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Occupational Wage Survey

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
£*ge
INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................

1

THE CINCINNATI METROPOLITAN A R E A ...........................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ................................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ...................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ........................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations .......................................
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ..............................

3
8
9
11

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* 6-336 Foundries, nonferrous .............................
B-3463 Stamped and pressed metal products........... ' ...............................
.
B-35
Machinery industries:
Machinery................
Machine-tool accessories ...................................................
B-40
Railroads ...............................
B-5452 Milk dealers ..................................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers .......................................... ............. . •••

1.
4
15
16
16
17

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction.................
C-205 Bakeries......................................................................
C-2082 Malt liquors ...................................
C-27
Printing......................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees .............................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and hel p e r s ..........................
C-542 Meat cutters...................
C-58
Restaurants .....................................
C-7011 Hotels ........................................................................

18
18
18
18
19
19
19
20
20

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plantw o r k e r s .......................................

21

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions...........................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ............................
E-3
Paid holidays .................................................................
E-4
Paid vacations .................................................................
E-5
Paid sick leave ...............................................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ..........................................................
E-7
Insurance and pension p l a n s ........

22
23
23
24
25
27
27

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ............................................................

28

I N D E X ......................................................................................

30

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports are avail­
able upon request for auto repair shops (May 1951), ferrous
foundries (June 1951), and power laundries (May 1951).

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents

13
13

Introduction 1/
The Cincinnati area is 1 of 4.0 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys* Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-vide basis* Cross-industry sampling methods were thus
utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types of
occupations:
(a) office; (b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping. In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4.) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions* jj/
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. Earnings data for these jobs
have been presented in Series B tables* Union scales (Series C
tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational
earnings for several industries or trades in which the great
majority of the workers are employed under terms of collectivebargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are
indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Cincinnati Metropolitan Area
The Cincinnati Metropolitan Area, fifteenth in size
in the Nation, consists of Hamilton County, Ohio, and Campbell
and Kenton counties, Kentucky. Total area population was over
900,000 in 1950, representing a gain of 15 percent over the
previous decade. More than half the inhabitants of the area
lived in Cincinnati which had a population of more than 504.,000
in 1950 according to the Census Bureau. This represents an in­
crease of about 11 percent over 194.0.

i/ Prepared in the Bureau's regional office in Chicago, 111.,
by Mary E. Stokes under the direction of George E. Votava, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau's
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2/ The construction and extractive industries and government
institutions were excluded from the study; see appendix for dis­
cussion of scope and method of survey.




Cincinnati occupies a commanding commercial position
on the Ohio River halfway between Pittsburgh and the Mississippi
River, and the Ohio River plays an important role in the city's
economy. By a series of locks and dams, the Ohio River is navi­
gable the year round, placing Cincinnati on the Mississippi in­
land waterway system* Seven certificated water freight carriers
transport coal, oil, coke, and other bulky cargo on the river*
Other freight and passenger transportation are supplied by 8
railroad trunk systems, 128 interstate motortruck lines, 6
scheduled airlines, and numerous bus lines.
Nonagricultural wage and salary workers in the Cincin­
nati Metropolitan area numbered more than 363,000 in January
1952. More than 4.0 percent of these workers were employed in
the wide variety of manufacturing plants located in the area*
The major manufacturing industries include electrical and non­
electrical machinery, food products, fabricated metal products,
chemicals, apparel, motor vehicles and equipment, printing and
publishing, furniture and fixtures, paper and allied products,
and transportation equipment. Manufacturing employment was
fairly evenly divided between durable- and nondurable-goods
establishments.
The electrical and nonelectrical machinery groups to­
gether employ approximately a fourth of all manufacturing work­
ers and fabricate a large variety of products, including machine
tools, electric motors, radio and television sets, laundry ma­
chinery, machine-shop products, and valves. Important nondur­
able-goods products include foodstuffs, soap and glycerin,
playing cards, chemicals, clothing, cosmetics, footwear, plas­
tics and plastic products.
Nonmanufacturing establishments in the Cincinnati
area provided employment to about 209,000 workers in January
1952. Wholesale and retail trade establishments employed 74.,500
workers, approximately 35 percent of the wage and salaried em­
ployees on the payrolls of nonmanufacturing establishments.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities em­
ployed 35,600 workers, and another 18,000 were reported in
building construction. Finance, insurance, and real estate
institutions provided employment to 63,200. Federal, State, and
local governments employed nearly 17,000.
About four-fifths of all plant workers in the industry
and establishment-size groups within the scope of the Bureau's
study were employed by firms having written agreements with
labor unions. Approximately 8 of 10 factory workers in manu­
facturing plants were employed under terms of collective-bargaining agreements. In nonmanufacturing industries the pro­
portion of nonoffice workers covered by union agreements ranged

2/ See appendix table
able-goods industries.

for listing of durable- and nondur­

2

from less than a fifth in financial institutions to more than
95 percent in transportation (except railroads), communication,
and other public utilities. About two-fifths of the workers in
wholesale trade, and four-fifths in services, worked in union­
ized establishments.
Less than a tenth of all office workers were working
under the provisions of union agreements. Unionization of
offices was notable only in the public utilities group where
nearly three-fourths of the white-collar workers were employed
in establishments having written agreements covering office
workers.

Occupational Wage Structure
Extensive foraal wage adjustments were made by firms
in the Cincinnati area between January 1950, the base period
for the Wage Stabilization B o a r d s 10 percent "catch-up'* wage
formula, and the time of the survey® These general wage in­
creases varied greatly in amounts and were most prevalent among
the manufacturing industries, in which more than half the plant
workers received pay raises totaling 15 or more cents an hour.
The tendency among larger companies was to grant similar in­
creases to both office and plant workers. However, many smaller
establishments adjusted salary levels of office workers on an
individual basis rather than by general increases.
Formal wage and salary structures were reported in
establishments employing more than 85 percent of the plant work­
ers and two-thirds of the office workers. Among manufacturing
industries, wage progression plans providing a range of rates
for time-rated plant workers were slightly more prevalent than
plans calling for a single or flat rate for each job. Singlerate plans were more common in the nonmanufacturing industry
groups. Large numbers of nonoffice workers in the latter groups
were employed in establishments that determined job rates on an
individual basis.
About a fifth of the plant workers were paid incentive
rates. In manufacturing industries a little more than a fourth
of the factory workers participated in some type of piece-rate




or bonus plan. This practice was more extensive in durablegoods than in nondurable-goods industries. Incentive systems
were either nonexistent or relatively insignificant among non­
manufacturing industries.
Virtually all formal wage plans for office workers
provided a range of rates. Few office workers were working
under single-rate plans, and a third were employed in establish­
ments that determined salaries on an individual basis.

Most Cincinnati firms within the scope of the study
maintained established minimum entrance rates for inexperienced
plant workers. Although entrance rates ranged from less than 60
cents an hour to more than $1.65, minima of $1 or more were re­
ported by establishments employing nearly half of all plant
workers. No manufacturing, public utilities, or wholesale in­
dustry establishment reported minimum entrance rates of less
than 75 cents an hour.
Nearly two-thirds of the women office workers were on
a 4.0-hour-workweek schedule in February 1952; a fourth had
schedules of less than 40 hours. The 40-hour week was also pre­
dominant among plant workers, with7 out of 10 working 40 hours.
Nearly all the remaining plant workers were scheduled to work a
longer workweek.

Late-shift operations employed about 15 percent of the
factory workers in the Cincinnati area in February 1952. All
such workers were paid shift differentials. In durable-goods
manufacturing industries about two-thirds of the workers re­
ceived a cents-per-hour differential and the others a percentage
over day-shift rates. Virtually all extra shift workers in non­
durable-goods were paid a cents-per-hour differential.
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing. In
19 of 29 office classifications permitting comparison, average
salaries of workers in manufacturing plants were higher than in
nonmanufacturing establishments. Average hourly earnings of
plant workers studied in all industries were slightly higher in
manufacturing for 15 of 25 job categories for which comparisons
were possible.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A - l :

3

O fyice O ccupation*

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n an a r e a
b a s i s i n C i n c i n n a t i , O h io , b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , F e b r u a r y 1 9 5 2 )

S ee f o o t n o t e a t en d o f t a b l e .
*
T ra n sp o rta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i lr o a d s ) ,
* * F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e .




c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .

NOTE:

O c c u p a t io n a l Wage S u r v e y , C i n c i n n a t i , O h io , F e b ru a r y 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF ..LABOR
B u re a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

W h e re v e r p o s s i b l e e a r n i n g s d a t a h ave b e e n p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e l y f o r b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s .
D ata c o u l d n o t b e show n s e p a r a t e l y f o r r e t a i l t r a d e due t o t h e o m is s i o n o f d e p a rt m e n t and
l i m i t e d - p r i c e v a r i e t y s t o r e s ; t h e r e m a in d e r o f r e t a i l t r a d e i s a p p r o p r i a t e l y r e p r e s e n t e d i n
d a t a f o r a l l i n d u s t r i e s co m b in e d and f o r n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g .

Table A-l:

O ffice Occupation* Con tinu e d
-

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Cincinnati, Ohio, by industry division, February 1952)

See footnote at end of table,
*
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .
** Finance, insurance, and re al estate#




$

Table A-li

O ffice OcCMfXtUitUU - GottfiM U td

(A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d on an a r e a
b a s i s i n C i n c i n n a t i , O h io , b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , F e b ru a r y 1 9 5 2 )

See footnote at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6

O ^ice OccufuUiOMl - GoM tinum
d

T a b le A - i:

(Average straight-time weekly hovers and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Cincinnati, Ohio, by industry division, February 1952)

A verage
N um ber
of
w orkers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E 1 :LY E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$ . t
$
$
$
$
$
$
1$
$
fo.0 0 32.50 3I .0 0 37.50 *0.00 1*2.50 45.00 k7.50 ;o.oo 52.50 35.00 37.50 50.00 32.50 3 - 00 37.50
5.
70.00 72.60 75.00 30.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
$
and
and
iiiaer
32.50 35.00 37-go iO.OO l2*5P =i5.PQ_ r.5P 5 0 .0 0 ;2.go 55.00 37.50 50.00 62.50 55.00 57.60 70.00 72.60 76.00 80.00 86.00 90.00 96.00 over

W eekly
h o urs
(S ta n d a rd )

W eekly
earnings
(S ta n d a rd )

k9.00
k9.00
k7.50
50.50
k8.50
k9..50
k9.00

_
-

39.50
39.50“
33.50
kl.oo
kO.OO

k
3
2
1
1

kk .0 0
kk.50"
k3.50
k7.00
k3.00
kO.OO

6

Women - Continued
Clerks, payroll ............ .
Manufacturing ...... .
Durable goods ..............
Nondurable goods ............... ...
Nonmanufacturing .......... ...........
..... .
Public utilities * •
Finance ** ..................... .

507
U16
255
161
91
37
2k

kO.O
ko.o
kO.O
39.5
39.5
39.5
37.5

Duplicating-machine operators..........»
Manufacturing ........ .............. .
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ............. •••••

101
66
ki
25

33*5
“ kSTOT
kO.O
ko.o

35

Key-punch operators............ ••••••••
Manufacturing..... .
Htirohl * g t t e
rrH
f
iiii <? t *ii
Nondurable goods
M m monnf nr+iY n
*.i*1
lir rill

39.5
335
”
""185".. I P "
kO . 0
13U
39.0
52
39.0
Hi9
37.0
55
287
171
116

Office girls ..................... .....
Manufacturing ...................... .
Nonmanufacturing.... ............. .
Uhnl noa I +raHa
p .*
f nna n X r
\
j

26

bo

Secretaries ....... ....................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods ...... .
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * *............. .
Wholesale trade.... •••••••...... .
Finance ** ............ ...........
Services......•••••..••.... .

Stenographers, general ...................
Manufacturing.......«.......... .
Durable goods.... ....... .
Nondurable goods ............. .
Nonmanufacturing ...... *........ .
PnM 1r ivM 11+F
*
.
Wholesale trade ........ .
Finance ** ................. ..
Services ..................... ..

3 6 .0

855
U78
37k
630

72
102
205
166

2.11k
1,266
711
555
3k8
92

260
307
80
i

39.0
kO .0
37.5
37.5
O

- —
6
6

35.00

26
2k
10
lk
2
2

68
k7
3k
13
21
11
3

33
26
12
lk
7
5
1

6k
58
32
26
6
1
~

27
19
13
6

9
5

15
11
1
10
k

13
13
13
-

8

lk
10
9
1
k

15
2
2
13

10

22

31

62
ko
17
23
22

IT ~ n r
3
lk
1
6
6

6

•
-

6 0 .5 0
6 1 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
6 k. 00

61.50
57.00
59.50

39.5
kO.O
kO.0
39.5
38.5
39.5
39.5
37.0
kO.0

33
31
21
10
2
1
”

k9.0Q
U9.00
k9.50
k8.50
k8.50
k9.00
5ll50
U8.00
U6.50

59.00
6 3 .5 0

8
8

90
kk"
k6
O
J
oc
O

”

75
52"
13

35.00
36.50
-.-U
ir '
bc'on
b

39.0
39.5
kO.0
39.5
38.5
kO.O
39.5
37.5
38.5

8
3
3
5
5

_
-

k
k

3k
85
15 — k T
lk
37
1
7
19
kl
k
10

17
3

19
r

19
19 [

c
;

“

.
-

36

72
k9
30
19
23

206
113
k8
65
93
b

279
lbb
71
87
121

26

kl
U2
19

5

18

2

k
lk
18
8

7

-

5
1

9

_

1

6
5

k

7

k2 |
33 !
27
6
9
6
“ ;

2

55
k7
35
12
8
1

-

1
1

1
-

1

x

30

28

12
10
2
18
8

2k

-

36
35
lk
21
1
1

19
13
3
5
6
2
3

19
15
15
k
2

17
10
2
8
7
5
2

2
2
2

-

1
1

-

_
-

1
1

-

1

-

3
3
2
1
-

3
3
3
_
-

3
2
2
1
1
-

5
5
5
-

1
1
1
-

.

-

_

.

-

_

-

_

.

.

_

_

-

-

-

1

-

-

23
9

-

-

-

2
2

-

1
1

1
1

7
2

15
9
k

-

_

-

2

.

.1

1

125
81
56
25
kk
13
7
16
U

119
70
38
32
k9
22
lk
8

1
1
1
_
_
-

_
.
_
-

.
.
-

.

-

-

_

m

«
.

_

3
3
3
-

7
k

lk

3

2

2
2^

i
,
u

.
-

10

-

-

11
3

15
8
b

1
I
_____

9
5

15

20

65
27
33
15
16

See footnote at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1

69
59
51
8
10
5

11

--- 2

k

36
10

25
k
k
21

2
5
13

xi

53

>3
4
37

33
5
8
20

k5
k
6
21
7

3k3
192
9k
98
151
k

280
203
135
68
77

27

17 8

88

20
18
2

29
20
12

58
11

116
60

95
5k
kl
83
2
11
k9
12

17 0
10 8

8

i

63
k5
62
10
8
12
25

203
33k
202 1 10b
iko
71
62
3k
98
137
8
19
k8
33
6k
33
2
5

6

3k
26
56
5
5
15
11

131
106
59
k7
25
6

1

12
7

171
99
6k
35
72
3
10
28
17

116

72
k5
23
22
27
16
10
1

k7
25
7
18
22
1
10
9

68

37
31
k8
15
3
18
2

2

28
19
lb
9
13
7
2
2
k 1 19
1
10
k
9

59
38

k3
37

21

10

k3
27
17

•17

27

10

21

6

10 9

52
15
37
57
3
19
k
29

hi
33
8

10
10
1

25
lk
2
10

9
"

3
3

-

k
8
7

1
.
3
-

16
15
1
-

31

9
7
5
2
2

3
3
1
2
-

3
3
.
3

3

-

_

_

_
-

_

«.

t
1

k
26
26

-

2

.

