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Occupational Wage Survey
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
March 1952

Bulletin No. 109 9

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION .....................................................................

1

THE MILWAUKEE METROPOLITAN A R E A .................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E .....................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ...................................
A-2
Professional and technical o ccupations..... ••••••••••*....... ...
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ............ ,
..............
A -4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ...............••
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-2071
Candy and other confectionery products ..............
5-336
Foundries, nonferrous ............................. ...... ....... ..
5- 3463
Stamped and pressed metal products ............
6- 35
Machinery industries:
Machinery .......................
Machine-tool a c c e s s o r i e s.........
5-63
Insurance carriers •

3
g

9
ll

14
14
15
15
18
18

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction...... ...................
C-205
Bakeries .................................
C-2082
Malt l i q u o r s ............
C-27
P r i n t i n g ............................................................
C-41
Local transit operating e m p l o y e e s ...... ................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s ....................................
C-541
Grocery stores .................
C-5452
Milk d e a l e r s .......................................................
C-7411 Hotels and restaurants ................

21
21

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ..........................

22

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ...................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ...........................
E-3
Paid holidays ........
E-4
Paid v a c a t i o n s ............................
E-5
Paid sick l e a v e ................
E -6
Nonproduction b o n u s e s ...... ..........................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ............

22
23
23
24
25
27
27

APPENDIX
Scope and method of survey .................

28

I N D E X .............................................................................

30

* NOBS - Additional occupational earnings reports are available
upon request for auto repair shops (May 1951), ferrous foun­
dries (June 1951), and power laundries (May 1951)*

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C.
Price 20 cents

Juna 2 0 , 1952

19
19
19
20
20
20

21

Introduction 2/
The Milwaukee area is 1 of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys* Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis* Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized In compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping* In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2 / Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terns of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Milwaukee M etropolitan A r e a
The Milwaukee Metropolitan Area (Milwaukee County)
had an estimated total population of £71,000 in 1950, represent­
ing an increase of 12 percent since 1940, More than 70 percent
of this total lived in the city of Milwaukee. Nationally, the
Milwaukee area ranks as the sixteenth largest standard metro­
politan area. Milwaukee's central location, its ample trans­
portation facilities, and its close proximity to all types of
mineral, forest, and agricultural resources make it one of the
Nation's important industrial areas.

2 / Prepared in the Bureau's regional office in Chicago, 111.,
by Marvin H. Glick under the direction of George E* Votava, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst* The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau's
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2 / Construction and extractive industries and government
institutions were excluded from this study;
see appendix for
discussion of scope and method of survey.




Nonagricultural employment in the area totaled 359,300
in March, of which 190,4.00 were employed in manufacturing estab­
lishments. Seventy percent of the manufacturing plant workers
were on the payrolls of plants producing durable goods. Employ­
ment in the durable-goods industries was dominated by the non­
electrical machinery group, with 53,500 workers. Other major
durable-goods industries included electrical machinery with
23,000 workers, fabricated metal products with 15,400, and pri­
mary metal products and transportation equipment with 14,500
workers each. Among the prominent nondurable-goods industries
in the Milwaukee area were food and kindred products with 21,300
workers, leather and leather products with 3,400, printing and
publishing with 7,200, and apparel with 6,600.

Milwaukee is a leading center for the manufacture of
Diesel and gasoline engines, outboard motors, motorcycles,
tractors, wheelbarrows, padlocks, malt beverages, hosiery, work
shoes, leather gloves and mittens, tin and enamelw&re, saw and
flour mill equipment, and graphic arts products.

An estimated 169,400 wage and salary workers were on
the payrolls of Milwaukee nonmanufacturing establishments in
March. Wholesale and retail trade establishments provided em­
ployment to approximately 66,000 persons, and another 16,000
were employed in finance, insurance, and real estate institu­
tions* The combined employment of the transportation (including
railroads), communication, and public utilities industries was
24,400. The service industries employed 29,700 workers, and the
building construction industry employed another 13,600. Feder­
al, State, and local government agencies reported employment of
19,700.

Among the industries and establishment-size groups
studied by the Bureau, more than four-fifths of the plant work­
ers were employed in establishments having written agreements
with labor organizations • Nine of ten factory workers in manu­
facturing plants were working under the terns of collective­
bargaining agreements. In nonmanufacturing industries, the pro­
portion of nonoffice workers covered by union agreements ranged
from less than a third in retail trade to nearly 100 percent in
the transportation (except railroads}, communication, and public
utilities group. Union contracts covered about two-thirds of
the nonoffice workers in wholesale trade and approximately 30
percent in the service industries.

Only in the public utilities group of industries was
there any appreciable degree of unionization among office work­
ers. About 90 percent of the office workers in this industry
group were employed in establishments having union contract
provisions covering office workers.

2

Occupational Wage Structure
Wages and salaries were formally adjusted upwards by
most Milwaukee establishments between January 1950, the base
date of the Wage Stabilization Board's 10 percent "catch-up1
1
wage Increase formula, and the time of the survey. Nearly all
manufacturing plant workers received formal wage adjustments
during this period. More than half the nonoffice workers in
nonmanufacturing establishments had received at least one gen­
eral wage increase; virtually all the remaining workers had re­
ceived pay increases granted on an individual basis.
Formal revisions of office workers1 salaries were
less prevalent, although office workers in the larger manufac­
turing establishments frequently were granted increases compa­
rable to those given plant workers. Individual merit or lengthof-service raises were more commonly used to adjust salary
levels of office workers.
Wage rates for 8$ percent of all Milwaukee plant work­
ers were determined on the basis of formal rate structures.
More than half of all time-rated plant workers were working
under wage progression plans which provide a range of rates for
each job. Plans setting forth a single or flat rate for time­
rated job classifications were typical of nondurable-goods manu­
facturing and wholesale trade establishments. Piece-rate or
bonus incentive payment plans covered plant j obs in which nearly
half the workers in durable goods and about 4-0 percent in non­
durable-goods manufacturing plants were employed. Incentive
plans were either nonexistent or relatively Insignificant among
the nomaxxufacturing industries.
Three-fifths of
establishments that based
for a range of salaries.
on single rate plans and
ployed in establishments
vidual basis.




all office workers were employed in
salaries on formalized plans providing
Ten percent were paid salaries based
the remaining office workers were em­
that determined salaries on an indi­

Established minimum entrance rates for inexperienced
plant workers constituted part of the formal wage structure of
establishments employing nearly all plant workers in the area.
Although entrance rates ranged from less than 60 cents to more
than $1.65 an hour, approximately three-fifths of the plant
workers were employed in establishments with minimum rates of
$1 or more. A 75-cent minimum was the lowest rate reported in
any manufacturing or wholesale trade establishment.

Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing estab­
lishments were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing.
In 27 of 33 office classifications permitting comparison, aveav
age salaries of workers in manufacturing plants exceeded those
of workers in nonmanufacturing establishments. Average hourly
earnings for plant jobs studied in all industries were higher
in manufacturing for 13 of 23 job categories for which com­
parisons were possible.

More than one-fifth of all plant workers in manufac­
turing industries were scheduled to work late shifts in March
1952. Virtually all these workers received shift premiums— usu­
ally expressed as uniform cents-per-hour (although in some in­
stances as a uniform percentage) additions to day rates. The
most common shift differential paid to second-shift workers was
5 cents and to third-shift workers, 10 cents.

Approximately two-thirds of the Milwaukee area plant
workers were scheduled to work 4-0 hours a week in March 1952.
Nearly all the remaining nonoffice workers in both manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries were scheduled to work more
than U0 hours. More than three-fourths of the office workers
in all industries were scheduled for 4,0 hours of work a week.
However, in finance, insurance, and real estate more than onefourth of the office workers were scheduled to work 37^ hours,
and in services about one-third were on a 35-hour work schedule.

3
A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Tati* A-l:

O

f

f

i

c

e

O

c

C

U

p

a

t

i

O

H

l

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Wis., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
.00 & . 5 0 & . 0 0 & . 5 0 ■fe.oo 7*2.50 ^5.00 & . 0 0 & . 0 0 & . 0 0 & . 0 0
40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 5*5.00 57.50 io
Weekly Under 32.50 35.00
Weekly
ear i g t
nns
hours
and
(St n a d (Standard) 32.50
adr)
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0 . 0 0 95.00 over
i

Number
o
f
workers

-T*
*
o

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Men
Bookkeepers, hand ....
Manufacturing .....
Durable goods ..
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ••
Retail trade ...

214
m
100
31
83
38

40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

$
78.00
79.50
78.50
83.50
75.50
70.50

Clerks, accounting ....
Manufacturing ......
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonoanufacturing ••
Wholesale trade ,

483
416
375
41
67
39

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
39.5
40.0

69.00
70.00
70.50
68.00
62.00
59.50

415
352
53
40

40.0
40.0

73.50
73.06
79.00
79.50

Clerks, general ......
Manufacturing ...•.
Nonmanufacturing .
.
Wholesale trade

4 0 .0

40.0

7
5
5

4

4

_
-

_
-

~

~

_
-

_
-

1
-

-

n
-

1
1

-

1
1

12
8
8

3
3
3

4
2
2

n
8
8

3
•

10
9

4
4

-

2
~

3
3

l
-

2
2
-

1
1
-

3
3
-

6
6
-;
~

3
3
-

6
5
5
1
-

_
-

20
2 !
2 |
- 1
18
18

»
n
n

- j
-

~ j
-

l

_ ,
- ,
-

_ 1
-

i

- j

~

_j
- 1

_

i

.

-

1
.

14
3
3

2

1
1

n
10

29

37
36
32

10
4
20
18

5
8
12
-

34
26
24
2
8
7

36
31
29
2 !
5
4

19
7
6
l
12
8

38
33
30
3
5
4

18
15
12
3
3
1

67
64
61
3
3
1

U
11
-

54
53
1
-

37
35
2
1

3 1

20
4 !
4
16
16

9
9
9

9
1
1

22
_

14
1
1

14
14

2
19
19

17
2
2
15
14

-

8
4

22
21

13
12

11

1? ,
11
9
2

U
9
9
-

1?
15
7
8

6
6
5
1

7
7
6
1

4
4
3
1

_

_

_

22
22

6
4
2

15
15

30
29
21
8
1 l
“ |

27
25
23
2
2

i
l
13

10
9 !
1 ;
- !

13
6

22
6
6
16
15

23
4

2
3
1
6
7 I
6
4

4
1

34

25

9
7
5
2
2
1

~~W

35
3?- —
31
1
3

100
98
93
5
2
1

21

IT

14

— W

13
1

7
-

3
7
4

16
7
1
6
9
1

10
10
10
_
_

3
3
3

-

-

25
33
12
10

5
_
5
4

5
5
4

2
£
2

2
2
2

1
1
1

.
-

.
-

_

-

13
9"
6
3
4
-

.

I

-

7

i

7

34
3
1

37
f
; --2f
9
6

104
51
46 h r o i
2
5
1
5

!
Clerks, order .......
Manufacturing ....
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Wholesale trade .

240
75
54
21
165
153

40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.5
40.5

64.00
65.00
67.50
58.00
64.00
64.00

_
- ;

j

_
- !
- |
-

J

110
102
79
23

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

60.50
60.00
59.00
63.00

18

39.5

48.50

_

_

Office boys .........
Manufacturing .... .
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Finance * * .....

112
76
53
23
36
20

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.5

38.50 2/ 1J
39.50
5
_
40.00
37.00
5
37.00
8
37.00
3

25
20
14
6
5
3

Tabulating-machlne operators ............
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ....................

160
123
37

39.5
40.0
39.0

66.00
66.50
65.50

Clerks, payroll .....
Manufacturing.... .
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods

Duplicating-machine operators

See footnotes at end of table.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




4 0 .0

-

-

-]
”

i
i

-

-

~

_ i2 ,
_
12
- ; 10
2
“

1

1

.

10 i
1
1
9
7

7
5!
4;
1 !
2
1

1 ___ 2_
9
9
~

-

-

-

7
5;
2
3
- j

___ aJ____L
3 1
3
1|
2
2
~

3

1

2 ___ li

35
26
20
6
9
4

7

7
5
4
1
2
1

7
7
6
1

6

3
3
1
1

-

6

10
5
5

16 j
3 i
l
2
13 i
13

-

2

6

-

1°

_

21
ir1
- !
n
10
io

4 _ U,
_
11
4
11
4
*
2

_

2

;

3

2?

n

8 ___ L
1
5
1
1
4
I
_ j

_

.1

- ;

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

3

8
2
6

-

i
1
1

2 ___ L s ___ 2_l
8
2
4
1

9
6
3

15
15

11
8
3

7
4
3

8
8

14
11
3

8
C
!
>
3

^ '

2

3

Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

M i *

A-i:

0 face Occupation* - C ontinued

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area

basis in Milwaukee, Wis., by inSustry division , March 1952)

See footnotes at end of table*
♦* Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5
Tabi*

a

O ffic e O c c u p a tio n *

-it

-

C o n tin u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Mis., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$

Under 32.50 31-00 3^.50 * . 0 0
0
$

Weekly
W
eeklyearnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) 32.50

$ *
1
1*2.50 ,1 . 0 0 ,
*7.5o 5o.oo 52.50 > . 0 0

1
*
*
35.00 37.50 !0 . 0 0 1*2.50 '5 . 0 0

$
0
57.50 > . 0 0

0
1*7.50 ?o.oo >2.50 55.00 57.50 > . 0 0

s
S2.50 $5 . 0 0

$
57.50 7 0 . 0 0 72.50 7 5 . 0 0 B0 . 0 0 35.00 90.00 9* . 0 0
5
and
>
>2.50 . 5 .oo S7«at 7Q. Q . 72-.5Q-T5.QQ 8 fl*Q . B5.QQ_ 9QaQQ- ?5-aP0 over
Q.
Q.

j
Women - Continued
Calculating-machine operators
(other than Conrotometer tvoe) .........

112

23
89
57
27

Nonmanufacturing....................

Clerks, accounting..... *............. .
Manufacturing ................. ......
Durable g o o d s ..... ............. ..
Nondurable g o o d s ....... ..........
Nonmanufacturing ............... .
Retail trade .............. .
Finance ** ........................
Services ........ .. ..... .
.

1

.2 l h
*
1*90
257
233
751+
177
177
200

39

39.5 .
.
.

h6,50

ho.o

5 0 .0 0

I
t

39,0
39.o
39.5

h5.50
ho. 50
56.50

h

hO.O
39.5

1*9*50

5

5 i.5 o

1+ . 0
0

39.5
hO.O
hO.O
Uo.5
39.5
hl.O

3

2
1

5

hO. 00
1*2.50
1* . 0 0
3
1* . 5 0
0
36.50
hi. 0 0
3h.50
35.00
38.50

5
22

h

-

h
l

10
2

3
2
1

.

.

.

.

67 ■-151
3
3*
l
3
23
11
6*
1
117

.

.

2h
12
12
1
.

l

21

3

32
52

2

17
ho 1
k

53.50
39.5
hO.O
57.00
ho.o
57.50
ho.o
5U. oo
39.0
5 1.00
. ho.o . 55.00 . .
. .
. .
h 8 .oo
38.5
5 0 .0 0
38.5
. h2.5. . 1*9.50 . .
.
. .

2

12

-

-

Clerks, order ...................... ..
Manufacturing ............. ..
Durable goods .............................. ..
Nondurable goods ......................................
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wholesale trade ............... .
Retail trade .......................

-kO.O
ho.o
ho.o
hO.O
39.5
ho.o
39.0

2

28

22

i
u.

<
2
2

52

7

3

2

2

2

2

202

136
88

112

2

18
9
9

21*
i5
9
5

9

137
93
83

69
60
1*9

10

11

1**
1
21 *

2

-

1
1

.

.

12

20

16
10

7

3
9
.

59
29
30
11*3
37
33
21 *

16

3h

11

26
8
1*

5
3

9

27
26
26
.
1

21 *

23
15

2

63
1*
3
7
36
20
12

5

17
5
3

20

5
3

9
5

18
16

10

7
3
3

10
8
2

2

2

1

hi

16

20

11
8

19
1
21
2

21 *
11
10
1

13

3
5

5
5

2

5
3
3

2

1
1
1

11
8

2

2

9
9

1
1
1

8
1

-

1
1

3
3

5
r

3
3 —

-

3
3
3

3
3
3

2

-

2

135
50
50

1+*
1
2l
*

69
29
25
h
hO

53
27
27
26

85

3
1*
13

2 .0

2
2
2

-

-

3

-

-

1

-

“

“

I

1
1

79
79
78

m

-

-

-

-

1
3

:

m

5

3
12
2

8
6
6

2

1

1

i
-

-

31
13

h3

n

26

22
20
2
21
10
2
8

11
11

11
11

.

-

5
3

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

?
9
9

.
-

-

-

15

-

6

-

-

-

6

-

-

lh

-

8

lo
*

92
39

59
26
25

15
53

33

1

9

c

7

7

15
15

10

12

22
16

13

12
8
2

19
*
3h

l*o
17

22
12

6
11

19
k

15
8

23
16

37
30
lh
16
7

11

5

5

.

6

1

_

1

39

27

1*8

8
1

21

7
12

_

6

33
17
16
79

59
29

6

52

22
2

m

1
1

6

1

-

1

2

96
29
21 *
5
67

6

1

5l
lh
37
71
13
27
lh

33
30
37
h

1

_

7

5

1*

21*

-

V
1

122

7

b

271
186 -0*7
108
100
111*
90
93 1 9 1
10
2 1 j 17
78
157 i
17
*

37
76
1^

17
15
*

Clerks, general
770
Manufacturing ............ . . ........ . .
311*
Durable goods . ...........
273
Nondurable g o o d s ............ .
m
Nonmanufacturing ............... .
1+56
Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . 83
.
...
Retail t r a d e . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iah.
Finance *
. . *. . . . . . ............... . .
..
17U
S e r v ic e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35.

.

23
l6
7

6
3

3

111

1*8
6

2

6

6

169
58
23
35

28
15

13

2

100

5
h3
3
lh
19

8
2

2

139
39
15
2h

59
16

27
5

12
5

27
23
h

11

53.5©
5o.oo
h8 .oo
h9.00
h6.50
h6.50
1* . 0 0
9

9
. .
. . . .
Clerks, file, class A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 . . . . hO.O. . . . 1.* . . . 0 . 0 . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1* . . 0 . . . . 5. 0. . 0 0
.0 .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39.5 .
. . . .
1* . 5 0
6
Finance * *
.
39.0
1* . 5 0
6
30

Clerks, file, class B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.166. . . . hO.O
......
Manufacturing............. .........
hO.O
61*8
hO.O
Durable goods .••«.............
559
Nondurable g o o d s..... .
hO.O
89
N onraanufacturing ............. ..... ..
518
39.5
W holesale tra d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
hO.O
86
Ratal1 trade
hO.O
107
Finance
.
. __ .
.
39.0
219
SenHces
20
ho.O

16
16

h

_

2

27

16

h

.
.

