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Occupational Wage Suivey

Bulletin

UNITED

No.

STATES

1 0 8 8

DEPARTMENT

Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




OF

LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




C o n te n ts
Page
INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................................................................................

1

THE HAMPTON ROADS A R E A ................................ ...............................................................................................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL W E STRUCTURE............................. . ...................................................................................................................
AG

1

TABLES:
A verage e a r n in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s t u d ie d on an a r e a b a s i s A -l
O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s .........................................................................
A -2
P r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s ....................................... ....................... • • • • • • ............
A -3
M ain ten ance and power p la n t o c c u p a t io n s
............... . . .................................................... . .
A -4
C u s t o d ia l, w a r e h o u sin g , and s h ip p in g o c c u p a tio n s ....................

3
5
6
7

U n ion wage s c a l e s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s *
C -15
B u ild in g c o n s t r u c t i o n ........................
C -205
B a k e r i e s ............................................................................................................................... . ..................... ..
C -27
P r in t in g ...............................................
C -41
L o c a l t r a n s i t o p e r a t in g em p lo y ees ............................................
C -42
M o tortru ck d r i v e r s and h e l p e r s .....................................................

9
9
9
9
9

E n tra n ce r a t e s D -l
Minimum e n tr a n c e r a t e s

f o r p la n t w o r k e r s .................................................

10

Wage p r a c t i c e s E -l
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l p r o v i s i o n s ....................* ................................................................ ............. ..
E -2
S ch ed u led w e e k ly h o u r s ............ .... .....................................................................................
E -3
P aid h o l i d a y s ...................................................................................................
E-A
P a id v a c a t i o n s ................................... ......................... ................................. . . . . . r ..........................
.
E -5
P a id s i c k l e a v e ............................................................................................
E -6
N on p rod u ction b o n u ses .. ......................................................
E -7
In su r a n c e and p e n s io n p l a n s ............... ......................... ............................................. . . • • • • • • • • • •

10
11
11
12
13
14
14

APPENDIX:
S cop e and method o f su r v e y ............................. ................................................... ......................................................

15

IN D EX ........................................................................................................................................................................................................

17

F or sale by the Superintendent of Docum ents, U. S. G overnm ent Prin ting Office
W a sh in gton 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents

June 4 , 1952

I n t r o d u c t io n

The Hampton R oa d s a r e a i s im p o r ta n t b o th a s a n i n ­
d u s t r i a l an d a c o m m e r c ia l c e n t e r . The a r e a i s s e r v i c e d b y t h r e e
m a jo r a i r l i n e s and a m odern n e tw o r k o f h ig h w a y s .

1/

The Norfolk-Portsmouth area is 1 of 4.0 major labor
markets in which the Bureau of labor Statistics, is currently
conducting occupational wage surreys* Occupations com on to a
m
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were
studied on a community-wide basis* Gross-industry methods of
sampling warm thus utilised in compiling earnings data for the
following types o f occupations * (a) o ffice ; (b) professional
and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial,
warehousing, and shipping* In presenting earnings information
for such Jobs (tables A-l through A-A) separate data have been
provided wherever possible for individual broad industry divi­
sions*
Earnings information for occupations that are charac­
teristic of particular, local industries have been presented,
when studied, in Series B tables* This supplemental coverage
was omitted in the survey in the Norfolk-Portsmouth area* Union
scales (Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supple­
menting) occupational earnings for several industries, or trades
in which the great majority of the workers are employed under
terms of collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or
m um rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices*
inim
Data were collected and summarized cm shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*
The Hampton

Roads

A rea

The Hampton Roads area which includes the counties of
Princess Anne, Elizabeth City, Norfolk, and Warwick, and the
cities of Norfolk, South Norfolk, Portsmouth, Newport News, and
Hampton had a total population of more than 589,000 in 1950;
approximately 60 percent of this total resided within the limits
o f the respective cities*
The Bureau's estimate of the annual budget for a Nor­
folk worker's family was $4,U 6, ranking 20th in a group o f 3A
large cities surveyed in the United States during October 1951©
The budget is described as providing a "modest but adequate"
level o f living for an urban worker's family of four persons—
an employed father, a housewife not gainfully employed, and two
ohildren under 15 years o f age* Between October 1951 and the
time of this survey in January 1952, reta il prices remained
fa irly stable*
1 / Prepared in the Bureau's regional office in Atlanta, Ga*,
by Louis B Woytych under the direction of Harry H Hall, Re­
*
*
gional W and Industrial Relations Analyst* The planning and
age
central direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau's
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations*




I n d ic a tiv e
o f Hampton R oads* i n d u s t r i a l im p o r ta n c e
i s t h e l a r g e v a r i e t y o f m a n u f a c t u r in g p l a n t s l o c a t e d
in th e
area;
s h i p c o n s t r u c t i o n and r e p a i r ,
flo u r m ills ,
p a p e r , and
c h e m ic a l p l a n t s c o m p r is e t h e b a ck b o n e o f t h e a r e a ' s i n d u s t r i a l
a c tiv ity .
M a n u fa c tu r in g em p lo y m en t d u r in g March 1 9 5 2 w as ap­
p r o x i m a t e l y 2 5 p e r c e n t o f t h e t o t a l n o n a g r i c u l t u r a l em p loym en t
o f a p p r o x im a t e ly 2 0 5 ,6 3 5 . 2 / The t r a n s p o r t a t i o n eq u ip m e n t i n ­
d u s t r y em p lo y ed 3 5 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s , w i t h t h e r e m a in in g 1 5 ,0 0 0 manu­
f a c t u r i n g w o r k e r s d i s t r i b u t e d among t h e f o o d and k in d r e d p ro d ­
u cts;
lu m b er and f u r n i t u r e ; p a p e r ; p r i n t i n g ; and c h e m ic a l i n ­
d u s tr ie s .