-

!
-

1

3
3
1
1
1

.
«
_

_

.

_

7

Ofyice Occupation^ - Continued
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Cincinnati, Ohio, by industry division, February 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N um ber
of
'vorkers

Weekly
hours
(S ta n d a rd )

W eekly
earnings
(S ta n d a rd )

h —
$
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 p . o o 52.50 55.00 57.50 j&.oo & .50 & .0 0 $7.50 fo.oo /2 .50 7*5.00 J0.00 6 . 0 0 90.00 n
95.00
and
and
under
32.50 35*00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.0(3 152.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over
1---------

Women - Continued
36.0

$
55.00

325
124
65
59
201
25
43
42
62

40.5
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.5
40.0
41*0
19. *
5
41*5

46.00
50.00
49.50
50.00
43.50
57.00
42*50
42.00
40.00

459
205
139
66
254
81
39
57

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39«5
39*5
37.5
39*5

43.50
44*50
45.50
42.50
42.00
43.00
42.50
43.00

Tabulating-machine operators ............
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ........ .
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing................ .
Finance « * ............... ........

160
55
38
17
105
52

38.5
39*5
40.0
39.0
37*5
35*5

47.50
51.50
50.50
53.50
45.50
41.00

Transcribing-machine operators, general ...
Manufacturing ........................
F i r l la g f l l
lifh
nvf
Nnndnr’ a gnnHi Tt-tITTTttttTttlttIf.
flhl
Nonmanufacturing.....................
Wholesale trade ..........................................
FinAnre
TTtT. T. TTtT. Ttf tI__ TT- TtT

278
169
129
UO
109
23
62

39.0
40.0
4.0.0
39.5
38.0
40.0
36.5

43.50
43.50
43.00
44.OO
43.50
49.50
41.00

Typists, class A ....................................................
Manufacturing............................. ......................
Durable goods............................... ..
Nondurable goods ................................... ..
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................
V h n l maaI e t.r a H n T. TIIIT. T111I. . ___ IT.
Finance ** ....................................................

557
422
215
207
135
33
67

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
38.0
38.0
37.5

46.50
45.50
47.00
44.00
49.50
58.50
44.00

Typists, class B .................................................... 1,998
Manufacturing ....................................................
989
Durahi e gnnd.*
?
1111(1T1TIT1T1I619
Nondurable goods ............................. ..
370
Nrr^nyjmiTArt.i]t Ing t__,T,,T,TT,,,____ --tt L,009
*
puh"l ^r
1 ^ a<
»
, i iti r i i - - «»
44
a o d ] a f .r a d n
t T- T . T. . TI T. T. TTt t t
187
Pinflr)(*A
( 1i 1TIttIlfT-TT-«TrTttI. tT
487
181
Services .........................

39.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
38.5
40.0
40.5
37.O
39.5

40.00
a . 00
42.50
39.00
39.00
36.00
42.50
37.50
a . 00

Stenographers, technical................

29

Switchboard operators ................ .
Manufacturing ......... ..............
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods .......... ..... .
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ................

Switchboard operator-receptionists .......

Nonmanufacturing
Whnl a h a )f
t
Finance
Rervlres

TtTTTrTTT-tTT..TTTtf,
____ T.

_

_

_

_

1

3

14
3
3
11
1

36
3
3
33
_
10
1
20

59
19
4
15
40
3
20
7

76
19
13
6
57
-

23,
15
7
8
8
_
2
5

15
13
8
5
2
.
.
2

3

-

70
24
22
2
46

42
21
13

3

4

2

72
23
10
13
49
12
g
14

37
24
22

5

94
18
14
4
76
28
10
24

71
43
27
16
28
xx

1

39
28
9
19
XI
5
2
1

21
12
x
8

9
9
9

6
1
1
5
5

7
2
2
5
5

6
3
2
1
3
3

19
4.
3
1
15
3

30
8
5
3
22
9

23
7
6
1
16
8

12
5
4
1
7
6

5
3
2
1
2
-

2
2
2

8
2
2

20
17
17

45
24
19

28
16
13
3
12
3
3

56
38
31
7
18
11
7

46
39
32
7
7
_
6

8
2
2
6
1
3

7
2
x
x
5
_
x

87
75
32
43
12
1
11

84
79
49
30
5

71
49
22
27
22

17
12
9
3
5

70
63
50
13
7

29
22
20
2
7

.4

7

5

3

6

384
181
91
90
203
5
59
S
it
21

208
120
95
25
88
2
25
10
24

136
88
87
1
48
x
33
5
7

139
104
102
2
35

79
37
29
8
42

8
5
x
4
3

20
2
13

5
XI
26

3

10
10
10

8
8
1
1
6

9

9
8

1
9

7

6

6

9
21

6

2

7

5

2

2

1

28
17
9
8
11
2

5
3
2
1
2
-

17
11
4
7
6
6

7
5
4
1
2
1

2
1
_
1
1
1

10
9
7
2
1
1

5
2
1
1
3
3

9
3
_
3
6
6

1
1
_
1
-

3

2

13

5

3

_

_

6

_
.
_

_

_

•
_
.
_

.
_

_

_

_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

1
1
_
1
-

1
_
_
_
1
-

_
-

_
_
_

_

-

-

_
.

_

_
-

_
_

-

_

_

_

x

10
9
9

8

10
10
g
2

x
x

6
6

3
3

-

-

47
30
6
24
17

65
57
13
44
8

-

-

80
170
35 — 65“
9
50
26
16
104
45
1
16
5
25
84
4
13

17

8

370
162
81
81
208
12
5
151
18

413
182
73
109
231
7
34
■
>32

5

21
_
6

15
9
7
2
6
1

1
_
_
1
1

5
4
4
1
-

8
3
3
5
-

4
3.
3
1
-

3
1
_
1
2
-

1
1
_
1
_
-

_
-

_
-

3
1

3
1

_
-

2
-

_
-

_
.

_
.

_

x
2
2

x
2
2

_
-

2
2

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

9
6
3
3
3

22
6
5
1
16
10

7
7
7
-

3
3
3
-

2
2
2
-

_

_

_
_

-

-

_
-

3

14
3
2
1
11
10
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

4
2

1
1

_

_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_

3

2
2

1

_

_

_

'

_

50
25
12
13
25
2
22

4
_
4
2

'

30
8
4
4
22
12
2
3
3
x
2

-

_

_

_

_

_

x

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for wnich employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

_
-

_

1

ekly

hours.

6

O+td ^ ecA tU C ol OoCUfxUiOtU

Table A-2:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Cincinnati, Ohio, by industry division, February 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N um ber
of
w orkers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
W eekly Under l*5.oo 17-50 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 5 0 60.00 62.50 6 5 . 0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 1 0 5 . 0 0 no.oo 115.00 120.00
W eekly
hours
earnings $
and
(S ta n d a rd ) (S ta n d a rd )
l*5.oo
115.00 120.00 over
80.00 ,85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00
L7.50 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 55.00 5 7 . 5 0 6 0 . 0 0 62.50 65.00 6 7 . 5 0 70.00 72.50
S

Men

Draftsmen, c h i e f .....................
Manufacturing .... ............ ........

112
112

39.5
39.5

103.50
103.50

Draftsmen ................................
Manufacturing .........................

555
533

1*0.0
1*0.0

81*.00
8U.00

6
6

3
3

Draftsmen, j u n i o r ............. ..........
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................

385
362
362

1*0.5
~Ho75
1*0.5

65.50
65.00
65.00

1

-

-

-

29
29

7
7

12
12

6
~

~

T

3
~
3

21
21

7
7

6
6

1
*
1
*

'

21
21

13
13

3
3

6
5

8
5

18
*
15

35
3*
1

63
62

132
123

62
61

78
77

30
26

3*
1
3*
1

18
18

3
3

9
9

*

73
72
72

37
37
37

59
59
59

33
32
32

1*0
37
37

3*
1
3*
l
3*
1

3§
38
38

19
13
13

19
10
10

1
1
1

1
1
1

_

_

.

-

-

.

*

1
*
3
3

17
16
16

9
9
9

*

Tracers ..................................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................

81*
71
71

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

1 1 .00
**
1*3.50
1*3.50

2 / 1*8

130
120
99
21
10

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5
39.0

60.50
60.50
59.00
68.00

1

11
*

9
9
9

9
9
9

10
9
9

2
1
1

1
-

3
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

3
3
3

6
6

15
12
12
-

30
27
25
2
3

23
22
22
.
1

11
11
7
1
*

9
9
8
1

10
10
8
2

3
3

11
10
1
*
6
1

1
1
1

1

1.
1
1

Women

Nurses, industrial (registered) .........
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ............. .........

%

6 * 50
1.

1
1

-

.

-

5
1

3

3
.

.

3
3
-

3

2
2
.
2

1
.

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

•

_

_

_

1

1

_

_

_
_

_

1

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours*
Includes 3 workers at $1*2.50 and under $1*5; 1 2 at $1*0 - $1*2.50; 9 at $37*50 - $1*0; 1 at $35 - $37*50; 8 at $32.50 - $35; 12 at $30 - $32*50.
|




NOTE:

Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

9

Table a-3: Maintenance and Pow&i plant OccupationA
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an ar e a
basis in Cincinnati, Ohio, b y industry division, February 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O RK ERS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R LY E A R N IN G S OF—

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
$
hourly Under 1 .25 f.30 f.35 i . i , I o k
earnings *

l.5o i .55 i.60 f.65 i . 70 1.75 1.80 i .35 1.90 i .95 1.00 ^.05
S

$

^.10

2.2C 2.25
$
2.15 $

$

*

2.30

2.40 * . » $
2 ! 5 2.5(
2.35 $
and

1.25
1.30 1.35 l.llQ 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1 . ^ 2.QQ 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.2Q 2.25 2.30 ^ 3 5 2.40 2.45 2.5C OVI 1
$
Caroenters. maintenance
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••.... ............. .

9
9

99

5
1

Nondurable g o o d s .... ............ ..............
Nonmanufacturing ••••••.•••••.... .......... .

101

Electricians, maintenance ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ........ .......••••••••......
Durable goods ............. ................ .
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing

527
442
305
137
85

Engineers, stationary ........ ........... .
Manufacturing ........•«•••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods ............. .................. .
Nondurable g o o d s ..... .......
Nonmanufacturing

122

335“
77

i;sr~

1.69
1.99
2.06

Helpers, trades, maintenance........ .........•••••••
f f f t n n g ii tit mti ttt ttm trt tti tt iti tM ttt ti
hif a M n ( H a _____________..._________._______
taa
Nondurable goods
flonmarmfantii-ring fMftftt tt ttt ftt Mt fft tM ...t t M t ,

_

-

2.04

-

.
.

_
-

f

t

1.99
2.03
1.74

2 .~

1.60

13
7
23
17

1.66

1.51
1.36
1 .6 l

6

2

7

38

16

6

37
36

-

-

-

-

1

.

34

-

2
2

11
8
8

2

-

-

3

44
I T
.
26

9
2

6

1

2
7

12
6

6

92
6o

3

1

1

6

108
60

60

OX

20
6

2U

ih

36

xp

172
6 |l
L8

21*

17
107
92
36
36
36

30

20
20

U8
U5

1.57
1.57
1.57

15
15
15

39
39
39

21
21
21

1.90
1.90
1 7O
f
X. ft

_

193
33
32

6

Machinists, maintenance
Manufacturing
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable goods •••••••••*•••••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••*••••••••••

484
C5I—

609

2

1
1

2

10

13
13

1

6

1

-

25

64

7 ft~
5

43
16
15

28

22

9

.
-

1
2

28
26

2h
2
2

19

.

1

2?
u

23
22

26

21

15

1
1

21

9

32 '
32

21

47
46
9
37

47
46
36

22
21

34
30

2

32

56
31
31

l
l

-

30
19
17
31

-

33
32
31

H r

10
7
7
3

2

-

24
-

-

7

IT H r
u

26

10
10

h

m

3
7

5

3

-

5
5
4

9 .
4

56
44

6

2h
20

5

12

16
12

12

L

62
58
29
29
4

-

-

45
42
4o

?8

23
23

37

8

26

8

14
14

m

2

12

12

4
4

14

_

3

3

1

-

-

2

-

-

6

13
-

27
15

36
33

26
26

4

10

6

2

_

1
2
2

29

24

4

1
1

-

.

3
3

21

9
9

25

-

31
8

.

15
4

-

37
37

13
n~

20

4

17

-

8

23

-

22
16

m

2

_

1

.6

.

23

~ u

m

4
19

-

-

32

8

•

.
11
1

•

16

12
11

_

32

6

-

83

1

11

82
1

t
$

1

11

.

_

_

81

5

1

11

1
1

«

2

1

.

.

.

.

.

2
2

•

il
l
xu

.

.

.

.

18

4

4

12

11

1
3

$1
51

16
16

61
61

16

61

3

m

20
1

9

•

•

•

6
6

51

37

l
i

6

1

8

9

20
2

15
g

5
2
2

71

8

71
Ix
71
fX

11
11
31

87
87
fi7
Of

96
29
56~ 29
56
29

18
18

8

12

66

13

11 .
11 .

65 n r
2
59

32
28^

51
36
25

26
21
3

11

18
5
5

8

25

18

17
Xf

155
155
155

13
4

-

25

20

g

59

1

6

44
"IT

20

83

59

ll

7

u*

59

8
.

3
3

18
8
1

32
30
26
4

2h
22

26
a
0

1
1

14

32
23

21
2
19

23
17

12

105
103

29

17
13

1

4

34

1
1

4

H r

22

7
7

1

11
10
6
1

26
12

7
1

7

2

9

5
4

-

79
53

1 .8 l
1.80

609
555—

1
+
2

12

ho

17
30
28

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ..•••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing
Durable goods

19
19
19

1

-

-

6

17
17
17

L

6

1.46
i.5o
1.1*3
1.58
I. 3 6
1.35

-

-

-

6
6
3 T
2

8

-

258

« ttttitttttttt tttttttttttttm

9

6

35
3u

l

17
17

.
.
-

•

20

5U
29

.

9
9
9

7
l

43

1.63
1.58

111

298
28U
21*1

*

10
10
10

.

_

2.11

875
"~59l—
293

_

_
„
-

l

-

-

1.87
1.99

532
421
175
246

.

1.75
1.97

87

k9

_

1.85

258

Firemen, stationary boiler •••••.•••••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ............... ................... ...
Durable g o o d s ...............••••••.............
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing
Finance -H •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
tt
Services ••*••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

puhllft

1.92

297
1

!

g
g

18

4
4
4
»

pnhli

a ttiiMtttttftttrimtttMtttt

Maintenance men. general utility ......... ••»•••••••••
Manufacturing ..... ............................ .
Durable goods ••••••••••••••.«••.... ......• ••••
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing
^ n lfia a lA

g ra tia

. . .

1
1

1.68
1.66

21*8

1.60
1.70
1.81

•
-

16

20

T

5 20
~

2

2

~

2

~

20

-




1
U

mr
6

23
23
21

37

45

1.
3

37

-

6
5
5

50
50

4?

87

28

17

8

6

48

nr TT~7ft~
33

5
1

97

8

16

1.78

See footnote ab end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, an d other pii>lic utilities.
*» Finance, insurance, and real estate.
NOTE*

48
17
*
47

2.07

668

t t t m t i t M t t t t i t u t t t n i i t t

«
»

3

"585“
338
82
32

3
3

2

1

8

20

70

h2

-

.