_

h
17
8

;

23
1
20
5

h
5
5

6*
1
52
37
15
12

11
2

18
lh

3
8

2

1

.
•

“

-

i

See footnotes at end of table.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate,




hlli
196
83
113
218
10h
82

1* . 0 0
7

11

1* . 0 0
7
1* . 0 0
8

1*6.50

23
10
2
8

1* . 5 0
6

11

13

1*9.50
39.50

11

13

38

31

39

11
6

16

20
8
12

5
27

3
13
15

12

15

lh

9
1

3*
1
9
3
6

25
22

3

31
18

U
lh
13
13

35
13
5

18
3

8
22
2

3
15
15

8

3

1+
2
2

1
1

h

2
2

2
1
2
3^

—
-

5
r

1

2

1
1

1*
1

5

3
3

-

1

6

O^lce O fu tlO d. - Cantinumt
ccM a H
J

Table A-lj

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Wis., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Av er a g e

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

.0
Wel
e k y W e l Under §2 5 J5.00
eky
hus
or
erig 8
anns
( t n a d ( t n a d 3 .0
S adr) Sad r ) 25

1 . 0 £0.00
75

£2.5 0 £5.00 £7 5 fo.oo §2 5 §5 .oo
.0
.0

3 . 03 - 0Uo.oo U2.5 0 U50 1*7.5 0
50 7 5
*0

50.00 52.5 0 55.00 5 7.50

1.0 lo.oo I2.5 0
75

£5.00

1 . 0 7.0 7 .0 7.0 10.00 fc.00
7 5 00 2 5 50

6 .06 . 0 65.00
00 25

67.50

7.0 7 . 0 7.0 8.0 85.00 9 . 0 ?5 .oo
00 2 5 50 00
00

1.0
50

lo.oo

and
over

Women - Continued
Clerks, payroll .....................
Durable goods ....... ......... .
Nondurable goods •••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturlng ....... ........ .
Public utilities * •••••••••••••«•••
Wholesale trade ................
1 trad* T......... .........
Duplicating-machine operators ........ .

Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••

60
0
21
3
196
13
7
6
7
2
3

uo.o
UO.O
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o

202

UO.O

16 S
15
22

U°*o

3U
5
21
7

.0
UO.O U8 5
.0
uo.o U9 5
o*oo
Uo.o i 5
3. ■U70
95 .0
5
3. UU.0
95
.0
Uo.o U7 5
5
3 , Uo.0
90

H2 ~
7

U6.00
U7 0
.0
uilso

3* 3* 0
95 9 5
3. Uo.oo
85

Key-punch operators ....•......... .
Manufacturing ................... .
Thirahla crnodn
Nondurable goods ......... ...»•••
Nomanufacturing ..................
Public utilities #
Finance **

207
6U

Office girls....... ...............
Manufacturing «••••••••••••«•••••••••••
Durable goods ................. .
Nondurable goods •••••... .
fni.ifi^yn
fnnniq<ilg
pjnance **
_ r-T___ -t-trt
_

228
3. Uo.oo
95
15 7
uo.o U2.0 0
13 Uo.o UU.00
1
UU
3. 3. 0
95 65
7 3. 3 .0
1 90 65
3 3. 3 . 0
8 85 7 0

8
3

22
U8

Secretaries ............. .......... .
1 29
.5
Manufacturing ••••••....... .
.m
Durable goods ............ •••••••
51
3
Nondurable goods ...............
2 U6
U8
2
Nonmanufacturing ........... ......
+«
|
1
p 4 ntitttttimtiii
1
3
0
Wholesale trade •••••••...... .
112
no
Retail trade •••••••••••••••••••••••
Finance ** ................. .
17
5
Services •••••.... .
7
3
Stenographers, general •••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing
Durable goods •••••••••••••••••••«..
Nondurable goods ...... ...... .
Nonmanufacturlng... •••••••••......
Public utilities * .. . .
.
Wiolssala trade ....................
PCta.ll trade .......................
Finance *» ........... .........
Services

_ ,10 U
2

1 17
,2
75
8
32
U
97
7
15
2
2i6
i
19
0
37
8
no

_
_
-

_
_
-

8
7
U
1 ?? 9
9
2
7 1 73 6 Ui
5
6 6
3 6 U5 2
8 6 5
U
9 2 3 3
1
22
U
5 3
3
•

3.
95
UO.O
UO.O

3.
95
3.
95
3.
95

62.00

6 .6
35
6 .0
U 0
62.00
60.00
66.00

5.0
85
5.0
25
38 .0
66.00
U05 5 . 0
. 85
UO.O
UO.o

UO.O
UO.O
U0 .0

U8 5
.0

5.0
05
5.0
05
3. 5 . 0
95 0 0
.0
Uo.o U6 5
Uo.o U9 0
.0
05
Uo.o 5 . 0
U05 U2 5
.
.0
3. UU.0
90
5
U1 .0

U6.00

2
2
2

2

m
-

10

1
5

2

-

_

8i
1

n

R
3

-

10

10

10
2
2

1
2
1

l

U7.0 0

66

10
8

5 .0
05
5 .0
00
5
i.oo
U85
.0
5.0
15
5 .oo
5
5 .0
35

u
3
1
7

2U
22

1*
8
1
2

3 3
3 0
3
0
1 2
6 9
1

22

1
3
13

2
5

32

2
5
3
7

20

6

.
-

-

*

.
.
-

20
10

.

9
5 1
6

2

2U
12
2U
2

U

1

u 1
7

8
1

10

2

.

iU

6
6
6

6U
^U
6U

1
1
1

U5

UU
Ul
Ul

20

1
8
ST
1
6

1
1

.

9

U

.

1
6

3
3
3

u

7

3--- T
2
3
1
1

_

2
2

8

3

2
1

5
5

1
1
1

u

_

u

„

_
_
_
_
_
_

3
6
1
5
u 9
3
3 3

31
12

21

3
3

9
7
7

11
8
8

6
1U
9
x --- 8 — jT
8
6
lU

2
2

3

1—
8
16
2
2
1

1

11+
lU
lU

2
1

3

n

9
2

2

1

1

1

13

13

|

2

2U

I
t
1

1

_

13

1
8
1

.
_

-

1
1
1

5
1

2
1
1

i

1

1

1

1?

i

2
6
2 1

.

_

3
7 6 !2 100 6 9 5
7 5 3 19 7 7 7
1 3 2
Uo
9
5
5 3 5
2 2 U 77 7 3 6 3
9
3 8 2 U
8 7 7
21
1 Ul 1 2 2
7
3 Uo 3 3 12 20 1
1
7 9 O
7
1
i
c
12
C
c
p
8
10
10
1 I
23
7 6
3
9 6 11
5 _1
3 8 1
3 U
3 5 9
10 5

n

10

2

2

10

2

2

6
5 5 77 5
3
5 1 U2 5 25
2 3
3
3 2 Ul 19
6 5
16
6
7 12
8
1 1 2U 2
3 3
1
O
X
£
*
2
7
2
3 1
8
7 1U 26
-

2

2

-

1
5

21
10
6

iU
r-T

2
2

5
3

£
U

U
11

_

6

n

6

5

3

_
U

2

2

.
.
.
.

_
.
.
.

1

l

-

_
.

1

_
_

2
2
2

13
12
1
1

U
9

12
2
2

lU

n

-

22
19
8

2 3
5 1
1 3
7 0
1 1 21
5 3
9
7 u

2U
22

6

1 5 U3 IU6
6 3
-i 5
3 8 1 5
9 9
-1
1
2
9 U8
-1 5
2
6
10
1
1 U5 2U 8
3
7
10
.
1
28
3 2
2
10
10
U2
6
3! 6 1
9 7 9
2
1
3
U
"
7 8

-

6
0
3
6

1
1*

5

1

U?
Ui

2
1

5 U7
7
Ul - ~ u r

16

7

lU

1
3
1
3

7
7

u 3
2

-

22

26 1

9

2

5 2 | 22
6 7
36
2 CT
1
5
1 i 1 10
9 6 s
1! U
7 7
7

U8

8
8
13

6

22

U

2

3

n

8

5

-

1
8

li

U

2

-

2
5

n

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2

5 5
5 7
3 3
6 3
3 10
0
6
23
1 2U
9
10
7

27 23 ? 31 2U 3 1
6
5 2
1 8 198 1 6 158
1 3 5
86
1 1 6U 6 15 13 9 k
8
2 5 2
22
6
5 U3 3 6U
6
3
1
7 1891 1 2 5 13 9 13
3
8 6
a
1 3 1 1
13
8 9
1
2
9 u 3 2 86
8
3 b
6
12
5 12 1 1
6
51
7 7 U5 2 UO
3 1
7
$
31
12
21
1U
1
9

2U !

9

7

185
n 8

15 1
106

20
2U

lU

7
2
U6
6
7

7
U
3
2
U5

1

12
6

21
1

6

7

102

9

•

3
2
3
0
2
3
7

7

2

1*

1

3

1

I?
f

7 3
1 0
5 2
1 7
20
3
3 1
1 k
5
5
1
7 y
U

12
12

1?
16
6
10

3
3

1
1
1

.
.

.
.
.
-

1
1
1

.
-

_

_
.
.
.

_
_
.
_|

_

7

O fy ic e O c c u p a tio n ^

T»bi* A-i:

-

C o n tin u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Wis., by industry division, March 1952)

A
Sex, occupation, and industry division

v

e

r

a

g

N U M BE R OF W ORKERS RE CE IV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E AR NING S OF—

e

Number

of

Under h . s o 3

5 . 3 0 7 0 . U 5 0 0 . U 0 2 0 . U 5$ 5 0 . to ? o 7 . 5 0
& & . . 5& 0 0. 0 0& .0
$
3 2 . 5 0
3 5 . 0 0 U 03 .7 0. 50 0 1 * L 5 2. U .0 7 05 . 0 5 0 5 52 .0 5 5. 5 00 . 0 5 0 7 0 . 5 0

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

5io.OO &
0
6

0 .

.

5& . 0 0 &
0

0

06

57$ 0 0 . 07 02 . 7 5 * 0 5 . 0 0

.

7 .6 52 0.

5

&

. 9 0 0 0.

0 0
0 .6 05 0.80.00 7 8 2 5 . . 5 9 9 0 0 0 .

07

07 05 .

0 f

0

e . 9o 5o .

9 05
0over .

0

0

0

0

Woman - Continued
9

Stenographers, technical......... .....

8

Manufacturing ....... ........... .

IB

Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••.......
Finance «* •............ .

2 0
1 8

Switchboard operators
.............
Manufacturing ....... .......... .
Durable goods ...... ••••••......
Nondurable goods ....... ...... .
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••.
Retail trade ..................
Finance *• .............. ......
Services ••••••••••••••••... .

2

5 8
7 7

Switchboard operator-receptionists .......
Manufacturing •••••••.......... .
Durable goods •••••............ .
Nondurable goods ••••.......... .
Manmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••
Public utilities * •••••••••••••••..
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••.•••«
Retail trade ••••... ...... ••••..
Finance ** •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Services ................. .

1 * 5 5
2 1 7
1 2 5
9 2
2 3 8
2 7
9 0
3 U
5 7
3 0

62
1 5
1 8 1
5 0
2 1
U 9

$
3 9 . 55
U O . O5
3 7 . 55
5

U
3
9
9

. 0
. 0
. o
3. 70 .

U
U
U

O .
O .

U l .

O
O5
5
5U

U

U
0

6 .

U O . OU
3 9 . 5U
3 9 . 5U
U
U
U
U
3
U

O
o
o
9
o

5 .
5 3.
3 .
U
7 U.

i

5
0
5
0.
O

0
0 0 0 O. .O
-U 7 .
1
0 0 5 o U- U .
0 0 ** ,

Transcribing-machine operators, general ..
Manufacturing ...... •••••.... ••••«••
Durable goods •«.•••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods ... •••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade ....... ••••••••.
Finance ** ...... ....••••.... ••••

Transcribing-machine operators,
technical ....... .

9
5
3
2
3
1

6
9
8
1
7
7

U 0 7
2 l i 6
1 9 U
5 2
1 6 1

u ii
5

8

2 7

U
u
U
U
3
3

o
o
o
o
9
9

. go 3 « g 0
. 5o 2 . 5 0 . o5 5 . 5 0 . Uo 8 . 0 0 _
. 55 U . 5 0 . 55 2 . 0 0 “

.
.
.
.
.

8
8
9
3
8
8
2

U O .

OU

5 .

9
O
i
9
8

3 2
1

1
'
- 0 0
-o

o

"




U
1

8
0

1
U 3 u 1 .3
8
9 i - i
1
!
9
U ;

. 0 0
u. o0 . 0
. 5 0
. 5 0
. 0 0
. 5 0
. 5 0

5

0

•

_
-o
.
-

L
!
i

1 11 5 6
19 1
U
2
2
•

lU
-1

U

U
1 0
•
1 2

5
19 ^
17
.2
3 6
8
8
8

9k

7
i f 2
3
1 9
5 2 6-2
1
IU
3 7
08 0 3 1
U
- 1
•
2
1
s1
1
1 5
1 0
1
6
1 1
1
3
3
* | 8
63

-8
2

_ 2_j
-

-

2
-

2

u
3
3

.

2
2
2

•

i

1 1
8
5
3
.3
i 1

|
l j * , 2 9 - ho
1 2
u
25
1
7
n
!
3
1 0
17
1 5
3
1 0
U

2

See footnotes at end of table.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
«* Finance, insurance, and real estate.

*

-

8
1U

2 3

8
7

2

1

5

.
2 6U
1
_
3

6
U
U
. 1.
2

.
6
“

6 0

U
1
0
1
3

n

28

25
20
5

2 U

U

2 33 2
2
1 8
3
1 1
0
U
5
8

2
2 !
.
*

9
9

”

l U
i i
8
3
1 6 3
1

1
”

6

1 6
i 5
6
1
.

-

.

3

“

1
1
1
.
.

7

1_

9

69
6

?
3

6
3

7
7
7
2 .
-

5
2

6
•
1

1

1

6_
_

1
1
1

_
.

2

1

01
.
-

0
9

1

1

0

3

_
.

3
2
1

.
2.

2

_
_ _

_

_

1
1

_

1
1

_

1
1

n

8

-

_

_

2

I_
_

•

__

.
•

} 1 1 2

9
5
U

1
1

2

1

_

_

l

-

2

7
2
5
0 l 1U 3

9

u

1 3
8
5
“3

2
9
9

1

1 8
8
2
1

n

1

3

I
1

U
U
5U
OU
5U
5U
5U

3
U
U
3
3

9

3
3

1

i
1

1
Tabulating-machine operators .............
Manufacturing ...... •••••••••••••••••
Durable goods •«••••••••••••••••»•••
Nondurable goods ••••••..........
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••
Finance **

1
1
-

.

-

2 U 6 6 . 39 5 0 U 8
l . 5O
5 5 . . o o
1
1
_
.
o o
1
.
.
95 . 0 52 6
8
0 0 5
3
U 7
13 19 . 356 0
O . O5
5
__
O 0 . 0 O_
U
2
2 3
“U 3 . " o o “
i

5 .
7 .
8 .
6 U. o
U

. O
. 5U 5 .
. Uo i .
. 0
. 5U 3 .

0
0 o .
0 0“

U

•
•
1

%

2 5
2 l 3!

10
10

6

U
-

a
I B

1 16 1

1 83
1 9
1 0
5

15

8

1 1

31 _
2
2
1
11

n

o
U
U

7
5
2

6 3

_

9

6

6 7

1 6

3

6

21
1 8
2

1

5

5

_2

7
3

3 5
8
1 8

n

2

u

17

U 19 U
U 1l2
2
3
2
6*

1

1 2

l U
1 2
n

12
1

0

1
92
1

2
-

10
10
9
1
_2

8
7
6
1
1
1

1
1

1
.1
.
•

1 U _
1 3

n

1

1

1

-

•

3

-_

-

_

1

.

_

8

_

-

_

_

.

1
1
1

|
.
_

_

_

Office GcatpatiOHi - Continued

Table A-l:

8

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Vis., by industry division, March 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY E ARNING S OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
;
$
0
3.03.03.0 U0.00 U25 U5 U75 50.00 5.05 .05.06 .0 62.50 6 . 06.07. 07.07.08.08 .0 1 0 0 5 0
25 50 75
5 0 75 . 0 25 50 00 5 0 9 . 09 .0
. 0 .oo .0
25 5 0 7 5 0 0
and
90.00 :
95.00 over
35.00 7.0 U0 0 U2 5 U50 U7 5 00 2 5 50 7 5 0 0 2 5 50 7 5 0 0 2 $ 5
00
75 .0 .0 .0 . 05.05.05.05.06.06 . 06.06 . 07.07 t 07 tOO 8.0
$

U
l

$

8

$

Wel
e k y W e l Under
eky
(tnad (tnad ♦
Sadr) Sadr)

CD

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Vo—n - Continued
Typistsr class A •••••••••••.......... .
Manufacturing .•.•••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods ................ .
Nondurable go^ds #TTT*rTTTTrr, trr-Nonmanufacturing... .....•••••.....
sealf trad*
Ratal 1
Finance * * ............. .......
Services ......................

60
U
33
7
30
U
3
3
27
6
2
7
2
9
18
2

6

-

U r w

.

.

2
2
2

U

I
.i
-

.
-

50.00

i

5
8
8

Ul.0
5
Uj.oo
Uo.o ! U3 0
.0
Uo.o ! U2 5
.0
3. ; 3 . 0
95 9 5
Uo.o
U2 0
.0
Uo.o
U3 0
.0

l3 2 2 1
6
jo
6
1
2 3
6 U
U
U
U
2
7
5 13 10
0 3 6
- I 1
8
- ! 9! 1
9
0
9 1
3 . 39 .50 5
95
3 . 3 .0 U1 1 7 ! 9
90 70
0
5
Ul.o
U1.0 0
8 1
8
U
UO.O

uo.o

9
8
Uo
3
8
2
5
8
1
3
2
U
1
6
19
9
X3
5
9
0
U5
6
U
10
3
2
3
5
1
U

2 3 7
7 2 0
<T 1
7
6
8 1
1
U
1
1 2 5
3 U
3
8 1 3
1 3
0 9
U
1 5
8
20 UUo : 22
9
7
1 0 20 1U
7 8 6
1 U 1 2 19
5 7 1
1 18 U5
6 0
1 0 10 1 8
2 6 0
1 2 1
3 1 2
5 ! 3 i U1
3
1 1; b
0 7
9 6 3
2 U
1
~
2 20
5

-

52 I
00

55 uo.5

1 88
,8
Typists, class B ...............................
Manufacturing................. .
riTTO"
Durable goods ......... ..........
7
UU
28
9
Nondurable goods... ...... .....
Nonmanufacturing... .......... •••••
86
U
Public utilities * ........... .
8
2
Wholesale trade
13
6
6
8
Retail trade.......... .... .
Finance * * ... ....... ......... .
U3
8
Services •••....... ....... ......
9
5
V
y
*
**

5 .0
05
5 .0
20
5.0
20
U8.00
U9 5
.0
U9 .50
U7 0
.0

Uo.o
Uo.
6
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.
5
U20
.
UO.O

9
0
5
2
5
0
2
3
8
2
U
8|
9
7
7
U
5
U
2
0
2
3
Ui
1l
0
3
3
3

6
2
UO
2
6
1
U
2!
2
1
0
9
2!
8
3
6
0
3
2
2
8
2
3
1
1
2
7
3

7
1
5
2
6I
1
91

U6

12 !
2
Uo ;

3
8
3
7
1
2
1
1
-

5
5
5
2
8
3

9
U
7
2
7
0
2
1i
2
u
7
1! 1
2i 9
1
U
1
3 8
8
1
3 1 1
1
1 -:
U6

-

-

1 1
5 8
1
6 1
6 1
1
9 7
8
1 1i
6
2
1! .
1 .
.
1 .
1
_
“;

-'

*

9 1
3 3
6 1

2

2
2

.
.

_
.

.

.
.

.

_

_

_

_

1
1| 1

5

-

_■ _
.
.
.
_

_
_

_
.
_
.
-

„
-

-

1 ---

»
_
.
.

