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Occupational Wage Survey
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK
J a n u a r y

B

u

l

l

e

t

i

n

N

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1

0

8

7

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
M aurice J. Tobin - Secretary



1 9 5 2

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




C

o

n

t

e

n

t

s

P age
INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................................................................................

1

THE ROCHESTERMETROPOLITANAREA...................................................................................................................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL W STRUCTURE...............................................................
AGE

1

TABLES:
A verage e a r n in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s t u d ie d on an a r e a b a s i s A -l
O f f i c e o c c u p a t io n s ................................................................................................................................................
A-2
P r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t io n s ...............................................................................................
A-3
M ain ten an ce and pow er p l a n t o c c u p a t io n s ............................................................................................
A -4
C u s t o d ia l, w a r e h o u s in g , and s h ip p in g o c c u p a t io n s .........................................................................

3
7
8
9

A verage e a r n in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s t u d ie d on an i n d u s t r y b a s i s —
B -35
M ach in ery i n d u s t r i e s ...........................................................................................................................................

11

U nion wage s c a l e s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s C -15
B u ild in g c o n s t r u c t i o n .........................................................................................................................................
C -205
B a k e r ie s ..........................
C -2082 M alt l i q u o r s ...........................................................................................
C -27
P r i n t i n g .........................................................................................................................................................................
C-41
L o c a l t r a n s i t o p e r a t in g em p lo y ees ........................................................................................................
C- 4 2
M o to rtru ck d r i v e r s and h e l p e r s ...................................................................................................................
C -7011 H o t e ls .............................................................................................................................................................................

12
12
12
12
13
13
13

E n tra n ce r a t e s D -l
Minimum e n t r a n c e r a t e s f o r p l a n t w o rk ers .................................

14

Wage p r a c t i c e s E -l
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l p r o v i s i o n s ..........................
E-2
S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u rs .....................................................................................................................................
E -3
P a id h o lid a y s .............................................................................................................................................................
E -4
P a id v a c a t io n s ........................................................................................................................................
E -5
P a id s i c k l e a v e ........................................................................................................................................................
E -6
N o n p ro d u ctio n b o n u se s .........................................................................................................................................
E -7
I n s u r a n c e and p e n s io n p la n s ...........................................................................................................................

14
15
15
16
17
19
19

APPENDIX:
S co p e and m ethod o f s u r v e y ................................................................

, .........................

20

IN D E X .............................................................................................................................................................................................................

22

F or sale by the Superintendent o f D ocu m en ts, U. S. G overn m en t P rin tin g Office
W a sh in g to n 25„ D . C. - Price 20 cents

June 6 , 1952

In tr o d u c tio n

1/

The Rochester area is 1 o f 4-0 major labor markets in
which the Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s is currently conducting
occupational wage surreys • Occupations, common to a v ariety o f
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing in d u stries, were studied on
a community-wide basis* Cross-industry methods o f sampling were
thus u t iliz e d in compiling earnings data for the follow ing types
o f occupations*
(a) o f f i c e ; (b) p rofessional and tech n ica l;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) cu stod ial, warehousing,
and shipping. In presenting earnings information fo r such jobs
(tables A -l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possib le fo r individual broad industry divisions*
Occupations ch a ra cte ristic o f p a rticu la r, important,
lo c a l industries were studied on an industry b a sis, within the
framework o f the community survey. 2 /
Earnings data fo r these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables*
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lie u o f (or supplementing)
occupational earnings fo r several industries or trades in which
a great m ajority o f the workers are employed under terms o f
collectiv e-b a rga in in g agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are in dicative o f prevailing pay practices*
Data were co lle cte d and summarized on s h ift operations
and d iffe r e n t ia ls , hours o f work, and supplementary ben efits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The

R och ester

M e tr o p o lita n

A re a

The population o f the Rochester Metropolitan Area
(Monroe County) was approximately 4-87,000 in 1951* About th reefourths o f th is to ta l liv ed in Rochester, third largest c ity in
New York State.
Nonagricultural wage and salary workers in the area
in January 1952 numbered more than 220,000 (excluding govern­
ment). Of th is number, more than 106,000 were employed in manu­
fa ctu rin g .
1 / Prepared in the Bureaufs region al o f f i c e in New York,
N. Y ., by Donald Blackmore and Theodore A llison under the d i­
re ctio n o f Frederick W M ueller, Regional Wage and Industrial
*
Relations Analyst. The planning and central d irection o f the
program was carried on in the Bureau*s D ivision o f Wages and
Industrial Relations*
2 / See appendix fo r discussion of scope and method o f survey.




Rochester is noted fo r the production o f photographic
supplies and o p tica l goods.
These Industries employ more than
30 percent o f the t o t a l manufacturing work fo rce .
The needle
trades employ approximately 8 percent o f the manufacturing
workers in the c i t y .
More than 16,000 employees were engaged
in the manufacture o f e le c t r ic a l and n on electrica l machinery in
January 1952.
Almost h a lf the employees in nonmanufacturing
industries within the scope o f the survey were employed in re­
t a i l stores.

O c c u p a tio n a l

W a g e

S tru ctu re

Extensive formal wage adjustments were madety Roches­
ter establishments during the period between January 1950, the
base period fo r the Wage S ta b iliza tion Board*s 10-percent
* catch-up" wage increase formula, and the time o f the study.
*
About 70 percent o f the plant and o f f i c e workers in the in­
dustries and establishm ent-size groups studied were employed in
establishments that granted at lea st one general wage increase
during the 2-year period. These increases were r e la tiv e ly much
more numerous a fte r the outbreak o f h o s t i l it i e s in Korea than
during the preceding 6 months. Only a few o f the establishments
studied had p etition s pending before the Wage S ta b iliza tion
Board fo r general wage increases.
Formalized rate structures for time-rated workers were
reported in establishments employing three-fourths of the o f fic e
workers and nearly nine-tenths o f the plant workers in the
Rochester area. Plans providing rate ranges far individual occu­
pations were more prevalent them those providing single ra tes.
Single-rate structures were v irtu a lly nonexistent fo r o f f i c e
workers and applied to only one-eighth o f the plant workers.
Individual determination o f salary rates fo r o f f i c e workers pre­
vailed in the services and trades industries but was not common
in other industry groups.
Established minimum entrance rates fo r inexperienced
plant workers were part o f the wage structure o f Rochester firms
employing 90 percent o f a l l plant workers.
More than a third
o f the workers were employed in establishments paying a minimum
o f over $1.15 an hour.
Entrance rates in excess o f $1.15 were
found prim arily in the manufacturing and public u t i l i t i e s in­
du stries.
In wholesale trade, more than 60 percent o f the
workers were employed in establishments with minimum rates o f
75 cents or le s s .
Nonproduction bonuses were prevalent in Rochester and
formed a s ig n ifica n t part o f the rate structure in the c it y .
More than two-thirds o f the o f f i c e workers and h a lf the plant
workers were in establishments paying such bonuses. P ro fit­

2

sharing bonuses were found most frequently in manufacturing in­
dustries ; the predominant type o f bonus among nonmanufacturing
industries was the Christmas or year-end bonus*
The general
practice in Rochester o f paying nonproduction bonuses was not
follow ed by establishments in the pu blic u t i l i t i e s in du stries;
about 95 percent o f the workers in th is industry group were em­
ployed in firms with no bonus plans*

About 80 percent o f the plant and o f f i c e workers were
scheduled to work a 40-hour week in January 1952*
Scheduled
40-hour workweeks were prevalent in each o f the industry groups
studied with the exception o f the finance, insurance, and re a l
estate group where schedules o f le s s than 40 hours prevailed*
Substantial numbers o f plant and o f f i c e workers in the servioes
and trades industries were scheduled to work in excess o f 40
hours a week*

Almost 10 percent o f the establishments studied main­
tained a fixed rela tion sh ip between supervisors1 pay and the
rate o f pay o f those supervised*
Uiese d iffe r e n tia ls were ex­
pressed eith er as cents-per-hour or percentage additions to the
highest rate o f those supervised*

T ypically, o f f i c e workers in manufacturing in du stries,
public u t i l i t i e s , and fin a n cia l in stitu tio n s received 2 weeks'
paid vacation a fte r 1 year o f service and 3 weeks a fte r 15 years*
The predominant vacation pattern fo r o f f i c e workers in trade and
service establishments was 1 week a fte r 1 y e a r's serv ice and 2
weeks a fte r 2 years* V irtu a lly a l l plant workers were employed
by firms granting at le a st 1 week's paid vacation a fte r 1 y e a r's
service and 2 weeks a fte r 5 years*

Wages and sa la ries o f workers in manufacturing in­
dustries were generally higher than those o f comparable workers
in nonmanufacturing* In 23 o f 26 o f f i c e occupations permitting
comparison, sa la ries o f workers in manufacturing firms were
higher*
Average hourly earnings fo r cu stodial and material
handling jobs were con sisten tly higher a lso in manufacturing
than in nonmanufacturing*




A large number o f Rochester workers were employed in
firms providing insurance or pension plans, paid at least in part
by the employers*
These plans were e sp e cia lly prevalent among
the public u t i l i t i e s and finance industries where v ir tu a lly a l l
workers received these benefits*

3

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A -l:

Office Occupation*.

(Average s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s i / f o r sele c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s stu d i e d on a n a r e a
b a s i s in R o c h e s t e r , N. Y., b y i n d u s t r y divi s i o n , J a n u a r y 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O RK ERS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
w
orkers

Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2 7 .5 0 30.00 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 65.00 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0

and
under

67.50

3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0
I

j

M
en
Bookkeepers, hand ..........................................
Manufacturing ............................................
Nonmanufacturing....................

38

Clerks, accounting ........................................
Manufacturing ............................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Wholesale trade ...................................

141
97

Clerks, general ..............................................
Manufacturing............................................
Nonmanufacturing........................ .............
Clerks, order .................................................
Manufacturing ............................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Wholesale trade ...................................

10
28

44
18

154

$
7 1 .5 0

a . 5
4 0 .0

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

Clerks, payroll ............................................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................

4 2 .0

6 7 .5 0

4 0 .0

6 2 .0 0
5 8 .5 0
5 8 .0 0

-

-

-

-

4 2 .5

4

-

-

-

4
1

3

i
-

47

42.0

5 8 .0 0

-

-

89
70

4 0 .0

5 7 .5 0

-

-

4 0 .0

6 2 .0 0

-

-

4 0 .0

6 3 .0 0

4 0 .0

" 1
|

3
3

-

8

12

-

- j

8

4
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

6 9 .5 0

...........................

12

4 0 .0

Office boys ......................................................................
Manufacturing ............................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................
Finance * * ..........................................................

46

4 0 .0

-

-

-

-

4
3

8

15
15 i

6

!

2

3
i
2

5 1

-

14
6

9
7
2!

33
18
15

j

1

13

5

8

:

6
4
2

7

8 !

1

-

1 | 20 1
1---------20
^
_
-

6

15

5
1
1

7
8

-

5

3
_

10

9

7

9

2

3
3

-

-

-

3
1

8

1

2

2

3

_
“

_
-

1

4

-

6

1

2

10

2

7

2

3

-

11
9 !
2 |

5

3

1

4 i

4

1
-

3
1

-

-

-

-

2

-

li
3
3

-

- i

1
2

1

-

-

-

-

2

3

4 i
4
!
-

4
3
1

3
3

24

5

1

_
-

7
3
4
2

27 i

10

2
1

2

-

8

-

2

_

15
14
1

-

13 i
13 !

!

2

1

-

3

^

-

1

6

-

-

-

6

-

-

'i

-

3
2

-

i

7

3 !

5

li

5
-

2
1

|

1 !

2

1
1

2
1

6

-1

1
1

j

-

8
!

3

3
4

2

2

.

7

j 4 6 .5 0

1

1
1
-

2

-

-

-

19
12 !
7
2

1

-

-

3
2

7

7
6

2

15
-

11

5
5

-

6 6 .5 0

40.0

_
-

2

13

1

5 8 .5 0

4 0 .0

- j
!

1

“

-

2

~

!

6 0 .0 0
6 1 .0 0

1

“

1

6 1 .0 0

3 9 .5
4 1 .0

-

-

4 0 .5
4 0 .0

24
16

-

2

1

1

107

19
18

_

8 3 .5 0

|

Duplicating-machine operators

and
over

7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 fC0 .0 0
9--------

1

1

6

-

" j
i

1

1
3 8 .5 0

7

4 :

21

4 0 .0

; 4 1 .0 0

-

25
12

4 0 .0

3 7 .0 0

-

3
4

4 |

3 9 .5

3 9 .0 0

“

-

-

3
6 i

|

7 I
6 |

3

4
l

Tabulating-machine operators ..............................
Manufacturing ............................. ............................