3
3

•

•

10

-

8

48

42
1

26
2

L
1
*

15
15

98
93
19
74
5

5§
5
4

2

10

1

53

28
28

28

10 _4I_

7
6
2
1
*
1

1

62
62

6
6
2
1
*

h
58

4
4

15
15

7

1

4

IS

-

7

8

-

3

17

1
1

-

-

_

.

O
7

74

1

6

9

27

9

6

9

101
101

17
17

47
41

9

20
20

19
x?

7

1
1

1
_

_

1
.

l

_

„

_

8

Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be & o s n separately for retail trade due to the emission of department and
limited-price variety stores) the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data far all industries combined and for norananufacturing.

10




Table A-3:

M aintenance and Pow&i P la n t O ccupation^ - C ontinued

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on sn area
basis in Cincinnati, Ohio, by industry division, February 1952)

11

Table a -i *

Custodial, Wan&ltGuAUuj,, and SUipfunp Occupation*

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Cincinnati, Ohio, by industry division,""February 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
i
t
$
$
$
$
s ^ $
$ „ $
Average
hul
o r y Under 0 .7 5 0.80 0.85 0 .9 0 0.95 1 . 0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1 . 1 5 1.2C 1.25 1.30 1 . 3 5 1.1*0 1.1*5 1 . 5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00
erig 1
anns
and
0.75
80 .85 .90 •95 1.00 1 . 0 5 1.10 1 . 1 5 1.20 I* 25 1.30 1,35 1 .1*0 j-jii 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.6.51.70 1.75 1.60 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.QQ over
$

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) .....

215
— w r
18^

10

1* 6 2

■
sa

678
“ -635
113
222
13

1 .5 0

1*51
1.1*6
1.59
1.1*0

-

-

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ...............
Manufacturing *.•••..............................
Durable goods............. ........ ......... .
Nondurable goods................. ............
Nonmanufacturing.......................... .

3,350
2,063
1,099
961
1,287

1.11
1.21
1.21
1.22
.93
1*11
1.02
.96
•91

181
181

202
23
23
179

.87
1.05
l.lU
.96
.83
i 01
•82
•76

90

Wholesale trade ..............................
Finance ** ...................................
naiz ITfTtlT-Trt-TrT»tittt»iiTf»ttit»i..ii«.»

135
181
380

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ..............
Manufacturing ........ .............. .......... .
Dni'flhlm ctaa/ c ............... ....... ...
H
Nondurable goods............... ..... ........
Nonmanufacturing.......*........................
Pnhl a nf i11fS am
*
r |-Tisi lisas'
T1
i
FI mnr>* ** ..T__TT__TirTltt_ft.TtItTr|ltf|lttI
t
A f iT‘Tir-‘iiTiiiiiiiirii ii iii iiii it i
Oi
s

7ll
1 I6

71
75
598
60
316

Order fillers ......................................
Manufacturing............... *.... ............. .
Durable goods ........ ....... .
Nondurable goods *.................. •••.... .
Nonmanufacturing......... ••••••••••••••...... .
Wholesale trade.................. *....... ..

1,115

Packers (men) ......................................
Manufacturing ...................................
Durable goods .............................. .
Nondurable goods.............. *•••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ••••••.......*......... •••••••••»
Wholesale trade ......................... ••••••

1,211
511
318
319
269

1.32
1.31*
1.33
1.36
1.25
1.22

Packers (women) •••••........................ *.....
Manufacturing ......... ........ *..............•••
Durable goods...... .
Nondurable goods •••........••••••....... ••••••
Nonmanufacturing......*.... ••••*.••••...... •••••

835
533
273
360
202

1.10
1.15
1.17
1.13
.97

Manufacturing *................... •••.... .......
Durable goods........*.......................
Nondurable goods *.... ................... •••••
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Wholesale t r ade ......... ................. .

218
172
13U
38
112
61

1.1*2
1.1*3
1.1*2
1.1*9
1.1*1
1.1*1

361
297
757
513

1.32
1 1.37
1.38
1.36
1.28
1.26

13
13
■*~
s

3
3
3
-

18
*
17
*
29
16
1

3

Guards.......... ........... *........ .......... .
Manufacturing *................. ..*........... •••
Durable goods........................... ..
Nondurable goods.... ............. ..... ......
Nonmanufacturing
............ .

13 5

3

l*!i8

_
15

_
90

10
8
89
200
20
20
180
2
17J
a
Af -

90

-

-

1
1

5
2
2
3

9
9
9
-

1
*
1
1
3

2

2

138 257 2 * 116 305 1 2 3 12 8
15
81
66
52 1 1 0
52
97
85
30
1 2 62
*
31
1 5 53
*
65
21
10
18
*
36
32
1
67
86 1 * 1
21*
38
62
6* 2
1
1 7 1*8
c
H,
18
11
30
J
10
18
8 ! 10
10
18
13
10
20
18
16
*
2
27
19
11 125
?7
11
SJ?
1 1 65
*
79 101 1 2 3
12
17
23
7
1\
10
uj
1
16
2
1
*
62
89 100
1
c
A
s
1
.
88
U
01,
•
C7
sU
sa
SI
12
12
12
-

36

-

-

“

11
11
2
9
-

-

_
-

1 11*3
*
*
1
* 18
17
*
1
1
*
95

-

_
•
-

-

5

5
5

18

18
18
18
29
17
13
U
12
12

-

17
2
2
15
1
1
■
sa

36
13
h
4
9
23
O

U3
15
*
*

1*

11

28
28

1*

11
*
10
*
10
*
1
592
551
19 5

356
11
*
19
15
1

15
8

51
21
3

18
30
18

6
1
*
5
5

27

20
20
10
10
-

67
15
*
22
23
22
22

19
*
33
2*
1
9
16
16

85
2*
1
8
16
61
51

15
*
33
23
10
12
12

31
31
15
16
-

5*
1
5*
1
10
11
**
-

320
213
13
200
107

39
39
2*
1
15

_
-

5

3

10
5
1
*
1
5
5

10
10
10
-

-

-

5
5

36
2*
1
21
3
12
172
157
65
92
15
6
3
6

19
19
19

-

315 1 0 7
98 288
82
72
89 179
10
9 109
33
27
25
13
1
12
1*
1
l
*
2
3
3
9
2
2
2

3
3

2

-

25
A?
1C
A5

12
12
12

39

•
*0

19
19
19

23
23
O

8*
1
83
22
61
1

82
82
79
3
-

60
55

3
1
1
2

13
2
2
11

27
27
27

27
5

1*
12
111
HI
1

-

-

6*
1
61
52
9
3

31
29
3
26
2
2

13
10
10
3

111
116
106
10
1

9
9

17
39

15
15

36
36

9
-

39
8

15

3

2
1

-

-

-

„
-

_
-

31
31
31

-

-

-

-

1 2 25
*
18 10
12 1 0
.
6
21 1 5
21 1 5

28

1

15
15

75
75

9
9

15

75

9
-

-

36
-

_ ! _
-

_
.
.
.

_
6
_ n T
.
•
6
.
-

_
-

_
-

.
- 1 .

_
.

_
_

_
.

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

.

12

32
32
32

2
.
.
-

_
2
2

50
50

.
.
-

_
-

-

-

3
3

15
10

67 1 0 3 1 3 1
7
65
5*
1
61
39
3
i
* 15
1
*
60
38
77
38
10
*
10
*

96 120
5 * 58
1
11
** 50
10
8
1 2 62
*
12
*
17

10 3

80 125
26 113
22
92
1
* 21
5 * 12
1
5 * 12
1

1 * 106
13
99
93
80
73
26
13
11
** 13
12
U1

136
63
38
25
73
12

32
27
2*
1
3
5
5

3 * _52_
1
3 * 57
1
3 * 17
1
10
*

18
6
6
1
*
1
*
1 . 2
*
1
1*

10
10
6
1
*
-

6
6
6
-

119

6
89
6
57
•
32
1 * 113
1
1*
1
93

50 1 2 3
3 * 123
1
20
13
80
1*
1
16
15
-

26
26
26
-

10
*
10
*
10
*
-

13
*
13
*
3
10
*

3
3
3

6
6
6

_J0_
15
1*
1
1
1
10
15
10
5

W*
11 *

18
18
16
2
-

18
17
8
9
1

17
15
15

21*
23

13

1
30

15

2

12
2

-

-

27
27
19
8
-

12
12
12
.
-

_
.
_

_
.

l
19
11 . 1
7
l
l

35
35
3
32
-

-

8
7

_

15

.
_
8
7
7
l
l
l
3

Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions*
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
aata for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

.

-

-

.
-

.
.
-

_
.
.
-

.
-

_

3
3

_
_

.

.
_

19
12
8
;
*

5
2
2

8
2

3

2
2

7

3
3

_

See footnotes at end of table*
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
u.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*
_______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Bureau of Labor Statistics




.
-

3

-

'

NOTEt

32

3

13
13

7

19
8
*
8
11
11

23
23
23

30

30
30

13 1

8
7

11 191 100
**
3 * 57
1
17
*
16
22
*
3* 1 1
1
25
10 131*
53
10 ill*
33

23
16
7
1
*
-

25
0c

2
6
5

_

3

3

2

.
_
.

_
_
.
_

50
.
.
3

3
3

1
1
1
.

•

12

T »bi. A-Ui

Guitodial, Wa.ieUoui.ituf., and SUiftfUnf Gccufxationi. - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Cincinnati7 Ohio, by industry divisionj February 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

Occupation and industry division

of
w o rk e rs

h o u r ly

earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
s
$
$
$
% $ 1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$„ S .. $
£
$
$
:
rnder 3.75 3.80 3.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 L 0 5 1*10 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1*90 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00
3.75

las

m
1hP

190
85
71
Shiooina-and-receivine clerks

1*3
335.
22U
9i
128
82

Stock handlers and truckers, hand •••••••••••••••»»»..
Manufacturing................ ............ .

!♦ i
|2

lo W

2,OU3

i*bt>
l«3b
I.I16
1 . 1a
l.b8
1*1*2

1,399
505
571

Nondurable goode 0.
PnVtl 4<* n a i l i t . 4 « fi *

__________________________________________________ _

Wholesale trade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • «
Truck d r iv e r s, heavy (over 1 to n s, t r a ile r typ e) • • • • •
*
Manufacturing ...................................................... ...............................

5
m
m

m

m

9

20

m

20

1

bb

9

1
*
1*2
2

7

11

5

“

5
9

9

m

35
30
30

12
1

5
9

m
m

71
2,187

1.61

_

578"
173
b05
1,609
855
370

1.63
1 * 1*6
1.70

5

10

5

30

«
»

362

m

2b

109

b5
21
16

9

18

27

9

10
21

5
9

8
8

25
25

n
30

10

21

223
152
122

2l
15

15

x

10

190
l5b
lib

36U
307"

59k
~ W ~

m
m
m

5

30
71
bl

2
9

29

20

56

b
b

30

20
6

21

30

35

6

5

10

9
b

2
2

lb

16

m
m

9
9

10

3
1
5

3

1.67
1.59

lb
30

10

10

33
b

10

2

6
3

b
29

30

1*69
339
229

166

28

306
72

10
10

208

1.10

251
135
58
I3
i

1 .2 b
1.11

m
-

-

1

8

ET
8

-

-

-

1

-

6

- —

6l
6

5

~~r
5

11

T T

23
23
23

52
5i
39

1*6

17

12

8

—

hi
10
5

b
*
*

2$

8~
66

h ~W
it
u

10
6

£
9

16

Excludes premia* pay fo r overtime and n ig it work.
Study lim ited to men workers except where* otherwise in d icated .
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e sta te .

1

m
m
32
18

6

— <T
28
XX
vi

lli
xi*

lb

15
(
b2

to
97
4

18
X

1.39
.88

3

t
77
b8
25

12
12

?3

175
2
2

10

93

b
83
65

82
XI
291
30
129

6

17
Xf
1
8

9
1
9

1
9

m
m
V

0

7

0
7

»
.
u

x

11

1

—
30

6
6"

55

12

7

22

5

12

3

22

5

1*9

5b

33

30

39
90
<

<t - # ■

IQ
*7

22

20

ti

28

2

x

Q

2

so

to
*7

h
*
*

18
5

18

23
23

13
*
13
*

20

56
56
56

62
b?

to
9i
)

n
n

33
33

6

13

lb
lb
lb

9
.i
X

15

30

X

6

c
Q

12
5

b 25
» X9
.
4
i
,
4
i;
i
*9
in
JXJ

m

1
X
X

"
"

&
15
*

6

1
1

)i8
49

5

4

30
t
27

6

“
85

R
K
09

X

5
2b

33

3b
2b

13
12

2b
2b

33

78
28
28

b65 J 8 S_
6
15
9

12

_89

278
22*2

27
£1

12

9

12
12

9
9

m
m
m

36

8

7
x
1*59 370
1*6
360
30

12

36
53

20

12

n r

1
1
1

53

6
‘
6

22*2

36

3

130

•

78
78
9
9
9

2
1

•

12

12

•

•

9

1

2

-

35
XP

26

26

x

1

2

30
30

2

10

_ J L
1

2b

m

1

26

10

12

•
•

1 1-7
-L-1 f

12

n

.
•

x

139 .
9

m
m

10
10

25
25

1

1
X

7
f

x
11
XJ
X3

18
12

\

2

3b

X

9

X?

5

7

39
15

9
2li
<4
in
XU

12

8

20

*
J
V
S

f

1
1*12
1*12

6

10

_ni
85

15
*

29

m

22

1
9

16
1

6

18

l

1 *1*3
1 .8 b
l*b8

1*16
1.18

lb

8

1.53

1.1*9
Ie W ~

89

1*12

18

3

33
33

18

1

1.62
u r

5b6 176
393 87
159 2 6
23b 6 1
153 89

198

80

9

20

*

b

173

18
5

10
18

81
16

X
x

7
i

2
2
2

6

6

8

26
28

2

27
33
lb

0

15
1 3 32
*
b — 3b 19
3
b 10
x
to
O no
XX
7 X9
O
10
7 8

6

18

20

8

c
9

2

30

12
12

38

5
£
9
£
9

8

6

23

89

1.71

1.55

25
23

2
2

38

28

330

23
23

38
18

8
8

10
*
*
l
u

20
12
8

33
33

n o

19

2

and
1.75 i*fin 1,85 1.90 1.95 ?,no OVAT*

192
175
17

bo

8
8

28

2
61

6

3
•2
x
x
x

20

501

36
l
2b

2
2

1^70

18

238

1

1.65

9

■
a

60

1-60

27
2
5

b8
23
25
1 53
*
31*3
107

16

32
29

30
b6

b

m

m

1.60

k

10

lb
ll

1.71
1.69

5

_

56
31

30
30

69
b8
b8

10

8"
6

13

33

1*2

5

6
6

35

1

Hi

13

5o

13
*
n

10

1

3b
29

18

w J 2 L 167 J * L 272 M 16
62
11*9 153
229 185
12
61
92
53 209
5i
9
b
92
20
57
13b
7
81
in
lb
13 62
*
1

m

m

21*
6

10

30
29
17

71
61

2

26

20

1.69
1.30

giyvla
222
Nondurable goods •••••••••••••••••••••*•••••••••
85
Nonmanufacturing
•••••••••••.............
57
Truckers, power (o th er than f o r k - lif t ) ••••••••••••••.
Ibb
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••«•••••••••••• — m ~




u

2

12
1

9

m

203

+

2b
2b
15

29

m

1.61

Truck d r iv e r s, heavy (over b to n s, other than
t r a ile r t y p e ) .............................................................................. .. .........................
W ow m ufectu ^ng

Finance **

1
x

33
13

11
3
8
3
3

m

m

m

1.57
1.31

__________ ___________

Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ••••••«•«••««••••«•«•««•••••••••••
Public u t i l i t i e s * ........................... .

lb

5
5

853
90
763

26
336

____ ____________ -

.i5
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 [1.20 1.25 1.10 1.15 l.JiO l J . i.Sn 1.55

m

616

Wholesale trade ••••«.o».
Truck driv ers, medium ( l i to and inclu ding b ton s) ...
Manufacturing

.90

_

1 .U)

1,221

.85

1.38
1 .1
*
I*li6
1 .1
*

b,0 b2
1 ,1*22

Public u t i l i t i e s *
Wholesale trade • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Truck d r iv e r s, lig h t (under
to n s)
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • » • •
tfmwif fantiirltig

"1
1.50
l*ii9
l*bl
1*55
1.52
1 * l5
i

*80

X

7
f

7

m
m

13

18

12
12

18

5

18

£

X

9

x

9

7
7

13

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-3 3 6 : fy o u n A fU e A ., N O M ^e V U M i.

