
7 to 9 days ••••••.••...........
10 days •••••••.••... .
12 or 13 days..................
14-days ...................... .
15 days •••••••... ... .........
16 or 18 days ................ T 1
T
20 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............
Over 20 days ................................................................... ..
Establishments with no formal provisions
for Dald sick le a v e ............................... .

29.6

38 8

35.5

#
3
9.7
1.1

.4
8.6
17

.
6

n

&

2.1

1.6
1.5

r

.7
3.3

c .O

4.8

6.2

70.4

A/R

33.2

35.5

1*0
aA
0#<5
o
•4
n a
0J.O

1Q
X#7

aA
o#o
0 c
•n
7
OO
*

1

X OK

L

A

#7 0
/ #o
7 1
r #X

JA.A
A. (
i} n
t
10.9

.
3
4.0
.
5
~

2.0
“

•9

2.0
•4
6.6
2.9
1.8

~

2.3
2*4

3.1
4*7

7.0

“

17.4

8.7

19.7

45.3

30.3

17.3
(y>
10.4

~

1.0

-

1.1

1.0

5.9

1 .7

9.4

5.9
1.1

4.9
2.6
.9
5.9

5.7

1.2
3.9
3.1

5.4
1.0
.4
2.3

1.4

•6

6.7
3.5
1.1
2.3
.
2

2.6

-

2.1
1.3

.4

-

12.9

-

-

-

-

-

5 .0
11.7
2.3
1 .9

-

8.5
15.6
1.3
15.0
2.4

3.4
2.1
1*4
2.7

3.8

1.3
(2 /)

-

-

-

-

-

9.5
17.4

.9
1.9

.4
2.1

1.9
1.4
4.3

2.2
“

12.0

“

1.3
1.3
"

-

-

-

.
2
-

1.9
.
7
.
3
-

.
3

.
9

_

_

2.1

.7
2.1

3.1
1.4

(2 /)

-

.
2

5. '
1
_

1 .6
.1
1 .0

1 .9
(i/ >

2 .6

2 .2

7 v# 7
f0 /

At O
OX

67.9

74.6

62.6

76.9

74.7

58.9

81.0

88.0

82.6

91.3

80.3

54.7

69.7

82.7

29.3

38*8

68.5

OC

39.2

23.1

25.3

41.1

24.2

12.5

17.4

9.4

4 2 .0

45.3

32.2

17.3

1 .0
i a
X eO

-

.
7
18.9
.
3

.
9
16.3
5.4
1.7

_

5.2
1.6
1.2

.
7
6.8
3.0
1.4

.8
5.4
.
5
.4
.
5
2.4

1 .0

2.1
1.3

.*
7
5.7

1.4
8.5
15.6
1.3

1.7
6.3
9.8
2.3

9.0
1.6

6.7
2.4
.
9

1.7

15 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................................................
Under 5 days ......................................................................
5 days ................ .......................... .............................................
6 days ............................................................................
7 dava ................................................................................... • •
8 or 9 days ................................................... ....................... ..
10 days ..................................................................................... .
12 or 13 days ............................ ........... .
15 days ................ .........................................................................
20 days ............................................................................................
Over 20 davs ............... .....
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............. .....

.2
9.3

R /
>.**•

1.2

1.7

.4

.3

.2

<y>

3 .9
1 .8

.
6
.
5
1 5 .4

66.8

1 0 .3
1 .8
A
.O

.
7

1/

0

A/ R
O e - .P

7 .4
2 .5

0
•O

r

o

“




3 .9
2 .0
.4

•4

o#U
7 n
1 y
x#o
X#0
<«X
n
X X #*
?

n

on /
rU#

1 1 #0
t d
x .o

4.0
3.7
1.4

12.9
-

4 .5
2 .5

1 .8

2 .2

2.3

1.9
1*4

-

15*3

39.5

9.5

30.8

6.9

3.4
3.1
.
3
.
7
9.8

A t #2
OX 0

31.5

74.6

60.8

76.9

74.7

—

**

-

•A

1 / Excludes limited-price variety stores.
2/ Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
I* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
*# Finance, insurance, and real estate.
*

2 /

y

-

3.7
1 .1
-

.2
2 .0

..
9
.
5

2.3
30.6

8.7

58.9

75.8

-

4.9
1.4
.
9

9.4
3.7

1 .2

_

5.9

.
7
3.9

-

_

.2
.