23

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

5 7 .0 0

-

_

-

-

-

|

1

-1

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

'

-

-

-

-

- :

-

- :

-

-

-

-

-

_ !
-

-

-

_

-

i

” !

_
j

-

-

i

_

5 6 .0 0

15

2 i
2 i
j

1
-

2

4
4

7

-

3

i
_____3 _ _____5 _ _____U
;
1

2

4

1

—

1
-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

- 1
- ;

j

1

i

W en
om

j

B illers, machine (b illin g machine) ...............
Manufacturing ..........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................
Iilknl aeal a
P ci 1 4 #)o
*

130

~73-----57
20
31

3 9 .5
3975“
4 0 .0
4 0 .5
4 1 .0

4 5 .5 0

W30—
4 2 .0 0
3 9 .0 0
4 4 .0 0

-

5
1
4

3
1

4 I
- i
4
4

12
1
11

5
5
1

16
5
11

16
12
4

26
19
7
2

5

3

10

3

3

6
5
1

14
10
4

4
4
- |

. 3

, 1

13
-

, J2

!
!

-

2 |

6
6

_

_

-

-

1
1

-

- '
-

-

-

6

1

See footnote at end of table,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Rochester, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Office Occupation* - Continued

Trtl• A-lt

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings ~)J fo r selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kochester, N. Y ., by industry d iv is io n , January 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T - T I M E W E E K L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

A ver age

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
§
eekly ^ i ° lo.oo 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
W
eekly W
earn gs under
in
h
ours
and
(Standard) (Standard)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

W en - Continued
om
B illersr machine (bookkeeping; machine). . . .
Manufacturing ............................................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................
Wholesale trade ...................................

Bookkeepers, hand.........................................
Manufacturing ............. ......... .
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Public u tilitie s * .............................
Retail trade ................... ....................
Services ...............................................

40.5
39.5
41.0
40.0
42.0

$
43.50
46.00
43.00
40.50
44.00

188
40.0
.... $4 ' “ 19 .5
40.0
94
19
39.5
39 5
11
40.0
32
a .5

57.00
56.00
57.50
48.50
66 50
61.00
54.00

68
19
49
11
31

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A . . .
Manufacturing ............................................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................
Retail trade ••••.................................

59
31
28
1 15

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

50.50
55.50
45.00
|44.50

Bookkeeoing-machine operators, class B . . .
Manufacturing ............................................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................
U inl psaI a f.rarip , ( 1 - T1. T. II I tI . t
V
Retail trade ........................................
Finance ** ............................................

285
47
238
39
43
152

39.5
39.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5

44.00
48.50
43.00
46.00
47.00
a .00

166
40.0
“ 103----- r iT .5
40.0
63
18
40.0
40.0
43

i
148.00
51.00
43.50
;48.00
141.50

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) .....................................
Manufacturing............................................
Nonmanufacturing....................................
Wholesale trade ...................................
Rfit.Al 1 t.rAflfi t i , , T1, , , r - - - TT--TTt --Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) .................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
U ocal a t.rarla
hrtl
i i i
i1
Clerks, accounting ........................................
Manufacturing ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................ ............ .
Public u tilitie s * ..............................
Wholesale trade ................................. .
Retail trade ...................................... .
Services TT. ................... .

41

40.0

13

40.0

~ 5 2 ---- “ 4o:o

40.0
414
” 283----- “ 39.5
41.0
131
20
39.5
41.0
46
42.0
44
11
41.0

45.50
!44:00'"'
40.50
10.00
51.00
48.00
48.50
48.00
50.00
47.00

_

-

_
“

.
- 1
-

12
10
31
5

13
1
12
4
6

-

-

-

_

.

2
2
2

-

-

_
-

2
2
1
1

-

_
-

1

-

-

-

_
-

•
- !
1

I
2
- 1
2
1
1

_
-

-

;
1
i
!
1
j

_
“ ;

-

-

2

-

- J

1 ;
- !
1 !
1
_

1

3
- j
3
3
!

1
1
30

50
2
48
3
1
44

30
2
2
26

8
2
^5
4
41
8
33

6
6 ;
3
3
|

23
—lr
17
9
4
11
9

-

6
6
5

2
1

1

9

24 1
r*r
1 i
9
1 j
_
1
3
1 |

i

See footnote at end o f table*
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s *
** Finance, insurance, and rea l estate*

8
5

1 !

5
3
2
_
- !
1 1

- !
;
- |
1
-

44
35
9
1
3
3
1

7
1
6

11
1
10
1
e
j
1
3

1
1

9

5
5
5

53
33
20
11
_
1
8

9

6

3
3
-

-

_
-

•
20 !
1 !
19 !
4
2
13

5i
1
4
2

4
4
- !
i

16 j
4 i
12
7

40
13
27
12
11
4

34
8
26
1
15
8

26
14
r~ T r
6 !
9 !
- i
3
6
6

19
H
5
5

!
1?
• ir S
“
!
* j
■
!
3
i
1 i
J

- 1 14
!
3

3
1

3

40 i &
12
30
28 !
4
3
7
15
2
1
!

64
32
32
1
15
16

71
49
22
2
8
6
6

54
.9
45
7
12
24

i
!
!
!

-

-

_

21
4
17
-

22
16
6
-

1
_
1
_

1
1

-

17
11
6
1
0
j

-

_

-

3
2
1

12
4
8
_
A
O

_

•

9

i
19 ! 1 1 1
16 !
— 2^
3
9
1
0
j
1
1

51
5
-

_
_
_

2
4|

-

~ i

2

7
7

1
1

1

-

-

i

..
-

5 !
-

-

1

35
35 |
- ;

2
1

1
28 1 41
1 !
.
1 1

7
l !
5
1

_
_

-

I
-

-

1
-

3

_
_

-

c
J

-

1
1
-

-

_
-

-

4
4

_
-

7
4
3

i

6
6

6
6
-

1
13

_

6
1
-5
_

-

4

1

8

1
1 ,

j
_____




“

18 !
10
8
3
7 !

2
1
1

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

2
^
■

1
1
_

-

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4
4

-

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2

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•

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11
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1

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8
9
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1
1
_
-

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2
5

4
4
-

•

6

•

5

_

j

_
-

_

-

-

.
_

_
-

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2

_

_ J

_
*

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-

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_

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_ 1 _
1-------

12
12
„

2
2
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-

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3
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3
3
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_
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-

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-

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5

m i

O f f ic e

* A - i:

O c c u p a tio n * - C o n t in u e d

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings 1 / fo r selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Rochester, N. Y ., by industry d iv isio n , January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
Weekly ^ 7 .5 0 30.00 3 2 , 5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 . 5 0 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 . 5 0 5 0 .0 0
Weekly
and
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) under
3 0 .0 0 3 2 . 5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 . 0 0 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 . 5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0

0
0
9^2

Sex,

$
5 2 .5 0

$
5 5 .0 0

$
5 7 .5 0

5 5 .0 0

5 7 .5 0

6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0

$
1 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0

72.50

7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 [ 1 5 .0 0 9 0 . 0 0

6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0

75.00

8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 1 9 0 .0 0 | o v e r

I 2.50 I
6 5 .0 0

5.00

$

1
j

Women - Continued
i

Clerks, f i l e , class A .............
Manufacturing......................
Nonmanufacturing .................

86

4 0 .0

%
4 6 .0 0

73

4 0 .0

4 6 .5 0

13

4 0 .0

4 1 .0 0

1

1

5

-

-

3

22

11 1

21

1
-

10 |

1

3

1

4

14

6

10 !

4

6

7

5

-

12 j
2

-

1

3 ;

5

6 |
4

1

1

1-----------i
!

Clerks, f i l e , class B .......
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing................
Wholesale trade .............
Retail trade ........ .........
Finance ** ......................
Clerks. general ........................
Manufacturing . . ..................
Nonmanufacturing .. •..........
Wholesale trade .............
Retail trade ...................
Finance * * ......................

202

4 0 .0

3 9 .0 0

112

4 0 .0

4 3 .5 0

90

4 0 .0

21

13

6

14

15

-

6

10

-

5

31

5

3

-

-

3

1

-

3 3 .5 0

15

40.0

3 6 .5 0

-

31
-

40

4 1 .0

3 1 .5 0

1

28

3 9 .0

3 4 .5 0

14

544

4 0 .0

5 4 .0 0

4 0 .0

! 5 3 .5 0

228

4 0 .0

5 4 .5 0

11

4 0 .0
4 2 .0

i 5 5 .0 0

3 8 .0

S 5 0 .0 0

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

4 8 .5 0

51

3 9 .5

4 2 .5 0

30

40.0

3 9 .0 0

Clerks, payroll ........................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing.................
Public u tilitie s * .......
Retail tra d e............ .

339

3 9 .5

i 5 2 .5 0

256

3 9 .5

5 3 .5 0

83

4 0 .0

I 4 9 .0 0

27

3 9 .0

41

4 1 .0

i 5 3 .5 0
14 6 . 5 0

“

4 6 .0 0

65

-

-

, 5 6 .0 0

90
66

—

-

i

-

_

_

-

_

_

_ 1

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

24

91

14

50

6

5 :

56

10

17

3

2

10

10

24

20

12

15

7

33

3

3 :

1
2

2

-

35

4

-

43

4

8

7

-

-

3
8

14
6

4

1

-

-

24
13

20

12

17

9

6

11

5

7

1

12

5

10

-

5

2

5

2

13

11

5

7
2

1

1

2

5

-

3

2

;

13

5

1

“

1

-

-

11

10

,

11

27

20

40

46

38

6

6

7

22

13

21

30

5

4 i

4
1

5

19
8

16

37 !
1

1

;

3

2

1

2

1

-

2

-

140

4 0 .0

4 7 .0 0

102

4 0 .0

4 8 .0 0

_
-

-

j

38

3 9 .5

4 3 .5 0

-

-

'

50
7
3
2

!

1

7
2

1

3

11

12

3
1

3

5

5

2

5

5

1

-

1

1

“1

1

9

15

22

20

2i

17

11

12

3

8

16 ,

13

16 !

16

9

12

3

6

7

6

19

6

18

4
4

3
16
16

3
3

7
11

7

13
10

11
10

3

1

!
26 !
26 ;

7
7

-

!

!

i

1

21

22

4

22

4

4 '
4

5

!

i

-

-

-

16

20

9 !

15;
1
1

17

8

6

1

5

!

,

-I
-

-

_
_

-

- 1
_
_
-

_
-

“

-,
-

1

_i
-!
-i

-

-;

-

1 1

-

- _:
_

_

-

2;

3

!

_
-

-

!

4

i

3
1

1
1

3
2

-

-

-

14
-

11

14

:

-

-

3

3

1

4

-

-

“

!

-

-

i

____

-

-

J

-

-

!

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- ,
S

- j
- ;

i

___ L_

- |

-

- !

*j
*

-

-----

1

;

—

_

5

-

-

_ j ----n_ ;

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

~
-

-

- !
-

“

_

___

-

:

.
i

!

j

See footnote at end o f ta b le.
■
* Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l it i e s ,
Finance, insurance, and rea l estate.

2
2

-

-

11
1

-

7

4

- j

j

4

1

_

_

1

-

:
!

3
3

3
24

-

__ 2L

1
- !

-

*|

2

-

3
3

3

7

9
6

5

_

6

5

2

_
_ j

_

-

17

10

2

_

_

-

65

2

-

_

22 !

4

2

-

54

5

2

-

I
-

39

-

-

-

50

"




-

38

-

2 9 .5 0

_

-

27 !

4 6 .0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

_

-

47

4 4 .5 0

1
14 1 .0 0
|4 4 . 0 0
3 3 .0 0

_

-

51

4 0 .0

4 0 .0

-

27

4 0 .0

4 0 .0

-

r

22

97
38
20

-

^3

17

135

_

i

1

Office girls .............................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing .................
Retail trade ...................

i

-

_

-

-

-

:

3

_

1

-

2

*

7

-

15
15

1

1
1

2

-

13 ! ^
“

!

23

10 !

2

i

-

----

i
i

17

1

-

-

1

3 ’

|------------

4

9
-

-

1
3

9

22

3
-

8

1

116

Key-punch operators .................
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing.................

3

15
-

Clerks, order ...........................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing .................
Retail trade ...................

Duplicating-machine operators
Manufacturing ......................