.
_
_
.
_
_
-

-

_
«
e
- ! -

_

i

i

1

_
.
-

!

_
-

-

1

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

1

.

.

-

'

-

_
_

_
_

_

- ; -

1

H reflect the w eek for w em
ours
orkw
hich ployees receive their regular straight-tine salaries an the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
d
All w at $30 to $32.50.
ere
Transportation (excluding railroads), com unication, and other public utilities.
m
Finance, insurance, an real estate.
d

Table a-2j PnefeidiCHal and technical GccupcUiond
(A
verage straight-time weekly hours and earnings ]/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in M aukee, Vis., by industry division, M 1952)
ilw
arch
N UM BER OF WORKERS R E CE IV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM ^ W E E K L Y EAR NING S OF—

A verage

Sax, occupation, and industry division

Number

of
workers

$

Tracers
M
anufacturing .
Nurses, industrial (registered)
M
anufacturing ...................
D
urable goods..............
N
ondurable goods ........ .
Nonm
anufacturing..... •••••••

132
130

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1$

$

$

$

i

$
Uo.o
105.00
U070... W .O O -

68U
55IT"
633
21

Uo.o
UO.O
UO.O
U i.5

81.00
80.50
80.50
77.50

UU6
...U39...

Uo.o
uo.o

65.00
6F.0CT

97
— W~

Uo.o
Uo.o

UO.O
.. U070 ""

50
50

s

$

$

and
U2.50 U5.oo U7.S0 50.00 52.50 55tOO 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00105.00 110.00 115.00 over

U0.00

D
raftsm chief
en,
M
anufacturing .
D
raftsm
en
M
anufacturing ...•••
D
urable goods ...
N
ondurable goods
Draftsm junior .
en,
M
anufacturing
Tracers
M
anufacturing .

$

s

%

Under U
0.00 U2.50 U5.oo U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110. 0c 115.00

Weekly
Weekly
earnings $
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

2
2

1

.

.

-

-

f

-

_

1

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

2
2

U
u

13
13

13
13

8
8

! 13
| 13

9
8

9
9

10
9

9
9

50.00
50.66

2
2

1 1
| 1

U

12
12

10
10

60.00
W &T
59.50
59.50
65.00

i_

-

9
9

2
2
2

-

-

_

3
3
3

6
6
6

§u
5U

18
18
18

57
55

2?
2U
22

2
3
3

52.50
55-.50

216
Uo.o
201 ' roro
Uo.o
156
Uo.o
U5
Uo.o
15

„
-

1

-

-

-

*

”

9

-

-

j

-

1

•

_

,

_

_

_

_

16
1U
11
11 i

3
3

9
9

28
25
21
U
3

18
18
11
7

_

3°
3°

"

_

1 1
1
1

3
3

j

6
U
O
Uo

j
2
2 1

37
37
31

26 i U5
25
1*5
_

”

:

13
13

2
2

7
7

2
1

u
u

118
117
117
-

x?9
1U
6
1U1
5

128
121
119
2

62
57
5

36

73 I Ul
72 i Ul
1

26
25

3
3

_

_

-

-

~

•

*

•j

i
*

!

! 17
16
j 12
:
U
1
i ________
_

_

s
5 i

-

l

”

U
9
;
U
B
25
3U ! 21
1U
i
1 ; k

9
9
6
3

_

“

_
l ________

•

i
22 ; n*
18
13
12
i iu
1
u
1
1

1
16
lit
12 !
2
2

-

ill

26
25
25

3
2
2
-

_
.
.
-

k
3
3

_

_

_

■

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
*
2 |
2
2 j

_

11
11

1

.

.

.

■

1

.

;

-

_

.

.

“

- ;

!

1

.

.

•

i
1

:
; k
!
■ u !

U6
U6

60 |
5U
53
1

36

30
29

i

?

9

iu
iu

•

.

:

_

_
“

.

•

j

_
.

“

i
________

1/ H reflect the w w for w em
ours
ork eek
hich ployees receive their regular straight-time salaries an the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
d




Occupational V Survey, M aukee, Vis., M 1952
age
ilw
arch
U DP RMN O L B R
.S. EAT E T F AO
B
ureau of L Statistics
abor

9
mo* a-3 : Maintenance and Powob Plant Occupation*
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Wis., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O
ccupation and industry division

N anufactoring
onm

?58
781
622
159
177

D
urable goods •••••........
N anufacturlng
onm
M
anufacturing ...........................................
nnnhl* M ria
A
Hiwm Ka sivH - . . . a I ie 1
ia
. ..*
^

Firenen. stationary boiler
T M iwahl a

...................... .

_ _. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Nondurable goods
Wa —

.................

U^ iaI a

a a

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ______. . . . . . . . .

I*

Helpers, trades, Maintenance
Manufacturing
Hoadorable £oods

#•••••••••#•••••••#••#••••••

Machine-tool operators, toolroom

......... ........

Durable goods
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
••••#•••••••••
Maintenance men, general utility
Manufacturing •••#•••••••••••••••••••#••••••.•
.

Thil^nW cr/w), . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
l.
VnnAiiiahl, cm fifl
A

Noomanufacturing
Public utilities
U K n l M ,1 « t.radA

v
Nobr Auly
uf e h en e
m
*2.50
o rg
£ 2 5 £.30 L x ^40 £.1*5 f.50 £.55 £.60 £.65 £.70 £.75 ueo £«s £.90 £.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 £.20 £.25 £.30 £.35 £.40
wrk er ina O d
o en ea g n ei
and
1(0
it30 1,35 V 1.45 u?o 1.55 U60 U6? U70 it 75 1,80 U85 If90 L95 2,00 2.05 2,10 2,15 2,20 2,25 2,30 2.35 2.40 2. 11? 2.50 ever
$
1
7
4l4 1*94
9 10 20 33 56 79 37 27 7 1 24 41 1 1 1 5 30 24
- - • • •
• ~ST ~nr “ BT"16"~W i f
281 1*94
1
~?7" T ~ T ^ 3 1 ~W • 1 3 3 —J5 — E
9
9 18
7 26 10 32 27
7
1 ii UL
a
J
199 1*90
*p ill
jj
9
5
2 17
to k
5
82 2#o
ID
p
w
1
1 17 28 52
20
133 1*95
3
7
- - - • - - - 1 - 1 - - 2

*

rftttttn im ittttttttttttttt

lO
li
317
133
184
97
31
596
493
272
221
103

24
30

2.06
2,01
2,00
2,06

2,26
1,88

1.89
1*90

m

m
“

•
•
•

.

.

•
•

•
.
•
•

•

m
•

•
•
•
•
•

m

•

•

•

m

-

1

m

1.63
1.65
1,64
1.65

\j Z
q

22
i4
12
2
g

1^50

2
2

8

3
3

21
21
21

2

✓5
|j

7

1.96

1,113
794
319

2,09
2.05

440
353
282
71
87
35

1.76
1*76
1.75

2.16

19
18
10

9

3
1

87
&
9 26
12 27

•

•

*

2
2

2
2

_
-

.

•
•

•
•

•
•

m •
- •

1
1
1

2

1

3
1

9

1
•

.

•

•
.

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

1
•

?

9

2
1
1

3
•
p

14

12
6
6
2

45
45
9
39

8

3
3
5

•
-

.
-

¥> 95
46 95

68
68

6
6

2
2

6

14

—r
5
l

9

•

9

39 35
25
30

16

m
7

f

10
10

1

•

1
1

1
1

•
13

4
1
1

42
9
1

• 8
32/ 33

1

1

.

•

\

3
1

1

•

_

-

-

.

•

•

-

•

•

•

•

„

•

.

.

«

•

>.

•

•
•

K3
>
103

68
68

•

•
-

•
•

«
-

-

•
-

.
-

•

2
2

m

1
1

•

_

m

2

•

m

45 25
45 25

•

•

9 44
9 44

1
1

•

6 44 62 71 86 52 90 107 67 59 149 282 37
r 30 H5F 71 "TIT~ fr 90 107 67 59 149 “252 37
5 26 47 65 65 37 90 307 65 59 143 42 37
9
1
15
9 19
2

14

29

✓

m

8
8

IS 55 17
*f
17
65 49 Xf
5
10
5 13 12
2
2
7 9
3

20

23
O

20
20
20

2
2
2

14

2

81 127
39
16

-

m

5
✓

29 53 27 4 3
28 31 8 r i r
9 31 8 26
23 19

67
7

21
21

5
5

3

•

•

23 - i48 53 42 20 41 29 86 14 13 19
r
20 16
l
30
79 i4 12 18
7 n
9
3 18
21 29 15 10
1 48
5
9
9 68 8 9
0 33
y !
7
_
25
22
23
*p 14 7
1
2
17

7
33

•

1.76

1.78
3*68
1.78

1
1

•
•

50 22 62 65 56 72 62 62
42 6 5 52 72
58
7 19 9 37 36 45 34 — f
34 27
19 15 36 28 16 27
31
4
24 3 20
28

£37
537

2.08

is 15 23 5? 66 54 61 69 61 101 136 ?6 113 . 30 29 n
•
10 21 44 65 ^ 1
60 67 60 91 115
108
- 10 20 38 59 43 47 59 47 91 115 50 33 • 5 •
• • •
• 1 6 6 8 13 8 13 •
18
2 75
• 5 2 8 1 3 1 2 1 10 1 24 5 30 24 11
18

26

1.55 14 15 7 9 4 49
6 81 r w
1.52 “ T 2
.
1.57
5 • 35 »
9
Q
1.46
46 17
y
1.96

2
2
2

3

1,89
1*85
1,89

637
435
261
17Ji
*f4

UP

1
1

67

63
31
5 3

1?
9
9

7
7

3

1

0

11

•

3

1

1

2

7

•

.

2

1

n

34

50
pw 29
j.O J*r
10
3 10

17

240

m 2
---

66

12
pa

7

m

Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2 13178 0 - 52 - 2




10

Taij1® a-3:

Maintenance and Powek Plant Occupation* - Cont inued

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Mis., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry d iv isio n

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)

N ber
um
of
w
orker*

136
75
61
1|17
*<),
2<

35

Avenge

hourly Under U25
earn
ing*
$
U25
L30

lx

1
-k g
1*85
le85
1.84
le 77
1.76
1.71
1.84

t
s
1
$
1
*
t
$
s
»
t
s
t
s
1
t
t
»
«
U35 U40 U45 U50 1.55 L60 1.65 1*70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 3.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 $
2.45 2.50
and
2
&C
a
5_
a
1*40 la 45 L 50 L 55 L60 L65 L 70 L75 LafiO 1*JB 1.20 1*95- 2 Q L2*01 2.10 205. 2 *2& 2a?5 l 0 Q -205 U iQ .1*45 2.^0 over
a

3
m

3

34

806
68^
113

1.95
1.97
1.78

340
327
263
64
wll

m

“

•

•

•

1
1

•

•

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

2.00
1.99
1.92
2.26

.
•

.
•

•
•

•

•
•

•
•

•
•

398
387
251
136

1*66
1.67
1.61
1.77

4
1
1

246

Hoftdtoor&blo goods •••••••••#••••••••••••••••••••

54
34
4
30
20
6

m

11
11
2
9

•

11 _23
11 2^
17
11
6

2
2
2

30
25

64
44

71
71

3

31
31
32,

9

43
43
43

23
23
23

17
17
15
2

34
34
21
23

35
35
27
8

29
29
23
6

37
29
26
3

4?
48
39

5
5
5

5
5
5

26
26
26

4

•

•

•

2
2
2

11
11
11

3
3
2,
2

13
13
13

27
20
2
18
7
7

18

•

21
33

11
2
2

6
6
4 — 5~
4
2
2
2

17
14

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance
Manufacturing
Durable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • # • • • • • • •
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • # • • • • • • • • •

123
214
96
18

2.03
2.o4
1.96
2.44

2
2
2

10

Tool-and-die makers • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Manufacturing

1,422

2.13
2.13

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
31 at $2.50 to $2.60; 1 at $2.60 to $2.70; 1 at $2.70 to $2.80.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

9

5

9
9

2

2

4

22
17
16

It
■y
8
8

38
37
24
23

30 16
6 15"
t
36
3
2

5
3

6
5

4
3
3

7

70
62
6l
8

17
17
17

2
2
14
•u*
12

10
3
3

7

21
21
17
4

9

5
5
4

26
26
1

1

4

9<

9

10
10
3

4

21
21

78
78

w

52 18
5* I B 50 18
2

51
5i
51

29
29
15

12

.
•

•
•

•
•

.
•

•
.

16 28 31
14 i r “ T
st
14 26
u

7
3

2
2

71
39

•

2

to
37

1

J

7
1

1
.
U

40
40
40

2
2,
2,

24
91.
24

7

7

35
14“

14

-

•

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

.

•

49
I18
SO

•

-

.

•

•

A
•

A
.

-

•

A

i.
uii u

10

•
•

1

— 44
ag

9

O
y
0
y

1
2;
2

3
1
3
4
3

332 169 133 238 188
332 159 133 i t 15B"

•
•

t
X

t9

0

14 15
6 ^ —f r
V

1

44

.1 5
•

16
jy

7

4

•

■V f

14

2

7

6
3
3 ---^
3
e
7

4
u

-

OP

2

9
9

13
23

2

65
65
61
4

•
•

m

■a
3
a
3

3
1

85
85

4

1

78
78
70
8

49
48
39
9

27 86
27 1 5 "
2
27
84

4
4
4

4
1

m

L
a

9
9

9

2.02
2.02
1.97
2.13




25

20
20
20

U

291
260
181
79

*

3

11
11
10

12
12

5

Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « . •
Durable goods
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1/

1

4

Oc

1.96
1.93
1.87
1.99
2.00
1.84

" c j Workers were distributed as follows:

17
17
16

40
24

84
76
86
4l

•

11
7
6

39 - U 39 54
25 36
14 18

Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VAnHnvflhl a
a*
... . . . . . . . . _
Vonmanofactaring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. . .
Public u t i l i t i e s * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

156

43
18
18

23

f

5
-

14 124 233
6
4 12
3
4 12
3
8 120 221
8 120 208

J

2
2
2

119
119

2
2
2

73 105
73 105

1
2
2

9
0
7

8
1 "

9

8

11

Table a 4:
-

G u&todicU, iV ateJuuU uify, a n d S /U p fu n p O eonpatiotU

2j

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area
basis in MilwaukeeJ Wis., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Num
ber
at
w
orkers

Occupation and industry d ivision

9
9
9
l
9
9
9
t
9
9
t
s
9
9
t
s
s
s
s
9
$
t
s
hourly Under 0.75 0 .8 0 0.85 0 .90 0 .95 1.00 1 .05 1.10 1 .1 5 1 .20 1.25 1 .30 1.35 1 .U0 1.U5 1.50 1 .55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
earnlogs
t
0 .75
1 .6 0 I .65 I .70 k i i 1.80 1 .85 1.90 M i j 2.00
f?0 ?95 1.00 1.05 1 .10 i a i 1 .20 1 ±2£ 1.30 h l l l.li0 l.li? 1.50
,80
Arwn§»

$

56k

1.68
1 .68

-W
m
329
105

1.U7
1 .U8
1.51
1.37

2,315
1 ,5 7 7
1,088
U89
738
111
7U
332
119
102

1 .3 0
1 .17
1.U3
1.22
1.16
1.29
1.21
1.11
1.26
1.02

9
9
2

2U
10
U

27
8
8
19
7

52
12
12
Uo
-

7

10

12

1.U25
377
23U
1U3
1,0U8
U*9
19
2U0
606

.99
1 .20
1.30
l.Oti
.92
•99
1.10
.90
.90

18

Order f i l l e r s ....................................................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................................
Durable g o o d s............... ............................. .............
Nondurable g o o d s ......... ..................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................... .......... ............................
Wholesale t r a d e ................................... .................
R etail trade .......................................................... .

1.890
922
7U5
177
968

1.52
1.52
1.58
1.29
1.52
1.U9
1.58

“

Packers (men) .......................... ..................................... .
Manufacturing ................................................................
Durable goods ...................... ............................... .
Nondurable g o o d s............................................... .
Nonmanufacturing ........................ ...........................
Wholesale trade ......................................................

MS®
T7555

1.US

2

Crane operators, e le c tr ic bridge (under 20 tons) ••••
Manufacturing • • • • • ........... ..........................................
Guards ................................... ........................ ....................
Manufacturing ............................................................. .
Durable g o o d s ...................... .................................
Nondurable goods . . . . . . ........... .............................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ................ •••••
Manufacturing ........................................................... .
Durable goods ........................ ..................................
Nondurable goods ................................. ..................
Nonmanufacturing........... ........................................... .
Public u t i l i t i e s * .................................................
Wholesale t r a d e .................................................... ..
R etail trade .........................................
FHnAnnn •## tTttTT__ T . . T T . T T T t t . . T T I , . T t . T i T . ti

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ......................
Manufacturing................................................................
Durable g o o d s .........................................................
Nondurable goods ................................................. .
M
mwumti f f.nH n^
it
t
PiiW
M «+.414 aa # ( (
(
(
( f
Uhnl a m I m t.mHA r t
r
T_ Ti - t r - TT i r - i « i « i
Rft+.al 1
i , i a, i,
, , ,, , , , , ,
,i.
Finance * * .............................................................................

56 h

-

612

335

666

35k

238
187

1.52
1 .6 0
1.37
1 .33
1 .3 0

10

_
* -

_
“
2k
-

7

-

-

18

7

18

-

2

-

-

*
.
-

"

2

2
7
—F T
2
5
2
”

17

lili
26
26
18
12

U3 100
- 15
8
•
7
U3 85
20
3
32 62

19

6

k

2
T

11

301+ U22 178
11
32
32
26
10 11
6
32
oq'J 390 1U6
Hi
71
2
11 60
37
77
69
3 233 276
-

-

1
-

1
-

“

16

-

U
12
10

-

-

i

2
-

h

8
— T

1
6

21
7 68
39
i r “ 3 “ “ 58” ~ W
21
28
5
3U
_ liO
li
•

?o
8

26
17

8
82
70
2
3
7

17

19

10

10
10

9

??
29
22
7
u

3

2

19

U8

10

?6
16
16
20
12

~

8

27

12

17
lli
•
lli

30
18

-

5
5

2
2

2
~

12
12

101
101

28
28

53

U7
“nr
39
2

39
17
22

23
rT T
23

~ W

22
27

20
19
Hi
5

2? i l l
25 111
2U i l l
1

71
32
19
13
39
35
li

127 i? 5
76
16
73
60
19
51 103
li9
71
2
32

?
9
9

11
5
11 ^ r
11
5

?U
9li

33
33

70 iuu
70

8
31 1U
b “I T - n r
8
31 1U

25

13
11
9
2
2
1
_
_

25

7U
66
U8
12
1U
7
3

3U
23
22
1
11
11
.
.

10
7
6
.1
3
2
.

97 166
u7 19
U7 15

86
10
10

36

126
30
30
8
3U 96
18
3U
16
62

10

82

5U

9
1

82
-

U6
8
-

2 .00
and
over

■

8
8

12
12

12
12

3U
3U

U
2
U2
U2

-

.