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

2.5

2.1

2.8

24.3

87.5

82.6

90.6

58.0

,1
_
_

2.4

_

8.5

8.0

6.6

54.7

67.8

82.7

_

Table E-6:

fi{M fV U M U 4 A U < U m

R on u A eA

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

Type of bonus

M anufacturing

100/0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1*1.5

2i*.6

32.7

28.6

30.7

27.3

28.2

35.2

52.3

26.3

36.7
10.0
13.2

38.0

21*.6
-

2.2

25.5
1.1*
2.5

29.1*
1.3
-

0 .1
1.5
l* .o

22,1*

31.1*
2.6
1.2

35.1

-

3.5

23.1
3.5
7.6

21*. 6

6.8

1.7

10.7

58.5

75.1*

67.3

71.1*

69.3

72.7

71.8

6U.8

1*7.7

73.7

Retail
trade

Services

Finance**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

55.1*

57.9

17.1

66.2

5U.1*

59.3

53.7
1.8
2.3

53.1
2.1*
-

5U.0
1.5
3.5

15.8

51.0
7.1
9.6

37.5
15.8

1.3

14.6

1*3.0

l*i*.6

2*2.1

82.9

33.8

ii5.6

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establiabsents with nonproduction
bonuses ^ ............ ......................................

1*8.7

57.0

Christmas or yaar-pnd............................
P rofit-sh arin g.................. ......................
O ther...........................................................

37.0
5.6
7.2
5L.3

*#

100.0

Retail
trade

All

*

All
indus­
tries

Whole­
sale
trade

Non­
durable
goods

Establishaents with no nonpzoducticn
bonuses............................................... .

Central
Offioee

Public
utili­
ties*

All
indus­
tries

A ll establishments • • • • • • ................ • •• •• •

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

M anufacturing

-

y

Services

y

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

5.8

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

y

H * .l*

Services

100.0

-

Excludes lim ited-price variety stores.
Includes data for industries in addition to these shown separately.
Unduplicated to ta l.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .
Finance, insurance, and real esta te.

9*ti44A&tu>e a n d P -e+ tliott PAotU

Table 1-7:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of plan

A ll establishm ents.................. .....................

M anufacturing
All
indus­
tries

100.0

M anufacturing

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

All

Establishaents with insurance or
pension plans 3 / ........................................

91*. 5

89.5

91*. 6

Life insurance.............. ...........................
Health insurance ......................................
Hospitalisation ........................................
Retirement p en sio n ................ .................

83.8
53.6
51.7
67.2

78.1*
55.9
1 1 .8
**
1(8,0

81.9
75.3
69.6
1*1*.9

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans .............................................