6 i

26

25

25
17

17

28

32

316

1
28 ;

■
‘

-

____

i

6

M i * A-i*

O fa c *

O c c d ifia tir m l

-

G o n tin a m d

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings 2 / f o r selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Rochester, N. Y., by industry d iv isio n , January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A ver age

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
'
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly J7.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 12.50 I 5 .OO £7 .5 0 70.00 72.50 75.00 J0.00 J 5 .OO 90.00
Weekly
and
earnings
hours
find
(Standard) (Standard) under
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Women - Continued

Secretaries .............................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * .......... .
Wholesale trade .......................
Finance * * .............................
Services ..........................

570
363
207
17
35
31

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0

*
59.50

1

62.50
54.00

-

4 1.0
1 0 .0
,

103
21

39.0
39.5

54.00
55.50

926
658

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.5

51.50
53.50
;45.50
; 51.00
: 50.50
43.50
44.00
;42.50

26

1

6

1<

20
6

8
2
6

38

-

7
31

5
19

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

52,50

50.50

1

-

-

-

64.00

6

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

-

-

2

1

_

_

-

-

-

1

4
-

22

4

20

35
15

4

3

-

38

20

15

-

-

1

4

7

5

4
13
5

17

-

1
11
2

2

132

61

127

50

93
34

78

48

3?

23
15

55
40

23
25

2

3

48

44
34
4
5

45
3

22
11

-

4

|

1
9

5

4

1
17

2
8

2

“

5
-

68

120

29

113

29
-

111
2

8
12
5

36
34

2
2

32

7

31

26
6
2

6
1

26

22
22

5

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

3
4

_

3

1

-

1

-

47
45

28

6
2

-

-

3
3
-

_
-

j
Stenographers, general ..................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing................... .
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Ra+.flnl
i i r
i i
frfr
i ii i
i
ii ii
Piawi ro q

268
19
57
63

102
27

4 0.0
39.5
38.5

- i
- |
|
!

1
1
x

13
13

Switchboard operators ...................
Manufacturing............ ...........
Nonaanufacturing .................... .
AGn'l A f Ta Ha
*
| 1| | |
|

186
58
128

Retail trade .......................
Finnnro ##
l(III.-.-T.llI1I11II1Ttt
Services ...........................

14
56
32
23

40.0
40.0

144.00
; 50.50
41.00

3

20

- i

1
3
1

1

71
24
47

1
1

3

2
10
7 1
1

1
5
7
4

17
18

74
50
24
1
23

10

63
69
3 !
18

39.5
40.5
41.5
39.5
38.5
44.0

Switchboard operator-receptionists ......

186

40.0

Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .............. ......
Wholesale trade ..... .............
Raf ai 1 1 rf
>l

107
79
25
43

40.0

39.0

Tabulating-machine operators ............
Manufacturing ........................

48
40

40.0
40.0

41.50
39.50
46.00
48.00

39.5

43.00

40.0

46.00
42.00

8

29

6

13

9 |
x
5

_
_

30

2
16

3
i
1
!
-

22

3

6

26
6

14

7

10
3
1

2

6

-

-

1

6 1

2
n

-

30

6 1

13

29

7

10
1

-

10
6

2

5
5

-

1
1

27

-

1 |
1

-

-

!

4
4

|
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

:

1
1

2
2

2

3
9

9
2 1

41

12

33

8
2
3

7
5
3

6
3 1

10

25
4
19

!

- I

25

11

12

5

5!
4 ;

13

6

1

10
3

-

_

-

1
1 j

n ____2_____ 6____ 2_
2
6
2
8

2
2

1
1

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

_

3
“

11
11
-

_

_

_

_

«

-

37

9

5
_

1

5

12

12
1
11 1

11
2

5

14
7
7

1

!

_

97 |
23

12
!

-

1
17

62 !
6 |
4
- l

1

42.00
;40.50

11
1
2

7

58.50
58.50

40.0

;

i

1
j
Stenographers, technical ............. .
Manufacturing ....................... .

23

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

26 ___ 3-____2 _
20
2
3 i
6
-

-

-

-

-

8

16
8
8
8

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

____ 2_

2
2

6

1

Transcribing-machine operators, general ••
Mannfap+.nHng
( I
( T
Nonmanufacturing............ .

83
70
13

! 52.00

52.50

40.0

i48.00
|47.00

1

- !
j

1

-

-

2
2

-

2
2

7

1
148.00

40.0
41.0

|
-

-

! ____
_

1

See footnote at end o f ta b le .
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
#* Finance, insurance, and rea l esta te.




1

1

5
2

13
-

12

9

17
13
4

7
2

3
3

4

22
22

12
9

1

3

14
13

6

4
2

3

1
4

4

1 ___ 2_____5_
1
5
3
2
2

"

-

Office Occupation* - Continued

M l * A-lt

7

(Average straight-time veekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Rochester, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A I G H T -T I M E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Average
Num ber

Sex, occupation, and industry division

o
f
workers

W eekly
hours
(Standard)

W eekly
earnings
(Standard)

$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
§
§
§
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 lo.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 10.00115 .00 90.00
_ | _
and
and
under
over
90.00
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
!
» 1 i n» «
a

Women - Continued

Transcribing-machine operators,
technical .............. ...... ...... .
Manufacturing ........................

%
44
41

55.00
55.00

40.0
40.0

~

~

1 1
1

~

1
1

3
3

6
6

1 ____ 5_
1
5

Tvnists. class B ........ ......... .
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** ........................

295
197
98
13

407
219
188
15
57
46
70

40.0

47.50
49.50
| 42.50
43.50

40.0
40.0
42.0

39.5
39.0
40.5
40.0
38.5

—

j
- ,
-

i 42.50
; 44.50
|39.50
! 44.00
! 40.50
37.50
39.00

39.5
40.0

22
1
21
2
12
7

i

2

— !

19
4
15 1
5
6 1
4

33

38
1 !
37 !
1

1
1

1
43 ! 100
IT
56

33
4

32
1
15
3
13

29

1

10
4
14

32
25
7 I
3

1
58 i
46 i
12 j
3 i
1
I
1 !
7 !

44
4
8
10
22

28
23

59
33
26

50
28
22
9

19
14
- !

26

46
40
6

5

9
3

- j
-

_

-

- j
- !

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-1

-

_ 1

_

- i

2
2
2
-

-

-

-

"

-

_____ 1

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

a -2

t

P to ^ ed A io n cU a n d

< ecJ u u ca l O c c u p a tio n *
T

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Rochester, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W E E K L Y E A R N I N G S OF—

workers

$

$

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$

$

$

$

$

8

of

S “

Number

8

A ver age

Sex, occupation, and industry division

1
1

3
2

4
4

4
4

.

-

1
1

1

2

! 20
20

11
11

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

.
.

_

$

1$

Under 40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100 .0c 105 .oc 110 .0c115.00 120.0C
ijo.oo

45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00175.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00100.00 L05.00 1 1 0 . 0 0 115.00 L20.00 125.00

Mm

Draftsmen, chief ..............................................
Manufacturing.................... .. ................................... ..

21
19

40.0
40.0

103.50
102.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

_

_

_

_

-

1 -

13
13

12
: 12

i 22
; 22

23

-

2
2

29

-

25

21

1

! 15

19

29
27

24

16
16

30
30

! 13

r ^ !
1

12
n

Draftsmen.....................................................................
Manufacturing...........................................................................

167
160

40.5
40.5

Draftsmen, junior ............... ...... .
Manufacturing.... ....................

153
146

40.0
40.0

69.50
70.00

_
-

-

*
*

T racers .......... .......................

17

39.5

50.00

1

_

9

I

81.50
81.50

3

!

4

23

_
----- !

i

20 | 26
:
26
i
_____ 1

:

_

!

_

4
4
29
28

i
!
1

2

7
7
_

- =—
i

W en
om
Nurses, industrial (registered) ...........
Manufacturing ........................

91
83

40.0
40.0

62.00
62.50

3
L
i

1/

L

2
1

20
9
7 i 20
I
! ____ ,
_

7
7

!

1
-

3
2

-

~

~

-

-

;

-

-

-

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular strflight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




“

_

i---

i

I
!____ 1
_

_____
i

Table

-

~

_

3
3
- :
- j
!

'

-

"

9
9

33
:
33
-

'

.

1
18 L _ l !
----—
15
5
3
-

23
22
1

"

19
7
6
- !
1 !

14

19;
18
1

" i
!

"

's

1/
*
**

1 !
- !
1
~

*
“

6
6

1
1

i

1
Typists, class A ........................
Manufacturing.......... .............
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Retail trade ......................

[

7
7

13
10

Occupational Wage Survey, Rochester, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF IABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

_

—

-

8

Table

a

Maintenance and flowed Plant Occupation&

-3 :

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Rochester, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation m a k ia^ustry division

Average
hourly
earnings

$

1 .0 0

246

Carpenters, maintenance .............................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................

199 "
47
29

*
1 .8 1
1. I 0

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

1 .8 8

_
-

_
-

-

—
-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .8 3
1 .8 1
1 .8 6
1 .8 8
1 .8 6

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

1 .4 4
1 .5 0

3

142

Helners. trades, maintenance ........................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Retail trade ..................................

203
133
70
12

1 .4 5
1 .4 9
1 .3 6

4
3
1

1 .1 3

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ....................
Manufacturing ....................................

357
357

1 .8 7
1 .8 7

1 .8 7
1 .8 8

Machinists, maintenance .............................
Manufacturing ....................................

138
138

1 .9 6
1 .9 6

Maintenance men. general utility ....................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Retail trade .................... .............
Services ......................................

234
148
86

1 .6 5
1 .6 3
1 .6 9
1 .6 5
1 .4 9

Mechanics. automotive (maintenance) ......... .......
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Public utilities * ............................

247

1 .6 4
1 .6 9
1 .6 2

$

$

$

6
6
-

1 .3 0 1 .3 5

$

$

$

$

$

$

_

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

1

_

_
-

_
-

1
2
2

2
2

6
6

1
1

10

_

1

-

$

$

4

-

3
3

4
3

3
1
2
2

“

3
1
2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

6

20
16

-

-

1
1

_
-

_

$

$

-

5
3
2

4
6
1

_
_
-

2
2
-

21

22

12

-

10
10
-

31
26

-

29
12
17

5

9

11
11

-

-

_

5

-

3
8

_
-

s

$

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2.40

2 .5 0

over
_

$

1 .6 3
1 .4 0

Pine fitters, maintenance ...........................
Manufacturing ....................................

51
51
27
23

1 .7 9
1 .7 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

Tool-and-die makers 2 / ..............................
Manufacturing ....................................

428

2 .1 9

_

-

-

-

-

428

2 .1 9

~

-

~

—

~

-

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

3
3

5
5

4

_

_

-_

3

-

-

3

3

-

1
1

4

12
12

21
21

14
14

31
31

22
22

38
38

52
52

18
18

14
14

21
21

71
71

9
9

10
10

-

-

2
2

4

9

3

5

9

29
29

12
12

29
29

12
12

4
4

6
6

2
2

2
2

_
-

12

5
4
1

2
2

1

3
3

12
1
11

4

3
9
9

9
6

4

_

_

_

_

3

-

_
-

13
6
7

2
1

8
7

1
1

_

1

3
3

32
32

19
19

4

9

3

5

9

10
10

14
10

16
16

28
28

23

3

16
7

4

-

14
9
9

2

-

l

9
9

-

8
6
2
1
1

-

4L

11

100

_

9
2
1

7
93
93

9
1
8

7
2

A

5

3

a

10
24

-

10

9

2

2

4

-

28
28

7

2

4

-

1
1

2

12

-

2

12

1
1

8
8

13
13

3
3

5

3

4
1

_
“

14

4

2

4

2
2
2

1
1
1

15
13

2

9
1

3
-

10

5

5

5

-

-

-

1
1

21
20

6
6

16
16

31
31

1

-

-

-

18
18

10
10

8
8

7
7

3

3

7
7

2
2

1

1

1

1

20

3

2

31
30
1

5

17

8
6

-

3

5
-

_

3
-

_

18
16
2

-

4
2.

1

-

24
14
10
10

5
1
4

A

7

75
74
1

7
7

62

18
18

7
7

_

_
-

-

_

_
_
-

22

_

_

_

_

24
24

3
3

1

_

2

20
20

_

1

1

3

-

-

3

3

1 .9 9
1 .9 9

Plumbers, maintenance ...............................
Manufacturing............... ....................

-

-

4
4

9

-

11
11

_

-

-

-

_

11

-

_

3

3

_

-

_

3
4

11

_

15
1
1

-

-

_

15
13

_

-

_

26

-

_
-

_

35

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

2

_
_

_

-

-

_

-

_
-

-

1

_
_

3
3

-

-

-

3
1
2

1
1

_
-

-

1 .6 9
1 .7 2

_
-

2
1
1
1

7
7

7

168
118
50
18

4
2
2

14
4
10
10

15
15

1

Painters, maintenance ...............................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Services ......................................