Unionization in the Hampton Roads area was almost
wholly confined to the manufacturing and the public u tilitie s
industries* More than B0 percent of the plant workers in the
public u tilities division were employed by establishments hav­
ing written agreements with labor unions* In the manufacturing
industries, approximately three in four workers were employed
by firms with union contracts* Union representation of plant
workers in the other Industry groups was negligible* The only
significant unionization among office workers was in the public
u tilitie s group* Nearly A0 percent of the office workers in
these industries were employed by establishments having col­
lective bargaining agreements covering office workers*

O c c u p a t io n a l

W age

S tru ctu re

E x t e n s i v e w age a d j u s t m e n t s w e r e made i n t h e Hampton
R o a d s a r e a b e tw e e n t h e o u tb r e a k o f h o s t i l i t i e s i n K orea an d J a n u ­
a r y 195 2 *
T h e s e g e n e r a l w age I n c r e a s e s , e x p r e s s e d e i t h e r a s
c e n t s - p e r - h o u r o r a s p e r c e n t a g e i n c r e a s e s , w e r e g r a n t e d t o su b ­
s t a n t i a l n u m b ers o f w o r k e r s i n a l l
in d u s tr y gro u p s s tu d ie d *
G e n e r a l l y , c e n t s - p e r - h o u r r a i s e s r a n g e d fro m 5 t o 1 5 c e n t s ‘ and
p e r c e n t a g e i n c r e a s e s r a n g e d fro m 5 t o 1 0 p e r c e n t *
I n d iv id u a l
w age a d j u s t m e n t s w e r e a l s o r e c e i v e d b y a l a r g e number o f w o r k e r s
i n a d d it io n t o , o r i n l i e u o f , g e n e r a l in c r e a s e s *

Virtually a ll plant workers in the Ham
pton Roads area
were employed in establishments with formalized m um entrance
inim
rates for inexperienced workers* M um rates of 75 cents or
inim
more an hour were recorded in establishments representing threefourths of the total plant employment* The manufacturing indus­
tries reported entrance rates ranging tram 75 cents to more than

2 / Hampton Roads labor Market, March 1952, Virginia State
Employment Service*

2

$1.20 an hour. The highest m um rates were paid generally
inim
by the public u tilitie s industries—more than three-fifths of
the plant workers were in establishments with m um of 90
inim s
or more cents an hour. M um entrance rates recorded among
inim
establishments in the services group were typically lowest—
nearly two-thirds of the workers were employed in establishments
with m um of less than 50 cents an hour.
inim s
The p r e v a l e n t s c h e d u l e d w ork w eek f o r b o t h o f f i c e an d
p l a n t w o r k e r s i n t h e Hampton R oads a r e a w as A0 h o u r s . A lm o st
t h r e e - f o u r t h s o f t h e o f f i c e w o r k e r s an d a b o u t t w o - t h i r d s o f t h e
p l a n t w o r k e r s i n a l l i n d u s t r i e s w ere em p lo y e d i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
h a r i n g a s c h e d u l e d A O -hour w o r k w eek . More t h a n n i n e - t e n t h s o f
t h e p l a n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s i n m a n u f a c t u r in g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
w e r e on a AO -hour s c h e d u l e . A m a j o r i t y o f t h e p l a n t w o r k e r s i n
t h e t r a d e an d s e r v i c e i n d u s t r i e s w ere em p lo y ed on w ork s c h e d u l e s
i n e x c e s s o f AO h o u r s , w h e r e a s m ore t h a n a t h i r d o f t h e o f f i c e
w o r k e r s i n t h e p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s g ro u p w ere w o r k in g 3 7 . 5 h o u r s a
w eek o r l e s s .

About a tenth of the plant workers in the Hampton Roads
manufacturing establishments were employed on extra sh ifts.
Nearly a ll these extra-shift workers received shift differen­
tia ls, expressed predominantly as a percentage addition to day
rates—most generally 7 percent for both second and third shift
work.




Nearly a ll office workers and approximately threefourths of the plant workers in the Hampton Roads area received
one or more paid holidays a year. M than two-thirds of the
ore
office workers '’hnd more than half of a ll plant workers received
at least six paid holidays annually.
Formal provisions for granting paid vacations to
employees with at least 1 year of service was a part of the
policy of establishments employing more than nine-tenths of the
office workers and almost a ll the plant workers in a ll indus­
tries. The average vacation period far office and plant work­
ers, after 1 year’ s service, was 1 weeko Most of the plant
employees in the area with 2 years’ service were granted 1 week,
and more than three-fourths of the public u tilities plant work­
ers were granted 2 weeks. The length of paid vacations for both
office and plant employees with 5 years’ service was predomi­
nantly 2 weekso
Manufacturing establishments, employing approximately
a tenth of a ll plant workers in this group, based their rates
of first-lev el supervision (generally designated leadmen or
working foremen) on a fixed differential above rates earned by
those supervised. The differential took the form of a specified
percentage or cents-per-hour addition to the earned rates of the
highest paid workers supervised. Such supervisory pay practices
were even more infrequent among establishments in other indus­
try groups.

3

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-i:

O j^ ice O ccu p a tion *.

( A verage s t r a i g h t - t i n e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
i n N o r f o l k - P o r t s m o u t h ( H a m p t o n R oads), V a . , b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , F e b r u a r y 1952)

S ee footnotes a t end of table.
*
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s ), c o a a u n i c a t i o n ,
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t ate.

**




a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), Va., February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

u

T le a
ab -it

Qjfoce Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / fo r selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Norfolk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), Va., by industry division, February 1952)

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f table.
*

Transportation (excluding railroads),

#*

F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t ate.




comnunication, a nd other public utilities.

O c cu n a tio n a l i'a~e S urvey, N orfolk-P ortsm outh (Hampton koacis), V a ., February 1952
u .s .

of

La b o r

Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

5

Office Occupation* - Continued

Table A-i*

(A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
i n N o r f o l k - P o r t s m o u t h ( H a m p t o n R o a d s ) , - Va., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , F e b r u a r y 195.2)

1/

y

*
«*

Houz*s r e f l e c t t h e w o r k w e e k f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e sa l a r i e s a n d the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k l y ho u r s .
W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s foll o w s :
1 a t $ 1 0 0 to 105; 1 a t $ 1 0 5 to 110; 1 a t $ 1 1 5 to 120; 3 a t $ 1 2 5 to 130.
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s ) , co m nunlc a t i o n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l es t a t e .