5.5

10.5

5.1*

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

y

Finance**

Services

100.0

100.0

92.1

99.0

91*. 9

77.8
ltlt.9
1*6.7
55.1*

62.8
52.2
76.7
30.1*

86.6
51.1*
58.9
73.6

7.9

1.0

5.1

100.0

86.7

98.7

76.1*
1*5.3
31.3
1*9.6

90.9
76.6
33.5
87.2

13.3

1.3

O ffio e s

All
indus­
tries

WholeDurable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

utili-

All

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

*/

100.0

100.0

Central

y

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

88.0

99.5

93.2

89.8

91.7

88.6

96.1*

83.9

100.0

88.6

79.9
33.1
31.7
1 1 .7
**

92.6
61.9
59.1
92.5

77.3
67.6
63.9
1*3.5

70.8
69.9
63.5
38.5

79.5
67.7
67.3
36.8

65.1*
71.2
61.1
39.6

89.5
75.1*
1*6.7
8l*.l*

79.9
50.0
53.7
1*7.0

75.6
62.0
80.1*
26.8

75.8
57.2
62.0
22.0

12.0

.5

6.8

10.2

8.3

11.1*

3.6

16.1

ll.l*
*

Excludes lim ited-price variety stores.
Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Unduplioated to ta l.
Transportation (excluding railroads), coomunioation, and other public u tilitie s*
Finance, insurance, and real esta te.




Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. D PA T E T O L B R
E R MN F A O
Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s

u

Appendix — Scope and Method of Survey

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was oolleoted by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed* In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform Job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A)* The covered industry groupings are: manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and fbrvioes* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work* Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for offloe clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i*e*, those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information c h i wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables* It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

42
ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN NEW YORK, N.Y., l/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JANUARY 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
es tabl ishment s
studied

2/

Number of
______.stabllghfflente___
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
. study

In establiishments
studif>d
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
4,359
1,270
402
868
2,834

598
160
70
90
3S5

1,400,000
389,700
144,400
245,300
917,800

562,630
111,090
50,400
60,690

410,200

165,830
15,420
5,630
9,790
124,720

209
768

60
78

221,100
116,700

160,790
23,130

31,190

51
101
51
51
51

All divisions ..... ............................
Manufacturing................ ••••••••••••••.
Durable goods
Nondurable goods £ / •••••••••••••••••.....
Nonmanufacturing..................... •••••••
Transportation (except railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ...................... .... ...
Wholesale trade ........ ................ .
Retail trade, except limited-price
variety s t o r e s ...... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ••••••.
Services j / ••••••........................
Central offices ••••••........... .

345
712
800
255

54
79
114
53

189,100
230,800
160,100
92,500

81,000
88,960
56,320
41,340

8,000
63,290
13,920
25,690

21
8
8
8

44
1,197
369
46
29
16
44
94
267
155
87
25
78
15
188

17
155
56
13
13
7
14

5,964
41,057
12,675
1,963
4,016
781
2,373
2,195
27,539
17,051
2,264
8,224
16,216
37,456
82,371

4,485
9,420
3,174
992
3,242
440
1,144
895
14,507
6,936
484
7,087
5,701
36,913
U , 982

338
297
136
93
268
25
106
33
1,980
1,103
30
847
474

101
101
101
-

101

8,320

Industries in which occupations
were surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Candy and other confectionery products •••••....
Women's and misses' coats and suits
Millinery................ .....................
Foundries, nonferrous •••••...... ....... ......
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware •••••••••••••••
Sheet-metal w o r k ....................... •••.••••
Stamped and pressed metal products.... ....... *
Electroplating, plating, and polishing ........ .
Machinery industries .................. ••••••«••
Machinery................. ............... .
Machine-tool accessories..... ......... ••••#
Paper and printing machinery....... ........
Radio, television, and related products ..... .
Railroads
Insurance carriers ................. ........ .

J/

2/

21
21

8/

21
8
21
21
8
21

51
101

21

22

46
22

14
10

18
14
27

-

31,433

New York City Area (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties, N. Y.).
Total establishment employment.
Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
f j Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products#
y Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organisations; and engineering and architectural services.
£ / Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with k or more workers were also included.
8/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.