.
-

•
•

3
_
3
3

1
i
1
.
_

.
-

.
>
_

«
>
-

3
3
3

k

5

7
2
-

-

6
6

5U 168 2li8 13li 157 160 216 215
125 211
96 T 2 F 161 "IHT T W
7 63 178
9ii 202
- 13
U8 91
26
56 159 178 153
73 198
U2 31 U5 28 12
7 50 152
21
27
U
70 lili
U7 105
29
35
59
9
25
13
31
18
2
8
Hi
2
5
7 10
13
.
21
2
2
2
1
li
U
5
u
_
20
20
1
1
1 20
29 61
29 11
5
1
1
q
8
63
5
5
7
5
7
7
1*
5 15
7
2
U5
37
8
29
8

9k

18
1
17
76
2

10
10
10

1

2

12
1
- “ir
- 12
“
“

“

2k

10

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), cconunication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
-

10

9

2

io
10
10
7
6

-

9
3
6

10

*
12
12

-

5

3

2

2
-

2li
5

2

19

17

2U
21

12
5

1U

6
6
8
8

3

72 192
52 50
li9 ~THTl“5 T w i
18
6
70
27
22
3li 33 69
21
3 10
53
2 10 18 li9

138 190 228
9li 112 120
83 105 120
11
7
78 108
lili
37 U8 a t
i
9 6U
7

-

89 133 llil
67
T 5 T “3 T
?3
28
61 68
U5
U5 51i
33 10
18
16
U0 12
18
8 12
16

nr

U

50 1U7
88
35
59
15

-

76
U0

~~~T“ BF
-

85

51

U3

99

U5
U6

53
53

82 Uo 16
U
77 — 55T“ 1 5 ----- T
2
77
35 16
2
5
5
5

30 76
- ar1
76
55 16
.
8
2
6
6

57

5

39
9
33"- J
38
9
.
1

2

3
2
2
1

Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Mis., March 1952
O.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12

Guitoditd, Wa>udtouU*u}, a n d Skipping Occupation* - Continued

Table a-4 i

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Milwaukee, Vlls., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
Occupation and industry division

a t

worker*

s
s
s
s
s
»
Under 0 .7 5 0 .8 0 0.8 5 0 .9 0 0.9 5 L o o 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 I .9 0 1 .9 5 1 .0 0
O
S
T
earning*
1
«rv3
0.75 .8 0
.8 5 .9 0 .95 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 over

944
857“
460
367
117
111

Receiving clerks ......... ................... .
Manufacturing ................... .......... •••••••

Retail trade ..................................

Shipping clerks ...................... ..............
Manufacturing ......................................
iiiiiiiiM iM M itnnTTTtTiiiim it
a

t t . tttTT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

...................................

UHnlaflala
Vm + ^ 4 1 4. » 4a
> ri
v

_____ ______. . . ____ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ___. . .
....................................

Shipping -and-j*ecefving clerks...............................
Manufacturing ••••••••••••«••••••••••••••••••••#••••
Durable goods ...................................
good** » T » » « » f I i l - I t * T » - T T “ T T - » t T * I T » T t
Nmmanufacturing ................................T..
Wholesale trade ..................................
Retail trade ....................................

Stock handlers and truckers* hand ............ .......
Manufacturing ......................................
Durable g o o d s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nondurable goods
Nonm&nufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PlllV| ^ l» llt.'j 1

^AA H

tT»TrTtT«tltt»t«ftt»T»tt»T»lIt

Wholesale trade .................................
Retail trade ....................................
S ervieaa »tT*t *» » » t » rt t TT#» *» t *rt r» » Tt TTT» Tr - T*» t

$
1 .1 1
1 .1 2
1 .1 9
1 .0 4
1.03
1 .0 2

369
203
157
46
166
102
61

1 .5 6
1 .5 6
1 .6 1
1 .3 8
1 .5 5
1 .5 7
1 .5 3

344
545“
153
89
102
75
23

1 .6 0
1.60
1 .6 5
1 .5 1
1 .6 1
1 .6 1
1 .6 5

485
3G T
192
112
181
104
34

1.6 3
1 .6 3
1 .6 4
1 .6 2
1 .6 2
1 .5 1
1 .8 2

3 .7 2 7
2 ,772
1 ,7 5 0
1 ,0 2 2

955
187
372
370
26

Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons)
• 699
ManufAflktinlng
— 55T “
Ditrahla gn/v) a
63
..........................
NntfHii^pAhlA g / w l m - T T ... ..
158
Nonmanufacturing ....t.....tt.............tt..t.t..f
478
W holseale tra d e t . t . rtTt1TT. . . T. . t t t t t r t t t f t t t t t t
129

ft**T T T -T T t**tT
T ttT T T T *ttfrrrtfT
rtr#tg
T T 1 TT .T
T T1 1 T .Ttllttl...tT .tT If.ttt
.1 T

1 .4 7
1 .4 7
1 .4 6
1 .4 9
1 .4 7
1 .5 5
1 .5 0
1 .4 2
1 .0 5

2

3

_

_

_
2
17
17

45
38
8
30
7
27

31
18
18
13
13

184
184
184

11
16
10

”

4
1

36
34
16
18
2

150
141
133
8
9
9

37
33
10
23
4
4

67
65
2
63
2
2

31
26
28

9
1
1

1
1

51
45
13
32
6
2

3
3

8
8

-

1
"

6
3

12
8

9
1

14
3
2
1
n
10
1

37
25
5
20
12
11
1

54
32
22
10
22
10
12

42
32
6
26
10
9
1

16
14

18
9

11
9

2

9

9

12
2

9

2
2

2

9

12
12
4
8

55
48
11
37
7

57
19
19

1
3

1

3

1

1

2
3
2
1

2

10

2
2
2

1
1

6
1
_

_

1

_

1
l

1

2

8

13

«•

14
14
4
10

8

20

28

15
4

10

11

12
8

78
19

1

3

1

3
1

1

23
12

5
7

101
88

155
94
29
65
61

3

8

13

4

5

10
18

19
59

11

8

1
12

4

5

5
13

2
53
4

6
3
2

13

2

1

5
— 1

46

1.5 3
1 .5 5
1 .5 2
1 .3 7

1
1

4

4

8

3
3

5
5
5

21
IV
17

19
5
5

4

14
14

4

5

2

2

1.5 3

1
8

10
8

_

2
5
4

8
4

3

1
2

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroad s), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .




197
ids
12
173
12
12

42
14
12
2
28
28

1

3
3

17

85
13

11

46
4

46
24

2

161 269 399
150 -3 4 r 3 9 9
55 151 306
97
95
93
21
11
10
1

2

465
345
278
67
120
63
57

286
200
186
14
86

23
23
23

2
2
2

25

32

20
10

20

47
19
17
■W
2
28
27
1

37
9
9

40
38

31
15
10
5
JO

2
5
4
1

20
12
10

44
44
16
28

49
49
i.Q
47

28
12
16

43
40

11
8
3
3
5

3

3

14
lt
i
Xif
1A
*4

18
15
3
12
3

'^

'_

19
11

10

8
1.
4
4

jJ2
32
31

8

36
22
22
14
11
3

40
28
28
12
11
1

186
97
93
4
89
1

29
48

84
4

660

572
466
106
88

59
42
38
L
4
17
11
3

36
28
20
8
8
2

10
8
6

10
g
4

g
£

4
4

125
xay

18
107
XVf

18
9
g
9
9

13

3

12

3

i
A

5

11
XL
J
a

*
!

7

5

3

2
2

2

63
49
49

330
2

2

14

36
2

12

3

7

1
2
2

7
8

j.
a

4
4

q
3

2
0
A

9

9

12 V
12
12

45

36
17
19
29
0

i/ 2 0

14

2

10
6
8 -------J
g
3

n
t

7

44
7
2
5
37

8
L
a

4
4

13
10
10

240
36 1 1 1
27 r t § “ 39
48
27
35
4
8
72
213
8
106
8
23
8
95
43

353
21
1A
xu
7
332
24

-

-

«

20
14
14 ------ g
iq
2
L
2
H
0
8
0
g
1
H

23
18
5

4

2

XX

I
,
H

11

86

19

3
2
2

1
1
1

4

43

19
19

38
24

5
5
5

16
1L
XO
16

333
351
2

5
C
5
c
2

13

Tbea-: GudtodicU, Wa^eiuuUUtff and S/UpfUHf OccupatiotU - Gontmum
al 4
d
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations
basis in MilwaukeeJ Wis., by industry

2j

studied on an area
1952)

dvao7March
ii i n

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

N ber
um
of

worker.

Awifi
3* 75
hourly
earning. Jnder

5.75

Truck drivers, m
edium ( l i to and including it tons) ••
Manufacturing ................................................ ...........

973

355
282
73
618

Public u tilitie s *

b75

U66
1 .6 3
1 .6 5
1 .5 b
1* 6 8
1 .7 2

12 b

Truck drivers, heavy (over b tons, trailer type) . . . .
Durable goods
Nondurable goods

UV? U 2Q L 25 UW

U 25 U 30 U 35 u b o

LhS

$

1
1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1.6 0 1 6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 $ .9 0 1 .9 5

,9 9

,9 5

-

-

IrtQ U< 5
Q >

1

1

16

L.35 L.bO l . h 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5

13
+

1

-JjL

•

-

-

-

1

l

1

•

16

17

-

1

-

16

b5
37
33

21

•

l.ft)

16
16

8

Truckers, power (fork-lift)
Manufacturing
]f«n—
ng * « ## # # ♦* ,« * » .# * ••••••••••«•••«•••
Wholesale trade

371

6
6

2
2

1.76
I.06

o
r

JO
JJJ
152

333

619
573

16
*

21

1/
2/
2

%/
*

/

603
" i

lf
it
40

lb
*

3b

•

73
29

8

b

b

T
— h --- 4T

a
j

b

36
16

m

20
20

21
21

27
27

b3
b3

bb
bb

l
4

4 *|2_

_ 1l

12 i

b

le U

12

i,

1.61
1,63

7

4

<

8

if-

lb

76

22

21

7

$

9
5

7
5

3
3

2

2

$
“ J
T
1
Is

H

3?
16

12
1
4.

38
2T
12

lb

11
+
22
22 H r
22

16
12

27

18

OJ,

4

X

L

16

32
29

12

26

1.
4

a

31

1+0

25

30
26
2

1.51

6

18
10

*

2

8
10
22

37

6b

3?"

b8

80
21

lb

28
18

T
O
lv
in
Xu

X

bp

39

3

7
1

Workers were distributed as follows: 19 at $2.05 to $2.10; 1 at $2.10 to $2.15.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

2a00 over

6

26

5

26
26

3

O
7

b
T
X
T

•

30
30

b9
19
»

an

1.0
4y

72b
10

71b

77

88

Ao
oy

8i

29

A
7
on
CJ
X

-JL __ 52. 1$
b3
111
14 ip
j

62

31
1
.
4

101

20 _23.
11
21
IT 21
AA
m

O
7

1
8

7

58
56
2

i t

1$

1 ).

39

ao

lift
40

8

35

b8

6— S

6

8

82

7— T
1
Tft
fo

68 111
68 m

•fC

lb
12

7
7

7
f

A
L

b
2b
b
2b ----- 4
20

22
22

2

b8

6
6

2
2

8

10
b 10

2
2
2

1
1

26
19

8

7
7

-M

1*

■O

1,
4

an
XU

X

2

4

9

8

8

L
4

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
.
.
^
A
__ A
Workers were distributed as follows: 9 at $2 to $2.05; 2 U at $2.05 to $2.10) 1 at $2.10 to $2.15; 10 at $2.15 to $2.20; 9 st $2.25 to $2.30; 12 at $2.30 to $2.35.
J




2.00

28

61

1.58
1.59
1.55
1.56

1 .1 s

33
b
.o
At J o
oj l|*7
60 bOl

1A
iw

1.80

1.26

b66
37

a

bb

1*7 il
7
■ M

W lii

76
76

21

2

1.73

W~ - t j r -

273
111

$2
bb
8

8

■1 70

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -111
Manufacturing ................................................. ...............................
282
Durable goods
251
N ondurable gorvla t f t t . t t . . ^ t t t t l l t l l l l , t t t t t l l (
31
Nonmanufacturing
39

W
atchmen .................................................................
Manufacturing
Durable goods
goods ••••••••••••••••••••*•«•••.«••

*J
1A
XU

1.67

Truck drivers, heavy (over b tons, other than
np ttTt ttiit ittatt tifn ■ ■ titittig
W
nraurm p+m
f* . H t i i i i f i t i t f t i f f i t n i i i i t i i i i i i M t
Ufita-n tmrin t1.ttttT,tftTIU1tl,tft|ttt,lftl,t

33

8

38
c
J

1 .6 5 1.7(1 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5

_ J 3_ 10 0

2)1
*4

38

b3

1.7b

115
767

s

and

>Q
9

1.77

21

L ,i9

1 .1 5

1.61

903
136

L.1 0

l
•

1 20

io 5

1.52

19

).8 0 3 .8 5 3 .9 0 3 .9 5 t o o

17
2
2

16
29
29

2

l

1

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations

Tmblm B-2071:

Candy 04ut OtU** Go4ifocii04i£A4f Product*,

1/

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers primarily engaged in manufacturing candy and other confections (Group 2071) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual (19U5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget* Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period*
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment*
(a) All or predominantly time workers*
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-336t

f

y

o

4

4

4

t

&

U

&

l

1/ N

,

O

+

u

f

f

&

l

A

O

U

*

.

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

y

$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
Under 1.1 0 1.1 5 1 .2 0 1.2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2.00 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2 .3 0
8
1.10
1.15 1 .2 0 1*25 1 .3 0 1.35 l.hO JU*5_ 1.5 0 JLaSi 1.60 1.6 5 1.7Q 1.75 1 .8 0 la£5_ 1 .9 0 1.95 2*90 2.95 2*19 2*15. 2.20 2 .2 5 2.30 2.1*0

$
2.1*C
and
over

All Plant Occupations
i
All workers ...... *.......... .......................
M e n ...................... ..................................................
Women •••••••••........... ..

979
950
29

1 .5 3
1.51*
1.1 7

68
g

1.3U
1*1*0
1 .6 9
1.1*6
1 .9 1

13
5
8

11
6
5

12
6
6

13
12
1

122
118
U

87
86
1

11*6
11*3
3

58
58
-

88
88
-

70
70
-

6
2

17

9

33
2
10
8
2

9

32

2

31*
31*
-

66
66
-

31
30
1

31*
31*
-

1*3
1*3
-

16
16
-

27
27
-

21
21
-

15
15

15
15

10
10
-

1
*
1
*

9
9

8
8
-

7
7

7
7

12
12
-

Selected Plant Occupations - Men
4nnaws en^ flpvt'lfi/lmita 1 / •

. . . . . . _. . . . . . _____ . . . . . . .

Time
Incontiv9 #••♦•••••••••••••••••••
Vitv*nflAm imnHmao \/m .................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M I dmi*o Ksn/1 KahaV l /s
a
i
............................. . . . . . . . .
f^ovia
AA 1/V\ . . . . .
W
..
......................... .............
holders, machine* Total •••••.... ................................. •*••
Tina
,
--iT
t
Incentive *.................................. ...
PA w
nyrm m mml Q1 l/m . . . . . . . . . .
sVa m AU f DATI < 7
S ....._____
IViinlrmas V rt/I 1 /a
i&
......
Uft^AVxwimm l/«
.....

y

2
/
3/

...
.. .

........
.....
.....
. . .

32
16
16
28
7
I
25
17
56
16
lo
*
26
20
c*
S J
n
$

1*62
1 .6 1
2.07
1.87
1*50
2 .0 1
1 .7 2
1 XI
1*30
1. V i
1
X. J10W

2

j

2
2
2

3
7
3

3
8

_

.

.

•

.

_

.

3

•

•

•
8
20
3
3

1

2

.

1

3

7
i
13

2
2
3
2
2
2

l*
i
3

c
5

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

3
3
2
3

3

7
•

. Th* »tudy covered independent nonferrous foundries (except die-casting foundries) with 8 or more workers.




2

3

2

7
7
i

2
2

3
2

2

7
7
I
m

?
i.
u
2
3
2

•
*
3
2
3
1

2
2

1

3

X

■
a
3

2

J
k

1
*
5

.
o

7

M
2

1
,
u
2

2

2

3

1
*
u

3

u

3
3

3

2

7

1

3

5

1

2

1

1
,
u
1
*

2
2

7

1

3

5

1

2

1

1
*

Data relate to an August 1951 payroll period.
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis.» ■ ?hT
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15

Table

B-3k63*

S tam p ed an d PleAAed M eted Productd> y

y
The study covered establishments with sore than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonautomotive stampings (Group
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a January 1952 payroll period.
y
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
y
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

3k63)

as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual

(19k5

edition)

M ackinV u} U ndnlPU ei 1/

Tmbie b-35:

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNING S OF—

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

$

$

$
$
$
$- $
1$
1$
!
$
Average
$
$ ^ $
l.kO 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 . 8 0 1.85 1.90 1.95 1 . 0 0 I.o5 1 . 1 0 1.15 2 . 2 0 2.25 2.30; 2.35 2 .k0 $
l
$
hourly Jnder(l.25 ( .30 1.35 J
2.k5 s2.50
earnings
!
i and
1.25
£/
1.30 (,
L.35 ltko |
l.k5 i*5o 1*55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1# 70 1.75 1 * 8 0 1.85 1*90 1*95 2 * 0 0 2.05 2 * 1 0 2*15 2 * 2 0 2.25 2.30 2.35!2.k0 2 .1*5 2 . 5 0 over
!
!
|
!

-

-

i
^Machinery y f

1

Men

!
j
2*77

*
1.99

-

256
221

T o t a l ................. .
T i m * ________ _____________
Incentive ...... .
Assemblers, class Bt Total .......................
T i m e .....................
Incentive .
Assemblers, class Ct Total
Time
Incentive
Electricians, maintenance k/a
Inspectors, class A k/a
Inspectors, class B k/a
Inspectors, class C T^a
Janitor#, porters, and cleaners iy'a
Assemblers, class At

1*80
2 .2 1

_

1,787
565

............ .........
...................... .
................................
.........................
..................... .........
..7....................................
.........................................
.........................................
.......................

1 ,2 2 2

1,327
105
912
280

237
2*81
279
561

1.95
1 .6 8
2 .0 8
1 .8 k
1.57
1.95
1.96
1*88

1.77
1.58
1.39

. ;
_
- i
-

i
|
_

-

-

-

. ! _
21
3

l
j
.
12
-1 .
1
3
9
- 5 ; 51 25
1
- - - 25 8
26
1 ! •
17
5
- -, . - _
- .
• 1
• ik; • 5 7
1
9
23
1* 13
ia i 51. 10 ;1 1 6 | 87

.

2

6
2

75
67
8
k
90 | 139
122
8 k;
6 ! 17
28
21k
170
13
10* 15
li!
7

2
21
10

39

37

21

22

S 18

15
k6 : 3 * 153
1
26 ! 15 1 2 2
20
19
31
H

!
_
.
i ; 8

7
23
132

6

30
78

l
!

1

•

12

56! 53
50 ! 33

13
29
9

1

1
1

See footnotes at end of table.




50
50

3
201

153
8k
69
k5

169
32
119
35
8k

___ 1

l

I
i

66
6k
2

63
31
32
60

1

12

-

kk
27

60
20

8

5
31
19

kk
19

16

n
5
86

7
79
75

29
25
k
71
3
68
11

.

75

11

21

28
71
38

27
37
2 k| 105
8 ! 17

1

18

30

12
292

2k

23

5k

68

5k

68
k8

5

6

_
292

62

.

33

158

_1

i

8

3

37

:

8

3
k2

37
98

38

k2
17

98
59

6

17

59

21

9

16

23
35

21

9
kk
_

16

6

31

-i

kO

79

31

12

10

kk
lk

-

16

kO
9

-

_
ia
k9
-

38

35

12

10
8

! Ik
2k

16

9

k9

79

.

62 1 5 8 ! k8
27! 15!
25
32
17
9!
531 211
k;

11
11

23

6

10

-

.

53
1

.

_

2

j

i
__________1

6

18
15

!
!

_

_
!
_

2

.

.
J

J

:

!

ia

-

.
_

_
_

_

_
i
6
-

_

_
_

_

-

-

-

1

_ _ _ -

1

[
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

m u

M a c U in v u f S n d u &h i e i if - C o n tin u e d

i-35t

Machinery

3/ -

s
$
N m er A era e E ar
ub
v g
*|
$
$
.25 $
.35 1 .1 0 1.1*5 f.50 1*.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 f.85
of
h rly ted L k.30 l$
ou
w ers e rn g
ork
a in s
L.25
y
l
1±2_ 1.1*0 1.^5 i.5o l*55_ 1,60 1j65_1*IQlia25_ 1*80. 1.85 1.90

t-1
H
•} 1 V«>
<. *O
U
T
O

N U M B ER OF W O RK ERS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E H O U RLY E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation and sex

Continued

|

2.20 $
2.25 *2.30 *2.35 *2.1:oJ$
2.1:5 ^.50
1.95 1.00 I.05 l.io 1.15 $
and
2,00 1*01 2.10 1*1£ 2,20 1±21 _2±30 _ jl25. 2^ 7.1*5 2.5C over
2
I
i
j
i
I

Men - Continued

{
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 5/s Total ................................
”

T i n e ............... ..................

Incentive ........................ .
Automatic-lathe operators, class A ij/b ............
Drill-press operators, radial,
class A:

T o t a l .................................. .
Time ............................. .

Incentive........ ................ .
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A U/b ..................... ........

Engine-lathe operators,
class A:

Total ....................................
T i m e .................................

Incentive .........................
Grinding-machine operators,
class A:

Total ...................................
Time .................................

Incentive .........................
Milling-machine operators,
class A: Total ...................................

%

1,523
17
*

1*98
1,81
2.09
1.95

_
.

178
87
91

1.82
1.70
1.93

_
_
-

_
-

263

1.99

-

-

381*
2li3
llil
U
32
132
300

1
.
1
-

.
_
-

12

8
1

6
8
-

2

3
3

1
1

35 108 158 128 19k 211 158 150 196
12 90 137 87 lk9 153 86 1:9 93
23 18 21 ia 16 58 72 101 103
2
2
1 5
3
7
| 3
8
8 15 15
5 !2
7 38 22
- ! 3
2
2 35 22
5 13
5
2
6
3
3 10
5I 9j
5
-

-

2.07
1.78
2.20

976

10
.
10
2

1
1

1.91:
1.66
2.08

2,1:99

_

k

3

12

2

_

class

A:

class B

5 /:

i h
I
1 k

1.91:
1.76
2.07
2.20

.
_

T o t a l .... ..............................
T i m e ..... ........................ .
Incentive ............................

536
185
351

1.97
1.82
2.05

_
-

-

-

2,187
616
1,571
6U

1.87
1.61:
1.96
1.92

1
1
*

.
■

11
9
2
*

10

259
90
169

1.85
1.62
1.97

-

-

-

-

375
127
2U
8
268
88
180
185
35
150
393
10U
289
36

1.86
1.61
1.98
1.85
1.65
1.95
2.03
1.70
2.11
1.90
1.61
2.00
1.93

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

- | - , - j - !
"

Total ........................ .