Table a -

2: P^cfedUonal and *JocJinical O ccupation*

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y ho u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
i n Norfolk-Portsnouth (Hampton Roads),” V a . , b y industry division, February 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W E E K L Y E A R N I N G S OF—

A veraoe

Sex,

occupation,

and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$

1$

1$

U7.50

50.00

52.50

$

$

55.00 5*7.50 60.00 62.50 65.00

£0.00 52.50 55.00 57.50

60.00

*

I*

$

j»

■$

1$

•$

$

$

90.00

95 . 0c 100 . od

62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 .0 0 j90.00 95.00

LOO.QC 1 0 5 . 0 0

67.50

1
1

i

70.00

72.50

75.00

80.00

85.00

:
|

N u r s e s , i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g i s t e r e d ) ...........

16

liO.O

70*50

1

!

-

_______ 1
_______!

y

Hours refl e c t




1

2
--------- i ------

-

!

3

-

1

-

3

-

2

-------------- --------: --------------1 ------

the w o r k w e e k f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d t h e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d t o t h e s e w e e k l y ho u r s .

Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), Va., February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6

Table

x-3t M aintenance and Powel Plant Occupation*

( A v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 / f ar m e n i n s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a b a s i s i n
N o r f o l k - P o r t s m o u t h ( H a m p t o n R o a d s ) , Va., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , F e b r u a r y 1 9 52)

1/

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d n i g h t work.

*

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication,




a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), fa., February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

7

Table A -ii:

Q u U od kU ,

T V ' 'la U o u L U u }, a n d
a

S U ift fu w f

O o c u p a td o * U

(Average hourly earnings 1 / f o r selected occupations 2/ studied o n a n area b a s i s I n
N o r f o l k - P o r t s m o u t h ( H a m p t o n Roads), Va., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , F e b r u a r y 1 952)

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a ble,
«
Transportation (excluding railroads),




coimmication,

a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), Va., February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-Jit

G u & to d i c U ,

W a A m liO H M M fy 0 4 t d

S /u p fM H Q

Q o O H p a tU m A - G o t U lH M s d

(Arerage hourly earnings 1/ fo r selected occupations 2/ studied on an area b a sis in
Norfolk-Portsnouth (H atto n Roads), V a., by industry d iv isio n , February 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A I G H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Truck drivers, nediun (li to and including 1 tons) •••
*
Manufacturing........... .........................
Monwanufactoring ................. ................
PnKVfft
* -.T .., .t
T tTTt. TTT,, T ,
U
h
n
l
ttItTTttTTftrTT-TTt--TttTTTTT-It
Fn+j>11 traHf tTTT-.tTT-.T-TTT--.__ T--_____ _ T
_

1,061
15i
930
117
313
110
||

Truck drivers, heavy (over 1 tans, trailer t y p e ) ....
*
Nonaanufacturing.................................

153
136

Truckers, power (fork-lift) .........................
kanufacturing............ ........................

73
5r

Watchnen...............................................................................
M anufacturing.................................. .............................
Hrannanuf a c tu rin g .................. ........... ‘. ..........................
Public U t ilit ie s * , . . . T , T T », , T T T t T T t , *
.T T »
TT T f T
Wholesale trade ..............................................

—

372
—

m

r

188
27

U9
28

Avenge

hourly
earnings

$
$
s
$
s
$
$
t
s
$
*
$
$
$
$
%
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
Undo; 0.50 0.5S 0.60 0.65 0 .7 0 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1 .3 0 1 . * 1.1*C l.li5 1 .5 c 1.60 1 .7 0 1.80 1.90 2.00
♦
0.50 .55 .6 0 .65 .70 •75 •80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 i.o5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.5C 1.6C 1 .7 0 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10

$
1.06
1.12
1.07
1#13

-

-

1.19
•92

-

-

51t
21*
30

I? 278
26
20
1 1 258
1*
Jj
O
26
18
230
13
9

! "

1.08
1.03

8
8

1
1

•96
.92
.83
•v 2
1.10
•8i*

-

1
1

i.H

I.® ’ 1

Skt

1 -

-

3

\

. |
-

3

12

12

-

k

1

38

78

1

1
*

1

id*
8

j . . _
1
j “

\ h

38
16
10
8

_
1

50
30

-

50

1
+
2
2
2

2

2
b
10

89
89

T”
28

56
2* r w
3 16
2

_

27

21

rm
T

12

3/
5/
*

Workers were distributed as follows: 6 at 3$ to 1*0 cents; 9 at 1*0 to 1 5 cents; 81 at 1 5 to 50 cents.
*
*
Workers were distributed as follows: 26 at 30 to 35 cents; 267 at 35 to 1*0 cents; 29 at 1*0 to 1*5 cents; 56 at 1* to 50 cents.
5
Transportation (excluding railroads), conaunication, and other public utilities.




9
9

16

6
6
-

1
*

2

-

-

7

1

_

-

-

-

69
21
18
(

6
3
3

3
2

61*
6U

30

18
(

9

-

16
16

2k

30

-

.
-

.

-

-

12

T

6

6

6

_

it

19
U
2

22

9

7

“ T

-

11

2

_

-

-

2

6

n

7

36

~ sr

?2
it
8

x

h

1

H r
-

8

12

2
6

s
1/ Excludes preniun pay fo r overtine and night work.
Data U n ited to nan workers except where otherwise in dicated.

36
16
20
8

2
1

n

13

"V

13
10
3

16

16

2

35

9

26

1?