g/
gf




Index

43

Page
Assembler (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) .....
Assembler (machinery) ••••••••••••••....... .
Assembler (radio, television, and related products)
Assembler (sheet-metal work) ••••«••••••.... ......
Bellman (hotels)
..... •••••••••••••..... •••••••
Bench hand (bakeries) .......... .
Biller, m a c h i n e ........ ••••••••••••...... ••••••••
Blocker (millinery) ............... ...............
Boatswain (ocean transport) ..... ............... ..
Bookbinder (printing) ..... .............. ........
Bookkeeper, hand ......... ........................
Bookkeeping-machine operator..... .......... .....
Brewer (malt liquors) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Bricklayer (building construction) ......... ......
Calculating-machine operator •••••.••••..... ......
Candy maker (candy and other confectionery products)
Carpenter (building construction) .... ............
Carpenter, maintenance .•••••••............. •••••••
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ..... ....... .
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) •••••••••
C leaner.......................
•••••
Cleaning woman (building service) .........•••••••••
Clerk, accounting ••••••............ ..............
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) •••••••.... .
Clerk, actuarial (insurance oarriers) ••••••••••••••
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) •••••••••
Clerk, file ............... ............... ...... .
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ....... ••••••....
Clerk, general ...................... ........ .
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••••••
Clerk, order •••••..... ••.••••••••••........ •••••••
Clerk, payroll .......... .
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ...•
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ...........
Compositor, hand (printing) ....... ...... .
Cook (restaurants and cafeterias) .................
Coremaker (nonferrous foundries) •••••••••••••••••••
Crane operator, electric bridge •••.••••••••••••••••
Crane operator, electric bridge (railroads) ••••••••
Cupola tender (nonferrous foundries) •••••••••••••••
Cutter (millinery) ..... ..........................
Cutter and marker (women's and misses1 coats
and suits) ....................... ....... .
Die setter (stamped and pressed metal products)
Dipper (candy and other confectionery products) ••••
Dishwasher (restaurants and cafeterias) ••••••••••••
Doorman (hotels) .... ••••••..... •••••••••••••••••••
Draftsman.............. ..........................
Drill-press operator (cutlery, hand tools, and
hardware) ••••..... ....... ..... ........... .
Drill-press operator (machinery) .......... .
Duplicating-machine operator ••••••••••••••••••«••.•
Electrician (building construction) ••...... .......
Electrician (ocean transport) ••••••••••••••••••••••




22
24, 25, 26
27
23
33
29
3, 6

21
31
29, 30
3, 7
3, 7
29
29
29
3, 7, 8
19
29
13
28

22

16
33
3, 8
28
28
28
4, 8
28
4, 8
28
4, 9
4, 9

28

28
30
32

22
16
28

22
21
20
23
19
32
33

12
22
24, 25, 26
3, 9
29
31, 32

Electrician, maintenance....... .
13
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ............ .... .
24, 26
28
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) •••••....... .
30
Electrotyper (printing) •••••••.... ••••••••••••••••••••••
33
Elevator operator (hotels) ••••••••••.... ............. .
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) •••••.•••••••••••«•••••• 24, 25, 26
31
Engineer (ocean transport) •••••••••.... ..... •••••••••••
13
Engineer, stationary ...... ••••••••••••••••••••..... ..
13
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r ....... ..... .
22
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) ••••••••••••*•••••••
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ......... •••••••••• 24, 25, 26
16
G u a r d ....... •••••••••••..... •••••••••....... ..... .
Helper (bakeries)
29
Helper, motortruck driver •••••••••••••••..... •••••••••••
30, 31
Helper, trades, maintenance.... ..... .
13
28
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) .................
33
Houseman (hotels) .... ••••••........ ......... ....... .
Inspector (machinery) ••••••.... ..... .................. 24, 25, 26
27
Inspector (radio, television, and related products) ••
Inspector, final (examiner) (women's and misses' coats
20
and suits) .....
•••••••••
16
Janitor •••••••••••••••••.... •«•••••••••••••••••••.... .
Janitor (machinery) •••••••••..... •••••.•••••••.... •••••
24, 26
Janitor (sheet-metal work)
•••••••••.••••.•••••••••••
23
Key-punch operator...........•••••••••••••••••••••••••«•••
5 9
28
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) .... .......
Laborer (building construction) ................ .
29
Longshoreman (stevedoring) ......... •••••••........
32
Machine operator (printing) .................. ••••••
30
30
Machine tender (printing) ....... ........ ••.•••••••
Machine-tool operator, production (radio, television,
and related products) .......................... .
27
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) •••••«..... 24, 25, 26
Machine-tool operator, toolroom..... •••••••••••...... .
14
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (cutlery, hand tools,
22
and hardware) ...... ••••••••........ ••••••••••••••••••
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) .............
25, 26
Machinist (radio, television, and related products) ••••••
27
Machinist, maintenance.......... ••••••••••••••••••••••••
14
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) .... ••••••••••••••••••
28
Machinist, production (machinery) .......... •••••••••••••
25
Maid (hotels) .... ••••••••.••••......... ..... •••••....
33
Mailer (printing) .....................
....
30
Maintenance meui, general utility ••«••••••••••••••••••••••
14
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ...... ...... .
14
Mechanic, maintenance.... ......................... ••••••
14
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) ...................... .
28
Mechanic, maintenance (stamped and pressed metal
products) ••«••••••....... •••••••••................. .
23
Milliner (millinery) .....................................
21
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ........ ...... .
24, 25, 26
Millwright .............................................
14
Mixer (bakeries) ....... .......... .
29
Molder (bakeries) .......... ............... ........... .
29
22
Molder (nonferrous foundries) •••••••••••••....... .