11
10
1

3
3

-

2
2

11
10

3
3

10
7
3

1 .5 0
1 .5 0

1

21
18

_
-

63
63

-

16

7

Oilers .............................................
Manufacturing ....................................

_
-

28

3
3

_

28
28

61

_

_

-JL.
54

1?
15

6
6

_

49
49

6
6

-

_

11
8

-

3
3

-

-

7
7

3

-

6
6

4
4

-

-

-

_

4
2

-

-

-

6
6

_

1?
13

-

4
3
1
1

-

-

11
11

9

1

29
13
16

2
2

6

-

14
14

1

_
-

26
26

6

9
2
2

l
1

-

4

1

50

11

7
7

-

-

17
16

_22_
30
2
1

11
11
-

14
14

16
10
6
6

-

14 - J A 12
44
2
-

33

2
2

-

-

58

9
5
1

2 .0 0 2 .1 0

7
7

2
2

4

_

49

2
2

-

1 .8 1
1 .8 1

17
16
1

-

1

153

-

45
4

-

-

8
1

_

3
1

4

4
3
1

-

9

153

-

4
1

55

7
7

Millwrights ........................................
Manufacturing ....................................

-

3
2

4

-

-

3
1
2

-

1 .7 5
1 .7 7
1 .4 8

10
6

9
9

4
4

24
22
2

_J6_

24
21

9
7
2

1
1

-

6
6

1 .6 4
1 .5 3

1 .9 0 1 .9 5

17
13

-

11
5
6
6

-

18 _ 1 3 _
10
17
1
3
3

1 .8 5

5
3
2
1

3
2

9

363
343
20

4

_

3

4

-

6
6

3
3

10
10
25
25

-

1
1
1

64

22

1

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

4

4

2

8

4

1

4
_

4
_

4
_

1
1

8

4

2
1
1
1

-

2
2

22
22

23
23

-

_

5
2

_

_

1

7
7

-

5
5

4
4

7
7

_

-

-

8

49

8

49

106
106

1 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational W
age Survey, Rochester, N. Y., January 1952
2 / Limited to workers with A years’ experience beyond apprenticeship period or beyond comparable experience in lieu of apprenticeship.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilitie s .
Bureau of Labor Statistics




s

23
23

_

-

1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0

-

3

-

1 .5 0 1 .5 5

-

19
16

3

-

3

-

2
2
-

-

-

-

1 .4 0 1 .4 5

_

Mechanics. maintenance ..............................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................

"

$

13
4

-

—

Firemen, stationary boiler ..........................
Manufacturing ....................................

185
146
27

1 .2 0 1 .2 5

-

226
148
78

62

1 .1 5

1 .1 0

1 .8 7
1 .9 7

Engineers, stationary ...............................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................
Retail trade ..................................
Services .....................................

49
17

1 .0 5

-

418
394
24

134

$

-

Electricians, maintenance ...........................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing .................................

29
23

$

Undei 1 . 0 0 1 . 0 5 1 . 1 0 1 . 1 5 1 . 2 0 1 . 2 5 1 . 3 0 1 . 3 5 1 . 4 0 1 . 4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 5 5 1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5 1 . 7 0 1 . 7 5 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 1 . 9 0 1 . 9 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2.30 2 . 4 0 2 . 5 0
$
and

_
161
161

_

1

_

_
_

-

-

_

_

-

-

82
82

3
3

_
-

U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT E T F AO

9

k-h:

Table

G u A to d ia l,

W a te k o u lU u }, a n d S U ifX fU 4U f O c c M p a tio n i

(Average h ou rly earnings 1 / fo r s e le c t e d o ccu p ation s 2 / stu died on an area
b asis iii R ochester, N. Y ., by in d u stry d i v i s i o n j January 1952)

N
A
h
O

c

c

u

w

p

o

a

s e
u

v
Jo
t r a »

e

k

S

r

r

n 6 r
ne

i

°

a

g
.0 .

l d

o
o i r

-

.

y
9 0 1e. 0 .9 5 8 j
s n

n

g

78

:

5 5

U

$
r oi
!

e

i . .0 5

0

1
j

i

5

.

I

l
1 .. 1 0 5

a

1

1

i

5o

.

. .

r

a

M

a

n

e

o

. . . . . . .

.e

c

r

t

2 a

6

t

u

o

r

r

i

s

n
1

M

a
N
F i n a n c e

n
* »

m

n
a

N

i

1 0 -

W h o l e s a l e

*

r
.

3 , 5 8 2
c

.

8 3

2

a

2

U

1 .2 1

6 ?
.

c 1 0 .5

-

18

e

-

.l

8

5

3

0 .

.

1 1 . 5 5 1 1 i.6 0 '

5 .
i

,

3

t

2

9

-

i

92

s

0

2

5

1
3
2 6

7
2 6

8 7
2

1
*2

6

15

:

1

5

1
11

8

!

;

0

;

-

! n
i
j

~

11

3 i
6 !

1

;

-

“

r

G

T

L

l 3 L6 7 7

.

. 0 j5. 5

s
.l 1

.i

1

;

W

=
-

$

u
l

>

1
1
r

I

l

1

l ei

*

2

i i

8l

0

3 8

.

.

. 7.

.

r
a
i5 o 9

05 |

i

i 5

l

t

h
h

c
2

i - r !
2

l

1

_

g

2
2

I
1
I

6

8 1 5 ,

12
3

2
j 6

-

;
-

i

1

9

3“

3

- 1

2

2

0
_

n
5o 0

o

v

t

r

i
2

-

i

_

.

-

._

_

|

-

,

_

_

i

_
-

-

-

1
|

_

-

_

-

_

_

_
! -

'

l
9

8

_

_

|

1
-

.
-

c
_

- _
3

.
-

_ 8

1

_

!

.

d

+

_

_
-

-

3 _

r

1

;

_

.

1
;

n
-

*

-

-

_

9
.

-

H

5
: 1 i1 5 5
_ 6 1

1
_

0

^

.

3a 1 5 1 8

;

5 r l 2
3
3
2
1
_
6
1
2
U

0

8

-

6

9

3

1

-

5 9 1

-

2
2

1
._

1
1

5

1

1

1 2

i

-

1

-

71 i 5
2

i

29 7

g 1
1 2

i 3 2 ,
•

2

i

2 i^

8

i

!

|

1

s3

9

6

1 0
6

■

7c

l

2 8
n

3

;6

3
I
:

i
l

i

:

l

1 12

33
933

n l

r61

l

31
13

0

1

9

:

01
~

1

~
I

—N

$

. . . j ;

O 1

1 1

d

1 .6 5 ; 5 !1 .
| O

0

e
3
3

'

y

i

3

l i

3!

e1

2 :0

17
1

p

1

5

3

:

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1

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1

6

8

s

i
3

—

i

6

YTT

5

1

8

5-

7

r

U

3
'

1

1

g

I F

IF

I$

1
32

6
1

7
r5

i .

|

n

1i 9 . 6

1

1

2

1

1t 0 93

139

r5

8
1~
3

5

3
2 3

9

7

i 6

-

3
-

h
3

9

u

!

|

32 n
121 u

h h
h o

g2
7

!

-

o1

—
3

2

g

2
1
1
1

$|
1

$ s

n- - - - - -

’

9

.

3

9 l i

-

-

1

1

t

2 i "~

6

86
-

. 3

pI
,-

c 1

-n

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6
d

-

: 6
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-

0

r

9

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1

.

8. c
6

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7

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. 9 8

. . . . . . . . . . .r . . . . . . . . . . . .v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i . .

-

52

u

1 . 3 3

3 ?
3 3 1

e

2- .

a

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-2

.

1 . 0 Uf

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

S

. -

h
9
-

,
t

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F i n a n c e

1

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:
T r a n s p o r ta t io n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) ,
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O c c u p a tio n a l Wage S u r v e y , R o c h e s te r , N. Y . , Ja n u a r y 195?
and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B ureau o f Labo r S t a t i s t i c s

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Tb a : Gudtodial, WateluuUiMty, and Skipping OccHpatiotU - GotUiHMed
a le -U
(.Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Rochester, h. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

Occupation and industry d ivision

Shipping-and-receiving clerks ................................................
M anufacturing...................................... ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ..........................................................
Wholesale trade ................................................................
R etail trade ............................................. .......................

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

19l*

116

78
3U
32
12

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ........................................
1,1*02
Manufacturing .......................................................................... — w r
1*80
Nonmanufacturing............ ......................................................
88
Public u t i l it i e s * ..........................................................
Wholesale trade ................................................................
273
Retail trade ......................................................................
119
Truck d rivers, lig h t (under ll tons) ..................................
manufacturing ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing.............. .......................... ............. .
Wholesale trade ................ ..............................................
R etail trade ......................................................................

153
31
122
39
80

Truck d rivers, medium (1? and including 1 tons) .............
*
Manufacturing ..........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ..........................................................
Wholesale trade ........................................ ..................... ..
R etail traae ....................................... .......................... ..

581
182
399
178
11*6
59

NUMBER O WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS O
F
F—
Average Under
3.75 3.60 5.65 (5.90 3.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 i . 1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1 .55 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 i .70 i .75 i.6 0 il.8 5 'l.9 0 j* i.9 5 ^ .o o
hourly
earnings $
! - i - i and
0.75 .60
.65 .9o| .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1l.lto 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 i.6 o 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.60 1.05. 1.90’ 1.95 2.00 over
i-------i—
tf
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2 ! 2
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1 ! 1 n 1 2' 2
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Truck d rivers, heavy (over 1 tons, t r a ile r type) ..........
*
133
Manufacturing .......................................................................... ------121
Nonmanufacturing .......................................................... .
56
Public u t i l i t i e s # ................ .................... ..................
Wholesale trade ................................................................
63

1.55
1.53
1.55
1.53
1.57

Truck d rivers, heavy (over 1 tons, other than tr a ile r
*
—type)
Nonmanuf a c t u r in g .............. ...................... .............................
Public u t i l i t i e s * . •....................................................
Wholesale trade ................................................................

158
122
31
83

1.50
1.1*6
1.50
l.ul*

Truckers, power ( f o r k - l i f t ) .............. ...................................
Manufacturing........ ...................... ........................................

lu9
136

1.50
1.1*9

Truckers, power (other than f o r k - l i f t ) ..............................
71
Manufacturing .......................................................................... ------- m ~
Watchmen.........................................................................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................................
Nomaanuf a cp u rin g ............ ......................................................
R etail traae ..................................................................
Finance
........ ................................................................

_
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1/

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night wort.

2/
*

S tu d y li m i t e d to men w o rk e rs exce p t where o th e rw is e in d ic a t e d .
T r a n s p o r ta t io n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .

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|

2 i 47
39
2
**7 39:
2
13 !
111
2*1
1
30
18
16 ;
5
31
30
1
- ,

1
_!
-!

—f “ t
_
_ |

1
*
1
*

-!
i
37! 20
20
371

10
6
10! — *!
!
27| 10
27: i o !
- j
- 1

1
l|

15
15;

12 :
10
2

1
+
2
2
_:

_:

!
i

“ j

1

2

71
7

17
17 i

_
_
_

-

!
-

'|




_
-

2+
11
—
_1

!

-

1
1
1

i
I---f —
_
_

1
*
_ “ T
_

-

-

-

h

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

_
_ j

_
_

_
_
_

_
-

!
_j
-

3 !

J

11
------- r

3

!

-

_

2
!
1 !
1
_

_

_

_

_

l

1 2

_
22 ------- 1
6
+
2 ~Si
- :
2
1;
_
_
•

16

_
_ ;
_ !
-

-

-

16
_

16

11

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-35i

M odU H & U f !)Ms&U&bU**. 1 /

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S OF —

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
'$
$
A
verage
$ , $
hourly Under 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75
1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 1.15 2.20 2.30 S.40 $
2.5C
earn gs $
in
1.25
2/
1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.6C
0

%

to

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

»rl

Occupation 2 /

Assemblers, class A ^ / a ....................................................
Assemblers, class B i b. .....................................................
J
Electricians, maintenance
..........................................
Inspectors, class A ije . .....................................................
Inspectors, class B (J b. .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners i j o ................................

276
195
15
14
34
59

1.95
1.63
1.92
1.85
1.66
1.36

7

2
2
10

2
12

8

2
9

2
16
3
8

59
4
3

4
25
8
1

4
16
2
1
1

8
6
2
-

9
12
1
4

18
14
3
2
5

28
12
3

13
16
1
2
3

Machine-tool operators, production, class A j>/ . . . . . . .