-

I
18
2
39
8

15
(

- ~ a r 'r ~
1

19
31

11

16

11*6
16
130
30
13
22
61
21*

32
16

3

“" T

_

1

3 1

3

80
80

_

3

-

-

_

-

3

i

22

8

9

7

-

9

•
-

9

_

3

1 7

-

|

_
_ _
_
- | - 1
_

i
1

_
”

-y

> _ •
_
_

C:

9

Union Wage Scales

( M i n i m i wage rates a n d m a x i m u m s t r a i g h t - t i n hours per w e e k a g r e e d u p o n through collective b argaining
betw e e n employers a n d trade-unions*
Rates a nd hours are those in effeot on dates indicated*)

Table C-I5s

& u ild u u f G o H A tb a ctiO H

Table C-27:

April 1, 1952

(i/ U 4 tU ^ f

Table C-42:

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

♦3.250
2.000
2.500
2.050
2.800
2.625
1.000

Classification

Brioklayert •••••
Carpenters ......
Electricians ....
Painters .......
Plasterers .....
Plumbers ........
Building laborers

Hours
per
week

40
40
40

A
O
AO
AO

Hours
per

Book and job shopss

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Hours
per
week

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Mixers, scalers .................... ......
Checkers .................................
Oven supervisors ..........................
Truck loaders ...... *..............•••••••
Vfrapplng-naohlne setters ..... ...........
Molder operators, divider operators,
and roll-machine operators
Oven feed and d e l i v e r y ................ .
Flour blenders
............. .
Mixers1 helpers, wrapping-machine
feeders ................................
Bakery helpers .... .......................
Fhn greasers, molder operators*
helpers, end bread packers .............
Roll baggers .......................... .

2

1

0




7

7

♦1.370
1.340
1.270
1.190
1.170

$2,000
2.000
2.125
2.000

Compositors, hand .
Machine operators .
Fhotoengravers ....
Pressmen, cylinder

1.120
1.110
1.070

40
40
40

1 .C4 0
.990

40
40

.990
•840

40
40

Com positors, hand - day w o rk.......... ...........
Com positors, hand - n igh t w o rk ............••••
Machine operators - day w o rk.............. •••••
Machine operators - n igh t work ...................
Machine tenders (m achinists) - day work . .
Machine tenders (m achinists) - n ight
work ...........................................................
FhotoengraTsrs - day w o rk...........................
Fhotoengrarers - n igh t w o rk ................••••
Pressmen, web presses - day work ................
Pressmen, web presses - n igh t work ..•••••
Pressm en-in-charge - day work .....................
Pressm en-in-charge - n igh t work .................
Stereotypers - day w o rk......................... ..
Stereotypers - n igh t work

40
40
40
40
40

A0
A0
A0
A0

2.453
2.560
2.453
2.560
2.453

37*
37*
37! r
37! f
37*

2.560
2.325

37*
40
40
37*
37$
37$
37*
35
35

2 .4 0 0
2.493
2.573
2.769
2.840
2.650
2.771

J lo c a l

Table C-41:

October 1, 1951

Classification

7

1-man oars and busses:
First 3 months .........................
4—12 months .........................r.TV.
After 1 y e a r ........................ •••••

0

Helpers •••••••••••«•••••••••••••••••••

♦1.000
1.000
.830
1.100
1.200
1.050
1.050
1.050
•920
1.050
.900

48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

Moving - Furniture:
Tractor-trailer, local ...................
Straight j o b .................... .........
Helpers

1.050
.950
.900

40
40
40

1.140
1.210
1.280
1.350
1.400

40
40
40
40
40

1.210
1.280
1.350
1.470

40
40
40
40
40

Produce and g r o c e r y .... .....................
Tract or-trailer .....**..** c
o
•
Helpers

1.100
1.200
1.050

48
4B
48

1.680
1.610

40
40

Classification

General - Freight, local:

AO

jS& M & U ed

Hours
par
week

JSS&.

Newspapers:

Table C-205:

Rate
per
hour

Railway express •••••••••....... ...... .
Helpers .•••••••«••••••«

Rate
per
hoar

Classification

M / a to * t> U tck S b'U O & U <Z 4td o tte lfl& U

-

Rate
per
hour

♦1.170
1.220
1.270

Hours
per
week

Agreement A .................... ..........
Tractor-trailer .......................
Helpers •.•••••••••«••••••••••••••••••«
Agreement B ............. ........ .........
Tractor-trailer ........................
Helpers
Agreement C ..............................
Tractor-trailer.......................
Helpers ........•«<>••..«.••«•••••••<>•••

Newspaper:
Day drivers:
First year .............................
Second y e a r ......................... .
Third y e a r .... ......... ..............
Fourth year .............. ...... .......
Fifth year and o v e r ...................
Night drivers:
First y e a r ........ .......... .........
Second year ........................
Third year ........... .
Fourth year ..........................
Fifth year and over ••••••.... .

1 .4 0 0

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Nor folk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), Va., February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
5
2
2

1
0

D:
Table D - i :

Entrance Rates

Minimum. Cnfoanoe. Rated, fad Plant W
a/dem . y
M
E:

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rate8 in —
Minimum rates (in cents)
All
industries

2J

All establishments.........

Under t+
Q
4 0 ............................
Over 40 and under 45 •••••••••
45 ........................... ...
Over 45 and under 50 .........
5 0 ............................
Over 50 and under 55 •••••••••
55 ............................
Over 55 and under 60 •••••••••
6 0 ............................
Over 60 and under 65 .........
65 ............................
Over 65 and under 70 .........
7 0 ............................
Over 70 and under 75 •••••.•••
75 ...........................
Over 75 and under 30 ....... . •
8 0 ...........................
Over 80 and under 8 5 ................. ...
85 ...................................................................................
Over 85 and under 90 . . . . . . . . .
9 0 ...................................................................................
Over 90 and under 95 . . . . . . . . .
Over 95 and under 100 .......................