44

Index - Continued
Page

Motortruck driver ••••••••••••••••••••••••...........
Nurse, industrial (registered) .............. .
Office boy .......... ........................... .
Office g i r l ..........................................
O i l e r ........................................... .....
Operator (local transit)
Order filler ............... ........ ...... .
Overman (bakeries) ............
.•••••••••••••••
Packer .... ........... ....... .....................
Packer (bakeries) ........... ...... .
Packer (candy and other confectionery products) ....
Painter (building construction) ................ ..
Painter, maintenance ••••••••....... •••••••••••••••••
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ...... ••••••••••••••
Pharmacist (registered) (drug stores) ........... .
Photoengraver (printing) ............ ........ .
Pipe fitter (malt liquors) ........ ••••••••••....... .
Pipe fitter, maintenance ........................ ..
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) •••••••••...... .
Plasterer (building construction) ••••••••..... ..
Plater (electroplating, plating, and polishing) .... .
Plumber (building construction) ................ ..
Plumber, maintenance .••••••.... •••••••••••••••.....
Plumber, maintenance (railroads) ........ ......... .
Polisher and buffer, metal (cutlery, hand tools,
and hardware) ••••....... ..........................
Polisher and buffer, metal (electroplating, plating,
and polishing) ....... ....... ••••••••••...... .....
Polishing-and-buffing-machine operator (cutlery, hand
tools, and hardware) ............................... .
Porter ......................... .......................
Porter (hotels) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••«'
Power-shear operator (sheet-metal work) •••••••••••••
Power-shear operator (stamped and pressed metal
products) ................................... .
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) •••.•••••••••••.
Press assistant (printing) ........................... .
Press feeder (printing) ........................... ..
Presser (women's and misses' coats and suits) •••••••.
Pressman (printing) ........ .......... ••••••........ «
Punch-press operator (radio, television, and related
products) ....................
••••••••••••
Punch-press operator (stamped and pressed metal
products) •••••.... ....... •••••..... .......... .
Quartermaster (ocean transport) ............. ........ .
Receiving clerk ................
••••••
Repair operator (radio, television, and related
products) ............................. •••••••••••••<
Sales clerk (drug stores) ....... •••••••••••••••••••.
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) ........
Seaman (ocean transport) .......................... ..
Secretary ..................................... ....... .
Section head (insurance carriers) ................ ..
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women's and misses' coats and
suits) •••••!...........••••••.................... .
Sewing-machine operator (millinery) ..... .......... ..