Time ......... .......................

Incentive .........................
Automatic-lathe operators, class B UA> ............
Drill-press operators, radial,
class B:

Total ............ .......................
Time .......... .......................
I n c e n t i v e ..................... ......

Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B:

Total ..........................
Time ......... ..............
Incentive ..................
Engine-lathe operators, class B: Total ............
Time ..........
Incentive ....
Grinding-machine operators, class B
Total .......
T i m e .....
Incentive .
Milling-machine operators, class B: T o t a l .... .
T i m e .... ..
Incentive ..
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class B h/a ....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including handT
screw machine), class B: Total ...................
T i m e ........... .
Incentive ...........

See footnotes e t end of table,




U66
98
368

1.80
1.65
1.83

8
2' 1
2I | 1

h

_

285
135
170
86

Machine-tool operators, production,

«,

k

T i m e ...................... .
Incentive ............................

Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A k b ••••
/
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
"
hand screw machine),

h

lk

_
- j
. I

- j

11
9
2

1
1

1
1

13
6
7

6
1
5

.
-

U

6
3
3
2

5

-

-

" j

5

10
10
9
7
2
2
2
2
2 22
2 21
1
“ j 17
7
10

1
_____ i

59
56
3

13
8
5

35
31

21:
19
5

k 38
f>
k2 17
k 21

30
17
13

17
8
9

1:6
30
16

23
8
15

3
1
2

13
13

k

29
29
-

26
17
9

33
29

25
17
8

U:
li
10

19
9
10

16
•
16

23
2
21

33

8
8

1
3

29

U
6
27
19
-

-

16

3k

7k

-

16

6

57
17
1

|

27

6

33
16
17
*

-

22

3

6

k

12

3

3

10
6

h

k

k

10
10
6

20
6

2k
7

9
9
19

U IS
3
18 i 18
25 30

19

28

19

28

79 159 280 173 127 n o 125 126 122 152 U3
_
1:5 113 133 100 55 31 2k
2
3k k6 11:7 73 72 79 101 121: 122 152 213
1
6
6
2
3
k
3
3
7 12
5

6
8

h

26
3

29
22
7
U
5
38
7
18
12
6
11
7
U
25
20
5
2

12 23 139
5 ! 9 27
7 : 11: 112
1

33
28
5
2

10
9
1
2

16
8
8
1

19
7
12

26
19
7

81
73
8

2k

16
8
27
9
18
21
17

k
h

3
1
36
21
15
2

hk
22
22

18 26
U 6
20
2
-

33

22
7
15
1

23 1
18 ! 11
k
5! 7
U 12 52
2 10 1:7
2
2
5
12 19 29
8
8 22
k 11 ! 7
2 3 10
2 8
2
3
11
8 27
8
k 22
k
3
5
11
6
5

9

n

26
22

3

9
”

23

20
17
3

2

6
i
6!

9

k
2
2

7

k

12 i
-;
12

1
99 i n 181: 98 1:7 25
1
1 n
98 110 173] 98 1:7 25
2
2!
1
1
•
!
1
•
2
li
1! 1
5
-'
j
2
1
1
1
:
5
j
2; 3
6
25 19 15

15

3

2

k

25
21:
1

125 196 11:7
17 69 11
108 127 136
7
1
:
-

?

1
.
1

!

-

-

“ ,

i
!
1

| - !

”

!

lk

k3

18
25

22
12
10

10
2
8

10
2
8
16

19
2
17
22
-8

2k

9

k

12

2k
9

5
23

k
19
1
26
11
15

10
5
5
10
_

10
10
20
1
19

|

7
7

21 71
- 21 71
1 3
.
*

1
1

1

5

13

5
5

.

k
9

7
7

li
li

5
.
5

8

62

51

23

5

3 21

8

62

51

23

5

3 21

5
5
5

.
3

6
6
2

5 17
- 5 17
2 9

h

k

h

12

15
2
13
9

26

ia

33

1:5

12

6

3

h 2

26

la

33

16

12

6

3

L 2

91

85

82

53

U
5

2k

17

18 ia

91
5

85
2

82
3

53

17

18 ia

k

li 16

k 16

-

U
5
1

2k

-

19

7

12

12

5

18

k

2

5

19

7

12

12

5

16

k

2

s

-

-

k

26

22

38

2k

9

12

21

13

6

13

k

3

2 3

26
9

22
20
2
18
15

38

2k

li:
19

9
8

12
10

21
7

13
n

6
n

13
2

k

3
3

2
2 £

U:
16

19
3

8
18

10
7

7
7

n
8

n
13

2
13

3
5

2

3

15
30

16
19

3
17
*

18

3k

7
n

7
22

8
19

13
9

13
5

3

h

5
1

5 12
2 5

19 1:7
] 1! 1
8 30
21
:

3:
1
-

n
6

22
-

19

9!!

5

h
2

1
-

2 5
1

5

1

1

.

5]
i

1i
I

1

■ -

k

1
3
20]
2
18
10
i
21]

30

1

21

13

12

17

1
6!

U
8 30 21
171 2
1
l
1
i

13

12

17j

6
1

5 12

_

IT

Tabi* b- 35* MacUinvuf OniuAbUU if - Gomtinumd
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
Average
hourly Under 1.25 1.30 1.35 i.Uo 1.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1 .70 1.75
earnings

Occupation and sex

$
1.2$

h JO

Machinery

" ij -

i ^ i i 1.U0 l j i i i i i o I i 5 i

$
$
1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05

M L M i U £ L ju fli

$
$
2.25 2.30 2.35 2.U0 2.U5 2.50
and
2.10 2 1 2.20 2.25 2.30 l i i S 1 ^ 0
over
2.15

.*

1*5&

Continued

Men - Continued

Machine-tool operators, production,
c la ss C 5/ 1 T o t a l........... ...................... .......................
T i i e .......................................................
Incentive • • • • • ....................................
D rill-press operators, radial, cla ss C h /b .............
D rill-press operators, single- or nu ltiplespindle, c la ss Ct T o t a l................................ • •• ••
T in e .......................................
Incentive • • • • • • • • • .............
Engine-lathe operators, cla ss Ct Total ..................
T in e ...............
Incentive . . . .
Grinding-machine operators, class C lt/a ...................
Milling-machine operators, cla ss C h/b .....................
Screv-nachine operators, automatic, class C ij/a . . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C u / b ...................... .............
Machine-tool operators, toolroom U /n ............. .
Machinists, production h /a ......................................• • • • •
Stock handlers and truckers, hand l^ a • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Tool-and-die makers (tool-aud-die jobbing shops) h/a •
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) U/a . . .
Welder*, hand, class At Total . . . • • ..............................
Tine ...................... .............
Incentive .........................
Welders, hand, cla ss Bt T o t a l.....................................
T in e .....................................
Incentive ............................

639
23U
U05
7U

136
U5
91
53
29
2U
60
83
17
127

302
92
819

226

$
1.70
1.5U
1.80
1.67

U
U

13
9
U
2
2

U

1.71
1.U5
1.8U

17
8
91
U
3
1

2

1.60

1

1.6U

1

1.56

1.70
1.7U
1.67

1.69
1.95
1.89
1.U3
2.13
2.0U

1
2

1
83

28 10
27
3
1 7

1

1

h

1

U

U9

8

U

7

16

as
22
26
6

a7
35
12
a

1

10
3
6

106
78
28
7
2
-

36
13
23

17

5

12

2 5
5 26
3 19
2 7
- 25
8 5
3 5

2

163

131

132
-

-

h

201

-

23

297
675
U07
268
719
515
20U

1.96

1

1.8U
2.15
1.80
1.67

1.67
1.38
1.65

18
17
1

59

13

33

9a

1.65
1.82

1

2

28

2

2

3
3
21
17

a

2.12

2

1
1

2

7
6

11

7
5
U

1

U
U
7
22
8
86
81
5

32
7
25
5
3

8

8

................................................................. l i t

279
253
179

5
2

U2
15
27
5

6

23

18

20

22

29
U
U

9

8

26

17

20

3
2

2

1

2

-

5

5

5
-

16

U
-

-

3
1

1

1

5
-

1

1 1

-

10
3

U
U
-

-

-

2
-

2

5

2

5

5
1

2

1

6

6

5

1 1
-

1

2

2

1

10

2

1

11

26
U
1 6 U 3

U
9
8
1 2 -

...........................................................

5
1
U
1
2
2
2
2
3 5
10
5 3 3 U 2
2 •
1 3
1 3
U
...................................................................................................................
10
19

25

8

10

16

9

5

1U
U
u
6U

17
10
1
U
U
236
193
U3

U
5

7

6
1

5
157
9
8

155

138
17

3
36
10

9
12
37
28
9
18 9
8 3
10 6

55

9
109

22
2
10

ia

26

3U

U9

88

21

1

66
11

5

38
7

U

5

86

75
n

u
5

a

3

22
3
18
28
17
U
13

2 1
12 18

2

-

U l
5

It

21 17

U as
5
23 13
a

6

19
3
3

9

1
1

1

-

1

-

5

a6

20

a

7

29
1

2

2

9

73

19

1
7

21

2
3

2
9

9
23

12

73

19

7

3

9

23

2

2

-

-

-

1

..............................................

8

13
9

6

1
1

12

12

5

6

25
25

W en
om

Assemblers, cla ss C ij / b ............................................ •••••
Inspectors, c la ss C k /a .....................................................
Machine-tool operators, production, cla ss C lt/b,
D rill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, cla ss C lt / b .......................................... .
Grinding-nachine operators, cla ss C h /b . . . . . . . . . . .

See footnotes at end of table.




.

20

9

a

ia

16

27
25

a

12

13
9
7

ia

6

6

7
3

19
6
13

2

5

3

2

5

7

i

2

1

-

12
5

13

10

22
23
16

10

-

3

1a
i

a

6

-

-

3
7
1 6

3
2
1 2

1
1

1

2

-

2

18
Table B - 3 5 MacUUt&uf
*

OnJUtitAiml y - GonUsumd
NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY E ARNING S OF—

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sax

j
s

Average
hourly
earnings

$

$
.30 )l . 3 tL.U0 1 . U L5 5 £ 5 £.60 fcf.65 L.70 1 . 7 1.80 j l . 81 .90 1 .95
5
.0 .5
5
5
. 2 5L

y

30 L.35 1.U0 fl.l*5 1 .5 0 |1.55 [1.60 pL.65

7

0

Loo 1

5
. 0 Lio 1 . 1 1.20 $2 . 2 5 3
5

[ 1 . 8 10 2 .[2.00 8 2*0£ 2.10. 201 2.20 2
*2 L . 5 ^ L 9 Q

[ L . 7 5

, 22 5. 3

035

0

^

.

.2 . 1*0 ^205^.50
3 5

-

2 1*0 2

and

0 2.$Q over
5

Machine-Tool Accessories
M
an
Janitors, porters, and cleaners l* / a ............. • • • • • • • • • •
Machine-tool operators, production, c la ss A U/a. 5 / ••
Engine-lathe operators, cla ss A l*/a
Qrinding-machine operators, cla ss A U/a . • • • • • • • • • •
Machine-tool operators, production, cla ss B U/a, 5 / . .
Engine-lathe operators, c la ss B l * / a ........... .
Grinding-machine operators, cla ss B h / a ..........••••«
Milling-machine operators, c la ss B y a
Machine-tool operators, production, c la ss C h/a . . . . . .
Machinists, production \ ja ...................... • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) U / a ....................................................... ..

1

2 3
8 7
7 0
1 * 9
7 0
1 6
1 0
2 2
3 0
6 1 *

2

2 6

%
1.2 7
1 .8 9

.
.
.
.

1*

10

2
1
1
1
. 1 * 3
. 8 9

1U

10
2

6
6
7
5

1 * 2

-

1 . 7 9
1
1
1
1
1
1

2 5
1 2
5
1 7
2
6
1 1

7

2 0
3
H *
1

1 * 9 2

1
*

6
U
-

2
2

1 3
112 0
2 5 2

2 8
5
2

1*

5

2 . 1 3

8
1 *9

1*

U

12

1
*

8

2

8 1 * 18

21 j 17

3 1 U6
6

2
0

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the machinery (nonelectrical) industry (Group 3$) as defined in the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual (19li5 edition) prepared by
the—
Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 351*3) with more than 7 workers were included in the study. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Includes establishments producing machine-tool accessories for which separate data are also presented.
In su fficien t data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) A ll or predominantly time workers.
(b) A ll or predominantly incentive workers.
5/ Includes data fo r operators of other machine to o ls in addition to those shown separately.

I

Table B-63*

O

h

A U /U Z M & C

A erage 2 ^
v
Occupation and sex

of

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

Men

3

$

1

[
$

0 . 3 0 2 0 . 35 50 . 3 0 7 0 . 5 0

and
under

3 5 .0 0

H

1 2
1 7
8 7

1

0 6
1 1
1 1
1 1 * 3
8 9
1 6
6 1 *
3 9

U
O
3 7
1 3 2
1 6
2 3 5
1 9

6 9 . 35 90 .
3 9 . 08 6 . 0 0
3 9 . 08 7 . 5 0

9
9
9
8
7
8
9
9
9

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

k. 5 O.0 0 f7* .5 0 p

o

. 5 o 2 o.

5

0

$
$
.5 00
5 5 7 5 . 60.000 62.50

65.00

Q Q
. 1 * 7 * 5 5 0 . . 5 Q 2 Q * 5 5 5 0 . 57*50 60*QQ 62*50 ,65*00- 6

6

0 0
7 . 7 5 0 0 . 7 0 2 0 . 7 5 5 0 . 8 0 0 0 . 85.00

7 * 70.00
5 0

7 . 0 7 -00 8 0 . 0 0 85*00
25 5

90.00 100.00
and

9 0 .0 0

1 0 0 . .fixer.
0*0

0

1
y

H
a
5lih.OO
.
1
51*8.50
01 * 1 * . 5 0 .
* ; 3 U
53 6 . 5 0 8
8
01 * 7 . 5 0
15 1 * 2 . 5 0 •
1
*
3
:5 i 7 . 5 o
*
10
03 9 . 5 0 01 * 3 . 0 0
: 5
6 1 . 3 0 8 0 . -5
1
3 8 . 5l * 5 . o o
3 9 . 01 * 8 . 5 0 •
6 0
j 3 8 . 03 09 . 0 3 3
3 9 . 57 U . 5 0

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

1(2.50
* U O

3 7 .5 0 l.n .o o b p . 5 0 Ii5 .0 0

$

Clerks, accounting ........
Section heads • • • • • • • • • •
Underwriters • • • • • • • • • • •

Clerks, accounting .........................................
Clerks, correspondence, class B * • • • • • • • • •
Clerks, f i l e , elass A • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .
Clerks, f i l e , cla ss B ........ ............. .
Clerks, general • • • • • ........ .
Clerks, premium-ledger-card .............. • •• •• •
Clerks, underwriter
Key-punch operators .............
Premium acceptors • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • » •
Section heads • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • • « « • • • • • • • •
Stenographers, general ..................... • • • • • • •
Typists, c la ss a
Typists, c la ss B .......................................... .
Underwriters • • • • • • • • • • • » • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • •

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY E ARNING S O F -

Number
workers

G & l/ U e S U s y

10

1 7

1 5

1
1

1
1*

1 * 3

8

2i
2i
1

6

9

6

8 ; 11
1

k

1 3
2
1

1
1

2I
h
2

5 6U

u

2

1
12
7
9

12

9

1
1 5

1 3

7

5

2

1 * 7

1
1*
2

1

1*

2
1

2

5
3

3
5

5

—____ —
y
The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual (191*9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget.
2/ Hours r e fle c t the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
V Workers were distributed as follows: 9 at $100 and under $105; 2 at $105 - $110; and 1 at $110 and over.
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wia., March 1952




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

C:

19

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum nag* rates and maximum straight-tim e hours per week agreed upon through c o lle ctiv e bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in e ffe c t on dates indicated.)

Table C-15*

B uilding GotU tiitcti& n
April 1, 1952

Bricklayers ...................... .............................. t .. #2*970 A0
Carpenters ............................................................ , 2 .690 A0
E lectricians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 2.600 A
O
Painters ..................................... ............................ 2.200 A0
Plasterers . . . . . . . . .... ..............
2.750 A0
Plumbers ..................................... ........................... 2.700 A0
Building laborers ...............................
1.960 A0

C lassification

& i

Rate Hours
per per
hour week

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Foremen..................
8
#1.570 A
First hands ...................... .
1.AS0 A8
Benchmsn:
First hands ............................ ..
l.AOO A8
Second h a n d s............................ ..
1 .300 A8
Third hands ............. ............... ................... 1.150 A8
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Mixers, overmen, doughnut-machine
operators ................................. ............. .. 1.525 A
O
Depositor operators, dividermsn,
ingredient scalers, oven feeders
and dumpers (bread ) .............................. 1.A25 A
O
Clerks, shipping and receiving . ............. 1.A25 A
O
Oven feeder's and dumpers (cake), bench
hands, wrapping-machine operators,
O
moldermen.........
1.335 A
Bench and machine h e lp e r s ........................ 1.215 A
O
Miscellaneous helpers:
O
Men.......................................................... 1.215 A
W en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.125 A
om
O
Agreement B:
Working forem en.............................. .
O
1.820 A
Mixers, shipping clerks ........... ........... ... 1.570 A
O
Dividermsn .................. ..................
1.510 A
O
Overmen, rudders . . ............ ............. ...... 1.A60 A
O
Wrapping-machine operators ...................... 1.3A0 A
O
Miscellaneous helpers, shipping-room
workers ........................................ .
1.270 A
O
Agreement C:
Mixers, overmen ...................... ............. .
1.A20 A
O
Dlvideroen, moldermen, bench hands,
doughnut-machine operators, stockroom workers ............... ........................... 1.360 A
O
Miscellaneous helpers:
Men.......................................................... 1,160 A
O
W en
om
.950 A
O




B o k & U & i

•

G

o n t im

u d

July 1, 1951
Rate Hours
per per
hour week

C lassification

Table C-205* B o h e / U
July 1, 1951

Table C-205*

C lassification

T

a b

l 205* c
e

Bakefriel* Gomtinumt
July 1, 1951

Rate Hours
per per
hour week

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement D:
Mixers, overmen, cake d eco ra to rs........... tl.AAO A
O
Wrapping-machine operators ............... .
1.A20 A
O
Dividermen, bench hands, doughnutmachine operators, ladders, flour
dumpers, ingredient scalers,
depositor o p era to rs....................... .
1.380 A
O
O
Shipping-room workers • • • • • • ................... 1.280 A
Miscellaneous helpers:
Men........................................................... 1.160 A
O
W en ......................................
om
.960 A
O
Bread only - Machine shops:
Foremen
1.A70 A
O
Mixers, ovenmen .............................................. 1.A20 A
O
Oven loaders and dumpers, wrappingmachine operators, moldermen,
dividermen ........................ .
1.360 A
O
Stockroom workers ...................... .................... 1.360 A
O
Miscellaneous helpers (men) ........................ . 1.160 A
O
Cake only - Machine shope:
Foremen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.A70 A
O
1.A20 A
O
Depositor op erators........ ...................... .
1.360 A
O
Miscellaneous helpers:
M .................... ...............
en
1.160 A
O
W en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
om
O
.950 A
Hebrew baking - Bread and cake:
Cake bakers, bread workers ........................... 1.5A0 A5
1.A60 A5
Crackers and cookies:
Sponge department:
Head m ix e r s..................................... .
O
1.A50 A
Ovenmen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.370 A
O
Mixers, r e lie f rollennen.
peelers-in ............................• • • • • .......... 1.350 A
O
Rollerman, peelers-ou b........... .
1.250 A
O
Mixers1 helpers .......................... .
1.220 A
O
Packers ....................................................... .
O
.970 A
Sweet department:
Mixers, r e lie f rollennen .................. .
1.350 A
O
Machinemen, ovenmen ........................••• •• • 1.300 A
O
Mixers1 helpers ......................................... 1.220 A
O
Overmen's h e lp e r s .............................
1.150 A
O
Pan feeders, greasers, general
helpers .....................................
1.070 A
O
Packers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
•9A0 A
O
Icing room:
Machinemen........................ ....................
1.300 A
O
Packers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.940 A
O
Feeders and s ta c k e r s ............................ .
.890 A
O
Packing department:
Floormen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.200 A
O
Floarmen's helpers
1.100 A
O

Rate Hours
per per
hour week

C lassification

Crackers and cookies: - Continued
Packing department: - Continued