Over 100 and under 105 . . . . . Tr
105 ..........................
Over 105 and under 110 ...... T T
Over 115 ar*i under 120 .......
120 and over . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1/

7j
*

100.0

3.9
.9
2.1
2.6
.5
2.7
1.0
.3
2.3
3.4
1.8
1.5
.6
.7
1.1
16.0
1.9
•4
7.5
.8
22.5
1.9
3.4
1.4
5.2
1.5
3.0
1.5
.8
6.8

Manufact uring esta blishments
with 21-100
workers

101-500
workers

501 or
more
workers

100*0 _j — 100.0 _ - IQQ.O..

100.0

Wholesale
trade

100.0

Retail
trade

_

.

•

-

-

-

-

_

_

.

8.1

-

“

“

1.1
-

100.0

10.7
2.0

—
-

I

I

-

7.1

“

_

_

_

-

_

_

25.9

24.4
10.8

2.6

7.7

6.7

2.5
15.6
5.7

12.6
_
__

7.3
19.5
4.0
27.0
3.7

4.4
11.5
8.4
10.8

31.1
12.2
3.2
16.4

45.9

2.8
_

8.5
6.3
2.2
7.2
4.3
.6
6.6
11.0
.9
6.6
2.5
2.9
4.6
19.9

8.4

2.8

r f wviiWgAO on
t
o
A04WOUW WX1 urtT*Vot* OU «XUTo Bull v8|
all establishments .... ............
P a a c ^vf nrr ohf

11.0
7.6

4Pfavianf 4a 1

Uniform cents (per hour) •••••».
4 cents •••••••••••..........
Over 5 and under 9 cents ••••
Q O —
«
TO rtanf.o

_

3.8

3d or
other
shift.

8.5

2.9

8.2

2.4

2.4
.3
1.9
•1

1.5

“

6.0

26.2

-

17.9

—

.3
•8
•4

.1

_

5

p o r* (* a n t.

5.8
o
.<
5.6

t t i ni

Q A — 4 Mil —mm MA J 4
A
X j M1
receiving no dilierential

2.7
8.3
8.4
1.8
7.8
5.1

“
•9

• • «• • • • • •

•3

•5

•9

-

4.2
i/

Less than .05 of 1 percent.

5.3

7.3

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




4.2

2d
shift

84.7

3.6
7.1
6.5
4.0
4*7
3.8

mm

Percent of plant
workers employed
on each shift in
all m^niyPactf^Hng

Shift differential

u. -100.0

_

P d a tU iio n i

Services

7.5
_

I

2 > i^ e n e u t u U

■hbie ®-l!
Public
utilities*

-

“

Supplementary Wage Practices

3 .5

Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), Va., February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT C
F LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

11

Table E-2:

S cJ t& d u l& d W & eJ U tf <Jtou*4>

PERCENT OP OFFICE WORKERS
Weekly hours

All establishments ....... ...........
Under 35 hours .......... ............
35 hours .............................
Over 35 and under 37$ hours ...........
37$ h o u r s ....... ................. .
Over 37$ and under 1*0 hours ..... .
1*0 h o u r s ......... ......... .
Over 1*0 and under 11 hours .......... .
**
l l hours ....... .....................
it
Over 11 and under 1* h o u r s ....... .
**
8
1*8 hours .............................
•JO hours ........................... .
Over 50 hours ........................

1/
y
*
**

Al
l
idsre
nutis

Manufacturing

Public
uii i s
tl t e *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

y

EMPLOYED IN—

100.0

.

o.h

.
0.6
.3
.3
7.0
90.7
•
1.1
-

1.8
.
32.5
7.5
1*9.1
1.8
7.3
-

-

•1
3.7
6.7
71.1
2.9
1*.9
6.7
2.8
.7

R t i trade
eal

100.0

.
76.1
-

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Finance**

100.0

.
.
3.2
1*8.1*
11.9
7.7
22.9
5.9
*

Al
l
idsre y
nutis

100.0

100.0

•
9.1*
25.5
6$.l
-

-

U*.l*
1*.5
5.0

Sendee.

.
60.5
3.9
12.9
22.7
*

1.9
.5
.
.6
61*.7
2.8
5.8
5.1*
13.8
.8
3.7

100.0

.
_
1.3
91.6
1.7
2.1*
3.0
*

Public
uiiis
tlte*

100.0
13.0
3.1*
.
_
-

60.2
5.1
lt.O
1.8
12.5

Wholesale
trade

Ret i trade
al

100.0

100.0

.
.
.
1*5.5
.
20.8
6.9
12.7
3.5
10.6

_
.
.
28.6
l.*
*l
13.1
llt.O
33.1*
2.2
1*.3

Sendees

100.0

_
_
.
•
28.8
3.0
8.9
8.1
51.2

m

-

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and othdk* public utilities.
*
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

fo ld

Table B-3*

J fo lid a ifi

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —

Number of paid holidays

All establishments
Establishments providing paid
holidays................. ,
1 d a y ................... .
2 d a y s ...................,
3 d a y s ..... ..............
3$ days .................
I d a y s ...... ........... .
t
5 days .................. .
6 d a y s .................. .
7 d a y s .......... ........
6 days ....... ............
8$ days .........
,
10 days ....... ........ .
12 days ................. .
13 dsys .................
Establishments providing no
paid holidays..... .

Manufacturing

Wholesale
trade

R etail trade

F in an ce**

Service**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.6

98.3

93.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

60.9

.1
.2
.7

_
.2
-

-

.6
.

.7
7.8
69.0
3.9
3.1
1.6
1.8
.3
7.1*

91 .3
*
1.1*
1.8
_
-

3.1*

1.7

_
.
2.5
- ,
_

.*
1
.*
1
.5
32.1
1*6.6
20.0

10.1
88.1
1.8

.
•
-

-

-

-

-

-

3.9
18.6
3.0
71*.5

6.3

-

-

-

1 1 .7
**
6.2
22.2
18.1
-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M PL O Y E D IN —

Public
utilities*

A ll
industries

1/
*
«*

Manufacturing

.1*

9.5
6.6
21*.8
19.6
-

39.1

A ll
industries 1 /

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

R etail trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

71.8

81.6

35.2

77.9

81.6

1*6.5

2.6
.*
1
1.3
2.0
-

_
1.3

6.5
15.1*
7.2
U*.6
25.2
9.0
•

1.1*
1*.6
•
7.0
65.8
2.8
-

3.1
8.9

22.1

18.1*

1.7
1.7
2.1
.6
2.3
l*.l
55.0
1.6
2.7
~

28.2

73.5
1.8
-

-

5.1
15.0
•
13.8
«
•

•

18.1*

61*.8

Services

_

-

19.7
11*.8
•

53.5

Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), Va., February 1 9$2
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LIBOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Paid VaocUiatU (4o*m al P\auiii»*u )

Table E-4:

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy

All establishaents ....................