716

1.95

-

-

2

4

7

2

5

3

12

26

40

62

75

Drill-press operators, radial, class A iJ b. .............
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A: Total ..........................................

72

2.04

1

8

3

82
45
37
57
95
118

1.79
1.76
1.84
1.94
1.96
1.90

12
10
2
2

11
9
2

9
9

6

2
3

21
7
14
2
6
14

21
11
15

151

1.93

6

19

11

7

....... .
Incentive
Engine-lathe operators, class A iJ b. .........................
Grinding—
machine operators, class A LJa . . . . . . . . . . .
Milling—
machine operators, class A Lj& . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A i j a ......................................

-

-

2
2

_

_

“
I
4

-

2

_

2

5

2

”

2

I

—

2
5

2
'

"

'

1
1

1

1

49 45
1
12
3 1
2 1
2

24
1
1

15
1
2

23
-

12
-

62

71

53

54

47

47

8

11

1

4

5

3

5
5

2

_

5
11
14

6
4
2 _
3 3
13 14
10
9

2
2
8
8

_
2
6
4

12

14 19

20

18

11
3
-

9
-

48

69

22

4

1

4

19

5

-

-

1

4

3

1

-

“

1
6
3
5

4
3
4
8

3
4
6
13

1
2
4

_
2

11

4

6

"

-

2
-

_

'

Machine-tool operators, production, class B j>/ . . . . . . .

431

1.66

8

7

6

6

7

10*

78

57

43

43

29

34

23

30

Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B l b. ............................................... .
J
Engine-lathe operators, class B l j b ..........................
Grinding-machine operators, class B IJ b. ..................
Milling-machine operators, class B L j& ................

45
37
84
65

1.57
1.76
1.66
1.63

2

2
2
3

4
2

2
-

2
1

2
3
3

7
4
14
5

8
5
9
6

11
3
13
3

2
5
23

5
8
3

4
9
5

1
5
3
5

9
4
4

Machine-tool operators, production, class C j>/ ...........

104

1.45

5

10

12

3

10

26

15

9

9

3

-

-

53
19

1.46
1.41

-

5

3

10

19
7

9
6

4

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

“

■“

“

“

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

1
6
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

25 10

2

D rill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class G l j -a .................................................
Milling-machine operators, class C i j e . ............. .

'

Machine-tool operators, toolroom i b .............................
J
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) l j* ., 6/ ...................................................
Tool-and-die makers (other than tool-end-die
jobbing shops) ^ /a, 6 / ...................................................
Welders, hand, class A l j b .......................................... ..

75

1.91

151

2.13

42
41

2.05
2.04

-

6
1.

-

3

4

“

-

-

14

22

-

-

3

3

1

11

-

5

-

-

5

10

2

“

1

1
1

12

5

17

~

26

6

12

5

-

28

15

15

6
5

2
3

4

7

2
4

3
5

3
3

2
4

4
1

9
6

4
4

-

-

1

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manu­
al (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were also included*
2/ Data limited to men workers.
2J Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Lj Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Rochester, N. Y., January 1952
j / Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
j
U.S. D P R M N OF LABOR
EAT E T
6/ Limited to workers with 4 years' experience beyond apprenticeship period or beyond comparable experience in lieu of apprenticeship.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




12

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minima rates and m
axim
um straight-tim e hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in e ffe ct on dates indicated.)

fable C-15 s

B u ild in g

Table C-205:

G O H A ts iu c tia n

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
2.650 A0
1.800 A0

$2,750

Bricklayers . . . . .
Carpenters ..........
Electricians . . . . .
Painters ..............
Plasterers ..........
Plumbers ..............
Building laborers

2.U 0

2.700
2.3A0
2.750

Table C-205:
July 1 , 1951
C lassification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.730

A0

1.630
1.580

A
O
A
O

Bread and cake - Hand shops:

First hands, working foremen,
decorators ..• • • ........................ •••••••
Second hands, overmen, mixers, feeders
dumpers..................................... .......... ..
Third hands, fryers, bench hands .........
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
F irst hands, working foremen,
decorators ............ .....................
Second hands, mixers, overmen,
feeders, dumpers .................... .
Third hands, moldermen, bench
hands.............. ...........................
Wrappers, machine ......................
W en employees:
om
Foreladies, decorators . . . . .
leers, general helpers . . . . .
Agreement B:
Mixers ...................... .............. .
Divldermen .......... ......................... .
Overmen, oven dumpers, feeders
Oven loaders, dumpers .............. .




Table C-2082:

M & l i J iix fr u o s u

July 1 , 1951

April 1 , 1952
C lassification

Bah&Uel - Continued

1.860

AO

1.750

AO

1.700

AO
1.630 AO
1.380 AO
1.220 » AO
1.610

AO
1.560 AO
1.560 AO
1.560 AO

C lassification

Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement B: - Continued
Moldermen, roll-machine operators,
benohmen, ingredientmen, machinemen, assemblymen, batchmen •••••••••• ♦1.510
Flour blenders, dumpers, mixers*
1.A60
helpers .............................. ....................... ..
Wrapping-machine operators,
1.A10
checkers .................. ...................................
1.360
Fan greasers, bread or pan rackers . . . .
Wrapping and slicin g h elp ers........ ...
1.335
Hebrew baking:
2.160
..
Ovenmen, mixers, fir s t oaks bakers..........
Bench hands, second cake bakers.............. ..
1.971
Crackers and cookies:
Agreement A:
1.510
Shop foremen, dough m ixers.................... ..
Batch scalers, machine operators, oven
1.A60
feeders, depositor operators ...............
Cooky dumpers, pan cleaners, carton
packers and helpers ................................
1.310
W en employees:
om
Foreladles ............................ ..................
1.310
1.160
Wrappers and packers ............................
Agreement B:
M mrfi
1
..........
1.610
1.560
Divldermen
Moldermen, ovenmen, benohmen,
feeders, assemblymen, batchmen,
1.510
dumpers, foremen, dough m ixers..........
Flour blenders, mixers* helpers,
batch scalers, machine operators,
feeders, dumpers, pan cleaners,
1.A60
carton packers and helpers ••••••••••
WrappingHnaohine operators •••.••••••••
1.A10
Flour handlers ............ ...............................
1.385
Pan greasers, bench helpers, pan
1.360
rackers, checkers and packers •••••••
Wrapping and slicin g helpers ...•••••••
1.335
Cooky dumpers, rack pullers ....................
1.310
W en employees:
om
1.230
Floorla d ie s .......... .............. ................. .
1.160
Wrappers and helpers ............................

Hours
per
week

A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A5
A5
A
O
A
O
A°
A
O
A
O

Table C -27:

P/UH*tUup

July 1 , 1951
A
O
A
O
Classification

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

A
O

A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O

Book and job shops:
Bindery women:
Agreement A
Agreement B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bookbinders:
Agreement A .••••••••••••••••••••••••.
Agreement B
Composi t cars, hand:
Agreement A ........................................ .
Agreement B ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Machine operators:
Agreement A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Agreement B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

♦1*306
1.200

37*
A
O

2.306
2.270

37*
A
O

2.A0O
2.365

37*
A
O

2 <400 37*
O
2.365 A

Occupational Wags Survey, Rochester, N. I . , January 1952
U.S. D P R M N G IABQR
EAT ET F
Bureau of labor S tatistics

13

Table C -27:

P/Utoti*Uj> - Continued

Table C -A l:

July 1 , 1951
C lassification
Book and job shops: - Continued
Machine tenders (m achinists):
Agreement A .................................. ................
Agreement B ........................ ....................
Mailers ..................................................................
Photoengravers ...................................... •••••••
Press assistants and feederss
Agreement A:
Cylinder press assistants ..............
Platen press hand feeders ..............
Agreement 8 :
Platen press hand fe e d e r s.......... .
Pressmen, cylinderi
Agreement At
Duplex p re sse s.......... .
O ffset p re sse s.............. ....................
Agreement B:
Rotary presses ....................................
Pressmen, platen:
Agreement A:
1 to 3 hand-fed p resses.............. .
2 autooatlo p re sse s.......... .
Agreement B:
1 to 3 hand-fed presses ..................
A hand-fed presses ............................
Stereotypers .......................... ............... •••••
newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work . . . . . . . . . . .
Compositors, hand - night work .............. ..
Machine operators - day work ....................
Machine operators - night work ................
Machine tenders (machinists) - day work
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
work •••••.............. ..
Mailers - day work ........................................,
Mailers - night work.............. ........... ..
Photoengravers - day work.............. .......... .
Fhotoengravers - night work ...................... ,
Pressmen, web presses - day work.......... ..
Pressmen, web presses - night work •••••<
Presamen-in-charge - day work . . . . . . . . . .
Preasmen-in-charge - night work .............. .
Stereotypers - day work.............................. .
Stereotypers - night work.......................... .




Table C -42:

Jtocal

MxUo^Putch H'UOL&ld

<and Jfelp&U - Continued
July 1 , 1951

October 1 , 1951
Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

$2,400
2.365
2.250
2.600

37$AO

374
37f

2.010

Classification
Subway oars ...............................................................
Busses:
First ^ months T-TT_ •■tTTiitt-ri-iTiaiit
_

$1,505

T - TTTT- T- TT l f T I

-TTIIII

,,1

44

1.475
1.495
1.505

months TTtTTTTTttIrttirTt-tIIItrl<i

A
f*t«T» 1 y k 1
« A*

Table C -42:

1.760

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

44
44
44

M*Uobt*44&h 3>bia0td
KS4td J telp & iA

1.520 40
2.604
2.563

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

C lassification

$1,470
1.400
1.520
1.470
1.495
1.570
1.550
1.553
1.442
1.380
1.700

Market - Public ............
Helpers ......................
M sat................................ .
Helpers ................ .
Packinghouse............
Country - Senior
Country - Junior
Newspaper ...................... .
Parcel delivery ...<
Special delivery . . .
Railway express . . . . . . .

40
40
48
48
40
40
40
40
48
48
40

July 1 , 1951
C lassification

per
per
hour week

Table C-7011:

cttateU,

January 1 , 1952
2.540
2.265

2.400
1.950
2.165
2.493
2.414
2.546
2.414
2.546
2.414
2.546

2.026
2.160
2.800
2.933
2.413
2.547
2.547
2.680
2.493
2.627

40

Beer .................................... ....................... .
H elpers.................................. ............ ..
Building:
Contractors1 trucks:
General ................ ................................
S p e cia lty ........ ....................... .......... .
D m truck, sand- and gravel-drivers
u p
and helpers ...........................................
Cement block .........................................
Concrete-mixer truck ............................ .
Lumber.............. ............. ...........................
Helpers .......................... .
C o a l.................................................................
Helpers ................ ......... ........................... .
Dairy products ............ ................ ............... .
Furniture:
C ity .............................................................
Helpers ...................... . . . . 0............... .
General - Freight and furniture . ............
Plano ..• • • .• .......... .......................... .
Semitrailer ...............................................
Contract drivers .....................................
H elpers.......... .....................................
Grocery - Wholesale .....................................
Sem itrailer.............................................. .
H elpers............ ..........................................
Liquor - Drivers and helpers
Macaroni............ .............................................

$1,708
1.627

40
40
Class ifioation

1.670
1.550

40
40

1.550

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.360
1.700
1.340
1.190
1.490
1.440
1.390

1.520 48
1.470
1.490

1.620
1.540
1.420
1.370
1.470

1.500
1.400
1.650
1.490

48
48
48
48
48
48
40
40
40
40
40

Bellboys . . . . .
B ell captains
Cleaners ................
Doormen ..................
Elevator operators
Housemen
M aids................ .
Telephone operators
Chief engineers . . . .
Engineers ................ .
Bus b o y s........ .
C ashiers............ .
Cooks.................. ..................
Head cooks .................. ..
Hostesses .................. ..........
Kitchen employees (female)
Kitchen employees (male) .
Pantry workers............ .
Waiters ...................... .
Waitresses .................... .
Bartenders •••••.•
Head bartenders . .
Service bartenders

Rate Hours
per
per
week week

$23.00 48
24.00 48
43.25

48

40.25
42.50
37.50
39.25

48
48
45
48
48
48
48
48
40

21.50 48

100.00
83.00
28.50
41.00
72.50
77.50
54.00
37.00
37.00
40.75

40

48
45
48
40
28.50 48
28.50 48
68.00 48
73.00 48
71.00 48

H

D:
Ta\>i»

d - 1:

Entrance Rates

Minimum CnPumoe Rated, fab Plant WabkeAd 1/
Percent o f plant workers in establishments with specified minimum rates in -

M
inimum rate (in cents)

A ll establishments ..................