Scalers ...........................
#0.9A0 A
O
W en em ployees................... .
om
.890 A
O
Wrapping and cellophane department:
W en employees:
om
Checkers . . ................................
1.000 A
O
Carton-forming machine operators,
machine g ir ls , packers,
bundlers ........... ....................... •••••
.9A0 A
O
Carton-caddy and cases
.........
.920 A
O
Feeders
.890 A
O

Table C-2082*

M

& lt

J id X jU O ^ U

April 1, 1952

Classification
Mechanical department:
Regular engineers ......................................... .
Regular coal passers, firemen, oilers,
and repairmen............................... ......... .
Extra engineers................................ .
Extra coal passers, firemen, o ilers,
and repairmen ........................ ......................
Brewing department:
Regular employees .....................................
Helpers - First y e a r.............................. .
Helpers - Second y e a r ........... .
Extra m ........................................ .
en
Bottling department:
Regular employees........... ...............................
Helpers - First year ...........................
Helpers - Second y e a r ...................................
Regular freightmen, icemen, loading and
unloading men, yardmen .................••••••..
Regular depot loading and unloading
m ...................................
en
Extra men............. ............. .................... .
W en ...............................................................
om
Delivery department:
Keg beer peddlers ....................
Keg beer peddlers1 helpers ............................
Bottle beer peddlers ........... ..................
Bottle beer peddlers1 helpers.........
Trtick operators............................... ...........
W
agon and auto washers ............. .
Extra delivery drivers ............... .

Rate Hours
per per
weak week
#81.00 A
O
78.00 AO
78.00 AO
75.00 A
O
76.00
62.00
63.50
73.00

A
O
AO
AO
A
O

7A.00 A
O
6 0 .0 0 A
O
61.00 AO
7A.00 AO
74.00 AO
71.00 A
O
60.50 AO
78.00
76.50
78.00
73.50
76.00
7A.50
7A.50

AO
AO
A
O
AO
AO
A
O
AO

Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee Wis., March 1952
U.S. D PA T EN OF L B R
E RM T
AO
Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s

20

Table C-27:

P/UhI***}

Table

c-27 * pAAntUuj- Continued
July 1 , 1951

July 1, 1951
C la ssifica tio n

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

Machine o p e r a to r s........ ........................ .
Machine tenders (machinists) ....................
Press a ssista n ts and feeders:
Cylinder and r o t a r y ...........
Job cylinder and platen ..................
Pressmen, cylinder presses:
1 sin g le -r o ll rotary (bread wrapper); 3
patent inside blanket; 2 Miehle v e rtic a l
(22 x 28 inches or le ss ); 1 Addressograph
or sim ilar type; 1 multi-color Harris;
1 sheet-fed rotary
1 double-roll rotary; any rotary th a t
prints 3 or more colors
1 Cox Duplex or Goss flat-bed .........................................
Job cylinder presses:
1 Kelly, Miehle v e rtic a l or horizontal
M iller High-Speed or Simplex or
sim ilar Job cylinder (22 x 28 inches
or le s s ) ............................... ... ................ ...
Pressmen, platen:
1 , 2, or 3 presses ................................ • • • • . • • • ................
1^ presses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Stereotypers

T t T . . . T r T f . . . . . . T . . . . . , . r . . . . T r . f.

C lassification

$1,150
2.300
2.453
2.540
2.453
2.453
2.453
2.758

40
40
37$
37*
37$
37$
37s
36$

2.175
1.465

40
40

Pressmen, web presses - night work ............... . • $2,750
Color men ................................................. .
2.857
Pressmen-in-charge - day work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.733
Pressmen-in-charge - night w ork...........
2.964
Stereotypers - daywork . • • • • • • . ........................ 2.533
Stereotypers - night work .......................... ••• •• 2.667

Table C-*l*

35
35
37$
35
37$
37$

Jio c a l < t*U U
J'U

G p& U itU uf' C*HfUo4fm *l
October 1 , 1951
Clas s ific a tio n

2.450

40

2.520
2.550

40
40

2.350

40
40
37$

40
40

40

2.330
2.370
2.533

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

1-man cars and busses:
First year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,590
After 1 year ................................ .
1.630

Table C-42s

M

tU o k b u tc k

Compositors, hand - daywork .............................. 2.613
Compositors, hand - night w ork ............................ ...
2.747
Machine operators - day work .............. .
2.613
Machine operators - night w o rk ....................... .. 2.747
Machine tenders (machinists) - daywork • • • • • • 2.613
Machine tenders (machinists) - night work . . . . 2.747
Mailers - day work ........................ ...................... 2 .267
Mailers - night w o rk ........................................ . 2.373
Photoengravers - day work .................................. 2 .840
Photoengravers - night work ............................. . 2.973
Pressmen, web presses - day work
2.533
Color m en..................... .
2.633

37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$

3 b 'U O & U

&nd JfelpmM
July 1 , 1951

Newspapers




July 1 , 1951
kate Hours
per per
hour week

Newspapers - Continued

Book and Job shoos

Compositors, h a n d .................. ..................................... ...

At/otoSlbutck %>Ua&U
<md Jtetp&M- Continued

Table C-42s

C lassification

Rate Hours
per per
hour week

Air and gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,700
Helpers
1.550
Armored c a r ................... .
1.530
Bakery:
Wholesale - Transport .................................
1.610
Special d elivery .......................... .
1.280
R etail - Store delivery:
Transport
................................ .
1.610
Pick-up d r iv e r s ...................... ............. .
1.610

40
40
40
48
40
48
40

C lassification

Rate Hours
per per
hour week

Bakery: - Continued
R etail - Store delivery: - Continued
Flour h a u le r s ............................................ $1,640
Special d elivery • • • • • ............. ................. 1.490
C racker..........................
1*500
Yeast:
First 3 months • • • • • . • • ........... • • • • • • • • • . 1.208
Second 3 months ...................................... .. 1.281
After 6 months .............................
1.354
Beer:
Depot drivers' helpers
1.400
Brewery:
Plant-to-plant .................... ..
1.900
Extra drivers .................... .................• • • • • • • 1.863
Building:
Construction:
Paving, excavating, grading ............. .
1.920
3-axle sem itrailer ................................... . 2.020
Concrete-mixer t r u c k ............. . . • • • • • • • • • 1.970
Material:
........... ...
3-axle sem itrailer
1.910
Helpers ................................... .
1.740
Conventional type ....................................... 1.850
Plumbing supply
1.615
Sand and gravel:
Conventional t y p e .............
1.800
3-axle sem itrailer ............................... 1.850
Carbonic g a s ............. ...............................
1.400
Coal, coke„and o i l ............................................... 1.560
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.440
Department store:
Furniture ........................................ .
1.620
Helpers ................................... ........... .
1.520
Package......................... ............... .
1.600
Parcel delivery .................... ....................
1.400
Drug:
Agreement A ............. .
1.400
Agreement B
1.350
Fruit and vegetable:
Agreement A - R etail ........................ .
1.300
Agreement B ................... ................................. 1.200
Agreement C - Wholesale ............... ............. .
1.620
Helpers .................... .......... .................... .
1.450
Furniture - R etail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.615
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.505

40
40
48
48
48
48
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
44
48
40
44
44

21
Table C-42:

M

a to s U b U c k

Table C-5U*

S b 'U o e 'M

Jfelp & U - Q ontim m d

General:
Cartage - Package:
Metropolitan a r e a ........... .
Helpers ....................................
Grocery - Chain store:
City ...........................................................
Helpers ................................................... ..
Hardware - Wholesale ................. .
Ice cream (sta tio n - to - s ta tio n )...........
Special d e liv e r y ..................................... .
Laundry:
Industrial wiper .................... ...........
Dry cleaning:
Ihtra-city ...................................................
Relay ............. ............. ............... ................
Branch store • • • • . • • .......................... .
Rug .......................... .
H elp ers........... .
Machinery, h e a v y ....................... ...................... ..
Magazine ................. ........... .
Milk:
Itactar .......................................... .
Plant-to-plant ............. ................................. .
O il and gas:
First 3 months ............... ...............................
After 3 m onths............... ............................
Paper ............................ ..........................................
Railway express:
Under 2$ tons .................... ....................
2 | tons and over ........... .................................
Soft drink ............... ............................................f

-

G o *U U U 4 *d

April 1 , 1952

J u ly 1 , 1951

C lassification

Q / l& O e 'U f S t o t o e A

Rate Hours
per per
hour week

48
48

1.650
1.560
1.470
1.575
1.471

48
48
40
48
48

1.350

40

.900 44

1.050
1.100
1.230
1.200

44
44
44
44
1 . 98 a 40
1.450 40
1.575
1.575

43
48

1.570 40
1.620 40
1.450 40
1.672
1.702
1.460

40
40
40

C lassification

Meat department:
Head meat cutters .......................................... $87.00
Journeymen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79.50
Apprentices - First 6 months
53.50
Apprentices - Second 6 months
56.00
Apprentices - Second year ............................. 61.50
Apprentices - Brird year .................. .
67.00

Grocery department:
Clerks:
Less than 6 months service . . ...................
6 to 12 months service
12 to 18 months service .................... .
18 to 30 months service ...........................
More than 3 0 months s e r v ic e ........... .
Head cashiers ...................................................
Self-service and D elicatessen (displaying
and stocking, labeling, pricing, wrap­
ping and scaling):
Less than 3 months
3 to 6 months ................................... .
6 to 12 months . . . . . . . ..............................
12 to 18 months ........... .............................
18 to 24 months ............. • • • • • • • • • . ..........
More than 24 months ............... ............. .

M

^ lk

45
45
45
45
45
45

C l a s s i fication

Q / l& O & U f S t o b e A

April 1 , 1952
C lassification

kate Hours
per per
week weak

M
en
Grocery department:
Clerks:
I-ess than 6 months s e r v ic e ............... . . . » $42.50 45
6 to 12 months s e r v ic e ............................. 45.00 45
12 to 18 months service ................
47.50 45
16 to 3 0 months service .......................... 53.25 45
More than 3 0 months service ................ .
59.00 45
F irst clerks:
In sp e cia l development stores
68.75 45
In super stores ................................. .
76.25 45
Produce heads:
In sp ecia l development stores ............. .
68.75 45
In super stores ......... .
76.25 45




Plant f o r e m e n ............. ..........
Class A - Lab o r a t o r y t e c hnicians ..
Class B - E m ployees m a n u f a c t u r i n g
b y - p r o d u c t s ............ ...........
Class C - Employees In paste u r i z ing .................................
Class D - Tractor drivers ......... .
Checkers, cooler help, g e n e r a l
t r u c k drivers, Inspectors,
ma c h i n e operators, w e i g h e r s .....
Assistant l a b o r a t o r y technicians,
non-^nachine operators, speciald e l i v e r y drivers, t r u c k a n d
t r a c t o r h e lpers, wagon a n d
aut o w a s h e r s ...........
Barn m e n ................... .
W o m e n ............ .......... ..........

G 4 td

R e A ta U fr O n td

39.75
4 2.00
44.75
49.75
54.50
59.25

45
45
45
45
45
45

Semi-transient apartment hotels .........
Transient hotels - 1 5 0 rooms a n d
ove r ......................................
Transient hotels - u n d e r 1 5 0 rooms .....
D o o r m e n ....................... .................
E l e v a t o r operators:
M e n - front ............................ .
M e n - B a c k ............. ......... ..........
W o m e n ................... .
Housemen ................ .......... .
Li n e n r o o m girls, seamstresses .............
Maids ................................. .
Telephone o p e r ators ......................... .
Watchmen, t i m e k eepers ........................

41.00 45
4 4.00 45
48.00 45
50.50 45
53.50 45
56.00 45

jb e c U & ti

Rat e p er R a t e p e r
Hours
day-lst
day- a f t e r
per
60 day s
day
60 days
$ 1 2.30
12.00

$ 12.92
12.60

8
8

1 2.00

32.60

8

12,00
1 2 .00

12.60
1 2 .60

8
8

11.56

12.14

8

11.21
10.43
9.03

11.77
10.95
9.48

C lassification

H o t e l service:
Bellboys and porters:
Class A transient hotels ........... .
Class B tra n s i e n t hotels .................
Class A apartment hotels .............. ..
Class B apartment h o t e l s ....... .........
B e l l c a p tains ......... ...................... .
C l e a n i n g women, b a t h r o o m m aids, a n d
night cleaners .................... .
Clerks:
C o m b i n a t i o n ...................... .
M a i l - Men .................................
M a i l - W o men ................
Night .......................................
R e c e i v i n g ...... .......... .................
Room:
Apartment hot e l s ...... ...... ............

March 1 , 1952
Table C-5U:

k lb

Bar service:
Bartenders .......................... .
E x t r a bartenders ................. .

W en
om

Tab!# C-5452:

J la

April 1, 1952
Rate Hours
per per
week week

M - Continued
en
$1,580
1.430

Table C-7U1:

8
8
8

M T : Inside r e lie f men receive the average basic wage scale
OE
of the men they r eliev e .

Resta u r a n t service:
Bus b o y s ...... .......... ................
Cashiers a n d checkers:
Cashiers
Checkers - Food ................. .
Combi n a t i o n ch e c k e r s a nd cashiers ......
D ishwashers - M e n o r w o m e n ........ .
Foun t a i n gi r l s ............. ..........
Garbage men, icemen, a n d g e n e r a l
ki t c h e n help ......................... .
K i t c h e n p o r t e r s ........ ........... ..........
P a n t r y girls ................... ..............
P a n t r y "iris - Head.................................. .
P a n t z y men; s t o r e r o o m m e n .......... .........
Silvermen; glass, pot w a s h e r s ..... .
Stewards:
Inside - D a y ...... ........... .......... .
Inside - Night ........... ••• • ......... .
S t o r e r o o m m e n - Assistant ........... .
S t o r e r o o m p o r t e r s ............. ..............
V e getable cooks (women) ..... .
Vegetable helpers ............... ..........
W a i t e r s ..... ............ .
W a i tresses ................ ..........

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$65.00
60.00

48
48

2 2 .50

48
48
48
48
48

25.25
2 8 .00
30.75
30.25
40.00

48

43.50
43 . 5 0
42.75
43 . 5 0
4 1 .50

48
48
48
48
48

46.85
51.80

48
48

56.75
46.30
38.00

48
48
48

42.50
41.50
41.50
43.50
43.50
41.50
42.25
41.50

48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

35.80

48

42.25
42.25
43.50
39.00
36.75

48
48
48
48
48

39.15
3 9.00

48

41.15
42.25
43.50

48

39.15
51.80
49 . 0 0
39.15
38.00
40.00
37.80
30.25
28.00

48
48

48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

22

D:
Table D-li

M

in im

u m

Entrance Rates

C u ts u M

ce

P a te A

fo b

P la n t

W

a f iU m

l

y

E:

Percent of plant workers In establishments with
specified minimum rates in -

Supplementary Wage Practices
% ify e 4* u t ia l P/UHtU io tU

Tabi* i-it

Manuf a c t u r i n g
M i n imum rate (in cents)

All
i n dus­
tries

Nondurable
goods

D u r able
goods

y
21- 2 5 0
workers

P ercent of p l a n t w o r kers em p l o y e d on eac h shift in -

Publio W h o l e ­
Ret a i l
utili­
Services
sale
trade
ties*
trade

E s t ablishments w i t h -

A

251 or
251 or
21-250
more
more
workers
workers
workers

CW4 -P+ 4
m"
1
b n i i t aii i e r e n t i a i

A1LI
tries
indue »
d or
d
other
shift
shift

3

2

All establishments

.......

60 or u n d e r ................
Over 60 and u n d e r 65 .....
6 5 ..........................
7 0 ..........................
Over 70 and u n d e r 75 .....
75 ..........................
Over 75 and u n d e r 80 .....
8 0 ..........................
Over 80 and u n d e r 85 .....
8 5 ..........................
Ove r 35 a nd un d e r 90 .....
9 0 ..........................
Over 9 0 a nd u n d e r 95 .....
9 5 ..........................
Over 95 and tinder 100 ....
100 .........................
Ov e r 1 0 0 a nd u n d e r 1 05 ..•
105 .........................
Over 105 a nd u n d e r 110 ...
n o .........................
Over 1 1 0 and u n d e r 115 ...
H 5 .........................
Over 115 and tinder 120 ...
1 2 0 .........................
Over 120 a n d u n d e r 125 ...
125 .........................
Over 125 and u n d e r 130 ...
130 .........................
Ov e r 1 30 and u n d e r 135 ...
135 .........................
Ove r 135 a nd u n d e r 140 ...
n o .........................
Over n o and u n d e r n 5 ...
1 / 1 5 .........................
Over 1A5 and u n d e r 1 5 0 ...
1 5 0 .........................
Over 150 and u n d e r 155 ...
Ove r 160 a nd u n d e r 165 ...
165 and over ...............

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0.0

1 00.0

100.0

18.2
3.6

10.6

0.3
-

12.3
2.6
-

1.3
-

6.3
9.3
3.5
-

13 . 8

5.2
9.0

0 .1
.3
.6
.6
.3
8.1
.9
3 .8
2.1
3.6
1.3
2.2
1.6
.6
3.5
4.2
3.2
1.2
.6
1.7
3.4
3.4
2.5
2.9
5.1
3.4
12.0
2.9
9.6

(2/)
1.1
.2
.4

1.3
6.4
.5

.2
.2

12.8
6.9
6.2
3.7
4.2
_
1.2
1.1
16.0
-

_
-

-

1.6
-

10 . 4
4.9
15.0
1.8

2.3
_

9.4
-

-

-

-

2.7
2 .0
.8
5.7
-

2.5
3.6

6.7
4.8
1.2
-

8.3
4 .1
.8

4.4
1.4
1.6

8.9
-

3.1
2.6
-

-

4.2
3.0
-

12.4
5.7
21. 6

10.9

3.5
1.7
2.8
3.5
10.0
6.8
22.1
5.9
11.9

-

-

-

-

-

1.3
-

-

2.1

5.9
5.7
3.5
5.5
-

2.4
7.3
2.9
-

.5

2.7
12.7
-