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and sex

ij

N U M B E R OF WO R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
Average
1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00
hourly Under 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75
earnings
$
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.30 1.35 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05
2/

OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40
and
2.10 2*11 2,20 2,25 2.30 2.35 2^40 over

P1ant
f
t
1.53
1.54
1.15

520
516
4

22
18
4

9
9
-

14
14

46
46

94
94

65
65

25
25

23
23

6
*
*

2
-

28
1
6

28
1

5
1
2

2
6
1

23
23

4
4

6
6

6
6

21
21

74
74

1
1
2
4
10
2

31
~

5
“
1
12
5

11
11

2
2

4
4

5
5

“
“

27
27

1

1

1
1

16
16

3
3

2

1

1

-

2
2

2

1

1

1
1

4
4

-

:

2
2

:

1
~

2

10
10

Selected PJaryt Occut»tions - Men
76

1.34
1.76
1.44
1.68
1.84
1.78
2.02
2.18

a

24
8
54
33
11
12

Maintenance men, general utility ....................

Patternmakers, metal ................................

1/

The study covered Independent

2/

E x c l u d e s prem i u m p a y for overtime a n d ni g h t work.

nonferrous foundries

3
-

-

1
~

-

—

—
-

-

-

-

(except die - c a s t i n g foundries)
All

-

-

-

1
-

w i t h S or m o r e w o r k e r s .

1 1
*
*
6 -

-

•

-

“
1
3

-

1

24
17

1
2

1
2
1

1

1

6
10

:

D a t a r e l a t e to an A u g u s t 1 9 5 1 p a y r o l l p e r i o d .

or a m a j o r i t y o f w o r k e r s in e a c h o c c u p a t i o n w e r e p a i d o n a t i m e b a s i s .

Table B-3^63:

Stamped and Plateed M etal

P > U H tu c t&

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation

2/

Die setters 4/a ••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••»••••••
Inspectors, class C k/t ......... .
Maintenance men, general utility l|/g •••••••••••••••••
Power-shear operators, class B h/&
Punch-press operators, class A tyb
Punch-press operators, class B "h/b • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . . • •
Tool-and-die makers iy'a • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • •

Number
of
workers

5

1
8

1
1
68
139
20

6
0

$
$
$
$
$
$ , $
$
Average
0
0
hourly Under 1 . 0 1 . 0 5 1 . 1 i 0. 1 1 5 . 2 I t s 1 . 3 1 0 . 3 1 5 . 4 1 0 . 4 i
earnings %
1 . 0 0
V
1 . 0 1 5 . 1 1 0 . 1 1 5 . 2 1 0. 2 1 5 . 3 1 0. 3 l.hO U
i 1 5 . 51
5
$
1
1 * 6 5 .
1
4
•
.
•
1
1 . 1 4 3
4
2
1 « 6 6
3
<
1
1*31
_
•
.
.
.
•
1 2
1 .5 8
3 . 0
5
3
.
6
6
2
38
.
13
45
1.43
4
4
3
2 o 0 0
i ____
_

1

$
^ s
$ ^ $
5
5 . 51 o. 5 1 .6 0 1 . 6 1 5 .

and

fj

6 1 0.

0. 51 5 .
7

1

1

2

1 0
1 0

2
5

8
73 L5 . 1 .80 5 I

6 1 5^ . 17 0 .
4

3

8

2

1

2

Q i . Oq ;c 2 .0 0 2

23

4

i

1

/
T h e s t u d y i n c l u d e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h m o r e t h a n 2 0 w o r k e r s e n g a g e d i n t h e m a n u f a c t u r e of s t a m p e d a n d p r e s s e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s ,
C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l ( 1 945 e d i t i o n ) p r e p a r e d b y t h e B u r e a u o f t h e B u d g e t .
D a t a r e l a t e to a J a n u a r y 1 9 5 2 p a y r o l l p e r i o d .
£/

$
$
$
$ «_ $
$
$
$
$
$
7 1 0 . 7 1 5 . 8 1 0 . 8 1 5 . 9 1 0 . 9 2 5 . 0 2 0 . 0 2 5 . *1 2 0 . 1 2 5 . 2 2 G . 2

4
5

9
7

2

3

3

7

l

1

1

except automobile,

3
1
1

1
l

12

0 2 -51 0 2

.

1

-

. 2 over
^

1

1

1

1

1

. 1 2 .2 0 2
5

*
2

1

_
2

2

4

( G r o u p 3-463) a s d e f i n e d in t h e S t a n d a r d

2

2

1

Industrial

D a t a l i m i t e d to m e n w o r k e r s .
Excludes premium pay for overtime and n ight work.
I n s u f f i c i e n t d a t a to p e r m i t p r e s e n t a t i o n o f s e p a r a t e a v e r a g e s
W

(b)

^
o r P r e d o m in a n t ly time workers.
All or p r e d o m i n a n t l y i n c e n t i v e w o r k e r s .




by

method

of

wage

payment.

Occupational Wage Survey,

Cincinnati

Ohio

February

U s DEPARTMENT
.!
Bure a u of

statiatic8

1Q52
QF L A B ®

5

u

MacJtin&uf, OHJUu&tfmi if

Table B-35:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2 j

Number
o
f
w rkers
o

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!
$
$
$
$
Average
h u l Under 1 . 0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1 . 3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 . 5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2.40
ory
erig
anns
too
n
1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 . 5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 .3 0 2.40 2 . 5 0

$
2 .5 0

and
over

Machinery l j
*
Assemblers, class A:

Assemblers, class B:

Total ••••..... ...............
Time .......... .......... .
Total ........................

1,0 4 0

Time ...........................................
Incentive ................. ..................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class Bs Total
Time ........................... .
Incentive ......................... .
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B: Total ............. ...........
Time ......................
Incentive .................
Engine-lathe operators, class B: Total ...........
T i m e ............
Incentive . . . .
Grinding-machine operators, class B 5/b ..........
Milling-machine operators,
class Bs Total . . . . . .... .......... . • • • • • • • • • • • •
Time ...................... TT ........ TT . tT _ T
Incentive ........................




-

195
399
94
174
145
33
275
1,844
1,344
500

1.68
1.62
1.82

225
165
60

1.66
1.54
1.97

40
361
195
134
61
222
172
50

1.54
1.64
1.72
1.65
1.86
1.67
1.64
1.77

82
43
34

1.80
1.63
2.04

352
263
89

1.65
1.60
1.31

-

1,213
769
444

1.54
1.45
1.70

-

94
71
23

-

-

682

Incentive
Assemblers, class C jg/a ............ ............ .
Electricians, maintenance j>/a................... .
Inspectors, class A £ / a .................. ...... .
Inspectors, class B j>/a .......................... .
Inspectors, class C
..................... ...................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ji/a ........................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 6/: To t a l ....... ............... ...................
Time .............................
Incentive ....................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class A: Total .............................. .
Tl TTlfi
Incentive ...................................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A j>/a .......................................
Engine-lathe operators, class A J^/a .......... ..........
Grinding-machine operators, class A: Total
T i m e ....
Incentive.
Milling-machine operators, class A: T o t a l ...... .
Time . . . • • •
Incentive .
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class A: To t a l ................... ....... .
Time ...................... ..... .
Tr ' n hIyo lirTttfIlttTITT-TtTT---.-T
no'
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
$crev machine), class As Total ...............
Time ...••••.....
Incentive .........
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 6/: Total ..............................

1 .6 1

1.55
1.9?
1.45
1*43
1.51
1.24
1.60
1.64
1.49
1.29
1.16

869
171
777

_

-

_

_

_
-

-

_

10
10

2
2

1

13

64
49

83
78

15

10

10 1

71

_
-

_

-

_

1

2
11

2

8

17

25

37

107

1
4
38

16
6
15

20

19
133
119
14
17
3
12
11
11
21

95
93
2
12 0

98
22

5
10

125
106
IQ
X7
147
n/,
33
2
12

3
8

9
48

3

352
343
q
58
36

89
80
Q
V
52
35
17

22

44
35
Q
7
51
40
11

58
39

44
41
Q
J
3

26
21

1Q
±7
28

25
3

£

57
41
1A
XO

1n
XU

’1
X

4

1

4

1

3

4

1

4

1
1

3

7
29

_

_

-

-

2

2

-

-

_

9
19
6

16
39
6

2

10
13

9
10
2

2
6

_

16
28
32

13
1

_

33
23

3

19
16
3
3

5
.
5

8

18

a
0

Xo

_

_

14
_
14

13
.
13

7
_
/

1

1

2

1

1

2

_

_

_

•

1

_

_

-

-

-

-

2

_

-

1

_

_

_

-

_

_

12

2
2

_
_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

34

20

21

3
12

-

71

9
39

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

187
141
46

305
280
25

170
147
23

189
154
35

138
108
30

99
61
38

222
189
33

15 1
112
39

52
18
34

49
18
31

22
8
14

49
25
24

26

-

93
67
26

9

-

6
27
4 i 12
2
15

17

-

-

1
1

20

■ -

20

17

12

9

26

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

11

3

5

1

3

9

-

1

6
1
5

2

_

35
28
7

1

_

14
11
3

2

_

29
28
1

1

-

33
31
2

2

_

53
49
4

11

_

2

1

2

1

2

3

5

1

3

9

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

1
1

3
1

-

_

_

_

-

51
48
3

8
9
7
2
3
3

3
1

-

9
15
2
13
11
4
7

2
1

-

25
12
4
8
46
43
3

5
3

_

15
15
9
6
7
5
2

_

-

1
6
4

_

-

3
24
43
40
3
5
3
2

2

-

1
30
13
7
6
12
12

_

-

2
52
14
12
2
16
13
3

-

-

16
71
14
14

7
5
o

12
11

6
4

7
5
0
4
C

16
14
O
4

2

40
30
10
26
2
24

2
2

9

2

5

6

-

_

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

i

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

4
4
2
2
8
2
6

-

-

-

-

-

|

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

!

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
3
1

1.43
1.42
1.45

_

_

_

1.40
1.32
1.59
1.49
1.43
1.56
1.73

-

185

J..49
1.47
1.57

'
1

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

5
4
1
2
2

31
15
13
2
14
8
6

-

-

O

42
19
17
2
28
23
5

-

5
3
r
>
c
.

6
4
O

5
2
3

17
11
6

52
46
6

61
58
3

60
.49
'll

11

14

20
4

7

10

40
30

4

4

10

115
96
19

174
141
33

166
132
34

106
83
23

103
73
30

117
101
16

27
5
22

36
12
24

51

14
11

6

15
11

3

2

4

39
30
9

100
80
20
9
5
4

6
3

34
29
5

22
21
1
6
4
2
3

17
16
1
24
22
2
9

16
14
2
27
20
7.
1*

6
2
4
24
20
. 4
12

11
10
1

24
23
1

26
23
3

24

-

51

_

_

3
4
2
2

4

_

4
3

1
1

4
2

_

1
1

1
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

3

1

2

1

2

_

1

1

1

1

2

3

2

2

X

1
1

-

7
7

6
4
2

1

108
76
32
164
136
28
180

-

12
30
7
7

X

X

2

3

2

2

2

6

1

1

7

2

4

2

3

2

6

1

1

7

2

4

2

3

27
1
26

34

27

32

12

7
7

5

_

_

_

_

32

12

5

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

34

27

1

2

_

_

_

-

156
29

1
-

-

3
3

6
6

3
3

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

_

-

13
11
2
4
4

.

1

3

-

-

U L

3

1
1

7

3

1

1

7
27

3

1
22
22

1
1

26

16

1
7

13
3
11

40
32

14
11

17
14

8

3

3

_

_

21

1
6

37
35
2

3
2
1

4

2

1

_

4
5
4
1

2
2

1
3

_

_

2

2
7

3
7

3

1

3
2
1

1

3

2
1
1
8

2
_

1
_

_

1

_

„

_

_

1
23

_

_

_

16

16

_

2

_

-

2

-

.• _

-

_

_

4

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

2

-

j
.

Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABCR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15

MacUin&uf, O H & U d y
tu u ts m .

Table B-35:

-

3o*Ui*uttd

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —
Number
of
workers

Occupation 2/

Average
hourly
earnings
y

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 1 . 0 0 1 . 0 5 1 . 1 0 1 . 1 5 1 . 2 0 1 . 2 5 1 . 3 0 1 . 3 5 1 . 4 0 1 . 4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 5 5 1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5
$
1.00
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70

$

1.70 1.75

$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
1. 3 0 1.35 1.90 1.95 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2. 3 0 2 . 4 0 2.5C
and

1.75

1 .80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 £ . 3 0 2 . 4 0 2.50

over

Machinery 4 / - Continued
Machine-tool

operators,

production,

c l a s s B 6 /: - C o n t i n u e d
Screw-machine operators,

automatic,

c l a s s B 2 / b ............................................ .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine),

c l a s s B:

Total

49

$
1.79

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

14

13
13

47
46

60

14

54
6

93
83
10

95
1/

1

1

1

3

6

5

7

3

1
-

2

9

26

13

2
-

13
1

17
2
6

5
16

13
12

-

2

3

10

15

17

4
10
10
20

275

1.54

134

Incentive

......... ..

141

1.44
1.65

T o t a l ........................................
T]
"
| I 1 I T 1 - 7

524
460

1.27
1.26

64

Machine-tool

....................
T i m e ..................

47

1.36
1.36

71
86

1.19
1.30

-

56
92

1.27
1.29

-

operators,

cl a s s C 6/:

1

1
8
3
5

-

3

r a d i a l , c l a s s C £ / b ..... .
s i n g l e - or m u l t i p l e -

s p i n d l e , c l a s s C £ / a ..................................
E n g i n e - l a t u e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C j > / a ..................
Grinding-machine operators,
Milling-machine operators,
operators,

c l a s s C j > / a .............
c l a s s C j?/a ........... .

1

-

3

1.24

-

-

-

1

2

109

-

1.25
1.57

-

-

3

7

9

-

-

-

-

-

8
-

52

j o b b i n g s h o p s ) j > / a .......... * ............................
T o o l - a n d - d i e m a k e r s ( o t h e r tha-, j o b b i n g s h o p s ) ........

107
107

2.04
1.83

-

Stock handlers and truckers, hand
. . . . ..............
W e l d e r s , h a n d , c l a s s A j > / a .................................
W a Irlpr<;^ hnnri
pIs
i
R

257
133
102

1.21

2

1.59
1.33

2

Tool-and-die

p r o d u c t i o n j > / a .................................
mai.ers

1

3

1

3

7

2

3

10

-

3

4

<<
33

operators,
operators,

c l a s s A jj/a .............
class A

£/&

• ; ...........

fjjB.,6/

operators,

production,

class

C j j / a ......