All
industries
2/

100.0

Manufacturing
establishments with251 or
21-250
more
workers
workers

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

20.3
1.5
16.2
6.0
1.9
1.0
2.7
3.7
2.5
3.0
.3
3.5
1.3
8.2
3.5
i*.6
.6
6.1
-

1.8
11.2
1.1*
2.9
8.1
1.8
.5
3.8
8.7
.3
6.0
.5
7.1*
36.6
3.5
.
-

1.5
_
l.l*
.
_
35.3
1.1*
-

3.9
1*.2
ll*.5
5.7
3.2
2.6
1*.0
3.7
19.8
-

-

3.0
3.1*
.5
21*. 6
3.0
7.5
.5
.2
_
1.3
3.5
1.8

-

-

0.2
.3
.1
.2
1.1
.1*
.1*
.1
3.1
.1
11.3
.2
i*.l
.3
.3
1.9
6.1
1.5
.1
2.7
3.8
5.9
.6
1*.3
.1*
5.2
.2
21*. 9
2.7
.7
.2
1.7
.8
2.3
(3/)
71*
2.2
.2

Establishments with no
established minimum .............

8.9

11.7

.1

-

1 .9

-

1.1*
-

•

-

3.2
-

.1*
-

-

.5
.7
.
2.5
30.7
16.2
.8
1*.0

-

3.0
.
.
.8

-

-

1.8

.1*

“

3.2

26.1*

.7

-

* s -it

S tu fft

2 > i^ ^ e 4 ^ a n t ia t P to H U lio tU

Shift d ifferential

Percent of plant workers
employed on each sh ift in A ll manufactur­
Machinery
ing industries
industries
1/
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
other
other
sh ift
sh ift
sh ift
sh ift

Percent of workers on extra sh ifts,
a ll establishments .............................

6.2

1.7

9.6

0.5

Receiving sh ift differential .........

5.1*

1.6

9.6

.5

Uniform cents (per hour) ...........
1 cents ....................................
*
5 cents .....................................
6 cents .....................................
8 cents .....................................
10 cents ...................................
15 cents .............................
17 cents ...................................
20 cents ...................................
25 c e n t s ......... ........................

1.9
(£ /)

1.1
.2
.1
(2 /)
76
.1
.1

1.5
-

.5
-

1.5
•
-

.5
-

Uniform percentage ......................
5 percent .................................
7 percent .................................
percent ...............................
10 percent ...............................
15 percent ...............................
16 p ercen t............................. .

3.5
1.7
(£ /)
1.2
.6

.5
.1*
(2 /)

.8

.1

Receiving no d iffe r e n t ia l............. .

-

.1
-

1.8
-

(2 /)
_
(2 /)

-

-

7.0

•
-

-

-

8.1
1.1
-

-

-

Lowest rates formally established fo r hiring either m or women plant workers other than watchmen.
en
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .




7.8
10.1*
1*.9
7.5
2.5
3.5
26.5
3.2
2.7
_
_
9.0
3.5
1.6
1*.2
-

-

1*9.6

Supplementary Wage Practices

100.0

6.2
2.0

-

'

1/
?/
3/
*

E:
Services
m i

100.0

Under 1 ....................................
*5
Over 50 and under 55 ...............
55 ................................................
Over 55 and under 60 ...............
6 0 ...............................................
Over 60 and under 65 ...............
65 ................................................
Over 65 and under 70 ...............
7 0 ...............................................
Over 70 and under 75 ...............
75 ................................................
Over 75 and under 8 0 ...............
8 0 ................................................
Over 80 and under 8 5 ............. .
85 ...............................................
Over 85 and under 90 ...............
9 0 ...............................................
Over 90 and under 95 ...............
95 ................................................
Over 95 and under 100 .............
1 0 0 ..............................................
Over 100 and under 105 ...........
105 ..............................................
Over 105 and under 110 ...........
110 ..............................................
Over 110 and under 115 ...........
115 ..............................................
Over 115 and under 120 ...........
1 2 0 ..............................................
Over 120 and under 125 ...........
125 ..............................................
Over 125 and under 130 ...........
1 3 0 ..............................................
Over 130 and under 135 ...........
1 3 5 ..............................................
Over 135 and under 11*0...........
11*0..............................................
Over li* 0 .....................................

Not available .................... .

Public
u tilitie s *

12.7
-

1 / Shift employment data not available fo r establishments accounting“"for 21*, 000 of the 78,000 manufacturing plant workers.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Occupational W
age Survey, Rochester, N. I . , January 1952
U.S. D P R M N O LA O
EAT E T F B R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15

Table E -2:

Sclt&duL&d Wj&eJzLf Jloukl

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E 1 ■ W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N -

Weekly hours

A ll establishments ....................................
Under 35 hours ............................................
35 hours .......................................................
Over 35 and under 37^ hours ....................
37£ hours .....................................................
Over 37£- and under A h o u rs....................
O
A hours .......................................................
O
Over A and under A hours ......................
O
A
AA hours ......................................................
Over A and under AS hours ......................
A
AS hours ......................................................
Over A8 hours .............................................

1 /

2/
3/
*
**

A
ll
in stries
du
100.0
.1
2.2
1.8
7.A
A.2
79.9
1.1
2.A
.5
.A
(1/)

M ufactu g
an
rin

P
ublic
u
tilities*

W olesale
h
trade

R trade
etail

Finance**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.
37.1
6.8
55.2
.A
.5
-

_
1.1
8.3
58.0
12.8
19.8
-

.
7.5
73.6
2.8
11.9
A.2
~

.2
1.8
(2/)
2.7
.2
9A.6
.1
.3
.1
“

8.7
19.3
37.7
27.6
6.7
“

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Services

A
ll
. anufacturing
in stries 2 / M
du

Public
u
tilities*

W olesale
h
trade

R trade
etail

S
ervices

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.6
11. A
A.O
A7.1
8.0
9.A
18.9
.6

_
.3
.9
81.3
1.5
2.7
3.0
8.3
2.0

73.1
1.8
3.A
19.7
2.0

_
_
AA.2
.8
21.1
5.6
28.3

_
2 .A

_
_
_
A7.0
7.9
6.2
10. A
22.3
6.2

100.0
1.2 ‘
89.6
1.8
.6
5.9
.9

_
A6.8
10. A
5.0
16.5
15.3
3.6

Data relate to women workers except for 2 large manufacturing establishments for which total o ffice employment was used.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 o f 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilitie s .
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3:

P a id

c M v lid c u fi

PERCENT O O
F FFICE W RK
O ERS EM YED IN
PLO
—
Number o f paid holidays

A
ll
in stries
du

M ufactu g
an
rin

P
ublic
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

R trade
etail

PERCENT O PLAN W RK
F
T O ERS EM
PLOYED IN—
Finance**

S
ervices

A
ll
anufacturing
in stries 1/ M
du

P
ublic
utilities*

W olesale
h
trade

R trade
etail

S
ervices

\
i

A ll establishments ......................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments providing paid
holidays .....................................................

99.9

100.0

99.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

95.5

96.8

100.0

96.5

93.2

85.0

66.5

_
1A.9
.A
28.8
55.A
.2

_
78.0
6.7
8.3
7.0
-

_
3.8
82.2
11.A
2.6
-

.2
3.5
90.9
5.A

_
2.0
8.0
85.5
-

1.2
(2/)
.6
.6
85.0
.7
3.7
A.3
.A
.3

_
.1
.5
95.5
.8
2.5
.6
~

_
25.5
2.0
31.6
31.2
6.2
-

_
75.9
3.9
7.3
6.1
-

9.6
2.9
5A.2
16.A
1.9
-

_
6.7
7.5
52.3
_
-

A.5

3.2

6.8

15.0

33.5

1 d a y ........................................................
2 days ......................................................
3 days ......................................................
A days ......................................................
6 days ......................................................
6£ days ....................................................
7 days ......................................................
7^- days ....................................................
8 days ......................................................
9 days ......................................................
11 days ....................................................
12 days ....................................................
Establishments providing no paid
holidays ....................................................
1/

_
(2/)
.A
.2
78.1
.7
A.2
.A
A.A
1.1
9.8
.6
.1

_
.1
(2 /)
93.8
1.0
3.5
.5
.9
.2
-

~

.3

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 o f 1 percent.
,
......
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilitie s ,
*# Finance, insurance, and real estate.

%/
*




3.5 (2/)

Occupational W
age Survey, Rochester, N. Y., January 1952
D.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT E T F AO
Bureau o f Labor S tatistics

16

T
able E
-lj.:

Paid V&catiotU (QoAmal P
aom UomA)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V a c a t io n p o l i c y

A ll

e s t a b l is h m e n t s

1year

••••••

E s t a b lis h m e n ts w it h no p a id v a c a t i o n s

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

All
industries _ /

100.0

1
00.0

1 0.0
0

100.0

1
00.0

1
00.0

1 0.0
0

1 0.0
0

98.8
19.0
•
2
78.2
1.3
.1
1.2

99.5
1 .1
1
•3
87.0
1.0
.1
.5

1 0.0
0
i l l .9
5
8.1

91.7
50
.3
-

9 .o
l+
65.8
28.2

1
00.0
24
91.7
5.9

1 0.0
0
57.5
•
1(2.5

-

-

-

-

1.5

1.1

9 *2
9
7.9
2.3
87.6
1.3
.1
.8

99.5
5.6
3.2
8
9.6
1.0
.1
.5

10
0 .0
2.8
97.2

98
.9
3
3.3
20.6
15.0
+

1
00.0
13-1
. +
86.6

-

-

-

99.2
1.9
63.9
32.1
1.2
.1
.8

99.5
.3
53.1
15.0
+
1.0
.1
.5

1
00.0
.9
99.1

99.2
1.9
28.3
1.0
66.9
1.1
.8

99.5
.3
1 .1
8;
•
5
79.1
1.2
•
5

10
0 .0
.9
7.1
92.0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0.0
0

1
00.0

1
00.0

1 0.0
0

1 0.0
0

98.5
5.1
7;
5.1
36.0

98.9
5 .9
2
6. 1
:
39.6

-

-

8 .9
8
50
.7
5.7
32.5
-

9*
71
7 --7
5
214
-

94
8
90.3
8.1

-

1
00.0
6 .8
U
35.2

...

-

i t l .l l
-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.3

6.0

-

11.1

2.9

1.6

96.8
30
.7
66.1

96.2
21.5
7+
1-7

8 .9
8
32.0
2.0
51.2
3.7

97.1
30
.6
66.5

984
52.6
54
10. 1
(
;

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .1
1

2.9

1.6

8..9
8.1
75.1
5.7

97.1
1 .8
0
8
6.3

984
19.0
71.9
7.5

-

o f s e rv ic e

E s t a b lis h m e n ts w it h p a id v a c a t i o n s

• • ■ ...

1 week • • • • • • • ........... ........................................ ..
Over 1 and u n d er 2 w eeks
2 w eeks
Over 2 and u nd er 3 weeks
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h n o p a id v a c a t i o n s

...

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 0.0
0

1
00.0
3 .9
0
2.0
67.1
-

98.5
3 .1
2:
1 .1
6
1
(9.9
.1

-

-

-

-

-

10
0 .0
12.5
79.5
8.0

-

9 .1
U
5.9

3.2

3
.8

9 .8
6
214
68.7
6.7

96.2
1.9
+
91.3
-

1 0.0
0

-

-

1.5

1.1

98.7
3.1
4
69.8
25.2
.2

99.1
1.3
•
5
6 k ,9
3.1
2:

o f s e rv ic e

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h p a id v a c a t i o n s

••••••

1 week • • • » • • • • ................... ..
2 w eeks ........................................................... ••••••

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h n o p a id v a c a t i o n s

15 y e a r s

Manufacturing

o f se rv ic e

1w e e k ..................... .................... ..............................
2 w eek s ...................................................................... ..
Over 2 and u nd er 5 'weeks • •• •• •• •• •• ••

5 years

1/ Manufacturing

All
industries

......................................................

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h p a id v a c a t i o n s

2years

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

...

-

-

92.3
7.7

1
00.0
.7
99.3
- -

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

3.2

3.8

-

-

1.3

.9

-

11
.1

2.9

1.6

9 .8
6
214
58
.8
9.9
6.7
3.2

96.2
1.9
+
864
1.9
+

98.7
3.1
( 2)
/
38.2
2.3
5+
1.9
.2
1.3

99.1
1.3
314
2.9
63.5

8 .9
8
8.1
_
57.5
2.0
1 .7
3
7.6
11.1

97.1
10
.8
_
83.5
2.8

984
19.0
_
63.3
1 .1
6

“

-

o f s e rv ic e

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h p a id v a c a t i o n s

........... ..