Al
l
idsre
nutis

Public
u iiis
t lte*

Manufacturing

Wholesale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Rti t
e a l rade

Finanos**

Al
l
.
industries^/ Manufacturing

S^viee.

Wholesale
trade

Public
uiiis
tlte*

Re a l trade
ti

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishaents with paid vacations....

95.6

95.8

95.9

98.3

94.4

100.0

82.6

83.1

84.5

85.2

64.8

89.6

68.9

1 week .............................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ....... .
2 weeks ............................
3 w e e k s ........................... .

61.7
1.3
32.2
.4

83.1
•
12.7
-

52.4
43.5
-

40.2
55.0
3.1

65.0
29.4
-

.5
12.7
86.8
-

63.3
19.3
-

66.7
16.4
-

77.4
7.1
-

38.7
.
46.5
-

41.6
23.2
-

73.8
15.8
-

62.1
6.8
-

Establishaents with no paid vacations ..

4.4

4.2

4.1

1.7

5.6

17.4

16.9

15.5

14.8

35.2

10.4

31.1

Establishasnts with paid vacations ....

97.5

/
97.8

95.9

w e e k .............................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ...........
2
weeks ............ ..............
3
weeks ........................... .

47.8
1.4
47.9
.4

Establishaents with no paid vacations ..

2.5

Establishaents with paid vacations....

97.5

97.8

95.9

96.3

106.0

1 week .............................
2 w e e k s ................ ...... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...........
3
weeks ............................

54.5
62.3
.3
.4

57.5
40.3

9.9
86.0
*
.

l U
82.8

24.6
75.4

2.5

2.2

4.1

1.7

Establishasnts with paid vacations....

97.5

97.8

95.9

98.3

100.0

1 w e e k .............................
2
w e e k s ....................... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..........
3 weeks ............................

10.3
49.1
23.8
14.3

1.8
32.8
55.7
7.5

9.9
46.8

12.4
60.5

24.6
67.5

1 rear of service

2

years

-

of servioe

1

Establishaents with no paid vacations ..

77.4
-

2

.

-

4.1

-

9

55.6
3.1

86.0
-

20.4
-

100.0

98.3
. 3

9

2

1.7

3.1

'

9

100.0
.

.

.6
73.6
-

0

.5
96.6
2.9

*

52.4
.1
32.9
-

17.4

“

1

85.4

22.4
-

5

12.7
86.8
-

“

-

82.6
6

0

82.6
46.4
36.2
•
-

0

.
85.4

2
73.5
-

.

10.1
-

2

1

2

-

75.1
-

5

94.6

.

3

9

8

.

77.9
.

3

5

.6

25.1 0
-

5

8

-

6

7

9.7
-

14.8

35.2

5.4

85.5

85.2

64.8

94.6

77.9

4.7
80.8
.

0

18.2
67.2
•
-

10.1
75.1
-

31.7
33.1
_

35.5
59.1
_

.
.

22.1

56.4
21.5
_

14.5

-

-

-

-

-

14.5

14.8

35.2

5.4

22.1

85.4

85.5

85.2

64.8

94.6

77.9

39.8
42.8

17.9
59.4

4.7
74.6
-

31.7
22.3
10.8

51.6
26.3

_

10.1
53.1
22.0

35.5
54.6

.

17.4

14.6

100.0

82.6

.5
73.0

-

64.8

85.2

85.5

14.6

6

13 years of service

Establishasnts with no paid vacations ..

1 /

•
**

2.5

2

_

.

39.2
.

4.1

25.4
2

1.7

Includes data fo r in d u stries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), eonmnioation, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




7.9
-

26.5
-

17.4

8

14.6

.

6.2
14.5

1

1

4

35.2

-

.

-

4.5

-

8
5.4

22.1

Occupational Wage Surrey, gorfolk-Portsnouth (Haapton Roads), V a., February 1952
o^bw^UtiitiS

8

5
5

.

13

Table E -5 :

Paid Blok Jtjoaoe (rfoim al pAoaUioml)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments....................
6 Months of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
3 d a y s ..............................
5 d a y s ..............................
6 day’ ..............................
s
10 days .............................
12 d a y s .............................
15 days..............................
30 d a y s ............... .............
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