M a c h i n i s t s , p r o d u c t i o n 2 / a .................................
Tool-and-die ma k e r s (tool-and-die jobbing
shops) 2 / a

-

-

10

36

40

27

21

10

9
-

-

33
-

7
-

4
-

4
-

2
-

-

1
-

-

-

-

5

9

29
11

25
11

8

5

8

7

14

6

9

7

33

7

4

3

4

2

-

1

-

-

-

65
56

39

34
32
2

22

1

8

10

2

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

18

1

2

1

1

6

3

3

1

2

4
1
3
3

-

35

_

1

1

1

-

1

7
1

4
1

-

-

-

-

-

6

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

15
-

-

1
-

_

16

9

16
8

19
-

5

3

1
6

3
12

1
y

1

4
4,

9

1

1

1

2
16

-

-

1

1

2

3

23

12

5

13

-

23
1

57

1
21

1
12

11

2

20

-

-

2

-

-

-

26
2

41

30

4
1

20
5

13
2

10

2

16

26

4

17

24

13
7

16

6

4
5

13

1

31

7

3

1
-

-

-

1

28
2

1
1

2

2

-

4

_

-

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

9

39

21

27

51

17

2

n

4

13

21

23

1
22
12

4

4

21
4

5

.

Machine-tool operators, production, class B
••
E n g i n e - l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ^ / a ..................
M i l l i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B j > / a ..............
Machine-tool

-

-

36
23

MagMnfcTgol, Accessories
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , a n d c l e a n e r s j i / a .....................
M a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c t i o n , c l a s s A Jji/a, £ / ..
Grinding-machine

-

(tool-and-die

%
/&

Milling-machine

-

9
-

1.67

............................. ................

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
s c r e w m a c h i n e ) , c l a s s C jj/a .......... ............ .
M a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s , t o o l r o o m 2 / a ...................
Machinists,

2
23

automatic,

73
210

class C £ / a

3

production,

Drill-press operators,
Drill-press operators,

Screw-machine

,

-

............... .................. ................

8
n o

1.02
1.73
1.67

_

6

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

1.74
1.40

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
2
6
6

29

1.44
1.41
1.29
1.71

107

2.04

24
6
51
10
16
40

-

-

1

-

6

5

12

9
2
3
2

4

n
6

-

10
2
3
3

1
6
2
1
-

9
2
.

6

_
1
2

n

n

3
1

-

-

5
3
_

4

2

3
1

_

.

15

-

6

2

1
1

5
1

_

25

2

_
-

_
.

.

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

1
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

4
3

-

10

2

2

1

1

_

6

.

-

-

_

-

2

4

13

13

16

16

26

1

15

-

1

4
1
1

1

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers (except for one large machine tool firm for which data were not available) engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35)
as defined in the Standard'Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were also
included. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
t j Includes machine-tool accessory (Group 3543) establishments for which separate data are also presented.
2/ Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
6/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




16

Table B-40:

Railuuu 1/
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Num ber
of
w o rk e rs

Occupation 2/

1 .2 0

$
1.25

$
1.30

1.35

Uo

L h s

i.5o

1

1.25

1 .1 0

1-15

1-iiO

1.L5

1.50

1.55

1 .6 0

$

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

$

i.«o
5

f.15

and
under
1.15 1 . 2 0

3/

.

5

1 .7 0

1.70

1.65

1.75

i.80

1.85

1 .9 0

i.95

S .0 0
2

1.75

1 .8 0

1.85

1.90

1.95

2 .0 0

2.05

3

1 .1 0

52

16

55

2

$

Carpenters, maintenance

162

i n a l r v h o n .a n P .f t
H o lp n rq

h .T » a r I o a ^

i t i r t i T i i m i i n i m r i » M » n

m ai n h an an n a

t t i r Tt r i i t i i m

i n i i m

n

Janitors and cleaners ......... . « o »
JUflanVH n l a h ^
l l o ^ V i a n 4 fsa
P a i n t . o r *a
W nn

mo n t a n a n M
«a«4 v i ^ A n e n m m
m a In tA n a n n a

C l hh.flTVa

i f T - T r i r T i t r t i r t i r T r i i r i i i i i » i
........................................_ ..........................
. . .

..............__ _____ __________

nu>i n t j t n a n r a

. . . . . . _________ ____ ____ _______________ _

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ....................
Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons) ........... ••••••

by

&

H

1 07
i Aq
x.oy
1 .1*8
1 07

9
1

2

650

1 *8

135

1 .6 1

102

1*6

9

23
129

6

-

-

16

1.89
1 07
< +7(
l

582

1.87

Number
of
workers

5

1

161*

178

231*
k

nvciagc
hourly
earnings

1/
1 .6 5

51
30
23
20
29
19
16
15

_

1.84
1.65
1.78
1.65
1.65
1.65
1.65

-

98

-

-

)as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19 U9 edition) prepared

M l 3*aUH
ik

i/

NU M BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVIN G S TRAIG H T-TIM E HOURLY E ARNING S OF—

Under
$
1.65

--------

$
1.65

$
1.70

-

-

$
1.80

$
1.85

_1.8p_ _1.85__

1.70
_

51
1
23
10
29
19
16
15

-

$
1.75

-

_
_
-

_

_

18
-

3
3
_
-

-

_

-

1 ---1.90

---- H P ---2.00
1.95

.J-«9iL _ 2.00
_
1
-

1
2.05

_2.0£_ _2.10_ - 2 ^

_
-

2
_
_

_

3
6
_

_

-

-

$
2.10

-

-

-

$
2.15

$
2.20

„2_.20_ _2.2j>_

_

-

_
-

_

-

-

1
_

_
_
-

-

“

-

2
_
_
_

_
-

-

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
earnings
U

$
Routemen (driver-salesmen), retail jj / .....
Routemen (driver-salesmen), wholesale £ / ...

462
108

70.00
70.50

¥

$

5 5 .0 0

6 0 .0 0

$
65.CO

$
70.00

$
75.00

*
80.00

$
85.00

6 0 .0 0

65.00

70.00

___ 75.00

80.00

85.00

90.00

24
~

125
~

96
56

and
under

124
43

27
9

52
-

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the distribution of dairy products (Grot?) 5452) as defined in
trial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers. All occupations were paid on a time basis*
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati,
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S.
i j Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Bureau
d
Routemen normally work 5 days during each 6 -day cycle.




8

2

3
326

Table B -5*521

FilJing-machine tenders ..........
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Order fillers ................ .
Pasteurizers .....................
Refrigerator men .................
Sanitary m e n ......................
Washers, bottle, machine ..........
Washers, can, machine ........

80

229

67

1. oRyQ
i

The study covered establishments with more than *>0 workers in the railroad industry (Group h O
Bureau of the Budget.
Data limited to men workers. All were paid on a time basis.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Occupation 2/

82

6
1

396

1 .8 6

195
7U1
38U
UOU
372

28
191*

14
-

the Standard IndusOhio, February 1952
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
of Labor Statistics

17

Table B-63:

Average

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

9

n

d

4

4

2/

W eekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

A

G

*

U

>

e l/

3

&

l

S

U

e

H

'

N U M B E R OF W ORKERS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T-T IM E W EEK LY E A R N IN G S OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
.
$
„ $
37.50 1*0.00 i 2 . 5 0 fe.oo 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 lo.oo 15.00
*

9 0 .0 0

85.00 90.00

onr

$

17.50

3 0 . 0 0 I2 . 5 0 I5 . 0 0
and
under
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 ho.no ii2.50 li5.00 li7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 7 0 . 0 0 72.50 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0

and

Hen
*
Clerks, general
Section heads ...... ...........
Underwriters............... ...

10
33
16
*

37.5
3U.5
36.0

70.50
69.50
7U.00

23
100

107
50
12
*

36.0
35.5
37.5
36.0
35.5
36.0
36.0
36.5
35.5
35.5
35.5

300

36.0

37.50
1*3.00
5U.oo
3U.00
1*2.00
1*1.00
38.50
53.50
l*5.5o
l*o.5o
l*l*.oo
37.00

2
2

-

5

3

1

1
3

5
3
3

6

7

1*

1
1
*

H*

5

•

3
12

1

3

2

_

1

1

3
1
*

1*

1
1

.

_

3

Women
Assemblers ••••.................
Clerks, accounting .... ........
Clerks, correspondence, class A
Clerks, file, class B ..........
Clerks, underwriter ...........
Key-punch operators ••••••.....
Premium acceptors • ••••........
Section heads ••••••••••••••••••
Stenographers, g e n e r a l ....... .
Tabula ting-machine operators ...
Typists, class A ............. ..
Typists, class B •••••••••••••••

12

217
55
U5
30
126

.

-

1
*
2

7
13

1
20

7
19

1
7

.

-

_

-

_

-

8

59

51

.
26
16

1
*

_

2

_

_

2

1
*

-

-

.
-

"

-

9
1
*
12

1
*
1
*
.

67
5
5
9
.

5

11

1
*

6

7

2
3
3

5
30
3
5
13
*

5

5

6
68

2

.

58

109

1
*
3
2
5
21

9
1
*
5

1

17

9

5

6

1

1
.
.
16

2

l

3

-

_

15

7

8

.
.

1

2*
1

9

2
2
3
1
8

1!
2
8
8

16
6

12
-

12
1

5

2

1
*

1

1
5

21
1
1

1*
1

1
*

-

l

1

5

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the standard Industrial Classification Manual (19l*9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the“Budget.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
212836 0 - 52 - 2




Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table c-205: Bah&iiel - Continued

-15: B u ild in g Go+Ufriuctton

Table C
<

April 1, 1952

July 1, 1951

$2*900
Bricklayers
Carpenters ................................... 2*475
FAeatricians ................................. 2.700
Painters ..................................... 2*310
2*750
Plasterers
2*640
Plumbers
Building laborers ............................ 1*650

Table c

-

2

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

0 B5 a k e l i e d .
:

July 1, 1951
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Foremen or first bakers .... .............. $1,710
1.628
Overmen, mixers ....... ......... .
Bench hands ............... ................
1.565
Crackers and cookies:
Head mixers, cutting-machine operators .... 1.580
1.520
Reel-oven operators ................. .
1.490,
Machine set-up captains, p e e l e r s ....... .
Upright and brake rollermen, mixers
(baking and icing), band overmen •••••••• 1.470
Assistant cutting-machine operators,
marshmallow depositor operators, receiv­
ing clerks, truck shipping clerks,
assistant reel-oven operators, inspect­
1.430
ors, checker captains .................
Assistant mixers, order checkers, spraymachine operators, auto-brake
1.350
operators ...............................
Small power truck operators, repairmen,
marshmallow beaters, order fillers,
flour dumpers, warehouse storekeepers ... 1.310
Syrup mixers, enrober helpers, grinding
mill operators, slotting-machine
operators, order chasers, car packers,
cheese and fig grinders, spray-machine
cleaners, shortening weighers ......... . 1.270
Women employees:
Inspectors, box tapers, oven tenders,
packers, ingredient weighers,
machine operators (class A) •••.•••••• 1.130




Hours
per
week

Classification

Hours
per
week

Crackers and cookies: - Continued
Women employees: - Continued
Machine operators (class B), breakers,
(stackers) variable scalers, dump
fillers, bundlers, magazine feeders,
machine 3took clerks, nesting
makers ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••* $1*080
Carton weighers, general helpers,
supply girls, carton handlers and
assemblers, machine helpers and
machine operators (class C), scrap
pickers .............................. 1.030

Table C-2082:

M

&

l

t

J l

40

d J

C f r

40
40
40
40

Bottlers ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• $69.05
Brewers •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••*•••••• 71.64
60.60
Laborers •
Warehousemen ......o......
64.75

Table C-27:
40

40

40

40

40

Hours
per
week

Rate
per
week

Classification

p

A

>

U

l

t

i

*

U

f

July 1, 1951
Classification

Book and job shops:
Bindery w o m e n ...... .
Bookbinders......... .
Compositors, h a n d .........
Electrotypers ..............
Machine operators ..........
Machine tenders (machinists)
Machine tenders:
1 or 2 machines
4 or 5 machines

Classification

40

February 1, 1952
40
40
40

P/UntitUf - Continued
July 1, 1951

Rate
per
hour

o o o o

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Table C-27:

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,265
2.573
2.493
2.573
2.573

37
37
37
37
37
37

2.680
2.733

37 i/2
37 1/2

2.220

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

u o

Rate
per
hour

Book and job shops: - Continued
Mailers ................... ••••••••........ $2,412
Photoengravers ............................ 2.667
Press assistant and feeders:
Cylinder press feeders; cylinder press
assistants, two-color over 54 inches;
helpers and automatic tenders ...••••• 1.883
Rotary press - First a s s istants..... .
2.093
Rotary press - Second assistants ....... 1.940
Pressmen:
Cylinder presses:
1 or 2 single-color, any make, more
than 19 x 25 inches; 1 single­
color, 65 inches or over; 1 2color flat-bed, over 25 x 38
2.310
inches, any size or make ..........
s i A .
2 cylinders, up to 19 x 2 5 inches ... 2.163
1 cylinder, Kelly or Miehle HighSpeed up to 19 x 25 i n c h e s ..... .
1.913
2 Miehle or Kidder job or 3
e n v e l o p e ........... .......
1.993
Platen presses:
1 or 2 presses .....................
1.913
1.960
3 presses ............... ............
4 presses ....... ........... ••••••••
1.987
5 presses ..... •••••................
2.020
Web and rotary presses:
1 web, single or double sheet-fed,
single or double-roll .............
2.403
1 3- or 4-color rotary, any mpke,
roll- or hand-fed .•••••••••..... . 2.443
More than 4-color, rotary, roll- or
hand-fed ..........................
2.610
Stereotypers ............. ............. .
2.507
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day w o r k .............
Compositors, hand - night work .......... .
Machine operators - day w o r k ......... .
Machine operators - night work ...........
Machine tenders (machinists) - day work ...
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
w o r k ......... ..........................
Mailers - day work ........................
Mailers - night work ••••.••••........... .
Photoengravers - day w o r k .... .«.......
Fhotoengravers - night w o r k ..... .

2.666

Hours
per
week

37 1/2
37 1/2

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2
37 l/2

2.666

37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.800
2.333
2.467
2.853
2.987

37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.800

2.666
2.800

Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

19

Table C-27:

P

s

U

*

t

- Ci
t

o*

U n f

t

i

n

u

e

d

Table C-42:

M

t

U

o

S

l

P

u

t

c

k

j

Classification

July 1, 1951
Hate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Classification

Beer*
Keg ............ .
Helpers:
Bottle ...........
Keg ...............
2.586
Coal and excavating*
2.720
4-wheel trucks
6-wheel trucks
Heavy machinery •••••<
Helpers ............ .
Table C-41* J
l
o
c
a
l
< 7
'
U
i
n
d
i
t
Commission house:
First 30 days .......
After 30 d a y s ...... .
Department store*
October 1, 1951
Furniture and pick-up
Rate Hours
Helpers ......... .
per
per
Package ..............
Classification
Factory - Trailmobile*
hour week
Drivers, bottom ......
Drivers, top .........
1-man oars and busses:
F i l m ...................
$1,680 AO
Helpers ......... .
After 1 year ........ ........... .
Fish and froaen food:
First 30 d a y s .... .
After 30 days ........
Freight - General*
Table C-42: M
&
t
o
b
t
k
U
c
k
3
)
* Local c a r tka g ed...... .
4
a
e
Helpers ..........
<
m
d
c
M
e
l
p
e
b
d
Specialty trucks .....
Helpers ••••..... .
July 1, 1951
Furniture .............. .
Hate Hours
Helpers •••••..... .
Classification
per
per
Grocery
.o.....
Double bottom •••••••.
hour week
Semitruck .........
Air reduction ...o.........o................o. $1,550 40
Helpers ............ .
I c e ...... ............. .
Helpers ..........e..ooo..oo.o.........*..o 1.4-00 40
H e l p e r s ..... .......
Bakery:
Laundry*
nTv^fik*r
..........
1.545 48
Dry cleaning*
Yeast:
Interstore drivers
Agreement A:
1.238 48
Helpers (carpet) •
First 3 months .......... ........
T o w e l .............. .
1.358 48
Second 3 m o n t h s ........ .......... .
Meat - Packinghouse ....
48
After 6 months ...................... 1 . 5 0 2
M i l k ..................
Agreement B:
Truck with trailer ...
First 3 m o n t h s .... ............. .
1.154 48
Moving - Furniture:
Second 3 months ..................... 1.274 48
Local .....••..... .
After 6 months
1.418 48
Newspapers* - Continued
Pressmen, web presses - day work .
.
Pressmen, web presses - night work
Pressmen-in-oharge - day work
Pressmen-in-oharge - night work ...
Stereotypera - day w o r k ....
Stereotypers - night w o r k ..... .