4 .9
-

“

-

—

28.9
3.5
-

100.0

-

6.9
6.0
6.0

22.4
1.1
1.7
7 .0
-

1.7
2.2
4.0
2.6
.2
-

3.7
4.8
-

1.9
2.0
2.7
1.1
1.5
5.7

3.3
.8

100.0

100.0

2 .0

4.2
-

4.9
3.6
26.7
4.0
4 .7
8.1
2.3
2.2
3.0
1.9
.3
2.3
2.1
5.0
1.0
5.4
1.1
.1
1.7
2.3
-

5.1
11.3
1.5
15.8
12.7
4.0
26.7

3.5

3.8

“

3.2

10.3

2.3*

'

1/

Lowest ra t e s f o r m a l l y e s t ablished for hir i n g either m e n or w o m e n p lant workers other th a n

watchmen.
2 / Excl u d e s d a t a f o r finance, insurance, and r e a l estate.

y
*

Less t h a n .05 o f 1 percent.
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, and o t her public utilities.




5.0

18.4

R e c e i v i n g shift
dif f e r e n t i a l ......

16.1

4.9

18.3

4.5
-

14.9
_
-

U n i f o r m cents
(per hour) .....
cents .......
cents .......
5 cents .......
c e n t s ...... .
7 cents .......
7.5 cents .....
cents .......
cents .......
cents ......
11 cents ......
12 c e n t s ..... .
12.5 cents ....
13 cents ......
13.3 cents ....
15 c e nts ......
16 cents ......
20 cents ......

2
4
6

8
9
10

13.6

.1
.1
6.1
1.1
3-.1

.2
.8

.3
.5

1.0
(V

(4/)

1.2
.1

(4/)
(4/)
2.3

(y:
(V)

.1
.1

5.5
1.5
4.3
.

1.1
.5

.6
1.4
-

shift

?•?

6.5

5.5

10.5

3.3

24.2

1.1

21 . 4

5.9

5.6

4 .9
_
_

10.5
.3
.4
7 .7
-

3.2
_
_

24.2
_

16.4
_

4.6
_

5.6
_

1.6

.1

(4/)

.7
_
_

.2
.1
.1

-

Cy)

2.2
.1

y

c
)
-

_

_

4

-

(4/)
.6
.1

2.4
1.4
-

.4
-

3.3
1 .8
-

( /)
.8
-

1.0

.4

1.5

O ther .............

.1

(y)

.1

-

.7

.1

.1

-

......

...

1.1 2I t4

Uniform per­
c entage ........
5 p e r c e n t .....
p e r c e n t ....
10 per c e n t ....

R e c e i v i n g no
differ e n t i a l

y

2d

24,6

_
-

2

3.7

.2

_

2

12.8

-

.2
.1
-

3

2

3

Mach i n e tool
ac c e s ­
sories

.6
.6

.2
_

-

7.0
(4/) 16 . 4
_
_
_
-

2.3
_
-

.8
-

1.1
_
_
-

1.1
-

3.2
2.9
8.5
_
.7
1.0
-

3.2
_
1.2
.1
.1

_
_
_
3.3
-

.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.7
.4

_
_

_

-

_

_

-

.1

-

_

_
_

-

_

2.3
_

-

.3

-

-

-

-

-

1.3
-

-

-

y)

c
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

4 .9
1.7
3.2

-

1.3

-

-

.1

-

-

.1

-

-

2.3

.4

.4

(4/)

-

.9

.4

7 .7

3.8

18.2

3

2

16,8

.5
.7
-

"

Esta b l i s h m e n t s w i t h no
e s t a b lished m i n i m u m ....

2

Percent of w o r kers o n
e x tra shifts, all
e s t ablishments .......

5.1
1.2
4 .8
3.2

-

S t a m p e d and
M a c h inery
p ressed
industries
metal
Nondurable
Durable
/
p r oducts
goods
goods
d or
d or
3d or
d or
d
d
d
d
other
other
other
other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift

A ll m a n u f a c t u r i n g industries 1 /

1/
2/

y
Lj

Includes d a t a for industries o t her tha n those sh o w n separately.
Includes m a c h i n e - t o o l a c c e s s o r y e s t a blishments also sh o w n separately.
No w o r kers employed o n 3d o r o t her shift.
Less tha n .05 of 1 percent.
O c c u p ational Wa g e Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., M a r c h 1952
U.S. DEPAR T M E N T OF LABOR
B u r e a u of Labor Statistics

23
Table E-2*

S c U & d u l& d

I t J j& e J z L f J to d iA A

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN-

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS 1 / EMPLOYED INWeekly hours

All
indus­
tries

A l l establishm ents ................................................

1 0 0 .0

Under 35 h o u r s .........................................................
35 h o u r s ........................................................................
Over 35 and under 37£ h o u r s ........................ ..
3 7 i h o u r s .................................... ................................
Over 37 £ and under 1*0 h o u r s ...........................
hO hours .......................................................................
Over hO and under hh hours .............................
hh hours ................... ...................................................
Over hh and under h8 hours . . . . . . . . . . . . .
h8 h o u r s .................... .................................. ...............
Over h8 and under 50 hours ............ ................
50 hour8 .......................................................................
Over 50 h o u r s ...........................................................

0 .3
2 .1
.9
8 .5
3 .1
7 7 .3
2 .1
5 .2
.1
.2

1/

y

3/
*
**

Manufacture

Manufacturing
All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

-

( 3 /)
h .2
.8
9 0 .3
.1
h .3
.1

1 .1
1 .2
9 2 .h
5 .1
-

0 .2
1 1 .9
8 h .3
.5
2 .1
.5

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

y
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

_
-

Retail
trade

-

1 0 0 .0
_

1 0 0 .0
1 .8
1 .2
2 .8
2 6 .8
lh .8
h 2 .8
_

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

5 .1

96. h
2 .0
-

1 .9
2 .2
8 3 .8
1 1 .6
.5

1 .7

9 .7
6 7 .2
9 .h
6 .6

-

-

-

-

1 3 .0
1 .0
2 .7

9 .8

3 3 .1
-

.5
.5
.8
_
6 7 .2
.6
5 .9
1 1 .1
7 .0
.8
h .3
.8

h .7
.
h 5 .5
_

-

-

-

.1

-

.3

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

.1
.1

.1
.1

.2

.5
*

-

-

-

-

-

■

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

0 .5

-

1 .5
-

Durable
goods

“

0 .7
.6
.3
.

1.0

7 0 .h
.1
2 .7
1 2 .9
5 .h
.8
5 .1

7 3 .1
.

1.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

i 1 0 0 .0

_

_

_

6 9 .6

1 .3
3 .7
1 .3
1 6 .0

'

h .9
_

7 6 .h
9 .2
6 .5
h .2
3 .5

_

5 7 .5
1 .0

1 0 0 .0
h .8
1 2 .0
-

1 8 .2
1 0 .0
3 .9
l.h
.1
■

-

7 .2
.9

3 .0
-

Services

-

.2

3 1 .6
-

5 1 .6
-

“

P & id

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

All establishments

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —
M a n u f a c t u r e ru

M anufacturing

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All

Services

'l/

...........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.3

99.1

98.9

99.8

99.9

100.0

99.7

100.0

96.5

88.3

£ d a y ........................................
1 d a y ........................................
l£ days .........................
h days ..........................
5 days .......................................
6 days .......................................
6£ days .................................... .
7 days .......................................
7 £ days .........................
8 days......................... .
8£ days.........................
9 days..........................
9£ days.........................
10 days ................... ............ .
11 days ........................ ........

.1
-

.1

_

-

-

-

1.5
.7
86.5

Establishments providing no paid
holidays .....................................

.2
.1
82.1
1.6
3.6
.1
3.9
5.3
.3
1.2
.1

.3
.1
96.3

-

96.9

.5

_

_

_

_

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.3

-

1-*

-

-

77.9
1.2
20.8

-

-

-

2.0

-

-

99.7

-

-

h.6

-

_
-

1.7

-

-

-

-

-

_

. 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

. 7

.9

.2

.1

"

.3

1.1

Includes d a t a f o r industries other than t h o s e separately.
Less t h a n .05 o f 1 percent.
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, a n d o t her publ i c utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




93.7

-

9.1

Public
All

Establishments providing paid holidays..

*
*#

7 .0
.6
5 .8
.8

6 3 .7
.h
6 .1
1 9 .h
1 .1
1 .5
3 .2
l.h

Retail

and

Number of paid holidays

1/

1 .3
10 .h

2 .2
1 .0
-

W
hole­
sale
trade

D a t a relate to w o m e n workers.
Includes da t a for industries other t h a n those s h own separately.
Less t h a n .05 o f 1 percent.
Tran s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), c o m m u n ication,
other p u b l i c utilities.
Finance, insurance, and re a l estate.

Table E-3 *

y

.

Public
utili­
ties*

_

All

-

_
-

1 .0

10.0
10.1

93.0

1 0 .3

2 .5

1.0

-

_
-

17.2
36.6
1.9
7.9
.h
h.6

-

“

3.5

.

.

100.0
92

.h

Durable

goods

100

.p

9 2 .3

_

.3
.5
.3
1.0
2.0
81.8

1.3
2.6
85.7

_

_

.3

-

-

1.6
(2/)

2.0

_
-

Retail

Services

100.0

100.0

! 1 0 0 .0

100.0

68.1

93.7

8 8 .3

18.0

goods

100.0
9 2 ,6

_

.7

.h
.1
_

Whole-

Non­
durable

1.3
.5
.

_

3 .0
2 .0

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

h.6
9.1
68.9

6o.h

1.1

7.h

.

_

7.1

_

-

_
.

_
-

.1
-

_

-

_

-

-

-

7.6

7.7

7.h

11.7

-

9 2 .3

_

_

88.5

_

_
.

83.3
_

.
_

_
-

5 .2

_

_
-

5.1
1 2 .h
_

.5

.3

31.9

_
_

_
_
.

_

_

-

-

_
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

6.3

11.7

82.0

Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2*

PcUd V&g U A (fyobmal P UuhU)
c aoh
aoo

T&Die E-4:

PERCENT OF PLANT W O R K E R S E MP L O Y E D IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN—
Vacation policy

M

M anufacturing
All
indus­
tis
re

Public
ui i
tl­
te*
is

Whole­
sl
ae
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

Al
l
indus­
tis
re

anufacturing

Public
uii
tl­
te*
is

Non­
durable
goods

Whole­
sl
ae
trade

Retail
trade

Servioes

An

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

i 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.9

98.il

98.6

97.7

99.7

98.6

100.0

100.0

98.U

98.2

98.6

98.6

98.9

96.9

99.2

97.8

90.8

_

_

_

1.2

58.5
.7
39.2

61.2
.5
36.9

U9.3
1,3
U7.1

60.9

-

72.0

1.6
5.8

2.6
87.U
.3
8.6

63.8
.

-

U9.U

.7
91.1
2.1
U.7

_

50.1
3.0
U5.8

.9
85.U
1.2
10.7

18.9

35.U

25.8

80. U
1.2
9.2

1.1

1.6

l.li

1.6

1.8

l.U

l.U

1.1

3.1

.8

2.2

9.2

99.2

98.9

98.6

98.U

98.3

98.7

98.6

99.2

96.9

100.0

97.8

90.8

Under 1 week .........................
1 w e e k .............................. .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............
2 weeks .............. ............. ..
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............

_

_

_

_

23.lt
2.8
72.7
.3

31.8
lu6
62.5
-

30.5

36.3
-

-

-

63.5
-

9U.^
-

68.7
-

75.7
15.2
7.7
-

2.6
76.8

62.1

.7
75.9
10.9
11.2
-

Establishments with no paid vacations ••

.8

1.1

l.U

.2

.3

l.U

99.8

100.0

100.0

99.8

99.7

98.6

Durable
Roods

Al
l

V

1
All establishments ......................
1 year of service

Establishments with paid vacations .....
Under 1 week ............ ............
1 w e e k ........................... .
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ..... .
2 weeks ..............................
Establishments with no paid vacations ..

_

»

_

50.5

62.8

-

•

38.8

U8.1

37.2

U.l
17.5
78.U

2.3

.3

l.U

99.8

99.7

98.6

_

_

5.U

29.9

.

_

-

-

_

U8.0

1.0

90.0

78.0

_

2 years of service

Establishments with paid vacations •••••

6.0
-

100.0

100.0

_

_
-

-

-

98.7
-

70.3
8.0

.5
6U.8
8.1
2U.9
-

-

-

1.6

1.7

1.3

98.U

98.3

98.1

.5
5.5
1.7
87.8

.7
U.3
2.3
91.1

2.U
3.3
92.9

86^5

_

.

_

.

“

1.0

10.0

1.3

-

90.0

20.1

_
18.7

_

51.3

_

27.8

_

78.7

_

-

.

-

19.8
-

78.2
-

U8.7
-

70.0
-

12.1
-

l.U

.8

3.1

2.2

9.2

98.6

99.2

96.9

97.8

90.8

U.8

-

5 years of service

Establishments with paid v a c a t i o n s ....

_

Under 1 w e e k .................. .
1 w e e k ...............................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............
2 weeks ..............................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ...... .
3 weeks ..............................

2.1
.3
95.5
.6
1.3

Establishments with no paid vacations ••

.2

_

_

2.5

1.0
2.U
96. U

100.0

_

_

-

8.1

.

-

_
.

99.6

98.6

71.U

-

98.0

.

-

-

20.5

2.1
.6
97.3

(2/)
97.5

_

•

-

-

-

-

-

.2

.3

l.U

99.8

99.7

98.6

(2/)

100.0

_

.1

2.0

-

-

6.5
.

83.9
8.0
-

_

100.0

_

_

-

1.1

16.2

.

2.6
9.1

.

-

96.9

98.9

62.2

86.0

.

_

..

•

-

-

19.U

-

2.2

9.2

100.0

97.8

90.8

15.9
U2.0

U~8
86.0

«.

2.8

.3

1.6

1.7

1.3

l.U

.8

3.1

98.U

98.3

98.7

98.6

99.2

96.9

.7
U.1
UU.l
1.1
U8.7

2.1
Ul.l
1.5
53.9

2.6
9.1
51.5

29.5

1.1
78.1

_

.

.

_

.

36.0

67.U

20.8

39.9

-

1.3

l.U

.8

3.1

2.2

9.2

-

15 years of service

Establishments with paid vacations .....

Under 1 w e e k ............... .........
1 week ...............................
2 w e e k s ............ ..................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............
3 weeks ..............................
Establishments with no paid vacations ••

1/

y

*
**

99.8

100.0

l.U
UU.5

1.0
110.6

1.0

1.0

37.7

50.9

.1
9.9

76.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

53.9

58.il

61.3

U7.9

89.7

22.1

.2

.3

l.U

_

.2

(2/)

100.0

100.0

100.0

7.8
38.6

55.6

6~5
83.1

•

.

-

53.6

UU.U

8.8

.5
5.3
U5.1
.8
U6.6

-

-

1.6

1.7

.

-

-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
u.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., March 1952
Bureau of Labor Statistics

25

P a id B lo k Jl& a a e (fyo A m a l pA oaid io nd’)

Ml* 1-5:

PEU C K N T OF PLA N T W O RK ERS EM PLO Y ED IN —

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E W ORKERS EM PLO Y ED I N -

Provisions for paid sick leave

A
ll
indus­
tries

M nufacturing
a
A
H

D
urable
goods

N
on­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

W
holesale
trade

R
etail
trade

Finance**

Services

A
ll
in u
d s-

M nufactu ing
a
r
A
ll

'V

D
urable
goods

P
ublic
utili­
ties*

N
on­
durable
goods

W
hole­
sale
trade

R
etail
trade
!

1
All establishments ........................ .

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

3l*.9

31.1

27.3

l*l*.l*

59.2

1*7.6

36.2

1.8
H*.l*
1.6
2.8
7.5
.7
1.3
.1
1.6
2.3
.7
.1

.8
16.5
.5
3.1
6.3
1.2
2.7
•
-

_
13.2
*.
1*.0
5.2
1.5
3.1*
-

10.0
-

1.1*
35.1
3.6
2.1
17.0
-

3.0
5.9
15.3
21.9
.
1.5

15.8
3.6
6.0
.3
io.5
-

5.2
5.1
3.7
5.1
1*.3
.8
15.8
-

.9
1.0
•
-

65.1

68.9

72.7

55.6

1*0.8

52.1*

63.8

60.0

98.1

91.6

97.1*

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...........................

31*. 9

31.1

27.3

l*l*.l*

59.2

1*7*6

36.2

1*0.0

1.9

8.1*

2.6

3 days • * . . . . ......................................
5 days .................................................
6 days .................................................
7 days .................................................
10 days ..............................................
11 d a y s............ ..................................
12 days ...............................................
15 days ...............................................
20 d a y s.............................................
26 d a y s.............................................
30 days ...............................................
Over 30 days ............................. .........

.8
10.1*
2.7
2.8
10.7
.7
1.3
.8
1.6
2.3
.7
.1

.8
10.9
.5
3.1
11.9
1.2
2.7
-

.
5.7

3.5
28.8
2.1
10.0
•

1.1*
35.1
3.6
2.1
17.0
-

•
1.7
15.8
2.5
.3
5.1*
-

.9
1.0
-

10.5
-

5.2
5.1
3.7
5.1
1*.3
.8
15.8
-

.1
2.2
2.1
1.6
.6
.7
-

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............................

65.1

63.8

60.0

98.1

100.0

100.0 J 100.0 j 100.0

100.0

100.0

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

-

9.1

7.0

_

_
9.1
_
•
.
.
-

_
.
7.0
.
.
-

90.9

100.0

100.0

38.9

32.2

8.5

2.2
1*.8
llt.8
17.0
.
.
.1

12.6
l*.l*
_
7.1
.
8.1
-

93.0

61.1

67.8

91.5

9.1

7.0

38.9

32.2

8.5

_

_

2.2
2.6
llt.8
17.9
1.3
-

_

_

1.9
12.6
1*.2
5.1*
-

1.3
.
_
7.2
-

1 year of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ........................... .
3 days ...................................................
5 d a y s............................................. .
6 days ................................ .................
7 d a y s............................................... .
10 days .................................................
11 d a y s..................................... ...........
12 d a y s...........................................
1$ days .................................................
20 d a y s........................... ................. .
26 d a y s.................... ...........................
3a d a y s............................................... .
Over 30 days ........................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................

3.5
28.8
2.1

1*0.0

1.9

8.1*
1.7
2.7
.1*
1.9
.6
1.1
(2/)

2.6
2.6
-

.
100.0

_
1.3
•
•
•
7.2
.
.
-

2 years 'of service

-

-

-

-

•
-

-

-

3.0
1*.5
15.3
«
18.7
1*.6
1.5

68.9

72.7

55.6

1*0.8

52.1*

-

1*.0
12.7
1.5
3.1*

-

-

-

-

1.1
(2/)
91.6

2.6

.
-

7.0
-

-

-

9.1
.
.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

90.9

93.0

•
-

97.1*

-

100.0

-

S*« footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wls., March 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
u.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
#* Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




-

-

-

.1

8.1
-

-

61.1

67.8

91.5

26

Paid SlcJz JljMute (fyobmal pAovilion A ) - GontUmed

Table E-5*

PE U C K N T OF PLA N T W O R K ER S EM PL O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E W ORKERS E M PLO Y ED IN —

Provisions far paid sick leave

M anufacture u

M a n u fa c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

D urable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries,

V

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

R etail
trade

Servioea

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9.1

Durable
goods

All

7.0

38.9

32.2

8.5

.

Non­
durable
goods

1
1
All establishnents

100.0

100.0

100.0

3U.9

31.1

27.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

59.2

lt7.6

36.2

ItO.O

1.9

6.U

100.0

2.6

5 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................. .

3 d a y s ............. ..................
5 d a y s ............. ..................
6 d a y s ....................... .......
7 d a y s ................ ..............
9 d a y s .... • .........................
10 d a y s .............................
12 d a y s ..............................
15 d a y s ..... ........................
20 d a y s ...... ............ ..........
22 d a y s ............. ................
25 days ..............................
26 d a y s ............. .
30 d a y s ...... .............. ........
Over 30 days ................ ........
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

15

.8
8.7
.5
3.1

2.9
lt.0
-

lit.l
1.2

15.5
1.5

3.0
lt.5
15.3

-

l.it
35.1
3.6
2.1
-

10.0

3.5
28.8
2.1

•

17.0

18.7

-

-

-

»

.8
-

15.8
3.1t
.3

•1

•

•

-

9.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.2
2.6
Ht.8
-

-

7.0

-

-

-

-

.1
2.1
.t
I

2.6

•

5.1

1.0

-

-

-

.
-

1.7
1.7

-

-

.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