1 week
Over 1 and u nder 2 w eeks ••••••• •• •• ••
2 w eeks .......................................... ...........................
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 weeks
3 w eeks ..............• • • .• • ..................
E s t a b lis h m e n ts w it h no p a id v a c a t i o n s

...

-

-

1 / Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2 / Less than .05 o f 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding ra ilroa d s), communication, and other public u t i l it i e s
** Finance, instarance, and real esta te.




1
00.0
_

-

38.5
5.9
55.6

-

-

3.8

“

1 0.0
0
12.5
60.5
27.0
-

100.0
.7
1 .8
1
87.5
-

-

-

.9

-

-

-

-

2.9

1.6

Occupational Wage Survey, Rochester, E. "r. , January 1952
TT.S. D
EPART7 ' T O TABO
F
R
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics

17

T
able ]>5

Paid SicJi Jt&cute

PaouM ohA)

PEECENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
P r o v is io n s

fo r

p a id

s ic k lea v e

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

6 m onths

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*
*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

All
industries

1 00
0*

A l l e s t a b l is h m e n t s

All
industries

1
00.0

1
00.0

1 0.0
0

10
0 .0

1 0.0
0

1 0.0
0

1 .7
7

9. 1
+

56.3

28.7

23.3

11.5
+

32.3

_

5+
1 .0
1.0

-

1.
/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

10
0 .0

100.0

1
00.0

100.0

1
00.0

100.0 [

1 .9
+

1.5

33.8

19.2

10.8

7.3

_

3 .8
0
2.5

_
-

_
5.8
2.1
2.9

1+
.5
-

Servioes

o f se rv ic e

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s ic k l e a v e

I day
3 days ,
5 d ays
6 days .
7 days .
1 d ays
0
II days
1 days
2
2 days
2

2.7
.6
9.2
2.1
.2
1.8
•
2
.1
.8

.3
6.0
1.2
.8
-

1.1

-

1.3
-

_

6.7
9.1
5
-1
7.8
-

_
1+
.9
8.6
9.8
-

_
-

32.3
-

7.6
1.6
-

-

25.5
-

-

6.8

1.6
.6
1.6
•
5
.1
.1
+
.1

-

1.3
-

.2

-

.5

39
*
5»k
3.0
6.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.8
"

"
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h no fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id

s ic k

le a v e

1year

8*
23

90.6

13.7
+

71.3

76.7

58.5

67.7

95.1

98.5

66.2

80
.8

89.2

92.7

5*
69

62.1

56.3

38.8

16.3
+

11.5
+

b
6.6

7.2

1.5

33
.8

21.8

27.6

1+
1.8

_
5+
1 .0
.1

.

-

•
9
7.3
1 .3
1
1 .1
3+
•
b
6.7
6.3

o f s e r v ic e

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r r a i d s ic k l e a v e

1 day • >
2 days ■
3 days .
5 days i
6 days i
7 days ■
1 days
0
1 days
2
15 d a y s
2 days
0
2 days
2
1+ d ays
+
1

.1
27
*
.6
5.9
2.0
•
3
34
7
2.7
3*
4
.8
•
2
.8

'

-

-

16.8
9.1
5.1
l+
»
3
-

-

5-5
.2
52.3
3.0

-

-

-

2.2

_
-

-

16. 1
+
H+
.3
9.1
6.8

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h no fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e

See f o o t n o t e a t end o f t a b l e *
*
**

T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c lu d i n g r a i l r o a d s ) ,
F in a n o e , i n s u r a n o e , and r e a l e s t a t e *




13.1
+

-

-

-

'

-

1.9
32.3
5.7
1.6

‘

'

"

61.2

5 -7
3

58.5

5 -h
3

_
-

1.0
-

.5
-

30.7
-

-

3.1

-

6.5
5*1
+
3.0
3.2

1.2
8.0
3.7
7. 1
+
1.5
5.8

-

*

7.5
1.5
+
2.8

'

13.7
*

.1
1.6
1.0
1. 1
+
1.2
.2
1.5
.1
.1

-

3-5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

92.8

98.5

66.2

-

3.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

78.2

7 .1
2+

85.2

l.i

3*
79

O o o u p a tio n a l Wage S u r v e y , R o c h e s t e r , N . Y * ,
com m u n ication , and o th e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s *

15
92

Jan u ary
TJ.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau o f L abor S t a t i s t i c s

18

P a id S icJ z Jlj& aae

Table

(fyobmal P/uuUdioni)- Continued

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
P r o v i s i o n s f o r p a id s i c k

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

le a v e
All
industries

A l l e s t a b l is h m e n t s

...............................................

2y e a r s

2 d a y s ...............................................................................
3 d a y s ...............................................................................
U d f y s ...............................................................................
5 d a y s ...............................................................................
6 d a y s ...............................................................................
7 d a y s ...............................................................................
1 d a y s ............................................................................
0
1 d a y s .............................................................................
2
15 d a y s .............................................................................
2 d a y s ............................................................................
0
2 d a y s ............................................................... ..
2
2 d a y s .............................................................................
$
UU d a y s .............................................................................
U8 d a y s ........................ ...................................................
u s t a o l is h m e n t s w it h no fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ................................................

of

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

100.0

100.0

1 0.0
0

1
00.0

1
00.0

1
00.0

1
00.0

58.5
.1
.u
2.7
5.8
2.2
.3
.
6.U
2.7
.7
3.6
.2
2.1
.8
3 .5
0

62.1

8 6
ii.

38
.8

6.6

-

_

-

5

3 .9
7

I

5 .9
8

3 d a y s .......................................................................
5 d a y s ...............................................................................
6 d a y s ............................................................... ..............
7 d a y s ...............................................................................
1 d a y s ............................................................................
0
1 d a y s ............................................................................
2
2 d a y s ..................... . ' ............... ...................................
2
2 d a y s ............................................................................
5
3 d a y s ............................................................................
0
3 d a y s ............................................................................
5
UU d a y s ................... ........................................................
5 d a y s ....................................................................... ..
0
. 6 d a y s .......................................... .. ...............................
0
6 d a y s .................................................. .........................
5
1 0 d a y s ....................................................................
3
2 0 d a y s ........... ...................... ..............................
0
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h no f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ................................................

U l.

-

5.U
.2
7.3
3.0
1.0
-

-

5 .o
U
.1
-

2.2
-

.3
2 .0
8

-

16.8
9.1
5.1
u .3
-

3.5

8.2
.9
b.9
11.3
15.8
.u
8.6
6.3

U

-

-

-

-

“

-

5.i i

62.1
_

1.1

-

±
f

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1
00.0

1
00.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

8.9
.1
.7
1.7
l .U
1.5
.2
1.1
.1
.2
.2
1.7

1.5

27.6
1.2
5.7
3.7
9.7
1.5
5.8

Servioee

100.0

ill.

5

U

-

-

-

-

1.9
-

32.3
1.6
5
-7

16.5
l i i .3
ii .5
6.8
-

-5

6 2
ii.

2 .8
1

-

-

-

-

30.7

-

-

-

-

1.0
.2
.3

3.1
l .u
-

2 .0
9

-

-

-

6.5
5-U
3.0
3.2
-

3.7
-

.8

iu

-

7.5
.3
2.8

-

U
-

-

-

-

.2

-

U
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

61.2

51.8

58.5

5 .ii
3

91.1

9 .5
8

35.8

78
.2

7 .ii
2

85.2

8 .6
U

3 ,8
8

9.6
.7
1.6
1.6
.2
.6
.1

2.0

30.8
5.7
3.7
1 .2
0
1.5
1.2

1 .8
U

_

53.1
U.9
11
.3
15
.7
.i i
2.8
6.3

6.6

_

ii U .i

.u
ii.ii

2.2
.3
6.6
2.7
.2
1.3
2.7
.1
.8
1.0
3.6
.6
30.6
l.ii

i i l.l

3.6
.2
8.0
3.0
1. 9
.
.2
1.1
-

.1

-

2.2
-

5 .0
U
-

U U .l
-

.3
2 .0
8

37
.9

I

-

5.il

11.8
9.1
5.1
9.3
-

-

-

1 .7
1

ill.

5

_
-

1.9
1.6
-

U

_

16.5
l i i .3
1.5
6.8
-

.5

-

-

-

ii
-

-

-

-

-

61
.2

16.9

5 .5
8

5 .ii
3

3.5

includes data fo r industries otner than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and rea l estate.




All
, /
industries

-

se rv ic e

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ................................................

1/
*
**

Public
utilities*

o f s e rv ic e

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ...............................................

1 years
S

Manufacturing

32.3
5.7

6|
i .2

21.8

_

_

_

1.5

-

-

.2

_
-

7.5
.3
2.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.7
.2
1.2
.1
.1
1.5
9 .ii
0

-

-

3.1

3.9
5-U
3.0
5.8

-

.3

30
.7
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

98.0

l.U
-

2 .O
9
35.8

3.7

-

8.5

-

U

.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 .2
8

69.2

8 .2
5

-

-

19

NoHjincducJUaH &ottud&i

Table E-6:

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Type o f bonus
All
industries

A ll establishments .....................................
Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / .......................................................................... ..
Christmas or year-end ..........................
Profit-sharing ......................................
Other .......................................................
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ......... ...................... .

1/
?/
*
**

1 0 0 .0

M anufacturing

Public
utilities*
*

1 0 0 .0

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Finance**

1 0 0 .0

Services

1 0 0 .0

All
industries 1 /

1 0 0 .0

M anufacturing

Public
utilities *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

6 7 .9

7 0 .3

1 * .5

8 6 .8

1 * 7 .8

9 0 .2

6 2 .7

50 . 1*

5 5 .5

5 .3

6 7 .6

1 * 1 .1

2 8 .6

3 0 .6

1 9 .5

7 1 .6

5 8 .8

2 0 .6

1 7 .5

2 .1 *

5 2 .6

1 * 1 .1

2 8 .6

1 * 7 .7

8 .2

1 * 2 .7
8 .2

8 2 .2

31*. 3

1 * .5
-

3 3 .3

6 .3

5 .7

-

3 .3

9 .3

2 .8

1 .9
6 .2

2 6 .5

3 .7

3 .9

l* .l*

5 .1

2 .9

1 2 .9

.3

3 2 .1

2 9 .7

1 3 .2

5 2 .2

9 .8

3 7 .3

1 * 9 .6

1*1*. 5

91*. 7

3 2 .1 *

5 8 .9

~

9 5 .5

-

-

~

7 1 .1 *

Includes data fo r industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilitie s .
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table

E-7:

OsUM toM C# a n d P -e+U iott PXattA

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —

Type of plan
Ail
industries

A ll establishments .................
Establishments with insurance
or pension plans 2 / ...........

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 l* .l

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

6 8 .8

9 9 .8

5 1 .1 *
1 * 3 .6

AH
industries 1 /

M anufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 9 .8

9 l* .l

9 8 .0

8 3 .2

7 l * .0

3 5 .0

9 7 .8

9 8 .7

8 5 .1 *

8 5 .6

91 *. 3

7 0 .6

7 6 .1 *

6 3 .1

6 5 .6

8 1 * .3

9 0 .5

6 2 .7

71*. 2

7 0 .7

25.8

i* l* .7

1 * 2 .7

6 9 .1

2 7 .9

2 0 .8

7 6 .6

1 9 .5

l*l*.l*

3 5 .1 *

1 5 .1 *

1 9 .5

2 1 * .5

5 7 .6

1 5 .7

2 6 .8

1 * 0 .8

2 0 .5

1 2 .0

1 0 .9

8 0 .3

3 9 .1 *

3 3 .7

9 1 .9

1 0 .9
6 .6

2 8 .5

7 1 .7

2 9 .1
3 0 .1

1 * 8 .7
3 1 .2

6 7 .0

2 5 .6

5 6 .5

6 2 .5

5 7 .1 *

3 0 .9

31*. 5

7 .7

Establishments with no
insurance or pension plans ,

5 .9

2 .2

.7

1 1 * .6

3 1 .2

.2

1 * 8 .6

1 0 .2

5 .9

2 .0

1 6 .8

2 6 .0

6 5 .0

Information not available . . .

(3 /)

-

.6

-

-

-

-

Life insurance.................. .
Health insurance................
H ospitalization..................
Retirement pension ........... .