$2,593
2.727
2.727
2.860

Opetottiuj, Cnvptetfeed




37
37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

>

U

< Table C-42:
J
&
l
d

M

*

U

o

k

b

u

4

&

k

^

'

e

S

U

t

<md atfelpekd - Continued

<and Jtelp&U. - Continued
July 1, 1951

b

July 1, 1951
Hate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,777

40
40

1.600
1.700
1.800
1.600

48
48
48
48

1.390
1.490

40
40

1.560
1.420
1.560

40
40
40

1.520
1.670
1.520
1.450

40
40
40
40

1.325
1.425

40
40

1.520
1.450
1.550
1.480
1.322
1.235
1.470
1.640
1.520
1.380
1.490
1.490

48
48
40
40
45
45
48
48
48
48
48
48

1.375
1.010
1.401
1.610
1.350
1.390

48
48

1.540

45

42

45
40
40

Hours
per
week

Moving - Furniture* - Continued
Helpers ............ ..................... . $1,430
Newspaper:
1 ton and under ..................... .
1.884
1 1/2 tons ............... ..............
1.910
2 tons .................................... 1.935
3 tons ............ ........... ..........
1.961
4 and 5 tons ................... .........
2.020
Helpers:
3 tons and u n d e r ...... ........•••••••
1.804
Over 3 terns
.... .
1.830
Oil - Local drivers:
First 30 days ...........................
1.595
After 30 days .......... .................. 1.760
Railway express ............... .............. 1.720
Soft drink and mineral, water:
6-wheel t r u c k s .... .......................
1.600
Route helpers .................. ..... .
1.000

40

1.726
1.726

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Table C-542:

M

&

C

i

t

G

45
38
38
38
38
38

3 /

38 3//
38 3/4
40
40
40
40
40

u

t

February 1, 1952

Classification

Journeymen meat cutters ............. ^

Rate
per
hour

Horn's
per
week

$1,556

45

Apprentices:
Starting r a t e ..... a....... .
After 6 months ...... .................. ,. t
After 1 year ............ .
After 18 months ..................
................. ,
After 2 years
After 2 1/2 years ....................... ..

1/2

1

3//
3//
3//
3//

.860
.920
.990
1.060
1.110
1.230

45
45
45
45
45
45

Female meat cutters*
Starting r a t e .... ...............
.
After 6 months ............ .
After 1 year ..........0.•••••...<,.0.......
After 18 months ..... ................. .
After 2 years ...........a..............
After 2 1/2 years ........ ................

•860
.920
.990
1.060
1.110
1.230

45
45
45
45
45
45

t

l

d

20

Table C-58:

R

e

A

t

c

U

i

/

U

L

+

February 1, 1952
Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

40

93.55
59.40
45.35
34.55
76.25
59.40
45.35

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

45.90
29.75
54.00
48.60
45.90
30.80
31.30
45.90

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

25.00
21.00

40
40

25.00
48.75
47.55
21.50

40
40
40
40

48.00
53.60
58.60

40
40
40

45.00
92.80
58.80
34.20
45.00
75.60
58.80
45.00
34.20
45.00

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

45.40
45.40
45.40
48.00
29.00
34.60
45.40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Agreement A:
Culinary - Class A houses:

Assistants ........... ............. .
Helpers o........... ............ .
Pastry chefs ...... ............. ...... . 0
Pastry cooks .......................... .
Short order cooks ......................
Miscellaneous:
Countermen or w o m e n ....................
Dishwashers •••.......... ......... .
Floor managers ....... .................
Meat carvers ....... ...................
Pantry men or w o m e n ........ ...........
Porters
Pot washers ............... .............
Steam-table m e n ....... ......... .
Waitresses:
Bus girls ......... ........ .......
Waitresses (regular) ...................
Waiters:
Bus boys
Head waiters ................ .. ......... ..
Waiter captains .............. .. ........ ..
Waiters (steady) .......................
Agreement B:
Bartenders :
>
Beer
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Regular
..••.•o ........» ........o
Service • . 0• . • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . . . . . . . 0
Culinary:
Assistant cooks .................... ...... .
Chefs • • • • • ..... .. ............. ..
C o nks

. . .. . . .. . . . .. . ....................
Helpers ....................................................................
Lunch or dinner cooks ............................................
Pastry chefs . . . . . . ..... ............................. ....
Pastry c o o k s .................................................................
Pastry cooks (female) .............................. . . . . .
Pastry cooks* helpers ............................ ..............
Short order cooks ............. ................... ...................
Miscellaneous :
Blockmen « . . « . * . o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o o
Counte r m e n......... . . . ........................................
Griddle m e n ............................. ................

Meat carvers ........ ........... ........
Miscellaneous workers ....... ..........
Pantry girls ........ ...... .. ...... ..
Steam-table men ................ .. .......




t

l

Table C-58:

R

e

A

t

H -/C

&

Uo

t

n

n

t U

.
i

n

u

e

d

Table C-7011:

February 1, 1952

$54.00

Classification

l

Rate
per
week

Agreement B: - Continued
Waitresses:
Bus girls ............................ . $22.40
Head waitresses, checkers, cashiers
or hos t e s s e s.... ........... ......... 37.40
W a i t r e s s e s.... ............. .......... . 19.60
Waiters:
Bus boys .....o.o....................... 22.40
48.00
Head waiters .................... .
47.00
Waiter captains .................... ••••
21.60
Waiters

J

t

o

t

e

U

,

•

C

o

a

t

e

U

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

s

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Bartenders:
Public .................................... $1,410
1,555
Service
Bar boys ..................... .
.790

40
40
40

Culinary:
Chefs:
Main kitchen, coffee shop and pastry ...
Assistants, main k i t c h e n ....... .
Cooks .......... ....................... .
Assistants ..................... .
B r e a k f a s t .............. ............. .
C a f e t e r i a...... ................ .......
A s s i s t a n t s...... ............... ••••
Helpers •••••...... .................
Short o r d e r ........................••••
Vegetable ..............................
Extra ................ ............. .
Helpers ................................
Coffee makers ............... ........ .
Countermen ................................
Miscellaneous kitchen workers ...... ......
Pantry girls (head) .....................
Pantry girls ....................••••••••..
Pie bakers, ice cream makers ..............
Silver cleaners ( h e a d ) ..... .
Stewards (assistant) ......................
Vegetable c l e a n e r s ..... ............. .

(l/>
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

tt/>
1.995
1.555
1.175
1.360
1.310
1.125
.905
1.175
.980
•905
.980
.980
1.215
.800
1.010
.930
1.555
.860
.860
.860

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Laundry:
C l e a n e r s ............. ............. .......
Heads ........ .........................
Laundry workers ...........................
Press operators ...........................
Seamsters .................................
Slipcover cutters .........................
Tumbler operators .........................
Upholsterers ..............................
Starting ...............................
Valet pressers ............................
Washmen ...................................
Wringer operators .........................

$0,905
1.010
.815
.860
.870
1.265
.885
1.480
1.130
1.330
1.150
.945

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Miscellaneous:
Bell captains .............................
Bellmen ...................................
Bellmen (mail).............................
Bellmen (night) ...........................
Carrying porters ..........................
Cleaners (male) ...........................
Cleaners (female) .........................
Cleaners (head) ...........................
Doormen ...................................
Elevator operators (male) ................
Elevator operators (female) ..............
Elevator starters (female) ...............
Firemen, oilers ...........................
Housemen ........... .......................
Inspectresses .............................
Linen room w o r k e r s .................. .
Lobby porters .............................
Maids .....................................
Maintenance men ...........................
Helpers ...... .........................
Messengers (package) ......................
Parlor maids ..............................
Polishers (head) ..........................
Seamstresses ..............................
Valet runners .............................
Window cleaners ...........................

.525
.410
.480
.510
.410
.900
.860
1.040
.765
.995
.880
.995
1.835
.900
.890
.860
.900
.860
1.835
1.495
.525
.860
1.155
.860
.410
1.365

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Waitresses:
Bus Kiris ............................. T___
Waitresses ................................

.625
.525

40
40

Waiters:
Bus men ...................................
Waiter captains ...........................
Waiters ...................................

.625
1.250
.580

40

Hours
per
week

February 1, 1952

See footnote at end of table.

t

February 1, 1952

Classification

Table C-7011:

J

Classification

1/

Soale of $115.00 per week.

40

40

Hours per week not limited.

n

t

i

D:

Entrance Rates

21

Plant tW/obJteAd if V

C s U b a H c e R a te d , fa b

Table D-i:

Rercent of plant workers in establishments with specified minimum rates in Manufacturing
Minimum rate (in cents)

All
industries

y

1 0 0 .0

All e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ....... ............. .
60 or u n d e r .... ................................ •••••••
Over 60 and under 6$ ........ . ......... .......... ••••

2 .6

165 and over .................... ••••••••••••«•«••••••

•2
.1
•5
iu.9
.1
U.9
2.9
5.3
2.9
3.1
1.0
1.0
2.2
6.5
3.2
.3
1.9
l.U
6.6
2.3
U.l
.2
5.9
1.5
5.2
.7
1.6
.1
1.3
.8
1.7
.2
.3
.3
•2

Establishments with no established minimum ••••••.«•«

12.0

Over 65 and under 70 ...................... •••••.......
Over 75 and under 80 •••••••••••••••••••.•••........ .
Oyer 80 and under 85 ............. ......... ............
Over 85 and under 9 0 ............ .............. .......
Over 90 and under 95 ••••••............. ............
Over 95 and under 100 •••••........................... .
Over 100 and under 1 0 5 ............. .............. ••••
Over 105 and under 110 ........ ................ .......
Over 110 and under 115 »•«.»•••............ .
Over 115 and under 120 ••••••••••............. .......
Over 120 and under 125 • ••........ ................... .
Over 125 and under 130 •••••••»••••••••••••.......
Over 130 and under 135 • •••.... •....... .
Over 1U0 and under 11*5 ................. .
Over 1U5 and under 1 5 0

V

... ...e

•

Nondurable goods

Durable goods

Establishments with 251 or
251 or
21-250
21-250
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers
100.0

100.0

100.0

1.6
12.0
U.U
1 0 .3

3.7
8.1
18.5
2.9
1.0
6.7
1.5
1.8
U.9
•
11.6

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

17.2
-

12.1
-

m

_
11.0
-

100.0

Public
utilities*

2.0
U.3
U.6
1.1
2.U
3.2
9.2
5.7
21.1
9.5
1U.7
-

2 9 .0

7 .3

•U
1 2 .2

2 .8

3.1
2.2
5.6
3.3
-

28.0
3.6
3.7
2.9
-

-

3.7
6.9
2.7
7.8
2.7
3.3
5.7
5.3
U.2
U.6
-

m

m

•t
f
-

•
•t
f

m

2.U
3.7
-

12. U
3.8
•

U.U
7.1
-

m
6 .0

16.5

w
m

3.7
23.8
l.U
3.7
1.1
6.U
•t
f

U.7
2.6
1.6
9.6
6.U
U.l
7.7
1.7
1.9
9.2
u.u
-

Retail
trade
3/

Services

100.0
u.u
1.7
2.5
7.7
15.7
2.3
36.0
.2
•
•2
7.0
•t
f
-

6.0

3.7
2.6
2.3
-

1.2

2.7
3.2
-

-

•

13.7

15.8

2 5 .U

22.3

1 5 .0

m
m
•t
f
•t
f
•
•

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate*
Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of
retail trade is appropriately represented in the data for "all industries."
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and others public utilities.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

y
y




22

E:

Supplementary Wage Practices

Table E-l:

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in All manufacturing industries
Shift differential

All industries

Durable goods

0.2

8.8

15.5

1.0

U.8

11.6

3.9

9.5

0.2

8.8

15.5

1.0

3.2
-

, 11.2
.1
.6
•U
U.5
.8
.U
.2
1.3
-

3.8
-

.7
-

.3
.2
1.0

3.8
1.2
2.6
-

.1
.1
-

1.8
1.8
-

11.6
9.8
1.8
-

-

5.7
3.0
1.8
.9

.1
.1
-

7.0
7.0
-

3.9
3.9
-

1.0
1.0
-

10.3

U.8

Receiving shift differential ......

10.6

U.S

10.3

3.5
-

6.1
.9
.5
-

Uniform percentage ............. .
5 percent .....................
10 percent ...................
15 p e r c e n t ..................
20 p e r c e n t .....••••••..... .
25 percent ...................

2.7
.1
2.3
*3

(k/)
■
7l
.7

(U/)
.3
1.0
1.0
-

m

.1
.9
.1
-

1.7
1.3
(Jj/)
-

2.1
-

-

-

U.2
-

1.6
1.6
-

3.7
.5

3d or
other
shift

9.5

U.5

1.7
-

y
3d or
other j
shift

3.9

io. e

(lvO
72
1.7
.1
.1
-

n

11.6

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ............ . •. •.

.3
.7
.1

Nondurable goods

Stamped and
pressed metal
products

2d
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

8.1
.1
.3
.7
1.9
.3
1.2
1.2
1.3
(V)
.3
-

Machine-tool
accessories

Machinery
■
5
o+ ao

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

Uniform cents (per hour) .......
2 1/2 cents ................. .
3 cents ...................... .
h c e n t s .................... . •
5 cents •• • • •.................
6 cents •••••...... ..........
7 cents ..................... .
7 1/2 cents ................
6 cents .......................
10 c e n t s .................... .
11 cents ........... .........
12 c e n t s ....... ..............
12 1/2 cents ••••.•••........
13 1/3 c e n t s ............ .
15 cents ............. ...... .
16 2/3 cents .................

\j

(W)

2d
shift

(U/)
7l
1.9
•U

.k
-

.5
.U
.2
.1
.u
.7
-

.1
.1
-

2d
shift

2d
shift

1/ Excludes data for industries other than those shown separately*
2/ Includes ma:hine-tool accessory establishments for which data are presented separately. Excludes one large manufacturer of machine tools for which data
were not available.
3/ No workers employed on 3d or other shift.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
t/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
”
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Table 1-2:

S c h e d u le d 'Ufj&eJzbf, ettounA

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS V
W eekly h o u r s

All
indus­
tries

A l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s .....................................................