.7
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5Jt
8.1

-

“

90.9

93.0

61.1

67.8

91.5

9.1

28.7

38.9

32.2

8.5

.
-

2.2
2.6
lit.8

.6

1.3

5.2
.

3.7
I .3
t

a
•O

.9

•

1.6
•7
.it
2.3
1.0
.1

2.7

3.U

-

-

-

-

.
-

.
-

_
-

-

•
-

i.h

.

-

.

•

.

-

“

“

10.5
•

15.8
-

-

lt.6
1.5

-

*
*

65.1

68.9

72.7

55.6

it0.8

52.lt

63.8

60.0

98.1

91.6

97.lt

37.2

31.1

27.3

ll.t
ttl

91.lt

it7.6

36.2

ItO.O

1.9

9.9

2.6

l*k

3*0

_

_

35.1
3.6
2.1
.8

lt.5
15.3

.8

5.2

1

1.1
(2/)

-

“

100.0

.6

1.3

-

-

-

17.9

12.6
5.5

-

-

-

7.2

1.3
.1

-

years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............. .

3 days..........................
5 days ..........................
6 days................... .
7 days..........................
10 days .........................
12 days .... ...... .... .........
15 days ........... ............. .
20 days................... .
26 days ...... ........... ........
30 days .......... ••••••.••.... .
35 days............... .........
60 days .........................
Over 60 day s ............ .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave.......... .....

1/
?/
*
**

.8
9.0
1.6
2.8
1.0
12.2
1.3

il.t
ttl

.8
9.0
1.6
2.8
10.0

21
.t
.9
2.8
2.3

.7
.I
t

.3
3.2

62.8

.8
8.7
.5
3.1
12.8
1.2
1.3
2.7

2.9
lt.0
13.8
1.5
1.7
3.1t

-

-

_
-

-

68.9

72.7

3.5
28.8
2.1

10.0

-

.
•
55.6

-

16.2

-

18.7

_
-

32.2

lt.6
1.5

8.6

52.lt

Includes data far industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

•
3.1t
16.1

10.5
5.U

~
63.8

5.1
3.7
It 3
.
.8

15.8

•
5.1

60.0

«
.

-

.1
2.1
.I
t

1.0

-

.9

1.3

_
98.1

2.2
.5
-

2.6

-

9.1

-

-

-

-

•
•
-

175

*

90.1

97.lt

l.l

.7
(2/)

-

-

-

17.9

100.0

-

7.0

"

-

21.7

.1

90.9

71.3

61.1

-

.
.
1.3

5.5
12.6

8.1
5.1t

•
67.8

7.2

•
-

91.5

27

T t 2 E-6: ftQ tyiK K U u U ia n &04U€l€4>
*>»
PKUCKNT OF PLA N T W ORKERS EM PLO Y ED IN —

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E W ORKERS EM PLO Y ED IN —

Type of bonus

Manufacturing
All

indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods *

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

All
indus­
tries

Services

Finance**

Manufacturing

y

;

.

j

Durable

Roods

1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

i

.1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 6 .0

2 7 .it

lil.li

6 0 .9

7 li.l

3 8 .6

2 2 .6
3 .6
1 .6

2 3 .3
3 .6
-

2 0 .9
3 .7
5 .5

1 3 .8
.6

5!t.6
6 .3
-

6 7 .5
3 .5
5 .7

3 8 .6
1 .3
-

7 3 .6

7 ii.0

7 2 .6

8 5 .6

3 9 .1

2 2 .9

6 l.it

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / .........................

U 3.3

2 9 .0

2 6 .6

3 7 .2

ItO.l

7 1 .3

8 5 .9

6 8 .ii

5 5 .5

3 3 .1

2 6 .it

Christmas or year-end.............
Profit-sharing ....................
Other ••..........................

3 8 .6
3 .8
3 . it

2 it.3
3 .7
2 .5

2 1 .3
lu ll
2.1t

3U .6
1 .5
2 .6

iiO .l
-

6 1 .0
1 0 .3

“

-

7 9 .3
it .l
7 .1

6 6 .3
1 .0
7 .8

li6 .it
1 0 .1
8 .8

2 9 .2
3.U
1 .9

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses .................. .........

5 6 .7

7 1 .0

7 3 .lt

6 2 .8

5 9 .9

2 8 .7

llt .l

3 1 .6

ltli.5

6 6 .5

Information not available .......... .

-

-

\J
y
*
**

-

-

-

-

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

-

Retail
trade

goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

o

Whole­
sale
trade

I

1 0 0 .0

io o

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable

1 0 0 .0

All establishments............ .......

-

1

All

.it

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .0

-

Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table 1-7:

9*ti44ACH*C& 04iJ P-e*Ui04t P lo ti
P E P C K N T OF PLANT W O RK ERS EM PLO Y ED INf—

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E W ORKERS EM PLO Y ED IN —

Type of plan

All establishments................... ...
Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2/ ....................

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u fa c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

All

100.0

100.0

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

Public
utilities*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

y

100.0 i

All

Durable
goods

100.0 1 100.0 0 100.0 0

\-

!

-

utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

100.0.

-

100.00

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

R etail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

-

9li.5

96.2

98.3

89.1

95.it

91.5

87.8

93.8

81t.3

88.3

91.7

96.7

79.1

85.8

88.3

77.6

57.2

Life insurance .....................
Health insurance ...................
Hospitalization .....................
Retirement pension .................

8it.7
8it.6
77.1
71.7

93.it
91.8
87.6
78.2

96.7
95.0
91.2
82.6

82.0.
80.6
75.2
63.1

63.0
89.9
56.3
7it.9

7lt.2
63.1
53.8
57.0

55.9
it3.9
itl.3
5it.5

83.9
83.3
7it.lt
73.5

58.8
73.2
62.3
9.0

77.9
75.9
72.8
56.5

86.lt
85.lt
83.1
59.it

93.6
90.8
89.0
67.8

68.2
71.7
68.3
38.0

63.1
51t.2
31.6
67.5

67.9
65.it
63.it
lt6.5

lt6.6
ltl.7
lt2.7
Jt9.2

U9.9
53.5
52.it
lt.5

Establishments with no insurance or
pension p l a n s ...................... .

5.5

3.8

1.7

i .6
t

8.5

12.2

6.2

15.7

11.7

8.3

3.3

20.9

lit.2

11.7

22.it

lt2.8

1/

y

*
**

10.9

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMSNT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis., March 1952
Bureau of Labor Statistics

28

Appendix — Scope

With the exception of the union soale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A). The covered industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their I ndus 1cm.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




at

Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents • The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, l.e., those hired to work the establishment’s full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

29

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN MILWAUKEE, WIS., 1/
'AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MARCH 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied

y

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ........ ...............................
Manufacturing .............. ••••............... .
Durable goods 2 / ........ .......... ........... .
Nondurable goods ij ............................
Nonmanufacturing......... .............. ......... .
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
u t i l it ie s...... .................... ....... .
Wholesale trade •••••............... .
Retail t r a d e ....... ................ ........ .
Finance, insurance, and real estate •••••......
Services jj/ ................... ............... .

21
21
21
21
21

1,417
622
338
284
795

292
124
69
55
168

266,700
187,300
134,200
53,100
79,400

166,040
122,060
95,780
26,280
43,980

30,230
19,590
16,210
3,380
10,640

21
21
21
21
21

65
193
321
113
103

22
39
43
31

33

17,800
11,900
32,000
10,100
7,600

14,670
4,000
15,630
6,000
3,680

2,990
1,120
1,560
4,270
700

21

21

38

7
9
10
53
16
17

1,016
1,244
2,293
59,672
1,142
4,907

1,016
1,024
2,161
54,414
537
3,629

146
120
248
10,555

8

7
17
14
120
41

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Candy and other confectionery products ...............
Foundries, nonferrous ........... ................. .
Stamped and pressed metal products .•••••••••••••••••.
Machinery industries ............................ ..
Machine-tool accessories ........... ...............
Insurance carriers ........................ .......... .

8

7/

21
21

-

2,389

1/ Milwaukee Metropolitan Area (Milwaukee County).
2/ Total establishment employment.
j/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products;
and miscellaneous manufacturing.
Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; papei^ and paper products; print­
ing and publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures;
nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
7/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.

ij




30

Index
Page

Assembler (machinery) ...............................
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery) ...............
Bartender (hotels and restaurants) .................
Bellboy (hotels and restaurants) ..... ........... ..
Bench hand (bakeries) ..................... .........
Biller, machine .................................... .
Bookbinder (printing) ........................... ...
Bookkeeper, hand ....................... .......... ..
Bookkeeping-machine operator .............. .........
Bottler (malt liquors) ..............................
Brewer (malt liquors) .............................. .
Bricklayer (building construction) .................
Bus boy (hotels and restaurants) ............. ......
Calculating-machine o p e r a t o r .......................
Candy maker (candy and other confectionery products)
Carpenter (building construction) ..................
Carpenter, maintenance ................... ..........
Cashier (hotels and restaurants) ............ .
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) ........
C l e a n e r ....... ....................................
Clerk, a c c o u n t i n g .... ..............................
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) .............
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) .........
Clerk, file ...... ....... ...................... ......
Clerk, file (Insurance carriers) ....................
Clerk, general ................................. •••••
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ................
Clerk {grocery stores) ......... .....................
Clerk (hotels and restaurants) .....................
Clerk, o r d e r ..........................
Clerk, p a y r o l l ..................... ................
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ....
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ..•••••••••.
Compositor, hand (printing) ................ ........
Coremaker, hand (nonferrous foundries) .............
Crane operator, electric bridge ........ ...........
Die setter (stashed and pressed metal products) ....,
Dipper (candy and other confectionery products) ....,
Doorman (hotels and restaurants) ...... ............ .




Page

15, IT

..................... ............. ..
8
Draftsman
16, 17
Drill-press operator (machinery) .........................
Duplicating-machine o p e r a t o r ....... ............... ......
3, 6
Electrician (building construction) ..... ................
19
Electrician, maintenance
...............................
9
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ........ ••••••.......
15
Electrotyper (printing) ••«............. ......... ...... .
20
21
Elevator operator (hotels and restaurants) •••.••........
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ..........•••••......... 16, 17, 18
Engineer, stationary ................................
9
Fireman, stationary boiler ................ ............ .
9
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) ...........
Ik
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) .................... 16, 17, 18
G u a r d .........................
11
Helper (bakeries)
19
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r ....... ......... .......... .
20, 21
Helper, trades, maintenance •••.•••.... ...................
9
Houseman (hotels and restaurants) ...................... .
21
Inspector {machinery) ............... ......................
15, 17
Inspector (stamped and pressed metal products) ...........
15
Janitor ....................
11
Janitor (machinery) ..... ...................... ...........
15, 18
Key-punch operator ............
6
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ...................
18
Laboratory technician (milk dealers) ......... ...... ......
21
Laborer (building construction) ...........................
19
Machine operator (printing) ..................... .........
20
Machine tender (printing) ......................
20
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ...... .
16, 17, 18
Machine-tool operator, toolroom ...........................
9
17
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) ........... .
Machinist, maintenance ...........................
9
17, 18
Machinist, production (machinery) ............... .........
Maid (hotels and restaurants) .................. ..........
21
Mailer (printing) ..............
20
Maintenance man, general utility ....••..... .............
9
Maintenance man, general utility (stamped and pressed
metal products) .........
15
Meat cutter (grocery stores) ................. ............
21

16
21
21
19

k

20
3,

k
k
19
19
19

21

5

lb-

19
9

21

Ik
11
3, 5

18
18
5
18
3, 5

18
21

21
3, 5

3, 6

18
18

20

lk
11
15

1^
21

31

Index QtmtiKumd.
Page

E2SL
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ........ .
10
M e c h a n i c , maintenance ...............................
10
Milling-machine operator (machinery)
..............
16 , 17, 18
M i l l w r i g h t .....................................................
10
Mixer (bakeries) .....................
19
Mo g u l operator (candy and other confectionery
products) .............. .............. ................... .
1^
Molder (bakeries) .................... . .......................
19
Molder (nonferrous foundries) ........................... .
1^
Moto r t r u c k d r i v e r .............................................
20, 21
Ifurse, industrial (registered) ........ ............... .
8
Office b o y ....................................
Office g i r l ......... ........................ ................
6
Oiler .. ...........
10
Operator (local transit) ............... ............... .
20
Order filler ........... ........................ ..............
11
Overman (bakeries) ................. .. .......................
19
Packer ....................... ...................... ...........
1 1 , 12
Packer (candy a nd other confectionery products) ......... .
lU
19
Painter (building construction) ........... .
Painter, maintenance .................... ........... ....... .
10
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) .............. ............ .
21
Permanent-mold-machine operator (nonferrous foundries) ...
14
Photoengraver (printing) ..............................
20
Pipe fitter, maintenance ........ ...................... .
10
Plasterer (building construction) .......... . .............
19
Plumber (building construction) ............... ...........
19
Porter ........ ....... .................... ....... ............
11
Porter (hotels a n d r e s t a u r a n t s ) ..........................
21
Pourer, m etal (nonferrous foundries) ........... ..........
lt
i.
Power-shear operator (stamped a nd pressed m etal
p r o d u c t s ) ........ .............. ............................
15
P r e m i u m acceptor (insurance carri e r s ) ......................
18
Press a s s i stant (printing) ...................
20
Press feeder (printing) ............................... ......
20
Pr e s s m a n (printing) .......
20
Punch-press operator (stamped a nd pressed m e t a l
products) ....................
15
R ece i v i n g c l e r k ...................
12




Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery)
........
Secretary ..........
Section head (insurance carriers) ........ .............. .
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries) ....... .............
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ........ ....... .
Shipping c l e r k ........ .......... .................. ......
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ..............................
Stenographer ........................... .......... .........
Stenographer (insurancecarriers) .................
.........
S t e r eotype (printing)
Stock h a n d l e r ...... ........... ........... ...............
3
Stock handler (machinery) .......... ................ ......
Stock handler (stamped and pressed metal products) •••••..
Switchboard o p e r a t o r .....................
Switchboard operator-receptionist ................
Tabulating-machine operator
................ ......... .
Telephone operator (hotels and restaurants) ••••.........
Tool-and-dle m a k e r ..... ...............
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ..... .....................
Tool-and-die maker (stamped and pressed metal
products) ................................................
Tracer .....................................................
Transcribing-machine o p e r a t o r ..................
Truck d r i v e r .... ..........................................
Trucker, hand ..............................................
Trucker, hand (machinery) ...••••...................... .
Trucker, hand (nonferrous foundries) ..... ...............
Trucker, hand (stamped and pressed metal products) •••••••
Trucker, pcarer
.........................................
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ............
Typist ..............
Typist (insurance carriers) •••••••••.....
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ..........
Valter (hotels and restaurants) •••••.........
V a t c b m a n ..... ................................. ....... •• • •
Watchman (nonferrous foundries) ...........................
Welder, hand (machinery) ..........
Wrapper (bakeries)
........ ................. •••••••
Wrapper (candy and other confectionery products) ........
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952

16, 17
6
18
1^
10
12
12
6, 7
18

20
12
17
15
7
7
3> 7
21
10
17, 18
15
8
7
12, 13
12
17
I*
*
15
13
16 , 17
8
18
18
21
13
1^
17
19
1^







THE OCCUPATIONAL W
AGE SURVEY SERIES

In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
City

Zri££_

BIS Bulletin No.

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
Seattle, Washington

20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
25
25
15
20
20
20
15
15
20

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1075
1064
1067
1068
1081
1070
1082
1042
1071
1058
1069
1057

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

This report was prepared in the Bureau's North Central Regional Office.
cations may be addressed to:

Conmuni-

Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.

The North Central Region includes the following States:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky

Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Montana

Nebraska
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102