1 / Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
? / Unduplicated total.
5 / Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilitie s ,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

-

-

-

-

Occupational W
age Survey, Rochester, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. D P R M N O LA O
EAT E T F B R
Bureau o f Labor Statistics

2 0

Appendix — Scope
With the exception o f the union so a le o f r a t e s , in ­
form ation presented in th is b u lle tin was c o lle c te d by v is i t s o f
fi e ld rep resen tatives o f the Bureau t o rep resen tative e s ta b lis h ­
ments in the area surveyed. In c la s s ify in g workers by occupa­
t io n , uniform job d esc rip tio n s were u sed ; th ese are a v a ila b le
upon req u est.
S ix broad indu stry d iv isio n s were covered in com piling
earnings data fo r the fo llo w in g types o f oooupations: (a ) o ffic e
c le r ic a l, (b ) p ro fe ssio n a l and te c h n ic a l, (c ) maintenance and
power p la n t, and (d) cu sto d ia l, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A -l through A -A ). The covered in d u stry groupings are t manufac­
tu rin g ; tran sp o rtation (except r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and
other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ; w holesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tra d e ; fin a n ce ,
insu rance, and reed e s t a te ; and s e r v ic e s . Inform ation on work
schedules and supplementary b e n e fits a ls o was obtained in a rep­
re se n ta tiv e group o f establish m en ts in each o f these indu stry
d iv is io n s . As in d ica ted in the fo llo w in g ta b le only e s ta b lis h ­
ments above a ce rta in s iz e were stu d ie d . Sm aller establish m en ts
were om itted because th ey fu rn ish ed in s u ffic ie n t employment in
the occupations stu died to warrant th e ir in c lu s io n .

Among the in d u stries in which c h a r a c te r is tic job s were
s tr d ie d , minimum s iz e o f establishm ent and ex ten t o f the area
covered were determined sep a ra tely fo r each indu stry (see f o l ­
low ing t a b le ) .
Although s iz e lim its freq u en tly varied from
those e sta b lish e d fo r surveying cro ss-in d u stry o ffic e and p lan t
jo b s , data fa r th ese job s were included only fo r firm s m eeting
the s iz e requirem ents o f the broad indu stry d iv is io n s .
A greater proportion o f la rg e than o f sm a ll e s ta b lis h ­
ments was stu died in order to maximize the number o f workers
surveyed w ith a v a ila b le re so u rc e s. Each group o f establishm ents




Method of Survey
o f a ce rta in s i z e , however, was given i t s
proper weight ia the
com bination o f data by indu stry and occu pation .
The earnings inform ation excludes premium pay for over­
tim e and n igh t work. Nonproduction bonuses are a ls o excluded,
but c o s t -o f -liv in g bonuses and in cen tiv e ea rn in gs, includin g
commissions fo r sa le sp e rso n s, are in clu d ed . Where weekly hours
are reported as for o ffic e c le r ic a l, th ey r e fe r to the work sched­
u le s (rounded to the n earest h a lf-h o u r) fo r which the s tr a ig h ttim e s a la r ie s are p a id ; average weekly earnings fo r th ese occu­
pations have been rounded to the n earest 50 c e n ts . The number
o f workers presented r e fe r s to the estim ated t o t a l employment in
a l l establish m en ts w ithin the scope o f the study and not to the
number a c tu a lly surveyed.
Data are shown fo r on ly fu ll-tim e
w orkers, i .e « , those h ired to work the esta b lish m en t1* fu ll-tim e
schedule fo r the given occupational c la s s if ic a t io n .
Inform ation on wage p ra ctic e s r e fe r s to a l l o ffic e
and p lan t workers as s p e c ifie d in the in d iv id u a l t a b le s . I t is
presented in terms o f the proportion o f a l l workers employed in
o ffic e s
(or p lan t departm ents) th a t observe the p ra ctice in
qu estion , except in the se c tio n r e la tin g to women o ffic e workers
o f the ta b le summarizing scheduled weekly h ou rs. Because o f e l i ­
g ib i lit y requirem ents, the proportion a c tu a lly re ce iv in g the
s p e c ific b e n e fits may be sm a lle r .
The summary o f vacation and
s ic k leave plans is lim ite d to form al arrangem ents. I t excludes
inform al plans whereby tim e o f f w ith pay i s granted a t the d is ­
cretio n o f the employer or other su p e rv iso r. S ick lea ve plans
are fu rth er lim ite d to those providing f u l l pay fo r a t le a s t
some amount o f tim e o f f w ithout any p ro visio n fo r a w aitin g
period preceding the payment o f b e n e fits . These plans a ls o ex­
clude h ea lth insurance even though i t i s paid fo r by em ployers.
H ealth insurance i s in clu d ed , however, under ta b u la tio n fo r in ­
surance and pension p la n s.

2 1

ESTABLISHMENTS AND W
ORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN ROCHESTER, N. Y ., l / ,
AND N M
U BER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JANUARY 1952

Item

Minimum number
o f workers in
establishm ents
studied
2/

Number o f
_______ establishm ents______
Estimated
to ta l
w ith in
Studied
scope o f
study

Etopldyment
Estim ated
to ta l
w ith in
scope o f
study

In establishm ents
studied
T otal

O ffic e

1 7 ,3 1 0
1 2 ,9 7 0
4 ,3 4 0

Industry d iv isio n s in which occupations
were surveyed on an area b a sis
A ll d iv isio n s • .............. ........................ ........................................
Manufacturing .........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................................................
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ),
communication, and other p u blic
u t i l i t i e s .....................................................................
Wholesale trade ..............................................................
R eta il tra d e , except lim ite d -p r ic e
v a rie ty sto res .........................................................
Finance, insurance, and re a l e sta te ................
Services 2 / .........................................................................

221

1 3 8 ,7 0 0

96
125

103,600

3 5 ,1 0 0

1 0 9 ,5 9 0
8 7 ,4 1 0
2 2 ,1 8 0

18
26

7 ,2 0 0
3 ,9 0 0

6 ,7 7 0
1 ,7 8 0

1,000
480

188
28
79

U1

16,500

8 ,9 7 0

15
25

3 ,3 0 0

940
1 ,7 2 0

4,200

2,600
2,060

us

17

6 ,5 3 1

5 ,7 2 4

21
21
21

709
305
404

21
21

33
76

21
21
21

21

200

In d u stries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry b a sis
Machinery in d u stries ..................................................................

U

728

1 / Rochester M etropolitan Area (Monroe County).
2 / T otal establishm ent employment.
2 / H o te ls; personal se r v ic e s ; business s e r v ic e s ; autom obile rep a ir shops; radio broadcasting and te le v is io n ; motion p io tu re s; n on profit
membership o rg a n iza tio n s; and engineering and a rc h ite c tu ra l se r v ic e s .
4 / Establishm ents manufacturing m achine-tool a cce sso ries w ith 8 or more workers were a ls o included*




22

In d e x
Page

Page

Assembler (machinery) ....................••••••••••
Bartender (hotels) ....................... . . . ................
Bellboy (hotels) ..........•••.............................
Bench hand (bakeries) ............................. .
B illerp machine .................................................
Bookbinder ( printing) .••••••••••....................
Bookkeeper, hand................... .
Bookkeeping-machine operator •••••.............. ••
Bottler (malt liquors) ••........♦.*............ .
Brewer (malt liquors) . . . .................................
Bricklayer (building construction) ••••••••••
Bus boy (hotels) ••••••••...............•••••••••••
Calculating-machine operator •••••••••••••••«
Carpenter (building construction) .................•
Carpenter, maintenance . . . ...................... .
Cashier (hotels) ................................... ...........
Cleaner......................................................
Cleaner (hotels) •••••••••••••••••••........... .
Cleaner (machinery) • •......... .
•
Clerk, accounting.................. .
Clerk, file ..........................................................
Clerk, gen era l.................. ..................••••••••
Clerk, order ••...••••............... .................. .
Cleric, p a y r o ll......... . . . .......... ••••••••.......... .
Compositor, hand (printing) ..................
Cook (hotels) ........... .
Crane operator, electric bridge ••••••••........
Doorman (hotels) ........... «••••«.......... ...............
Draftsman............. •••••••••.•••.........................
D rill-press operator (machinery) ........... •••••
Duplicating-machine operator ••••••••••••••••
Electrician (building construction) ......... .
E lectrician, maintenance
............. ••••••••••
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) . . . ........
Elevator operator (hotels) . . . ........ ••••••••••
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) •••••••••••
Engineer (hotels) •••••••••••........... ...............
Engineer, station ary...........•••••••••••••••••
Fireman, stationary b o ile r ..............................
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) •••••••
Guard ••••••••••........... .....................................
Helper (bakeries) •••••................. •••••......... .
Helper, motortruck driver •••••••••................
Helper, trades, maintenance
Hostess (hotels) .................... •................. •••••
Houseman (hotels) ••••........•••••••...............
Inspector (machinery) ........... ............................
J a n itor..................................
•••••••••
Janitor (machinery) ..........
••••••••••
Key-punch operator.............••••...•••.......... .
Laborer (building construction) •• ............. .
Machine operator (printing) .......................••••
Machine tender (printing) ......... .................. .
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery)
Machine-tool operator, toolroom ......................
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) •




11

±3
13
12

3, 4
12

3, 4
4
12
12
12

13
4
12
8

13
9
13
11

3, 4
5
3, 5
3, 5
3, 5
12, 13
13
9
13
7
11

3, 5
12
8
11

13
11

13
8
8
11

9
12

13
8

13
13
11

9
11

5
12

12, 13
13
11
8
11

Machinist, maintenance..................
Maid (hotels) .....................................................................................
Mailer (printing) ............... ................................ ....................
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y ............. ............. ...............
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) •••••........ •••••••••••••
Mechanic, maintenance......... < > ................. .........................
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ...................................
M illw right...................................................................................
Mixer (bakeries) ..................................
Molder (bakeries) ................................................. .................••
Motortruck driver ................................ •••••.......... ......... .
Nurse, industrial (registered) ...........................................
O ffice b o y ....... .......................
O ffice g i r l ..................................................................................
O ile r ............................................................................................
Operator (loca l transit) .............................................
Order f i l l e r ........... ....................................................
Ovenman (bakeries) ....................................
Packer............
Packer (bakeries) ...................... ••••••........ ..........................
Painter (building construction) ..............••••••••••••••••••
Painter, maintenance ................
Photoengraver (printing) .............................................
Pipe fit t e r , maintenance ••••..................•••••••..................
Plasterer (building construction) .........................................
Plumber (building construction) ..............................................
Plumber, maintenance..................
•••••••...................
Porter ................
Porter (machinery)
........••••••••••••••••••••••........ •••••
Press assistant (printing) ••••......... ••••••••••.••..............
Press feeder (printing) ......................
••••••••••....
Pressman (printing) ........................................ . . . . ...................
Receiving clerk •••••••••••••....................................
Secretary •••••••....................................................
Shipping clerk •••••••••••••••••••...............•••••••...........
Shipping-and-receiving c le r k ................
Stenographer ...................... ........................... . . . . ........ •••••••
Stereotyper (printing) ...........................
Stock handler ••••.............................................
••••
Switchboard operator ••••..........................................
.
Switchboard operator-receptionist
Tabulating-machine op erator................................ •••••••••••
Telephone operator (hotels) .....................
Tool-and-die maker........... .............................
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ...........................................
T ra cer.........................
Transcribing-machine operator ••••••••••••........................
Truck driver ...................
Trucker, hand....... ................................
Trucker, power................................
•••••.
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ...............................
Typist .........................
Waiter (hotels) •••••......... ...................•••••••••.................
Watchman .................
Welder, hand (machinery) ............................. . ...........................
Wrapper (bakeries) .....................................
.
☆ U. S. G O V E R N M E N T PRINTING OFFICE : 1952 0 — 211620

8
13
13
8
8
8

11
8
12
12
13
7
3
5
8
13
9
12
9
12
12
8
13
8
12
12
8
9
11
13
13
13
9
6
9
10
6
13
10
6
6
3, 6
13
8
H
7
6, 7
10
10
10
11
7
13
10
11
12







T E O C PA N L W G SU V Y SERIES
H C U TIO A A E R E
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent o f Documents, U.S. Government Printing O ffice, Washington 25, D C,
*
fo r the following communities:
S ite
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis~St• Paul, Minnesota
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
Seattle, Washington

BIS Bulletin No.
1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1064
1067
1068
1070
1042
1071
1058
1069
1057

£x±ss
20 cents
15 cents
25 cents
20 cents
20 cents
20 cents
20 cents
20 cents
15 cents
25 cents
15 cents
20 cents
20 cents
15 cents
15 cents
20 cents

This report was prepared in the Bureau’ s Middle Atlantic Regional O ffice
munications may be addressed to:
Robert R« Behlow, Regional Director
Bureau o f Labor S tatistics
341 Ninth Avenue
N York, N York
ew
ew
The services o f the Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics1 regional o ffice s are available for
consultation on sta tistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work in ju ries, construction and housing*
The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
N Jersey
ew

N York
ew
Pennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102