1 0 0 .0

U nder 3 5 h o u r s ...............................................................
3 5 h o u r s ............................ .................................................
O ver 3 5 and u n d er 3 7 j h o u r s ...............................
3 7 $ h o u r s ................................................... ........................
O ver 3 7 i en d u n d e r 1*0 h o u r s ...............................
bO h o u r s ................................. ................ ...........................
O ver 1»0 and u n d er bb h o u r s . . • • • .....................
bb h o u r s ............................................................................
O ver bb and u n d e r b8 h o u r s .................................
b8 h o u r s ...............................................................................
b ? i h o u r s .............................. ............................................
50 h o u r s .............................................. ................................
51 h o u r s ..............................................................................
5b h o u r s ............................................................. ..
5 6 h o u r s ..............................................................................
h o u r 8 ............................................................................
58 h o u r s ..........................................................
6 0 h o u r s ............................................................ ................

3 .6
5 .0
1 .3
1 0 .0
3 .1
6 3 .7
1 .6
2 .8
l.b
7 .5
-

Sl\

EMPLOYED IN-

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Manufacture

Manufacturing
Durable
goods

All

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Non­
durable
goods
1 0 0 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

1 0 0 .0

.
1 .8
.5
9 .1
.1
7 0 .2
1 .5
1 .6
1 .2
lb .O
-

Whole­
sale
ti ade

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 8 .3
1 6 .6
b«2
2 0 .1
1 3 .8
2 6 .2
..

8 .2
.7
1 .9
7 3 .9

1 .0
2 .5
7 .8
1 .2
7 9 .5
.

.
0 .6
l.b

-

-

0 .5
b .o
.2
9 1 .0
.6
3 .5
.2
-

-

-

.

.
.
-

.
-

-

-

-

..

-

*

■
*

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•2
.5
-

-

-

7 .1
8 .2
-

■

"

.8
..
«
..

-

Non­
durable
goods

io o . o

1 0 0 .0

0 .5
1 .9

3 .8
1 .2
1 7 .6
-

Durable
goods

All

1/

0 .3
3 .0
.1
6 5 .2
2 .6
2 .7
1 .8
2 b .3

7 6 .7

All
indus­
tries

1 0 0 .0

_

-

Services

y

1 0 0 .0

.

Finance**

b .l
1 .1
2 .8
-

.
.

1 0 0 .0

Whole­
sale
trade

io o .o

.
.

-

7 5 .5
.3
.b
2 .6
7 .3
.6
7 .5
.
2 .0
l.b
”

6 8 .7
.
.6
3 .6
8 .7
.9
1 2 .1
.
3 .2
2 .2

l.b
5 .1

_
_

8 7 .1
.7

6 8 .6

.9
b .8

8 .5
1 2 .7
.
9 .1
•

•

-

.
_
.
-

Retail
trade

•

Services

y
!

1 0 0 .0

_
_

.

-

7 1 .0
•2
2 .2
5 .3
9 .6
•b
6 .2
•2
.1
.1
l.b
1 .0
.3

!

Public
utili­
ties*

_
b .b

_

_

6 2 .7
.9
7 .2
1 2 .1
2 .2

8b. 5

.

_
_

6 .1
.5
b .5

6 .b
2 .b

.

.

•

1 .1

_

_
_
6 .1

_'
-

1/ Data relate to w en workers.
om
2/ Although data could not be show separately for retail trade due to the omission of departm md limited-price variety stores, the rem
n
ent
ainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in ihe data for "all industries."
3/ Includes data for industries other than those show separately.
n
* Transportation (excluding railroads), com unication, and other public utilities.
m
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Paid <Solida4
fi

Table 1-3:

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T WO R K E R S E M PL O Y E D IN

P E R C E N T OF O FFICE W O RK ERS EM PL O Y E D IN —

N ber of paid holidays
um

-

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

y

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

N on­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
tie s*

W hole­
sale
trade

y

y

All

All establishments .............................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments providing paid
holidays ........................................

99.0

98.6

98.2

99.0

100.0

100.0

85.3

93.2

92.7

71.0

93.6

bb.6

(3/)

.1
-

_

.b

-

-

A
•8

-

-

.3
1.0

-

.1
-

100.0
..
“

-

-

.

.

-

1.3
75.3
7.0
7.2
.3
b.2
1.9
1.2
.2
.3

2.0
86.1
b.8
.8

3.0
95.1

•b
71.8
12.2
2.2

3.2
25.5

88.7

7.b
23.9

-

-

-

1.0

SS.fc

1 day ...........................................
2 days..........................................
2j days ........................................
3 days...... .. ..................................
b days ..........................................
5 days........................................................... ........................
6 days ..........................................................................
6& days............... ...................................................................
7 days.....................................................................................
7i days........................................
8 days ..........................................
9 days...........................................
10 days........................................
11 days ........................................
12 days ........................................
Establishments providing no paid
holidays........................................

All
indus­
tries

(3/)
7l

All

Durable
goods

N on­
durable
goods

_

_

-

-

b.8
•

.
-

12. b
-

l.b

1.8

1.0

-

-

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

F inance**

Services

89.7

l.b
.3
1.1
73.2

1.1
.5
•6
83.6

90.5

9b. 1
•b
2.1
1.2
1.7
72.3

-

-

-

•

-

.2

-

-

-

-

.6
21.1

-

97.3
.
.8
-

-

-

-

9b. 7
1.0
1.6

50.1
23.1
•2
1.8
5*$
10.0
6.6
1.2
1.5

6.8
-

b.5
3.5
“
•

l.b
b.8
•
•
•
“

*
"

3.7
12.7
-

b2.3
*-

3.3
1.6
*

"

2.7

lb.7

6.8

7.3

5.9

29.0

6.b

_

.

-

_

-

78.1
"

-

2.7
•

-

1.8
-

-

-

Retail
trade

Services

-

7.7
5*6

-

-

Although data could not be show separately for retail trade due to the omission of departm and limited-price variety stores, the rem
n
ent
ainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
data for "all industries."
Includes data for industries other than those show separately.
n
Occupational W Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
age
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
U.8. DP RMN O L B R
EA T E T F A O
Transportation (excluding railroads), oowm
unication, and other public utilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Finanoe, insurance, and real estate.


%



Pcud Vti&cUiotvL (rf-okmcd

Table E-4:

fi/toaidiO H d)

PE R C E N T OF OFFICE W O RK ERS E M PLO Y ED I N —

M anu fa ctu rin g

M anufactur in 0

Vacation policy

All
indus­
tries

All

P E R C E N T OF PL A N T W O RK ERS E M P L O Y E D IN

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

F inance**

u

All
indus­
tries

All

2/

Durable
goods

N on­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

R etail
trade

Services

1/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.5

99.6

99.4

100.0

99.4

100.0

100.0

99.1

96.6

98.2

97.7

99.0

95.4

93.6

93.9

83.4

88.6

4.1
9.7

6.5
2.6

74.9
21.6

69.5
-

1 vear of service
Establishments with paid vacations

. . . . . .

_
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s .............. ...

_

_

38.0

43.3

5 1 .3

(1/)
60.3
1.2

-

54* 1
2.2

47.6
-

...

•4-

99.8

99.8

99.7

_

10.6

2 vears of

.5

_

Establishments wit h no paid vacations

.6

14.5
12.2
70.6

-

64.2
5.7

-

_

_

34.4
65.0

.6

-

53.1

.7
78.8

.5

3.0

79.4

68.0

-

_

20.6
-

32.0

45.5

14.0
.r

1 . 0

-

2.5

-

-

-

47.6

84.2

25.9

46.0

.5
7.8
1.4

-

-

-

-

-

.9

3.4

1.8

“
2.3

1.0

4.6

6 .4

6.1

99.1

97.9

99.2

98.9

99.6

96.8

93.6

93.9

.7

1.0

57.4

65.1
15.7

service

Establishments with paid vacations

......

6.5

81 .4

„

Establishments w i t h no

paid vacations

...

100.0
_

99.4
_

100.0

100.0
_

20.0

21.6
-

7.9
-

69.7

71.9

91.5

-

84.9

2.5

-

.2

.2

.3

99.8

99.8

99.7

2.0

6.5
-

-

-

15.1
-

10.0

1.3

5 vears of

_

30.1

8.0
-

100.0

91.1

11.4
28.3
.1

17.4

68.2
22.6
8.1

-

2.5
59.8

45.6

4.4
32.9

1.4
49.8

24.9
68.7

38.5
54.0

-

~

“

1.4

-

-

-

-

.6

-

-

.9

2.1

.8

1.1

.4

3.2

6 .4

6.1

99.4

98.4

99.2

98.9

99.6

100.0

93.6

97.2

8.1

8.7

1.2
83.2

1.7
82.4

1.5
2.7
88.2

20.7
72.7
2.8

4.5
80.2

“

service

Establishments with paid vacations

......

1.1

•9
.7
98.1
-

2.0

2.5

-

...

.2

.2

.3

..••••

99.8

99.8

99.7

2.1
.2
Over 2 and u nder 3 wee k s

• • • • ..........

Establishments with no paid vacations

94.4
1.1

.4
93.8

100.0

99.4

3.7
-

1.1
-

86.9
2.9
6.5

-

98.3
-

100.0

8.4
91.6

.

100.0
93.3

•

.2
99.2

-

2.9

-

4.9

5.1

6.5

-

-

3.8

-

1.0

1.3

-

.6

-

-

.6

1.6

.8

99.2

10.7
82.9 ,

4.9
90.9

-

-

3.4

-

-

1.4

1.1

.4

-

6.4

2.8

98.9

99.6

93.6

97.2

15.3

15 vears of service
Establishments with paid vacations

100.0

99.4

100.0

100.0

99.4

98.4

.2

7.9
66.8

3.7

1.1

3.7

76.5
-

.9
86.0
-

_

61.7
-

62.7
-

83.5
-

72.6
-

93.5
-

20.4.7

21.3

12.8

34.6

35.6

12.8

23.6

5.7

-

-

.2

.2

.3

1.7
77.0
Over 2 a nd u n d e r

3 weeks

Establishments w ith no

.............. .

paid vacations

...

2.0

-

.6

-

3.8

.6

100.0

8.5

1.5

20.0

4.5

9.2

4.9

64.9
1.1

74.7
1.8

48.6

48.5
2.9

73.3

90.9

1.0
22.0

23.8

19.5

11.1

1.4

6.4

2.8

31.0

.7

.9

1.4

“

1.6

.8

1.1

.4

42.7
1.4

-

1 / Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in the data for "all industries."
7 j Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2 / Less
.05 of 1 percent.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




-

25

Paid S ick Jl&aua ($o*mcU P/uutUiOHi)

Table £-5:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE W O R KERS EMPLOYED IN—
Provisions for paid sick leave

M anufacturing

M anufacturing
Al
l
indus­
tis
re

Al
l

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
uii
tl­
te*
is

Whole­
sl
ae
trade

Re a l
ti
trade

Finance**

Srie
evcs

Al
l
indus­
tis
re

ll

1/

Al
l

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
ui i
tl­
te*
is

Whole­
sl
ae
trade

Rt
e ail
trade

S r ices
ev

1/
j

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

28.6

27.5

38.9

9.8

4.7

35.4

18 days ............................ .
60 days ..........................

.7
11.2
.4
.9
11.3
2.1
2.0

9.6
1.8
12.4
3.7

U.9
2.9
15.0
6.1

1.3
8.5
-

4.3
.4
-

8.8
11.4
12.0
3*2
-

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave
...... ••••

71.4-

72.5

61.1

90.2

95.3

28.6

27.5

38.9

9.8

10.8
.4
.9
9.5
2.1
.3
-

11.2
2.9
18.7

1.3
7.3

2.3
.3
2.0

7.3
1.8
14.2
.5
3.7

71.4

72.5

61.1

All establishments .....................

100.0

100.0

4 2 .8

8.1

3.9

18.9
.7
13.3
9.9
“

8.1
-

6 4 .6

57.2

91.9

96.1

9 9 .0

98.4

4.7

35.4

4 2 .8

8.1

3.9

1 .0

1.6

4.3
.4
-

20.2
6.6
3.2
4.0
-

18.9
.7
1.5
9.9
11.8
-

_

„

100.0

100.0
r ™ .— -

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 year of service

Establishments .with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................. .

2 days ............. ............... .
5 days ................ ........
6 days ••••..... ....................
7 days ..............................
10 days ........... .................

2 years

_

_

.2
1.6
.8
1.2
(2/)
.1
-

1 .0

1.6

-

1.3

20.0

4.1

1.6
-

-

1.3
-

4.9
4.6
10.0
.5
-

4.1
-

“

“

.
1 .0

-

“

100.0

98.7

80.0

95.9

1.3

20.0

4.1

of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............. ••••

5 days ............................
6 days ............................ . .
7 days ..............................
10 days .............................
12 days .............................
15 days ........... ............... .
18 days .............................
20 days .............................
22 days ••••............ ............

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................ .

-

-

-

1.2

6.1

-

8.1
-

1.0
.8
1.6
(2/)
.2

95.3

6 4 .6

57.2

-

-

-

1.4
-

“

90.2

_
-

1 .0

-

-

91.9

.1
.2

96.1

1.6
-

”

_
-

. 98.4

-

100.0

1.3
-

2.1
.5
4.7
3.2
-

4.1

*
*

98.7

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABCR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




9.5
-

-

-

9 9 .0

-

80.0

-

-

95.9

26

SloJz Jte&ue (fyohm al

Table K-5t

pAKuUiion i)

C ontinued

-

PERCENT OF OFFICE W ORKERS E MPLOYED IN—
Provisions for paid sicK leave

PERCENT OF PLANT W O R KERS E MPLOYED INM anufacturin'
-

M anufacturing
Al
l
indus­
tis
re

Al
l

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
uii
tl­
te*
is

Whole­
sl
ae
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

S rvices
e

Al
l
indus­
tis
re

Al
l

1/

1/

100.0

100.0

100.0

. 0 0 .0
1

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ........ .........

28.6

27.5

38.9

9.8

5 days ........................... .
6 days ............ ............... .
10 d a y s .............................
12 d a y s ......... ...................
15 days ......... ....................
18 d a y s ..... ........ ...............
20 days ............. ................
30 days .......................... .
4 0 d a y s ............................ .
58 d a y s .................... .........
Over 58 day* ........................

10.8
•A
8.8
2.1
.9
.9
2.2
.2
.3
2.0

7.3
13.0
1.8
1.2
.5
3.7

11.2
16.8
2.9
1.9
6.1

1.3
7.3
1.2

4.3
-

-

-

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ......... .

71 .A

72.5

61.1

90.2

95.3

30.5

27.5

38.9

9.8

27.3

10.8
.4
1.9
8.8
2.1
.9
-

7.3

11.2
16.8

1.3

4.3
22.6
.4
■
-

5.3
3.2
4.0

1.5
9.9
11.8
-

8.1
-

-

-

-

-

-

72.7

64.6

57.2

91.7

All establishments......... .......••••

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
uii
tl­
te*
is

Retail
trade

S r ices
ev

1/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

8.3

3.9

1.0

1.6

-

1.0
.8
1.5
a/ )

_
-

_
_
_
-

-

-

_
_
1.6
-

-

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

96.1

99.0

98.4

5.0

1.0

1.6

-

1.0
.8
1.2
1.5

_
1.0
-

«
.
_
1.6
_
_
_
.
-

_
_

100.0

Whole­
sl
ae
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.3

20.0

4.1

5 years of service

4 .7

.4
-

35.4

4 2 .8

20.2
5.3
3.2
4.0
2.7
-

18.9
.7
1.5
9.9
11.8
-

.2
8.1
-

-

-

-

57.2

91.7

35.4

42.8

8.3

20.2
-

18.9
.7
-

64.
.6

.1
.2

.3

1 .0

100.0

9.5
1.3

1.1
.5

4.1
_

_

4.2

_
_
_

-

-

4.7

98.7

80.0

95.9

16.2

20.0

4.1

15 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............. .
5 days ..............................
6 d a y s ......... ....................
7 d a y s ....... ......................
10 days ......................... ••••
12 days .............................
15 days ............. ................
18 days .......................... .
20 d a y s ......... .................. .
25 days .............................
30 d a y s .............................
65 days ••••........... .............
90 days .............................
Over 90 days ........................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

.6
.3
2.2
.3
.1
2.1

69.5

-

13.0
1.8
1.2
-

.5

-

2.9
1.9
-

3.7

6.1

72.5

61.1

-

7.3
1.2
-

-

90.2

-

1.3
1.4

.2
-

(2/)
.1

.2

-

-

(2/)

-

_
_

.2

-

-

99.0

98.4

95.0

_
_
_
.
_
_
-

100.0

_

9.5

.
14.9
1.3

_

_

1.1

4.1

.5
.
_
_
_
.
_

_
__

_

4.7

_

_

_

-

1.0
3.2

-

83.8

80.0

95.9

1/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in the data for "all industries."
7 j Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
J j Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




27

Table E-6:

A

t

O

H

f

M

k

i

i

u

U

i

O

H

B

W hole­
sale
tra d e

P ublic
utili­
tie s*

N on­
durable
goods

D urable
goods

All

U

4

A

&

R etail
trad e

F in a n c e **

All
indus­
tries

Services

2 /

y

1

0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 3
/
................. •.........