Al
l
idsre
nutis

Manufacturing

Public
uiiis
tlte*

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

R t i trade
eal

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finanoe**

S-rvio-

Al
l
industries^/

Manufacturing

Public
uiiis
tlte*

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

R t i trade
eal

Sendees

100.0

100.0

6.6
5.0
i.6
-

3.8
. .3
3.5
-

100.0

100.0

100.0

10.9
5.6
5.3
-

13.7
10.8
2.9
-

26.8
1.1
25.7
-

100.0

89.1

86.3

73.2

98.0

100.0

98.2

100.0

93.1

96.2

21.7
18.1
1.1
2.5
-

12.7
12.7
-

18.0
11.3
5.3
1.1
-

13.7
10.8
2.9
-

33.1
1.1
16.9
8.8
6.6
-

8.5
1.3
2.1
2.1
.6
1.0

10.0
8.2
1.8
-

2.6
1.7
.9
-

17.5
2.3
10.7
1.6
2.9
-

12.7
.
.3
-

.7
-

1.1
2.6
1.5
-

91.3

75.3

87.3

82.0

86.3

66.6

91.5

95.9

90.0

97.1

82.5

87.3

11.3
1.6
3.6
.2
1.1
1.1
2.6
.6
1.8
.2
1.5

8.7
3.6
.6
1.0
3.5

21.7
18.1
1.1
2.5
-

12.7
12.7
-

18.0
5.7
5.6
5.3
1.1
-

13.7
2.9
10.8
-

33.1
1.1
JL6.9
8.8
6.6
-

8.5
2.5
2.5
1.1
.6
1.0
.1
.7
-

1.1
1.1
•
-

10.0
8.2
1.8
-

2.6
x.7
.9
-

17.5
2.3
5.7
5.0
1.6
2.9
-

12.7
.3
3.5
8.9
-

85.7

91.3

75.3

87.3

82.0

86.3

66.6

91.5

95.9

90.0

97.1

82.5

87.3

39.9
23.8
2.0
2.9
3.6
1.6
.6
1.8
.3
1.5
1.8

61.1
55.7
5.2
3.5
-

15.8
1.1
18.1
2.5
21.1

12.7
12.7
-

18.0
5.7
10.9
1.1
-

13.7
2.9
10.8
-

33.1
1.1
16.9
8.8
6.6
-

30.8
21.6
1.3
1.2
1.7
1.2
.9
.2
.7
2.0

16.9
11.3
2.6
-

23.8
8.2
1.8
13.8

2.6
2.6
-

17.5
2.3
5.7
6.6
2.9
-

12.7
.3
3.5
8.9
-

60.1

35.6

51.2

87.3

82.0

86.3

66.6

69.2

53.1

76 Jp

97.1

82.5

100.0

100.0

6.7
.2
.1
3.6
.3
1.0
1.5

1.1
.6
3.5

93.3

95.9

100.0

11.3
1.5
1.6
1.2
1.1
1.5
.6
1.8
.2
1.5

8.7
3.6
1.6
3.5

85.7

-

-

100.0

2.0
(2/)
1.1
.3
,3
-

100.0

•

1.8
1.8
-

-

1 veer of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
5 d a y s ..............................
6 d a y s ..............................
7 or 10 days ........................
12 days .............................
15 or 18 d a y s ...................... .
20 days .............................
21 d a y s ............. .............. .
30 days .............................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

.1

3.5
8.9
-

2 vears of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
5 d a y s .... ,........................
6 days ..............................
7 d a y s ..............................
9 d a y s ............... s.............
10 days .............................
12 days .............................
15 or 18 days .......................
20 d a y s ............................ .
21 days .............................
30 days .............................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
10 vears of servioe
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................ .
5 days .............................
6 d a y s .......... .............. .
7 through 10 days ...................
12 d a y s ....... ....................
H days .... .......................
15 or 18 days ......................
20 d a y s ................ ...........
21 days ............................
30 d a y s ............... .............
65 d a y s .......................... .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

p

Includes data fo r in d u stries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s), coasaunioatlox^ and other public u t ilit ie s
Finance, insurance, and re a l estate.




_

87.3

Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk-Portsaouth (Hampton Roads), V a., February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s

X
U

Table £-6:

N O H fV U kJM cliO n & a n n ie t

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type of bonus

All eatabHah— n t a ..... ........... .
Xatabllsteenta vlth noepreduction
bocmsee 2 / ................... .
Chrlstaae or y e a r - e n d ....... .
Profit-sharing.......... ....... .
O t t e r ..............................
Istabllstesnts with no nonproduotlon
bonuees ..............................

if
zj
•
**

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Al
l
.
i d s r e 1/ Manufacturing
nutis

Al
i
idsre
nutis

Manufacturing

Public
u iiis
t lte*

Wholeeaie
trade

Re a l trade
ti

Finance**

Sendees

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

* * .0

19.2

3*.9

2 7 .0

88.2

72.1

90.5

*1.3

38.6

16 .1
3.1
-

.V
-

72.3
9.0
7.9

69.1
3*.3

5 6 .0

80.8

65.1

73.0

11.8

27.9

R t i trade
eal

Srle
eree

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

22.5

10 .0

**.9

88.9

76 .2

22.5
-

1 0 .0

**.9
7.3
-

76.1
8 .*
*.*

60.3
12.9
11.9

58.7

9.5

Wholesale
trade

1.8

7 8 .0

3.6
5.8

3*.9
5.0

2 7 .0

Public
uiiis
tlte*

77.5

9 0.0

55.1

1 1 .1

2 3 .8

37.3
3.*

9.7
9.5

Instates data for Industries otter ttea tteoo shewn sspsratsly.
Uhduplieated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), ccasnmication, and otter publlo ntllltlss.
Tlnsnss, Insurance, and rsal sstats.

Table E-7:

Ontusuuvoe. and P-enUon Plant

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of plan

Ai
l
„t
i d s r e I f Manufacturing
nutis

Manufacturing

P
ublic
uiii s
tlt e *

Wholesale
t ade
r

R t i tr d
eal ae

Finance**

Sendees

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Istabllstesnts vlth Insurance or
pension plans 2 / .... ................

8**5

90.3

75.2

8*.6

88 .*

97.8

16.3

Life Insurance ................... .
leelth insurance...................
lospltalisatlon..... ........... .
Rstlrenent pension ..................

90.3

7 2 .0

86.1

69.1

97.8
*.7

16.3
3.7

83.3

71 .6

7 2 .8

1 5 .0

6 .6

66.8

*3.3
51.7
**.3

81.5
75.1

8*.8

6 5 .0
69.9
39.8

19.5

9.*

28.*

-

15.5

9.7

2 * .8

15.*

11.6

2 .2

Al
l
idsre
nutis

All astabllsfanenta............. .......

letabllateente vlth no insurance or
pension p l a n e ...... ............

if
2/
•
**

-

83.1

Inc ludes data for Industries otter then those shorn separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), ooananleatlon, sal otter public utilities.
rinanoe, insurance, and real estate.




83.7

Pub i
lc
uiiis
tlte*

Wholesale*
trade

R t i trade
eal

Send*.