30, 31

12
5
9
15
30

16
29
16, 17
29
19
29
15
28
33
30
29
15
28
29
24
29
15
28

22

Sewing-machine operator (women's and misses' coats and
suits) ...*••••»...... ..... ................•••••••••••
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries)
Sheet-metal machine operator, miscellaneous machines
(sheet-metal work) ................... .
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance
Sheet-metal worker, production (sheet-metal work) ••••••••
Shipping clerk .............................. .
Shipping clerk (millinery) .............. .............. .
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k .... ..... ..............
Solderer (radio, television, and related products) •••••••
Starter (building service) ......... .........
Stenographer................................. .........
Stenographer (insurance carriers) .............. •••••••••.
Stereotyper (printing) ••••...... ................ ......
Steward (ocean transport) ......................... •••••••
Stock handler.............. ................. ......... .
Stock handler (machinery) ...................... .
Stock handler (railroads) ........................ ••••••••
Stock handler (sheet-metal work) .................. .
Stock handler (stamped and pressed metal products) ......
Straw operator (millinery) ............. .............
Switchboard operator ....................................
Switchboard operator-receptionist........... ...........
Tabulating-machine operator ......... .................. .
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) ...... .

22
16
33
23
23
28
30
30

20
30
27
23
31, 32
17
27
33
24, 25
31, 32

5, 10
20

21

22
23
15
23
17

21
17
27
33

5, 10
28
30
32
17
25, 26
28
23
23

21
5, 10

10

6 , 11

28

33
27
Tester (radio, television, and related products) •••••••••
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women's and misses' coats
20
and suits) ........ .................. ••••••...... .
15
Tool-and-die m a k e r ..... ••••••......... .................
22
Tool-and-die maker (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) •••
25 , 26
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ..........................
Tool-and-die maker (stamped and pressed metal products) ••
23
12
Tracer •••••••.... •••••••••••••••••..........••••..... .
6 , 11
Transcribing-machine operator ••••••••........ ••••......
21
Trimmer (millinery) ........................ ............
17, 18
Truck driver •••••••........ •••••••••••••••••••...... .
17
Trucker, hand ......... ............... ............••••••
Trucker, hand (machinery) ........ ......................
25, 26
28
Trucker, hand (railroads) ..... ...... ......•••••........
Trucker, hand (sheet-metal work) ..................
23
Trucker, hand (stamped and pressed metal products) ......
23
18
Trucker, p o w e r ...... ••••••.......... .
28
Trucker, power (railroads) ••••............. .
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ..........•••••••• 24, 25, 26
6 , 11
Typist ....................... •••••••••••........••••••••
28
Typist (insurance carriers) ..••••................... .
28
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ...... .
32
Waiter (restaurants and cafeterias) .........
18
Watchman •••••.... .......... ......................••••••
31, 32
Watchman (ocean transport) •••••............ ....... ..
Welder, hand (machinery) ..... ..........................
25
23
Welder, hand (sheet-metal work) *•.... ...... ....... ••••
29
Wrapper (bakeries) •••••••...... ..................
Wrapper (candy and other confectionery products) •••••••••
19
T e l e p h o n e opera t o r (hotels)

24

20

..... • • • • • • • • • ....... .

U, S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952

THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES

In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surreys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C,
for the following communities:

fAa
rs

BIS ..ftiUfttn Nq «
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minnsapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey
New Orleans, Louisiana
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
San Franci sco-Oakland, California
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, Washington
This report was prepared in the Bureau's
munications may be addressed to:
Robert R.
Bureau of
341 Ninth
New York,

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1075
1064
1067
1068
1081
1074
1070
1060
1082
1042
1071
1058
1069
1076
1078
1057

20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
25
25
15
15
25
20
20
20
15
15
25
15
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cent8
cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Middle Atlantic Regional Office*

Com­

Behlow, Regional Director
Labor Statistics
Avenue
New York

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing*




The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
New Jersey

New York
Pennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102