3

Christmas or y e a r - e n d ...............
Profit-sharing...... .......... ......
O t h e r ................................

1/
in trie
2/
3(
*

6

9

01

.

3

0

1

3
2

7

1

1
U

6

6

01

.

0 . 0
. 7
. l

3

.

0

8

U

0

.

0

8 . 3
2 . 3
2 . 7

3

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ............ .......... ........

0

.

.

0

0

. ’ 0 1

.

0

3

8 .

U

3

l i . 8

9

0

.

0

6

0

. 10 0

0

0

.

10

0

1

3

2 . 5 1 5 . 1
1 . 7 1 5. .7 8
3 . 1
-

3

2 .

7

9

.

1

5

.

.

1

0

6 .

6

6 3 .

6 .

7

3 8 .7

U

6 .
. 2

5

35.

U

3

. 1

. 7

U

3

7 .

6

9

1

0

6 . 66 23 0..0 1

.

Services

U

7

3

0

7

01

.

.

6

0 1 0 0 . 0 0.

1

.

0 . 60 3 5 . 21 *.

8

U

5

7

U

-

3 . 0
2 . 8

0

01 0 0 .0 0 .

5 0 .9

7

1 9 .

u.
ul

9

1

0

9

U

3

9

.

.

.

9 . 2
.1 8 . 7

.

3

.

U

3

6

.

8

9^iA44A4^su>eancl P-e*UioH> PlatU

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

All
in dus­
tries

1

All establishments........ ............

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 3
./ . . . . .

.

. . .

Life insurance .......... .......
Health insurance........ .......... .
Hospitalization .....................
Retirement p e n s i o n .................
Establishments with no insurance er
pension p l a n s .... ...................
1

P E R C E N T OF PL A N T W O R K E R S E M PL O Y E D IN —

M anu fa ctu re

Type of plan

ion not available ..•••••......

.

D u rable
goods

All

0 0

.

. 8 . 5 ..

01

U.

7 3
5 5
5 7
5 U

. 9
. 9
. 6
. U

1

.

U
. 3

3

M anufacture

0

0

.

Public
utili­
tie s *

N on­
durable
goods

0

0

. 0 .5 .
9 .

9 2 .1

8

8 2 .7

9
7

6 8 . 7
3 6 . 8
U L . 2

6
6
5

0 .
U .
6 .

8

6
0
2

1 . 6
5 . 9

7 6 .6

5

2

.

1

6 2 .6

1

. 8
.7

1

2 .

R etail
trad e

F in a n c e **

All
indus­
tries

Services

y

1

8 .

W hole­
sale
tra d e

0

0

.

0

9

1

.

6

0

7

0

3

.

0

.

7 . U
2 . 7
3 . 3

0 6 8. .8 U

0

.

2

.7 38

0

1 1 000 . 0 .
0

87. U

1

61* . 9

8
1
8

1

0

6

1

7 6 .
.

1

U
U
9

U 0 . 1
3 8 . 8
U 7 . 5

7
6

9 . 9
3 . 5

I

U .

8

70. U
5 5 .9
5 1 .6
3 5 .5

2

1

2 .

2

3

6

2

6 .

9

6

.

U .

0 0 1 . 0 01 0 0 . 0 0 .

8

7 5 .5

3 9 .
U 8 .

01

3

.

8

8

5 .

10

6

0 0

5

6 3 . U3
86 .3 .9 U
3 7 . 7

2

1

1

5

.

7

3

.

.

8 0 .8

8 U 8. 0 2 . 7 U
6 . 1
5
5
6 8 .7
2

6 1

W hole­
sale
tra d e

P ublic
u tili­
tie s *

N on­
d urable
goods

D urab le
goods

All

y

1

0

8

0

U

0 1. 00 0 1 . 0 0 0

1 5

.

U . 2
U . 76 87 2 . 5 5
U . 6 2 U . 8
5 . U9 U 6 . 5 9 . 1

9

.| 2

1

y

R etail
tra d e

5 .

9

9 .

Services

.

0

0
5

1

0

2

. 1

. 3
'

. 5

. 8

j

1

5

«

U

.
.
.
.

6
3
8
6

U

.

6

3 . 1
6 . 2

U

i .

5

•

!

1

Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the .emainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
data for "all industries.”
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1952
Unduplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




0

3
0
0
0

3
2

o

.

U
9 .

U
2
2
2

5 3 .5
3 1 .1

0

i
1

'

1/
in the
2/
J/
“
*

2

3

3

1

0

Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
data fbr "all industries.”
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

T bex 7
al -:

:'• £-•

1

3 2 . L6 0 2 . 5 2 . 3
3 . 7 3 .U 2 . o
U . O 1 U . .2 7

. 53 3

R etail
tra d e

i

0 1 . 0 01 00 0 ..0 0

0

3

U

U . 2
. 0
. 6

9
2

8 1 * . 9

1

0

y

W hole­
sale
tra d e

Public
u tili­
tie s*

N on­
d urable
goods

D u rab le
goods

All

i

All establishments ................... .

L

M a nufacturing

M anufacturing
All
indus­
tries

4

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Type of bonus

o

28

Appendix-Scope ar

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations 2 (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A -4). The covered industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers *0 the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Bata are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment’s full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

29

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN CINCINNATI, OHIO 1/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, FEBRUARY 1952
UCCfjcS
ucf-:

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
t
J

E£
..
fncs
c
Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establi.
shments
studi.ed
Total

-Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
21
21
21
21
21

1,617
695
342
353

922

27 8
116
59
57
162

226,900
144,500
88,000
56,500
82,400

101,300
65,260
43,460
21,800
36,040

18,710
9,240
5,940
3,300
9,470

21
21
21
21
21

All divisions .......... ..........................
Manufacturing .................................
Durable goods 2/ ..........................
Nondurable goods ( J .... ......... ...... ..
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ..............................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail trade 2/ ...........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .......
Services 6 / ................... ...........

93
240
340
101
148

24
39
34
30
35

17,300
12,200
30,100
9,600
13,200

13,250
2,600
6,100
6,360
7,730

2,400
$60
730
4,570
1,210

8
21
21
21
21
21

12
9
102
10
19
22

10
7
44
9
11
9

614
1,497
24,949
12,211
1,389
3,838

515
1,391
14,195
10,525
1,104
2,740

10
171
2,021

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis l/
Foundries, nonferrous ........ ....................
Stamped and pressed metal products ................
Machinery industries ..............................
Railroads .........................................
Ml]k dealers ........... ......................... .
Insurance carriers ........................... ... •.

8/

-

Ill
2,232

1/ The Cincinnati Metropolitan Area (Hamilton County, Ohio, and Campbell and Kenton Counties, Ky.).
2/ Total establishment employment*
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
ij Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade in the numbered tables due to the omission of department and limited-price
variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.
6/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
2/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
8/ Machine-tool accessories establishments with 8 or more workers were included.




30

Index
Page
Assembler (insurance carriers) ........... .............
Assembler (machinery) ............ •......••••••.... ...
Bartender (restaurants) ........... •••••••••.0.........
Bellman (hotels) •.....................................
Bench hand (bakeries) •................. ..............
Biller, m a c h i n e ....... ................ ..... .........
Bookbinder (printing) ................... ........... ••
.
Bookkeeper, h a n d .... . ................................
Bookkeeping-machine operator ••........... .......... .
Bottler (malt liquors) ...............
.
Brewer (malt liquors)
.... ............... .
Bricklayer (building construction) .......... .
••••••••••
Bus boy (restaurants) ••••••............
Calculating-machine operator.................
Carpenter (building construction) •••••••........ ......
Carpenter, maintenance ................................
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ....................
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries)
Cleaner •••.... .......................................
Cleaner (hotels) ........................ ...... .......
Cleaner (railroads) ••••••..........
Clerk, accounting ................. ..... ............ •
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) .............. .
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) ••••.......
Clerk, file ...........................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ..... ...... ..........
Clerk, general ........................................
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ...................
Clerk, o r d e r .....................
Clerk, pay r o l l ...........................
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ••••......... .
Compositor, hand (printing) .................
Cook (restaurants)
............................. ....•
Coremaker, hand (nonferrous foundries) ....... ....... .
Crane operator, electric bridge ....... .
Die setter (stamped-andpressed metal products) ••••••••
Dishwasher (restaurants) ..............
•••••••
Doorman (hotels) .......................
Draftsman.... ..............
•>••••
Drill-press operator (machinery) ••••••••••.......... .




17
14
20
20
IS
A

IS
3, A
A

IS
IS
IS
20
A, 5
18
9
16
13
11
20
16
3, 5
17
17
5
17
3, 5
17
3, 5
3, 6
17
18
20
13
11
13
20
20
°
14* 15

Page
Duplicating-machine operator......................
Electric ian (build ing cons truction)
......
Electrician, maintenance •••••.•••••..........
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ....... .............
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) ••••••••............
Electrotyper (printing) ....... ......................... .
Elevator operator (hotels) ••••••..... ................ .
Engine-lathe operator (machinery)
........... .
Engineer, stationary.................
Fil]ing-machine tender (milk dealers) ....................
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r .......................
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) .••••••••••••.......
Grinding-machine operator (machihery) ............... .
Guard ....................................................
Helper (bakeries) .................................
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r ................................
Helper, trades, maintenance ...............................
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) .... ••••••••••••••
Houseman (hotels) ...................
Inspector (machinery) ..............
Inspector (stamped and pressed metal products) ...........
•••••
Janitor ........................
Janitor (machinery) .....................................
Janitor (railroads) ....................
Key-punch operator .......................................
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) .................
Laborer (building construction) ..........................
Laborer (malt liquors) ..........
•••••
Machine operator (printing) ..............................
Fkchine tender (printing) ••••............................
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ............
Itechine-tool operator, toolroom................
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) .......
Machinist, maintenance •••••................
•••••
^chinist, maintenance (railroads) ..........
Machinist, production (machinery) .............. ••••••..••
Maid (hotels) ............................................
Mailer (printing) ............
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y .......
Maintenance man, general utility (nonferrous foundries) ...

6
18
9
1.
4
16
IS
20
14, 15
9
16
9
13
14, 15
11
18
19
9
16
20
14
13
11
14
16
6
17
18
18
18
18
14, 15
9
15
9
16
15
20
18
9
13

31

Index Continued
Page

Page
Maintenance man, general utility (stamped and pressed
metal products) •••.••••••.......... .....................
Meat cutter (meat cutters) ••••••.... ......... ............
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) •••••••••••'►............
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milk dealers) ....... ..
Mechanic, maintenance ...... •••••••••.................... .
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) ......... ........
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ..... ................ H ,
Millwright ............ ................•••••••••••.•••....
Mixer (bakeries) ••••••••••••...... ••••••••••••.... .
Molder (nonferrous foundries) .........
•••.••••••••
Motortruck driver
Nurse, industrial (registered) .................... •••••••••
Office boy .................. .............................
Office girl .................
Oiler .................................
Operator (local transit) ........ ........... .............
Order filler ........ ..... ........... ......... .
Order filler (milk dealers) .... •••••.........•••••••••••••
Overman (bakeries) ..................................
P a c k e r .... ............................ ..................
Painter (building construction) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Painter, maintenance ••••••••...... ••••••••...... ••••••••••
Painter, maintenance (railroads) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) .........
••••••••••••••••••
Patternmaker (nonferrous foundries) ..................
Photoengraver (printing) ................... ............ .
Pipe fitter, maintenance ............
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ......... ••••••••••••••
Plasterer (building construction) .................. ••••••••
Plumber (building construction) ••••••••••••.... •••••••••••
Porter
Power-shear operator (stamped and pressed metal products) ..
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ••••••••......
•
Press assistant (printing) ......
Press feeder (printing) ....................................
Pressman (printing) ............. .
IB,
Punch-press operator (stamped and pressed metal products) ••
Receiving clerk ...... .................... ...............
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) .......




13
19
10
16
10
16
15
10

18
13
19
8
3
6
10
19
11
16
18
11
18
10
16
16
13
18
10
16
18
18
11
13
17
IB
IB
19
13
11
16

Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) ................
Sanitary man (milk dealers) ...... ..................... .
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) .•••••••••••.
Secretary ................ ............ ..... ••••••••••••
Section head (insurance carriers) •••••••••••............ .
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ....... ••••••..... .......
Shipping c l e r k ............................ .......... .. ..
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ••••••••••••.... ••••...... .
Stenographer.................... ...................... .
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ...................... .
Stereotyper (printing) .................................
Stock handler ........ ........... ........... ........ .
Stock handler (machinery) ...........
••••••••.
Stock handler (railroads) ........ ••••••......... .
Switchboard operator..........
Switchboard operator-receptionist ........................
Tabulating-machine operator
............ .
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) ..... .
Tool-and-die m a k e r .............................. •••••••..
Tool-and-die maker (machinery)
..... •••••••••••...... .
Tool-and-die maker (stamped and pressed metal products) ...
Tracer ...................................................
Trans cribing-machine operator •••••••••••.... ....... ..
Truck d r i v e r ..........................................
Truck driver (railroads) ............................. ••••«
Trucker, hand ............. ........ ............ .........
Trucker, hand (machinery) ••••........
Trucker, hand (railroads) .....................
Trucker, power ........ ••••••••••............. ....... .
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery)
...... .
l y p i s t ..............................
typist (insurance carriers) ••••••.................
Underwriter (insurance carriers)
........ .......... .
Waiter (hotels) .........................
Waiter (restaurants) ........
•
Warehouseman (malt liquors) .........
Washer, bottle, machine (milk dealers) ..... ........ ..
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) •••.••••••••••••••••••.
Watchman.........
Welder, hand (machinery) ............. ....... •••••• ••<>•••

16
16
14> 15
6
17
10
12
12
6, 7
17
18, 19
12
15
16
7
7
3$ 7
17
10
15
13
8
7
12
16
12
15
16
12
1U , 15
7
17
17
20
20
18
16
16
12
15

☆ U . S. GOVERNM ENT PRINTING O FFIC E : O - 1 9 5 2




THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:

Ciil

m ss

3LS Bulletin No.

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
Seattle, Washington
This report was prepared in the
cations may be addressed to:

20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
25
15
20
20
15
15
20

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1075
1064
1067
1068
1070
1042
1071
1058
1069
1057

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

s North Central Regional Office.

Coamnmi-

Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offioes are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.




The North Central Region includes the following States:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky

Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Montana

Nebraska
North Dakota
Qhio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102