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

7*.9

81.9

7 0 .0

6 0 .3

8*.5

28.1

71.5
58.3
59.2
35.7

78.3
72.0
65.*
5*.5

68.7
53.1
55.6
51.0

58.5
39.6
*5.5
8.3

78.1
55.9
69.5
7.*

28.1
7.9

25.1

18.1

3 0 .0

39.5

15.5

71.9

10.8
-

Occupational Wage Surrey, Worfolk-Portenouth (Baapton Roads), Ya., February 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

15

A p p e n d ix — Scop e

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed* In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
olerioal, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A)* The covered industry groupings are: manufac­
turing! transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other\fcublic utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




and

M e th o d

of

Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work* Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i*e*, those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information an wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables* It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

16

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN NORFOLK-PORTSMOUTH (HAMPTON ROADS), V A . ,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, FEBRUARY 1952

Item

Minimum number
-rdf workers in
establi shments
studied
2/

NumBi*r o f ~
_
_
establi shments_____
Estimated
Estimated
total
total
within
Studied
within
scope of
scope of
Study _
_____ study.____

!/,

Employment
In establishments
studied
Total

Office

40,680
23,590
17,090

4,850
2,660
2,190

7,420
2,350
4,660
980
1,680

530
330
560
650
120

Industry divisions in which occupation?
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ......................................
Manufacturing ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ............. ......... .
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ...............................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail trade ..............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .....
Services 2 / ..... .........................

21
21
21

722
163
559

160
119

76,700
35,300
41,400

21
21
21
21
21

68
129
219
32
111

26
25
34
12
22

10,300
7,000
17,300
1,600
5,200

a

1/ Norfolk-Fortsmouth (Hampton Roads) Area (Norfolk, South Norfolk, and Portsmouth Cities and Elizabeth City, Norfolk, Princess Anne, and
Warwick Counties)•
2/ Total establishment employment•
Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.

2/




17

Index

I A CO t - C O t O C C

o
O ' s O so
vO SO -g
O
vO O O O O V O v O v O

OS

☆

c s t ^ I ^ O n o s ^ o C N nO O




Molder ( b a k eries) .......................................... .
Motortruck d r i v e r ................ ............................
Nurse, industrial (registered) ••••••••••••........••..... .
Office girl .............................. ................... .
Oiler ..... ......... ••••••...... ...... ••••••••••••••...
Operator (local transit) .......... ......... .
Order filler
.... .
P a c k e r ...........................................
Packer (bakeries) .......................... .................
Painter (building construction) •••••••••.......... •••••••»..
Painter, m a i n t e n a n c e .... •••••...... ............. .........
Photoengraver (printing) ...... •••••••••.......... ....... ...<>
Pipe fitter, maintenance ••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••.•»...
Plasterer (building construction) •••••••••••••••••••••»»•••.
Plumber (building construction) •».••••••••••••»•.... .
Porter ....................... ....... ............... .
Pressman (printing)
Receiving c l e r k ...... ••••••••••...... ......... ...........
Secretary ••••.••••••«
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ••••........... ........
Shipping clerk .................... ............. . .....o......o
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ............ ....... .
Stenographer .................. ............. .................
Stereotyper ( p r i n t i n g ) .............. ••••••...... ...........
Stock handler ••••••...••••••.•o..ooo......o.ooo«....eo9o.ooo
Switchboard operator •••••••••.........
Switchboard operator-receptionist •••••••••••••••o.o.........
Truck driver ...............••••••••••..... •••••••••••....... . 7,
Trucker, hand
Trucker, power
Typist ......................... ....... ........... ......... .
Watchman ................... ......................... ..........

O s CTS

Biller, machine ........... ........... • •••................
Bookkeeper, hand ............................ ........ .
Bookkeeping-machine operator •••••••••••••••.... •••••••••••
Bricklayer (building construction) ••••••.••••••••••••••••••
Calculating-machine operator
Carpenter (building construction) .... ••••.••••••••••••••••
Carpenter, m a i n t e n a n c e ............ •..... •••••••••••••••••••
Cleaner ........................ ....... .................... .
Clerk, accounting ••••••.••••••........•••••••••........ ....
Clerk, file ........ .................... ......
Clerk, general ........ • •••...............................
Clerk, order ................................. .......
Clerk, p a y r o l l ..... .......................... ...... .
Compositor, hand (printing) ..................................
Electrician (building construction) ..... •••••........ .
Electrician, maintenance ...............................
Bigineer, stationary .............................•••••...... .
Fireman, stationary boiler ..................... ........... .
Guard .................. ........... ...........................
Helper (bakeries) ...........................••••••••••......
Helper, motortruck driver .................................. .
Helper, trades, maintenance ........... ........ .....•• .....o
Janitor ................................................ .......
Key-punch operator ... •..................................... .
Laborer (building construction) ••••••••........ .
Machine operator (printing) ...............................
Machine tender (printing) ........ ........... ....... ........
Machinist, maintenance ..............
Maintenance man, general utility •••••.......................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ••...•..... ......... ••••
Mechanic, maintenance ..................... .
Mixer (bakeries) ..................... ........ ...... .

so v x so s x v x s x

Page

U. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R I N T I N G OF F I C E : 0 — 1952







THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES

In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D# C#
for the following communities:
P.#y
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Portland, Oregon
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
Seattle, Washington

BLS Bulletin No.

Price

1045
1044
IO56
1043
1041
1066
1059
IO64
1067
1068
1070

20 cents
15 cents
25 cents
20 cents
20 cents
20 cents
20 cents
20 cents
15 cents
25 cents
15 cents
20 cents
15 cents
15 cents
20 cents

1042
1058
1069
1057

This report was prepared in the Bureau^ Southern Regional Office#
may be addressed to:
Brunswick A# Bagdon, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Room 664
50 Seventh Street, N. E.
Atlanta 59 Ga#

Cammi

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics* regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.

The Southern region includes the following States:
Alabama
Arkansas
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia

Louisiana
Maryland
Mississippi
North Carolina
Oklahoma

South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102